Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089228/00038
 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: July 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00038
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA


IFAS EXTENSION


DeSoto County
Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
July 2008 / Volume 30 Number 7
CALENDAR OF EVENTS Have a Great 4th of July
August
1-2 Florida Junior Cattlemen's Association 1st Annual Beef Show, Okeechobee, FL
23 Grazing Management 101-Okeechobee, FL

September
4-5 Advanced Grazing Management School, LaBelle, FL
9-10 Florida Cattlemen's Association Fall Quarterly, Sebring, FL
17-19 Wildlife Field Days, Longino Ranch, Quail Creek Plantation
26 FCA Replacement Heifer Sales, 1:00 pm, Arcadia Stockyards

October


15 UF/IFAS Ona Range Cattle Research Center 2008 Weed Field Day
21-23 Reproductive Management School, Arcadia, FL
31 1st Annual All Purpose Heifer Sale, 1:00 pm, Arcadia Stockyard

STUDY SHOWS MORE PATHOGENS IN ANTIBIOTIC-FREE PIGS
Research at The Ohio State University indicates that meat from free-range hogs raised without antibiotics carries more
pathogens and parasites than meat from conventionally raised hogs fed low levels of antibiotics. More than half of the
pigs on antibiotic-free farms tested positive for Salmonella, compared with 39 percent of conventionally raised pigs,
according to an OSU release. The presence of the Toxoplasma gondii parasite was detected in 6.8 percent of antibiotic-
free pigs, compared with 1.1 percent of conventionally raised pigs. And two naturally raised pigs of the 616 sampled
tested positive for Trichinella spiralis, a parasite considered virtually eradicated from conventional U.S. pork operations.
Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, June 19, 2008 Vol. 10, Issue 26.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


I







MARKET INFORMATION
June 30, 2008


06/28/08
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 98.28
Live Heifer 98.33
Dressed Steer 154.72
Dressed Heifer 154.90
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoortsllm ctl50.txt


Last Week Last Year


94.88
95.04
150.05
150.10


06/28/08 Last Week
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate)
Slaughter 706,000 694,000
Live Weights 1259 1256
Dressed Weights 765 763
Beef Production (M. of Pounds) 538.7 527.8
htt:nllwww.ams.usda.aov/mnreoortslSJ LS712.txt


06/14/08


85.78
85.75
133.40
133.63


Last Year
(Actual)
696,000
1258
772
535.4


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 2.50% 2.67%
Choice 56.30% 56.00%
Select 33.55% 34.27%
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


2.03%
51.77%
37.34%


USDA NaIk News LMX 4X8
Chok.u S.hd Sp-.d


/ I / / / 4 / / ,/ /W /


mm mu


Choice/Select Spread
06/27/08
$6.60/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M XB403.TXT


Arcadia Stockyards Medium & Large 1 and 2 BullSteers & Heers Arcadia Stockyard Feeder Steers & Buk Medium & Large 1 & 2
June 2S. 2008 June 25.2008
110 ---- ---- ------- -
160




0 S40 1 00








lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, July 1, 2008.
State I Volume Steers Heifers
TX 19,200 $108.80 $108.76 $107.65 $101.27 $100.44 $102.25






AL 10,600 $101-110 $99-105 $95-100 $92-99 $87-95 $83-92
TN 9,000 $106.83 $102.65 $98.67 $94.54 $92.34 $89.16
FL 6,200 $88-100 $85-97 $82-96 $82-95 $81-94 $80-92
GA 7,600 $90-106.50 $83-104 $82-102 $82-97 $76-91.50 $74-88




KY 19,800 $105-115 $99-109 $95-105 $90-100 $86-96 $86-96


CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 20 to 24 cents lower from 7.01-7.10 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 26 cents higher from 7.37-7.38 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 22 to 24 cents
higher from 7.14-7.17 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 26 to 46 cents higher from 7.03 %-7.43 % per
bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 26 cents higher from 7.14 %-7.23 % per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2
Yellow Corn rail was 36 % cents higher at 6.88 % per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review,
Friday June 27, 2008 http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ GR851.txt

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







GRAIN CROPS-PLANTING AND GROWTH STATUS
Corn 89% has emerged Barley 98% has emerged
Soybeans 77% is planted Sorghum 62% of the intended acreage is sown
Winter wheat 84% advanced to the heading stage Oats 33% has headed
Spring wheat 98% has emerged
States with the worst pasture conditions-at least 30% of the acreage rated poor or worse-include: Arizona (43%);
California (94%); Colorado (50%); Florida (60%); Georgia (35%); New Mexico (65%); North Dakota (45%); South
Carolina (39%); Texas (37%).
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2008HTTP://DESOTO.IFAS.UFL.EDU/
YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
2008 1.87" 1.51" 2.52" 3.33" 2.55" 7.09" ___ __ _18.87"
2007 1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 2.28" 5.04" 5.42" 5.57" 4.56" 1.46" 0.05" 0.78" 32.79"
2006 0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 0.81" 2.13" 33.06"
2005 ____ __9.71" 8.73" 5.86" 4.03" 8.78" 3.78" 0.11" NA
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES (2 METERS) AT THE EXTENSION OFFICE
HIGH 82.30 84.9 86.10 88.1 94.6 94.9 ____ ] J NA
LOW 28.5 35.6 39.3 41.6 51.90 65.00 N J NA
Rainfall for 2008 is currently 3.92 inches ahead of 2007

PENCILING BULLS VS. STEERS
Fewer pounds of gain and increased health costs demand running a sharp pencil if you're considering cutter bulls rather
than steers. Oklahoma State University (OSU) compared 111 calves arriving as bulls (548 lbs.) with 204 steers (524 lbs.)
during a 44-day backgrounding period at the Willard Sparks Beef Cattle Research Center. Calves were processed,
including surgical castration after 24 hours. According to Glenn Selk, OSU cattle reproduction specialist, 42.3% of the
bulls castrated after arrival became sick at least once, vs. 11.3% of the steers; mortality rate for the castrates was 23.4%
vs. 3.9% for the steers. Overall health cost for calves arriving as bulls was $12.30/head, compared to $2.65/head for the
steers. On the other side of the equation, the steers gained more-3.63 lbs./day-than the castrates at 2.97 lbs./day.
In his most recent Cow Calf Corner commentary, Selk also points to a study conducted at the University of Arkansas
(UA) comparing the effects of castration methods and timing castration at arrival compared to castration 14 days
after arrival. Compared to comparable steer calves used as the control group, steers gained an average of 22 lbs. more
during the trial (42-51 days) than the castrates. Steers gained 3.52 lbs. for the first seven days of the trial, compared to
1.58 lbs. for the bulls. In the Arkansas study, bulls were separated into four treatment groups: surgical castration on
arrival; banding on arrival; surgical castration on day 14, banding on day 14. Though there was no difference in
morbidity among the castration groups, 29% fewer steers required antimicrobial treatment than the castrates (50% vs.
79%), resulting in a $5.56/head health cost advantage for the steers. Bulls castrated on arrival gained 0.33 lbs./day more
than those castrated on day 14; they gained 0.24 lbs. more per day than those banded on arrival. "There was no effect of
castration method or timing for the number of calves treated once for respiratory disease, the average number of
treatments per calf, or the medical costs of treatment. However, more bull calves (24%) required a second treatment,
which tended to be greater than steers (9.6%)," explains Selk. Source-Beef Stocker Trends, Tuesday, June 17, 2008.
Most of you I know go ahead and cut your calves at a young age. For those who don't, put yourself in an order buyers
position after having read this report. Higher mortality and higher health cost = less for bull calves. Jim!

Beef Management Calendar

July/August
Control weeds in summer pastures. Check dustbags, oilers, etc.

Consider preconditioning calves before sale including ICheck pastures and hay fields for grubs, mole crickets,
vaccination for shipping fever and IBR at least 3 weeks and armyworms.
before sale. __

Check mineral feeder. IRevaccinate calves at weaning for blackleg.

Wean calves and cull Cow Herd. Pregnancy check cows.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







ETHANOL STUDIES SHOW MORE EFFECT ON FOOD PRICES THAN FUEL
Results of two recent studies indicate federal ethanol mandates have placed significant pressure on food prices with
almost no impact on the price of gasoline. Dr. Keith Collins, former chief economist of the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, and Dr. Thomas Elam, of FarmEcon LLC, submitted their new analyses to the Environmental Protection
Agency on Monday, which was the end of EPA's public comment period on a request from Texas Gov. Rick Perry to
partially suspend the Renewable Fuels Standard in light of serious economic harm caused by the current policy. The
Collins report indicates that unless the RFS is suspended or revisited, U.S. grain stocks will fall even further as ethanol
consumes a larger share of the dwindling corn supply. Based on results of his study, Elam concludes that "maintenance
of the current RFS schedule in the face of a smaller 2008 corn crop will be devastating to meat, dairy and poultry
producers." Source-Food Systems Insider, Friday, June 27, 2008, Volume 8 Issue 12.
PIGS RAISED WITHOUT ANTIBIOTICS MORE LIKELY TO CARRY BACTERIA,
PARASITES
While consumers are increasing demand for pork produced without antibiotics, more of the pigs raised in such
conditions carry bacteria and parasites associated with food-borne illnesses, according to a new study. A comparison of
swine raised in antibiotic-free and conventional pork production settings revealed that pigs raised outdoors without
antibiotics had higher rates of three food-borne pathogens than did pigs on conventional farms, which remain indoors
and receive preventive doses of antimicrobial drugs. "Animal-friendly, outdoor farms tend to have a higher occurrence
of Salmonella, as well as higher rates of parasitic disease," said lead study author Wondwossen Gebreyes, associate
professor of veterinary preventive medicine at Ohio State_University. More than half of the pigs on antibiotic-free farms
tested positive for Salmonella, compared to 39 percent of conventionally raised pigs infected with the bacterial pathogen.
The presence of the Toxoplasma gondii parasite was detected in 6.8 percent of antibiotic-free pigs, compared to 1.1
percent of conventionally raised pigs. And two naturally raised pigs of the total 616 sampled tested positive for
Trichinella spiralis, a parasite considered virtually eradicated from conventional U.S. pork operations. The scientists
tested pigs on farms in North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin. Of the total studied, 324 were raised in antibiotic-free
systems and 292 lived on conventional farms. The researchers took blood samples to test for the presence of antibodies
against bacterial and parasitic infections. The higher rates of infection on natural farms were consistent in all three
geographic regions. Source-Food Systems Insider, Friday, June 27, 2008, Volume 8 Issue 12.
THE PRICE DIFFERENCE IN CALVES BETWEEN FLORIDA, TEXAS & OKLAHOMA
Last Wednesday, 500 weight Medium and Large No. 1 & 2 bulls and steers at the Arcadia Stockyards brought
$90.98/cwt. Using an average weight of 516 pounds and with an 85% calf crop, return per cow would be $399.04 per
cow and with a 70% calf crop return per cow would be $328.62. For the same day in Oklahoma City, OK, 500 (528
average) weight Medium and Large No. 1 steers brought $111.66/cwt. Forty-one head Medium & Large 1 & 2 steers
that averaged 582 pounds brought an average of $113.49/cwt. In Tulia, TX, on June 24th, 500-540 weight Medium and
Large No. 1 steers brought $112.00-$119.50/cwt. That is a significant difference between Florida and the area where the
feedlots are located. Typically the spread between Southeastern cattle and that area had been between $5 and $8 per
cwt. For a comparison, I looked at the weekly averages in Florida, Georgia and North Carolina which resulted in an
average of $95.58. For the one day, Wednesday, Arcadia Stockyards report there is not a significant difference when
looking at the Florida average for the week of $94.72 but the difference with the Midwestern states is a reality that we
have to live with. My point with writing this article is to try to focus on things that we have a chance of changing and
therefore improving profitability. In the second sentence is one of the biggest keys; that of improving weaning
percentages. For every 1% increase in percent calves weaned in the above example, price per calf sold increases by
$4.72. A 15% increase amounts to $70.42 for every calf sold. There is only one accurate way of determining calf crop
percentage and that is by dividing the number of calves weaned by the number of cows that were exposed to breeding
bull(s). For example, culling open cows and then dividing that number into the number of weaned calves is not accurate.
If you don't know what your weaning percentage is, use your records and do some figuring. It will pay to know. Jim
RAINS CUT MIDWEST CORN BY 1.2 MILLION ACRES
Midwest corn producers are reporting losses of around 1.2 million acres to extensive rains and flooding in June,
according to USDA's June 30 Planted Acreage Report. USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service reported the
losses after re-interviewing approximately 1,200 farmers June 23-25 in the flood-affected areas. NASS says it will
conduct a more extensive acreage update survey during July. Findings from this study will be incorporated in the
August crop production report! Corn planted area for all purposes is estimated at 87.3 million acres, down 7 percent
from last year. Source-Crop News Weekly, July 2, 2008 I Volume 8, Issue 27.

James F. Selph
eSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock & Forages
"No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden". Thomas Jefferson




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