Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: June 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00037
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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U UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA IFAS EXTENSION






DeSoto County
Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
June 2008 / Volume 30 Number 6

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Florida Cattlemen's
Convention and Allied
June Trade Show
12 1st Annual Ona Range Cattle Research Station Youth Field Day, 8:30 AM 1:00 PM

16-17 Cattlemen's College, 1:00 PM and 8:00 AM, Marco Island Marriott, Marco Island, FL

17-19 Florida Cattlemen's Convention and Allied Trade Show, Marco Island Marriott, Marco Island,
FL
1s1 ANNUAL ONA RANGE CATTLE RESEARCH STATION YOUTH FIELD DAY
The Ona Range Cattle Research Station will host a Youth Field Day for 4-H and FFA members who are 8 years old or
older. The field day will include speakers, field tours, demonstrations and a lunch. If a child should wish to attend, the
AREC is asking that they call (863-735-1313) to register or register by e-mail (ona(ifas.ufl.edu).
A Brent Sellers RCREC Grass & Weed Nursery / Demonstration Site
a Toni Wood Rumen Canulated Steer: Discussion of his use in laboratory analysis & demonstration
b Jim Selph Wildlife & Agriculture: Utilizing Range for Cattle and Wildlife
a John Arthington Nutritional Requirements of Beef Cattle / Body Condition Score / Early Weaning
O Lockie Gary Forage, Hay, & Soil Sampling and Testing: How it's done properly and why it's important
P Austin Bateman The role of the RCREC Cattle: Research & Revenue / Cowpen & squeeze chute demonstration
dP Christa Carlson Water Quality and Pasture Fertilization / Soil pH testing demonstration
THE HORSE BAN AND THE LAW OF UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES
The banning of horse slaughter in the U.S. was one of those emotional ideas everyone agreed with initially and that
rather handily passed into law. Unfortunately, the experts were right. Since the nation's three horse-slaughter plants
were closed by the pulling of federal inspection services last year, horse prices have fallen throughout the system, and
neglect has skyrocketed as people have no way of disposing of unwanted animals. This week, the Livestock Marketing
Association (LMA), as part of its legislative efforts, called on members of Congress to change the law. LMA President
Jim Santomaso said the industry is seeing "more and more reports of abandoned horses and of horses turned out and
left to starve, because owners can't afford their upkeep, or have the means to properly dispose of them." Santomaso, the
operator of a Sterling, CO market, said LMA members report that horses are being left at their facilities when they
don't sell, "because their owners don't want them back." Of course, the Humane Society of the
U.S. looks to take the suffering even further, seeking legislation that would also ban the transport
of horses to outside countries for slaughter. I suppose a bright side to all this is that the "wild"
horse population stands to get a big new infusion of genetics, as people increasingly turn horses
they can't care for out onto public lands. Source-Troy Marshall, Editor-Cow-Calf Weekly,
May 16, 2008.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








MARKET INFORMATION
June 2, 2008


laf-


05/31/08
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 95.18
Live Heifer 95.24
Dressed Steer 149.75
Dressed Heifer 149.73
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/Im ctl50.txt


05/31/08 Last Week
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate)
Slaughter 625,000 722,000
Live Weights 1253 1253
Dressed Weights 762 762
Beef Production (M. of Pounds) 474.8 548.4
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/SJ LS712.txt


05/17/08
National Grading Percent
Prime 2.76%
Choice 55.52%
Select 34.01%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.
Mid-Month Futures Based Price Forecasts
700-800 Lb. Feeder Steers, Dodge City. KS I


I 3 Vfr 3. BasI --1t3OiN3Le BI11 --.--lHOSt, Baia I
8, J.u .08 A.u. SW, 0t. O Nw, w, ). '09 Fb.
'08 '08 'o8 o08 I
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Last Week Last Year


94.38
94.40
148.89
148.61


92.89
92.88
147.35
146.97


Weekly Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread


1


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source: ,,ws am.... en....., exacess.,ws......o w a, e a r n


Last Year
(Actual)
610,000
1241
758
461.1


Last Week Last Year


2.70%
54.92%
33.54%


2.02%
50.06%
37.74%


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Choice/Select Spread
06/02/08
$3.55/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M XB403.TXT


BEEF PRODUCTION
vs. CATTLE INVENTORY
MI Hgad Inventory on January 1 US t Ponmb

2120
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11\5 -2

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ow Ind 19 IM II C 2W I -n. o,
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The summary below reflects the week ending March 30, 2008 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to


J--II. l I L ,--IL. afIC. ~ III a ciLtU. a 1. I .M ltl V kI, LIU a UOl;A a .II
State Volume Steers Heifers
Calf Weight 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.
TX 16,500 $112.61 $107.38 $104.09 $105.76 $103.56 $94.54
AL 8,500 $107-113 $104-110 $100-106 $100-106 $93.50-102 $90-95
TN 6,300 $109.46 $106.06 $100.51 $99.91 $94.69 $89.77
FL 3,600 $95-114 $92-103 $90-100 $87-101 $89-104 $80-84
GA 6,300 $95-117 $90-111 $86-103 $89-105 $84-98 $80-90.50
KY 15,800 $108-118 $100-110 $96-106 $94-104 $89-99 $88-98
OK 14,700 $124.23 $117.26 $113.06 $112.44 $108.90 $104.62

CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 8 to 11 cents lower from 5.70-5.77 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 6 to 9 cents lower at 5.57 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 13 to 14 cents lower
from 5.42-5.48 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 12 / to 23 / cents lower from 5.37 %-5.62 % per bushel.
Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 13 /2 cents lower from 5.52 %-5.58 % per bushel. Minneapolis US
No 2 Yellow Corn rail was 15 z cents lower at 5.13 % per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market
Review, Friday May 30, 2008 http: //www.ams .usda. gov/mnreports/SJ GR851. txt

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


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WeekEnding Date


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GRAIN CROPS-PLANTING AND GROWTH STATUS
Corn 88% is planted Barley 97% of seeding is complete
Soybeans 52% is planted Sorghum 46% of the intended acreage is sown
Winter wheat 64% advanced to the heading stage Oats 98% of planting is complete
Spring wheat 76% has emerged
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2008HTTP://DESOTO.IFAS.UFL.EDU/
YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
2008 1.85" 1.51" 2.51" 3.33" 2.51" ____ _11.71"
2007 1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 2.28" 5.04" 5.42" 5.57" 4.56" 1.46" 0.05" 0.78" 32.79"
2006 0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 0.81" 2.13" 33.06"
2005 1 ___ __ ___ 9.71" 8.73" 5.86" 4.03" 8.78" 3.78" 0.11" NA
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES (2 METERS) AT THE EXTENSION OFFICE
HIGH 82.30 84.9 86.10 88.1J 94.6 [ ___________NA
LOW 28.50 35.60 39.30 41.60 51.9 _NA
Rainfall for 2008 is currently 1.58 inches ahead of 2007

USDA TO ELIMINATE "DOWNER" EXCEPTION
"To maintain consumer confidence in the food supply, eliminate further misunderstanding of the rule, and ultimately
make a positive impact on the humane handling of cattle, I believe it's sound policy to simplify this matter by initiating a
complete ban on the slaughter of downer cattle that go down after initial inspection," says USDA Secretary Ed Schafer.
He announced May 20 that USDA's Food Safety Inspection Service will draft a proposed rule to remove the exception
that allows certain injured cattle to proceed to slaughter. The opportunity for re-inspection has come under increasing
scrutiny since the furor caused by the undercover Hallmark-Westland video depicting animal abuse. "We're pleased by
USDA's decision to ban all non-ambulatory cattle from entering into the U.S. food supply. This ban is important to
strengthen consumer confidence in our beef products," says National Meat Association (NMA) CEO Barry Carpenter.
NMA and other industry organizations, including the American Meat Institute and National Milk Producers
Federation, recently petitioned USDA to ban the practice. According to USDA, of nearly 34 million cattle slaughtered
last year, fewer than 1,000 head that were re-inspected were approved by the veterinarian for slaughter. Source-Beef
Stocker Trends. Tuesday. June 3. 2008.

Beef Management Calendar

June/July

Last Date to Plant Sorghum-Sudan Grass Check dustbags, oilers, etc.

Check mineral feeder. Use at least 8% phosphorus in Check pastures and hay fields for grubs, mole crickets,
mineral and not over 2 'z to 1 calcium to phosphorus. Ispittlebugs and armyworms.

Get heifers vaccinated for brucellosis if not already done. Reimplant calves at 90 to 120 days with growth
Stimulant.

Watch for evidence of pinkeye and treat. Pregnancy check cows.

Control weeds in summer pastures. IPlant warm season perennial pastures.

Plan to attend the FCA Convention.
QUIET, GENTLER HANDLING PAYS OFF
Cattle are prey animals and as such their horizontal pupils see the world differently than humans. Cattle can see widely
around them, but do not see above them and they have very poor depth perception. For this reason, livestock handling
experts say moving toward and then behind the globe of the eye is an ideal spot to encourage cattle to move past you.
Handling expert Curt Pate, Helena, Mont., noted during a live cattle handling demonstration that handlers should also
be aware that cattle ear tags can obstruct the animal's vision, and he advised producers to swing wider on those sides of
the cattle. Also, finding the one "instigator" in a group of cattle that riles them all up, and then focusing on settling that
animal down can help in the overall task of moving cattle where you want them to go. Source-Drovers Alert Special,
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







June 2, 2008. As a side note to this article, I recently ordered from the NCBA a DVD from their Cattle Learning Center.
This DVD was made at the 2006 NCBA Cattlemen's College. The DVD is titled "Low Stress Cattle Handling" and
features Curt Pate, Charlie Trayer and Joel Ham. It can be viewed at our office or checked out for viewing at your
home or business. Jim
ALMOST 40% SUPPORT BAN ON HORSE RACING
In the wake of Eight Belles' euthanasia following injuries in the recent Kentucky Derby, a Gallup poll
(www. allup.com/poll/0 7293/PostDerby-Tragedv-38-Support-Banning-Animal-Racin. aspx) reveals that almost four in 10
Americans (38%) say they would favor banning sports that involve competition between animals. Women were slightly
more in favor of banning racing than men, and those 18 to 29 favored a ban slightly more than older age groups. There
was little difference in these attitudes by church attendance or by political party. Results were based on telephone
interviews, with 1,017 national adults 18 and up, conducted May 8-11. In addition to the question about banning horse
and dog racing, Gallup's annual Values and Beliefs survey updated a broader question about the treatment of animals,
last asked in 2003. A quarter of Americans said animals deserve the same rights as humans, while almost all of the rest
agreed animals should be given some protection from harm and exploitation. Gallup reported that the aforementioned
attitude toward the treatment of animals is virtually the same as it was five years ago. Source-Troy Marshall, Editor-
Cow-Calf Weekly, May 30, 2008.
STOCKING RATES AND FERTILIZATION OF PASTURES
About once or twice a week, I will get a call about weed problems in pastures. The question usually goes something like
this: "I have a 15 acre pasture and it is all weeds and no grass. What do I do to get back my grass?" My normal reply
is how many horses do you have! Their response is how do you know that I have horses? We then talk about typical
stocking rates of 1 animal unit (horse or cow on bahiagrass) to 3-5 acres. I go on to try to make the point that there is no
exact stocking rate number. It is all dependent on soil type, forage type, weather and management. Now to the point of
this article; if you are going to forgo an application of fertilizer this year to your pasture, only do this if it is bahiagrass.
The other improved grasses such as floralta limpograss will likely lose their stand if you fail to fertilize. The other
consideration that I would encourage is to reduce stocking rate. Our typical scenario of 3-5 acres per animal unit is
based on fertilized pastures. Without fertilization, then the stocking rate moves to about 5-7 acres per animal unit.
Even if you are not going to fertilize your pastures this year, test your soil to make sure the pH is adequate. You may
want to consider liming your pastures if the soil test results called for. With the drought we have been in, our grasses
are stressed. We have typically seen an increase in mole cricket activities in those years when we have drought and we
have to think of mole crickets in a similar manner to cattle for stocking rate purposes. The late Dr. Martin Adjei in one
trap (10 X 10 Meters) trapped in excess of 18,000 tawny mole crickets one night. The tawny feeds on both the roots and
leaves of bahiagrass. If you choose to not fertilize, pay more attention to your cattle and pastures through the summer
months. If body conditions remain constant or declines and if pastures remain very short, then an adjustment to
stocking rate must be made in time to allow the cattle to gain the normal weight gain of the summer before fall. As a
final note, it is always tempting to cut corners on costs, but the one thing we should never cut costs on is our mineral
program. I know for most of you that would just never happen, but I still need to say it for the benefit of anyone fairly
new in the cattle business that reads this newsletter. Jim
DOVE FIELDS IN FLORIDA
Mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) are the most hunted migratory game bird in North America.
These, as well as white-winged doves (Zenaida asiatica), are also pursued by countless hunters in
Florida. As migratory upland game, the management of both species falls to both the United States
Fish and Wildlife Service and Florida Florida Fish andWildlife Conservation Commission (FWC).
Planting and manipulating supplemental food crops for doves through the establishment and management of dove fields
is an important dove management tool. If possible, provide supplemental feed year-round through plantings in dove
fields. This will keep birds in an area and in better condition. Also consider how long different species will take to
mature, and stagger plantings. What and when to Plant? Now is the time to begin preparations and planting. Some of
the species to consider are: Browntop Millet, Proso Millet, Japanese Millet, Sunflower, Corn, Sorghum/Milo, Sesame,
and a number of other plants. Last fall we wrote a publication on Dove Fields in Florida that you can find at
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/UW265 It contains the information to insure your legality in planting Dove Fields as well as
planting information. Copies are available in our office as well.
"No occupation is so delightful to me as the
culture of the earth, and no culture comparable
to that of the garden". Thomas Jefferson James F. Selph
eSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock & Forages

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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