Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: May 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00036
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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SF UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA IFAS EXTENSION






DeSoto County
Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
May 2008 / Volume 30 Number 5

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Tropical Breeds of Cattle
Ankole-Watusi Bull
May
29 UF/UGA Corn Silage Field Day, Plant Science Research & Education Center, Citra, FL

June
16-17 Cattlemen's College, 1:00 PM and 8:00 AM, Marco Island Marriott, Marco Island, FL

17-19 Florida Cattlemen's Convention and Allied Trade Show, Marco Island Marriott, Marco Island,
FL
"GREEN" PRODUCT FAD MAY HAVE PEAKED
Recent surveys indicate American consumers are being turned off by the hype surrounding organic products for three
reasons: price, skepticism and confusion. The percentage of consumers who believe organic products are good for them
is down to 45 percent, while those who believe they're good for the environment has fallen to 48 percent, according to
the latest survey from the consulting firm WSL Strategic Retail. Both measures stood at 54 percent approval rating two
years ago. The higher cost of organic products versus mass market alternatives is a primary deterrent to many
consumers. On average, organic products still sell for a lofty premium, as much as 50 to 100 percent more than non-
organic alternatives. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, May 1, 2008 Vol. 10, Issue 19.
COMMISSION RECOMMENDS PHASE-OUT OF SOME CONFINEMENT PRACTICES
A two-year study released by the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production recommends tighter controls
on the use of antimicrobials in livestock production, along with a long list of recommendations relating to public health,
environmental protection and animal welfare. The commission, assembled by The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John
Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, also recommends a "disease-monitoring program and a fully integrated
and robust national database for food animals to allow a 48-hour trace-back through phases of their production." In the
animal-welfare area, the report cites gestation crates for swine and battery cages for laying hens as threats to animal
welfare and pubic health. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, May 1, 2008 Vol. 10, Issue 19.
FARM BILL EXTENDED TWO WEEKS
Congress extended the farm bill for another two weeks until May 16, but the House-Senate conference committee on
Thursday night made huge progress on a number of fronts. The conference completed the research, rural development,
conservation, energy, forestry, crop insurance and livestock titles. The key items remaining to be finalized are the dairy
import assessment, payment limitations and adjusted gross income limits, storage facility loans, and a few trade items.
The conference is expected to meet again early next week to complete the bill. Source-P. Scott Shearer, Washington,
D.C. Correspondent-Cow-Calf Weekly, May 2, 2008.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








MARKET INFORMATION

May 5, 2008 1


05/03/08
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 92.27
Live Heifer 92.28
Dressed Steer 148.25
Dressed Heifer 147.83
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/Im ctl50.txt


BEEF PRODUCTION
Slaughter
Live Weights
Dressed Weights
Beef Production (M. of Pounds)


05/03/08
(Estimate)
699,000
1265
708
535.2


htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/SJ LS712.txt


04/19/08


Last Week Last Year


92.11
92.19
149.44
148.69


96.15
96.22
154.09
153.74


Last Week
(Estimate)
704,000
1272
772
541.6


Last Year
(Actual)
663,000
1229
749
495.1


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 2.86% 2.87%
Choice 57.39% 57.33%
Select 32.33% 31.16%
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


Mid-Month Futures Based Price Forecasts
700-800 Lb. Feeder Steers, Dodge City, KS



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2.17%
50.58%
38.50%


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Weekly Steer Dressed Weights
870
860
850
840
830
820
810
800
790
780


2008 2007 5 Year


Weekly Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread
19
m 2007 R 208 -5 YrAvg

15





3
17


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01/11 02/22 04/04 05/16 06/27 08/08 09/19 10/31 12/12
W k FEnding Date
KSU Dept. ofAg Eon
SouuIc USDA& Janies Nil tert, K-State Ag. fo-unrlu www.agmanaaer.Info


Choice/Select Spread

05/05/08

$3.49/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M XB403.TXT


Kansas Combined Auction (Dodge City, Pratt, & Salina)
WeeMk Welghtec Average SO0 600 Lb. Steer Pncre


IIC
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0/11 02122 04/itC 05116 06/27 0/3O 09 W19 10C31 1I/12
WIL fEdng DBtD


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The summary below reflects the week ending March 21, 2008 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, March 25, 2008.

State Volume Steers Heifers
Calf Weight 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.
TX 17,000 $112.78 $104.30 $105.00 $100.70 $100.24 $97.79
AL 8,200 $103-111 $99-109 $96-102 $95-105 $90-97 $82-88
TN 8,100 $106.73 $101.41 $96.00 $96.07 $89.08 $84.18
FL 4,800 $86-106 $88-97 $83-87 $80-93 $80-88
GA 7,000 $85-107 $87-102 $80-100 $85-100.50 $79-92 $77-87
KY 23,900 $106-116 $98-108 $90-100 $90-100 $83-93 $83-93
OK 26,800 $121.44 $111.32 $108.39 $106.85 $103.94 $99.70

CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 9-19 cents higher from 5.89-5.99 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 31 cents higher from 5.82-5.85 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 23 to 34 cents
Higher from 5.68-5.82 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 29 to 37 cents higher from 5.72 %-6.00 % per
bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 31-35 cents higher from 5.87 %-5.93 % per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2
Yellow Corn rail was 26 cents higher at 5.51 % per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review,
Friday May 2, 2008 http: //www.ams .usda.gov/mnreports/SJ GR851. txt

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


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Rainfall for 2008 is currently


MEAT PRODUCTION UP, CONSUMPTION FLAT
During the first quarter of 2008, U.S. commercial pork production skyrocketed to 11.6 percent above a year ago,
according to the Livestock Marketing Information Center. For the same period, beef production increased 2.2 percent
and total poultry was up about 5.4 percent. Per capital consumption in the United States of red meat and poultry,
however, did not change much in the first quarter of 2008 compared to a year ago due to increases in exports, frozen
stocks and population, and lower U.S. imports. For calendar year 2007, estimated U.S. per capital total red meat and
poultry consumption on a retail weight basis was a record 221.6 pounds per person. Current forecasts for 2008 indicate
another record at about 222 pounds per person, according to LMIC. Consumption could drop in 2009, however, as
exports pick up and high input costs cause a slowdown in livestock production. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, May
1. 2008 Vol. 10. Issue 19.

Beef Management Calendar

May/June

Remove Bulls. Fertilize warm season pastures.

Check mineral feeder. Apply Spot-On Agent for Grubs and Louse.

Vaccinate and Implant (except for replacement heifers) Reimplant calves at 90 to 120 days with growth
any late calves. stimulant.

Get heifers vaccinated for brucellosis if not already done. Pregnancy check cows.

Fertilize warm season pastures. i
ECONOMIC & MARKET OUTLOOK FOR 2008-57th BEEF CATTLE SHORTCOURSE
The following information is a highlight of the presentation of Dr. John Lawrence (Professor, Iowa State University,
Ames, IA) given at the 57th Annual Beef Cattle Short Course last week in Gainesville.
Disastrous world wheat production in 2007, growing food and feed demand globally, and the new demand as petroleum
substitutes have driven grains and oilseed prices to record levels. These higher prices will encourage production around
the world, but not before driving up costs to livestock producers. The cost of gain is higher for feedlots limiting what
they can pay for feeder cattle. Competition from crop production grazing acres has pushed the cost of forage
production higher. Beef cow herds are feeling the squeeze and are expected to further reduce beef cow inventories.
Besides fewer calves born, feedlots will want to place heavier cattle to reduce corn feeding and the number of days on
feed. As a result, there is excess feedlot capacity and excess packer capacity. The demand side is also under pressure.
The weaker economy has hurt beef sales more than pork or poultry. With a weaker economy and higher gas prices,
consumers are looking for a cheaper item in the center of the plate. Retailers are featuring cheaper cuts and at times
Select rather than Choice. Look for steady to lower calf prices ahead and rising cowherd costs driven by higher forages
and land prices. While the long term forecast is for smaller cattle supplies, the outlook for 2008 is for steady to larger
beef supplies thanks to record cattle on feed and increased cow slaughter. Total red meat supplies are forecast to
increase 2.6% from 2007 levels. Beef imports are expected to be slightly higher than 2007 levels and approximately
double the tonnage of the U.S. exports. Beef demand growth has stopped and may be retreating. Beef exports continue
to slowly rebuild from the closed borders in late 2003. Exports to Japan grew steadily throughout 2007 and early 2008.
Exports to South Korea are more sporadic, but are increasing.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







CURRENT STATUS OF GRASS FED BEEF-57th BEEF CATTLE SHORTCOURSE
The final standard for the grass (forage) fed marketing claim was published by the Agricultural Marketing Service
(AMS), as a Notice in the Federal Register on October 16, 2007. The grass fed standard states that grass and or forages
should be the feed source consumed for the lifetime of the ruminant animal, with the exception of milk consumed prior
to weaning. The diet should be derived solely from forage, and animals cannot be fed grain or grain by-products and
must have continuous access to pasture during the growing season. Through this voluntary standard, livestock
producers may request that a grass (forage) fed claim be verified through an AMS audit program and will have the
option of labeling the product as USDA Certified Grass Fed Beef.
AVMA BROCHURE TARGETS STUDENTS
Veterinary students are the primary audience for a brochure produced by the American Veterinary Medical Association
(AVMA) titled "Animal Welfare: Seeing the Forest and the Trees," but anybody who deals with animals may find the
info useful. According to the brochure, science and ethics should be the basis of decisions about animal welfare, as well
as a whole-system approach and careful consideration of the consequences of decisions, such as how changes to improve
the behavioral aspects of animal welfare may result in detriments to the health aspects. Source-Cow-Calf Weekly,
May 2, 2008
PAYMENT LIMITATIONS UNDER DISCUSSION
According to various press reports, the latest proposal for payment limitations would be for the Adjusted Gross Income
(AGI) cap to be set at $750,000 for non-farmers in 2009 and lowered to $650,000 in 2010 and $500,000 in 2011. The AGI
cap for farmers would be set at $950,000 in 2009, but for every $100,000 over the limit, growers would lose 10% of their
farm program payments. Current law is $2.5 million AGI cap. This is a major issue for the administration, which
continues to argue for much lower AGI cap. -- P. Scott Shearer, Washington, D.C. correspondent. Source-Cow-Calf
Weekly, May 2, 2008.
GREAT NEWS IN THE CATTLE MARKET
Last week was the perfect storm falling corn prices, rising boxed-beef prices, a major breakthrough in regaining
access to the Korean market, and a friendly Cattle-On-Feed report that showed larger-than-expected marketing and
record-small placements, which put several dollars on the market almost overnight. Expectations are for continued
strength next week, as improving weather will help the slow-developing grilling season to get underway. The agreement
with Korea, which allows for all products under 30 months of age, is expected to put an additional $20/head or more on
the fat market and provides a much-needed boost to the market. Most importantly, the agreement precluded Korea
from halting all shipments with any mistake on the part of U.S. exporters, removing the notorious tactic for which
Korea had become infamous. With record fuel prices, falling consumer confidence and decreasing disposable income,
this was welcomed news. -- Troy Marshall-Source-Cow-Calf Weekly, April 25, 2008.
NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS SERVICE:
* Corn 10% is planted, compared to 20% last year and 35% for normal. Progress lagged nearly 20 points or more
behind normal throughout most of the Corn Belt.
* Soybeans 2% is planted, which is 1% behind last year and 3% behind normal. Soybean planting was delayed in all
states except Louisiana. Limited planting activity had occurred in Kentucky, Michigan and North Carolina, but
planting had not begun in the Corn Belt and adjacent areas of the Great Plains.
* Sorghum 27% of the intended acreage is sown, 2% less than last year, but 1% ahead of normal. Planting in Texas
was 65% complete, ahead of last year and normal by 4 and 11 points, respectively. Planting was also underway in
Arkansas with 13% planted, significantly behind last year and normal by 62 and 46 points, respectively.
* Oats 54% of planting is complete, which is 2% less than last year and 14% behind the five-year average. Progress
lagged the most in Iowa and Minnesota with planting 40 points or more behind normal. Emergence was delayed in
all states, with development significantly behind the five-year average in the northern Corn Belt and adjacent areas
of the Great Plains. 33% has emerged, 1% less than last year and 9% behind normal.
* Barley 35% of seeding is complete; 2% behind last year and 4% behind average. 6% has emerged, which is 7%
less than last year and 6% less than normal.
* Spring Wheat 30% of the crop is in the ground, which is 2% ahead of last year but 4% behind the five-year
average. When compared with the usual pace, all states were behind by 13% or more, except Montana and North
Dakota where progress was at or ahead of the five-year-average pace. 4% has emerged, 2% less than last year and
8% behind the average pace.
"No occupation is so delightful to me as the
culture of the earth, and no culture comparable James F. Selph
to that of the garden". Thomas Jefferson DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock & Forages
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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