Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089228/00034
 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: March 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00034
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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SF UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA IFAS EXTENSION






DeSoto County
Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
March 2008 / Volume 30 Number 3 Burning Woods

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
March
11-13 Florida Cattlemen's Association Legislative Quarterly Meeting, Tallahassee

29 Small Farms Livestock Conference: "So You Want to be a Farmer", 8:00 AM 3:30 PM, Polk
County Extension Office, Bartow, FL
April
5 Small Farms Livestock Conference: "So You Want to be a Farmer", 8:00 AM 3:30 PM,
Hendry County Extension Office, LaBelle, FL
17 Farm Credit of South West Florida Annual Meeting, Hardee Agri-civic Center, Wauchula,
6:00 PM
24 DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association Spring Meeting, Turner Center Exhibit Hall, 7:00 PM

E. COLI VACCINE NEARS U.S. APPROVAL
Bioniche Life Sciences, based in Belleville, Ont., announced last week that the USDA has given notice that the latest data
for the company's E. coli 0157:H7 vaccine for cattle meets the agency's "expectation of efficacy" standard, allowing the
company to seek a conditional license. Once it receives the conditional license, Bioniche can begin selling the vaccine in
the United States if at least one step in the manufacturing process takes place on U.S. soil. "This is a large step forward
for the E coli 0157:H7 vaccine," says Bioniche President and CEO Graeme McRae. "The granting of a U.S. conditional
license will permit U.S. beef and dairy producer's access to a scientifically validated means to reduce the risk of E coli
0157:H7 contamination." Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, February 14, 2008 Vol. 10, Issue 7.
SPRING PASTURE FERTILIZATION
This time of the year, Cattle producers should be thinking about fertilizing their grass pastures. Most of Florida's
pastures are comprised of Bahiagrass. Our current recommendation is to conduct a standard soil test (UF/IFAS
Standard Soil Fertility Test: pH, lime requirement, P, K, Ca, and Mg-Cost $7.00). If P (phosphorus) is low, then a
tissue test should be run and P applied if tissue concentrations are below 0.15% P. Pastures that have had no P applied
for several years should have both soil and tissue samples submitted simultaneously. If you are just planning to apply a
low level of fertilizer, then apply 50 to 60 pounds of actual N (Nitrogen). This year, the cost of N is high (over $40/acre).
You may ask if that is the best place to spend your dollars for inputs! A study done by Cattle-fax several years ago
determined that "high return-low cost cow-calf producers" had 3 areas that they didn't cut back their spending.
Those 3 things were: Bull Prices, Herd Health and Pasture Maintenance (fertilization, pasture rotation, etc.). If you
have other improved grasses such as star or flora-alta grass, fertilizer is required to avoid losing a grass stand.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








MARKET INFORMATION
March 3, 2008

03/01/08 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 93.00 91.59 93.63
Live Heifer 93.02 91.57 93.54
Dressed Steer 148.11 145.58 149.28
Dressed Heifer 148.18 145.65 149.30
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/Im ctl50.txt


BEEF PRODUCTION
Slaughter
Live Weights
Dressed Weights
Beef Production (M. of Pounds)


03/01/08
(Estimate)
630,000
1289
777
487.7


htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/SJ LS712.txt


Mid-Month Futures Based Price Forecasts
700-800 Lb. Feeder Steers, Dodge City, KS









1 I a 5& lear
S YiE V -m W K'tt Se-e~a ~ x cf J s ie -~
roHK =.2-e a Pfr BssE kao~ ';,


02/16/08


Last Week
(Estimate)
620,000
1290
777
480.0


Last Year
(Actual)
623,000
1267
763
474.1


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 2.43% 2.55%
Choice 57.73% 57.75%
Select 31.76% 31.80%
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


w


2.74%
54.89%
34.04%


Weekly FI. Steer Dressed Weight


Weekly Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread


1 o1007 2008 -- 5YrAvg


~II....


IlliiI '


01/11 02/22 04/04 05/16 06/27 08/03 09/19 10/31 12/12
Weepk Fnding Date


KSU Dept. of Ag Econ
W^?Vt a nmanan eInfi


Choice/Select Spread
03/03/08
$3.96/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M_XB403.TXT


Kansas Combined Auction (Dodge City, Pratt, & Salina)
Wckly Weighted Average 500-600 Lb. Steer Prices
145
140
135



us ,i I i

105
: I** n T r r i i i i

1OVI 02/233 0/0O4 051/f 36)7? 08/08 0919 10/31 l3[12
W-lk Ending Dte


;or,,e UEDA& James rUhtfrt, A-s E.oramI'e


Su Gept- o Ag t-'n


The summary below reflects the week ending February 22, 2008 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, February 26, 2008.


Calf Weight


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.


TX 12,200 $121.71 $112.53 $103.99


AL 11,600 $110-115 $102-108 $96.25-102.50 $100-109


TN 110,200 $113.22 I$102.98 I$95.16

FL 4,400 $102-116 $93-108 $73-90


GA 7,200 $104-123.50 $92-109


KY 21,000


$86-103


$107-117 $93-103 $90-100


$104.62 $100.43 $97.31


$88-96


$100.09 $90.38

$90-102 $80-95

$90-116 $82-98

$90-100 $85-95


CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 3 to 5 cents higher from 5.12-5.20 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 15 to 15 cents higher from 5.33-5.36 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 18 to 19 cents
higher from 5.19-5.29 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 13 to 18 cents higher from 5.13 %-5.28 per
bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 19 to 20 cents higher from 5.27 %-5.29 per bushel. Minneapolis US
No 2 Yellow Corn rail was 7 cents higher at 5.01 per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market
Review, Friday February 29, 2008 http: //www.ams .usda. gov/mnreports/SJ GR851.txt

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


-I.-


$85-93

$86.19

S73-82
$73-82

$82-85

$80-90


hI i ,111111.


USDA& James 141 s


fat cli5 iS/; ni7
W.W1, emiOT


i,r iiai ,u~
r~uaQ olyZrrn
rux iqaimar21 in(a


I






FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY AN N UAL RAIN FALL-2008http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/
1ST COLUMN IS 2008-2ND COLUMN IS 2007-3RD COLUMN IS 2006-4th COLUMN IS 2005.
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
1.85" 1.46" 3.31"
1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 2.28" 5.04" 5.42" 5.57" 4.56" 1.46" 0.05" 0.78" 32.79"
0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 0.81" 2.13" 33.06"
____ __ _9.71" 8.73" 5.86" 4.03" 8.78" 3.78" 0.11" NA
Currently we are 0.71"behind last years rainfall.
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES (2 METERS) AT THE EXTENSION
OFFICE-FIRST COLUMN IS THE HIGH & 2ND COLUMN IS THE LOW
82.3 84.90 NA
28.50 35.60 NA
Arcadia, FL: Period of Record Monthly Climate Summary, Period of Record : 1/1/1931to 6/30/2007
_Feb Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Average Max.
Temperature (F) 1 115 1 1 91"317 13 1 7
Average Min.
Prci. 149.2 50.4 54.3 58.1 63.6 68.9 70.9 "71.3 70.5 64.3 56.3 51.2 60.7
Temperature (F) _
Average Total
Precipitation (in.) 84 77 3 52.56
Source: Southeast Regional Climate Center, sercc()climate.ncsu.edu, NOAA
MEAT CONSUMPTION TO DECLINE
As rising production costs and export growth drive retail prices higher, U.S. consumers are likely to purchase less meat
over the next 10 years, according to USDA's Agricultural Long-Term Projections to 2017, released this week. The report
projects that per-capita beef consumption will decline by about 5 pounds and pork by about 2 pounds. Poultry
consumption will increase by about 2.5 pounds during the same period. Source-Food System Insiders, February 15,
2008, Vol. 8, Issue 3.
IS OUR MONETARY POLICY RIGGED FOR SUCCESS OR FAILURE?
Initially, the weakening of the U.S. dollar was seen as a positive for ag. After all, it encouraged exports, thus making our
product cheaper to foreign sources. But the list of unintended consequences makes it a lot more difficult to analyze the
results. Many experts argue that if we'd maintained the value of the dollar or at least prevented its freefall, we would
have avoided inflationary concerns. Nor would the price of oil have climbed to S100/barrel, they say, thus mitigating the
explosion in input costs. Plus, consumers would have more disposable income, allowing continued growth in beef
demand, and on and on. We've already seen returns diminish in the ethanol industry despite increased mandates.
Where would ethanol, corn prices and the like be if oil were $60/barrel rather than $100? It's almost impossible to say,
but the general consensus is that, for export-dependent markets such as ag, a slight weakening in the U.S. dollar was a
positive. The magnitude of the devaluation is something no one predicted and its implications are far more disturbing.
Troy Marshall-- Source-Cow-Calf Weekly, February 29, 2008.
THREE BUCKS LOCKED UP! TURKEYS BY: MAC TURNER
BEEF PRODUCTION
vs. CATTLE INVENTORY
ML Had Invenlory or, Januar I U S AI Poundl
120 28
lB ., :2
110 27

S 25
10 \ 25Z
100 24
95 23


90 22

HM .W .alm .*-. intw "B1eem I Mm rH ? *J
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide reseaiices
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


I








Beef Management Calendar

I March/April

Check mineral feeder. [Check for external parasites and treat if needed.

Deworm cows as needed. IIdentify, vaccinate, implant, and work late calves.

Cull cows that failed to calve & market in April Check for lice and treat if necessary

Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and get fertilizer Vaccinate against blackleg and brucellosis after 3 months
incorporated in grass roots while there is still good soil of age and before 12 months of age.
moisture. Fertilize ryegrass if necessary. 11
THE WORLD'S LARGEST BEEF PROCESSOR
By acquiring Smithfield Beef and National Beef, JBS would become the largest U.S. beef processor. The acquisitions
would allow JBS to slaughter more than 42,000 head per day in 12 U.S. plants. America's second- and third-largest beef
packers are Cargill Meat Solutions, 29,000 head per day, and Tyson Foods at 28,000 head per day. Last year JBS bought
Swift and Company for $225 million, with a slaughter capacity of about 18,000 head per day. JBS's Australian
acquisition, Tasman Group, is Australia's largest multi-species meat processor. Additionally, Tasman operates a feedlot
for 25,000 cattle and 45,000 lambs. JBS's acquisition of Five Rivers Ranch includes the company's 10 feedyards with a
capacity of more than 800,000 head. Industry observers believe this huge deal will be subject to review by the U.S.
Department of Justice which may have antitrust concerns. When completed, the acquisitions would make JBS the
world's largest beef processor, with the capacity to slaughter 80,000 head per day in plants in Brazil, Argentina, United
States, Australia and Italy. Analysts believe JBS wants to expand in the United States, Australia and Europe to boost
sales in markets that restrict imports of beef from Brazil. Smithfield spokesmen indicated now is a good time for them to
exit the beef business amid rising corn costs and excess U.S. beef slaughter capacity. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday,
March 6, 2008 Vol. 10, Issue 10.
CATTLE-FAX: CORN PRICES DOMINATE IN 2008
The corn market will dominate cattle talk in 2008. While the industry struggled to adjust to $3 per bushel corn for most
of last year, prices exploded to over $5 per bushel by January. Volatility in the grain markets is sure to squeeze cattle
feeders and limit prices for feeder calves in the coming year. "There is even more reason to be concerned about corn
prices this year," says Randy Blach, executive vice president of Cattle-Fax, speaking from the annual Cattle-Fax
Outlook Seminar at the Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show in Reno, Nev. "Prices for other
commodities have risen along with corn, increasing competition for what farmers choose to plant." Prior to the latest
spike in corn prices, Cattle-Fax had projected that corn plantings would decrease by 6 million acres in 2008, down from
the 93 million planted in 2007. Now the Centennial, Colo.-based market analyst firm says one of the key indicators to
watch is how prices for other commodities respond. If they stay high, it's a signal that other grains are ready to compete
for planted acreage. Unprecedented demand for corn, wheat and soybeans is driving the price surge. Export demand is
strong and Congress in December increased the ethanol mandate to 15.2 billion gallons from livestock feed sources like
corn by 2012. While the 2007 corn harvest was record-large at just over 13 billion bushels, Cattle-Fax analysts say the
need for another near record-large corn crop will pressure margins across the industry.
"Profit opportunities exist, but it will take tough management to find them this year," says Blach. "We are in a period
of rapid change and thin margins." He added that rather than producers pushing beef through the production chain,
consumer desires increasingly drive it, offering cattlemen more chances than ever for profits. Today, nearly 25 percent
of cattle are sold through some sort of certified program. Nearly 60 percent of all fed cattle do not sell on the cash
market. "There are a lot of programs out there that hold promise for increased value," Blach says. "But you have to do
your homework to make sure you're selling into one that actually pays. We always have to re-evaluate our business, and
some of the dynamics this year make it imperative that cattlemen position their business to minimize risk as much as
possible and take advantage of the profit opportunities that are out there. Volatility will be more extreme than in years
past." Source-NCBA Policy News/Cattle Fax, February 7, 2008, Reno, Nevada-Mike Miller.
Congratulations: Alexis Stinson for -
having the 2008 Grand Champion Steer James F. Selph
James F. Selph
at the Southwest Florida Fair in Lee
at the Southwest Florida Fair in Lee DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock & Forages
County.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.






Small Farms Livestock Conference III
"So You Want to be a Farmer!"


rt*


Polk County Extension Office
Bartow, FL
March 29, 2008

Hendry County Extension Office
LaBelle, FL
April 5, 2008


The South Florida Beef Forage Program Extension Agents will be holding the annual Small Farms Livestock Production
Conference at the Polk County Agriculture Center in Bartow, Saturday, March 29, 2008 and at the Hendry County
Extension Office in LaBelle on April 5, 2008. The Small Farms Livestock Production Conference is designed for
ranchettes or small landowners who are considering the raising, management and production on livestock for pleasure
or profit. This course, "So You Want to be a Farmer", was designed more specifically for new or agriculturally
inexperienced landowners who are considering some field of livestock production on their small or limited acreage to
help guide them and provide them information for making a more informed decision about what type of livestock
producer they may want to become.
This course will provide basic information about all the different animal species as possibilities for a small farming
operation. We will explore some economic and business basics of agricultural production; look at specialty production
and markets as possibilities; give some basics of animal health, buying healthy animals and keeping them healthy;
pasture and forage requirements before you ever get started, including understanding different forage species and their
fertility and maintenance requirements will be presented; and what considerations you will need to make for fencing,
housing, handling and holding equipment for all types of animal species.

Agenda topics for the day long conference will be:


AM "So You Want to be a Farmer"
Moderator: Sonja Crawford, Bridget Carlisle
8:00 Check-in and registration
8:45 Welcome and Introductions


PM "What You're Going to Need"
Moderator: Lindsey Wiggins, Christa Carlson
12:45 Animal Health Issues: Sources, Buying and Keeping
them Healthy Lockie Gary


9:00 Exploring the Possibilities: An overview of animal 1:45 Fencing, equipment, holding, handling and housing


species for production consideration Pat Hogue
10:00 4R's of Farming: Resources, Risks, Rules &
Rewards TBA
10:45 Break
11:00 Overview of Specialty Markets to Explore -
Robert Halman


needs and wants for Livestock Production -
Jim Selph
2:45 Break
3:00 Pastures: Species, Fertility and Maintenance -
Christine Kelly-Begazo
4:00 Questions and Adjourn


12:00 Lunch
Cost of the conference will be $ 20 per person pre-paid registration by February 16, 2007, and $ 30 late registration
received after February 16, to include lunch and any program materials. Individuals planning to attend should
contact Jim Selph (863-993-4846 or e-mail: iimselph(iufl.edu) at the DeSoto County Extension Office.

NAME ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP PHONE
E-MAIL
Program location you plan to attend, check one of the following: Bartow LaBelle
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


L
tef







HORSE BOTS
Horse bots (Figure 1) are bot fly larvae and are internal parasites of horses. The horse bot larvae develop in the stomach
of horses causing symptoms ranging from stomach ulcers, and esophageal paralysis to occlusion of the digestive tract.












Figure 1: Intestinal Bots, CREDITS: J. F. Butler, University of Florida
The adult bot fly (Figure 2) is a bee-like fly about 1/2 to 3/4 inch in length. Bot flies are covered with black and yellow
hairs and do not feed as adults. In Florida two species of adult bot flies may be active throughout the year, although
they are more abundant from late spring to early winter. Female bot flies lay from 150 to 1,000 yellowish eggs. The eggs
are firmly glued to the hairs of the forelegs, belly, flanks, shoulders and other parts of the body of the horse. While the
fly's egg laying does not cause the horse pain, the horse often is bothered by the presence of the fly.
Egg laying principally occurs on the inside knees of the animal where the horse can easily reach the eggs with its tongue.
The eggs are ready to hatch 7 to 10 days after oviposition, and will hatch only if the horse licks or bites the area where
they have been glued. It is believed that the sudden increase in temperature from the tongue stimulates the young larvae
to hatch. Warm moist grooming cloths may also cause eggs to hatch and present a hazard of infestation to the individual
grooming the animal. Once inside the horse's mouth, the larvae burrow into the mucous linings of the mouth and
tongue and remain there for 3 to 4 weeks. Damage to the mouth membranes is often seen during this stage. From the
mouth, the larvae pass to the stomach and intestine where the second and third instar larvae remain attached but may
change location. They remain in these areas until the following summer.











Figure 2: CREDITS: J. F. Butler, University of Florida
When fully mature, the third stage larvae detach from the stomach, pass through the intestines and are passed in the
droppings. They migrate out of the droppings and burrow under the surface of the soil. Here the pupae remain for 1 to
2 months. The adult fly emerges throughout the summer and fall. The adult fly does not feed but immediately starts its
egg laying cycle, which lasts for about two weeks, after which the fly dies. Cold weather and frost usually kill off the
remaining flies in the fall of the year and signal the end of the egg laying season. Only one generation is completed per
year. In south Florida, adult bot flies have been found to be active year-round. In central and north Florida adults are
found from spring to early winter. Highest populations of adults are recorded from August through September. Larval
populations sampled in horses in October and November ranged from 1 to 184 larvae per stomach in central and north
Florida.
Effective control of horse bots requires breaking the life cycle of the fly. Insecticides are labeled for external treatment
using warm water wash. This must be done after eggs have been laid but before they hatch. For external insecticide
treatment, a warm water wash (110 -1200 F) should be rubbed or sponged on areas infested with eggs. The larvae will
hatch and die from contact with the insecticide. Treatments should be applied weekly during peak oviposition periods
(August-September). During the wash, care should be taken to protect hands from both insecticide and larvae with
synthetic rubber gloves. Grooming may aid in removal of eggs but effectiveness of control is questionable. For internal
treatment of horse bots, consult a veterinarian. Source: External Parasites on Horses, P. E. Kaufman, P. G. Koehler
and J. F. Butler, ENY-283
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







Age, Calvin Interval & Gestation Table
Day Jan Feb Mar Apr Ma Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec ay Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
1 1 32 60 91 121 152 182 213 244 274 305 335 1 366 397 425 456 486 517 547 578 609 639 670 700
2 2 33 61 92 122 153 183 214 245 275 306 336 2 367 398 426 457 487 518 548 579 610 640 671 701
3 3 34 62 93 123 154 184 215 246 276 307 337 3 368 399 427 458 488 519 549 580 611 641 672 702
4 4 35 63 94 124 155 185 216 247 277 308 338 4 369 400 428 459 489 520 550 581 612 642 673 703
5 5 36 64 95 125 156 186 217 248 278 309 339 5 370 401 429 460 490 521 551 582 613 643 674 704
6 6 37 65 96 126 157 187 218 249 279 310 340 6 371 402 430 461 491 522 552 583 614 644 675 705
7 7 38 66 97 127 158 188 219 250 280 311 341 7 372 403 431 462 492 523 553 584 615 645 676 706
8 8 39 67 98 128 159 189 220 251 281 312 342 8 373 404 432 463 493 524 554 585 616 646 677 707
9 9 40 68 99 129 160 190 221 252 282 313 343 9 374 405 433 464 494 525 555 586 617 647 678 708
10 10 41 69 100 130 161 191 222 253 283 314 344 10 375 406 434 465 495 526 556 587 618 648 679 709
11 11 42 70 101 131 162 192 223 254 284 315 345 11 376 407 435 466 496 527 557 588 619 649 680 710
12 12 43 71 102 132 163 193 224 255 285 316 346 12 377 408 436 467 497 528 558 589 620 650 681 711
13 13 44 72 103 133 164 194 225 256 286 317 347 13 378 409 437 468 498 529 559 590 621 651 682 712
14 14 45 73 104 134 165 195 226 257 287 318 348 14 379 410 438 469 499 530 560 591 622 652 683 713
15 15 46 74 105 135 166 196 227 258 288 319 349 15 380 411 439 470 500 531 561 592 623 653 684 714
16 16 47 75 106 136 167 197 228 259 289 320 350 16 381 412 440 471 501 532 562 593 624 654 685 715
17 17 48 76 107 137 168 198 229 260 290 321 351 17 382 413 441 472 502 533 563 594 625 655 686 716
18 18 49 77 108 138 169 199 230 261 291 322 352 18 383 414 442 473 503 534 564 595 626 656 687 717
19 19 50 78 109 139 170 200 231 262 292 323 353 19 384 415 443 474 504 535 565 596 627 657 688 718
20 20 51 79 110 140 171 201 232 263 293 324 354 20 385 416 444 475 505 536 566 597 628 658 689 719
21 21 52 80 111 141 172 202 233 264 294 325 355 21 386 417 445 476 506 537 567 598 629 659 690 720
22 22 53 81 112 142 173 203 234 265 295 326 356 22 387 418 446 477 507 538 568 599 630 660 691 721
23 23 54 82 113 143 174 204 235 266 296 327 357 23 388 419 447 478 508 539 569 600 631 661 692 722
24 24 55 83 114 144 175 205 236 267 297 328 358 24 389 420 448 479 509 540 570 601 632 662 693 723
25 25 56 84 115 145 176 206 237 268 298 329 359 25 390 421 449 480 510 541 571 602 633 663 694 724
26 26 57 85 116 146 177 207 238 269 299 330 360 26 391 422 450 481 511 542 572 603 634 664 695 725
27 27 58 86 117 147 178 208 239 270 300 331 361 27 392 423 451 482 512 543 573 604 635 665 696 726
28 28 59 87 118 148 179 209 240 271 301 332 362 28 393 424 452 483 513 544 574 605 636 666 697 727
29 29 88 119 149 180 210 241 272 302 333 363 29 394 453 484 514 545 575 606 637 667 698 728
30 30 89 120 150 181 211 242 273 303 334 364 30 395 454 485 515 546 576 607 638 668 699 729
31 31 90 151 212 243 304 365 31 396 455 516 577 608 669 730

For leap year, add 1 day to all dates after February 29. Example, March 1, 1996 is day 61 rather than day 60.


Beef Cattle Calving Records
Date Calf Calf Birth Calving Calf Calf Cow Cow Cow Comments
_Sex Tag Wt. Ease Sire Vitality ID BCS* Problems


Condition Score: l=Thinnest throat


Ihe Institute ot Food and Agricultural Sciences (IWAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








BIF Frame Score Chart Cows & Heifers
Dr. Larry W. Olson Extension Animal Scientist


7 35.1 37.1 39.2 41.2

8 36.0 38.0 40.1 42.1

9 36.8 38.9 40.9 42.9

10 37.6 39.6 41.6 43.7

11 38.3 40.3 42.3 1 44.3


20 42.1 44.1 46.0 47.9 49.8 51.8 53.7 55.6 57.6 59.6

21 | 42.3 | 44.2 46.1 | 48.0 50.0 51.9 53.8 55.7 57.7 59.7

The Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) Frame Scores, are a method of estimating skeletal size based on hip height,
which is shown in this chart. Frame scores represent differences in height at the same age of about 2 inches. Values in
the chart represent averages of thousands of cattle, but individual animals may vary.
Heights should be determined on the top-line directly over the hips or hooks with cattle standing on a firm, flat surface,
legs symmetrically positioned, and head in a normal position. The most common device for determining height is a
measuring stick, available at many livestock supply companies. It consists of a cross-arm (with a bubble level) attached
in a 90- degree angle to an upright containing a ruler.
Body size is an important genetic factor in beef cattle production. Historically, size was first estimated by measurements
such as height or length. As scales were developed, weight became more common as a measure of size. Measurement and
weight are related but their rates of maturity differ. By 7 months of age, cattle reach about 80 percent of mature height
but only 35 to 45 percent of mature weight. At 12 months, about 90 percent of mature height is reached, compared to
only 50 to 60 percent of mature weight.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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