Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: February 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00033
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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SF UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA IFAS EXTENSION







DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
Grand Champion Steer
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266 Exhibitor: Paige Hamrick
February 2008 / Volume 30 Number 2 Photo: Tonya Bordner

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
February
28 Using the USDA/NRCS Website for Obtaining Soil Survey Information, DeSoto County
Extension Office, 7:00 8:30 PM
March
29 Small Farms Livestock Conference: "So You Want to be a Farmer", 8:00 AM 3:30 PM, Polk
County Extension Office, Bartow, FL
FOOD PRICES CONTINUE TO CLIMB
Last year, the Consumer Price Index for food rose by 4 percent, the largest annual increase since 1990, and the USDA
projects another 3 to 4 percent increase this year. The food-at-home index is now 5.6 percent above last December, while
the food-away-from-home index is 4 percent higher than one year ago. Beef prices decreased 0.4 percent in December,
but remain 4.5 percent above one year ago. Eggs, dairy and poultry prices have posted some of the biggest increases over
the past year. The report cites higher energy and commodity prices working their way into the retail market as the
reason for higher food prices. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, January 31, 2008 Vol. 10, Issue 5.
NEW AG SECRETARY CONFIRMED
Ed Schafer was confirmed and sworn in as the 29th Secretary of Agriculture this week. Schafer succeeds Mike Johanns,
who resigned in September to run for the U.S. Senate. Schafer served two terms as governor of North Dakota from 1992
to 2000 and made diversifying and expanding North Dakota's economy, reducing the cost of government and advancing
agriculture his top priorities in office. He also worked to normalize trade relations with China and develop the Chinese
export market for North Dakota farm products, according to a USDA release. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday,
January 31, 2008 Vol. 10, Issue 5.
NY TIMES WANTS US TO "RETHINK THE MEAT GUZZLER"
A story in Sunday's New York Times laid out the case against meat. Raising livestock, the story says, uses a lot of energy,
requires the use of land for crops and grazing, and creates a lot of manure. Author Mark Bittman also wrote "How to
Cook Everything Vegetarian," though he says he is not a vegetarian. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, January 31,
2008 Vol. 10, Issue 5. For more information, stop by the Extension Office for a copy of the full N.Y. Times article.
USING THE USDA/NRCS WEBSITE FOR OBTAINING SOIL SURVEY INFORMATION
From 7:00 till 8:30 PM we will have an informal training on using the NRCS Web Soil Survey. Please call our office if
you are planning to attend. Soil surveys can be very useful in planning farming operations. The old method was a
printed book that you hoped was still in print. As far as I can tell, any county that you are looking for soils information
is available on line. Jim
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








MARKET INFORMATION

February 4, 2008

02/02/08 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 99.47 90.29 88.00
Live Heifer 89.67 90.68 87.67
Dressed Steer 143.34 144.39 138.04
Dressed Heifer 143.28 144.66 138.61
htto://www.ams.usda.aovlmnreoortsllm ctl50.txt


BEEF PRODUCTION
Slaughter
Live Weights
Dressed Weights
Beef Production (M. of Pounds)


02/02/08
(Estimate)
613,000
1296
774
472.8


htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/SJ LS712.txt


1/19/08


Last Week
(Estimate)
640,000
1299
778
495.9


Last Year
(Actual)
642,000
1279
769
491.9


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 2.55% 2.64%
Choice 54.93% 54.65%
Select 33.35% 33.93%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


700D-00 Lb. Feeder Steers, Dodge City, KS


S -


A
r


t'0


tfl------ -t;kr m~n35,ba Trt~ tVr bDI r


U


2.60%
54.24%
33.49%


11)C fl)?
Moce~lc


Weekly Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread
25
23 2007
21
21 2008
19
17 --5YrAvg
15
13
11 i

7
5 -------- -f | .------------ ---

3 ------- --II. ...I I

01/11 02/22 04/04 05/16 06/27 08/08 09/19 10/31 12/12
Week Ending Date


SourLI : USDA & ]ames Mintert, K- State Ag. Economics


KSU Dept. of Ag Econ
www.agmanager.lnfo


Choice/Select Spread

02/04/08

$4.98/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M_XB403.TXT


Kansas Combined Auction (Dodge City, Pratt, & Salina)
Weekly Weighted Average 500 600 Lb. Steer Pnces


135
130
125
120
115


1051
951
01/11


02/22 04/04 05/16 06/27 08/08 09/19 10/31 12/12
Week Endng Date


So.nte: USDA&JamesNlmteft. -stateAg Economics


Ku Dept. Ag Econ
www*aqmnaqergfifo


The summary below reflects the week ending January 25, 2008 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, January 29, 2008. ea-,.


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.


TX 16,600 $105.15 I$101


AL ,600


$100-105 $89-90


TN 8,200 $94.93


$88.78


$84.50-89.50 $89-95


FL 6,800 $88-113 $85.50-96 $78-81


GA 7,300 $89-103 $83-97


KY 23,900


$92-102 $84-94


CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 3 to 6 cents lower from 4.81-4.88 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 15 to 18 cents higher at 4.89 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 14 to 16 cents higher
from 4.74-4.78 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 12 to 16 cents higher from 4.71%-4.96% per bushel.
Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 16 to 17 cents higher from 4.85%-4.87% per bushel. Minneapolis US No
2 Yellow Corn rail was 12 cents higher at 4.68% per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review,
Friday February 1,2008 http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ GR851.txt

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


Weekly FI. Steer Dressed Weight

-z-ri


"fi


Calf Weight


$95.92


$94.09


$83.87


$93.03

$80-83

5$78.49

|76-85

5$73-87

$75-85


$85.95

$80-95

$77-98

$80-90


$80-85

$82-92


$90.33

$80-90

$76.03



$74-82

$71-81


01/1l 5B4iE1 5[+19 9 0; 07/16 Q443
.a . .
i. A L







FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-20087http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/
1sT COLUMN IS 2008-2N COLUMN IS 2007-3R COLUMN IS 2006-4th COLUMN IS 2005.
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
1.85"
1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 2.28" 5.04" 5.42" 5.57" 4.56" 1.46" 0.05" 0.78" 32.79"
0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 0.81" 2.13" 33.06"
9.71" 8.73" 5.86" 4.03" 8.78" 3.78" 0.11" NA
Currently we are 1.08" ahead of last year.
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES AT THE EXTENSION
OFFICE-FIRST COLUMN IS THE HIGH & 2ND COLUMN IS THE LOW
82.30
28.50
EXTREMIST GROUPS FORM NEW ORGANIZATION
Despite its friendly-sounding name, folks in the livestock business understand that the Humane Society of the United
States (HSUS) is of the extreme ilk that believes livestock production should be done away with in all its forms.
HSUS has joined with a similar group, Veterinarians for Animal Rights (VAR) to establish a new organization called the
Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association (HSVMA). An HSUS news release earlier this month says, "Both
groups have long expressed frustration with the industry-biased positions taken by the American Veterinary Medical
Association (AVMA). AVMA is on the opposite side of animal protection advocates or neutral on a wide range of
unacceptable abuses of animals..." For instance, current HSUS litigation in New Jersey says that castration and docking
without anesthesia are mutilations that are inhumane farming practices. Source-Beef Stocker Trends, Friday, January
29, 2008.

Beef Management Calendar

c February/March

Check mineral feeder. |Check for external parasites and treat if needed.

Work Calves (castrate, deworm, vaccinate, implant) Watch calves for signs of respiratory diseases
Cull cows that failed to calve & market in April |Check for lice and treat if necessary

Pull soil samples to be run at UF Soils Lab |Fertilize ryegrass if necessary
INVENTORY--GRAIN WEIGHS DOWN MARKET
"It appears that buyers are gambling that the fed cattle market will soon respond to low inventories and increased beef
exports to offset higher cost-of-gains, as current price levels will not pencil out according to spring CME Live Cattle
Futures," say analysts for the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS). They're referring to the market last week that
surprised some at its strength. Even though feeder calves and feeder cattle traded $3-$5 lower last week, plenty of folks
expected the market to slip further amid growing negative factors including increasing corn prices and adverse weather
conditions in some major buying areas. As for the gamble, though Friday's Cattle On Feed report is bearish short-term
-- the largest Jan. 1 feedlot inventory since the series began; 1% higher than a year ago -- there should be fewer cattle
available in coming months (see "Dearth Of Winter Pasture Shifts Marketing Patterns," below).
"Timing can change the picture in the feedlot situation and it is important to remember that the large placements since
last September included not only the anticipated summer yearlings but an unusually large number of Canadian feeders
as well as lightweight feeders that would have been grazing this winter, if there was any grazing to be had," says Derrell
Peel, livestock marketing specialist with Oklahoma State University. "Early placement of winter calves means they will
not be available for placement in the first half of 2008." In the meantime, AMS reports fed cattle in Nebraska brought
$4-$5 lower last week (mostly S143). Southern Plains trade held basically steady, to 500 higher at mostly $91 to $91.50.
As of Friday afternoon, AMS was reporting, "Packers so far this week have had the leverage as they have seemed to buy
cattle with ease with larger show lists, or maybe growing concerns of weather, feed cost and economic concerns have
feedlots on the defensive." Source-Beef Stocker Trends, Friday, January 29, 2008.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







2007 U.S. CORN CROP TOPS THE RECORD BOOK
The 2007 U.S. corn crop's final production tally is 13.1 billion bu., which eclipses the previous high, set in 2004, of 11.8
billion bu. According to USDA's "Crop Production 2007 Summary," released Jan. 11 by USDA's National Ag Statistics
Service (NASS), 2007 production topped 2006's by 24%. Cotton and rice yields also hit all-time highs. Total U.S. corn
acreage in 2007 was 93.6 million acres, a 19% jump over 2006 and the most since 1944's 95.5 million acres. In addition,
the 86.5 million acres of corn harvested for grain was the most since 1933, and 22% greater than 2006. Average corn
yield was 151.1 bu./acre -- second only to 2004's 160.4 bu./acre, and up 2 bu. from last year. Soybeans suffered as a
result of more corn acres, as U.S. farmers planted and harvested 16% fewer soybean acres in 2007 than in 2006. A total
of 63.6 million acres were planted in soybeans, and 62.8 million harvested. Soybean production, at 2.6 billion bu., was
down 19% from the 3.2-billion-bu. record of 2006, while the average yield was 41.2 bu./acre, 1.5 bu. below last year.
Source-Cow-Calf Weekly, Friday, January 18, 2008.
ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION OF BEEF CATTLE-IS IT PRACTICAL?
About 27 years ago, W.M. Marsh, Charles Harmon, Marcia Rodgers, Chrystine Holley and I went to a 3 day school to
learn how to artificially inseminate cattle. Since that time, I have artificially bred a fairly good number of cattle, have
taught A. I. at our Reproductive Management Schools and have worked with operations that have gone into A. I.
programs. Would I recommend the use of A. I. for the average rancher? Absolutely not! Does it work and is it
profitable? Absolutely! Now I have just written 2 questions and given my answer which seems to contradict one
another. The reality though is that they do not. The average person will try something like this for one or two years.
The reality is that it takes at least 4 to 5 years to become proficient in an A. I. breeding program. I am not referring to
the technical aspect of artificially breeding a cow, but rather the whole of the process that is involved in an A. I.
program. For A. I. to work well, the following bullets are just some of the things that are needed for success:
M Cattle that are at least a body condition score 5 or higher and are on an increasing nutritional plane!
M Excellent handling facilities!
M Fairly docile cattle that are used to being handled and worked quietly and regularly in the pens!
P A highly organized producer who is willing to spend a lot of time observing his cattle for heat!
Sr A producer who maintains excellent cattle records and then takes the time to study what he has recorded!
M Doing a good job of matching A.I. Bulls to the cow herd!
1 Having and maintaining an excellent Herd Health Program and maintaining clean facilities and
equipment!
P Having an excellent A. I. Technician who is dedicated to his job!
S Excellent maintained storage facilities for A. I. Equipment, including a regularly checked semen tank!
If you do or have the above, then considering the use of an A. I. program might be a fit for you. If you then can do a
good job at heat detection, choosing and maintaining quality semen, properly handling of semen at the time of
artificially breeding and the correct placement of the semen into the cow then you can have a successful A. I. program.
If you asked me what the hardest part is (it is all hard), I would tell you that really learning how to determine heat in
cattle is the hardest part that I have found for most who try and it is probably why most give up early on. If you have an
interest and would like to talk in detail about an A. I. program for your ranch then give me a call (993-4846) at the
Extension Office. Jim Selph
AGRICULTURAL & OTHER WEBSITES OF INTEREST
CattleNetwork: http://www.cattlenetwork.com/cattle_beef_homepage.asp
Farm and Ranch News: http://www.farmandranchnews.com
Google Earth http://earth.google.com/
National Cattlemen's Beef Association: http://www.beef.org/
USDA NRCS Web Soil Survey: http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov/
Florida Quail: http://floridaquail.wec.ufl.edu/
Florida Wildlife and Agriculture: http://wildlifeandag.wec.ufl.edu/

The above websites are some that I do not believe that I have shared with you in the past. If you have not found and
downloaded Google Earth already and you have high speed access such as DSL, you will find that you can get real good
resolution aerials of your property. The soil survey site is similar but the map resolutions are not as current and are
black and white, but you can get a lot of soil and land information at this site. It is not easy to use, but I was able to
figure it out and if I can do it, I know that you will be able also!!!

James F. Selph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock & Forages
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.






Small Farms Livestock Conference III
"So You Want to be a Farmer!"


rt*


Polk County Extension Office
Bartow, FL
March 29, 2008

Hendry County Extension Office
LaBelle, FL
April 5, 2008


The South Florida Beef Forage Program Extension Agents will be holding the annual Small Farms Livestock Production
Conference at the Polk County Agriculture Center in Bartow, Saturday, March 29, 2008 and at the Hendry County
Extension Office in LaBelle on April 5, 2008. The Small Farms Livestock Production Conference is designed for
ranchettes or small landowners who are considering the raising, management and production on livestock for pleasure
or profit. This course, "So You Want to be a Farmer", was designed more specifically for new or agriculturally
inexperienced landowners who are considering some field of livestock production on their small or limited acreage to
help guide them and provide them information for making a more informed decision about what type of livestock
producer they may want to become.
This course will provide basic information about all the different animal species as possibilities for a small farming
operation. We will explore some economic and business basics of agricultural production; look at specialty production
and markets as possibilities; give some basics of animal health, buying healthy animals and keeping them healthy;
pasture and forage requirements before you ever get started, including understanding different forage species and their
fertility and maintenance requirements will be presented; and what considerations you will need to make for fencing,
housing, handling and holding equipment for all types of animal species.

Agenda topics for the day long conference will be:


AM "So You Want to be a Farmer"
Moderator: Sonja Crawford, Bridget Carlisle
8:00 Check-in and registration
8:45 Welcome and Introductions


PM "What You're Going to Need"
Moderator: Lindsey Wiggins, Christa Carlson
12:45 Animal Health Issues: Sources, Buying and Keeping
them Healthy Lockie Gary


9:00 Exploring the Possibilities: An overview of animal 1:45 Fencing, equipment, holding, handling and housing


species for production consideration Pat Hogue
10:00 4R's of Farming: Resources, Risks, Rules &
Rewards TBA
10:45 Break
11:00 Overview of Specialty Markets to Explore -
Robert Halman


needs and wants for Livestock Production -
Jim Selph
2:45 Break
3:00 Pastures: Species, Fertility and Maintenance -
Christine Kelly-Begazo
4:00 Questions and Adjourn


12:00 Lunch
Cost of the conference will be $ 20 per person pre-paid registration by February 16, 2007, and $ 30 late registration
received after February 16, to include lunch and any program materials. Individuals planning to attend should
contact Jim Selph (863-993-4846 or e-mail: iimselph(iufl.edu) at the DeSoto County Extension Office.

NAME ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP PHONE
E-MAIL
Program location you plan to attend, check one of the following: Bartow LaBelle
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


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