Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089228/00031
 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: December 2007
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00031
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA


IFAS EXTENSION


U


DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266 I
December 2007 / Volume 29 Number 12


'U'


Merry Christmas &
Happy New Year


CALENDAR OF EVENTS
December
7 Florida Brangus Breeders Association Bull Sale, Arcadia Stockyards, 1:00 PM

January
2 Special Slaughter Cow & Bull Sale, Arcadia Stockyards, 12:00 PM
17 Florida Cattlemen's Institute and Allied Trade Show
20 DeSoto County Fair, Steer Grooming Contest, 2:00 PM, DeSoto County Fairgrounds
22 DeSoto County Fair, Steer Show, 7:00 PM, DeSoto County Fairgrounds

23 DeSoto County Fair, Swine Show, 7:00 PM, DeSoto County Fairgrounds
24 DeSoto County Fair, Beef Breeding Show, 7:00 PM, DeSoto County Fairgrounds
25 DeSoto County Fair, Steer & Swine Sale, 7:00 PM, DeSoto County Fairgrounds

SURVEY REVEALS ANIMAL-WELFARE ATTITUDES
The American Farm Bureau Federation and Oklahoma State University recently surveyed more than 1,000 individuals
across the United States to measure their opinions about farm-animal welfare. OSU economist F. Bailey Norwood notes
several key lessons from the survey results. First, the public cares more about human welfare and farmers than they do
farm animals. Respondents rated the financial well-being of U.S. farmers as twice as important as the well-being of farm
animals, and poverty, health care and food safety as five times more important. In addition, consumers understand
animal welfare is a result of their shopping decisions in addition to farmer decisions. They realize they have a choice of
purchasing meat from traditional production or, if they prefer, paying for meat from alternative production systems.
According to Farm Bureau release, analysis of the survey results indicates respondents consider the suffering of one
human to be equivalent to the suffering of 11,500 farm animals, and a majority of respondents believe producers should
be compensated if forced to comply with higher farm-animal welfare standards. Results like these show that while
activist groups make headlines, most mainstream consumers still understand and appreciate the role of animal
agriculture in food production. John Maday, Drovers associate editor -Drovers Alert, Thursday, November 29, 2007
Vol. 9, Issue 48.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


I








MARKET INFORMATION
December 3, 2007

12/01/07 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 95.03 95.09 85.92
Live Heifer 95.20 95.02 85.95
Dressed Steer 150.04 149.85 135.22
Dressed Heifer 149.84 149.85 135.34
htto:/lwww.ams.usda.aovlmnreoortsllm ctl50.txt

12/01/07 Last Week Last Year
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate) (Actual)
Slaughter 677,000 580,000 630,000
Live Weights 1305 1304 1295
Dressed Weights 791 791 786
Beef Production (M. of Pounds) 533.4 457.1 493.3
htto:/lwww.ams.usda.aovlmnreoortslSJ LS712.txt


National Grading Percent
Prime
Choice
Select


11/16/07

2.66%
51.55%
34.21%


http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


n1~n-l -U~e -ae IIeTle5
5 r -- F Ii~ll Gil ll

-


Last Week Last Year


2.76%
52.83%
33.82%


3.21%
52.18%
35.80%


Weekly F.I. Cattle Dressed Weight



U I


v M W2 we oo 151 :2v
..E "


Weekly Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread
25
23 '-20C6
17 -
21 ,,.,
4 ___|-U -.--41i


I I~9


01/05 02/16 03/30 05/11 06/22 08103 09/14 10/26 12/07
Week Ending Date


Source. USDA & 3anes 1mItert, K State Ag. Economics


KSU Dept. of Ag Econ
w w.agmanager.lnfo


Choice/Select Spread
11/30/07
$16.40/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M_XB403.TXT


Kansas Combined Auction (Dodge City. Pratt, & Salina)
iW-y Wi,.91-Tod JA-.q 500-600 Lb. St- P-


I I


955
4





Vos 0S C 6 01120 .1vl1 M/zlz OGM0 M:f4 01& W0J7
W-1 EMd' DI a


The summary below reflects the week ending November 9, 2007 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, November 13, 2007.


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.


TX 28,500 $106.66 $102.86 $103.72 $97.13


AL 12,800 $110-120 $98-105 $89-97


TN 110,500 $106.46 I$95.24

FL 10,200 $92-108 $85-97


S95.09

S$80-88


$91.98


$96-106 S84-94


$91.95


$85.32


$90.40

$82-92

S83.92


S80-103 IS79-100 IS77-90


GA 8,200


$95-109 IS87-105 IS81-97


The above information is reported for earlier in the month because the latest report only list cattle in Texas due to
the Holidays. Jim

CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 5 to 7 cents higher from 4.16-4.21 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 2 cents higher from 3.74-3.76 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 6 to 7 cents higher
from 3.72-3.74 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 1 /to 17/2 cents higher from 3.632-3.97% per bushel.
Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 7/ cents higher from 3.831-3.86% per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn
rail was 42 cents lower at 3.50% per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday November
30, 2007, http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ GR851.txt
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


Calf Weight


$81-99


$78-94


$78-82


' l-M-T^ 1


II I


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T


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FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2007 http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/
1sT COLUMN IS 2007-2 COLUMN IS 2006--3R COLUMN IS 2005.
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 2.28" 5.04" 5.42" 5.57" 4.56" 1.46" 0.05" 32.01"
0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 0.81" 2.13" 33.06"
9.71" 8.73" 5.86" 4.03" 8.78" 3.78" 0.11" NA
Currently we are 1.08" ahead of last year.
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES AT THE EXTENSION
OFFICE-FIRST COLUMN IS THE HIGH & 2ND COLUMN IS THE LOW
86.60 86.50 86.30 90.50 89.00 97.50 95.40 97.10 94.20 92.20 84.920 0
33.30 32.60 39.50 43.90 53.00 63.20 69.30 69.80 67.80 63.60 42.120 0
CATTLE-ON-FEED TRENDS CONTINUE
There was little surprise in the November Cattle-On-Feed (COF) Report, in terms of numbers as well as direction.
"October placements were up 12% year-over-year as feedlots took advantage of available supplies of heavy yearling
cattle coming off of summer grazing programs," says Derrell Peel, Oklahoma State University livestock marketing
specialist. "Placements of cattle over 800 lbs. were up 23% from last year and placements of cattle 600-800 lbs. were up
15% from last year." Specifically, according to the Nov. 16 COF report, 11.8 million head were on feed Nov. 1, which is
2% below last year, but 3% higher than the same time in 2005. The 2.72 million head placed in October was 12% more
than 2006, but 3% lower than in 2005. Marketings in October (1.88 million head) were 6% higher than a year ago and
8% higher than in 2005. Though it may not yet be a full-blown trend, the latest COF report also underscores the fact
that more cattle are being fed closer to the densest population of ethanol plants. Cattle on feed in Iowa were 12% more
than a year ago; 8% more in South Dakota. Conversely, cattle on feed declined in Oklahoma (7%), Colorado (9%) and
Kansas (5%), compared to the same time last year. -Beef Stocker Trends, Friday, November 27, 2007

Beef Management Calendar

I December/January

Check mineral feeder. [Check for external parasites and treat if needed.
Deworm cows and heifers prior to winter feeding season. Observe regularly for calving difficulties.
Rotate calving pastures to prevent diseases. Watch for scours in calves.
Give bulls extra feed and care so they will be in condition Have dead animals posted by a veterinarian or diagnostic
for breeding season. laboratory.

Watch condition of cow herd and supplement if necessary. Discuss herd health with your veterinarian and outline a
Post calving cows have the highest nutritional requirements program for the 2008 year.
in the first 82 days.
Develop or review of management plan and update for next Carry a pocket notebook to record heat, breeding
year. abnormalities, discharges, abortions, retained placentas.


llnvestigate health of bulls before you buy.


IiJanuary 1, put bulls out for October calving season.


USDA PROPOSES STANDARDS FOR NATURAL-MEAT LABELS
Demand for "natural" meats has grown significantly in recent years, but a common complaint among food companies
and consumers is there is no uniform standard for the natural designation. In response, USDA this week proposed
voluntary standards for naturally raised marketing claims for livestock and meat. The agency is seeking comments on
the proposed standards between now and Jan. 28, 2008 -Drovers Alert, Thursday, November 29, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 48.



The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







AUSSIE SCIENTISTS FIND MUSCLING GENE
Researchers at Adelaide University in Australia have identified a gene that explains a large increase in retail beef yield.
While the gene, called myostatin F94L, isn't the only gene that influences retail beef yield, it has a large effect.
Homozygous animals have 13% larger ribeye areas and 4% more total retail yield, according to the research. The gene
is most commonly found in Limousin cattle, researchers say. According to the North American Limousin Foundation
(NALF), the gene's high-yielding form occurs in 83% of the Limousin breed, meaning 68% of Limousin animals are
homozygous for the trait and 28% are heterozygous. "This gene appears to explain a much larger proportion of the
genetic variation of the (retail yield) trait than any of the currently available gene markers for marbling, tenderness, or
feed efficiency," says Alex McDonald, general manager of the Limousin Society in Australia. "The discovery of what
appears to be a major gene, which can be used to increase retail beef yield in all breeds of cattle throughout the world, is
an exciting breakthrough." Negotiations are underway with an Australian laboratory to provide a commercial gene test
for the F94L modification. -- NALF release -Cow-Calf Weekly, Thursday, November 21, 2007.
FIRM INTRODUCES MOTOR OIL FROM BEEF TALLOW
Years ago, Conoco advertised its gasoline to consumers by urging them to "put a tiger in your tank." With its
introduction of motor oil made from beef tallow, a firm called Green Earth Technologies could consider marketing its
product with a tagline such as "beef up your engine." Called G-Oil, it's the first bio-based, high-endurance motor oil to
provide superior performance at competitive prices, reports Doane's Ag Report. While it takes nearly three barrels of
crude oil to make one barrel of motor oil, Green Earth says it gets a full barrel of quality motor oil from a barrel of
animal fat. -- Joe Roybal -Cow-Calf Weekly, Thursday, November 21, 2007.
BOBWHITE QUAIL IN FLORIDA: ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT: WILLIAM
GIULIANO, JAMES SELPH, AND BRANDON SCHAD
I have had the distinct pleasure of being a co-author on this new book on the Florida
Bobwhite Quail. We have a number of copies in our office and we are selling them for
$25.00 (tax included) each. I know many of our ranchers are interested in Quail and
this is a book that you might like to have or give as a Christmas present to a friend or
family member. Below are some details on the book.
Bobwhite Quail in Florida provides current information on Bobwhite biology, ecology.
population status, and habitat requirements. Readers will find detailed descriptions of
the habitat necessary for quail to breed, nest, forage, take shelter, and ultimately thri\ c.
The authors offer useful management practices for farms, rangelands, and forests, including,
Prescribed fire and other disturbances
Artificial feeding
Predator management
Restocking with wild or pen-raised birds
Harvest and hunting -
Over 75 beautiful color photographs illustrate the practical information provided in
Bobwhite Quail in Florida. With the help of this useful book, landowners, land manarv, ic.
hunters, and wildlife enthusiasts can become active participants in the recovery of the
state's most popular game bird.
QUAIL, DOVE, DEER AND TURKEY VIDEOS
To access the online videos from the Shortcourses we have done over the past several year go to the following website:
http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/. On the left hand side of this page, click on Wildlife and Conservation under Environment. At
this site, in the middle column, click on Florida Quail. Once at the Florida Quail site, click on Courses/Project in the
upper right side of the page. On this page are several buttons on the left hand side of the page. The Shortcourses that
we did this year are not up yet, but they will be fairly soon. Those from 2005 and 2006 are there and you can view them
from your computer. If you should have any problems accessing these videos, please let me know. You should be able to
access them even with a dial-up connection, but I suspect that the faster your connection speed is, the better these will
run. It is my sincere hope that you and your family have the best Christmas and New
Year and that 2008 will give you the best calf crop and the heaviest weaning weight
that you have ever had. Ris 4 ,-
j | UNIVERSITY of
U FLORIDA James F. Selph
The Foundation for The Gator Nation DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock & Forages
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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