Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089228/00030
 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: November 2007
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00030
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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SF UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA IFAS EXTENSION







DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
November 2007 / Volume 29 Number 11 Happy Thanksgiving

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
November
30 All Breed Bull Sale (Angus, Braford, Brangus, Charolais, & Polled Hereford, Arcadia
Stockyards, 1:00 PM
December
7 Florida Brangus Breeders Association Bull Sale, Arcadia Stockyards, 1:00 PM

January
2 Special Slaughter Cow & Bull Sale, Arcadia Stockyards, 12:00 PM

BEEF EXPORTS SHOW INCREASE
Exports of U.S. beef showed an increase in both value and volume through August, according to the U.S. Meat Export
Federation (USMEF). The value of U.S. beef exports increased 28% to $1.67 million, compared with the same period last
year. U.S. beef and variety meat exports were up 16% in volume to 495,829 metric tons (mt) or 1.09 billion lbs.
According to USMEF, notable gains were made in Central and South America as export volume increased 68% to 5,986
mt or 13.2 million lbs. and value increased 64% to $10.9 million. This growth was driven by liver exports to Peru and
frozen beef exports to Guatemala. Larger markets such as Canada also showed gains with a 31% increase in volume to
81,380 mt or 179.4 million lbs. and a 34% jump in value to $372.1 million. Mexico remained the No. 1 market for U.S.
beef and beef variety meat exports with a volume of 235,471 mt or 519 million lbs., valued at $781.5 million. USMEF
expects beef prices to remain strong domestically through the rest of the year due to relatively tight cattle supplies.
However, U.S. beef will remain a good value internationally due to weakness in the U.S. dollar. -Cow-Calf Weekly,
Friday, October 19, 2007.
BEEFCAST BRINGS EXPERTS TO YOU
You can receive timely industry analysis, news and commentary through BeefCast, a new podcast that can be accessed
easily on the Internet or via an iPod. Each week, three 10- to 15-minute programs, which feature experts' comments on
beef production, industry issues and other wide-ranging topics, are produced. BeefCast podcasts are sponsored
exclusively by Elanco Animal Health, hosted by Ned Arthur of Truffle Media Networks and made available free to
listeners. -Drovers Alert, Thursday, October 25, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 43.
THANKSGIVING
We at the DeSoto County Extension Office wish you and your family a Happy Thanksgiving. We have much to be
thankful for in this country. For me, I have been very thankful to have been your County Ag Agent for 28 plus years.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








MARKET INFORMATION
October 29, 2007

10/27/07 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 92.41 93.02 89.38
Live Heifer 92.63 93.46 89.70
Dressed Steer 142.86 144.17 139.69
Dressed Heifer 143.75 144.98 140.36
htto://www.ams.usda.aovlmnreoortsllm ctl50.txt

10/27/07 Last Week Last Year
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate) (Actual)
Slaughter 670,000 674,000 649,000
Live Weights 1301 1298 1292
Dressed Weights 793 792 784
Beef Production (M. of Pounds) 529.8 532.2 506.8
htto:/lwww.ams.usda.aovlmnreoortslSJ LS712.txt


10/12/07


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 2.64% 2.42%
Choice 52.90% 51.74%
Select 35.38% 35.42%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


Mid-Month Futures Based Price Forecasts
700-800 Lb. Feeder Ste, E Dodge City, KS


------------


U


3.01%
51.19%
36.96%


Weekly F.I. Steer Dressed Weight


III III K t .1 1 1 1 II II II I


I


0: 0224 TC4,4 D:2 I7/11 09!38 1W'7? 11
WekEndfna


,5U DF *L6gB


Weekly Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread
25
23 2006
21 2007
17
1 --55 r g
s
13
1,




01/05 02/16 03/30 05/11 06/22 08/03 09/14 10/26 12/07
Week Ending Date
KSU Dept. of Ag Econ
Source: USDA &James Mintert, K- StateAg. Economics www.agmanager.info


Choice/Select Spread
10/30/07
$12.37/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M_XB403.TXT




Kansas Combined Auction (Dodge City, Pratt, & Salina)
Weekly Weighted Average 500-600 Lb. Steer Prices
145
140 --- ---------------------------------------------_____ ____ ____
135
130 .... .
125
120
115
110
1005
1 1 11 1 1 1 1i111 11 I 111 [111111 1
01/05 02/16 03/30 05/11 06/22 0803 09/14 10/26 12/07
Week Ending Date


ISU DepL of Ag Econ


The summary below reflects the week ending October 19, 2007 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, October 23, 2007.


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.


TX 28,600 $112.67


$102.82 $97.89 $102.55 $103.62 $104.15


AL 14,500 $111-121 S100-110 $96-101


TN 11,400 $107.26

FL 11,400 $96-111


GA 8,400


$98-106 $90-100


$100.54 $97.28 $93.51


$90.82


$86.30


$87-103 $87-92 $87-104 $84-102 $78-90


$97-115 $92-111 $90-98 $85-101 $84-96 $80-90.50


CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 11 to 12 cents higher from 4.13-4.20 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 16 to 19 cents higher at 3.75 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 24 to 27 cents higher
from 3.68-3.70 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 20 to 29 cents higher from 3.54z 3.86 z per bushel.
Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 20 to 21 cents higher from 3.69 /2-3.73 z per bushel.
Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn rail was 30 cents higher at 3.59 z per bushel.
Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday October 26, 2007,
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ GR851.txt


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


Calf Weight


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FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2007 http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edul
1sT COLUMN IS 2007--2 COLUMN IS 2006--3R COLUMN IS 2005.
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 2.28" 5.04" 5.42" 5.57" 4.56" 1.46" 31.96"
0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 0.81" 2.13" 33.06"
9.71" 8.73" 5.86" 4.03" 8.78" 3.78" 0.11" NA
Currently we are 1.84" ahead of last year.
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES AT THE EXTENSION
OFFICE-FIRST COLUMN IS THE HIGH & 2ND COLUMN IS THE LOW
86.60 86.50 86.30 90.50 89.00 97.50 95.40 97.10 94.20 92.20 0 0
33.30 32.60 39.50 43.90 53.00 63.20 69.30 69.80 67.80 63.60 0 0
BOILED PEANUTS WHIP OTHER PEANUTS
Oct. 26, 2007 -- Study: Boiled Peanuts Are Richer in Antioxidants Than Raw or Roasted Peanuts--Boiled peanuts may
be the cream of the crop, besting raw peanuts or roasted peanuts in terms of nutrition. That news comes from food
scientists in Alabama, who ought to know about boiled peanuts, which are a Southern snack. The researchers -- i lio
included graduate student Yvonne Chukwumah and Lloyd Walker, PhD, of Alabama A&M University -- bought
peanuts at a grocery store. Their shopping list included raw Virginia peanuts in the shell, raw peanut kernels, and
commercially boiled peanuts. The scientists boiled the raw peanuts for four hours while the peanuts were still in their
shell. They also dry-roasted raw peanut kernels and roasted other raw peanut kernels in oil. Next, the scientists made
an extract from each batch of peanuts. Lab tests on the peanut extracts show that boiled peanuts had higher levels of
antioxidants than the raw and roasted peanuts. Antioxidants, which come in many forms and are found in plants, may
help prevent cancer, heart disease, and other chronic conditions, note the researchers. The commercially boiled peanuts
were a bit higher in a certain antioxidant than the boiled peanuts brewed by the scientists. When peanuts are boiled in
their shell, the peanut kernel absorbs antioxidants that are in the peanut shells and skins. That can't happen with
shelled, skinned peanut kernels, the researchers note. Their findings appear in the Journal of Agricultural and Food
Chemistry.-Web MD, Tuesday, October 30, 2007. --By Miranda Hitti WebMD Medical News--Reviewed by Louise
Chang, MD-Note: This is an article that has nothing to do with cattle but I thought you would find interesting. Jim

Beef Management Calendar

November/December

Cut Hay. lCheck dustbags, oilers, etc.

Heavily graze pastures to be interplanted to ryegrass. Check pastures and hay fields for armyworms.

Check mineral feeder. Observe cows daily to detect calving difficulty.

Wean calves and cull Cow Herd. Check for external parasites, especially lice & treat.
Watch condition of cow herd and supplement if necessary. Determine bull replacement needs, develop selection
Post calving cows have the highest nutritional requirements criteria, and start checking availability of quality
in the first 82 days. I animals.

Plant cool season Ryegrass and small grains. IPlant cool season legumes.

Calve in well drained pastures. ISurvey pastures for poisonous plants.
Implement bull conditioning program for the breeding Get breeding soundness exams on bull battery so you
season. b have time to find replacements this fall.
SENATE AG COMMITTEE INCLUDED PACKER OWNERSHIP BAN IN FARM BILL
Last week, the Senate Agriculture Committee included language that would place a ban on packer ownership of
livestock in the farm bill. The amendment would prohibit packers from owning or feeding livestock directly, except for
14 days before slaughter. The National Cattlemen's Beef Association opposes this and other measures that were included
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.






in the Senate version of the farm bill. All livestock producers should be greatly concerned about the potential damage a
ban on packer ownership will do to our industries. NCBA says it has opposed legislation that would "alter the
competitive structure of the cattle industry or limit cattlemen's marketing options." This legislation would certainly do
that. At this point, cattle industry lobbyists don't believe they have the votes to stop the ban on packer ownership when
the bill hits the floor of the Senate. But they haven't given up hope, and it's not too late for you to voice your opinion.
Whether or not the ban remains in the farm bill will be determined when the House and Senate conference on the bill.
- Greg Henderson, Drovers editor-Drovers Alert, Thursday, November 1, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 44.
BEEF INDUSTRY RESPONDS TO CANCER REPORT
The beef industry has spent months preparing for the release of a report by the American Institute for Cancer Research
that links eating red meat to cancer. While most of the report focuses on the roles that obesity and a sedentary lifestyle
play in causing cancer, it also makes a recommendation that people reduce the amount of red meat, especially processed
meats, in the diet to less than 18 ounces a week. -Drovers Alert, Thursday, November 1, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 44.
FSIS ISSUES UPDATE ON E. COLI INVESTIGATION
A defunct Canadian meatpacker is "a likely source" of beef that caused an outbreak of foodborne illnesses in the United
States and Canada, according to USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service. Nearly 100 illnesses have been reported
due to the E. coli 0157:H7 bacteria in the two nations. FSIS said a comparison of "DNA fingerprints" of beef samples
pointed to Ranchers Beef Ltd., of Balzac, Alberta. The Food Safety and Inspection Service directed U.S. food makers not
to use boneless beef "trim" from Ranchers Beef and to hold all raw products made from it until both nations complete
the investigation. FSIS delisted Ranchers Beef as an importer on Oct. 20. -Drovers Alert, Thursday, November 1, 2007
Vol. 9, Issue 44. So
"VERY WARM" WINTER FORECAST FOR MUCH OF U.S. 1 o40
Expect a very warm winter across much of the U.S., with only the Northwest receiving average or above 1 30
average cold and snow. That lack of precipitation could be problematic for the drought-stricken South, 8
however. That's the 2007-08 winter forecast from Joe Bastardi, www.AccuWeather.com chief long-range 20
forecaster. "November into December and March and April will be closest to what we consider winter 1
weather, with the chance of cold and snowy conditions. But once we're into the heart of winter, from : l
mid and late December into February, we may see one of the top-10 warmest winters ever recorded for the southeastern
U.S.," Bastardi says, adding that the core of the warm weather will be centered over the Tennessee Valley and the
Carolinas. In fact, the 2007-08 winter may be as warm as the winters of 1998-99 and 2001-02, both warmer-than-
average seasons. "More than 75% of the days this winter may have temperatures above normal in most of the nation,
southeast of a line that runs from the Great Lakes to the Southwest. Only the Pacific Northwest should experience
cooler-than-normal temperatures," Bastardi says. AccuWeather.com believes that the combination of what may be a
top-five La Nifia event combined with a cycle of warming water temperatures in the Atlantic are the key signals to the
coming winter season.---Cow-Calf Weekly, October 26, 2007.
FALL RYEGRASS VARIETIES
Ryegrass is a valuable winter and spring grazing crop for use on flatwood soils or the heavier sandy loam soils in
Florida. Ryegrass may be seeded alone or with a small grain on a prepared seedbed or over-seeded onto permanent
grass pastures. After broadcasting or drilling the seed, be sure to use a roller or culti-packer. The use of a roller will
help seal in the moisture and help insure a good stand.

Recommended varieties (by maturity) are:
Mid to late: Florlina, Surrey II, Jackson and TAM 90
Late: Jumbo, Prine, Big Daddy and Passeral Plus

Plant 20-30 pounds per acre at a depth of 0- inch. Prior to planting, either graze or burn bahiagrass pastures and then
either chop or lightly disc the Bahia. Target about November 15th as the planting date for the ryegrass. If we plant too
early, we will have too much competition from the Bahia and can also have disease problems.



SI UNIVERSITY of
FIFLORIDA James F. Selph
The Foundation for The Gator Nation DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock & Forages

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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