Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: August 2007
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00027
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA


IFAS EXTENSION


DeSoto County
Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266


August 2007 / Volume 29 Number 8 d
3rd Annual/Quail/Dove
CALENDAR OF EVENTS Short Course--October 19,
2007-Mark your Calendar
August for October 19th


16 Beef Quality Assurance Certification, 10:00 AM-4:00 PM, Highlands Agri-Civic Center,
Sebring, Contact Lindsey Fielder, Extension Agent I, 863-402-6540 for Details.
September
5-6 Advanced Pasture Management School, Turner Center Exhibit Hall on the 5th, 8:00 AM -3:30
PM and Ona Research Station on the 6th, 8:45 AM-4:00 PM.
October
4-5 2nd Annual Florida Deer and Turkey Short Course, UF/IFAS North Florida Research and
Education Center, Quincy, FL
10-12 Florida Farm Bureau Annual Convention, Daytona Beach Hilton, Daytona Beach, FL
11 Pasture Weed Field Day, Ona Range Cattle Research Center, 8:30 AM 1:30 PM
11 DeSoto/Charlotte Farm Bureau Annual Meeting, DeSoto Middle School Cafeteria, 6:30 PM,
Arcadia, FL
16-18 Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition, Moultrie, GA
19 3r" Annual Florida Quail/Dove Short Course, Turner Center, Arcadia, FL, 7:30AM-5:00PM
25 DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association Annual Fall Meeting, Turner Center Exhibit Hall, 7:00
PM, Arcadia, FL.
PASTURE WEED MANAGEMENT
When we think of pasture weed management at this time of the year, we oftcin ill ink ol
controlling Dogfennel. The biggest mistake made is being late with our application of l
the herbicide. By that I mean that we should be applying a herbicide to the Doleii'nl '
when they are approximately 12 to 18 inches in height. At that height, the irconiniildcd d 4
herbicide is Weedmaster at 2-3 pints per acre. Weedmaster is a combination ol 2
chemicals, 2,4-D and Dicamba. For control of larger dogfennel that has reached
approximately 24 to 36 inches in height the IFAS recommendation is to use 3 piint of
PastureGard per acre. PastureGard is a combination of triclopyr (Remedy) and/
fluroxypyr (Vista). A 3rd option is the use of Forefront at 2-2.6 pints per acre. The 7 T r-t / T,
addition of 8 oz. of Vista to 2 pints of Forefront will improve the Dogfennel control to greater than 90%.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.









MARKET INFORMATION
August 6, 2007

8/4/07 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 91.97 90.63 80.52
Live Heifer 92.04 90.80 80.60
Dressed Steer 144.69 141.39 128.04
Dressed Heifer 144.99 141.66 128.09
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/lm ctl50.txt


BEEF PRODUCTION
Slaughter
Live Weights
Dressed Weights
Beef Production (M. of Pounds)


8/4/07
(Estimate)
671,000
1270
781
522.3


htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/SJ LS712.txt


7/20/07


Last Week
(Estimate)
668,000
1265
778
517.9


Last Year
(Actual)
629,000
1273
780
488.9


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 2.16% 2.04%
Choice 53.24% 53.74%
Select 35.96% 37.23%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


5 Area Weekly Live Steer Price


- 2007 2006 ......5yravg


U


051
840
WI~




77'
10


2.56%
52.28%
37.72%


Weekly F.I. Steer Dressed Weight



I I

XIli I l I II .
I i '-I! iH 111*II I
I. Ii i li', II I I I _____:


01/06 02/24 04/14 06/02 07/21
Week Endirg
Source: USDA&S James M tert K-Stale Eeononmic


D9/08 10127 12/15
5SU D.pt of Ag E-ic
000 ilaomn&Ow~hr


Weekly Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread
25
23 -.ZO. ---
21
19
S15
13 Ibu I
l3 II I L ---- --I-I I, ,I

7

1 II1-11-'1-1111111111I-III1111111-1I ------
01/05 02/16 03/30 05/11 06/22 08/03 09/14 10/26 12/07
WeLk Fnding Date
KSU Dept. of Ag ECon
Source: USDA & ames Mintert. K-StateAg Economics wwv.agmanagerinmo

Choice/Select Spread
08/07/07

$4.98/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M XB403.TXT


Kansas Combined Auction (Dodge City, Pratt, & Salina)
Weekly Weighted Average 500-600 Lb. Steer Prices
145



105 -----
140
135
5125
120I T


95 .... .. .. II11111 .,11
95
01/05 02/16 03/30 05/11 06/22 08/03 09/14 10/26 12/07
Weea Ending Date
KSU Dept. of Ag Econ
Source: USDA & James Mtntet, K-State Ag- Economics wagmanager info


-i -
The summary below reflects the week ending August 7, 2007 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, August 3, 2007.



C'.ill'\ eri011 5;1111-5511ll I (II i-(%5.ll 01 -51ll 5III-55. III% 0 i-05 III%. f -5I-


STX 118,500 $120.38 |$114.41 |$111.46

AL 12,200 $118-123 $107-1153 $101-1085

TN 10,700 $117.49 $119.99 $105.37

FL 8,000 $102-116 $96-111 $91-106


GA 18,900

CORN:


$103-123 IS99-116 IS90-108.50


$113.72 $108.93 $109.21

$106-1151 $102-1103 96-101

$108.57 $103.89 $96.59

$98-107 $93-106 $96-99

$97-114 $S92-107 I$81-97


Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 6 to 13 cents higher from 3.67-3.78 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 10 to 11 cents higher at 3.24 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 8 cents higher from
3.10-3.12 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 14 to 16 cents higher from 3.02-3.31 per bushel. Toledo
US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 6 to 9 cents higher from 3.26-3.28 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn rail
was 37 cents lower at 2.89 per bushel.
Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday August 3, 2007,
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ_GR851.txt

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







SECOND CASE OF FMD CONFIRMED IN ENGLAND
Officials in England have confirmed a case of foot and mouth disease in a second cattle herd within the 6-mile
quarantine area set up after the first case appeared last week. According to news reports, investigators have confirmed
that the strain of the virus is the same as one used in a nearby laboratory. According to a report in the English
newspaper The Guardian, officials believe human error might have resulted in a person or vehicle introducing the virus
to the affected farm, rather than airborne dispersal from the laboratory. British officials remain hopeful that rapid
containment and culling of potentially infected herds will prevent a widespread outbreak of FMD. -Drovers Alert,
Thursday, August 9, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 32.
TYSON OFFERS CAB PREMIUMS FOR ANGUSSOURCE-TAGGED CALVES
Tyson Fresh Meats, the nation's largest beef packer, now offers Certified Angus Beef (CAB) brand premiums for
AngusSource-tagged calves that qualify. The Tyson Fresh Meats plant in Lexington, Neb., rails off these Angus-based
cattle for certified Angus program evaluation by the USDA. Historically, "Angus-type" was defined only by a
phenotypic, 51% black-hided criterion. In April, Tyson became the second packing company to accept this form of
genotypic verification as well. Tyson Fresh Meats now offers Certified Angus Beef (CAB) brand premiums for
AngusSource-tagged calves that qualify. "This is great news for commercial producers who are working to raise high-
quality calves, but color kept them from getting any CAB premiums," says Mark McCully, Certified Angus Beef LLC
(CAB). "Now that we know their genetics, they'll also be considered for the brand." "Adding another packer just
increases the scope of this opportunity," the CAB supply development director says. AngusSource is a leader in the
Angus genetic-, source- and age-verified arena. The USDA Process Verified Program (PVP) requires calves to be at least
50% Angus-sired by a registered and transferred Angus bull. Cattle are enrolled at the ranch of origin and group age
is documented as the month, day and year of birth for the firstborn calf in the group. Since 1995 packers have paid
producers more than $200 million in value-based grid premiums for cattle accepted into the brand. -Drovers Alert,
Thursday, August 9, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 32.
CROPS LOOKING GOOD
Although conditions can vary widely between locations, current surveys indicate a big U.S. crop of corn, soybeans and
sorghum, and pasture conditions generally have improved over last year. This week's USDA Crop Progress report rates
56 percent of the nation's corn as good to excellent and 18 percent at poor or very poor, numbers that mirror those from
the same time last year. The report rates soybeans at 58 percent good or excellent compared with 53 percent last year.
Sorghum, at 68 percent good or excellent, looks much better than last year when just 31 percent of the crop fit those
categories. Drought has severely damaged pasture and range conditions in some areas, particularly in the Southeast and
Upper Midwest. Nationally though, 67 percent of pasture and range rates at least fair, compared with 50 percent last
year, and 33 percent rate poor or very poor, compared with 50 percent last year. -Drovers Alert, Thursday, August 9,
2007 Vol. 9, Issue 32.
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2007 http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/. 1ST COLUMN
IS 2007-2" COLUMN IS 2006-3D COLUMN IS 2005.
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 2.28" 5.04"* 5.42" 20.37"
0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 0.81" 2.13" 33.06"
9.71" 8.73" 5.86" 4.03" 8.78" 3.78" 0.11" NA
*1 have corrected the June entry and have adjusted the annual total. Currently we are 5.06" ahead of last year.
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES AT THE EXTENSION
OFFICE-FIRST COLUMN IS THE HIGH & 2ND COLUMN IS THE LOW
86.60 86.50 86.30 90.50 89.00 97.50 95.40
33.30 32.60 39.50 43.90 53.00 63.20 69.30
OKLAHOMA CATTLEMAN ACQUITTED OF ANIMAL CRUELTY
A Webbers Falls, OK, cattleman charged with animal cruelty after he shot and killed two hunting dogs chasing his cattle
was acquitted after just an hour of jury deliberation. MuskogeePhoenix.com reports that James Yang argued a legal
right to protect his property from the dogs, which a group of coyote hunters had let run loose across the countryside the
night of March 25, 2006. Evidence presented during the three-day trial showed Yang, a Laotian immigrant who owns
an egg- and cattle-production operation in southeastern Muskogee County, had previous problems with dogs harming
his livestock, the article says. -Cow Calf Weekly, August 3, 2007.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.









I Beef Management Calendar

August/September
Control Smutgrass with Velpar if there is adequate soil Check dustbags, oilers, etc.
moisture.

Treat for liver flukes as close to August 15th as possible. Check pastures and hay fields for armyworms.

Check mineral feeder. IRevaccinate calves at weaning for blackleg.

Wean calves and cull Cow Herd. Pregnancy check cows.

If cattle grubs were found on cattle last winter or heel flies Determine bull replacement needs, develop selection
were observed in the pasture, treat for cattle grubs in criteria, and start checking availability of quality
August. Ilanimals.

Heavily graze pastures to be inter-planted to cool season Pregnancy test and cull open heifers from replacement
pastures. herd.
USDA KICKS IN $35 MILLION IN BOVINE TB FUNDING
USDA is providing an additional $35 million in emergency funding for the bovine tuberculosis (TB) eradication
program. This is in addition to $2 million in emergency funding already available for TB control and eradication.
Bruce Knight, USDA Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs, says the funding "will support our
efforts to protect the health of the national herd and prevent disease spread." Currently all states are designated
accredited-free for TB, except Minnesota and portions of Michigan and New Mexico. Bovine TB is a contagious and
infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis. It affects cattle, bison, deer, elk, goats and other warm-blooded species
and can be fatal. The disease can only be transmitted to humans through direct contact with infected animals or
consumption of raw milk. It isn't transmitted through consumption of pasteurized milk. TB outbreaks can compromise
international and domestic trade in U.S. animals and animal products. -Cow Calf Weekly, August 3, 2007.
ADVANCED PASTURE MANAGEMENT SCHOOL
Make your plans to attend the Advanced Pasture Management School to be held here at the Turner Center Exhibit Hall
on September 5-6, 2007. This 2 day school costs $60.00 if registered by August 17, 2007, after that date the cost is
$80.00. See the information on pages 5 and 6 of this newsletter for more details.
ARE YOU READY FOR THE BREEDING SEASON-SIRE POWER
Let's start with a herd of 100 brood cows. You would normally have 4 bulls. Let's also say that the bulls vary in age
from 3 to 8 years. You will put your bulls out the first Monday after Christmas. How many calves do you expect to be
produced by the 100 cows and 4 bulls? The first calves will begin around October 10th. Can you look at a bull and
decide if he is a good breeder just from an external view point? Back to the 4 bulls!! Research has shown that if you are
using say 4 bulls, typically one may sire as many as 70-80% of the calves. Typically that bull will be your older more
dominant bull. The older bull is probably more likely to have degraded semen counts or worst yet to be totally infertile.
What should we do if we find ourselves in such a circumstance? First of all, we definitely want to avoid a calf crop of 30-
40%. Start by conducting a Breeding Soundness Exam on all 4 bulls prior to the breeding season. Bulls should be
examined at least 60 days prior to the start of the breeding season. This allows for re-testing and replacement of bulls
failing the examination. A BSE consists of four basic steps:
M Visual assessment of the feet, legs, eyes, teeth and external genitalia;
S Palpation of the accessory sex glands (prostate and seminal vesicles);
M Measurement of the scrotum as well as palpation of the testis and epididymis;
M Collection and microscopic evaluation of a semen sample.
If you are in a multiple sire situation, try to use bulls of the same age. When buying replacement bulls, also try to buy
half-brothers. Doing this will increase the uniformity of the resulting calves.
I r I UNIVERSITY o
UF FLORIDA James F. Selph
The Foundation for The Cator Nation DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock & Forages
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.





GRAZING MANAGEMENT SCHOOL


This course is sponsored by The South Florida Beef-
Forage Program of the University of Florida,
Cooperative Extension Service. It is conducted with
the volunteer assistance of area livestock producers
and Allied Industries. It represents separation of the
original Forage and Pasture Management School into
subject components that can be taught in a couple of
days. It is part of a continuing multi-County
education effort to help South-Central Florida
producers raise and market high quality beef cattle,
per cow, per acre, profitably.

Grazing management is the manipulation of livestock
grazing to obtain defined outputs of livestock
products. It involves careful management of both
pasture and livestock resources to meet desired
objectives. This new course is offered in a two day
session. The theories of grazing management
concepts and methods are discussed in a classroom
setting during the first day. Concepts taught are
supported by practical applications in the field during
the second day tour to selected ranches in the area
and the Ona Range Cattle Research and Education
Center.

This is the second annual "Grazing Management
School" and we encourage you and your personnel to
attend. Registration fee for this school is $ 60.00 if
returned by August 17, 2007, and $ 80.00 if returned
after August 17, 2007. Registration forms can be
obtained at one of the Extension offices in The South
Florida Beef-Forage Program area, or by contacting one
of the participating Extension Agents listed on the back
of this brochure. Registrations should be returned to,
and checks made payable to:

South Florida Beef-Forage Program
c/o Christa Carlson, Treasurer
1303 17th Street West
Palmetto, FL 34221


AGENDA

ADVANCED GRAZING MANAGEMENT SCHOOL

AM Moderator: Jim Selph

8:15 8:30 Introduction
Jim Selph

8:30 9:10 Soil Fertility for Forages, Pastures,
and Hay
Dr. Maria Silveira

9:10 9:50 Forage Varieties for Grazing
Systems
Pat Hogue

9:50 10:00 Break

10:00 10:45 Pasture Establishment &
Renovation
Lockie Gary

10:45 11:30 Weed Control in Varying Grazing
Systems, Steffany Dragon,
Dr. Brent Sellers

11:30- 12:30 Lunch

12:30 1:10 Conserved Forage Options (hay,
haylage, silage), Nutritive Value
and Dry Matter Losses
Jim Selph

PM Moderator: Lindsey Fielder

1:10 1:50 Grazing Management Systems
Dr. Lynn Sollenberger

1:50-2:00 Break

2:00 2:40 Matching Management Concept and
Systems to our Warm Season
Grasses and Legumes
Dr. Joao Vendramini


2:40 3:20 Understanding Forage Based N
Nutrition and Deficits in Forage
Quantity and Quality
Dr. John Arthington

3:20 3:30 Open Discussion with Presenters


Thursday, September 6, 2007

ALL DAY FIELD TOUR

Moderator: Glenn Schaibly


AM 8:45


Arrive at the Range Cattle Research
and Education Center (RCREC),
Ona


9:00 11:30 RCREC, Ona Ordinary
Rotational Grazing of Mulato
Brachiaria, Bahiagrass, Stargrass
and Limpograss: Effect of
Defoliation on Root System.
Dr. Joao Vendramini

11:30 12:30 Lunch

PM 12:30 4:00 Afternoon Programs To Be
Announced


Dates, times and locations are tentative and subject to change.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-
discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service,
University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


Wednesday, September 5, 2007








The South Florida Beef- Forage Program
Participating Extension Agents:


Desoto County

Glades County

Hardee County

Hendry County


Jim Selph


(863) 993-4846


T UNIVERSITY of
UFI FLORIDA
The Foundation for The Gator Nation


Shelley Humphries (863) 946-0244


Lockie Gary

Sonja Crawford
Glenn Schaibly


Highlands County Lindsey Fielder


(863) 773-2164

(863) 674-4092

(863) 402-6540


Hilsborough Co. Brent Broaddus (813) 744-5519

Manatee County Christa Carlson (941) 722-4524


Persons requiring special accommodations
per the Americans with Disabilities Act
should contact Jim Selph at (863) 993-4846 at
least (5) five working days prior to the
conference.


2007 GRAZING MANAGEMENT
SCHOOL


September 5 6, 2007

DeSoto County
Turner Center
Arcadia, FL


- .. 4 .


Okeechobee Co.


Pat Hogue
Pat Miller


(863) 763-6469


Polk County Bridget Carlisle (863) 519-8677


Collier County


Robert Halman (239) 353-4244


Participating Specialists:


S r'
~.4.


Range Cattle REC, Ona


Dr. John Arthington
Dr. Brent Sellers
Dr. Maria Silveira
Dr. Joao Vendramini


UF Animal Science Dept., GainesviHe Dr. Matt Hersom


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an
Equal Employment Affirmative Action Employer authorized
to provide research, educational information and other
services only to individuals and institutions that function
without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national
origin. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA, IFAS, FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.


DeSoto County Extension


Other Grazing Management School
Speakers:


UF Agronomy Dept.


And


Dr. Lynn Sollenberger
Forage Mgmt & Nutrition


The South Florida Beef-Forage Program
University of Florida
IFAS Extension


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-
discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service,
University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


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