Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089228/00026
 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: July 2007
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00026
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA IFAS EXTENSION



DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
July 2007 / Volume 29 Number 7
3rd Annual/Quail/Dove
CALENDAR OF EVENTS Short Course--October 19,
2007-Mark your Calendar
August for October 19th
11 Basic Pasture Management School, 8:30 AM-4:30 PM, Hardee Extension Office

16 Beef Quality Assurance Certification, 10:00 AM-4:00 PM, Highlands Agri-Civic Center,
Sebring, Contact Lindsey Fielder, Extension Agent I, 863-402-6540 for Details.
September
5-6 Advanced Pasture Management School, Turner Center Exhibit Hall on the 5th, 8:00 AM -3:30
PM and Ona Research Station on the 6th, 8:45 AM-4:00 PM.
October
4-5 2nd Annual Florida Deer and Turkey Short Course, UF/IFAS North Florida Research and
Education Center, Quincy, FL
19 3rd Annual Florida Quail/Dove Short Course, Turner Center, Arcadia, FL, 7:30AM-5:OOPM

COOL ISSUE RISES TO THE TOP
The American Meat Institute sent letters to 97 producer organizations last week advising them that their members may
soon hear from meatpackers about what they will require of their suppliers as part of mandatory country-of-origin
labeling. COOL is scheduled to go into effect Sept. 30, 2008. AMI says producers should be aware that cattle born this
year are likely to fall under the provisions of the law next year.
AMI and R-CALF have sparred over the COOL issue in recent weeks, with R-CALF claiming that AMI has attempted
to mislead Congress and consumers about the law. But while R-CALF is adamantly supporting the implementation of
COOL, it just as adamantly opposes an animal identification program. In a letter to House Agriculture Committee
Chairman Collin Peterson (D-Minn.), R-CALF urged him to "not tie any sort of animal identification program to the
country-of-origin labeling law." Greg Henderson, Drovers editor -Drovers Alert, Thursday, June 28, 2007 Vol. 9,
Issue 26.
ETHANOL IMPACTS ON-FEED NUMBERS; NORTH BENEFITS
Everyone predicted that higher corn would result in higher placement weights, and that it would shift the relative
competitive advantage of the various feeding regions. The latest Cattle-On-Feed Report reflects those very changes.
Placements of cattle weighing over 700 lbs. were up over 20% compared to a year ago. This data may be a little biased as
we're comparing to a very small placement number of a year ago. In addition, last year's placements were drought-
driven and had served to reduce weights. In fact, the placement number, which was up 13% compared to a year ago,
was still 2.5% below the five-year average. Placements in states like Kansas and Texas were down significantly in this
latest report, while placements in Iowa and Nebraska were up. A superior basis on corn, and access to ethanol by
products, is likely to keep this trend intact for the foreseeable future. -- Troy Marshall-Cow Calf Weekly, June 29, 2007
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.









MARKET INFORMATION

June 25, 2007

6/23/07 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 86.62 89.69 83.22
Live Heifer 86.74 89.68 83.17
Dressed Steer 136.88 140.55 129.67
Dressed Heifer 136.92 140.73 130.21
htto://www.ams.usda.aovlmnreoortsllm ctl50.txt

6/23/07 Last Week Last Year
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate) (Actual)
Slaughter 698,000 716,000 709,000
Live Weights 1241 1237 1266
Dressed Weights 759 756 778
Beef Production (M. of Pounds) 527.9 539.3 549.3
htto:/lwww.ams.usda.aovlmnreoortslSJ LS712.txt


6/08/07


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 1.99% 1.88%
Choice 51.83% 51.60%
Select 37.36% 36.80%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


5 Area Weekly Live Steer Price


-- --------------- ----
80 -----

2 ------ ---- ------- ----

- 2007 2006 -.... 5 yravg


U


2.32%
50.27%
40.39%


Weekly F.I. Steer Dressed Weight



.


11ra1


.
01/06 02/24 04/14 06/02 07/21 09/08 10/27 12/15
Week Endinm
KSU Dept. ofAg Eon
Source: USDA & a mes Min ert. K-State Ag. Ecanoam k wvw.agmanager.inio


Weekly Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread
25
23 L 4Wnnf
21 ,- -
19
"17 -

'13
9 ,- ----------...*---- ------ *

7
5
13 ,iI I I------- -



01/05 02/16 03/30 05/11 06/22 D8/03 09/14 10/26 12/07
Week Ending Date
KSU Dept. ofAg Econ
Source: USDA&James Iintert, K-State Ag. Economics www.agmanager.info


Choice/Select Spread

06/29/07

$6.66/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M_XB403.TXT




Kansas Combined Auction (Dodge City, Pratt, & Salina)
V'.- I'l W hi *.i, .: ~r 500-600 Lb. Steer Prices
145
140
135
-130
S125
120
115
L11o
S10
100
95
01/05 02/16 03/30 05/11 06/22 08/03 09/14 10/26 1207
Week Ending Date
KSU Dept. ofAg Econ
Source. USDA& James Mintert, K-State Ag. Economics www.agmanager.info


The summary below reflects the week ending June 22, 2007 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to 650-
lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, June 26, 2007.


Calf Weight


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.


TX 12,700 $112.55 $101.80 $106.26 $106.90 $102.74 $100.72


IAL 115,100 $108-116 $101-108 $97-102

TN 13,500 $108.75 $103.77 $97.78

FL 5,400 $99-112 $89-103 $90-98


$98-107 $95-99


$97.24


$92.97


$88-100 $89-91


GA 8,100


$100-119.50 $91-107


$85-100 $90-106 $85-101 $82-88


CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 33 to 43 cents lower from 4.57-4.68 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 45 cents lower at 3.32-3.35 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 43 to 45 cents lower at
3.36 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 43 % to 45 cents lower from 3.22 /2-3.44 per bushel. Toledo US
No 2 rail Yellow corn was 43 z to 47 %cents lower from 3.36 /2-3.44 z per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn
rail was 36 cents lower at 3.11 per bushel.
Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday June 29, 2007,
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ_GR851.txt

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


$82-86

I$87.73


M ill1 11 11111111111 1 11111 11 1111


Ir--.







KOREA LIFTS SUSPENSION OF SIX U.S. PACKING PLANTS
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns announced Monday that the government of South Korea has lifted the suspension
of six U.S. meat plants. "We are pleased that Korea will allow the resumption of shipments from these plants," Johanns
says. "USDA has taken action to ensure compliance with Korean import requirements here in the United States, and
Korea recognized these efforts. Despite some start-up problems, beef exports to Korea are rapidly increasing." Johanns
also announced that a U.S. delegation is in Japan to begin technical discussions, the next step in the process to more fully
open the Japanese market to U.S. beef and beef products. -Drovers Alert, Thursday, June 28, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 26.
JAPAN, UNITED STATES GRAPPLE AGAIN WITH BEEF DISPUTE
On Wednesday, Japan and the United States resumed trade talks as U.S. officials continued to demand that the
Japanese ease restrictions on US beef imports. During the two-day working-level talks, the two countries will discuss a
report on US beef published last month by an international farm animal trade body that said the meat posed little risk to
health. -Drovers Alert, Thursday, June 28, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 26.
LOOK FOR INCREASED LOSS OF MID-SIZED FEEDLOTS
Expect major and accelerated consolidation in the U.S. cattle-feeding sector in the next 5-10 years, says economist and
consultant Bill Helming of Olathe, KS. Most at risk, he says, are middle-sized feedyards (5,000- to 25,000-head capacity),
which will find it difficult to compete for capital and against the efficiencies of larger feedyards (50,000 to 100,000 head)
in the wake of rising input costs driven by the ethanol-production surge and over-capacity in the feeding sector. Cattle-
Fax estimates that in 2005, the largest 2% of feedlot operators in the U.S. controlled 85% of the market. Helming
estimates the largest 1% could control 75% of the market within the next 10 years due to accelerating consolidation.
The livestock industry has always had to contend with surges in corn price, but it was always weather-related issues that
temporarily drove grain prices higher, Helming says. This time, the grain-price situation is demand-driven by the
ethanol juggernaut and there will be no reprieve in the short term. The result, Helming tells BEEF, is the consolidation
will largely be at the expense of mid-sized (5,000- to 25,000-head capacity) feedyards forced to merge, quit or sell out in
the face of intense competition for cattle, capital and efficiency. "With elevated inputs for energy, labor costs and grain,
and underutilized capacity, there's a real onus on feedyard operators to try of figure out how to become more efficient.
The problem is that the excess-capacity situation in U.S. cattle feeding, if anything, will only get worse, given the grain
situation and where we are in the cattle cycle. That further accentuates the driving force to consolidate. Someone has to
go out of business," Helming says.-Cow Calf Weekly, June 29, 2007.
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2007 http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/. 1ST COLUMN
IS 2007-2" COLUMN IS 2006-3R COLUMN IS 2005.
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 2.28" 4.19" 14.10"
0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 0.81" 2.13" 33.06"
9.71" 8.73" 5.86" 4.03" 8.78" 3.78" 0.11" NA
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES AT THE EXTENSION
OFFICE-FIRST COLUMN IS THE HIGH & 2ND COLUMN IS THE LOW
86.60 86.50 86.30 90.50 89.00 97.50
33.30 32.60 39.50 43.90 53.00 63.20
COCCIDIOSIS
I asked Dr. Max Irsik for information that I could put in this newsletter on Coccidiosis. Dr. Irsik is the Beef Cattle
Extension Veterinarian of the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. The following is what he sent me:
A colleague of mine recently purchases some bred Angus heifers, which subsequently calved with the calves developing
coccidiosis. Her questions to me were: How should she treat the animals? And how long will the organism survive on
her farm? Her observations were, she had beautiful calves when born which were visibly damaged by the parasite, and
by the time she knew what the problem was it was too late to stop the weight loss and bloody scours. In brief this is an
overview of Coccidiosis in beef cattle:
Coccidians are protozoal parasites that are host specific, transmitted by the fecal-oral route and cause diarrhea.
Significant species that cause disease in cattle belong to the genus Eimeria. Young animals are more susceptible to
clinical disease than older cattle. Coccidiosis is frequently observed in confined conditions; however, the disease can
occur on pasture. The disease can occur any time of the year but is more prevalent during winter months, even in
confinement operations. Animals may pass oocysts in their feces without clinical disease, therefore, a diagnosis of
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







coccidiosis is based on clinical signs and ruling out other diseases.
Management procedures that reduce stress and prevent contamination of feed and water are important in preventing
coccidiosis. Effective control programs also commonly incorporate the use of medicated feed or water. Drugs commonly
used for coccidiosis control and prevention programs include monensin, lasalocid, decoquinate and amprolium. When
clinical disease is present, amprolium, sulfonamides and management changes are used to control the disease.
Another clinical syndrome attributed to infection with coccidia is nervous coccidiosis (also called nervous enteritis).
Affected animals may show, muscular twitching, irregular eye movements, an arched back, paddling, recumbency,
seizures and often die. The exact mechanism that causes these neurological signs is unknown, but a neurotoxin or an
imbalance is suspected.
By experimentally challenging calves with coccidia, researchers have correlated clinical signs with time of infection.
Diarrhea with mucus was observed in infected calves on days 17 and 18 following inoculation, and dysentery and
fibrinous casts were observed on day 19. Immunity to one species of coccidian does not cross protect against another
species. The level of immunity following exposure may vary. Animals with partial immunity may not exhibit clinical
disease, however, infections can still occur. These individuals pass oocysts and, therefore, continually contaminate the
environment.
In conclusion, management programs that minimize stress, reduce environmental contamination and improve the
overall health of each individual animal through preventive health programs help minimize the impact of coccididiosis.
Several products are available for the control, prevention and treatment of bovine coccidiosis. Approved products are
efficacious. If animals exhibit clinical signs of coccidiosis, options for treatment are available, depending upon cost-
benefit, facilities and labor availability. Veterinarians and producers should be familiar with this disease and take
appropriate measures for prevention and treatment.

Beef Management Calendar

July/August
Control weeds in summer pastures. Check dustbags, oilers, etc.
Consider preconditioning calves before sale including Check pastures and hay fields for grubs, mole crickets,
vaccination for shipping fever and IBR at least 3 weeks and armyworms.
before sale. 11

Check mineral feeder. IRevaccinate calves at weaning for blackleg.

Wean calves and cull Cow Herd. Pregnancy check cows.
TEXAS RUSTLER PLEADS GUILTY
The suspect in the largest cattle theft case in Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association (TSCRA) history pled
out this week, agreeing to serve five years of state jail time and pay restitution for cattle theft. Jerome Heath Novak of
Angleton is also scheduled to plead out in four other cattle theft charges in the next several weeks.
Novak, a 28-year-old who grew up in a ranching family, rustled 289 cattle worth more than $289,000 over nine moths.
TSCRA Special Ranger Tommy Johnson said Novak knew how to work cattle and how to sell them with the least
amount of risk.
"He worked alone and took the stolen cattle to a leased pasture where he mixed them with his own cattle," Johnson said.
"He sold the unbranded cows over a period of a couple of months at several sale barns. Branded cows were kept on
pasture and allowed to calve out, then he sold the calves." -Cow Calf Weekly, June 29, 2007.






If UNIVERSITY of
UFFLORIDA
The Foundation for The Cator Nation James F. Selph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock & Forages
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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