Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089228/00025
 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: June 2007
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00025
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

nlDS6-07 ( PDF )


Full Text




UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA IFAS EXTENSION



DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
June 2007 / Volume 29 Number 6 d Annu
3rd Annual/Quail/Dove
CALENDAR OF EVENTS Short Course--October
e 19, 2007-Mark your
Calendar for that date.
18-19 FCA Cattlemen's College-Marco Island, Fl

19-21 Florida Cattlemen's Association Annual Convention & Allied Trade Show-Marco Island, Fl

August
11 Basic Pasture Management School, 8:30 AM-4:30 PM, Hardee Extension Office

September
5-6 Advanced Pasture Management School, Turner Center Exhibit Hall on the 5th and Ona
Research Station on the 6th.
WHAT'S THE VALUE OF EXPORTS TO U.S. CATTLEMEN?
Even at a limited level, the value of beef exports is evident. "Korea's renewed interest in U.S. beef has already generated
tremendous additional value," according to NCBA. And we're not talking chicken scratch, either. The recent sales to
South Korea, limited though they are in volume, are calculated to be worth between $40 and $48 million to the beef
industry. Wholesale prices on the three cuts exported to Korea -- chuck rolls, brisket and deboned short ribs -- have
risen recently and analysts say the reopening of the Korean market has added about $31/head to the value of fed cattle
sold the past 3-4 weeks. -Cow Calf Weekly, Burt Rutherford, May 25, 2007.
RESEARCH ON E. COLI 0157 VACCINE IN CATTLE
Kansas State University researchers are conducting a series of studies to test a vaccine, which may reduce the presence
of E. coli 0157 in feedlot cattle. E. coli 0157, a pathogen commonly found in the feces of beef cattle, can enter the food
chain during harvest and not only cause foodborne illnesses in humans, but can also have economic implications for
producers, said Nagaraja. The researchers, who are part of K-State Research and Extension, recently completed the
third study in a series of experiments, which included 60 feedlot calves that all tested positive for E. coli 0157. The
calves were divided into one of three treatment groups that each received different doses of the vaccine (Escherichia coli
0157 Siderophore Receptor Porin) on days zero and 21 of the eight-week experiment. Group one, which was the control
group, received a placebo vaccine; group two was administered two cubic centimeters (cc) of the vaccine; and group
three was given three cc. The study showed that the total prevalence of E. coli 0157 in cattle that received three cc of
the vaccine decreased by 15 percent when compared to cattle that received a placebo, said Nagaraja. The overall
prevalence for each treatment group was: 33.7 percent for the placebo group; 29.1 percent for group two which received
two cc of the vaccine; and 17.7 percent for group three which received three cc the highest dose administered. This
study was the third in a series of studies in which the first two also showed promising results. K-State will conduct
another study this summer in a feedlot setting and may look at the effects of different doses. -Drovers Alert, Thursday,
May 23, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 21.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.









MARKET INFORMATION

May 29, 2007

5/26/07 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 94.54 97.50 80.73
Live Heifer 94.63 97.63 80.87
Dressed Steer 150.53 154.44 126.46
Dressed Heifer 150.47 154.74 126.74
htto://www.ams.usda.aovlmnreoortsllm ctl50.txt

5/26/07 Last Week Last Year
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate) (Actual)
Slaughter 696,000 702,000 696,000
Live Weights 1229 1230 1249
Dressed Weights 747 747 765
Beef Production (M. of Pounds) 518.5 522.6 530.0
htto:/lwww.ams.usda.aovlmnrenortslSJ LS712.txt


5/12/07


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 2.02% 2.09%
Choice 50.06% 50.20%
Select 37.74% 37.95%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


2.23%
48.82%
41.30%


-----~-~- U


5 Area Weekly Live Steer 'rice
10500
100.00 -------
95.00 -------------
9000 ------------- --
85.00 -------------- -------
80.00 -----
7500 -
70.00
- 2007 2006 ...... 5yravg


Weekly F.I. Steer Dressed Weight
860








01/06 02/24 04/14 06102 07/21 09/08 10/27 12/15
Week Endinr-
Ku De.t, A. Econ
rce: USDa Ja mes M lntert, K-State Ag. Ec nomrcs www.agmanager.mlfc


Weekly Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread


17
15
13
11
9
7 o
5


I'll''


01/05 02/16 03/30 05/11 06/22 08103 09/14 10/26 12/07
Week Ending Date


Source: USDA& James Mintert, K-StateAg. Economics


KSU uept. ot Ag Econ
www.agmanager.info


Choice/Select Spread

05/29/07

$9.16/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M_XB403.TXT




Kansas Combined Auction (Dodge City, Pratt, & Salina)
14 I, o-i ]h hr-.j A.-, -r 500-600 Lb. Steer Prices
145
140
135
130
125
120
S115
~110
105
100
95
01/05 02/16 03/30 05/11 06/22 08/03 09/14 10/26 12/07
Week Ending Date
KSU Dept. of Ag Econ
Source: USDA& James intert, K-State Ag. Economics www.agmanager.info


The summary below reflects the week ending May 18, 2007 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to 650-
lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, May 22, 2007.


Calf Weight


T'V I1 rrt I


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.
$V 2hn


TX 17,600 $119.91 $114.16 $107.94 $113.89 $106.2
AL 12,900 $116-121 $109-114 $104-108 $102-112 $98-107.50 $85-95


ITN 19,300 $116.70 $107.35 $99.52

IFL 16,300 $101-115 $94-102 I90-93


GA 9,500

CORN:


$104.18 $97.58

$92-102 $90-96


$92.19

$80-90


$103-120 $96-112 $90-104 $95-109 $87-102 $80-94


Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 1 to 2 cents lower from 4.77-4.85 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 9 to 11 cents higher at 3.62 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 10 to 11 cents higher
at 3.63-3.64 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 3 z to 7 z cents higher from 3.56 /2-3.81 z per bushel.
Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 4 z to 6 z cents higher from 3.68 /2-3.71 z per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2
Yellow Corn rail was 6 z cents higher at 3.49 z per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review,
Friday May 25, 2007, http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ_GR851.txt



The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


r


~







FOOTROT IN CATTLE
As you can see in the annual rainfall chart below, we are quite below where we would like to be at this time of the year.
Soon we hopefully will see the summer rains start and with that we approach a time when Footrot in cattle can become
prevalent. Footrot is a highly contagious disease affecting the interdigital (between the toes) tissue of ruminants. It is
one of the most common causes of lameness in cattle and sheep and can result in serious economic loss. It is caused by a
combination of bacteria's, one of which inhabits the ruminant digestive system and can live in the soil for up to 10
months. The highest occurrence of Footrot will be during the wet season. Cuts, bruises, puncture wounds, or severe
abrasions of the foot will damage the skin in the interdigital space and predispose an animal to Footrot by allowing
bacteria to invade and multiply within the tissue. The bacteria cannot by themselves, gain entry to the skin and cause
foot rot.















CLINICAL SIGNS: You will first see lameness in one or more feet of an affected animal. This is often followed by
reddening of the interdigital tissue and swelling of the foot which will cause a spreading of the toes. The spreading of the
dewclaws is considered a classical sign and is due to the swelling. There will be a distinctive lesion such as above and a
foul odor.
TREATMENT: The affected foot should be cleaned and inspected for characteristic clinical signs and to rule out other
causes for the swelling and lameness such as, foreign bodies, infectious arthritis, or wounds caused by trauma.
Historically, an antiseptic and bandage were applied after cleaning and trimming the foot, but topical treatment and
bandaging are considered less important than systemic therapy. Prompt diagnosis and initiation of antimicrobial
therapy are essential to achieve a satisfactory response. The treatment of choice is parenteral (not in or through the
digestive system) antibiotics administered for three to five days. In commercial beef cattle that are difficult to handle,
feed additives such as chlortetracycline and oxytetracycline have been used for control and treatment of large numbers
of cattle with the disease. Although this is convenient, there is no feed-grade antimicrobials labeled for control or
treatment of foot rot. According to the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification (AMDUCA), extralabel use of feed
additives is prohibited in the United States. Readers are advised to seek advice from a veterinarian for specific
recommendations. In some severe cases where the infection has extended into deeper tissues of the foot, surgical
correction including amputation of the affected claw may be indicated. Recovered cattle can usually function well with
one claw.

FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2007 http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/.
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 2.28" 9.91"
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES AT THE EXTENSION
OFFICE-FIRST COLUMN IS THE HIGH & 2ND COLUMN IS THE LOW
86.60 86.50 86.30 90.50 89.00
33.30 32.60 39.50 43.90 53.00
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY CHILLING HOURS AT THE EXTENSION OFFICE
18.8 33.2 28.5 1.2 0.0 Last Month to Report to Chilling Hours till the Fall

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.









Beef Management Calendar

June/July

Last Date to Plant Sorghum-Sudan Grass Check dustbags, oilers, etc.

Check mineral feeder. Use at least 8% phosphorus in Check pastures and hay fields for grubs, mole crickets,
mineral and not over 2 'z to 1 calcium to phosphorus. Ispittlebugs and armyworms.

Get heifers vaccinated for brucellosis if not already done. Reimplant calves at 90 to 120 days with growth
Stimulant.
Watch for evidence of pinkeye and treat. Pregnancy check cows.

Control weeds in summer pastures. Plant warm season perennial pastures.

Make plans to attend the FCA Convention.

INFORMATION FROM THE 56th ANNUAL BEEF CATTLE SHORT COURSE
Weed Control-Establishment and Maintenance: Dr. Brent Sellers of the Ona Range Cattle Research Center
provided this information on the program. In the remaining space I will try to highlight some of his major points as it
relates to Bahiagrass establishment.
Weeds in pastures and rangeland cost ranchers in excess of $180 million annually in Florida by reducing forage yield,
lowering forage quality, and causing animal injury through toxicity or specialized plant organs (thorns and spines).
Effective weed management begins with a healthy pasture. No pre-emergence herbicides are currently available for
bahiagrass establishment. Therefore, post-emergence herbicides are the only option. However, no herbicides for
pastures should be applied to bahiagrass until at least three tillers are present or plants are at least five inches tall. At
that point in time, it can be assumed that all post-emergence herbicides labeled for bahiagrass are safe to apply.
The following herbicides can be safely applied to established bahiagrass:
2,4-D (2.0 to 4.0 pt/acre of 4 lb formulation) Annual broadleaf weeds should be treated soon after emergence for best
control with lower rates. Perennial weeds should be allowed to obtain a leaf surface large enough to allow sufficient
spray coverage (12-18 inches tall). Use amine formulations during warm weather and ester formulations during cool
weather.
Banvel (0.5 to 2.0 qt/acre). Rate depends on weed species and size. More expensive than 2,4-D.
WeedMaster(2.0 to 4.0 pt/acre). WeedMaster is a mixture of 2,4-D and dicamba and often provides better control as a
premix than either product alone.
Remedy Ultra (2.0 to 4.0 pt/acre). Provides good control of many broadleaf weeds, but is used primarily for brush
control in pastures and rangeland. For best results, apply with at least 30 gal/acre of water. The addition of a non-ionic
surfactant will increase weed control.
Milestone (5 to 7 fl oz/acre). Excellent control of TSA, horsenettle, and other members of the nightshade family.
Controls pigweeds and other broadleaf weeds, but not blackberry or dogfennel. Can be safely applied under trees.
Desirable forage legumes may be severely injured. A 0.11% v/v solution is recommended for spot-spray applications.
Forefront (2.0 to 2.6 pt/acre). Forefront is a premix of aminopyralid (Milestone) and 2,4-D. See comments for Milestone.
Forefront provides better control of dogfennel than Milestone as long as plants are <18 inches tall at application. For
dogfennel plants >18 inches tall, a tank-mix partner will be necessary.
Pasturegard (2.0 to 4.0 pt/acre). Provides excellent control of dogfennel, blackberry (4.0 pt/acre), teaweed, and other
broadleaf weeds. Less effective on TSA than with Remedy alone.
If you would like a copy of the complete proceedings of this presentation, they will be available in the DeSoto County
Extension Office.

SI UNIVERSITY of
U I FLORIDA James F. Selph
The Foundation for The Gator Nation DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs