Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089228/00024
 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: May 2007
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00024
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

nlDS5-07 ( PDF )


Full Text




S UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA IFAS EXTENSION



DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
May 2007 / Volume 29 Number 5
ont torge o regis er or
CALENDAR OF EVENTS the Cattlemen's Convention
May
25 SubTropical Agricultural Research Center Field Day-Brooksville, Fl

30-1 Southern Pasture & Forage Improvement Conference -Tallahassee, Fl

June
18-19 FCA Cattlemen's College-Marco Island, Fl

19-21 Florida Cattlemen's Association Annual Convention & Allied Trade Show-Marco Island, Fl

WHAT'S THE COST OF A MISSED BREEDING CYCLE?
A tight breeding season offers the opportunity to manage and market the resulting calves as one consistent group.
However, have you ever considered the direct economic benefit of cows that conceive on the first cycle? Assuming
adequate nutrition is available; a good calf is likely gaining about 2.25+/ lbs/day at weaning time. If born 21 days later
than his counterpart, a calf could easily weigh 40-50 lbs. less as a feeder calf come market time in fall 2008. If feeder
calves are worth $1.20/lb. next fall, one missed breeding cycle could cost $50-60 for each calf that is born only one cycle
late. For a cow that's two cycles late, those numbers double. Herd health (vaccinations, etc.), cow body condition
(nutrition), bull (breeding) power, bull breeding soundness and estrus synchronization programs are all factors that
equate to getting cows settled early in the breeding season. Now's the time to consider the economic impact of each of
these management opportunities as it relates to the harvest of your 2008 calf crop. -- Stan Smith, Ohio State University
Extension-Beef Cow-Calf Weekly, April 27, 2007.
CATTLE ON FEED DOWN 1 PERCENT
USDA's April Cattle on Feed report, released last Friday, shows U.S. feedyard inventories, as of April 1, down by 1
percent from one year earlier. Placements into feedyards during March totaled 1.97 million, 7 percent above 2006 and
12 percent above 2005. Fed-cattle marketing during March were down by 6 percent from last year. About 63 percent of
March placements were in the heavier weight categories above 700 pounds. Stronger prices for fed cattle and a
somewhat more favorable grain outlook apparently encouraged placements during March.-Drovers Alert, Thursday,
April 26, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 17.
RESEARCHERS WORK TO UNLOCK ENERGY POTENTIAL IN SWITCHGRASS
Molecular biologists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service and the University of Nebraska are studying gene
sequences in perennial switchgrass in an effort to improve the crop's potential for ethanol production. Specifically, the
researchers are identifying genes that regulate the production and deposition of lignin, which holds plant cell walls
together. Development of new varieties of the grass with a lesser capacity to produce lignin could make sugars more
available for fermentation. Development of cellulosicc" sources of ethanol, such as switchgrass, could reduce the
industry's dependence on corn as a raw material. -Drovers Alert, Thursday, April 26, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 17.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.









MARKET INFORMATION

April 30, 2007

4/28/07 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 96.29 96.06 79.27
Live Heifer 96.27 96.07 79.35
Dressed Steer 154.49 154.46 127.65
Dressed Heifer 154.24 153.70 127.03
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoortsllm ctl50.txt


BEEF PRODUCTION
Slaughter
Live Weights
Dressed Weights
Beef Production (M. of Pounds)


4/28/07
(Estimate)
671,000
1247
756
461.2


htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/SJ LS712.txt


4/13/07


Last Week
(Estimate)
647,000
1252
759
471.6


Last Year
(Actual)
681,000
1236
755
483.5


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 2.32% 2.29%
Choice 51.33% 50.46%
Select 36.92% 37.80%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


5 Area Weekly Live Steer Price
loo


90
85
80


-5 yr avg


U'


2.67%
51.26%
37.23%


01/06 02/24 04/14 I6/ IIII 1 1 1 10/27 12115
Weekly F.1. Steer Dressed d eight









KSU Dept. of Ag Eco,
0o106 U 0224 0414DA 0602 07/21 090 m 1 n0127 a15er
WeekEnding
KUUDept, co Ag fE-
G-1;e US~DA& 3- H Well, V-Stte Aq- Rmoo "rwgmoxer i


Weekly Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread


21 'r.


^~ ~ ~~ -**-1

-. I. ] .,

V iiII i II Iin' i r. f1'1',i 1ii "L


01/05 02/16 03/30 05/11 06/22 08/03 09/14 10/26 12/0/
Week Ending Date


Sourre: USDA & lampes Minerr, K-State An. rconomr K


KSU Dept. of Aq Econ
www w.dgrladag.nglnfo


Choice/Select Spread

04/27/07

$12.12/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M XB403.TXT


Mid-Month Feeder Steer Basis Forecasts
700-800 Lb- Feeder Steers, Dodge City, KS


11 Y` Av RBis. Forecast
90 --- HIost P~- of La: 3 Yrs. Bais Fe




-3

-4
May Juni, Jul. Aug. Sep. Oct,
'07 '07 '07 '07 *07 '07
Date
Source: CME & K-State Research & Extension
Basis =Cash Price- Nearby Futures Price


Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar.
07 07 08 08 '08
KSU Dept. of Ag Econ
www.agmanager.lnfo


The summary below reflects the week ending April 20, 2007 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to 650-
lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, April 24, 2007.


Calf Weight


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.
------- I --------------------- I ------ I -------n l i,,,, 1'


TX 23,200 $123.06 $1 1


AL 9,600 $112-120 $107-112

LTN 9,200 $9116.91 $109.01 $98.72

FL 5,600 $99-115 $95-102 $90-98


GA 9,300


$100-110 $92-100 $85-91


$104.35 $95.86


$88.96


$90-107 $86-100 $80-90


$104-122 $95-111 $84-103 $93-114 $90-105 $84-95


CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 13 to 19 cents higher from 4.75-4.89 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 3 cents lower from 3.51-3.52 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 4 to 6 cents lower at
3.43-3.47 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 3/ lower to /2 cents higher from 3.47 3-3.70%per bushel.
Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 1/ cents higher from 3.54 3-3.553 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn
rail was 3/ cents lower at 3.413per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday April 27,
2007, http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ_GR851.txt


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


70 7
2007 -2006


T'V I ^^f ?f~f I







PINKEYE IN BEEF CATTLE
In last month's newsletter, I had an article on pink eye in bf Th ire th accompanied that article was of
Stage 1. In this newsletter, I thought you might like to
see stages 2 and 3.
Stage II: The clinical signs described in Stage I
continue, but the ulcer spreads across the cornea. As
more inflammation occurs, the cornea becomes I STAGEII
increasingly cloudy. At this point, some of the dark
color of the iris can still be seen. Blood vessels from the
outside portion of the cornea begin to grow across the
cornea to help with healing. These blood vessels make
the cornea appear pink, which is how the disease
received its name. 0
Stage III: The ulcer covers most of the cornea and the
inflammation continues to spread into the inner parts of
the eye. When this occurs, the inside of the eye fills with' STAGE III
fibrin, which is a pus-like substance that
gives the eye a yellow appearance versus the typical
brown appearance.

FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2007 http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/.
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
1.93" 2.09" 0.81" 2.80" 1 1 1 111 1 1 1 7.63"
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES AT THE EXTENSION
OFFICE-FIRST COLUMN IS THE HIGH & 2ND COLUMN IS THE LOW
86.6 86.5 86.3 90.50
33.30 32.60 39.50 43.90
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY CHILLING HOURS AT THE EXTENSION OFFICE
18.8 33.2 28.5 1.2
FAWN WEATHER INFORMATION
The FAWN (Florida Automated Weather Network) can be accessed at the following website: http://fawn.ifas.ufl.edu/.
There is also a toll free number that can be called to get information when you are in the field away from a computer.
That number is: 866-754-5732.

Beef Management Calendar

_I May/June
Remove Bulls. Fertilize warm season pastures.

Check mineral feeder. Apply Spot-On Agent for Grubs and Louse.

Vaccinate and Implant (except for replacement heifers) Reimplant calves at 90 to 120 days with growth
any late calves. stimulant.

Get heifers vaccinated for brucellosis if not already done. Pregnancy check cows.
BEEF QUIZ BOWL & MARKETING CONTESTEvery year at the Cattlemen's Convention, which is held
in June, there are two contests held for the youth. One being the Beef quiz bowl and the other being a Beef marketing
team. The quiz bowl consists of a 4 person team with questions pertaining to beef knowledge, all questions are taken
from the cattlemen's magazine. The point is to answer the questions correctly and faster than your opponents; as well
as, to prove your knowledge of the Beef industry. The marketing contest is a 3-person team that sells something, a lot of

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







steers, bulls, heifers, embryo's, etc. The speech needs to be between 3 5 minutes and no props may be used. However,
video and / or power point presentation, to show the product, is acceptable. In addition, it also helps
to have a handout for the judges. This speech must be given to the local Cattlemen's Association
prior to the competition. If any one is interested in participating, please call the extension office
863-993-4846. I strongly urge the older kids to take advantage of this opportunity because they
will receive recognition in front of FLORIDA'S finest cattlemen and they also will receive prizes.
Furthermore, for those of you who are duel tasking in 4-H and FFA, there should be no worries;
this event takes place after the FFA State Convention. If you are interested in participating in
these activities, the deadline is May 15, 2007.
INFORMATION FROM THE 56th ANNUAL BEEF CATTLE SHORT COURSE
Last week was the 56th Annual Florida Beef Cattle Short Course which is held annually in Gainesville. Over the next
several issues of this newsletter, I plan to highlight information that I gleaned from this year's program.
Economic and Market Outlook for 2007: Dr. Walter Prevatt of Auburn University provided this information on the
program. Some of you may remember Walter when he was a young livestock economist located at the Bradenton
Research Center. His written procedure is 8 pages. In the remaining space I will try highlight some of his major points.
As of January 1, 2007, the U.S. Cattle and Calves inventory was 97 million head (+.3% previous year). The new cattle
cycle began in January 2004 and is exhibiting modest growth. 2007 U.S. domestic beef production is expected to
increase about 0.6 billion pounds over last year. Net beef supply (domestic and imports) is expected to increase by 0.5
billion pounds.
The current combination of higher levels of cow slaughter year to date and the minimal change in January 2007 beef
replacements with a year ago, suggests that future cow-herd expansion is questionable. A level inventory of cattle and
calves does not mean that total pounds of beef production will grow slowly. There is a strong potential of more live
cattle imports from Canada.
Higher corn prices are expected to entice significantly additional acres to be planted in corn. If fewer that 6.5 million
additional acres are planted, then corn prices will move higher. Many analysts expect about 8 million additional acres to
be planted. These increases will probably come at the expense of soy bean acreage.
Pasture and range conditions will be very important this year as feeders are held on pastures longer to avoid the higher
costs of gains in the feedlot. If widespread drought conditions develop, this could potentially depress feeder prices this
year. Nationwide, a drought of any magnitude will have a significant effect on cattle production costs and the potential
for continued herd expansion during 2007.
Per capital consumption of beef is expected to remain close to the 66-68 pounds per person through the rest of this
decade. The forecast for 2007 U.S. cattle imports is 2.2 million head (-4% from a year ago). U.S. beef imports totaled
3.1 billion pounds during 2006, down 14% from 2005 due to increased U.S, domestic cow slaughter. Cattle farmers will
want to pay close attention to the corn market this year. Corn futures market prices may be viewed daily at
http://www.futuresource.com (click on grains at the bottom of the webpage).
If you would like a copy of the complete proceedings of this presentation, they will be available in the DeSoto County
Fvtontinn Offieo
Table 3. Estimated feeder steer prices based on various corn prices, Alabama auctions, September
2007.
Corn price, $/bu
Weight $3.00 $3.50 bf $4.50 $5.00 $5.50 $6.00
(Ib) $/cwt
350 $162 $147 $117 $101 $86 $71
450 $142 $130 f ^T $44 $107 $95 $83 $71
550 $124 $115 $97 $89 $80 $71
650 $113 $106 J- $92 $85 $78 $71
750 $107 $101 t-; $89 $83 $77 $71
Assumes each $0.50/bu increase in corn prices will result in a corresponding feeder steer price
decrease of $15.25/cwt, $11.75/cwt, $8.75/cwt, $7.00/cwt, and $6.00/cwt for 350 Ib, 450 Ib, 550 Ib,
650 Ib, and 750 lb feeder steers, respectively.

FLORIDA James F. Selph
The Foundation for The Cator Nation DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




























































































The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs