Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: March 2007
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00022
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA IFAS EXTENSION



DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter ..
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
March 2007 / Volume 29 Number 3 Corner Brace Assembly??

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
March
17 Small Farms Livestock Conference: "So You Want to be a Farmer", 8:00 AM 3:30 PM,
Manatee County Extension Office, Palmetto, Fl
29 "Fence Building 101 for the New Rancher" DeSoto Extension Office, 5:30-7:00 PM

April
19 Farm Credit of South West Florida Annual Meeting, Hardee Agri-civic Center, Wauchula, 6:00
PM
26 DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association Spring Meeting, Turner Center Exhibit Hall, 7:00 PM

FARM BUREAU URGES SUPPORT FOR 25 X '25
The American Farm Bureau Federation this week urged lawmakers to set an ambitious goal: supplying 25 percent of
the nation's energy from renewable sources by 2025. According to AFBF, the 25 x '25 vision would create new economic
opportunities, improve national security and curb greenhouse gas emissions. AFBF president Bob Stallman says, "By
producing energy right here at home we can generate increased farm income, stimulate rural development, and help
improve air, water and soil quality." The Energy Future Coalition, an independent, non-partisan initiative funded by
private foundations, sponsors the 25 x '25 effort that Farm Bureau has endorsed. The 25 x '25 project includes many
forms of energy such as wind, solar, hydro, geothermal and biofuels. To learn more about 25 x '25, go to www.25x25.org.
Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, March 1, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 9.
BALANCE OF TRADE IMPROVING
Prior to the closure of export markets in 2003, the value of U.S. beef exports exceeded that of imports by $2.41 billion.
Since then, the balance shifted to imports, but export values are slowly clawing their way back, according to the
Livestock Marketing Information Center. During 2006, according to LMIC, the value of beef and cattle imported into
the United States increased 12 percent over that for 2005, and set a record of $5.1 billion. Growth in exports helped
offset the increase, although the United States remained a net importer. Subtracting the value of imports from that of
exports, the net value for exports in 2006 was a negative $1.16 billion. That figure represents a significant improvement
in the balance of beef trade compared with deficits of $1.48 billion in 2005 and $1.36 billion in 2004.
Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, March 1, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 9.
USDA PROJECTS MORE FOOD SPENDING AWAY FROM HOME
According to USDA's 10-year outlook report, expenditures for meals prepared away from home will continue to grow,
reaching about 51 percent of total food expenditures by 2016. On average, the report projects that retail food prices will
increase less than the general inflation rate. However, prices for meat and poultry could exceed that rate over the next
few years as the industry adjusts to higher feed prices. Source-Food Systems Insider, e-version, Friday, February 23,
2007, Vol. 6, Issue 4
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.









MARKET INFORMATION
March 5, 2007


3/3/07 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 93.54 90.58 87.99
Live Heifer 86.46 90.71 88.04
Dressed Steer 149.28 145.03 141.33
Dressed Heifer 149.30 144.84 144.84
htto:/lwww.ams.usda.aovlmnreoortsllm ctl50.txt
S,


BEEF PRODUCTION
Slaughter
Live Weights
Dressed Weights
Beef Production (M. of Pounds)


3/3/07
(Estimate)
625,000
1277
769
478.7


htto:/lwww.ams.usda.aovlmnreoorts/SJ LS712.txt


2/16/07


Last Week
(Estimate)
630,000
1281
771
484.2


Last Year
(Actual)
620,000
1281
782
483.6


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 2.74% 2.50%
Choice 54.89% 53.57%
Select 34.04% 34.56%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


5 Area Weekly Live Steer Price
100.00
9500 ------- --------- ------- --

85.00 -
80.00
75.00
75.00. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --- -- -- -- ---
70.00
- 2007 2006 ..... 5 yr avg


2.82%
53.74%
35.20%


U


Weekly F.I. Steer Dressed Weight
sea i --








01/06 02/24 04/14 06/02 07/21 09108 10/27 12/15
Week Endln KU Deptf Ag
source USDA & K bStt Resar1d & Extnsoi www a.anaoger 0ft


Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread


ouce.: AMS USDA, Uod y: CLy, KS & KbU Dept. Ot AQ Econ
-State Rsearch & rxtension Www.dai fl" .l"ww ri( f

Choice/Select Spread
03/05/07

$6.34/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browseby/txt/L
M XB403.TXT


Mid-Month Futures Based Price Forecasts
16 700-800 Lb. Feeder Steers, Dodge City, KS
114 -


94
M.r. '07 April 'O/ May 0/ Jun. '0/ Jul. '0/ Aut. '/0 Sep. '0/ OL. '0/ Nov. '0/
Date


Source: CMI & K State Rlcardi & IWxtlnsion
ror-casr 3/0707 runtres Price + Basis rFTimates


KSU Dept. of Aq FEn
www. ~andria Lr.infu


The summary below reflects the week ending January 19, 2007 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, January 23, 2007.


Calf Weight


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.


TX 24,200 $117.03 $106.15 $101.34 $105.06 $97.41
AL 13,300 $111-119 $98-106 $96-102' $100-110


TN 11,800 $111.00 $96.45


$90.57


FL 5,700 $92-114 $82-100 $82-86


$95.24


$86.03


$85-100 $78-86


$83-88

$83.35

$80-82


GA 8,700

CORN:


$96-117 $85-104 $78-95


$86-109.50 $80-94.50 $78-85


Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 3 cents lower from 4.97-5.08 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck Yellow
Corn was 14 cents lower from 4.06-4.08 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 15 to 18 cents lower from
3.97-4.00 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 17 1 cents lower to 12 cent higher from 3.97-4.22 per bushel.
Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 14 1 to 15 1 cents lower from 4.03-4.04 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow
Corn rail was 21 1 cents lower at 3.88 per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday
March 2, 2007, http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ_GR851.txt


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


21 -

9
a ll ::i ii i] :t : :l:l- :,




01/oU 02/16 03/3t0 Ob11 06/22 08/03 09/14 10/26 12/0/
Week Ending Date


I


T'V I[ ?r rt I








U.S. Red Meat Exports Continue To Increase In 2006
For the third consecutive year, Mexico led all markets in volume and value for U.S. beef and beef variety meats in 2006,
reports the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Meanwhile, overall exports of U.S. beef and beef variety meats
worldwide increased 39% in volume to 655,920 metric tons (mt) and 50% in value to $2.04 billion in 2006 compared to
2005. This was despite no market access to Korea, and limited access to Japan. In Mexico, the volume of U.S. beef
products increased 32% to 371,087 metric tons and value jumped 33% to $1.17 billion over the 2005 figure. Meanwhile,
year-end numbers show U.S. pork and pork variety meat exports continued their record-breaking volume growth for a 15th
year, totaling 1.26 million metric tons (mt), a 9% increase over 2005. Their value also increased 9%, reaching more than $2.86
billion. And exports of U.S. lamb and mutton plus lamb variety meat increased 55% in volume in 2006 to 13,934 mt and 66%
in value to $27.8 million over 2005. Source-Cow-Calf Weekly, February 23, 2007.
SOME FACTS & MYTHS REGARDING HIGHER CORN PRICES
Everyone's speculating that higher corn prices will fuel a drive to make cattle bigger on grass, with an end-result of
fewer days on feed. The reasoning is quite simple -- cost of gain will be significantly cheaper in grazing programs than in
the feedyard. But the supply of feeder cattle hasn't changed. If one decreases days and accelerates the rate of turnover,
then what already was an overcapacity situation in the feeding industry will increase. The result is there will be a need to
import additional feeder cattle from Canada and Mexico, which will further stoke the whole trade debate. It also likely
means feedyards, which are battling to keep full, will actually add support to the calf and feeder market. The trend for a
number of years has been to move cattle to the yard at lighter weights and then feed them longer. This trend enabled
feedyards to behave as if they were in an expansion environment, despite numbers remaining constant (more days on
feed and bigger outweights). This year, the number of calves available to be placed is virtually unchanged, but the shift
in placement weights (going higher) will have the effect of making inventories of placeable cattle appear smaller, even
while numbers remain constant. And while we're on the subject of corn prices, let's address some prevailing myths:
* Higher corn prices means lower cattle weights. There's some truth to this -- the incentive to produce fat will
decrease, or there will be more of an economic incentive to identify that optimal body composition point where feed
efficiency begins to rapidly decline. However, pounds remain the primary economic driver in the cow-calf, feeding
and packing industries. Fixed overhead costs need to be spread over as many pounds as possible. This changes
dramatically if the cost of putting on that pound is less than what the pound is worth.
That said, there's still ample incentive to make cattle bigger if they're worth $90/cwt. and cost of gain (COG) is at
$70. The winter storm has removed a lot of tonnage from the system, but the math isn't there to encourage lighter
weights. Certainly as COG approaches price levels, there's more incentive to market cattle at their proper biological
endpoint, but it's incorrect to assume the incentive for pounds has changed.
* Higher corn prices benefit beef over poultry and pork. The logic of this argument is also sound. The reasoning is
beef production only uses grain for half of its production cycle, while poultry and pork use corn for a much greater
part of the life cycle. But beef production is at such a disadvantage in feed efficiency and feed conversion compared
to poultry and pork that the relative changes in costs of production don't dramatically change the relative
competitiveness between the proteins. 4 u.S. Total Corn Supply_
14 2006 EtImoe-
* Higher corn prices will drive a shift to grass-fed beef. Grass-fed beef is "
potentially a great niche market. However, the world prefers high-quality S
corn-fed beef, and that's where the U.S. beef industry has a competitive .
advantage. Grass-fed beef from an industry standpoint isn't an option;
it's neither price competitive nor the product of choice. A shift to a grass-fed
program could be great for individual operations, but a disaster if the entire
industry were to shift in that direction. Source-Cow-Calf Weekly, 3 'v 8 ,; 95 91 01 3 b -"
Troy Marshall, March 2, 2007. '. .. -'.9
CORN PLANTING INTENTIONS HIGHEST SINCE WORLD WAR II
The first of what will surely be a number of estimates on planting intentions was released Thursday, and it shows the
ethanol-driven euphoria in corn country is at full throat. Allendale, Inc. estimates the 2007-08 corn acreage that will be
planted this spring will hit 90.760 million acres, up 12.43% from last year. That represents the largest acreage in corn
since 1944 when 95.475 million acres were planted, Allendale says. The peak planted acres of 113.024 million occurred in
1932. Assuming Allendale's projected 152.5 bu./acre yield, a record corn production of 12.570 billion bu. may be in the
offing. Some of those corn acres will come at the expense of soybeans. Soybean planting intentions of 65.927 million
acres is down 9.595% from last year, representing the lowest level since 1996 when 64.196 million acres were planted,
Allendale says. Wheat acres should see a slight bump of 3.149%, if growers plant the 60.493 million acres that Allendale
projects. That would be the largest since 2003 when 62.141 million acres were planted. Source-Cow-Calf Weekly,
March 2, 2007.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2007 http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/.
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
1.93" 2.09" 4.02"
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES AT THE EXTENSION
OFFICE-FIRST COLUMN IS THE HIGH & 2ND COLUMN IS THE LOW
86.60 86.50
33.30 32.60
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY CHILLING HOURS AT THE EXTENSION OFFICE
18.8 33.2
FAWN WEATHER INFORMATION
The FAWN (Florida Automated Weather Network) can be accessed at the following website: http://fawn.ifas.ufl.edu/.
There is also a toll free number that can be called to get information when you are in the field away from a computer.
That number is: 866-754-5732.

Beef Management Calendar

March/April

Check mineral feeder. jCheck for external parasites and treat if needed.

Deworm cows as needed. IIdentify, vaccinate, implant, and work late calves.

Cull cows that failed to calve & market in April Check for lice and treat if necessary
Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and get fertilizer Vaccinate against blackleg and brucellosis after 3 months
incorporated in grass roots while there is still good soil of age and before 12 months of age.
moisture. Fertilize ryegrass if necessary. II

Observe bulls for condition and success. Rotate and rest if Observe cows for repeat breeders.
needed. 1
IS WEATHER & CORN PRICE SHIFTING CATTLE PLACEMENTS?
Traditionally, Texas, Kansas and Nebraska rank as the top three Figure 1
cattle feeding states, in that order, amongst feedyards with 1,000+ Cattle on Feed, 1000+ Head Feedyards,
head capacities (see Figure 1). A unique combination of severe By States. 2004-2007
winter weather, high corn prices, and the rapidly increasing 30
production of ethanol byproducts may have been shifting that I
pattern in recent months. Cattle on feed data from February's
report, for example, showed that Nebraska now has the second 2
largest number of cattle on feed in lots with 1,000+ head capacities. I 200
This resulted from a 24% increase in feed numbers since i .o
September 2006 in Nebraska. Interestingly, other Northern Plainso .
feedyards saw increases as well. Iowa and South Dakota on feed
inventories increased 17% and 48%, respectively, during this time -. .- -..-. .... ......-.. -
period. Texas inventory declined 5% since September 1, 2006 and ^ s ,s q
Kansas and Oklahoma increased inventory by less than 2% oS.
(the U.S. average was a 6.7% increase during this five-month
time period).
Figure 2 shows cattle on feed placements expressed as a percent of the previous year for September 2006 through
January 2007 for selected states. While conclusive trends are not evident from this data, it does indicate that placements
in Southern Plains states like Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas were down this past winter compared to last year. Northern
Plains states like Nebraska, Iowa, and South Dakota generally posted smaller placement declines or increases during
these past five months.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








So, are cattle moving north? It appears so at least temporarily. The
competitive advantage for cattle feeding may have shifted to the F e
Northern Plains states recently for several reasons. First, successive Cattle Placements, 1000+ Head Feedyards,
Percent of Year-Ago. Monthy
winter storms from December through February hit Southern Plains A
states hard, causing tough pen conditions and substantially lowering ... ... .
feeding performance. As a result, southern feeders have placed fewer .o .....
cattle on feed. While storms have recently impacted cattle feeders on
the Northern Plains, this will not likely be evident in placement g
numbers until the March Cattle on Feed report is released later this I
month. A second reason for the shift in placements and on feed
numbers is cost of gain differences between the Northern and
Southern Plains. For example, the average corn price in the Texas '30
Triangle area was $3.73/bu from September through February,
$0.54/bu higher than the average Omaha, NE price during that time. o s. o4-,6 Nw-6 D wm Jan7
Typically, Southern Plains feeders can afford to feed higher priced
corn (due to transportation costs from the Corn Belt) because cattle feeding performance in the winter months exceeds
that in the Northern Plains. However, that better performance didn't materialize this winter, as mentioned earlier.
Thirdly, cattle feeders in Nebraska, Iowa, and South Dakota are able to take advantage of wet and dry distiller's grains
from nearby ethanol production. While ethanol byproducts can be shipped to the Southern Plains, bulk and moisture
content lead to cost disadvantages for feeders farther from ethanol plants. Also important is that feeding ethanol
byproducts, particularly wet distillers grains, typically results in significant improvements in cattle feeding
performance. Source-In The Cattle Markets, Darrell R. Marks, Ph.D., University of Nebraska, Lincoln, March 5,
2007.
"FENCE BUILDING 101 FOR THE NEW RANCHER"
On March 29, 2007, from 5:30 till 7:00 PM, I will be having a workshop on Fence Building. This program is intended
for individuals who are new to ranching or have never been instructed in the art and science of fence building. We will
talk about equipment needed, how to determine amounts of wire, staples, posts, etc. to buy for a given area of land and I
will be showing a video on building fences. The material covered will be applicable to fencing for cattle, horses, goats,
etc. We will cover the use of barbed wire, woven wire and electric wire fencing. If you plan to attend, please call the
Extension Office at 993-4846 and ask to be put on the registration list for this program.
DESOTO SHERIFF'S OFFICE REQUEST YOUR HELP
The DeSoto County Sheriff's Office has requested that I put in this newsletter that they are trying to update their
Livestock Owner Registration List with information such as person to contact, emergency contact phone numbers, type
and breed of animals, and location of pastures. They have left a supply of their registration forms at our office that can
be filled out to provide the information.

U.S. Beef Exports Cattle Imports From Mexico
180 200
160 C 2005 2006 -5 YR.AVG. 180 2006 r 2005 5 YR. AVG.
S40 160
140
140 140
S120 ~ 120

80 80
60 60
40
40 40
20
E 20 0
0 Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Month
Month
KSU Dept. of Ag Econ KSU Dept. of Ag Econ
Source: USDA & K-State Research & Extension www.agmanager.info Source: USDA & K-State Research & Extension www.agmanager.info




UNIVERSITY of James F. Selph
U IFLORIDA DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock
es (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
The Foundation for The Cator N atiot:tion with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








Small Farms Livestock Conference II
"So You Want to Be A Farmer"



V Manatee County Extension Office
Palmetto, FL I
March 17, 2007


The South Florida Beef Forage Program Extension Agents will be holding the annual Small Farms Livestock Production
Conference at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center in Sebring, Saturday, March 3, 2007 and at the Manatee County
Extension Office in Palmetto on March 17, 2007. The Small Farms Livestock Production Conference is designed for
ranchette or small landowners who are considering the raising, management and production on livestock for pleasure or
profit. This course, "So You Want to be a Farmer", was designed more specifically for new or agriculturally inexperienced
landowners who are considering some field of livestock production on their small or limited acreage to help guide them and
provide them information for making a more informed decision about what type of livestock producer they may want to
become.
This course will provide basic information about all the different animal species as possibilities for a small farming
operation. We will explore some economic and business basics of agricultural production; look at specialty production and
markets as possibilities; give some basics of animal health, buying healthy animals and keeping them healthy; pasture and
forage requirements before you ever get started, including understanding different forage species and their fertility and
maintenance requirements will be presented; and what considerations you will need to make for fencing, housing, handling
and holding equipment for all types of animal species.

Agenda topics for the day long conference will be:
8:00 8:45 Check-in and registration 12:15 Lunch

8:45 Welcome and Introductions PM "What You're Going to Need"

9:00 Exploring the Possibilities: An overview of 1:00 Fencing for all types of Livestock Dr. Ike
animal species for production consideration Pat Ezenwa
Hogue
1:45 Pastures: Species, Fertility and Maintenance -
9:45 4R's of Farming: Resources, Risks, Rules & Christine Kelly-Begazo
Rewards Steffany Dragon
2:30 Break
10:30 Break
2:45 Equipment, Holding, Handling and Housing
10:45 Overview of Specialty Markets to Explore Needs and Wants for Livestock Production Jim
Robert Halman Selph

11:30 Animal Health Issues: Sources, Buying and 3:30 Questions and Adjourn
Keeping them Healthy Lockie Gary
Cost of the conference will be $ 20 per person pre-paid registration by February 16, 2007, and $ 30 late registration
received after February 16, to include lunch and any program materials. Individuals planning to attend should
contact Jim Selph (863-993-4846 or e-mail: iimselph(&ufl.edu) at the DeSoto County Extension Office.

NAME ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP PHONE
E-MAIL
Program location you plan to attend, check one of the following: Palmetto


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to
i dividuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin ,
political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative
Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




























































































The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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