Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: February 2007
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00021
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA IFAS EXTENSION



DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
February 2007 / Volume 29 Number 2 Grand Re-opening &
Ribbon Cutting, Turner
CALENDAR OF EVENTS Center Exhibit Hall
February
15 Grand Re-Opening of the Turner Center Agri-Civic Center, Open House, 11:00 AM till 6:00
PM; Ceremony 1:00 PM
March
3 Small Farms Livestock Conference: "So You Want to be a Farmer", 8:00 AM 3:30 PM,
Highlands County Extension Office, Sebring, Fl
17 Small Farms Livestock Conference: "So You Want to be a Farmer", 8:00 AM 3:30 PM,
Manatee County Extension Office, Palmetto, Fl
WELCOME NEW EXTENSION AGENTS TO THE DESOTO COUNTY EXTENSION
OFFICE
This month, we welcome 2 new Extension Agents to our office. Beginning on February 9, 2007, Ms. Christy Pryor will
begin work as our new Extension 4-H Agent. Ms. Pryor is originally from Sarasota County and received her B.S. from
the Animal Science Department at the University of Florida. On February 15, 2007, Ms. Kristy Candelora will begin as
a Regional Specialized Agent-Wildlife/Natural Resources. Ms. Candelora is originally from Dade City, Fl and received
both her Bachelor's and Master's of Science from the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Department at the University
of Florida. She also has a psychology degree from the University of North Carolina. She will plan, develop, teach and
evaluate educational programs of regional interests related to Upland Wildlife (Northern Bobwhite, Turkey, Dove, etc.)
and Ecosystems, in cooperation with the Upland Ecosystem Restoration Project. Please join me in welcoming these 2
new agents to our office.
RESEARCHERS WORKING ON VACCINE TO PREVENT CATTLE ABORTIONS
Researchers at the UC-Davis School of Veterinary Medicine are working to develop a vaccine to prevent a foothill
abortion, a bacterial disease that annually causes the loss of 45,000 to 90,000 calves, costing $6.3 million to California
cattle producers. The disease is transmitted by bites from the pajaroello tick. Although infected pregnant cows show no
obvious clinical symptoms, they will abort their calves anywhere between six to nine months into the pregnancy. "There
is evidence that the infected cows and their fetuses are producing an immune response to the bacterium," said Jeffrey
Stott, a veterinary pathologist. "This is encouraging because it indicates that a properly formulated vaccine should be
effective in preventing this disease." Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, February 1, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 5.
EXPANDING WTO COMPLAINTS AGAINST U.S. CORN
The European Union, Australia, Argentina and Brazil have joined Canada in a complaint against the United States in
the World Trade Organization. The dispute involves what the countries claim are illegal government handouts to
American corn growers. Canada's complaint also challenged whether overall farm subsidies in the United States comply
with rules of international commerce. The WTO already has ruled that some U.S. cotton subsidies do not. Source-
Drovers Alert, Thursday, February 1, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 5.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.









MARKET INFORMATION

FEBRUARY 1, 2007

1/27/07 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 86.33 86.73 94.63
Live Heifer 86.46 86.87 94.55
Dressed Steer 135.58 139.51 149.39
Dressed Heifer 137.60 139.15 149.48
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/Im ctl50.txt

1/27/07 Last Week Last Year
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate) (Actual)
Slaughter 632,000 610,000 608,000
Live Weights 1300 1301 1289
Dressed Weights 784 788 784
Beef Production (M. of Pounds) 493.8 479.0 475.3
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/SJ LS712.txt


1/12/07


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 3.04% 2.97%
Choice 54.86% 55.56%
Select 33.08% 33.90%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


5 Area Weekly Live Steer Price
100
95
90-

85+
80 -


2.57%
52.91%
36.56%


U_ U -_~_


Average Dressed Steer Weight


- 2007 2006 ...... 5 yr avg 775
--..-- 5 yravg 2006 2007


Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread


2 17
-0
S,---
MII



01/05 02/16 03/30 05/11 0622 08os03 09/14 10/26 12/07
Week Ending Date


S-urCe: AMS-UIDA, Dodg y, A V5
KState Research & Extenon


K5U iept. ofr ag ccn
www.aganasserife


Choice/Select Spread

02/01/07

$7.76/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browsebyl
txt/LMXB403.TXT



Mid-Month Futures Based Price Forecasts
112 700-800 Lb. Feeder Steers, Dodge City, KS
11 0 ----- Yrv Avq- n.i -.--MosNe. Nq. Ba -n Most Ps. a J
Inn


rrh. Mar. April May lun. lul. '07 Au. Sep. Oct. Nov.
'07 '07 '07 '07 '07 '07 '07 '07 '07


source: CMt & K-5tate Research & extension
roreraPtf 1/26/07 rurures Pnce + ftae '+stimates


KSU Dept. of Aq Fron
www.agnanagur.in


The summary below reflects the week ending January 19, 2007 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, January 23, 2007.


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.
LO 11 I P I n I n i I oo n I O .L


$98.l


AL 12,900 $95-104 1$84-90


TN 7,200 $93.93


$85.73


FL 5,200 $82-101 $76-92


GA 2,000


$87-102 $80-98


CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 2 to 5 cents higher from 4.64-4.68 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 9 cents lower at 3.81 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 6 to 7 cents lower from 3.70-
3.73 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 8 cents lower from 3.71-3.85 per bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow
corn was 5 to 6 cents lower from 3.75-3.77 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn rail was 9 cents lower at
3.56 per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday February 2, 2007,
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ_GR851.txt
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


a-. .


Calf Weight

TX 6,600


980-88

$80.99



I $72-87


$80-90

$83.99

$74-91

$76-91


Lp0u.l0

$72-82

$79.10


',OO.UJ

$75-85

$79.32

$76-79

$72-85


$75.50-80.50


--


$94.2J









GLYPHOSATE RESISTANCE STILL INCREASING
Cotton producers have been using glyphosate for weed control for many years now. Though once thought of as a
herbicide that would never lose effectiveness, we now know that previously susceptible weeds can and will become
resistant to glyphosate. In 2000, the first documented case of glyphosate resistance in the US was discovered in
Delaware. Although horseweed was the first resistant weed, it was soon revealed that it would not be the last. Since that
time, 6 additional glyphosate resistant weeds have been found. These weeds include 2 ragweeds (common and giant
ragweed), 2 pigweeds (Palmer amaranth and common waterhemp), and 2 ryegrasses (Italian and rigid ryegrass).
Although no glyphosate resistant weeds have been found in Florida, considering the national trend, it is possible (if not
likely) to occur here as well. It is critically important that we do not rely on glyphosate for total weed management in
any cropping system for extended periods of time. In corn, the use of atrazine and preemergence grass control
herbicides will provide a great weed control and resistance management advantage. Likewise, preemergence grass
herbicides and residual products at layby will be greatly beneficial in cotton. It is true that adding alternative herbicides
will increase the expense of the production system. However, managing resistant weeds is much more troublesome, time
consuming and expensive than a resistance prevention strategy. A pro-active resistance management strategy employed
now will pay great dividends in the future.
Source-Agronomy Notes, Vol. 31:2 February 2007, Jason Ferrell UF/IFAS Weed Scientist.
VALUABLE WEBSITE FOR FARMERS AND RANCHERS
Ken Harrison obtained information on the following website and I thought that I would pass this along to you. The
website is: http://websoilsurvev.nrcs.usda.gov/app/ This site is interesting in a couple of ways. First, it allows you to
highlight an area on an aerial map and determine acreage. Secondly, it then will define the soil types in the highlighted
area and give you both the acreage and the percentage of those soil types. The picture below is of the roughly 100 acres
at the Turner Agri-Civic Center. The website is fairly easy to navigate and use. I was able to find the aerial and mark it
without reading any instructions, which is probably pretty typical for a lot of us. A special thanks to Ken Harrison for
finding this and sharing the site with us.

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Bfle Edt View Favorites Iools deb
GCogleI C-pwri d vo S BQoolt-ar- =.aR" g6DIbbd'e d "^ Cedc %AutoUrk. i [#Sendto- ; p:odd eating Lir
M? 4% @WebhSdISurey f F- aw9- j Iods

LOa tU -.noc!ol Daa1FeeeSS1_911 il I


Area of Interest


DeSoto County, Florida
Map Map Unit Name Acres Percent
Unit in AOI of AOI
Symbol
2 Anclote mucky 19.5 17.0
fine sand,
depressional
3 Basinger fine sand 16.0 14.0
5 Basinger fine 2.7 2.4
sand,
depressional
20 Immokalee fine 4.5 4.0
sand
21 Malabar fine sand 0,6 0.6
22 Malabar fine 0.2 0.2
sand, high
24 Myakka fine sand 23.5 20,5
36 Smyrna fine sand 46.D 40.1
99 Water 1.5 1.3


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


soil map d







NEW C.A.B. SPECS TAKE EFFECT
Packing plants licensed to produce the Certified Angus Beef brand began using new, 10-part carcass specifications
today. The CAB board voted last fall to replace the brand's original Yield Grade 3.9 limit with more specific consistency
requirements, including ribeye area of 10 to 16 square inches, hot carcass weight less than 1,000 pounds and fat
thickness less than 1.0 inch. The change is in response to a trend toward heavier cattle, closely trimmed fabrication of
cuts and other technical advances, says CAB president John Stika. It also recognized the top concerns of end users
surveyed in the 2005 National Beef Quality Audit. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, February 1, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 5.
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL-2007 http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/.
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
1.93"
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY HIGH & LOW TEMPERATURES AT THE EXTENSION
OFFICE-FIRST COLUMN IS THE HIGH & 2ND COLUMN IS THE LOW
86.60
33.30
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY CHILLING HOURS AT THE EXTENSION OFFICE
18.8
FAWN WEATHER INFORMATION
"Chilling hours or "chill units" refers to the hours of temperature below 450F and above 320F that occurs while the
tree is dormant. Deciduous trees require a certain number of these hours for buds to break in a timely manner and start
the growing season that follows the winter cold period. It is a natural method of adaptation, thus higher chilling fruit
tree cultivars grow and fruit in higher chilling locations. Many of the more temperate fruit trees like peaches, plums
and pears are sold on the basis of their chilling hour requirements. The FAWN (Florida Automated Weather Network)
can be accessed at the following website: http://fawn.ifas.ufl.edu/. There is also a toll free number that can be called to
get information when you are in the field away from a computer. That number is: 866-754-5732.

Beef Management Calendar

February/March

Check mineral feeder. |Check for external parasites and treat if needed.

Work Calves (castrate, deworm, vaccinate, implant) IWatch calves for signs of respiratory diseases

Cull cows that failed to calve & market in April |Check for lice and treat if necessary

Pull soil samples to be run at UF Soils Lab |Fertilize ryegrass if necessary
FEEDYARD PLACEMENTS SLOW
January's Cattle on Feed report shows a continuing trend toward fewer cattle being placed into feedyards. Many cattle
moved to feedyards earlier than normal this year due to drought, and higher grain prices have discouraged placements
this winter. The report lists placements into feedyards during December at 1.71 million head, 9 percent below the total
for December 2005. Fed-cattle marketing also dropped 5 percent below the year-earlier total during December, partly
due to weather. Feedyard inventories as of Jan. 1 stood at 12 million head, 1 percent above those of Jan. 1, 2005. As of
Jan. 1, the number of heifers on feed was 4 percent higher than one year earlier, suggesting a slowdown in herd
expansion. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, February 1, 2007 Vol. 9, Issue 5.
CALL FOR FORMATION OF BIO-FUELS WORKING GROUP
The National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA) and other producer and industry groups have asked USDA to form
a panel to study the emerging bio-fuels economy and its implications for livestock producers and animal ag. In a letter
to USDA Secretary Mike Johanns, the groups said, "Public focus on ag issues continues to expand as new and exciting
technologies place the ag sector in the driver's seat of America's energy future. However, with these changes and
developments have come serious and significant concerns for the tens of thousands of farmers, farm families and all
those involved in the $128-billion livestock, dairy, and poultry sectors." The purpose of the working group is to "study
the emerging bio-fuels economy and its full implications for these producers, the sector and the consumers they supply
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







and serve". Joining NCBA in the request are: The National Pork Producers Council, American Meat Institute, National
Chicken Council, National Milk Producers Federation, and National Turkey Federation. Source-Cow-Calf Weekly,
January 26, 2007.
PETA PET-KILLING PAIR GOES ON TRIAL
Two employees of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) went on trial this week for killing animals. Adria
J. Hinkle and Andrew B. Cook, employees in PETA's Norfolk, VA, headquarters office, are charged with 21 counts each
of animal cruelty, a felony, and some assorted misdemeanor crimes of littering and dumping. The duo is accused of
discarding garbage bags of euthanized cats and dogs into a grocery store dumpster outside Raleigh, NC. PETA contends
the pair provided humane deaths to unwanted animals while local officials say the PETA workers took the animals
promising to find them homes but secretly killed them. In its defense, PETA says it actually euthanizes thousands of
animals each year, claiming destroying the animals is superior to putting the animals in animal shelters. The arrests and
trials have been a public-relations bonanza for anti-PETA groups. One group, the Washington D.C.-based Center for
Consumer Freedom (CCF) circled the courthouse this week sporting a banner that read: "PETA: As Warm and Cuddly
as You Thought?" "PETA doesn't deny that the two threw the dead bodies into a dumpster. And they don't deny that
what Hinkle and Cook did is standard practice for a group that wants constitutional rights for pigs," CCF
(www.consumerfreedom.con) says. CCF asks, with PETA's $25-million budget, "if euthanizing these animals is more
humane than keeping them in overcrowded shelters, it begs the question: If local shelter conditions really are that bad,
and the preservation of animal life is PETA's singular purpose, why didn't they adopt the animals themselves? Maybe
the home they'd provide is less than ideal -- but it's certainly better than being dead." Source-Cow-Calf Weekly,
January 26, 2007.
APPEALS COURT KILLS TEXAS HORSE SLAUGHTER
The Humane Society of the U.S. is cheering but not many cattlemen are happy about last Friday's ruling from the Fifth
Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans. A three-judge panel from the Big Easy ruled that a 1949 Texas law that bans
horse slaughter for human consumption is valid. The ruling affects two of the nation's three horse slaughter plants --
Dallas Crown Inc. at Kaufman, and Beltex Corp at Fort Worth. A third plant, Cavel International, Inc., is located in
DeKalb, IL. The plants produce horsemeat for export to the European Union and other countries. C.R. "Dick"
Sherron, president of the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, says horse slaughter is an emotional issue,
and a legal decision based on emotion is alarming and has threatening implications for owners of other types of
livestock. There are approximately 9.2 million horses in the country, Sherron says, and USDA figures show that about
88,000 horses, mules and other equines were slaughtered in 2005. "That's less than 1%," he says, "which is a good
indication that slaughter is not a decision horse owners make indiscriminately." Source-Cow-Calf Weekly, January
26, 2007.
mr U.S. Exports Surge 200607 Market Share
Corn Exports for the U.S. 60
MMT: Million Metric Tons c %m 1n
50 5%


Argentina
40 14%


30

S @ d United States 71%




UNIVERSITY of James F. Selph
UF FLORIDA DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock
The Foundation for The Cator Nation



The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








Small Farms Livestock Conference II
Highlands County Extension Office
Sebring, FL 1k
March 3, 2007 is

\b ^ Manatee County Extension Office
Palmetto, FL
SMarch 17, 2007


The South Florida Beef Forage Program Extension Agents will be holding the annual Small Farms Livestock Production
Conference at the Highlands County Agri-Civic Center in Sebring, Saturday, March 3, 2007 and at the Manatee County
Extension Office in Palmetto on March 17, 2007. The Small Farms Livestock Production Conference is designed for
ranchette or small landowners who are considering the raising, management and production on livestock for pleasure or
profit. This course, "So You Want to be a Farmer", was designed more specifically for new or agriculturally inexperienced
landowners who are considering some field of livestock production on their small or limited acreage to help guide them and
provide them information for making a more informed decision about what type of livestock producer they may want to
become.
This course will provide basic information about all the different animal species as possibilities for a small farming
operation. We will explore some economic and business basics of agricultural production; look at specialty production and
markets as possibilities; give some basics of animal health, buying healthy animals and keeping them healthy; pasture and
forage requirements before you ever get started, including understanding different forage species and their fertility and
maintenance requirements will be presented; and what considerations you will need to make for fencing, housing, handling
and holding equipment for all types of animal species.

Agenda topics for the day long conference will be:
8:00 8:45 Check-in and registration 12:15 Lunch

8:45 Welcome and Introductions PM "What You're Going to Need"

9:00 Exploring the Possibilities: An overview of 1:00 Fencing for all types of Livestock Dr. Ike
animal species for production consideration Pat Ezenwa
Hogue
1:45 Pastures: Species, Fertility and Maintenance -
9:45 4R's of Farming: Resources, Risks, Rules & Christine Kelly-Begazo
Rewards Steffany Dragon
2:30 Break
10:30 Break
2:45 Equipment, Holding, Handling and Housing
10:45 Overview of Specialty Markets to Explore Needs and Wants for Livestock Production Jim
Robert Halman Selph

11:30 Animal Health Issues: Sources, Buying and 3:30 Questions and Adjourn
Keeping them Healthy Lockie Gary
Cost of the conference will be $ 20 per person pre-paid registration by February 16, 2007, and $ 30 late registration
received after February 16, to include lunch and any program materials. Individuals planning to attend should
contact Jim Selph (863-993-4846 or e-mail: iimselph(4ufl.edu) at the DeSoto County Extension Office.

NAME ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP PHONE
E-MAIL
Program location you plan to attend, check one of the following:_ Sebring Palmetto

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to
i dividuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin ,
political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative
Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




























































































The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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