Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: January 2007
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00020
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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SF UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA IFAS EXTENSION


DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
January 2007 / Volume 29 Number 1 DeSoto County Fair

CALENDAR OF EVENTS January 18-28, 2007
January
18 24th Annual Florida Cattlemen's Institute and Allied Trade Show, Osceola Heritage Park,
Kissimmee, Fl
20 DeSoto County Fair Goat Showmanship Show, 10:00 AM

21 DeSoto County Fair Grooming Contest, 2:00 PM

23 DeSoto County Fair Steer Show, 7:00 PM

24 DeSoto County Fair Swine Show, 7:00 PM

25 DeSoto County Fair Beef Breeding Show, 7:00 PM

26 DeSoto County Fair Steer and Swine Sale, 7:00 PM

24th ANNUAL FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S INSTITUTE AND ALLIED TRADE SHOW
The Theme for this year's Florida Cattlemen's Institute and Allied Trade Show will be "Get Em Bred Institute". This
year's Institute and Allied Trade Show will be held on January 18, 2007, at the Osceola Heritage Park, 1921 Kissimmee
Valley Lane, off of Highway 192 East (Irlo Bronson Highway), Kissimmee. The host motel will be the Quality Inn
located just east of Osceola Heritage Park on 2050 E Irlo Bronson Hwy. The Institute will begin with the Trade Show
opening at 8:00 A.M., followed by the welcome at 8:45 AM given by Dr. Jimmy Cheek, Vice-President for Agriculture
and Natural Resources at the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). One of the
keynote speakers for this years Institute are Dr. W. E. (Bill) Beal. Dr. Beal is a Professor in the Department of Animal
and Poultry Sciences, College of Agriculture at Virginia Tech University located at Blacksburg, Va. His beef cattle
reproductive physiology research is focused on controlling estrus and ovulation in heifers and postpartum cows.
BSE-IMMUNE COWS ENGINEERED
Twelve cows have been genetically engineered to be free from the proteins that cause BSE, which may give them
immunity to the disease. A team of researchers from the United States and Japan reported that they had eliminated the
gene responsible for making the proteins, called prions, in these cows, which are now being injected directly with BSE to
further verify the results. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, January 4, 2007, Vol. 9, Issue 1.
CAB MAKES THE MOST OF LIMITED SUPPLIES
More than 544 million pounds of Certified Angus Beef was sold in 56 countries during the brand's fiscal year that ended
Sept. 30. CAB identified a record 13.1 million Angus cattle last year, but an acceptance rate of 14 percent was the lowest
in the program's 28 year history. Despite the low acceptance rate, CAB saw a seventh consecutive year of sales greater
than half a billion pounds made possible by marketing nearly 300 pounds of boneless beef equivalent per carcass.
Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, January 4, 2007, Vol. 9, Issue 1.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.









MARKET INFORMATION
November 28, 2006

1/06/07 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 88.88 87.94 93.79
Live Heifer 89.07 88.03 93.93
Dressed Steer 141.11 139.31 148.57
Dressed Heifer 141.33 139.64 148.54
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/Im ctl50.txt

1/06/07 Last Week Last Year
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate) (Actual)
Slaughter 517,000 523,000 525,000
Live Weights 1300 1298 1279
Dressed Weights 788 787 776
Beef Production (M. of Pounds) 405.9 409.7 406.1
htto:/lwww.ams.usda.aov/mnrenortslSJ LS712.txt

12/22/06 Last Week Last Year
National Grading Percent
Prime 2.69% 3.17% 2.86%
Choice 52.56% 53.51% 51.19%
Select 35.61% 35.61% 37.82%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


5 Area Weekly Live Steer Price


70 -
- 2006 2005 - 5 yr avg


Weekly F.I. Beef Production
'0
'0



j II
rI ,- I --

S I I I -II Ill III IIII I111i Il l I I I .l I

01/07 02/25 04/15 06/03 07/22 0O/09 10/28 12/16
Week -nding KSU Dept olf Ag fr
USDC)A & K-5.1.t P-e-tch & F-t,-- www .gmn,..ger.mfo


Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread


I IlJilll I!I! i. III. 11 I11 IIIIII
01/06 02/17 03/31 05/11 06/23 08/04 09/15 10/27 12/08
Week Ending Date
Sur AMS-USiiA, qDCtly, KS'-r
K5tat Researh & xtenson r w.

Choice/Select Spread
01/05/07

$14.11/cwt
http://marketnews.usda.gov/gear/browsebyl
txt/LMXB403.TXT



Mid-Month Futures Based Price Forecasts
112 700-800 Lb. Feeder Steers, Dodge City, KS
110 -t-3 Yr. Avg. Basli m_

S106 Mnat PoasRais 9'
-d
loo
os. .-- t *

98
96
94
Der. lan-. eb. Mai. April Mily Jun. ]ul. Aug. Sp. Otl.
'06 '01 '0/ '0 'O/ '/ 'O/ '0 '0/ '01/ '0
DaFre


Sourn: CMl & K Slatt Rt-sirh & .txl-non
Forecast; 12/1/V0 Fuurmes Price + Bfasis rstimafes


KSU Dept of Aq F-on
www.aginarrgr .infu


The summary below reflects the week ended November 10, 2006 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, December 19, 2006.


Calf Weight
IF;'V I _'1 S.f._ I


5 5500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750bs. 500-550 bs. 600-50 bs. 700-750 bs.


L12~. I)V ,YIU IIU.-tJ I 10VL Ib IUII.YO IJ0.JO


AL 11,100 $100-108


$94-101 $90-96


ITN 19,800 $100.56 1$91.78

FL 7,300 $86-105 $80-95


GA 12,000

CORN:


$98.97


$88.59


$88.78

|S76-85

I884.51


',yt.0U


$90-100 $83-90


$88.78


$85.16


$83-104 $76-87


$90.26


$86.49


CORN: Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 10 to 15 cents lower from 4.10-4.15 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2
truck Yellow Corn was 27 to 29 cents lower from 3.40-3.42 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was not
available. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 22 1/4 to 25 1/4 cents lower from 3.34 /4 -3.53 /4 per bushel. Toledo US No
2 rail Yellow corn was 24 to 26 cents lower from 3.40 -3.41 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn rail
was 27 cents lower at 3.12 per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday
January 5, 2006, http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ GR851.txt


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


$79-86

$82.69

$70-75

$77.62


So rce







2007 COULD BE BETTER FOR CATTLE FEEDERS
Lower calf and feeder-cattle prices could help cattle feeders improve their balance sheets this year compared with 2006,
according to the Livestock Marketing Information Center. Last year, returns for cattle in Southern Plains Feedlots,
where losses averaged $75 per head, were the worst in LMIC records dating to 1975. Feeders will need to carefully
manage purchase prices for cattle this year, and rising feed costs will remain a challenge. In the cow-calf sector, returns
were lower during 2006 but remained positive at an average of about $48 per cow, according to LMIC. Higher cull-cow
prices this year could help offset lower calf values, and cow-calf returns should be similar to last year, depending on
weather and feed costs. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, January 4, 2007, Vol. 9, Issue 1.
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL--http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/.
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 0.81" 2.13" 33.06"
FAWN WEATHER INFORMATION
The FAWN (Florida Automated Weather Network) can be accessed at the following website: http://fawn.ifas.ufl.edu/.
There is also a toll free number that can be called to get information when you are in the field away from a computer.
That number is: 866-754-5732.

Beef Management Calendar

I January/February

Check mineral feeder. Check for external parasites and treat if needed.

Deworm cows and heifers prior to winter feeding season. jObserve regularly for calving difficulties.

Rotate calving pastures to prevent diseases. Watch for scours in calves.

Give bulls extra feed and care so they will be in condition Have dead animals posted by a veterinarian or diagnostic
for breeding season. laboratory.

Watch condition of cow herd and supplement if necessary. Discuss herd health with you veterinarian and outline a
Post calving cows have the highest nutritional requirements program for the 2007 year.
in the first 82 days.

Develop or review of management plan and update for next Carry a pocket notebook to record heat, breeding
year. abnormalities, discharges, abortions, retained placentas.

_I January 1, put bulls out for October calving season.
Make sure lactating cows are receiving an adequate level of Work calves (identify, implant with growth stimulant,
energy. vaccinate, etc.).
SENATORS ASK FOR ADEQUATE FUNDING FOR AG
Senators Norm Coleman (R-MN) and Blanche Lincoln (D-AR) plan to send a letter to the President urging him to
"refrain from proposing harmful cuts" to ag when preparing the Administration's fiscal year '08 budget. The letter
states, "Instead, we urge you to propose a robust, new investment in renewable fuels that will add to the budget savings
already realized or forecast under current farm policy and make room for the Administration to propose additional
funding in order to meet new priorities and policy objectives, including many identified by the Administration, without
making harmful cuts to existing priorities." The administration will present its budget to Congress the first week of
February. Source-Cow-Calf Weekly, Friday, January 5, 2007.
DESPITE FDA ENDORSEMENT, CLONED FOOD STILL YEARS FROM STORE
SHELVES
Despite a government endorsement, food from cloned animals could take years to reach supermarket shelves. But the
backing does give hope to several struggling businesses that clone cows and pigs. The biotechnology companies believe
ranchers, dairy producers and others now will be more willing to pay upward of $16,000 per clone following last week's
tentative approval by the Food and Drug Administration to use the technology to produce food. Although no law bars
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








cloned food, the companies and their customers have for the past three years voluntarily withheld sales of cloned-
derived food pending the FDA review. An 800-page FDA report concluded Thursday there is no difference between
cloned and conventionally produced food. The FDA won't formally adopt its findings until early 2007, keeping the
voluntary ban in place. The initial milk, beef and pork products on the market likely won't come directly from cloned
animals because of the technology's cost. Instead, ranchers are expected to pay to produce a "rock star" breeder that
would produce valuable offspring for years to come. The idea is to create exact genetic duplicates of animals that
consistently produce superior offspring. Breeding today is as much art as science, and ranchers have no way of knowing
if a particular cow will produce steakhouse grade cuts or dog food. Source-Food Systems Insider, Friday, January 5,
2007, Volume 6, Issue 1
E. COLI VACCINE APPROVED IN CANADA
Canadian biopharmaceutical company, Bioniche Life Sciences Inc., received authorization to distribute its E. coli
0157:H7 cattle vaccine to Canadian veterinarians. This is the first vaccine technology for control of the bacteria and is
indicated for the reduction of shedding of E. coli 0157:H7 in cattle. Source-Food Systems Insider, Friday, January 5,
2007, Volume 6, Issue 1
KNOW WHEN COWS NEED ASSISTANCE.
Intervention is justified when a cow continues to have active contractions but makes no progress in expulsion of her calf.
Research has shown that timely, appropriate intervention (for mature cows, one hour; and for first-calf heifers, up to
two hours after the onset of abnormal contractions) increases the cow's chances of getting rebred. In a normal delivery,
the calf's forelegs and head, encased by membrane, are forced through the birth canal and emerge from the vulva. You
should train yourself to recognize an abnormal delivery and know when professional help is required. Using a
disposable glove, feel the various parts of the calf to determine its position in the birth canal. In normal position, the
bottom of the calf's feet face downward and its head can be felt between its front legs. Some abnormalities--such as one
or both forelegs back, or head turned back can be corrected by pushing the calf back and manually repositioning the
extremities. Backward presentation with rear feet first is usually uncomplicated. Other abnormal positions would likely
renuire veterinary assistance


battle


iolyestrous


19-23
Average: 21


b-JU nours
Average 18 hrs.


12 nours atter ena
of estrus


Goat Seasonal polyestrous in 12-24 1-4 days 30-36 hours after 144-155 days
Fall Average: 20 Average: 39 hrs. start of estrus Average: 150 days
Sheep Seasonal polyestrous in 14-20 20-42 hours At or near the end 144-151 days
Fall Average: 17 Average: 30 hrs. of estrus Average: 147 days
Horse Seasonal polyestrous in 10-37 2-6 days 24-28 hours before 320- 380 days
Spring Average: 21 Average: 4 days the start of estrus to Average: 338-345
24 hours after the days
end of estrus
Swine Polyestrous 18-24 1-2 days 8-12 hours before 113-116 days
Average: 21 Average: 36 hrs. the end of estrus or Average: 114 days
37-40 hours after
the start of estrus
Estrus: A female animal's readiness to mate: heat
Polyestrus: Having multiple periods of estrus in a year, or during a breeding season. Multiple heat cycles
during the fall or spring.
*Bos indicus (Brahman): 293 day average.





UNIVERSITYof James F. Selph
UL FLORIDA DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock
The Foundation for The Gator Nation
ine instilue oir ooo ana Agricutural sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


2 /U-23 aays
283 days*






UNIVERSITY of th UNIVERSITY of
U NIVFLORIDAT 24h Annual Florida Cattlemen's Institute U N[FLVORIDA
The Foundation for The Cator Nation And Allied Trade Show The Foundation for The ato Nation

January 18, 2007
Osceola Heritage Park
1921 Kissimmee Valley Lane, Highway 192 East

Sponsored by:


UF/IFAS EXTENSION SERVICE AND THE FLORIDA
ALLIED INDUSTRIES


"Get'em Bred Institute"
Nutrition, Health and Management for Reproduction


8:00 AM Trade Show Opens
Moderator: Gary Mikulecky,
Chairman 2007 FCIATS,
UF/IFAS, Highlands
8:45 AM "Welcome": Dr. Jimmy Cheek,
UF/IFAS-Vice President for
Agriculture and Natural
Resources
"Welcome": Dr. Hal Phillips,
DVM, Florida Cattlemen's
Association, President
9:00 AM "Animal Health Needs for
Today's Cow Herd"-Dr. Mark
Spire, DVM, MS, DACT
Manager, Technical Services,
Schering-Plough Animal Health
10:00 AM Trade Show Break
10:30 AM "Understanding the Estrous
Cycle and Maintenance of


Pregnancy"-Dr. Bill Beal,
Professor Animal and Poultry
Science Dept., Virginia Tech
11:30 AM "The State of the State"-Charlie
Bronson, Florida Commissioner
of Agriculture
12:00 PM AWARDS
12:15 PM LUNCH
1:00 PM "Reproduction Requires
Adequate Nutrition"-Dr. Matt
Hersom, Ph.D, UF/IFAS, Animal
Sciences Department
1:45 PM "Managing Pastures for Beef
Cattle"-Dr. Joe Vendramini,
Forage Agronomist, UF/IFAS,
Range Cattle Research and
Education Center, Ona
2:30 PM Trade Show Break
3:00 PM Wrap-Up, Dr. Bill Beal


Please RSVP to our office if you plan to attend: 863-993-4846, e-mail: jselph@ifas.ufl.edu
Hotel Information: Kissimmee Quality Inn, Heritage Park 2050 E. Irlo Bronson Highway, Kissimmee, Fl,
Telephone: 407-846-4545, Room Rate: $59.00/ Night, plus tax. (Ask for Florida Cattlemen's Institute Rate)

Participants Requiring Special Accommodations Should Contact Randy Bateman (321-697-3000)
48 Hours Before The Event.





The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational
information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed,
color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department
of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension
Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.










Cat 63 Bear (black) 210

Cattle 283 Bison 270

Angus 281 Camel 410

Ayrshire 279 Chimpanzee 236

Brahman 292 Coyote 63

Brown Swiss 290 Deer (Mule and White-tailed) 200

Charolais 289 Elephant 660

Guernsey 283 Elk, Wapiti 255

Hereford 285 Giraffe 425

Holstein 279 Gorilla 270

Jersey 279 Hare 36

Limousin 289 Hippopotamus 240

Shorthorn 282 Leopard 95

Simmental 289 Lion 108

Dog 58-72 Marmoset 150

Donkey 365 Monkey (Macaque) 180

Goat 150 Moose 240

Horse 330 Muskox 255

Llama 350 Opossum 12

Pig 114 Panther 90

Sheep 150 Porcupine 210

Fur Animals Days Pronghorn 230

Chinchilla 111 Raccoon 63

Ferret 42 Reindeer 225

Fox 52 Rhinoceros (African) 480

Human 266 Seal 330

Shrew 20

Skunk 63

Muskrat 29 Squirrel (gray) 40

Nutria, Coypu 130 Tapir 390

Otter 270-300k Tiger 103

Rabbit 31 Walrus 450

Wolf 63 Whale (sperm) 450
This is a table that I found that I thought that many of you who receive this newsletter might find
interesting as to the length of gestation (the length of time the offspring have spent developing in the uterus)
of different animals. Jim Selph


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national
origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University
Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


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