Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: November 2006
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA IFAS EXTENSION



DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
November 2006 / Volume 28 Number 11

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Happy Thanksgiving
November
9 Society for Range Management; 8:30 AM, Palmdale
9 Florida Citrus Mutual District Meeting; 10:30 AM 12:00 Noon; First Baptist Church, Arcadia
11 Quail Hunting Season Begins and Runs Through March 4, 2007
17 Hardee County Cattlemen's Association All Breed Bull Sale, Cattlemen's Arena, Wauchula, Fl
23 Thanksgiving Holiday
29-1 FCA Quarterly Meeting; Ocala Hilton, Ocala, Fl
December
4 Understanding the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act; 5:30-8:30 PM;
Turner Center Exhibit Hall, Arcadia
UNDERSTANDING THE MIGRANT AND SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL WORKER
PROTECTION ACT
On December 4, 2006, the DeSoto County Extension Office will be sponsoring an educational program for farm labor
contractors and agricultural employers with compliance requirements of the migrant and seasonal agricultural worker
protection act. The program will begin at 5:30 PM at the Turner Center Exhibit Hall and snacks and drinks will be
provided. Federal and state representatives will conduct the training and there will be a special emphasis on
transportation, migrant housing, as well as H2A registration information and wage and hour's role in the enforcement
of H2A contracts. Registration for this program is not required.
WHOLE FOODS LAUNCHES "ANIMAL COMPASSIONATE" LABEL
The New York Times reported this week that Whole Foods Market will roll out a line of meat carrying labels signifying
"animal compassionate." The labels indicate the animals were raised in a humane manner until slaughter. The Times
reported that Whole Foods "decision to use the new labels comes as a growing number of retailers are making similar
animal-welfare claims on meat and egg packaging, including 'free-farmed,' 'certified humane,' 'cage free' and 'free
range.'" The Times also reported that while the animal-welfare labels are proliferating, "it remains unclear whether
they appeal to anyone other than a niche market of animal lovers, particularly since the meat and eggs are as much as
twice as expensive as products that do not carry the labels." Industry watchers agree that the increase in animal-welfare
labels has been driven in large part by animal-rights organizations. Whole Foods founder and CEO, John Mackey, is a
vegan who has been increasingly outspoken on animal-rights issues. The U.S. government does not regulate how farm
animals are treated, or verify animal-welfare labels. However, the federal government does require that labels are
truthful and has established definitions for such designations as free range, natural and organic. Source-Drovers
Alert, Thursday, October 26, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 43.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








MARKET INFORMATION
October 28, 2006

10/28/06 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 89.38 87.55 87.21
Live Heifer 89.70 87.55 87.32
Dressed Steer 139.69 136.41 136.63
Dressed Heifer 140.36 137.32 137.47
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/lm ctl50.txt

10/28/06 Last Week Last Year
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate) (Actual)
Slaughter 652,000 639,000 630,000
Live Weights 1291 1291 1284
Dressed Weights 788 788 784
Beef Production (M. of Pounds) 511.5 501.9 490.9
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/SJ LS712.txt

10114/06 Last Week Last Year
National Grading Percent
Prime 3.01% 2.67% 3.16%
Choice 51.19% 51.26% 50.70%
Select 36.96% 37.59% 36.47%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


5 Area Weekly Live Steer Price


Choice-Select Boxed Beef Price Spread
25
21 +2005 n -- --
13 1. ,
17

i 119 iim m '
1E


.1.j IE, .. ... M !l ....
01/06 0o/17 03/31 05/12 06P23 08/04 09/15 10/?7 12nOa
Week Ending Date


Sornu: AMS-ULDA, Dodq Cdty, KS &
K Sate Research & Evxtesion


Choice/Select Spread
10/27/06
$10.49/cwt
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreportsllm_xb4
03.txt

U.S. Cattle On Feed
Lots Over 1000 Head
12.25-
12.00

a-
4 I I.Il
1'' *'II






SU,,O, ofAg
Jan F~b nor Apr May lun lul Aug Sep Oct Nov DUc
rFIap fkgro


- 2006 2005 ...... ----5 yr avg 320-
-r I 2006 2005 ------5yravg

The summary below reflects the week ended October 20, 2006 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, October 24, 2006.


Calf Weight


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.


25,100 $114.93 $108.80 $105.85 $108.81 $102.02 $
AL 13,100 $110-120 $100-108 $96-105 $102-108 $93-101


ITN 19,900 $107.82 1$99.78

IFL 19,700 $89-102.50 1$84-98


GA 18,900

CORN:


$92.63

I$80-87


$97.22


$89.55


$985-100 $80-96


$83.90

$73-88


$93-113 $86-101 $85-100 $84-110 $80-103 $75-103


Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 2 to 6 cents lower from 3.32-3.36 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 12 to 14 cents higher from 3.13-3.15 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 10 to 11 cents
higher at 3.00-3.02 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 14 to 20 cents higher from 3.07-3.22 per bushel.
Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 17 to 19 cents higher from 2.99-3.09 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn
rail was 23 cents higher at 2.91 per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday October 27,
2006, http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ_GR851.txt


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


KSU Dept. of Ag Mon
www..aurmaniaTa.tfro


Weekly Beef Production







IT'S DEER-COLLISION SEASON
Hunters may look forward to the fall season, but auto insurers are understandably nervous. Each year some 1.5 million
deer-vehicle collisions kill more than 150 people, injure tens of thousands more, and cause more than $1 billion in
vehicle damage. And the damage is probably much higher, as auto insurers say that nearly as many collisions go
unreported, either because the owner isn't required by law to report, or because of lack of insurance. According to the
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the average cost per insurance claim for collision damage is about $2,600. With
injury claims, the total reaches $11,000 per collision. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reports that more than 11
million people hunted big game such as deer and elk in 2001, the most recent year the agency conducted its National
Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation. (The survey is conducted every 5 years.) But few believe
hunting pressure can have much of an effect on deer-vehicle collision rates. Recent studies show the deer population
growing exponentially across the United States. How to protect yourself? Insurance companies say the best defense is
alert driving. Be aware the peak time of deer movement is morning and evening, and remember that deer tend to travel
together and often cross a roadway in single file. As for those vehicle-mounted "deer whistles?" Save your money.
Research shows deer are not affected by that deterrence method. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, October 26, 2006,
Vol. 7, Issue 43.
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL--http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/.
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 9.30" 4.15" 1.36" 30.12"
FAWN WEATHER INFORMATION
Last week, we had the first real cool spell of the fall. On October 25, 2006 at 7:30 AM we recorded a low of 41.120 F.
The FAWN (Florida Automated Weather Network) can be accessed at the following website: http://fawn.ifas.ufl.edu/.
There is also a toll free number that can be called to get information when you are in the field away from a computer.
That number is: 866-754-5732. Most FAWN users are farmers or growers working in the State of Florida. The most
common usage of FAWN is in day-to-day management decisions, though FAWN can also be used in longer-term
planning. As winter approaches, the FAWN site might be a website that you want booked for easy access and also store
the toll free number in your phone.

Beef Management Calendar

November/December

Cut Hay. Check dustbags, oilers, etc.

Heavily graze pastures to be interplanted to ryegrass. Check pastures and hay fields for armyworms.

Check mineral feeder. Observe cows daily to detect calving difficulty.

Wean calves and cull Cow Herd. JCheck for external parasites, especially lice & treat.


Post calving cows have the highest nutritional requirements criteria, and start checking availability of quality
in the first 82 days. Iof animals.n b acenne lo li

Plant cool season Ryegrass and small grains. Plant cool season legumes.

Calve in well drained pastures. JSurvey pastures for poisonous plants.

Implement bull conditioning program for the breeding Get breeding soundness exams on bull battery so you
season. have time to find replacements this fall.
RESEARCHERS LOOK AT E. COLI EATING VIRUS
Researchers are working on developing a virus that will kill E. coli 0157:H7 in the digestive tract of cattle. Several years
ago, USDA researchers were trying, unsuccessfully, to get E. coli 0157 to be resident in sheep; after several tries, they
realized the sheep had a bacteria-eating virus. Researchers have isolated the virus and are now trying to develop it into a
treatment. They are moving slowly to be certain they don't create another problem with the virus. All of the viruses
being used occur naturally in cows and sheep. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, October 26, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 43.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







RED MEAT PRODUCTION DECLINES IN SEPTEMBER
U.S. red meat production during September, at 3.93 billion pounds, declined from 4.25 billion pounds during August
according to a USDA report. The number was, however, up slightly from that of September 2005. For January through
September this year, red meat production totaled 35.23 billion pounds, up from 33.89 billion pounds during the same
period last year. Beef production during September, at 2.16 billion pounds, was slightly above the previous year. Cattle
slaughter for the month was down slightly from a year earlier, but a seven-pound increase in average slaughter weights
accounts for the increase in production. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, October 26, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 43.
PLACEMENTS SLOWER, BUT ON-FEED NUMBERS STILL HIGH
October's USDA Cattle on Feed report, released last Friday, shows feedyard inventories as of October 1 up 9 percent
from one year earlier. Placements during September, however, declined 5 percent from September 2005 after large
year-to-year increases during June, July and August. Placements in the under 600 pound weight category were the
exception, showing an increase of 28 percent over one year earlier and demonstrating the continuing impact of drought.
The report shows another important trend in the number of heifers on feed. Heifer numbers in feedyards as of October
1 were up 16 percent from one year earlier, suggesting that forage shortages are limiting the expansion of breeding
herds. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, October 26, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 43.
LAW INTRODUCED TO PROHIBIT ANIMAL ID
Senator Jim Talent (R-MO) and Congresswoman Jo Ann Emerson (R-MO) has introduced legislation that would
prohibit USDA from implementing a national animal ID system. It would allow for a voluntary animal identification
system and would require USDA to protect any information obtained through a voluntary system. Source-Cow-Calf
Weekly, October 27, 2006
CATTLE-FAX SEES HIGHER CORN PRICES CONTINUING
Higher corn prices are here to stay, says Randy Blach, vice president of Cattle-Fax. Speaking at last week's joint
convention of Texas Cattle Feeders Association and Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association in Amarillo, TX,
Blach said the ethanol boom and continued feed demands will pressure feed costs at feedyards. "This isn't a short-term
thing," he said, noting U.S. ethanol production will likely see its corn usage increase from nearly 3 billion bu. to about 6
billion bu. within a few years. In addition, feedyard capacity increased by 22% from 1990-2004, "and we're still adding
pens," he says. "The need for good fundamental market information is greater today than it's ever been," Blach says.
Clayton Yeutter, USDA Secretary from 1989 to 1991, said the government's 510/gal. subsidy for ethanol production
allows an ethanol plant to "pay for itself in 18 months. So ethanol is the real wild card for beef production costs."
Yeutter projects higher corn prices in the short term, and possibly the intermediate term. He believes increased ethanol
production could foster more flexibility in the next farm bill, as some want more Conservation Reserve Program acres
put back into production to help meet the demand for more corn. Source-Cow-Calf Weekly, October 20, 2006
Poisonous Plant ID









0 1t


Lantana Black Nightshade Bracken Fern
I ran these in a newsletter last year, but with winter coming on, and the lack of moisture, I thought that I would put
them in this newsletter again. Toxicity from plants primarily results when we have a lack of available forage for cattle
and other livestock species, especially into the late fall and winter after frosts.
r UNIVERSITY of
UrFLORIDA James F. Selph
The Foundation for The Ca tor Nation DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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