Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: August 2006
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00015
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter

2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266


- I Sian jun nnw tn attend the 1 St


Annual Florida Deer/Turkey
August 2006 / Volume 28 Number 8 Management Shortcourse


JAPAN REOPENS TO U.S. BEEF
Japan announced the reopening of its market to U.S beef from cattle less than 20 months of age. USDA Secretary Mike
Johanns cited the long process of confirming the U.S. system is in full compliance with Japan's import requirements and
confirming the safety -- via "clear, scientific data" -- of U.S. beef. He also said: "Nations need reasonable methods of
addressing the inadvertent shipment of products that don't meet an importing country's specifications, without
disrupting an entire trading relationship. The U.S. has such methods of addressing noncompliant shipments from Japan,
as well as our other trading partners, and I am hopeful that going forward Japan will take a similar approach."
Japan opened its market to U.S. beef in December 2005 but closed it again the following month after a U.S. veal
shipment was found to contain product not allowed under the original agreement. In 2003, the U.S. exported $1.4 billion
worth of beef and beef products to Japan. Source-P. Scott Shearer,Cow-Calf Weekly, July 28, 2006
1ST ANNUAL FLORIDA DEERITURKEY MANAGEMENT SHORTCOURSE
On August 18, 2006, we will be having the 1st Annual Florida Deer/Turkey Management Shortcourse at the Turner
Center Exhibit Hall beginning at 8:00 AM. This program is designed to educate landowners, managers, and hunters on
the ecology and management of Deer and Turkey in Florida. Registration is only $50 (Due August 11h) and includes a
noon smoked nrime rib meal. Late Registration cost is $75.00. See the attached "' ... i 0. .


MARKET INFORMATION
July 31, 2006

7/29/06 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 79.48 79.68 79.51
Live Heifer 79.55 79.53 79.65
Dressed Steer 126.04 126.22 122.99
Dressed Heifer 125.98 126.00 122.69
htto:llwww.ams.usda.aov/mnrenortsllm ctl50.txt

7/29/06 Last Week Last Year
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate) (Actual)
Slaughter 669,000 657,000 637,000
Live Weights 1274 1272 1262
Dressed Weights 783 783 779
Beef Production (M. of Pounds) 521.9 512.3 493.7
htt:ll/www.ams.usda.aov/mnrenortslSJ LS712.txt

7/15/06 Last Week Last Year
National Grading Percent
Prime 2.68% 2.43% 2.71%
Choice 52.85% 52.33% 54.23%
Select 37.89% 38.14% 35.57%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreportslNW LS196.txt
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, cree
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperativ,
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of Count


2006 2005 ------ 5 yr avg


Choice/Select Spread
7/28/06
$16.29/cwt
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/lm_x
b403.txt
JULY 1 CATTLE INVENTORY
U.S.
MI. Head
140
2006 = 1057 Million Head
0+1.1 Percent
130

120
110
=_..d Ills. .


WYeekly Beet Production


1









5 Area Weekly Live Steer Price Weekly Choice Cutout
100 $170
95 -- ----- -------------- $160
90 -$150- - --
85 -
80 -- ----
75 ------ 7 --...----------------- -
75 ---------- ----- -L'---- ----- ----- ----
70 $120
2006 2005 -----5yr avg 2006 2005 ----- SyrAvg

The summary below reflects the week ended June 27, 2006 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to 650-
lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, July 25, 2006.


C'.ill' 0i 1h 5a111i-55ii II,. (0bil-(045iI IIIh "aiHI-"5i I ),. 5IiII-55i. II 6. (il-l 5 IIhI "i -"5g II I ,.

TX 311.111111 '121.21 '123.62 '115.51 15.62 I 111.38 I'f14.40l

TAL 16,800 $115-122 $107-112 $98-106 $109-117 $101-107 $92.00-100.00

ITN 10,100 $114.54 $108.28 $102.37 $106.89 $100.17 $92.64
FL 7,500 $100-117 $90-113 $85-91 $94-112 89-102 91.00-95.00

GA 11,100 $102-122 $95-112 $92-105.50 $98-115.50 $90-105 $95.50-97.00

CORN:
CORN: Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 2 to 3 cents lower from 2.37- 2.40 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2
truck Yellow Corn was 5 to 6 cents lower at 2.17 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 3 cents lower from
2.07-2.09 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 6 % to 9 % cents lower from 2.17 %-2.23 % per bushel. Toledo
US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 3% to 4 % cents lower from 2.13 %-2.23 % per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn
rail was 5 cents higher at 1.79 % per bushel.
Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday July 28, 2006
http://www.ams.usda.2ov/mnreports/SJ GR851.txt
BEEF MARKETS--JULY PLACEMENTS SURGE; COW HERD EXPANSION SLOWS
The July Cattle on Feed report and the mid-year Cattle Inventory released last Friday tell the story of continuing
drought, writes Darrell Mark, University of Nebraska economist, at www.lmic.info/ After a drop in May placements,
feeders placed 10.7% more cattle in June, mostly lighter weight feeders. Placements of cattle less than 600 lbs. were up
37%, and calves 600-700 lbs. were up 24%. Meanwhile, placements more than 700 lbs. fell 5-6% from 2005. Mark says
the higher placements of lighter cattle suggest drought is driving light stockers off grass early, and early weaning may be
taking place. Thus, supplies of feeder cattle may be tighter than expected this fall. He says the trend also points to
increased slaughter numbers in 2007's first quarter, which may pressure fed prices. Mark calls the growing front-end
supply of cattle on feed "concerning." Cattle on feed for more than 120 days (3.9 million head), is up 18.2% from last
year, the fourth consecutive month of double-digit increases. And, it's translating to increasingly larger dressed weights.
Meanwhile, the Cattle Inventory report estimated the July 1 all-cattle and calf inventory at 105.7 million head, up 1.1%
from July 1, 2005. Both the beef-cow and dairy-cow inventory grew only 100,000 head from last year. Mark believes
limited feed supplies and drought are dampening herd expansion, while the number of heifers held for beef cow
replacements in 2006 (5 million head) was unchanged from 2005. That slow growth in beef-cow numbers portends just a
0.3% increase in the 2006 calf crop. At 37.9 million calves, that's less than 400,000 head more than the 2004 calf crop,
which was the smallest in history. Thus, he says, fall calf supplies are expected to remain tight, which points to another
year of relatively high feeder cattle prices.
Source--- Joe Roybal,Cow-Calf Weekly, July 28, 2006
POLITICIAN MOVES TO BAN CARBON MONOXIDE IN MEAT PACKAGING
Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) says she'll introduce legislation to ban the use of carbon monoxide (CO) in the packaging of

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







meat. Currently, the Food and Drug Administration allows the use of CO for meat packaging, which recent Texas Tech
University and University of Georgia research shows prevents the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Melvin Hunt, Kansas
State University, says the "effort to discredit the science that went into it -- and efforts to discredit the federal agency
that reviewed it three times -- is scientifically inaccurate and unfortunate." For more on the use of CO in meat
packaging, type in a web search engine: Carbon Monoxide in Meat Packaging: Myths and Facts. Source-P. Scott
Shearer,Cow-Calf Weekly, July 28, 2006
TRADE NEGOTIATIONS COLLAPSE
International trade negotiations broke down this week in Geneva, Switzerland, suspending the "Doha Round" of talks
aimed at breaking down trade barriers and reducing world poverty. In a news conference following the suspension, U.S.
Trade Representative Susan C. Schwab and Ag Secretary Mike Johanns said the U.S. team came to the negotiations
with a great deal of flexibility and willingness to reduce farm subsidies that distort trade. "Unfortunately," Schwab said,
"most of our trading partners showed up with exactly the same positions as they had two, three weeks ago when the last
set of Doha Round negotiations hit the skids." The breakdown in trade negotiations will play a big role in development
of the 2007 farm bill. Secretary Johanns has stated that the new bill would focus on improving international trade and
market access for U.S. commodities, likely meaning reductions in domestic farm subsidies. But if other nations are
unwilling to negotiate their own subsidies and other trade barriers, pressure to maintain supports here will grow.
Already, several members of Congress are calling for a one-year extension of the current farm bill. Source-Drovers
Alert, Thursday, July 27, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 30
WESTERN RANCHERS JOIN LAWSUIT TO DEFEND GRAZING REGULATIONS
The Public Lands Council, an organization of public-lands ranchers throughout the West, has joined in a lawsuit to help
defend the final grazing regulations issued by the Bureau of Land Management. The PLC represents the National
Cattlemen's Beef Association, the American Sheep Industry and the Association of National Grasslands. Upon
publication on July 12, the Western Watersheds Project immediately filed a lawsuit in federal district court in Idaho to
block the regulations. A second suit was also filed by the National Wildlife Federation, the Natural Resources Defense
Council, the Idaho Conservation League and the Idaho Wildlife Federation. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, July 27,
2006, Vol. 7, Issue 30
FAWN-DESOTO COUNTY ANNUAL RAINFALL
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC Total
0.32" 3.26" 0.97" 0.14" 2.07" 2.71" 5.84" 15.31"
This information comes from our FAWN site located behind the Extension Office. You can access this information from
our website by scrolling down and clicking on FAWN. The website is: http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/. You might find it of
interest that on July 30, 2006 at 10:15 PM we recorded winds speeds of 87.35 mph and at 11:00 PM wind speeds of
146.11 mph. I don't know if this was an abnormality in the recording or if there possibly were tornados in the vicinity.
SUNBELT AGRICULTURAL EXPOSITION, MOULTRIE, GA.
For those who have never attended the Sunbelt Expo. in Moultrie, I would encourage you to consider attending this
year. Hours for the Sunbelt Expo are 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday and 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. on
Thursday. Cost of admission is $6.00 per person per day. The mission of the Expo is: "To produce the Premier Farm
Show in the World; one that is conducive to trade and emphasizes information, education and implementation of the
latest agricultural technology, research and equipment." All kinds of farm and ranch equipment is exhibited and in
many cases demonstrated. I am interested in how many people might be interested in attending if transportation was
available such as a bus to transport up and back. If you are interested either e-mail me at iimselph(ufl.edu or call
(993-4846) the office and let us know. Jim
NACAA 2006 TOUR-ALTERNATIVE LIVESTOCK
Last week, I attended the National Association of County Agricultural Agents Annual Meeting and Professional
Improvement Conference in Cincinnati Ohio. On Wednesday, we conduct agricultural tours and I selected and
attended the Alternative Livestock. There were four farm/ranch stops that included Goats, Free Range Turkeys,
Llama/Alpacas, and Elk. In almost all states, the numbers of operations raising goats is increasing due to the demand
for this meat source from different ethnic groups. Llamas and Alpacas are being raised for their wool and to some
degree as companion animals. The Llama/Alpaca do not appear to me to be economically feasible at this time with
breeding animals selling for $30,000-50,000. The free ranging turkey was a niche market that they processed and
marketed directly to the public. Both the goats and free ranging turkeys used a breed of guard dog called the Great
Pyrenees. The pictures below are some that I took of the different operations. I thought you might enjoy seeing them.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.























Beef Management Calendar


_I August/September

Control Smutgrass with Velpar if there is adequate soil Check dustbags, oilers, etc.
moisture.

Treat for liver flukes as close to August 15th as possible. Check pastures and hay fields for armyworms.

Check mineral feeder. IRevaccinate calves at weaning for blackleg.

Wean calves and cull Cow Herd. Pregnancy check cows.

If cattle grubs were found on cattle last winter or heel flies Determine bull replacement needs, develop selection
were observed in the pasture, treat for cattle grubs in criteria, and start checking availability of quality
August. I animals.

Heavily graze pastures to be inter-planted to cool season Pregnancy test and cull open heifers from replacement
pastures. herd.




James F. Selph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock




























The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


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Participating Agents and
Specialist
Jim Selph DeSoto County
863/993-4846
Dr. Bill Giuliano-Wildlife Ecology and
Conservation Department
352/846-0575
Robert Halman Collier County
239-353-4244
Lockie Gary Hardee County
863/773-2164
Gary Mikulecky Highlands County
863/402-6540
Christa Carlson Manatee County
941/722-4524
Pat Hogue/Pat Miller Okeechobee
County
863/763-6469
Brantley Ivey- Polk County
863/519-8677
Sonja Crawford- Hendry County
863/674-4092
Shelley Humphries Glades County
863/946-0244
Steffany Dragon/Brent Broaddus -
Hillsborough County
813/744-5519

Registration Form
Name:
Address:
City:
Phone #:
E-Mail:
Number Attending:
Payment Amount: $





For information, including registration, contact Dr.
Bill Giuliano, UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife
Ecology and Conservation, 352-846-0575 or Jim
Selph, DeSoto County Extension Director, 863-993-
4846.


This program is designed to
educate landowners,
managers, and hunters on the
ecology and management of
Deer and Turkey in Florida.
The science-based information
will come from a variety of
sources, including landowners,
the hunting industry,
academia, NGO's, and natural
resource agencies, and be
presented in layperson terms.


Advanced Registration: $50.00
Late Registration after 8/11/06: $75.00
Make Payment to: South Florida Beef
Forage Program
Mail Registration and Payment to:
DeSoto County Extension, PO Box
310, Arcadia, Florida, 34266
Website Information:
http://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/Wildlife and
Conservation/wildlife and conservation.htm


,tUNIVERSITY OF

TFLORIDA


IFAS EXTENSION

st Annual Deer/

Turkey Management

Shortcourse
Turner Center Annex
Arcadia, FI

Auaust 18. 2006


Cooperators:
UF/IFAS Dept. of Wildlife Ecology &
Conservation
South Florida Beef Forage Program
FWC


UN I *L11 AII 1


LODGING AVAILABLE AT:
HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS 863-494-5900


SOLUTIONS
foryour LIFE




Agenda


Presiding: Jim Selph
7:45 Registration & coffee
8:00 Welcome & Introductions-Jim
Selph & Bill Giuliano
Turkey Ecology,

Management, & Issues
8:05 Turkey Facts: Brian Zielinski -
Biologist, National Wild Turkey
Federation
8:25 Turkey Habitat Management:
Lovett Williams Biologist and
Owner, Real Turkeys
8:55 Supplemental Feeding and Food
Plots for Turkeys: Brian Zielinski
Biologist, National Wild Turkey
Federation
9:15 Harvest Management and its
Effects on Turkeys: Larry Perrin
Turkey Program Coordinator,
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
9:45 Break


Deer Ecology,

Management, & Issues
10:00 Deer Facts: Robert Vanderhoof
Deer Program Coordinator,
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
10:20 Deer Habitat Management:
Steve Shea Biologist, St. Joe
Company
10:50 Supplemental Feeding and Food
Plots for Deer: TBA
11:10 Quality Deer Management:
David Guynn Professor,
Clemson University
11:40 Harvest Management and its
Effects on Deer: Robert
Vanderhoof- Deer Program
Coordinator, Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission
12:10 Q&A with Speakers
12:30 Lunch
1:30 Field/Site Visit and Meeting
with Managers and Speakers at
a local Ranch


Corporate Sponsors

Gulf Coast Tractor

and Equipment



(e)


National Wild
Turkev Federation


WAL*MART
ALWAYS LOW PRICES '

Of Arcadia



COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA, INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES, Larry R. Arrington,
Director, in cooperation with the United States
Department of Agriculture, publishes this
information to further the purpose of the May 8 and
June 30, 1914 Acts of Congress; and is authorized
to provide research, educational information and
other services only to individuals and institutions
that function with non-discrimination with respect to
race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,
sexual orientation, marital status, national origin,
political opinions or affiliations.




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