Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089228/00014
 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: July 2006
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00014
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266 Sign up now to attend the 1st
Annual Florida Deer/Turkey
Jul 2006 / Volume 28 Number 7 Management Shortcourse

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
August
18 1st Annual Deer/Turkey Management Shortcourse, Turner Center Exhibit Hall


September
27-28 2006 Grazing Management School, Hardee County Agri-Civic Center, Wauchula

29 FCA 12th Annual Quality Heifer Sale, Arcadia Stockyards, Arcadia

October
6 Black Brangus Bull Sale, Arcadia Stockyards, Arcadia
5-6 2nd Annual Quail Management Shortcourse, Monticello Opera House and the Plantations in
Jefferson County
17-19 Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition, Moultrie, Ga.
JAPAN AGREES TO LIFT BEEF BAN
The Japanese government announced on Wednesday an agreement to resume imports of U.S. beef. The agreement
comes, however, with numerous conditions and it remains unclear just when shipments will resume. According to news
reports, Japan will send three groups of officials to the United States over the next month to inspect the 35 packing
plants certified for exporting beef to Japan. The agreement also calls for unannounced inspections of plants in which
Japanese officials can accompany U.S. inspectors. Only beef from animals 20 months of age or younger will qualify for
export, and all specified risk materials must be removed. Japan initially opened its markets to U.S. beef under similar
specifications on Dec. 12 but reinstated the ban on Jan. 20 after receiving a shipment of veal containing bones listed as
specified risk materials. Although the agreement is a positive step toward resumption of trade with Japan, many on the
American side remain cautious. For instance, Ag Secretary Mike Johanns said, "I cannot emphasize strongly enough the
importance of Japan recognizing the U.S. food-safety-inspection system as a single, effective system and acting
accordingly in resuming trade." NCBA's CEO Terry Stokes expressed his group's frustration, saying, "We know from
experience that Japan has become an unreliable trading partner. Our cattlemen have paid a tremendous price for the
continued delays by Japanese officials to resume beef trade on scientifically recognized principles." Stay tuned. The
haggling on this deal is far from over. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, June 22, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 25

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.









MARKET INFORMATION
June 6, 2006

6/24/06 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 83.22 79.89 82.10
Live Heifer 83.17 80.43 82.18
Dressed Steer 129.67 125.08 129.17
Dressed Heifer 130.21 125.45 129.24
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/Im ctl50.txt

6/24/06 Last Week Last Year
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate) (Actual)
Slaughter 708,000 704,000 644,000
Live Weights 1253 1250 1254
Dressed Weights 769 767 770
Beef Production (M. of Pounds) 542.0 537.5 493.1
htto://www.ams.usda.aov/mnreoorts/SJ LS712.txt


6/10/06


Last Week Last Year


National Grading Percent
Prime 2.32% 2.25%
Choice 50.27% 50.67%
Select 40.39% 39.39%
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/NW LS196.txt


5 Area Wkly Wtd Avg Sltr Steer Price





85------------,-------------
1o0






75 ------------- -------

70
..... 5yrAvg 2005 2006


Weekly Choice Cutout


155 -- -- -- -. ----L


14,- ...... .... .. .. ...

125 --- .--- ----- -- --- -- ------ .
130 ------------------ --- --
125 20
120-
...... 5 yr Avg 2005 2006


2.39%
54.67%
37.77%


I-


2006 2005 ----- 5yravg


Choice/Select Spread

$22.35/cwt
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/lm_x
b403.txt


FEEDLOT PLACEMENTS
US Total, Monthly
l Iuu Head
3,000
2,750
2,500 I Avg.
200004
2,250 A



1.500

JN FFR M Y JLA JFa AL. RFP WT DFC
Lsk eMatli Utm in aom W- e W


The summary below reflects the week ended June 27, 2006 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to 650-
lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, June 27, 2006.


ICalf Weight


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.
--550 lbs. l


TX 130,300 $119.00 $116.26 $110.78 $114.65 $108.76 $101.81

AL 12,800 $119-128 $110-116 $93-104 $110-116 $100-108 $95-102

TN 9,700 $120.32 $110.65 $102.44 $110.19 $101.79 $91.31


FL 6,800 $93-119 $95-112


GA 11,600


$93-109 $86-106


$103-123 $95-115 $91-104 $95-116 $87-111 $84-108


CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 16 to 17 cents lower from 2.30-2.32 per bushel. Kansas City US No
2 truck Yellow Corn was 4 to 5 cents lower from 2.08-2.10 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn
was steady to 2 cents higher from 1.98-2.00 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 2 1/ cents higher
from 2.19 1/2-2.27 /2 per bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 2 /2 cents higher from 2.10 1/2-2.23 1/2
per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn rail was 4 /2 cents higher at 1.91 /2 per bushel.
Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday June 23, 2006
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ GR851.txt

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


Weekly Beef Production


I







JAPANESE RETAIL PRICES OF BEEF
The following information comes from the USDA Market News Report for June 20, 2006. I thought that
our Cattlemen might be interested in what prices Japanese customers pay for a pound of beef. Currently
the figures are not available for U.S. Beef due to the Japanese government having shut down imports
from America. The price is based on the U.S. Dollar and in pounds.
April 2006 Chuck Brisket Sirloin Round
Japanese Wagyu Bargain Beef $20.27 $19.81 $38.61 $19.81
Japanese Wagyu Normal Beef $25.03 $25.38 $46.86 $24.38
Australian Imported No-RollBeef $6.58 $7.35 $12.34 $5.77
Australian Imported Normal Beef $9.48 $10.41 $14.97 $7.58

If you are not familiar with Japanese Wagyu cattle, they are the primary in
cattle raised in Japan today. In the Japanese language 'Wa' means
Japanese or japanese-style and 'gyu' means cattle. Most of the cattle were
influenced by British and Continental breeds for a few generations nearly
100 years ago. The beef from Wagyu is called Kobe Beef and is a legendary, f
delicacy. This is a type of beef that is in the upper ranges of Prime.
COMPARE THE MARBLING OF U.S. PRIME & KOBE BEEF I' <

AVERAGE JAPANESE
PRIME U.S. KOBE
BEEF BEEF




Interestingly, Wagyu cattle are reported to have ;lti"llactorl le -tdiclt n3 1up11pol`s? o not put on a
corresponding amount of back fat, KPH fat, etc.
THE SHARK BRINGS HIGH-END AUSSIE BEEF LINE TO U.S.
Professional golfer Greg Norman, known as "the great white shark," is debuting a new "luxury brand" of Australian
beef to the U.S. market. Called Greg Norman Australian PrimerT (GNAP), the line includes Greg Norman Signature
Wagyu, a 350-day, grain-fed, super-premium line of Wagyu beef; and Greg Norman Premium, a range of 120-day,
grain-fed beef. Also, as part of the program are Greg Norman 100% Australian Beef Patties and Hot Dogs.
The line is produced in partnership with Australian Ag Company (AAco), which a GNAP release says has more than
600,000 "BSE-free cattle" on 24 stations and feedlots comprising 22 million acres in Australia's Queensland and
Northern Territory. AAco's "farm-to-plate" standard ensures complete management over the entire supply chain, AAco
says. Norman says he sees a big future for quality Australian grain-fed beef in the U.S. because "there's no doubt
Australian food products, and beef in particular, resonate very strongly with U.S. consumers because of Australia's
clean, green, wholesome image." Source-Cow-Calf Weekly, June 16, 2006. NOTE: Hopefully this company will
not make BSE an issue in selling beef to the general American public. I have searched the GNAP website and did
not find BSE mentioned, rather they address the issue of markets increasingly looking for assurances over
food safety, traceability and integrity. They do mention that "There have been a few issues around the world
with beef in recent years. For more information on this: http://www.gnaprime.com.au/index.php. J. Selph
DROUGHT CONTINUES TO SPREAD
Drought and dry conditions generally expanded and worsened across the continental United States last week. More than
half of the lower 48 states were classified as abnormally dry or worse; 35 percent experienced moderate to exceptional
drought, an area 17 percent larger than the week before. It has caused increasing stress on crops across the country.
According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, 46 percent of the winter wheat in the primary production
states was in poor or very poor condition as of June 12; at this time last year, that figure was only 16 percent. Other
crops with larger proportions in poor or very poor condition compared to this time last year included pastures and
rangelands (29 percent now and 11 percent a year ago), oats (26 percent and 8 percent), cotton (22 percent and 9
percent) and sorghum (20 percent and 5 percent). Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, June 22, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 25
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







SENATOR FRIST STILL WORKING ON ESTATE TAX
In June, the Senate rejected a measure to repeal the estate tax; now Senate Republicans are trying to draft compromise
legislation. A proposal by Arizona Republican Jon Kyl that would exempt estates valued at $10 million dollars from
taxation seems to be the most likely compromise. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist says he'd like to move successful
legislation within the next two weeks; he hopes for resolution on the issue before the end of the year. Source-Drovers
Alert, Thursday, June 22, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 25
CALF PRICES CONTINUE TO PRESSURE FEEDYARD MARGINS
Profits have been hard to come by for cattle feeders this year, and it appears the trend will continue through the
summer. Analysts at the Livestock Marketing Information Center estimate a breakeven price of $87 per hundredweight
for a 750-pound steer placed on feed during May. The futures board, meanwhile, indicates sale prices around $83 for
cattle finished late this summer. According to LMIC, slaughter-cattle prices over the past 20 years have averaged about
85 percent of calf prices. This spring, the "sell/buy margin" dropped as low as 62 percent. Fed-cattle prices over the past
week have averaged about $80, and wholesale beef prices have held up well, running above $150 per hundredweight for
the Choice cutout this week. The Choice-Select spread is unusually wide at more than $22 but probably will narrow
seasonally in the coming weeks. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, June 22, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 25
WHAT MAKES FOR GOOD HORSE HAY
Horse owners and hay producers don't always agree on how to identify safe, good quality horse hay. Here is a list of seven key
characteristics buyers should consider when evaluating horse hay. Krishona Martinson and Paul Peterson, University of
Minnesota extension agronomists, spoke about these characteristics at a recent Minnesota Horse Expo seminars.
1) Mold/Moisture Buy hay baled between 15-17% moisture and it should be free of mold. Hay baled above 25% moisture
poses the threat of severe heat damage or spoilage, mold growth, and/or hay fires.
2) Maturity Don't equate seed heads with "good" hay. Seed heads just indicate that the plants are mature, with thick stems,
more fiber, less protein and decreasing levels of digestible energy. But hay with more leaves and softer, smaller stems are
better quality.
3) Cut Or Crop Don't base nutritional value on when hay is cut, the agronomists say. First cutting can often produce more
coarse hay than later cuttings. But good and bad horse hay can be produced in any cutting.
4) Grass Hay Vs Alfalfa Alfalfa and clover generally have higher protein content than grasses. So alfalfa hay is a good
protein source for young developing horses. But it may have more protein than what other horses need.
5) Smell Not all sweet-smelling hay is good, caution the experts. Sometimes hay smells sweet because sugars within it
carmelize, which indicates mold presence.
6) Color A green color is only a fair indicator of hay quality, Peterson says. "Bleached color indicates exposure to sunlight
or rain, and can mean vitamin A has oxidized. But other essential nutrients are usually present in bleached hay."
7) Storage Considerations/Spoilage Once you've bought it, keep stored hay away from water and wild animals, which can
contaminate it. Source-UF/IFAS Animal Science Newsletter, June 2006TTTTTTTTTT

Beef Management Calendar

_I July/August
Control weeds in summer pastures. Check dustbags, oilers, etc.

Consider preconditioning calves before sale including Check pastures and hay fields for grubs, mole crickets,
vaccination for shipping fever and IBR at least 3 weeks spittlebugs and armyworms.
before sale.

Check mineral feeder. IRevaccinate calves at weaning for blackleg.

Wean calves and cull Cow Herd. Pregnancy check cows.



James F. Selph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock



The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.





Participating Agents and
Specialist
Jim Selph DeSoto County
863/993-4846
Dr. Bill Giuliano-Wildlife Ecology and
Conservation Department
352/846-0575
Robert Halman Collier County
239-353-4244
Lockie Gary Hardee County
863/773-2164
Gary Mikulecky Highlands County
863/402-6540
Christa Carlson Manatee County
941/722-4524
Pat Hogue/Pat Miller Okeechobee
County
863/763-6469
Brantley Ivey- Polk County
863/519-8677
Sonja Crawford- Hendry County
863/674-4092
Shelley Humphries Glades County
863/946-0244
Steffany Dragon/Brent Broaddus -
Hillsborough County
813/744-5519

Registration Form
Name:
Address:
City:
Phone #:
E-Mail:
Number Attending:
Payment Amount: $





For information, including registration, contact Dr.
Bill Giuliano, UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife
Ecology and Conservation, 352-846-0575 or Jim
Selph, DeSoto County Extension Director, 863-993-
4846.


This program is designed to
educate landowners,
managers, and hunters on the
ecology and management of
Deer and Turkey in Florida.
The science-based information
will come from a variety of
sources, including landowners,
the hunting industry,
academia, NGO's, and natural
resource agencies, and be
presented in layperson terms.


Advanced Registration: $50.00
Late Registration after 8/11/06: $75.00
Make Payment to: South Florida Beef
Forage Program
Mail Registration and Payment to:
DeSoto County Extension, PO Box
310, Arcadia, Florida, 34266
Website Information:
Hhttp://desoto.ifas.ufl.edu/WildlifeH and
Conservation/wildlife and conservation.htm


,tUNIVERSITY OF

TFLORIDA


IFAS EXTENSION

st Annual Deer/

Turkey Management

Shortcourse
Turner Center Annex
Arcadia, FI

Auaust 18. 2006


Cooperators:
UF/IFAS Dept. of Wildlife Ecology &
Conservation
South Florida Beef Forage Program
FWC


UN I *L11 AII 1


LODGING AVAILABLE AT:
HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS 863-494-5900


SOLUTIONS
foryour LIFE




Agenda


Presiding: Jim Selph
7:45 Registration & coffee
8:00 Welcome & Introductions-Jim
Selph & Bill Giuliano
Turkey Ecology,

Management, & Issues
8:05 Turkey Facts: Brian Zielinski -
Biologist, National Wild Turkey
Federation
8:25 Turkey Habitat Management:
Lovett Williams Biologist and
Owner, Real Turkeys
8:55 Supplemental Feeding and Food
Plots for Turkeys: Brian Zielinski
Biologist, National Wild Turkey
Federation
9:15 Harvest Management and its
Effects on Turkeys: Larry Perrin
Turkey Program Coordinator,
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
9:45 Break


Deer Ecology,

Management, & Issues
10:00 Deer Facts: Robert Vanderhoof
Deer Program Coordinator,
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
10:20 Deer Habitat Management:
Steve Shea Biologist, St. Joe
Company
10:50 Supplemental Feeding and Food
Plots for Deer: TBA
11:10 Quality Deer Management:
David Guynn Professor,
Clemson University
11:40 Harvest Management and its
Effects on Deer: Robert
Vanderhoof- Deer Program
Coordinator, Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission
12:10 Q&A with Speakers
12:30 Lunch
1:30 Field/Site Visit and Meeting
with Managers and Speakers at
a local Ranch


Corporate Sponsors

Gulf Coast Tractor

and Equipment



(e)


National Wild

Turkev Federation


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA, INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES, Larry R. Arrington,
Director, in cooperation with the United States
Department of Agriculture, publishes this
information to further the purpose of the May 8 and
June 30, 1914 Acts of Congress; and is authorized
to provide research, educational information and
other services only to individuals and institutions
that function with non-discrimination with respect to
race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,
sexual orientation, marital status, national origin,
political opinions or affiliations.




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