Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: June 2006
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00013
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266 Don't forget to attend the
Cattlemen's Convention &
June 2006 / Volume 28 Number 6 Allied Trade Show

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

June
19-20 Florida Cattlemen's College, Marco Island Marriott, Marco Island
20-22 Florida Cattlemen's Convention and Allied Trade Show, Marco Island Marriott, Marco Island

August
18 First Annual Deer/Turkey Management Shortcourse, Turner Center Exhibit Hall

September
29 FCA 12th Annual Quality Heifer Sale, Arcadia Stockyards, Arcadia
U.S. SENATORS PURSUE END TO JAPANESE BEEF BAN
Thirty-one U.S. senators sent letters to Japan's prime minister this week urging an end to the ban on U.S. beef. The
letter suggests there is "overwhelming scientific evidence supporting the safety of American beef." Additionally this
week, James Zumwalt, minister at the U.S. embassy in Tokyo, has warned Japan against imposing another total ban on
U.S. beef, even if prohibited risk materials are found in a shipment. He said Japan should, under the terms of a bilateral
trade agreement, only ban shipments from the particular meat processor found violating the shipment regulations.
Kansas Sen. Pat Roberts said this week he believes the latest round of lobbying will convince the Japanese to resume
American imports of beef. Roberts said Congress could review placing tariffs on Japanese products if the ban is not
lifted. Last fall, Roberts and North Dakota Sen. Kent Conrad introduced legislation to impose such tariffs before the ban
was lifted in December. Japan's prime minister is scheduled to visit Washington in late June and the U.S. wants the
matter solved before that time. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, June 1, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 22
RAPID TESTING FOR FMD
Scientists at California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have developed a rapid diagnostic test that
simultaneously tests for foot-and-mouth disease and six other look-alike diseases in livestock. The new test, still in the
validation stage, reduces the time for diagnosing all seven diseases from days to hours. According to an LLNL release,
the U.S. livestock industry could lose up to $3 million in direct costs for every hour's delay in diagnosing FMD. The test
could minimize the scope and impact of an outbreak by allowing early diagnosis. In addition to the test, the researchers
have made advances in testing and tracking samples that could improve agricultural disease surveillance. The LLNL
scientists are working in partnership with the Homeland Security Department, USDA and University of California.
Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, June 1, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 22

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








MARKET INFORMATION
June 6, 2006

5/28/06 Last Week Last Year
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 80.72 79.22 86.80
Live Heifer 80.87 79.26 86.90
Dressed Steer 126.46 125.05 138.10
Dressed Heifer 126.74 124.84 137.84

6/03/06 Last Week Last Year
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate) (Actual)
Slaughter 609,000 698,000 568,000
Live Weights 1244 1240 1243
Dressed Weights 762 759 761
Beef Production (M. of Pounds) 462.2 527.4 429.4


$140


$ 120 '
-- 2006 -- 2005 ...... 5 yrAvg


-- 2006 2005 -.... -5 yr Ag


Weekly Choice C utoul
$170

$160

$150- ----- ----------- --

5140 -- - -- -

$130


$120
2006 -2005 ------ 5 yr Avg

Choice/Select Spread
$22.64/cwt


Weekly Choice Cutout: In the early part of
2006, we were mirroring 2005, but for the
2nd quarter it has been below 2005. With
summer coming on it typically slumps in the
heat.
Weekly Steer Dressed Weights: For all of
2006, weights have been above last year and
the 5 year average. This means that the
volume of marketable red meat is climbing.
Such trends can impact price of feeder
calves this summer and fall. J. Selph


The summary below reflects the week ended May 23, 2006 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to 650-
lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, May 23, 2006.


Calf Weight 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.

TX 24,000 $122.49 $111.02 $106.45 $115.22 $100.17 $92.49
TAL 9,100 $115-125 $106-113 $97-106 $111-120 $97-107 $92-101 S


ITN 17,600 $118.48 $108.93 $98.33

FL 5,200 $105-117 $100-111

GA 7,300 $105-123 195-114 186-99


$109.90 $99.04


$95.51


$87-112 $92-113

$96-125 $88-109 $90-101


CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 1 cent lower to 2 cents higher from 2.48-2.54 per bushel. Kansas City US No
2 truck Yellow Corn was 1 cent lower to 2 cents higher at 2.30 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 2 to
3 cents higher from 2.15-2.16 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 7 cents lower to 1 1/4 cent higher from
2.30 1/2-2.40 1/2 per bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 1 /4 to 2 /4 cents higher from 2.35 '/ -
2.45 / per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn rail was 1 cents higher at 2.07 z per bushel.
Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday June 2, 2006
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ GR851.txt
Note: Last year in April, Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was steady from 1.89-1.91 per bushel. In June it was
2.04-2.06 per bushel. Historically as the price of corn rises, the price of calves declines. I believe that the amount of
corn that may be shifted to ethanol production may have impact on corn prices this summer and fall. JFS
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


Weekly Choice Cutout


Weekly Steer Di essed Weights







DRY WEATHER ADDS TO GRAIN CONCERNS
Recent hot and dry weather has fueled concern that grain prices could rise over the coming year. Iowa
State University economist John Lawrence notes that U.S. corn stocks are ample today, but growing
demand for ethanol adds to the concern in case of a short crop. Lawrence notes that December 2006 corn
futures traded above $2.85 per bushel in mid-May, an increase of 45 cents since January. December 2007
futures, meanwhile, were over $3.10 and December 2008 were over $3.20, indicating that traders expect
prices to trend upward in the long term. But while weather and demand issues support prices, most
markets are seeing a weak basis, notes University of Illinois economist Darrel Good. The average spot
cash price of corn in central Illinois on June 1, 2006, was 28 cents under July 2006 futures, Good notes.
The harvest delivery bid was 31 cents under December 2006 futures, compared to the previous four-year
average of 23 cents under. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, June 8, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 23
OIL DECLINES WITH 'POSITIVE' IRAN NEWS
Oil prices declined Tuesday after Iran's top nuclear negotiator cited "positive steps" in a package of incentives offered
to it by world powers to curb its nuclear program. Oil market traders have feared that Iran could disrupt oil supplies if
provoked by sanctions or some other punishment from the United Nations. Crude oil on the New York Mercantile
Exchange closed Tuesday at $72.05 per barrel. Also this week, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries
indicated it would leave its output quotas steady at 28 million barrels per day. Exxon Mobile Corp., which held its
annual shareholders meeting last week in Texas, says it will not invest in alternative energy sources such as wind or
ethanol, and it has no plans to build a new refinery. I guess there's no need to change a business model that earned $36
billion in profits last year the highest ever by any U.S. corporation. Exxon also took a public relations hit last year
when it was revealed that it paid former CEO Lee R. Raymond $147 million when he retired. Source-Drovers Alert,
Thursday, June 8, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 23
USDA BY-PRODUCT DROP VALUE (STEER)
The hide and offal value from a typical slaughter steer (1) for today was estimated at 7.99 per cwt live,
down-0.04 when compared to Tuesday's value. The Lbs. and Value columns are in hundredweights
(cwt).
FOB CENTRAL U.S.TODAY'S CALCULATIONS FOR BY-PRODUCT VALUE (STEER)
Lbs Price Value

Steer hide, butt brand/Pc 4.96 68.50 5.37
Tallow, edible 1.20 14.75 0.18
Tallow, packer bleachable 4.50 13.25 0.60
Tongues, Swiss 0.26 124.00 0.32
Cheek meat, trimmed 0.32 77.50 0.25
Head meat 0.13 38.00 0.05
Oxtail, selected 0.16 155.00 0.25
Hearts, regular, bone out 0.38 17.50 0.07
Lips, unscalded 0.11 117.00 0.13
Livers, selected, export 0.96 14.00 0.13
Tripe, scalded edible 0.65 27.00 0.18
Tripe, honeycomb bleached 0.15 42.50 0.06
Lungs, inedible 0.47 2.53 0.01
Melts 0.14 2.33 0.00
Meat bone meal, bulk/ton 3.70 136.00 0.25
Blood meal, 85% bulk/ton 0.60 480.00 0.14
Totals: 18.69 7.99
Dressed equivalent basis (63% dress): 12.68
Typical slaughter steer weighs 1,275 pounds. The hide and offal value from typical fed cattle (steers and heifers
1,240) for today was estimated at 8.04 per cwt live, down-0.06 when compared to Tuesday's value.Source: U.S.
Market News, June 7, 2006
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION CATTLEMEN'S COLLEGE
This year at the Florida Cattlemen's Association Annual Convention and Allied Trade Show, there will be a Cattlemen's
College held for the 1st time. It will begin on Monday afternoon at 1:00 PM and last till 4:00 PM. The second half will
be on Tuesday morning from 8:30 AM till 11:30 AM. The following topics will be presented:
4 1:00-2:30 PM-"USDA Conservation Programs for Florida Ranchers"-Greg Hendricks & Pete Deal,
USDA/NRCS---2:30-3:00-Questions and answers
S3:00-4:30 PM-"Market Update and Forecast "--Kevin Good, Cattle Fax, Denver CO-4:30-5:00-Questions
and answers
k 8:00-11:30 AM-"Advancements to Improve Reproductive Performance"--Dr. Daniel W. Scruggs, Pfizer
Animal Health----"Matching E.P.D.'s with your Cowherd Needs"
Breed Representatives: David Gazda, American Angus Association
Robert Williams, American Charolais Association
Dr. Don Smith, Florida Brangus Breeders,
RESEARCH PROJECTS SHORTAGE OF FOOD-ANIMAL VETERINARIANS
A study commissioned by a coalition of veterinary groups predicts ongoing shortages of food-animal veterinarians.
Results of the research, recently published in the Journal of the American Veterinary MedicalAssociation, suggest the
number of veterinarians entering agricultural practice will fall 4 to 5 percent short of those needed each of the next 10
years. "With the American public more focused than ever on food safety and security, the role of the food-animal
veterinarian has never been more important," says Lyle Vogel, director of the Animal Welfare Division of the AVMA.
Participants in the study also developed a list of strategies for industry and educators to bring more veterinary students
into food-animal practice. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, June 8, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 23
ONLINE DATABASE VERIFIES WORKER STATUS
Dunkin' Donuts is participating in a pilot program that allows employers to verify a worker's legal status using online
databases from the Social Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security. Such a program could
become mandatory for employers. USDA reports that there are 4 percent fewer workers on American farms now than
at this time last year and last year's workforce was 10 percent below the year before. The American Farm Bureau points
to this as a reason why immigration reform must include a guest-worker program. A USA Today poll on views on
immigration reform shows that Americans fall into four different categories. The groups can be characterized as "hard-
liners," "unconcerned," "ambivalent" and "welcoming." Source-Food Systems Insider-E-Version, Friday, June 2,
2006, Vol.5, Issue 11

Beef Management Calendar

_I May/June
Last Date to Plant Sorghum-Sudan Grass Check dustbags, oilers, etc.

Check mineral feeder. Use at least 8% phosphorus in Check pastures and hay fields for grubs, mole crickets,
mineral and not over 2 'V to 1 calcium to phosphorus. Ispittlebugs and armyworms.

Get heifers vaccinated for brucellosis if not already done. Reimplant calves at 90 to 120 days with growth
Stimulant.

Watch for evidence of pinkeye and treat. Pregnancy check cows.

Control weeds in summer pastures. IPlant warm season perennial pastures.

Make plans to attend the FCA Convention.



James F. Selph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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