Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089228/00012
 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00012
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

nlDS5-06 ( PDF )


Full Text














DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266 Don't forget to register for the
Cattlemen's Convention &
May 2006 / Volume 28 Number 5 Allied Trade Show

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

May
3-5 55th Annual Florida Beef Cattle Shortcourse, Hilton UF Conference Center, Gainesville, Fl

June
19-20 Florida Cattlemen's College, Marco Island Marriott, Marco Island

20-22 Florida Cattlemen's Convention and Allied Trade Show, Marco Island Marriott, Marco Island

U.S. TO KILL ENTIRE FLOCKS IF BIRD FLU FOUND
USDA officials announced that if avian influenza is found in U.S. chickens or turkeys, the government will kill any flocks
suspected of having the virus -- before testing is complete, The Associated Press (AP) reported. "Quick detection will be
key to quickly containing it and eradicating it," Ron DeHaven, head of USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service, told the AP. Most of the chickens raised in the U.S. are housed in commercial facilities that are protected
against the spread of disease. But, there are several backyard and free-range flocks that are harder to protect. Officials
are encouraging owners to bring flocks inside and watch for signs of flu and report them to state or federal authorities.
USDA is testing as many as 100,000 wild birds this year and the industry is testing every commercial flock for the flu
virus. Source-Cow Calf Weekly, April 21, 2006
SOUTH KOREA SENDS EXPERTS ON FACT-FINDING MISSION TO U.S.
South Korea sent a fact-finding team to the U.S. on Wednesday to verify the age of the cow found infected with BSE in
Alabama. The cow was the second native-born case found in the U.S.
U.S. officials say that, based on photos of the animal's teeth, it was born before the feed ban took effect in April 1998,
but they haven't been able to confirm the animal's actual age. "Despite the assessment by experts here who saw the
photos' of the animal's teeth from various angles, the team will be sent to check the remains," said Kim Chang-seob, the
ministry's chief veterinary officer. South Korea has been in discussions with U.S. officials over when they will resume
imports of U.S. beef. They plan to send several teams to the U.S. in May to inspect 33 processing plants that applied for
export certification to South Korea. If all goes well, the first imports of U.S. beef are expected into the country around
early June. Source-Cow Calf Weekly, April 21, 2006
HOUSEHOLD INCOME FOR FARMS DEPENDS ON OUTSIDE SOURCES
A majority of household income for farms comes from outside sources, according to a USDA report. Off-farm sources of
income including employment earnings, business activities and investments provided 85 percent to 95 percent of
total household income for all farms between 1999 and 2003. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, April 13, 2006, Vol.
7, Issue 14
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.










This Week Last Week Last Yei


hIp trWW'* amns usda go.'mnnreports/SJ LS712.txt
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate) l.ccmall
Slaughter 621,000 608,000 600,000
Live Weights 1258 1265 1221
Dressed Weights 768 773 745
Beef Production (mil lbs) 4-4.8 468.1 444.7
http:i/www-ams.usda-gov/mnreports/lm ctl50.txt
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 82.34 84.07 93.86
Live Heifer 82.24 84.13 93.96
Dressed Steer 132.18 132.98 149."3
Dressed Heifer 131.27 133.20 149.46
U S CATTLE IMPORTS FROM MEXICO
Monthly U S CATT
Thou. Head
Thou Head
200-

150- Avg.
2000-04 100-

100- 2005
2006 50- ----
50

S0--N-J-- FEB
0--I--I-I-I I I I I I I I JAN FEB MAR


MARKET INFORMATION
April 24, 2006


LE IMPORTS FROM CANADA
Monthly











--APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC


CATTLE ON FEED
US Total, Monthly
Mi. Head
125-
12.0
11.5
11.0
10.5
10.0--

9.5-I- I I I I [- I I
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
Livestock Maretig Inforatlon Center

This chart gives an indication of where
we currently at with cattle on feed.
This year is well ahead of the last 5


Avg
2000-04
2005
2006


JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC Nestockenter 04
I -N-03 Lestock Mareig Information Center 0413/06
LNvestock Marketng Informtnaon Center 04/13o 6
The summary below reflects the week ended April 21, 2006 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to 650-
lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, April 25, 2006.



Calf Weight 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.

TX 23,600 $123.17 $110.52 $106.82 $115.74 $103.51 196.28


IAL 7,500 $120-125 I$112-120

TN 9,400 $121.26 $106.50 $95.14

IL 4,400 $110-119 $110-113


$105-124 $98-110 $87-94


$113-121 $100-110 $90-92


$110.95 $97.84


$88.28


$100-116 $94-99 1

$101-120 $90-110 IS83-93


CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 1 cent lower to 3 cents higher from 2.44-2.49 bushel. US No 2 truck Yellow
Corn was steady at 2.16 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was steady to 2 cents higher from 2.06-2.08 per
bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 1/2 cent higher from 2.14 3/4-2.23 3/4 per bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail
Yellow corn was 1 1/2 cents higher from 2.13 3/4-2.19 3/4 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn rail was 2 1/2
cents higher at 2.05 3/4 per bushel. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday April 21, 2006
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ_GR851 .txt
AFTER A GOOD START, 2006 SOFTENING FOR FEEDLOTS
The years 2002-2005 were generally profitable for cattle feeders, says Dillon Feuz at www.lmic.info. The University of
Nebraska economist says 2006 will likely be much different, with losses some weeks possibly exceeding $150/head. How
do these returns compare to historical returns? Feuz modeled weekly feedlot returns for Nebraska based on average

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


Avg.
2000-2004
2005
2006




C-N-10
04121106


GA 9,100







Nebraska feeder cattle prices and Nebraska fed cattle prices. For the 2000-2002 period, Feuz estimates feedlots averaged
a $40/head loss. During the 4th quarter of 2001 and the 1st quarter of 2002, losses averaged S115/ head, with one week
seeing losses of more than $200/head. In contrast, he estimates average profits were $80/head sold from 2002-2005. Feuz
says feedlots found the first few weeks of 2006 profitable but returns have been negative since February. At current fed-
cattle price levels, he estimates losses of about $90/head. If cash prices follow the CME Live Cattle board and decline
into the mid-to upper-$70s in the next couple of months, he says losses likely will average more than $125/head. Feeder
prices have declined some in recent weeks, but Nebraska feedlots may not generate positive returns until the 4th quarter
of 2006, he adds. Source-Beef Stocker Trends, April 18, 2006
ENERGY PRICES PUT MORE ACRES IN SOYBEANS
USDA's 2006 "Prospective Plantings" estimates projects U.S. farmers will plant record soybean
acres and fewer corn acres this year. Soybeans are expected to claim 76.9 million acres in 2006,
up 7% from 2005. Large increases are expected in the Corn Belt, including 600,000 more acres
in Illinois, and 500,000 more acres in Indiana. Meanwhile, corn plantings are expected on
78 million acres in 2006, down 5% from 2005. This would be the lowest corn acreage since 2001.
In addition, wheat is expected to total 57.1 million acres, down slightly from 2005. This will be
the lowest wheat acreage since 1972. USDA says farmers are switching from corn to less input
intensive crops due to high fertilizer and fuel costs. Source-Beef Stocker Trends, April 18, 2006
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN CONFIRMS USDA'S ID COMMITMENT
Last week, USDA Secretary Mike Johanns released an implementation plan that included timelines and benchmarks for
the National Animal Identification System (NAIS). It's newsworthy only in the respect there had been a lot of concern
regarding what USDA was actually doing in the ID and traceback arena, and whether the agency had undergone a
change of heart. The implementation plan essentially only reaffirmed 2009 as the target date for 100% NAIS
compliance, and that USDA hasn't changed its initial plan or views. The private initiatives that have been advancing
now appear to be the clear leaders, and the next step is simply moving producers to participate. While other players may
emerge, the U.S. Animal Identification Organization (USAIO) appears to be the clear-cut leader. Source-Cow-Calf
Weekly, April 14, 2006
FMD THREATENS 18 MILLION CATTLE IN EGYPT
Already in a countrywide battle against avian influenza, Egyptian officials report thousands of Egyptian cattle are
infected with foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). An Egyptian Gazette article reports eight governorates have thus far found
FMD disease. The first cases were announced in March. The disease threatens an estimated 18 million livestock,
according to the Veterinary Services Authority, affiliated to the Ministry of Agriculture, the article says. Source-Cow-
Calf Weekly, April 14, 2006

JANUARY 1 COW INVENTORY

U.S., Annual

Mil. Head
50
2006 = 33.3 Million Head
45
405 +1 Percent


Beef
30-
25- Dairy

20
2006 = 9.1 Million Head
15- +06 Percent

5 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I.
5 1 1 4.1
1976 1979 1982 1985 1988 1991 1994 1997 2000 2003 2006
C-N-02
Livestock Marketing Information Cenler 0N72
DataSoe 0S2DNASS 0120







INFORMATION SOURCES FOR BUILDING PLANS FOR CORRALS, BARNS, ETC.
4 Corrals For Handling Beef Cattle--This book features information on cattle behavior, handling techniques,
corral design corral geometry and corral components. Cost is $10 and can be purchased by calling (780) 427-
0391. http://wwwl.agric.gov.ab.ca/department/deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex27?opendocument
SBeef Housing and Equipment Handbook, Fourth Edition-This Handbook covers farmstead planning, building
construction and materials, ventilation, cow-calf and cattle feeding facilities, feed storage processing and
handling, water and waterers, utilities, manure management, and fences and gates. The cost is $15 & can be
ordered from the Midwest Plan Service at 1-800-562-3618. https://www.mwpsha.org/catalog.html
SHorse Facilities Handbook-This Handbook includes topics on site planning; design and construction of stables,
paddocks, and other outdoor and indoor facilities; manure management; storage; fencing; utilities; and fire
protection. Cost is $35 and it also is available from from the Midwest Plan Service at 1-800-562-3618.
https://www.mwpsha.org/catalog.html
4 Farm Building Plans---These building and facility plans were developed over many years by engineers at Land
Grant universities. They provide conceptual information that is excellent for planning purposes. The plans were
prepared through the USDA Cooperative Farm Buildings Plan Exchange. Cost is $5 for the first page, $2 for
each additional page. They can be ordered at the following website:
http://www.cerc.colostate.edu/Blueprints/Farmbuildings.htm
SDr. Temple Grandin's Webpage: An excellent source of information is the following website:
http://www.grandin.com/ Dr. Grandin is a designer of livestock handling facilities and an Associate Professor of
Animal Science at Colorado State University.
FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION CATTLEMEN'S COLLEGE
This year at the Florida Cattlemen's Association Annual Convention and Allied Trade Show, there will be a Cattlemen's
College held for the 1st time. It will begin on Monday afternoon at 1:00 PM and last till 4:00 PM. The second half will
be on Tuesday morning from 8:30 AM till 11:30 AM. The following topics will be presented:
4 1:00-2:30 PM-"USDA Conservation Programs for Florida Ranchers"-Greg Hendricks & Pete Deal,
USDA/NRCS---2:30-3:00-Questions and answers
S3:00-4:30 PM-"Market Update and Forecast "--Kevin Good, Cattle Fax, Denver CO-4:30-5:00-Questions
and answers
k 8:00-11:30 AM-"Advancements to Improve Reproductive Performance"--Dr. Daniel W. Scruggs, Pfizer
Animal Health----"Matching E.P.D.'s with your Cowherd Needs"
Breed Representatives: David Gazda, American Angus Association
Robert Williams, American Charolais Association
Dr. Don Smith, Florida Brangus Breeders,

Beef Management Calendar

May/June
Remove Bulls. Fertilize warm season pastures.

Check mineral feeder. Apply Spot-On Agent for Grubs and Louse.

Vaccinate and Implant (except for replacement heifers) Reimplant calves at 90 to 120 days with growth
any late calves. stimulant.

Get heifers vaccinated for brucellosis if not already done. Pregnancy check cows.

Watch for evidence of pinkeye and treat. IPlant warm season perennial pastures.

Make plans to attend the Beef Cattle Short Course. IMake plans to attend the FCA Convention.



James F. Selph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




























































































The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national
origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University
Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs