Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: April 2006
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
Don't forget the Cattlemen's
April 2006 / Volume 28 Number 4 Annual Spring Meeting

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

April
13 Advanced Beef Basic Class, Smutgrass Management and Control, 6:00 PM, DeSoto County
Extension Office- Meal Sponsored by DuPont-RSVP Required
27 DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association Annual Spring Meeting, 7:00 PM, Turner Center
Exhibit Hall

May
3-5 55th Annual Florida Beef Cattle Shortcourse, Hilton UF Conference Center, Gainesville, Fl
I Brochure is inserted into the envelope with this Newsletter
BIRD FLU AFFECTING POULTRY EXPORTS
The USDA has reduced its estimate of broiler-meat exports during the second half of 2006 in its World Agricultural
Supply And Demand Estimates. The report projects higher domestic poultry production based on slaughter numbers
and weights but says exports will decline because of international concerns over avian influenza. Estimates of 2006 beef
and pork production and exports remained steady with last month's report. Projected broiler prices are lower, however,
because of larger domestic supplies. Increased competition from poultry at the retail meat case could pressure beef
prices during the coming months. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, March 16, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 10
DESOTO COUNTY CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING
The 2006 DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association Annual Spring Meeting will be held at 7:00 p.m., Thursday, April 27,
2006, at the Turner Center Exhibit Hall. All members, along with their family are invited to attend. Members are
asked to bring a covered dish. You may bring one guest to the steak dinner. Members bringing more than one guest
will be asked to pay $10.00 per each additional guest. Not only will you be able to enjoy an excellent steak dinner by
attending, you will also hear excellent information concerning beef cattle production and most of all you will have a
great time socializing with your friends.
ADVANCED BEEF BASIC CLASS, SMUTGRASS MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL
On the evening of April 13, 2006, we will be having at the DeSoto County Extension Office a program on
Smutgrass Management and Control put on by me and Dr. Brent Sellers, Extension Weed Specialist,
UF/IFAS, Ona Research Station. Probably the number one weed that ranchers in DeSoto County are
currently fighting is Smutgrass. The purpose of this seminar will be to help you make the best decisions in
working to control this problem weed in your pastures. A BBQ meal sponsored by DuPont will be served at
6:00 PM that evening and the program will begin after the meal is over. Because we are serving a meal, we

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







request that you contact the office with an RSVP to let us know if you plan on attending. CEU's will be
offered for this educational program.


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BEEF PRODUCTION (Eitimate) (Estimate) In.al:
Slaughter 613,000 583,000 566.000
Live Weights 1279 1282 1223
Dressed Weights 782 782 '46
Beef Production (mil lbs) 477.4 454.5 419.6
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5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 83.87 86.24 92.61
Live Heifer 83.96 86.25 92.55
Dressed Steer 133.58 137.04 151.66
Dressed Heifer 133.54 137.41 151.07


select grade beef is very uniform in quality and
somewhat leaner than the higher grades. It is fairly
tender, but, because it has less marbling, it may lack
some of the juiciness and flavor of the higher grades.
Only the tender cuts should be cooked with dry heat.
Other cuts should be marinated before cooking or
cooked with moisture to obtain maximum tenderness
and flavor.


Corn Plantings
Year Planted All Purposes Harvested Yield Production Price per Unit Value of production
2006 78,019
2005 81,759 75,107 147.9 11,112,072 1.90 21,040,707
2004 80,92911 73,6311 160.4 11,807,086 2.06 24,381,294s
2003 78,6031 70,944 142.2 10,089,222 1 2.42 24,476,803
2002 78,894 1 69,330 129.3 8,966,787 2.32 20,882,448s
2001 75,702 1 68,768 138.2 9,502,580 3 1.97 18,878,819
The following are the Unit(s) used above.

1 thousand acres 2 bushel 3 thousand bushels 4 dols / bu 5 thousand dollars
The summary below reflects the week ended January 27, 2006 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, February 21, 2006.


Calf Weight


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.


TX 18,600 $128.28 |$113.91 |$103.61 $124.13 $105.78 |$94.97
AL 5,600 $125-134 $104-114 $94-100 $115-122 $103-109 i*


|TN 6,100 $123.68 |$109.02 $98.82
IFL I4,300 $109-124 $94-113 $91-97


$112.70 $100.25 |$89.64
$101-115 $92-93


|GA 17,200 $109-134 IS100-117 IS91-101 $101-125 $91-105 S82.50-90

CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 5 to 6 cents higher from 2.20- 2.23 bushel. US No 2 truck Yellow Corn
was 3 cents higher at 2.00 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 15 to 17 cents higher at 2.00 per
bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 10 1/2 to 11 1/2 cents higher from 2.05 3/4-2.16 3/4 per bushel. Toledo
US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 14 1/2 cents higher from 2.02 3/4-2.05 3/4 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow
Corn rail no bid. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday March 31, 2006
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ_GR851 .txt
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


MARKET INFORMATION
April 3, 2006 Th







PASSING OF DR. FINDLAY PATE
It is with great sadness that we inform you of the passing of Dr. Findlay Pate, our friend and colleague.
Findlay passed away on Tuesday, March 21, 2006. Dr. Pate served IFAS for over 30 years and recently retired as
Director of the Range Cattle Research and Education Center in Ona. As an IFAS leader, Dr. Pate was widely
known for his strong support of the Florida cattle industry. He asked that all programs at Ona be directed toward
improving the lives of our Florida cattle ranching families. He was widely recognized for his support of county
extension faculty, which was always a visible component of Ona's research and education programs. Many of the
IFAS faculty and staff that may have never met Findlay will remember his annual E-mails during the University
Christmas holiday. These E-mails reminded the IFAS-ALL list that, "... although much of the University will be
closed over the next week, the Range Cattle Research and Education Center will remain open to care for our
animals, oversee our programs, answer producer questions, and greet visitors to our Center." Findlay was truly
the Cattlemen's professor and an undeniable link between IFAS and the strong bond of support among the beef
clientele. He will be deeply missed by all who knew him and was impacted by his life. Source: Dr. John Arthington
Phone: (863) 735-1314 Email: iarth(2ufl.edu Center Direction and Associate
Professor UF/IFAS, Range Cattle Research and Education Center, Ona, FL
TRADE FIRST, REDUCE TESTING LATER
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns has indicated he wants to resolve the trade dispute and resume beef exports to
Japan before reducing BSE testing in the United States. The USDA has planned to eventually scale back the
intensified testing once it achieved its goal of helping determine the prevalence of BSE in U.S. herds. The
department currently tests about 1,000 cattle per day, but a budget proposal would reduce the number to about
110 per day. Johanns stated in a Monday news conference that he is in no hurry to decide on future testing levels,
suggesting he wants to resolve ongoing negotiations with Japan first. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, March 30,
2006, Vol. 7, Issue 12
GLOBAL BSE CASES DECLINING
Worldwide cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy have declined about 50 percent per year over the past three
years, according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. In 2005, just 474 animals died of BSE
around the world, compared with 878 in 2004 and 1,646 in 2003, and against a peak of several tens of thousands in
1992, the FAO said. Deaths caused by the human form of BSE, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, have also been
dropping, the FAO said. There were five deaths in 2005, compared with nine in 2004 and 18 in 2003. All of the
deaths occurred in the United Kingdom, which was hit hardest by both BSE and vCJD.
The incidence of BSE, and vCJD, may be on the wane, but misinformation and sensationalism about the disease
are rampant. One of this season's more popular TV dramas has a "gun-toting, mad-cow-afflicted lawyer" played
by William Shatner. But possibly the most maddening news comes from a poem in a test meant for preparation for
standardized tests in Missouri. The poem reads in part:
"Your brain could rot from eating beef
From mad cow disease there is no relief."
Two Republican Missouri state senators, John Cauthorn and Bill Stouffer, have objected, claiming the test is
propaganda, not education. Obviously, some children will be left behind if this test is allowed to stand. Source-
Drovers Alert, Thursday, March 30, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 12
TENNESSEE LEGISLATOR CHALLENGES ELECTRONIC ID
Tennessee is looking to opt out of the national electronic cattle-tracking system under a bill being considered by the
House. Rep. Frank Niceley, the measure's sponsor, said Tuesday that electronic tracking is too expensive and that
tags containing microchips could be manipulated for fraudulent purposes. He instead is calling for no-tech metal
tags that are "cheap, dependable (and) can't be monkeyed with." According to news reports, his proposal is at odds
with the state's governor's goal of making Tennessee a world leader in electronically tracking cattle. Source-
Drovers Alert, Thursday, March 30, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 12
MORE CATTLE, LESS BEEF FROM CANADA
As expected, imports of feeder and slaughter cattle from Canada have increased since the border opened in July.
According to the Livestock Marketing Information Center, weekly imports of Canadian feeder cattle averaged
about 10,000 head in February, compared with a weekly average of 5,700 head before the border closed in 2003. As
of mid-March, weekly feeder-cattle imports were running about 10,500 head, and Canadian on-feed inventories
were 3 percent below those of one year ago. Slaughter -cattle imports from Canada averaged about 17,000 head
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







per week during February, compared with about 13,000 per week for the same period in 2003. LMIC analysts note
that in conjunction with the increased imports of live cattle, U.S. beef imports from Canada have run below those
of last year. Source- Drovers Alert, Thursday, March 30, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 12
BODY CONDITION SCORING SYSTEM- "" '


BCS 7:Very Good Ends of the spinous processes can only be felt with very firm pressure. Spaces between
processes can barely be distinguished at all. Abundant fat cover on either side of tail head with some
patchiness evident.
BCS 8:Fat Animal taking on a smooth, blocky appearance; bone structure disappearing from sight. Fat
cover thick and spongy with patchiness likely.
BCS 9:Very Fat Bone structure not seen or easily felt. Tail head buried in fat. Animal's mobility may
actually be impaired by excess amount of fat.



Beef Management Calendar

I April/May
Hang forced-use dust bags by April 1st for external Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and get
parasite control or use insecticide impregnated ear fertilizer incorporated in grass roots while there is
tags. still good soil moisture.
Check mineral feeder. Check for lice and treat if necessary.

Work calves (identify, implant with growth stimulant, Cull cows that failed to calve while prices are
vaccinate, etc.). Be sure to work late calves. seasonally up.

Watch calves for signs of respiratory diseases. ISurvey pastures for poisonous plants.

Observe cows for repeat breeders. Observe bulls for condition, rotate and rest if needed.

Make sure calves are healthy and making good Make sure lactating cows are receiving an adequate
weight gains. level of energy.
Remove Bulls May 21st to end calving season May 1st Apply Spot-On Agent for Grubs and Louse

Vaccinate and Implant (except for replacement heifers) Vaccinate against blackleg and brucellosis after 3
any late calves months of age and before 12 months of age



James F. Selph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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