Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: March 2006
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00010
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266
Time for Spring Pasture
March 2006 / Volume 28 Number 3 Fertilization

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

March
18 Small Farms Livestock Production Conference II, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM, Hendry County Extension
Office, Labelle, Fl
28-30 Reproductive Management School, Polk County Extension Office, Bartow, Fl

April
13 Advanced Beef Basic Class, Smutgrass Management and Control, 6:00 PM, DeSoto County
Extension Office- Meal Sponsored by Dupont-RSVP Required
27 DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association Annual Spring Meeting, 7:00 PM, Turner Center
Exhibit Hall
FDA IS URGED TO CONSIDER CARBON-MONOXIDE-TREATED MEAT
Carbon monoxide gives meat a bright pink color that lasts for weeks, but its growing use as a "pigment fixative" is
alarming consumer advocates, who are challenging the FDA and the meat industry. They note that the European
Union has banned the use of carbon monoxide as a color stabilizer in meat. Meat-industry officials deny the claim
that carbon monoxide is a colorantt," a category that would require a full FDA review, because it only helps meat
retain its natural red color. A bona-fide public-relations nightmare. While The New York Times and The
Washington Post note that the carbon monoxide is harmless at the levels used in treating packaged meat, they also
claim it allows stores to sell meat that is no longer fresh. Consumers, therefore, would not know the meat is not
fresh until they opened the package at home and smelled it. The Post says "no one knows how much carbon-
monoxide-treated meat is being sold," and labels do not indicate whether the meat has been treated. Kroger, the
nation's largest grocery retailer, announced this week it would no longer carry carbon-monoxide-treated meat.
Whether or not carbon-monoxide treatments are safe should be left to the scientists at the FDA, but labeling of the
treated meat should be mandatory. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, February 23, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 8
ENERGY PRICES COULD AFFECT CORN PLANTING
Industry analysts continue to speculate that corn plantings this spring could decline considerably due to rising energy
prices. Diesel fuel, natural gas and fertilizer prices have increased significantly from last year. Iowa State University
economist Robert Wisner notes that corn production typically requires more nitrogen fertilizer than soybeans and often
more diesel fuel for tillage. In irrigated areas of the Great Plains, farmers use natural gas for running irrigation pumps,
and in some years, corn requires further natural gas use for drying. These issues could lead to significant acreage
shifting from corn to soybean production. One factor that will encourage corn planting in some areas is the increase in
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







ethanol production. Wisner says that at times this winter, Iowa ethanol plants have out-bid local elevators for summer
corn delivery by 15 to 20 cents. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, February 23, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 8
MARKET INFORMATION
February 27, 2006 This Week Last Week Last Year

hu .' 3nIl r.'lJ j' &:'1 "*ire ci- I ': I L. i-' 7 12 tIl
BEEF PRODUC TION 'Trinmarl e.nml I..I.nmne tral
Slaughilei 568.0fi0 539.001) 5-1.000
Li% e H' eights 128- 1289 1250
Di essed %eights -S3 '83 ~59
Beef Pioduclion Iml lhq s)443.4 420 431.2
http:/lwww.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/Im .:i1:-I I, Choice grade beef has less marbling than Prime,
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRI( E but is of very high quality. Choice roasts and
Live Steer 89.15 88.80 86.75 steaks from the loin and rib will be very tender,
Live Heifer 89.23 88.72 86.84 juicy, and flavorful and are, like Prime, suited
Dressed Steer 142.57 140.36 136.97
Dressed teer 142. 1. 13 to dry-heat cooking. Many of the less tender
Dressed Heifer 142.40 140.29 137.03
cuts, such as those from the rump, round, and
blade chuck, can also be cooked with dry heat.
Actual Slaughter Under Federal Inspection for Week Ending 02/12/2006

Cattle Calves Hogs Sheep Goats Equine Bison

Head
Monday 115,874 3,475 392,227 10,832 2,830 677 133
Tuesday 114,855 3,105 391,412 8,142 1,767 0 152
Wednesday 114,417 3,419 396,043 11,027 2,015 339 117
Thursday 115,371 2,257 397,262 10,620 1,841 382 190
Friday 112,950 2,696 384,378 8,357 1,137 79 123
Saturday 2,773 0 59,331 37 45 0 1

Total 576,240 11,990 2,020,653 49,015 9,635 1,477 716


The summary below reflects the week ended January 27, 2006 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, February 21, 2006.


Calf Weight 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.
TX 20,900 $133.34 $122.19 $107.55 $123.04 $107.47 $99.61
AL 8,300 $127-139 $114-119 $113-116 $118-126 $104-114 $98-104
ITN 8,800 $126.66 $111.36 $105.59 $114.51 $100.23 $95.23
FL 4,400 $110-135 $102-125 $106-115 $100-129 $99-122
GA 7,000 110-146 103-123 $100-108 $103-3 S0-134 $90-111 $91-99

CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 1 to 2 cents lower from 2.20-2.22 bushel. US No 2 truck Yellow Corn
was 1 cent lower at 2.03 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 1 to 2 cents lower from 1.91-1.93 per
bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 1/2 to 2 1/2 cents higher from 2.08-2.11 per bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail
Yellow corn was 1/2 cent lower to 1/2 cent higher from 2.02-2.04 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn
rail no bid. Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday February 24, 2006
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ_GR851.txt
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







AG TRADE ENDED 2005 WITH $3.7 BILLION SURPLUS
Even though the U.S. ended up with a record trade deficit in 2005, ag ended the year with a $3.7-billion trade
surplus. USDA says exports totaled $63 billion, about $1.6 billion more than 2004. Imports were $59.3 billion,
which was $5.3 billion higher. Export values for fruits, nuts, red meat and poultry meat increased. Meanwhile
wheat, corn, cotton and soybeans experienced value declines. The increases in imports were from coffee, malt
beverages juices, wine, fruits, nuts and dairy products. Source: P. Scott Shearer, Washington, D.C.,
Correspondent, Cow-Calf Weekly, February 17, 2006.
AVIAN FLU FEARS SMASH ITALIAN POULTRY CONSUMPTION
FoodProductionDaily.com says avian influenza's (AI) creep toward the heart of the European Union (EU) has
caused a "psychosis" among Italian consumers. The result is a 70% drop in poultry consumption in that country,
says the Italian farmers' association. This week, Hungary, Germany, and possibly France, became the latest EU
member states to report AI in wild birds. It's been confirmed in Italy, Austria, Greece and Slovenia, as well as
outside the EU in Russia, Ukraine, Romania, Bulgaria, Azerbaijan and Turkey, the report says. Since the
outbreak began December 2003, AI has killed more than 90 people in four Southeast Asia nations and led to the
destruction of 200 million birds. Source: Joe Roybal, Cow-Calf Weekly, February 17, 2006.
PUBLIC LANDS MAY BE FOR SALE
Bush's proposed 2007 federal budget, which was sent to Congress on Monday, calls for giving the U.S.
Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management new authority to sell the land they oversee.
Together, those agencies control hundreds of millions of acres. The Forest Service proposes selling
150,000 to 200,000 acres, which will raise $800 million over five years. The BLM expects to sell land
worth $40 million to $50 million per year. Some of the money raised would go to BLM conservation
programs, but the majority would go to the treasury. Neither agency has said what lands it expects to sell,
but the Forest Service is expected to post a list of potential sites on its Web site by Friday. Source-
Drovers Alert, Thursday, February 16, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 7
FARM INCOME PREDICTED TO DROP IN 2006
The USDA estimates that farm income will drop this year by $18 billion. In 2005, net farm cash income was nearly
$83 billion; the forecast for 2006 is about $65 billion. The drop reflects lower cash receipts, mostly from crops; the
livestock sector faired better because of strong beef cattle prices and because of large meat production expected in
2006. Along with a drop in crop receipts, part of the problem is lower government payments to farmers because of
hurricane relief and other natural disasters. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, February 16, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 7
FED-CATTLE CLOSEOUTS MOSTLY IN THE RED FOR 2005
Cattle feeders struggled to sell cattle at a profit through most of 2005, according to the Livestock Marketing
Information Center. Feed prices were low, but the high price of feeder cattle kept breakevens above market prices
much of the year. Through 2005, average returns were positive during March, April, May, November and
December according to LMIC estimates. Strong fed-cattle prices during January allowed feeders to open 2006 with
profitable closeouts, but February reverses the trend with slaughter prices in the low $90s and breakevens
averaging $96 to $97 per hundredweight LMIC projects an average loss of $50 per head or more during February.
Breakeven prices will decline, however, to around $92 to $93 by May, due to lower feeder-cattle prices. Source-
Drovers Alert, Thursday, February 16, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 7
ANIMAL RIGHTS GROUPS' FUNDS CONTINUE TO GROW
Donations to animal rights groups increased 40 percent from 2003 to 2004 (the most current snapshot available.)
"Animal People," a publication that bills itself as "News for people who care about animals," reported the results
based on Internal Revenue Service Form 990, which the groups are required to file. Here's a quick look:
The Humane Society of the United States revenues equaled $74 million, up 3 percent.
The Massachusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (the next largest group), grew revenues to
$48.2 million, an 11 percent jump.
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals reported a 20 percent gain or $28.1 million in revenue.
PETA-affiliated Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and the PCRM Foundation combined for
$16 million, up from $12 million in 2003.
The Animal Agriculture Alliance points out that the groups' combined efforts against animal agriculture spent
more than $290 million in 2004. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, February 16, 2006, Vol. 7, Issue 7
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







BODY CONDITION SCORING SYSTEM


BCS 7:Very Good Ends of the spinous processes can only be felt with very firm pressure. Spaces between
processes can barely be distinguished at all. Abundant fat cover on either side of tail head with some
patchiness evident.
BCS 8:Fat Animal taking on a smooth, blocky appearance; bone structure disappearing from sight. Fat
cover thick and spongy with patchiness likely.
BCS 6:Very Fat Bone structure not seen or easily felt. Tail head buried in fat. Animal's mobility may
actually be impaired by excess amount of fat.


20th ANNUAL REPRODUCTIVE MANAGEMENT SCHOOL
The next Reproductive Management School will be held in Bartow on March 28-30, 2006. The cost for this year's
school is $350.00. The purpose of the course is to strengthen managerial capabilities of owners and operators of
beef cattle ranches. This is an intense course in reproductive management of the cow herd. Although the topic of
pregnancy diagnosis is given extensive treatment in the program, participants should not expect this training to
make them proficient in that skill. Please see page 6 of this newsletter for more details.

Beef Management Calendar

March/April

Hang forced-use dust bags by April 1st for external Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and get
parasite control or use insecticide impregnated ear fertilizer incorporated in grass roots while there is
tags. still good soil moisture.
Check mineral feeder. Check for lice and treat if necessary.

Work calves (identify, implant with growth stimulant, Cull cows that failed to calve while prices are
vaccinate, etc.). Be sure to work late calves. seasonally up.

Watch calves for signs of respiratory diseases. ISurvey pastures for poisonous plants.

Observe cows for repeat breeders. Observe bulls for condition, rotate and rest if needed.

Make sure calves are healthy and making good Make sure lactating cows are receiving an adequate
weight gains. level of energy.


James F. Selph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.






T UNIVERSITY OF
SFLORIDA
IFAS EXTENSION


20th Annual

Reproductive Management School

March 28-30, 2006

Polk County Ag Center

1702 Hwy 17 South

Sponsored by:


South Florida Beef/Forage Program


Tuesday March 28. 2006
8:00 Introductions-Jim Selph
8:30 Pregnancy Testing-Dr. Joel Yelich, Animal Science Dept.,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville
10:00 Break
10:10 Quiet Handling of Beef Cattle
Dr.Joel Yelich
11:00 Pregnancy Testing Video
11:30 Lunch (provided)
12:15 Intact Tracts Lab Dr. Al Warnick, Professor Emeritus,
Animal Science Dept., UF/IFAS
1:00 Lab-Hands on Pregnancy Testing
3:30 Heifer Development and Management of Young Cows- Jim
Selph, DeSoto County Cooperative Extension Service,
UF/IFAS, Arcadia, FL
4:15 Bull Breeding Soundness Evaluation
5:30 Bull Breeding Soundness Evaluation-Live Animal Demo
Wednesday March 29. 2006
8:00 Genetic Management for Efficient Reproduction-Dr. Al
Warnick
8:30 Coping with Calving Problems
9:15 Breeding Season Management-Lockie Gary, Hardee
County Cooperative Extension Service, UF/IFAS
9:45 Break


10:00 Health Management-Vaccination Program for
Reproduction-Dr. Max Irsik, UF/IFAS Extension Beef
Veterinarian
10:30 Nutrition for Reproduction Economics of
Supplementation Dr. Mat Hersom, UF/IFAS Extension
Beef Specialist
11:15 Reproductive Implications of Body Condition and
Nutritional Management Dr. Mat Hersom
12:00 Lunch (provided)
12:30 Laboratory: Hands on Pregnancy Testing-Staff
3:30 Utilizing Performance Records
4:30 Body Conditions Scoring Problem
Thursday. March 30. 2006
8:00 The Role of Artificial Insemination in Beef Cattle -Dr. Joel
Yelich
8:30 Herd Bull Selection
9:00 Estrus Synchronization and Heat Detection
9:30 Break
9:45 Nutrition for Reproduction Forage Quality-Dr. John
Arthington, Range Cattle REC, UF/IFAS, Ona, Fl
10:15 The Role of Ultrasound in a Beef Cattle Herd
10:45 Program Summary and Evaluation-Staff
11:00 Hands-on Laboratory End of Reproductive Management
School


The South Florida Beef Program will conduct this year's Reproductive Management School in Bartow at the Polk
County Aq-Center. The purpose of this school has been to strengthen managerial capabilities of owners and
operators of beef cattle ranches. The school utilizes technical seminars and laboratories dealing with reproductive
management of the cow herd. Although the topic of pregnancy diagnosis is given extensive treatment, the school
does not intend to make participants proficient in this skill. The goal is an improved understanding of the broad
subject of breeding herd management and for those enrolled to be better equipped to work with their veterinarians
in accomplishing breeding program objectives.



Cost: $350.00
Please RSVP to our office if you plan to attend: 863-993-4846, e-mail: jselph@ifas.ufl.edu

Participants Requiring Special Accommodations Should Contact Brantley Ivey (863-529-8677) 48 Hours
Before The Event.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to
i dividuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin ,
political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative
Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








** 2006 REPRODUCTIVE MANAGEMENT SCHOOL STATEMENT OF PURPOSE **

This course is sponsored by the Florida Cooperative Extension Service and is conducted with the assistance of area
large animal Veterinary practitioners. It is part of a continuing multi-county effort to help South Florida beef
producers market more pounds of beef per cow profitably.

The purpose of the course is to strengthen managerial capabilities of owners and operators of beef cattle ranches. This
is an intense course in reproductive management of the cow herd. Although the topic of pregnancy diagnosis is given
extensive treatment in the program, participants should not expect this training to make them proficient in that skill.
Rather it is hoped that an improved understanding of the broad subject of breeding herd management will be
achieved and that individuals enrolled in the course will be better equipped to work with their veterinarians in
accomplishing breeding program objectives.

REGISTRATION FORM

This is to confirm my intent to attend the Comprehensive Reproductive Management School to be sponsored by the
Florida Cooperative Extension Service and South Florida Beef-Forage Program.

I understand that the school will be held at the Hardee County Agri-Civic Center (Bartow) March 28-30, 2006.

I further understand that my deposit of $100.00 is non-refundable and that an additional fee of $250.00 will be
payable by March 28, 2006. I also understand acceptance in the school is dependent upon the $100 deposit and receipt
of this registration form by the school's registrar before the class is filled.

The $350.00 fee is intended to cover the cost of conducting the school and does not include meals and lodging.

$ 100.00 deposit (non-refundable)
$ 250.00 due March 15, 2006

$350.00 Total


NAME

ADDRESS

E-MAIL ADDRESS:

HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE


COUNTY

SIGNED:


SIGNED:


EXTENSION AGENT


(Participant)


(E \ii nsion Agent)


(Date)


(Date)


Make Checks Payable to:


South Florida Beef-Forage Program
PO Box 310
Arcadia, Fl 34265


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national
origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University
Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.












Small Farms Livestock Conference II
Hendry County Extension Office
LaBelle, FL
March 18, 2006


8:30 AM Registration
9:00 AM Welcome & Introductions- Pat Hogue
9:15 AM Pasture Weed Control Dr. Brent
Sellers
10:00 AM Break into Cattle, or Goat Sessions


Horse Session----CANCELLED DUE TO LACK OF
INTEREST


Cattle Session


10:05 AM Selection of foundation Animals Jim
Selph
10:45 AM Body Condition Scoring of Cattle -
Dr. John Arthington
11:30 AM National Animal ID and Record
Keeping Brantley Ivey
12:15 PM Lunch
12:45 PM Production Practices On Your Own -
Lockie Gary
1:30 PM Adjourn to Afternoon Demonstrations
1:45 PM Pasture Weed Identification Combined
Session Dr. Brent Sellers
& Gary Mikulecky
2:15 PM Cattle Selection Jim Selph
2:45 PM Cattle Body Condition Scoring -
Dr. John Arthington
3:15 PM Production Practices Demonstrations -
Lockie Gary & Christa Carlson


Goat Session

10:05 AM Production Practices on Your Own -
Lockie Gary, Dr. Ike Ezenwa
10:45 AM National Animal ID and Record
Keeping Pat Hogue
11:30 AM Selection of Foundation Animals Dr.
Ike Ezenwa
12:15 PM Lunch
12:45 PM Body Condition Scoring of Goats Dr.
Ike Ezenwa
1:30 PM Adjourn to Afternoon Demonstrations
1:45 PM Pasture Weed Identification Combined
Session Dr. Brent Sellers
& Gary Mikulecky
2:15 PM Goat Selection Dr. Ike Ezenwa
2:45 PM Production Practices Demonstrations -
Lockie Gary & Sonja Crawford
3:15 PM Body Condition Scoring of Goats Dr.
Ike Ezenwa


Cost of the conference will be $ 20 per person pre-paid non-refundable registration to include lunch and any program
materials. Individuals planning to attend should contact Jim Selph (863-993-4846 or e-mail: iselph()Jfas.ufl.edu) at
the DeSoto County Extension Office.

NAME ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP PHONE
E-MAIL
Program Session or area of interest (check one of the following): Cattle Horse Goat
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS,
Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to
i dividuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin
political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative
Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







Florida Flatwoods Bahiagrass Establishment Costs. 2003
Previously Established Flatwoods 1
1 acre
Item Unit Quantity Price Value Your Farm


Operating Costs
Dolomite 2,3
Pensacola Bahiagrass Seed 4
N-P205-K20 (16-8-16) 5
Micronutrients 6
Tractors and Machinery
Plowing
Disking 7
Seeding
Mowing 8
Labor
Interest on Operating Capital


0.20$ 35.00
35.00$ 1.00
4.00$ 11.00
6.15$ 0.51

1.00$ 29.50


Acre
Acre
Acre
Acre
Hour
Dollar


1.00$
1.00$
1.00$
3.71 $


28.85
8.00
12.48
6.50


$ 86.00


Total Operating Costs


$ 7.00
$ 35.00
$ 44.00
$ 3.12

$ 29.50
$ 28.85
$ 8.00
$ 12.48
$ 24.12
10% $ 8.60
$ 200.67


Ownership Costs
Return to Management
Machinery
Discs
Plows
Mowers
Seeders
Tractors
60-80 hp
100+ hp
Overhead
Land Rent


Acre

Acre
Acre
Acre
Acre


1.00$ 22.93


1.00$
1.00$
1.00$
1.00$

1.00$
1.00$
1.00$
1.00$


Acre
Acre
Acre
Acre
Total Ownership Costs


3.02
3.83
1.43
0.66

1.36
14.47
57.32
20.00


$ 22.93


3.02
3.83
1.43
0.66


$ 1.36
$ 14.47
$ 57.32
$ 20.00
$125.02


$ 325.69


Notes:1 Dry matter yield in establishment year expected at 0.5 ton/acre
Soil test may indicate the need to lime more or less frequently;
Lime to a pH of 5.5 with knowledge that pH of 5.0 is target
2 Based on application of 1 ton/acre every 5 years
3 Fertilizer and dolomite costs include custom spreading
4 Seed application to produce a good stand in 90 days
5 Split application 200# applied 30 days after seeding, 200# applied 60 days after seeding
6Includes 1.5 # each of elemental Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe from a sulfate source;
0.15# B and 5# S per acre
7 4 times at 2 week intervals following plowing
8 2 times to control weeds; weeds are mowed at 6-8" height back to 2" height
This document was prepared by: Tom E Anton, Agricultural Economist; Scott Smith, Economic
Analyst; & Paul Mislevy, Agronomist. It has been 3 years since this document was written and
consequently $ values will have changed. You can replace $ figures with current values.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and
other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,
sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service,
University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


Total Costs




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