Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: February 2006
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street. Arcadia. Fl 34266


February 2006 / Volume 28 Number 2


2006 DeSoto County Grand
Champion Steer


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

February
1-4 NCBA Annual Convention Denver, CO
6 Strawberry Field Day, 1:30 4:00 PM, Gulf Coast Research Center, Balm, Fl
8-20 Florida State Fair Livestock Shows, February (BEEF) 9th, 10th, 13th, 14th, 15th, (DAIRY) 17th,
19th

March
4 Small Farms Livestock Production Conference II, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM, Polk County Extension
Office, Bartow, Fl
18 Small Farms Livestock Production Conference II, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM, Hendry County Extension
Office, LaBelle, Fl
28-30 Reproductive Management School, Polk County Extension Office, Bartow, Fl

MAGAZINE COVERAGE OF BEEF SOARS
In 2005, the number of beef recipes published in consumer magazines increased 14 percent from the previous year.
The circulation of these consumer magazines is more than 30 million. The top three magazines featuring beef (130
plus million circulation combined) were First for Women (1.6 million circulation), Cooking Light (1.7 million
circulation) and Woman's World (1.5 million circulation). One of the top priorities of the Beef Checkoff Program
is spreading news about beefs nutritional message and ease of preparation. Source---Beef Checkoff News,
January 30, 2006.
FLAT IRON STEAK TAKES CENTER STAGE
Recently, the Flat Iron steak was prominently featured in an "all about the Beef Cookoff" issue of Beef Insights, a
checkoff e-newsletter sent to more than 500 influential food communicators. The Flat Iron steak was developed
with beef checkoff dollars through a muscle profiling study designed to find greater value in underutilized beef
cuts. Cut from the shoulder clod, the Flat Iron is a tender and lean steak that can be offered at a lower price than
most premium steak cuts. Source---Beef Checkoff News, January 30, 2006.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


J










MARKET INFORMATION
January 30, 2006 This Week Last Week Last Yea

httph/ww ams usda a:vnmnre[ orls'SJ LS712.txt
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) (Estimate) lan.l
Slaughter 608,000 603,000 591.000
Live Weights 1282 1280 1259
Dressed Weights 778 777 -61
Beef Production imil Ih) 470.9 466.4 447.6
http:I/www.ams.usda.qovlmnreports/lm ctlbU.txt
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 94.63 96.02 88.21
Live Heifer 94.55 95.98 88.56
Dressed Steer 149.39 151.49 139.78
Dressed Heifer 149.48 151.50 139.60


Prime grade beef is the ultimate in
tenderness, juiciness, and flavor. It has
abundant marbling -- flecks of fat within
the lean -- which enhances both flavor
and juiciness. Prime roasts and steaks
are unexcelled for dry-heat cooking
(roasting and broiling).


Actual Slaughter Under Federal Inspection for Week Ending 01/14/2006


Cattle Calves


Hogs


Sheep Goats Equine


Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday


106,916
124,469
119,721
123,728
113,936
17,589


2,539
2,847
2,256
1,774
2,574
0


Head
402,148
405,439
394,939
399,818
383,087
82,073


606,359 11,990 2,067,504


52,490 12,366 2,019


The summary below reflects the week ended January 27, 2006 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, January 30, 2006.



Calf Weight 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.

TX 23,600 $130.18 $118.99 $112.18 $120.59 $109.35 $104.94

AL 8,600 $126-139 $117-126 $104-111 $112-124 $103-115 $98-108

TN 10,600 $128.15 $111.63 $104.41 $112.35 $100.08 $93.60


FL 5,900 $104-132 $104-123 $94-99


$102-122 $95-112 $95-109


|GA 17,100 $109-136 |$102-112 $595-109 |$104-125 $93-109 IS94-101

CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 9 to 10 cents higher from 1.99-2.02 bushel. US No 2 truck Yellow Corn
was 12 cents higher at 1.97 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 11 to 14 cents higher from 1.90-
1.94 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 12 to 14 cents higher from 2.01-2.13 per bushel. Toledo US No
2 rail Yellow corn was 13 to 14 cents higher from 1.97-1.99 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn rail was
14 cents higher at 1.84 per bushel.
Source: USDA Weekly National Grain Market Review, Friday January 27, 2006
http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/SJ_GR851 .txt

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


Bison


Total


11,327
10,917
11,691
10,064
8,459
32


2,902
2,973
2,593
1,975
1,898
25


827
50
428
470
244
0


291
192
187
138
168
48


1,024







TAIWAN REOPENS ITS MARKET TO U.S. BEEF
Taiwan on Wednesday announced it will resume trade immediately in U.S. boneless beef from animals 30 months
of age and younger. Taiwan closed its market to U.S. beef exports upon discovery of BSE in a U.S. dairy cow of
Canadian origin in late December 2003, but lifted the ban in April 2005. Confirmation the following June of the
first domestic case of BSE in the U.S. reinstated the ban until this week. Taiwan was previously the sixth-largest
market in value for U.S. beef, importing $76.5 million in product in 2003. Source: Joe Roybal, Cow-Calf Weekly,
January 27, 2006.
THE BSE SAGA CONTINUES -- IN JAPAN, U.S., CANADA
Whew! Just when it appeared things were headed back to a semblance of predictability where BSE and foreign
trade are concerned, comes a weekend like Jan. 20-23.
On Jan. 20, a Japanese inspection team at Tokyo's Narita Airport finds spinal column in a veal shipment
from Brooklyn, NY-based Atlantic Veal and Lamb. Japan promptly shuts down U.S. exports to Japan
pending an investigation and a U.S. explanation.
On Jan. 23, Japan announces its 22nd case of domestic BSE after tests confirm a cow that died the previous
week was infected with the fatal brain-wasting disease. The 64-month-old cow was born before Japan
implemented its feed ban.
That same day, Canada confirms its fourth domestic case of BSE, leading to calls by trade protectionists
for the closure of the U.S. to Canadian beef imports.
The U.S. dodged one bullet on Monday when South Korea said the Japan situation wouldn't affect its decision to
reopen its market to U.S. beef in late March. The agreement allows the importation of boneless beef 30 months of
age and younger. Just what the short- and long-term results will be of the latest BSE happenings is anyone's guess.
John Harrington, DTN livestock expert, listed three points on the matter:
Japan's move to re-instate its ban on U.S. beef will probably delay the recovery of that market by at least
30-60 days. The challenge of regain consumer confidence in U.S. product will be even tougher than before.
The discovery of a fourth case of BSE in Canada isn't statistically surprising and won't change current
trading agreements with the U.S.
On the other hand, the psychology impact of another Canadian problem with older animals will probably
delay the current rule-making process to eventually allow the importation of over 30-month cattle and beef
from Canada.
Source: Joe Roybal, Cow-Calf Weekly, January 27, 2006.
55TH ANNUAL BEEF CATTLE SHORTCOURSE
Mark your calendar for the 55th Annual Florida Beef Cattle Short Course at the University of Florida will be held
on May 3-5, 2006, at the Hilton University of Florida Conference Center in Gainesville, Florida. Next months
newsletter will have all the details.
NEW UF SURVEY SHOWS FLORIDA FARMLAND VALUES INCREASED BY 50
PERCENT TO 88 PERCENT DURING PAST YEAR
Demand for land by developers, investors and speculators pushed the value of agricultural land to record levels in
all regions of the state during the past year, according to a new University of Florida survey. Prices of agricultural
land increased by 50 percent to 88 percent across the state, and most of the farmland is not being purchased for
agricultural purposes, said John Reynolds, a professor with UF's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, who
conducts the annual Florida Agricultural Land Value Survey.
He said the survey indicates that the average value of agricultural land ranges from about $2,700 per acre for
unimproved pasture and farm woods in Northwest Florida to almost $10,000 per acre for orange groves in Central
and South Florida. The value of pastureland increased about 81 percent in the south region and 78 percent to 82
percent in the central region. The value of improved pasture increased 85 percent to 87 percent in the northern
regions. The value of unimproved pasture increased 76 percent in the northeast and 82 percent in the northwest.
OVERVIEW OF THE NAID PREMISES REGISTRATION PROCESS
To register, the livestock owner or authorized agent may:
Complete a Premises ID Application form and mail or fax it to the FDACS
Call or email FDACS and provide the information
FDACS processes the application FDACS notifies the livestock owner of the new Premises ID

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







BODY CONDITION SCORING SYSTEM

,llCn-- .I -


S. rnin"

TrCZ


i~3


T-DC K.


BCS 4: Borderline Foreribs not noticeable; 12th and 13th ribs still noticeable to the eye, particularly in cattle with a
big spring of rib and ribs wide apart. The transverse spinous processes can be identified only by palpation
(with slight pressure) to feel rounded rather than sharp. Full but straightness of muscling in the hindquarters.
BCS 5: 12th and 13th ribs not visible to the eye unless animal has been shrunk. The transverse spinous processes can
only be felt with firm pressure to feel rounded not noticeable to the eye. Spaces between the processes not
visible and only distinguishable with firm pressure. Areas on each side of the tail head are fairly well filled but
not mounded.
BCS 6: Ribs fully covered, not noticeable to the eye. Hindquarters plump and full. Noticeable sponginess to covering
of foreribs and on each side of the tail head. Firm pressure now required to feel transverse processes.

20th ANNUAL REPRODUCTIVE MANAGEMENT SCHOOL
The next Reproductive Management School will be held in Bartow on March 28-30, 2006. The cost for this year's
school is $350.00. The purpose of the course is to strengthen managerial capabilities of owners and operators of
beef cattle ranches. This is an intense course in reproductive management of the cow herd. Although the topic of
pregnancy diagnosis is given extensive treatment in the program, participants should not expect this training to
make them proficient in that skill. Please see page 6 of this newsletter for more details.

Beef Management Calendar

February/March

Hang forced-use dust bags by April 1st for external Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and get
parasite control or use insecticide impregnated ear fertilizer incorporated in grass roots while there is
tags. still good soil moisture.

Check mineral feeder. Check for lice and treat if necessary.

Work calves (identify, implant with growth stimulant, Cull cows that failed to calve while prices are
vaccinate, etc.). Be sure to work late calves. seasonally up.

Watch calves for signs of respiratory diseases. ISurvey pastures for poisonous plants.

Top dress winter forages, if needed. Observe bulls for condition, rotate and rest if needed.

Make sure calves are healthy and making good Make sure lactating cows are receiving an adequate
weight gains. level of energy.
Hispanic Market Success
The Beef Checkoff Program recently produced and distributed a Spanish audio news release (ANR), highlighting
beef grilling and a beef culinary expert. A total of 121 radio stations across the country representing an audience of
13.4 million aired the ANR. The Beef Checkoff Program continues to fund programs targeted to the Hispanic
population, one of the fastest growing segments in the United States. Source---Beef Checkoff News, January 30,
2006.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.






T UNIVERSITY OF
SFLORIDA
IFAS EXTENSION


20th Annual

Reproductive Management School

March 28-30, 2006

Polk County Ag Center

1702 Hwy 17 South

Sponsored by:


South Florida Beef/Forage Program


Tuesday March 28. 2006
8:00 Introductions-Jim Selph
8:30 Pregnancy Testing-Dr. Joel Yelich, Animal Science Dept.,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville
10:00 Break
10:10 Quiet Handling of Beef Cattle
Dr.Joel Yelich
11:00 Pregnancy Testing Video
11:30 Lunch (provided)
12:15 Intact Tracts Lab Dr. Al Warnick, Professor Emeritus,
Animal Science Dept., UF/IFAS
1:00 Lab-Hands on Pregnancy Testing
3:30 Heifer Development and Management of Young Cows- Jim
Selph, DeSoto County Cooperative Extension Service,
UF/IFAS, Arcadia, FL
4:15 Bull Breeding Soundness Evaluation
5:30 Bull Breeding Soundness Evaluation-Live Animal Demo
Wednesday March 29. 2006
8:00 Genetic Management for Efficient Reproduction-Dr. Al
Warnick
8:30 Coping with Calving Problems
9:15 Breeding Season Management-Lockie Gary, Hardee
County Cooperative Extension Service, UF/IFAS
9:45 Break


10:00 Health Management-Vaccination Program for
Reproduction-Dr. Max Irsik, UF/IFAS Extension Beef
Veterinarian
10:30 Nutrition for Reproduction Economics of
Supplementation Dr. Mat Hersom, UF/IFAS Extension
Beef Specialist
11:15 Reproductive Implications of Body Condition and
Nutritional Management Dr. Mat Hersom
12:00 Lunch (provided)
12:30 Laboratory: Hands on Pregnancy Testing-Staff
3:30 Utilizing Performance Records
4:30 Body Conditions Scoring Problem
Thursday. March 30. 2006
8:00 The Role of Artificial Insemination in Beef Cattle -Dr. Joel
Yelich
8:30 Herd Bull Selection
9:00 Estrus Synchronization and Heat Detection
9:30 Break
9:45 Nutrition for Reproduction Forage Quality-Dr. John
Arthington, Range Cattle REC, UF/IFAS, Ona, Fl
10:15 The Role of Ultrasound in a Beef Cattle Herd
10:45 Program Summary and Evaluation-Staff
11:00 Hands-on Laboratory End of Reproductive Management
School


The South Florida Beef Program will conduct this year's Reproductive Management School in Bartow at the Polk
County Aq-Center. The purpose of this school has been to strengthen managerial capabilities of owners and
operators of beef cattle ranches. The school utilizes technical seminars and laboratories dealing with reproductive
management of the cow herd. Although the topic of pregnancy diagnosis is given extensive treatment, the school
does not intend to make participants proficient in this skill. The goal is an improved understanding of the broad
subject of breeding herd management and for those enrolled to be better equipped to work with their veterinarians
in accomplishing breeding program objectives.



Cost: $350.00
Please RSVP to our office if you plan to attend: 863-993-4846, e-mail: jselph@ifas.ufl.edu

Participants Requiring Special Accommodations Should Contact Brantley Ivey (863-529-8677) 48 Hours
Before The Event.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to
i dividuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin ,
political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative
Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







** 2006 REPRODUCTIVE MANAGEMENT SCHOOL STATEMENT OF PURPOSE **

This course is sponsored by the Florida Cooperative Extension Service and is conducted with the assistance of area
large animal Veterinary practitioners. It is part of a continuing multi-county effort to help South Florida beef
producers market more pounds of beef per cow profitably.

The purpose of the course is to strengthen managerial capabilities of owners and operators of beef cattle ranches. This
is an intense course in reproductive management of the cow herd. Although the topic of pregnancy diagnosis is given
extensive treatment in the program, participants should not expect this training to make them proficient in that skill.
Rather it is hoped that an improved understanding of the broad subject of breeding herd management will be
achieved and that individuals enrolled in the course will be better equipped to work with their veterinarians in
accomplishing breeding program objectives.

REGISTRATION FORM

This is to confirm my intent to attend the Comprehensive Reproductive Management School to be sponsored by the
Florida Cooperative Extension Service and South Florida Beef-Forage Program.

I understand that the school will be held at the Hardee County Agri-Civic Center (Bartow) March 28-30, 2006.

I further understand that my deposit of $100.00 is non-refundable and that an additional fee of $250.00 will be
payable by March 28, 2006. I also understand acceptance in the school is dependent upon the $100 deposit and receipt
of this registration form by the school's registrar before the class is filled.

The $350.00 fee is intended to cover the cost of conducting the school and does not include meals and lodging.

$ 100.00 deposit (non-refundable)
$ 250.00 due March 15, 2006

$350.00 Total


NAME

ADDRESS

E-MAIL ADDRESS:

HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE

COUNTY EXTENSION AGENT

SIGNED:_
(Participant) (Date)

SIGNED:
(E \it nsion Agent) (Date)


Make Checks Payable to: South Florida Beef-Forage Program
PO Box 310
Arcadia, Fl 34265

.UNIVERSITY OF
L -FLORIDA sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to ir on with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national
IFAS EXTENSION ons. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University
Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








Small Farms Livestock Conference II
Polk County Extension Office
Bartow, FL
e;- March 4, 2006 4


/i


Hendry County Extension Office
LaBelle, FL
March 18, 2006


8:30 AM
9:00 AM
9:15 AM
10:00 AM


Registration
Welcome & Introductions- Pat Hogue
Pasture Weed Control Dr. Brent Sellers
Break into Cattle, Horse or Goat Sessions


Cattle Session

10:05 AM Selection of foundation Animals Jim
Selph
10:45 AM Body Condition Scoring of Cattle -
Dr. John Arthington
11:30 AM National Animal ID and Record Keeping -
Brantley Ivey
12:15 PM Lunch
12:45 PM Production Practices On Your Own -
Lockie Gary
1:30 PM Adjourn to Afternoon Demonstrations
1:45 PM Pasture Weed Identification Combined
Session Dr. Brent Sellers
& Gary Mikulecky
2:15 PM Cattle Selection Jim Selph
2:45 PM Cattle Body Condition Scoring -
Dr. John Arthington
3:15 PM Production Practices Demonstrations -
Lockie Gary & Christa Carlson

Horse Session

10:05 AM Selection of Foundation Animals Joel
Mcquagge
10:45 AM Production Practices on Your Own -
Steffany Dragon


11:30 AM
Pat Hogue
12:15 PM
12:45 PM

1:30 PM
1:45 PM


2:15 PM

2:45 PM


Goat Session
10:05 AM

10:45 AM

11:30 AM

12:15 PM
12:45 PM

1:30 PM
1:45 PM


2:15 PM
2:45 PM

3:15 PM


National Animal ID and Record Keeping -

Lunch
Body Condition Scoring of Horses Joel
Mcquagge
Adjourn to Afternoon Demonstrations
Pasture Weed Identification Combined
Session-Dr. Brent Sellers & Gary
Mikulecky
Production Practices Demonstration -
Steffany Dragon & Shelly Humphries
Selection and Body Condition Scoring of
Horses Joel Mcquagge


Production Practices on Your Own -
Lockie Gary, Dr. Ike Ezenwa
National Animal ID and Record Keeping
- Pat Hogue
Selection of Foundation Animals Dr. Ike
Ezenwa
Lunch
Body Condition Scoring of Goats Dr. Ike
Ezenwa
Adjourn to Afternoon Demonstrations
Pasture Weed Identification Combined
Session Dr. Brent Sellers
& Gary Mikulecky
Goat Selection Dr. Ike Ezenwa
Production Practices Demonstrations -
Lockie Gary & Sonja Crawford
Body Condition Scoring of Goats Dr. Ike
Ezenwa


Cost of the conference will be $ 20 per person pre-paid non-refundable registration to include lunch and any
program materials. Individuals planning to attend should contact Jim Selph (863-993-4846 or e-mail:
iselph(i)fas.ufl.edu) at the DeSoto County Extension Office.

NAME ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP PHONE
E-MAIL
Program location you plan to attend, check one of the following: Bartow LaBelle
Program Session or area of interest (check one of the following): Cattle Horse Goat


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to
i dividuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin ,
political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative
Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


Mt


,4







BRACHIARIA'S FOR DESOTO COUNTY
Brachiaria Insurgente and Abundance are excellent yielding and very leafy bunch grasses with little or no winter
production. They have good CP concentration and excellent digestibility. In fact digestibility will run 6 to 8
percentage units above Florona stargrass. The problem with Brachiarias at Ona was cold tolerance. The
temperature during the fall of 2000 and spring of 2001 dropped below 32oF 11 times with a one time extreme low
of 19oF. This temperature regime killed 100% of the Brachiaria study. One commercial producer west of
Okeechobee has been growing two Bracharia cultivars for at least 3 yr with no persistence problems. It appears
that Bracharia may be a viable alternative for warmer areas of south Florida. Source-Range Cattle REC
Newsletter, March 2003, Volume 6, Number 1
FERTILIZE PASTURES EARLY
For ranchers who intend to fertilize pastures this year now is the time to start planning. What should you fertilize,
and when and how much should be applied? In deciding what to fertilize, priority should be given to fertilizing the
better quality forages such as hemarthria, pangolagrass, and stargrass. Priority should be given to fertilizing
pastures that will be grazed by younger cattle, especially firstcalf heifers. Of course, bahiagrass is the major
pasture forage in Florida. The South Florida Beef/Forage Extension Agents conducted an excellent field study on 9
ranches in south Florida to measure the benefits of different fertilizer applications. They found that bahiagrass
showed a good response to nitrogen fertilization, but little response to phosphorus and potassium. The most
economical fertilizer application was to spread 60 pounds of nitrogen per acre in March. When nitrogen was
applied in March there was a very good response in bahiagrass yield in April and May, and this response
continued through the summer months. Nitrogen application also significantly increased the crude protein content
of bahiagrass in the April and May period. Source-Range Cattle REC Newsletter, March 2003, Volume 6,
Number 1
EU SUPPORTS 'HUMANE' FARMING LABEL
The European Union has moved closer to implementing an "animal welfare" label on food. The EU's policy-
making arm suggests a special label for poultry, beef, pork and fish produced by so-called humane farming
methods to encourage consumers to buy the products. The proposal is part of a five-year EU plan to promote
animal welfare. The EU also plans to reduce the use of animals in medical and product-safety tests and to develop
more-scientific methods for gauging animals' well-being.
The EU maintains a ban on U.S. beef raised with growth-promoting hormones. In 1998, the World Trade
Organization issued a judgment against the ban permitting the U.S. and Canada to collect penalties of more than
$100 million per year in extra duties on European exports. Source-Drovers Alert, Thursday, January 26, 2006,
Vol. 7, Issue 4
DARK CUTTERS: WHAT ARE THEY?
Dark cutting beef refers to muscle tissue that fails to turn the typical cherry red when exposed to air.
With dark cutter the muscle remains dark (ranging from dark red to almost black) when the carcass is
ribbed. A depletion of glycogen stores in the muscle results in dark cutting beef. The pH level is also
higher than normal in dark cutting beef. Consumers associate dark beef as both tough and poor flavor.
Additionally, dark cutting beef has poor storage properties and shortened shelf life.
According to the 1995 National Beef Quality Audit 2.7% of the audited carcasses ($6.08 per head) were
classified as dark cutters. Dark cutting carcasses are discounted within the USDA beef quality grades.
Packers routinely lower the price of dark carcasses 20% to 40% and market them to alternative outlets.
Dark cutting beef is most often associated with preslaughter stress. Environment factors such as extreme
cold, rain or heat along with weather fluctuations can lead to temporary glycogen depletions. Cattle
which become excitable during sorting, hauling, penning and overcrowding can be candidates for dark
cutting. Holding cattle off feed for one to two days can also lead to dark cutting beef. Overaggressive or
r misuse of growth promotant implants has also been implicated with dark
cutters.

J a; J F.teph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock
S. -II 1 1. Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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