Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: January 2006
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00008
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266


BENEFICIAL WASP PARASITIZING A
Na" &January 2006 / Volume 28 Number 1

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

January
19 23 rd Annual Florida Cattlemen's Institute and Allied Trade Show, Osceola Heritage Park,
1921 Kissimmee Valley Lane, Highway 192 East, Kissimmee, 8:00 AM-3:30 PM
19-29 DeSoto County Fair
21 Florida Bull Test Sale Marianna, FL

March
4 & 18 Small Farms Conference-Advanced Course-LaBelle and Hillsborough Counties

HONG KONG ENDS U.S. BEEF BAN
Hong Kong has reopened its market to boneless beef from U.S. cattle less than 30 months of age. Hong
Kong authorities said that the government would begin processing import requests immediately, but that
each consignment of beef must have prior written permission from the Food and Environmental Hygiene
Department. There were hints that the 30-month restriction was an initial phase and the possibility
remained to reinstate imports of all U.S. beef products. Hong Kong was the fifth-largest export market
for the U.S. and imported about $90 million worth of U.S. beef in 2003. Source: Greg Henderson, Drovers
editor-Drovers Alert Thursday, January 5, 2006, Vol. 6, Issue 1.
NCBA PRESSES FOR TRADE REFORMS
Representatives of the NCBA were in Hong Kong two weeks ago to urge support among World Trade
Organization member countries for a U.S. proposal for global agricultural-trade reform. The representatives
focused particularly on beef tariffs imposed by the European Union. "The European Union seems to be clinging to
an old-school mentality that supports high tariffs and barriers to entry. We are very disappointed that they are
making zero progress in this area," says NCBA chief economist Gregg Doud. "Our message to the negotiating
teams is simple: The future success of our industry depends upon fair and transparent expansion of access to
consumers around the globe." The EU's bound tariff on beef imports is at 57 percent. The NCBA says the
average global tariff on exported beef and beef products is 85 percent. In October, the U.S. made a proposal that
would potentially reduce bound tariffs to about 7.5 to 12.5 percent. Source: Greg Henderson, Drovers
Editor-Drovers Alert Thursday, December 22, 2005, Vol. 5, Issue 51.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








Market Information
This Week Last Week Last Year
http/lwww.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/SJ LS712.txt
BEEF PRODUC TION (Estimate) IrE nmjir (Actuau
Slaughrie 527,000 605,000 53S,000
Live Weights 1283 1284 1274
Dressed Weights 778 782 772
Beef Production (mil Ibs) 407.9 470.7 412.9
http:l/www.ams.usda.qovlmnreportsllm ct150.txt
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE
Live Steer 93.90 95.73 87.58
Live Heifer 94.09 95.82 87.85
Dressed Steer 150.85 154.59 138.27
Dressed Heifer 149.79 154.78 138.30


Avg. Price Slaughter Steer Nebraska
Choice 2-4 1100-1300#


F M A M J J A S
|-*-204 --20051


0 N D


Avg. Price Feeder Steers Oklahoma City
Medium Frame No. 1 600-700#


F M A M J J A S
|-4-2004 --205


O N D


The summary below reflects the week ended December 5, 2005 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to
650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: USDA-SJ: National Feeder & Stocker Cattle Summary


500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.


TX 123,000 $125.31 IS120.66 IS120.14 $115.19 S$11.46 S$111.85

AL 15,900 S117-126 $110-116 $101-110 S108-116 $100-107 $95-102

TN 12,200 $117.91 $112.01 I108.11 $107.55 $101.65 $95.02


FL 10,900 $100-125 $95-110 NR


GA 10,200


$95-110 $90-100 $91-96


$104-125 $98-117 $92-106 $99-113 $93-106 $85-103


CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was steady from 1.86-1.87 bushel. US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 2 cents
lower at 1.86 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 2 cents lower from 1.88-1.89 per bushel.
Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 1 3/4-10 3/4 cents lower from 1.87-1.94 3/4 per bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail
Yellow corn was 1 1/4 cents higher to 1 1/4 lower from 1.94-1.96 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn
rail was 2 3/4 cents lower at 1.76 per bushel.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


Year to Dare Slaughter

105- 10.7 1D.
95





-5 --sTT ----- G ----- S- E-- -
B5
75
_65 -
55-
45-

25 -
15-1
Z2 2,6
-9


|02005.24|


1~


Calf Weight







Source: USDA Grain and Feed Weekly, Volume 53, Number 53, Friday December 30, 2005:
http://www.ams.usda. ov/LSMNpubs/pdf weekly/dc grain.pdf
THE 23RD ANNUAL FLORIDA CATTLEMEN'S AND ALLIED TRADE SHOW-
JANUARY 19, 2006
The 23rd Annual Florida Cattlemen's Institute and Allied Trade Show will occur again this year in Kissimmee at
Osceola Heritage Park. If you plan to attend, please call our office in order to RSVP at 993-4846. This year's
theme is "Basics for the Future". If you need a room, call the Best Western Heritage Park Hotel at 407-846-4646 to
make a reservation. Please mention the group code of: Florida Cattlemen's Institute. See the attached flyer for
more information on this years Institute.
WEATHER AND CROPS
A massive winter storm dropped as much as 2 ft. of snow in some parts of the Northern Plains last week, within
winds and deep snow sending lots of cattle scattering over fences. Death loss as high as 500 head was reported at
several feedlots in Nebraska and South Dakota. On the other end of the spectrum, USDA Ag Marketing Service
(AMS) reporters said, "The Southern Plains remains extremely dry with this year's early wheat-pasture season
resulting mostly in a bust. There are very few cattle turned out, and many that were have headed back to auction
or to growing yards. Luckily, low feed costs are enabling many backgrounders to put pounds on cattle in a growing
yard cheaper than on wheat."
Besides low feed costs, this economic reality also has to do with the fact pasture costs in drought-stricken areas
have increased significantly as producers with the option have increased irrigation to get some pasture up. Reports
last week from the Texas Panhandle said wheat leased on a gain basis was going for 45/lb. compared to 34 last
year. For perspective, 49% of winter-wheat condition in Texas was reported as being poor or worse for the week
ending Nov. 27. Only 17% is reported as good or excellent, and that's typically come with the added cost described
above. Nationally, 52% of the winter wheat is reported in good or excellent condition, compared to 76% at the
same time last year. Conversely, 15% is reported to be in poor or very poor condition, compared to 4% last year.
Source: -Beef Stocker Trends, December 5, 2005.
U.S & CANADIAN BEEF SOLD IN JAPAN
Both U.S. and Canadian beef are on supermarket shelves this week in Japan. On Monday, two supermarket
chains, Cowboy and Marunaka Co., reintroduced U.S. beef for the first time in two years, according to the Kyoo
News. Marunaka received about 6 tons of beef from Kansas, with prices ranging from about $8/lb. for chuck to
$14/lb. for sirloin. Phil Seng, president of U.S. Meat Export Federation, predicts the U.S. will sell about 110,000
tons of beef to Japan in 2006, about a third of the total in 2003. He made this prediction last week during a
welcome-back luncheon in Tokyo. Seng added it will probably be three years before the U.S. attains pre-BSE levels
of exports to Japan. And, for the first time in three years, Canada sent 8 tons of Ontario beef to Hanamasa Co., a
supermarket and restaurant chain. Before the ban, Japan was Canada's third-largest export market, behind the
U.S. and Mexico. Source: -Beef Stocker Trends, December 5, 2005.
BILL WOULD REGULATE FERTILIZER PRODUCTION & SALE
The House Subcommittee on Homeland Security Prevention of Nuclear and Biological Attacks approved
legislation that would regulate production and sale of ammonium nitrate (fertilizer). The legislation will require
any individual producing, selling or buying ammonium nitrate to register with the Department of Homeland
Security. Sellers of ammonium nitrate will be required to keep records of purchasers, including driver's license
numbers or other photo ID, and the amount of ammonium nitrate purchased. Source: -Beef Stocker Trends,
December 5, 2005.
COCCIDIOSIS IN CATTLE
Economics: Coccidiosis in cattle is one of the five most economically important diseases of the cattle industry. It is
estimated to cost the industry $100 million or more annually. Coccidiosis in cattle usually presents as acute
diarrhea with or without blood (Fig. 1), straining, severe weight loss, and not uncommonly as a neurologic form
that usually results in death of the animal. The more chronic form of the disease causes growth retardation, and/or
acts as a stressor causing increased susceptibility to other infections, such as salmonellosis (intestinal disease), or
Bovine Respiratory Disease. Coccidiosis is primarily a disease of young animals and also of older animals in poor
condition. Control: Anticoccidial drugs commonly used in cattle should be used at label recommendations, paying
careful attention to maintaining preventive levels for periods long enough (28 days +) to affect the life cycle.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.








---- -


BCS1 BCS2


*TT--
BC 3 : ii .
BCS 3


BCS 1: Emaciated Bone structure of shoulder, ribs, back, hooks and pins sharp to touch and easily visible. Little
evidence of fat deposits or muscling.
BCS 2: Very Thin Little evidence of fat deposits but some muscling in hindquarters. The spinous processes feel sharp to
the touch and are easily seen, with space between them.
BCS 3: Thin -Beginning of fat cover over the loin, back and foreribs. Backbone still highly visible. Processes of the spine
can be identified individually by touch and may still be visible. Spaces between the processes are less pronounced.

Over the next two newsletters, I will publish the 6 other Body Condition Scores and Pictures. I also have these in a pocket
guide that I have available for free in our Extension Office.


Reproductive Management School
The next Reproductive Management School will be held in Bartow on March 28-30, 2006. The cost for this year's
school is $350.00. The purpose of the course is to strengthen managerial capabilities of owners and operators of
beef cattle ranches. This is an intense course in reproductive management of the cow herd. Although the topic of
pregnancy diagnosis is given extensive treatment in the program, participants should not expect this training to
make them proficient in that skill.

Beef Management Calendar

February

Top dress winter forages, if needed. Put bulls out with breeding herd.

Check mineral feeder. Check for lice and treat if necessary.

Work calves (identify, implant with growth stimulant, Cull cows that failed to calve while prices are
accinate, etc.). seasonally up.

Watch calves for signs of respiratory diseases. Survey pastures for poisonous plants.

Make sure lactating cows are receiving an adequate Watch for calf scours.
level of energy.
FOOD PRICE INDEX INCREASES
Food prices have seen moderate increases through this year, according to the government's Consumer Price Index.
On average, food and beverage prices increased by 0.3 percent during October, as did the index for food consumed
at home. The index for meats, poultry, seafood and eggs decreased by 0.2 percent, led by poultry and eggs, as beef,
pork and seafood prices increased somewhat. Overall, the report indicates that food prices will finish the year
between 2 and 3 percent higher than last year. Source: Greg Henderson, Drovers editor-Drovers Alert Thursday,
December 8, 2005, Vol. 5, Issue 46.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.






T UNIVERSITY OF
V FLORIDA 23d Annual Florida Cattlemen's Institute
IFAS EXTENSION And Allied Trade Show

January 19, 2006
Osceola Heritage Park
1921 Kissimmee Valley Lane, Highway 192 East

Sponsored by:


UF/IFAS EXTENSION SERVICE AND THE FLORIDA ALLIED INDUSTRIES


"BASICS FOR THE FUTURE"


8:00 AM Trade Show Opens
Moderator: Joe Walter,
Chairman 2006 FCIATS,
UF/IFAS, Brevard
8:45 AM "Welcome": Dr. Jimmy Cheek,
UF/IFAS-Vice President for
Agriculture and Natural
Resources
"Welcome": Joe Marlin Hilliard
III, Florida Cattlemen's
Association, President
9:00 AM "Basics of Pasture
Fertilization"-Dr. Jerry
Sartain, UF/IFAS-Soil and
Water Science
10:00 AM Trade Show Break
10:30 AM "Recent Developments in Cattle
Marketing"-Mark Harmon,
Joplin Regional Stock Yard,
Joplin, MO


11:30 AM "The State of the State"-Charli:
Bronson, Florida Commissioner
of Agriculture
12:00 PM AWARDS
12:15 PM LUNCH
1:00 PM "Ranch Horse Safety"-Joel
McQuagge, UF/IFAS, Animal
Sciences Department
1:45 PM "BQA Update"-Dr. Todd
Thrift, UF/IFAS, Animal
Sciences Department
2:00 PM Trade Show Break
2:30 PM "State and Federal Regulations-
Changing the Way You Do
Business"
Panel Discussion-Wade
Grigsby, Moderator
Mike Milicevic, Dr. Tom Holt,
Don Robertson, Mark Harmond
and Mark Donaway
3:30 PM Return Evaluations and
Drawings for Fence Building Kit


Please RSVP to our office if you plan to attend:
863-993-4846, e-mail: jselph@ifas.ufl.edu
Hotel Information: Best Western Heritage Park,
2145 E. Irlo Bronson Highway, Kissimmee, Fl,
Participants Requiring Special Accommodations Should
Hours Before The Event


Telephone: 407-846-4646, Room Rate: $45.95/
Night (Ask for Florida Cattlemen's Institute
Rate)

Contact Randy Bateman (321-697-3000) 48


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to
i dividuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin ,
political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative
Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







USDA CHANGES NASS WEB SITE
The USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service launched its newly redesigned Web site
(http://www.nass.usda.gov/) that makes agricultural data easily accessible. Visitors to the site will find a new
Google-powered search engine, an SVG interactive mapping application, an RSS news feed and XML technology.
USDA reports will continue to be available online within minutes after release. Source: Greg Henderson,
Drovers editor-Drovers Alert Thursday, December 8, 2005, Vol. 5, Issue 47.
TARIFFS HURTING U.S. BEEF, STOKES SAYS
National Cattlemen's Beef Association Chief Executive Officer Terry Stokes says high tariffs are hurting U.S. beef
exports. Tariff reduction is a priority for the NCBA as World Trade Organization negotiations approach in Hong
Kong. The U.S. proposes that tariffs on U.S. beef be reduced to 7.5 to 12 percent, significantly lower than the
current 30 to 57 percent. Source: Greg Henderson, Drovers editor-Drovers Alert Thursday, December 8, 2005,
Vol. 5, Issue 47.
PROFITABILITY OF CALVES SIRED BYTERMINAL VERSUS MATERNAL BREEDS
OF BULLS
Colorado State University scientists used 80 steer progeny produced by mating British cross females to
one of three terminal sires (Charolais) or one of five maternal sires (three Angus and two Red Angus-
Composites) to compare the effects of sire type (terminal vs. maternal) on performance, carcass traits,
and profitability. Steers sired by terminal bulls were significantly heavier at most stages of production, from
birth to harvest, and grew faster from birth to weaning than steers sired by maternal bulls. Terminal-sired steers
consumed significantly more feed, but there were no differences between sire types in feed conversion or cost of
gain. Carcasses sired by terminal bulls were significantly heavier than those sired by maternal bulls, but other
carcass traits did not differ.
Profitability was compared using two different marketing scenarios-selling calves at weaning or retained
ownership through harvest. If sold at weaning, terminal-sired calves would generate $39.52 more net return than
maternal-sired calves. If retained through harvest, terminal-sired calves would generate $83.62 more net return
than maternal-sired calves. These results suggest that for commercial cow-calf producers who routinely retain
ownership of their calves through harvest and who have access to a reliable source of affordable females, the use of
a terminal crossbreeding system may be a viable strategy for enhancing profitability (Schneider et al. 2005.
Colorado State Univ. Beef Report). Source-UF/IFAS Animal Science Newsletter, January 2006
FEEDLOT CATTLE GETTING FATTER IN THE WRONG PLACES
Cattle-FaxTM analysts recently reported that the percent of Yield Grade 4 cattle has been increasing at a rate of
about 1 percentage point per year since 2001. In 2005, it averaged about 7%, compared to only 2% in 2001. If this
rate continues, the percent of Yield Grade 4 cattle could reach 12% by 2010. Equally alarming is the fact that the
percent of Choice grade cattle has remained relatively flat during the same 2001-2005 time period. In other words,
carcasses are getting fatter on the outside, but marbling is not keeping pace with external fat. Heavier carcass
weights are also contributing to the increase in Yield Grade 4's. Source-UF/IFAS Animal Science Newsletter,
January 2006
CATTLE IMPORTS AT MODERATE LEVELS
Since the U.S. border reopened to Canadian feeder and slaughter cattle in July, live-cattle imports have not
increased as much as expected, according to the Livestock Marketing Information Center. Feeder-cattle imports
from Mexico, meanwhile, have dropped off somewhat from a year ago. From late July through late November,
U.S. imports of feeder cattle from Canada have averaged slightly above 8,900 head per week versus around 11,400
head per week for the same period in 2002. LMIC analysts note that 2002 import numbers were high due to
drought in Canada. Slaughter-cattle imports from Canada have averaged about 12,500 head per week since July,
compared with 16,500 head per week in 2002 and an average of about 17,000 head for 2000 through 2002.
Source: Greg Henderson, Drovers Editor-Drovers Alert Thursday, December 15, 2005, Vol. 5, Issue 50.


James F. Selph
DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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