Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: November 2005
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266


November 2005 / Volume 27 Number 6

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
November
1-3 Inter Agency Basic Prescribed Fire Training Course 2005-2006, Turner Center Exhibit Hall
1 Fall Blueberry Shortcourse, 5:30-8:45 PM, Polk County Ag. Center, Bartow, Fl
16 The Florida Beef Quality Producer Program -Why is it Important to My Beef Cattle Operation?
and How Can I Get Involved? Turner Center Exhibit Hall, 10:00 AM 3:00 PM, RSVP
17 Fall Weather School 2005, 9:30 AM-12:30 PM, DeSoto County Extension Office, Lunch
Provided

December
7 Citrus Nutrient BMP Program, 9:00 AM- Noon, DeSoto County Extension Office

8 Cucurbit Production Workshop, 1:30-4:30 PM, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center,
Balm, Florida
13 Equipment & Tractor Driver Operator Safety Training, 7:30-9:00 AM, Turner Center Exhibit
Hall
A HUMAN FUNGICIDE ... FOR PLANTS?
A naturally occurring compound called sampangine, patented in 1990 to treat human fungal infections, has been patented
again for another use. It and similar, related compounds may have use as low-toxicity, broad-spectrum controls of fungal
plant pathogens that threaten agriculture. Sampangine-based compounds have been shown to control fungi such as
Botrytis cinerea, which causes gray mold on tomatoes; Colletotrichumfragariae, which causes anthracnose crown rot and
wilt in strawberry plants; and Fusarium oxysporum, which causes vascular wilt in crops such as potatoes, sugarcane, and
many ornamentals. These antifungal compounds may boost the $31-billion annual "minor crop" industry by helping to
manage fungicide-resistant diseases both before and after harvest. The research is being done with Icoria Inc., of
Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Source: -USDA Agriculture Research Magazine, September 2005.
ANIMAL HEALTH--BRAZIL CONFIRMS THREE NEW FMD CASES THIS WEEK
Brazil confirmed three new foot-and-mouth outbreaks in the southwestern Brazilian state Mato Grosso do Sul. The new
cases came a little more than a week after the first outbreak was confirmed in the same locale Oct. 10. Nearly 40 countries
have imposed bans on Brazilian beef imports since the first announcement. Reports are that more than 10,000 head of
cattle have been depopulated so far due to the outbreak. Source-Cow Calf Weekly, October 21, 2005- Joe Roybal

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University
Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.






Year to Date Slaughter
Market Information
This Week Last Week Last Year 0-
go
http://www.ams.usda. ov/mnreports/SJ LS712 txt 7n.e ao.1
BEEF PRODUCTION (Estimate) Eiumaiei (.crmall s-
Slaughter 621.000 611,11i) 647,000 70
Live Weights 1282 1279 1267 1 e
Dressed Weights 785 785 773 X n
Beef Production (mil Ibs) 485.1 476.7 497.6 40-

http://www.ams.usda-qov/mnreportsllm ct150.txt 25.2
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE 2
Live Steer 8.488.68 85.91 10 2 21
Live Heifer 87.71 88.83 86.08 0a
CATTLE HOGS SHEEP
Dressed Steer 137.65 139.57 133.76 HOGS SHEEP
Dressed Heifer 137.87 139.88 134.63 [D2o5204 1

Avg. Price Slaughter Steer Nebraska Avg Price Feeder Steers Oklahoma City
Choice 2-4 1100-1300# Medium Frame No. 1 600-700#

956 130-



115
V






85 '
8 1 L5


75 -0 F---A--J--A--N 0 V


70 F M A M J J A S 0 N
J F M A M FMAMJJJ S 0 N D
I--2004 -205 -2004 -4 2005
The summary below reflects the week ended September 16 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to 650-
lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, October 24, 2005


Calf Weight 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.

TX 40,300 $122.18 $115.27 $115.52 $109.93 $104.68 $101.21

AL 14,800 $114-122 $108-116 $107-1134 $104-114 $95-1053

TN* 11,700 $115.01 $110.47 $107.13 $107.10 $101.49 $96.50

FL* 10,400 $102-118 $98-107 $95-1044 $98-110 $90-100

GA*(**) 9,200 $104-121 $98-113 $91-108 $94-113.50 $90-106 $86-92

CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 3 cents lower from 1.64-1.65 per bushel. US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 1
to 3 cents lower at 1.71 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 1 to 3 cents lower from 1.47-1.48 per
bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 3/4 to 15 3/4 cents lower from 1.64 3/4-1.85 3/4 per bushel. Toledo US No
2 rail Yellow corn was 1 3/4 cents lower to 1/4 cent higher from 1.53 3/4-1.60 3/4 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2
Yellow Corn rail was 2 cents lower at 1.50 3/4 per bushel. Source: USDA Livestock and Grain Website,
Volume 53, Number 43, Friday October 21, 2005:
http://www.ams.usda.gov/LSMNpubs/pdf weekly/dc grain.pdf
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University
Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







THE FLORIDA BEEF QUALITY PRODUCER PROGRAM-NOVEMBER 16, 2005
The Florida Beef Quality Producer Program is a cooperative program that has been developed by the University of
Florida Beef Cattle Extension Group, the Florida Department of Agriculture and the Florida Cattlemen's
Association. The educational program is designed to update producers on Beef Quality Assurance (BQA). Florida
has had an informal BQA program for 15 years and most producers are aware of the beef quality issues facing our
industry like injection site blemishes and bruises. With the current market situation, it is becoming increasingly
important to not only be aware of what can be done to improve beef quality but it is also critical to DOCUMENT
your beef quality practices and procedures. The demand for source verified, age verified, and process verified
cattle is increasing and market access is certainly greater for cattle with a known and documented history. The
Florida Beef Quality Producer Program on November 16, 2005, will focus on these topics and many others including:

Injection site management
Avoiding residues from antibiotics, medicated feeds, chemicals, feed contaminants, feed toxins, ruminant by-
products
Foreign object avoidance
Breeding and genetic selection
Utilization of animal heath products
Cattle handling/processing
Cull cow management

Most importantly, the training will focus on the Record Keeping that will help you DOCUMENT the beef quality
practices on your operation. Producers who attend the meeting will receive the 140 page Florida Beef Quality
Producer manual that outlines how a producer can implement a Beef Quality Assurance Plan on his/her operation. I
would encourage all beef cattle producers to attend this meeting and I also recommend that all producers bring their
cow crew. Beef Quality Assurance is everyone's job and it takes everyone to implement it properly. A meal will be
provided at lunch therefore we will need you to RSVP at 863-993-4846 by November 15h.
HAWAII DECLARES OPEN SEASON ON STRAY COWS
Starting next month, hunters in Hawaii will be allowed to shoot stray cattle as a way to protect native forests.
"Cattle pose a major threat to our native forests," says Deborah Ward, spokeswoman for the Hawaii Department of
Land and Natural Resources, which regulates the hunts. "They remove the native understory vegetation, allowing
alien weeds to move in and take over the native forest." On Nov. 5, the state will open the hunts on "feral and
trespass" cattle found in the Hilo watershed area each weekend and through Nov. 26. Each licensed hunter will be
permitted to kill and remove two cattle per day with no season limit. Source: Greg Henderson, Drovers editor-
Drovers Alert Thursday, October 20, 2005, Vol. 5, Issue 42.
CORN ESTIMATE GROWS TO NEAR RECORD
USDA increased its October corn estimate to 10.857 billion bu., the second largest in history. This estimate is 218
million bushels higher than the one in September. The primary reason is an increased yield estimate, up 2.9 bushels
from last month's estimate to 146.1 bushels /acre. "The production increase more than offsets an increase in corn
utilization," say Economics Research Service analysts. "Corn ending stocks estimated have been raised to 2.22
billion bushels Overall, U.S. feed-grain production is forecast at 296.1 million tons, up from 287.3 million forecast
last month. Within that increase, however, estimates have been lowered for sorghum (375 million bushels, 18% less
than last year), barley (212 million bushels, 24% less than 2004) and oats (115 million bushels, 1% less than last
year).

Corn -- Growers had harvested 49% of their acreage, 6% ahead of last year, and 1% ahead of the
five-year average. Harvest was most active in the Corn Belt. 57% is reported to be in good or
excellent condition, compared to 75% last year.
Soybeans -- 76% of the crop has been harvested, 7% ahead of last year and 9% ahead of normal.
Progress was near or ahead of normal in all states.
Sorghum -- acreage at mature or beyond advanced to 82%. That's 3% ahead of last year, but 4%
behind normal. The two largest states for soybean production -- Kansas and Texas -- trail the
average pace of maturation by 5% and 4%, respectively. 50% of the crop has been harvested, 6%


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University
Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







ahead of last year and 11% behind average. All told, 50% of the crop is reported to be in good or
excellent condition, compared to 62% last year.
Winter Wheat -- 78% of the winter-wheat crop has been sown, 1% ahead of last year, and 1%
ahead of normal. 50% of the acreage has emerged, 5% behind last year and 2% behind the five-
year average. Source-Beef Stocker Trends, October 24, 2005

HURRICANE WILMA
We can all be thankful that Wilma did not bring the damage and devastation of Charlie. During the 12 hour period
of 1:30 AM till 1:30 PM, our FAWN site recorded a maximum wind speed of 64.81 mph. The average wind speed
during that time period was 27 mph. The site recorded 5.4 inches of rainfall during a 24 hour period. The
information is on the following website: http://fawn.ifas.ufl.edu. Although it is not currently available, you will be
able to access the FAWN information by calling toll free 1-866-754-5732. The Arcadia Station ID is 490. Hopefully,
this dial-n will be up and running in the near future.
STRIPED GRASS LOOPER IN LIMPOGRASS
Recently I observed striped grass loopers in a pasture of Floralla
Limpograss. I thought that you might like to see some iiiforinmaioii
on this pasture pest. There are several generations of loopers each -
year in Florida. Eggs hatch in 3-4 days and larvae begin feeding bh
stripping the epidermis from the top surface of the leaf. Vllen Ihe i
larvae are approximately half grown, they begin feeding on leaf
margins. After feeding for approximately 3 weeks the larvae locale fe'
protected areas in the canopy, fasten several blades of grass logeeth
and spin a cocoon. After spending 8-10 days in the pupal stage, Ihe
adults emerge, mate, and after 3-4 days begin laying eggs.

Japanese Beef Embargo Costing Billions
If you find yourself growing so weary of the rhetoric surrounding Japan's casual approach to resuming U.S. beef
imports that you'd like to forget about it, don't. The embargo is costing the U.S. beef industry $3.14 billion/year.
That's the estimate the National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA) released last week. It includes a calculation of
lost export premiums based on the top 10 cuts exported to Japan in 2003. It also includes an estimate of the impact
these additional, un-exported pounds of beef have had on domestic live cattle prices. "This equates to a projected
cumulative two-year net balance of trade loss to the U.S. beef industry of $7.3 billion," say NCBA officials. "It is
unacceptable for this prolonged Japanese embargo on U.S. beef to cause further economic damage to America's
cattle producers." Indeed. Speaking at the annual meeting of the Texas Cattle Feeders Association (TCFA) last
week, Randy Blach, Cattle-Fax executive vice president, reminded folks that as good as cattle markets have been the
past couple of years, they would be even better today if all export markets were reopened to the U.S.
Meanwhile, Secretary of Ag Mike Johanns told TCFA meeting attendees, via satellite: "Enough is enough. It's time
to reopen the border, and we will continue our efforts until the border is reopened. Johanns emphasized Japan is
the key because it and South Korea account for / of the 64% of beef exports still lost to U.S. producers. While
standing firm on U.S. demands that Japan cease belaboring the process, Johanns said he hopes the retaliatory
measures some in Congress are lobbying for can be avoided because these would likely spawn counter-retaliatory
steps that would delay the process further. As it is, Blach explained the U.S. pork industry has increased exports by
$1 billion annually since beef was locked out of export markets. Australia has increased beef production by 30%.
Canada has increased packing capacity by 34%. Bottom line, even when borders are reopened, Blach cautioned, "It
may take us three or four years to get back to the same level of exports we had before, but we've got to have them."
reopen the American market to these products from Japan while the Japanese government refuses to apply the OIE
guidelines with respect to American beef products." Boyle also suggested it is intellectually inconsistent to permit
Japanese beef into the U.S. while continuing to preclude the import of cattle 30 months of age and older and the beef
products derived from those animals from other minimal risk regions such as Canada. Source: Beef Stocker
Trends, October 24, 2005.




The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University
Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.

















"Crotalaria
r:y v&


Red Maple


Coffee Senna


Coftee Bean/Sickle Pod


Beef Management Calendar

November

Calve in well-drained pastures. Observe cows daily to detect calving difficulty.

Check mineral feeder. IPlant cool season legumes.

Check for external parasites, especially lice, and Re-evaluate winter feeding program and feed
treat, if needed. supplies.

Implement bull conditioning program. Survey pastures for poisonous plants.

Get breeding soundness exams on bull battery so Determine bull replacement needs, develop
you have time to find replacements if some fail. selection criteria, and start checking availability of
___ quality bulls.
Review plans and arrangements for the upcoming Check progress of developing replacement heifers
breeding season. are they going to meet your target weight by the
start of the breeding season
PLANTING IN FORMER CITRUS LAN DWith the amount of acreage that has been lost to Citrus
rti hl.ricorf id(I.i -iduij-alt ~-ejiiltft I in planting back to pastures or other crop concern
for flie risi t leniletlitaihA'e l s-.og' g s and the resulting damage that it causes to new
$eI k f; 4 ZI ,,.i .. ...... an 24 months post application. On the left is the


James F. Selph
3 1. 1.1DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock
llh itllut ul i u and -I.ilultual l Sii S. l Ii upplu t iLLuin aulorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


1. Crotalaria-All livestock are susceptible to poisoning. Death
can occur from large quantities. Liver damage and
photosensitization are exhibited in livestock.
2. Coffee Senna & Coffee Bean/Sicklepod-Cattle, sheep, goats,
horses, pigs, rabbits & chickens are susceptible. Moderate to
severe diarrhea in cattle. Death can occur.
3. Red Maple-All horses can be affected. Fresh green leaves are
not toxic, however wilted and dried leaves are. Anemia &
abortion can occur.


- -- -~'






UNIVERSITY OF -
FLORIDA
IFS EXTENSION Cucurbit Production Workshop
Gulf Coast Research & Education Center
Balm, Fl

December 8, 2005

Pre-Registration is Requested


If you grow watermelons, cantaloupe, squash or cucumbers, this meeting is a must.
Learn about current pest problems, new control measures, varieties and
irrigation/fertilizer management. Visit with vendor/sponsors to learn more about
the latest control materials and what's coming for the future.

1:30 pm Cucurbit virus and insect problems. New control materials.
Dr. Susan Webb, UF/IFAS, Extension Entomologist, Gainesville

1:55 pm Major cucurbit diseases and control measures. Watermelon vine decline update.
Dr. Pam Roberts, UF/IFAS, Pathologist, SWFREC, Immokalee

2:20 pm Nematode problems in cucurbits. Life after methyl bromide?
Dr. Joe Noling, UF/IFAS, Nematologist, CREC, Lake Alfred

2:40 pm Weeds, weed competition and weed control.
Dr. Bill Stall, UF/IFAS, Extension Weed Specialist, Gainesville

3:00 pm Break Enjoy refreshments and visit with vendors.

3:30 pm Fertilizer and irrigation management for cucurbits, including doublecropping, and vegetable BMP
program.
Dr. Eric Simonne, UF/IFAS, Extension Specialist, Gainesville

3:50 pm Personal melons, melon pollinizers and new melon varieties.
Dr. Don Maynard, UF/IFAS, Professor Emeritus, GCREC, Balm

4:10 pm Squash, cantaloupe and cucumber variety update.
Alicia Whidden, UF/IFAS, Extension Agent, Hillsborough County

4:30 pm Adjourn, visit with vendors


The Meeting is free.
Please call:
Alicia Whidden at 813-744-5519 ext. 134 or
Phyllis Gilreath at 941-722-4524.
2 CEUs and 2.5 CCA credits have been approved.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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