Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089228/00005
 Material Information
Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Series Title: DeSoto County beef newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Arcadia, Fla. -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
DeSoto County Extension Office, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Arcadia, Fla.
Publication Date: October 2005
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089228
Volume ID: VID00005
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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DeSoto County

Beef Newsletter
2150 NE Roan Street, Arcadia, Fl 34266


Rate of fatal occupational injuries for selected occupations, 2004
Taxi drivers and chauffeurs
Driverisales workers and truck drivers
Electrical power-line installers and repairers
Roofers
Farmers and ranchers
Refuse and recyclable material collectors
Structural iron and steel workers
Fishers and related fishing workers
Aircraft pilots and flight engineers
Logging workers
Fatality rate (per 100.000 emploged]0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100


October 2005 / Volume 27 Number 5

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

October
6 DeSoto/Charlotte Farm Bureau Annual Meeting-DeSoto Middle School Cafeteria, 6:30 PM
7 Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 PM, Arcadia Stockyards, Arcadia
12 Florida Society for Range Management, 3:30-8:00 PM, Carlton 2x4 Ranch-- RSVP at 494-7302
13-14 1st Annual Quail Management Shortcourse-Turner Center Exhibit Hall
18-20 Sunbelt Agriculture Exposition, Moultrie, Ga.
21 Arcadia Stockyards Grand Opening, 4:00 PM-RSVP at 494-3737
27 DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association Annual Meeting-Turner Center Exhibit Hall, 7:00 PM

November
1-3 Inter Agency Basic Prescribed Fire Training Course 2005-2006, Turner Center Exhibit Hall

4 Cowboy "Chute" Out-4 Man Ranch Team Competition for Pride and Prizes-Location TBA

16 Beef Quality Assurance, the Florida Beef Quality Producer Program, Turner Center Exhibit
Hall, 10:00 AM 3:00 PM
USDA PREDICTS LARGER CROP
USDA earlier this week predicted a larger corn and soybean crop this year. The corn crop was estimated at 10.639
billion bushels compared to USDA's August estimate of 10.350 billion bushels. The soybean crop was estimated to be
2.856 billion bushels compared to the August estimate of 2.791 billion.Source: P. Scott Shearer,
Washington, D.C.-Cow-Calf Weekly, September 16, 2005
FARMING/RANCHING AMONG MOST DANGEROUS JOBS
Farmers and ranchers are involved in the sixth most dangerous job in the United States, according to the U.S.
Bureau of Labor Statistics. The agency says 37.5 deaths occurred per every 100,000 people employed in 2004. Non-
highway vehicle accidents accounted for 40 percent of occupational fatalities for farmers and ranchers last year.
Source: Greg Henderson, Drovers editor-Drovers Alert Thursday, September 22, 2005, Vol. 5, Issue 3


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University
Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.


UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA


IFAS EXTENSION



I





Year to Date Slaughter
Market Information
This Week Last Week Last Year
90
http://www.ams.usda.qov/mnreports/SJ LS712.txt
BEEF PRODUC TION (Estimate) qEtiunmale (Actual) 71.3 71.7
Slai ghier 642,000 652,000 619,000
Live Weights 1274 1273 1266
Dressed Weights 784 783 775 .
Beef Production (mil Ibs) 500.7 50S.1 477.6 40
30
http:l/www.ams.usda.qo.!nmnreporls.'In ctl50.txt 22.7 23.2
5 AREA WEEKLY WEIGHTED CATTLE PRICE E
Live Steer 86.00 86.19 83.78 10" 1I8 9
Live Heifer 86.15 86.39 83.99 CATTE HOGS SHEEP
Dressed Steer 135.29 136.47 131.77 |I2oo .2oo4
Dressed Heifer 136.04 136.91 131.79

Avg. Price Feeder Steera Oklahoma City Avg. Prices laughter Ster Nabralta
Medium Frame No. 1 GOD-7TOD Choice2-411(0-1300N
130- 96



I^:30o ,' 9G 9 A A----
-*-,--- IV-a,- N V--


i




F M A P J J A 8 0 N D 1 F M A M J J A B 0 N D


The summary below reflects the week ended September 16 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to 650-
lb., and 700- to 750-lb. heifers and steers. Source: Beef Stocker Trends, September 19, 2005


Calf Weight 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.

TX 36,500 $122.80 $114.28 $114.05 $117.27 $109.21 $108.37
AL 19,600 $113-124 $106-115 $103-107 $109-117 $102-111 $98-105
TN 15,400 $116.03 $111.27 $105.30 $108.64 $101.98 $96.12
FL 12,800 $104-118 $96-108 $92-104 $96-112 $91-102 **
IGA 11,700 $106-124 $100-123 $97-108- $98-114 $90-109 $85-105

CORN:
Kansas City US No 2 rail White Corn was 1 to 2 cents higher from 1.77-1.80 per bushel. US No 2 truck
Yellow Corn was 1 cent lower at 1.76 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was steady to 1
cent higher from 1.53-1.56 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 2 3/4 to 6 3/4 cents higher from
1.73 1/4-2.00 1/4 per bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 1/4 cent lower from 1.65 1/4-1.70 1/4
per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow Corn rail was 4 3/4 cents higher at 1.63 1/4 per bushel. Source: USDA
Livestock and Grain Website, Friday September 23, 2005:
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University
Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







http://www.ams.usda.gov/LSMNpubs/pdf weekly/dc grain.pdf
TIGHTER RULES ON FEED
FDA commissioner Lester Crawford said the government will change feed regulations to mirror rules proposed for
Canada in order to further defend against the spread of BSE. Canada has proposed regulations banning at-risk
tissues, including brains, spinal cords and other parts that can carry the disease, from feed for all animals, including
chickens, pigs and pets. Currently, Canada's rules are similar to U.S. rules. For example, it is legal to add cattle
protein to chicken feed, and feed that spills from cages and mixes with chicken waste on the ground is swept up for
use in cattle feed. In addition to the risk of transmission from uneaten feed, scientists believe chi en waste present
a risk because the BSE protein can survive the chicken's digestive system. Source: Greg Hend )
editor-Drovers Alert Thursday, September 22, 2005, Vol. 5, Issue 38. /
SENATE APPROVES BAN ON NON-AMBULATORY CATTLE _>
On a voice-vote Tuesday, the U.S. Senate approved an amendment barring non-ambulatory livestock from human
consumption. The amendment, sponsored by Senator Akaka, D-Hawaii, adds language to the Senate Agriculture
Appropriations bill to bar the use of federal funds for inspection or approval of non-ambulatory livestock for human
consumption under the Federal Meat Inspection Act. The House Agriculture Appropriations bill does not include
any similar restriction, so the issue will need to be resolved in conference. For more information from the American
Meat Institute, go to: meatami.com Source: Greg Henderson, Drovers editor-Drovers Alert Thursday, September
22, 2005, Vol. 5, Issue 38.
COW-CALF RETURNS DOWN SLIGHTLY
Cow-calf producers earned record returns during 2004 averaging nearly $150 per cow, according to the Livestock
Marketing Information Center. Those numbers will decline somewhat this year, but 2005 returns are likely to be the
second-highest ever. Calf prices are down slightly from last fall, and LMIC analysts expect cash receipts to decline
by about $10 per cow. In addition, production costs have increased, largely due to higher energy prices. With lower
calf prices and higher production costs, the LMIC projects returns this year to average about $120 per cow. Source:
- Greg Henderson, Drovers editor-Drovers Alert Thursday, September 15, 2005, Vol. 5, Issue
FEEDING CULL COWS IN FLORIDA
At the FCA Convention and Allied Trade Show in June, Dr. Jeff Cater reported to the A
Research and Education Committee on a research study done recently. Ninety cull ~
cows were fed a concentrate diet for 90 days. The diet was calculated to providel2.1%
crude protein, 70% TDN and 18.1% crude fiber. During the final feeding phase, one-half
of the cows received a dietary feed additive (Optaflexx), proven to increase carcass
yield. Additionally, one-half of the cows were given a growth promoting implant at the beginning of the study.
Preliminary analysis indicated a slight advantage in ADG for the cows fed Optaflexx (2.91b/d vs. 2.51b/d) and final
weighs of 1128 vs. 1096. Because of the increased weight, Optaflexx fed cows had heavier carcasses than controls
and yielded more dollars per carcass by nearly $33.00. Results are preliminary at this time, but they are
encouraging that producers might be able to increase values of cull cows prior to marketing. A more detailed
account of this can be found on page 96 of the September issue of The Florida Cattleman and Livestock Journal
Magazine.
E-MAIL OF EXTENSION NEWSLETTERS AND OTHER INFORMATION
I have asked this in the past, but have not done so recently. If you would like to have this
newsletter and other Extension information sent to you by e-mail, please send me a reply
to my e-mail address which is: iselph(&ifas.ufl.edu. In the subject line, put "Newsletter".
After last years hurricanes, I would have liked to have had everyone's e-mail addresses in order to have gotten out
timely information. After a disaster of course, not everyone will have the capacity to get e-mails immediately.
However, many people now have generators that will in many cases allow for electronic mail to function. Even in
non-emergency times there arises every so often a need to get out information as rapidly as possible. Having such a
list will be a benefit to everyone including our county cattlemen's association. It will be used only for the newsletter
and items such as I have stated above.
FLORIDA SOCIETY FOR RANGE MANAGEMENT
The Florida Society for Range Management will have their fall meeting this year on October 12, 2005 at the Carlton
2x4 Ranch. Participants will discuss a variety of issues including, quail management on working ranches, surface
water management, the short term effect of removal of livestock from tame pastures. Call 494-7302 for more
information. Time is 3:30-8:00 PM and Cost is $15.00.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University
Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







SHOW TIME APPROACHES FOR AGRICULTURAL EXTRAVAGANZA-SUNBELT AG
EXPO
Catch a glimpse of farming in the future this October at the South's biggest and best farm show. It's the
Sunbelt Ag Exposition, North America's Premier Farm Show. The Expo is the world's largest farm show
with on-site row crops and field demonstrations. During the show's three days, Oct. 18-20, the latest
technology from the agricultural industry will be on full display near Moultrie, Ga., for all to see and
evaluate. Each year, the Expo showcases forward-looking farming practices for visitors from throughout
the Southeast, the U.S. and other parts of the world. Whether you are looking for agricultural equipment,
services or information, you will find it here at the Expo. More than 1,100 exhibitors are expected this
year, and many have come back year after year since the first Expo in 1978. The Expo is planning a new
event this year, one that will give farmers valuable insight on what they can expect from changes in farm
policy. Precision Ag. technology returns with another strong showing. Site-specific, precision farming
takes the guesswork out of planting, spraying and a host of other farm chores. And Expo has helped
nurture this technology from its early experimental stages until now when it has become a must-have for
modern farmers.
Animal agriculture is also well represented. Cattlemen will see presentations on hay quality. Others will
cover national animal identification, a crucial step in protecting individual herds and the nation's food
supply from dangerous diseases. Also, new-to-Expo beef breeds, the Romagnola and Blonde d' Aquitaine,
will be on display. Horse enthusiasts will thrill at the demonstrations in the equine arena, featuring cutting
horses, barrel racing and reined cow horses. Goats and alpacas are other farm animals featured at Expo,
along with some of the smartest and entertaining dogs to be found anywhere. Border collies will be
rounding up sheep and cattle in an annual Expo tradition, the American Grand Finals stock dog
competition.
SENATE VOTES TO BAN JAPAN BEEF IMPORTS
If they won't buy our beef, we won't buy theirs, the Senate has decided.
On a 72-26 vote, the Senate adopted an amendment prohibiting importation of Japanese beef until Japan lifts its ban
on U.S beef. Opponents of the amendment argued trade decisions about food safety should be based on science, not
on restrictions in Japan or other countries. Japan was the biggest customer for American beef, importing more than
$1.5 billion worth of beef in 2003.
The Senate, apparently, agrees with the American Meat Institute on this issue. AMI president J. Patrick Boyle said
"it is both ironic and exceptionally disappointing to the beef industry that APHIS is expeditiously moving forward to
reopen the American market to these products from Japan while the Japanese government refuses to apply the OIE
guidelines with respect to American beef products." Boyle also suggested it is intellectually inconsistent to permit
Japanese beef into the U.S. while continuing to preclude the import of cattle 30 months of age and older and the beef
products derived from those animals from other minimal risk regions such as Canada.
Source: Greg Henderson, Drovers editor-Drovers Alert Thursday, September 22, 2005, Vol. 5, Issue 38.
MARTHA STEWART LENDS HER "GOOD" NAME TO PETA
Martha Stewart, the home-making guru and former fur-wearer, has completed a video on behalf of PETA, asking
people not to wear fur. "I used to wear fur, but, like many others, I had a change of heart when I learned what
actually happens to the animals. So much violence in the world seems beyond our control, but this is one cruelty we
can stop by being informed consumers," she says in the video, which can be seen at peta.org.
Source: Greg Henderson, Drovers editor-Drovers Alert Thursday, September 22, 2005, Vol. 5, Issue 38.
DESOTO COUNTY CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING
The 2005 DeSoto County Cattlemen's Association Annual Meeting will be held at 7:00 p.m., Thursday, October
27th at the Turner Center Exhibit Hall. All members, along with their family are invited to attend. Members are
asked to bring a covered dish. You may bring one guest to the steak dinner. Members bringing more than one
guest will be asked to pay $10.00 per each additional guest. Our guest speaker will be Joe Marlin Hilliard III,
current President of the Florida Cattlemen's Association.
Prescribed Fire Training Course (Cattlemen's Version) 2005November 1-3, 2005 there will be
a Prescribed Fire Training Course held at the Turner Center Exhibit Hall. The course is designed to train
cattlemen/private landowners in the use and application of prescribed fire. The course will begin at 12:00 Noon on
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only
to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University
Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.







the 1st and end on Friday the 3rd sometime after 3:30 PM after the conclusion of the Exam for Certification. Thi
cost of this school is $150.00. Currently, there are 16 individuals signed up for this activity. We are able to offel
to up to 25. If you have not signed up and wish to do so, either call our office or send in the registration form fr,


L I ,: II :11


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Bracken Fern


Beef Management Calendar

I October

Plant cool season legumes. Plant ryegrass after October 15th.

Check mineral feeder. Check dust bags and back rubbers.

Check for external parasites, especially lice, and Check for army worms and grass loopers and treat if
treat, if needed. necessary.

Cut Hay in October if pastures are dry enough. ISurvey pastures for poisonous plants.

Watch condition of cow herd; maintain adequate Determine bull replacement needs, develop
cow nutrition. Selection criteria, and start checking availability of
_quality bulls.

I II


James F. Selph, DeSoto County Extension Director, IV, Livestock



The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.





LI UNIVERSITY OF
* FLORIDA st i i MI .i
IFAS EXTENSION1 Annual Quail Management Shortcourse

IFAS EXTENSION


Day 1
Quail Ecology, Management, & Issues
Presiding: Jim Selph
Presiding: Jim Selph
8:00 Registration & coffee
8:30 Welcome
8:40 Status, distribution, and thoughts on quail population
declines in Florida)-Tommy Hines FWC
8:55 Quail population declines and the Northern Bobwhite
Conservation Initiative in Florida and the Southeast-Don
McKenzie, Wildlife Management Institute and Coordinator of
NBCI
9:10 Quail facts-Bill Giuliano
9:30 Predation & predator control-Bill Palmer, Tall
Timbers
9:55 Fire ant effects & control-Roberto Pereira, USDA-
ARS
10:00 Break
Presiding: George Tanner
10:40 Habitat assessment: identifying good and bad sites-
Roger Wells, QU National Habitat Coordinator
11:10 Mechanical treatments to improve rangelands for
quail-George Tanner
11:30 The importance and use of fire in quail management-
Mike Orlando, FWC
12:00 Lunch & Keynote Speaker: Rangeland Quail and Their
Management--Experience and Successes-Dave Delaney, King
Ranch
Presiding: Bill Giuliano
1:30 Rangeland grasses: identification and pros and cons for
wildlife and livestock-James Martin, UGA
1:50 Cows & quail: can they co-exist?-Bill Giuliano
2:20 Supplemental feeding: does it really help?-Bill Palmer
2:40 Food plots & agricultural crops: use and benefit for
quail-Nigel Morris, FL QU
3:00 Pen-raised quail: their use and problems for wild
birds-Jim Selph
3:20 Break
Presiding: Bill Giuliano
3:40 Herbicides & quail-Any Pierce, Red River Specialties
4:00 Benefits of quail management practices to other species:
turkey, deer, and others-Chuck McKelvy, FWC and Adam
Butler, UGA
4:25 Quail hunting leases: how do they work?-Wayne
Zahn, Lykes Bros.
4:45 Shooting preserves: how do they work?-Wayne Zahn,
Lykes Bros.
5:05 Regulations regarding quail hunting, leases, and
shooting preserves-Nick Wiley, FWC
5:25 Quality hunting issues: what makes a good hunt?-Dick
Corbett, FWC and others


Turner Center Exhibit Hall

Arcadia, Fl

October 13-14, 2005


Registration $50.00


Facilitating: Will Sheftall
6:00 Dinner & Panel Discussion: What is the future of quail
and quail hunting in Florida?- What does the future for quail
and quail hunting in Florida look like? how dependent is quail
habitat management on a future critical mass of industrial
forestry and rangelands in different regions of the state? Who
will be the quail habitat stewards and managers in Florida in the
future? the hunters? the beneficiaries?
Da 2
Presiding: Jim Selph
7:30 Registration & coffee
8:00 Habitat management: range management, food plots,
fire, etc. on local areas
12:00 Lunch
Bird Dogs: Information & Demonstrations
Presiding: Jim Selph
1:00 Working dog health & nutrition-Martin Kauffman,
IAMS
1:20 Hunting dogs: what good are they?-Clay Sisson-
Albany Quail Project
1:40 Dog breeds and training-Butch Beyer
2:00 Q&A with speakers
2:30 Field demonstration and Q&A with nationally
recognized hunting dog person-proper use of training collars,
other training methods, etc. -Butch Beyer
5:00 Depart

This program is designed to educate
landowners, managers, hunters, and quail
enthusiasts on the ecology and management
Northern Bobwhite Quail in Florida. In
addition, bird dogs and their importance to
quail hunting will be examined. The science-
based information will come from a variety
of sources, including landowners, the
hunting industry, academia, NGO's, and
natural resource agencies, and be presented
in layperson terms.

Cooperators:
South Florida Beef Forage Program
Tall Timbers
FWC
Quail Unlimited

LODGING AVAILABLE AT:
HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS
863/494-5900


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.









4.: UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA

IFAS EXTENSION

1st Annual
Quail Management Shortcourse
Registration Form.
October 13-14, 2005


Complete the registration form, enclose registration fee and return to the registrar
at the address below. If you have any questions, contact your County Extension
Agent listed in the brochure.


Name:

Address:

City: State: Zip:

Home Phone:
Business Phone:



Registration Fees: $50.00 per person (non-refundable) for the Quail
Management Shortcourse.
Checks Payable to: South Florida Beef-Forage Program.
Return to: South Florida Beef-Forage Program
2150 NE Roan St.
Arcadia, FL 34266






The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M.
University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.






UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA


IFAS EXTENSION


South Florida Beef-Forage Program Participating Agents
Presents:
First Annual
Cowboy "Chute" Out
Four Man Ranch Team Competition
nIDriC. I I


DeSoto County Jim Selph
(863) 993-4846
Glades County Shelley Humphries
(863) 946-0244
Hardee County Lockie Gary
(863) 773-2164
Hendry County Sonja Crawford
(863) 674-4092
Highlands County Gary Mikulecky
(863) 402-6540
Hillsborough County Brent Broaddus
(813) 744-5519
Manatee County
(941) 722-4524
Okeechobee County Pat Hogue & Pat Miller
(863) 763-6469
Polk County Brantley Ivey
(863) 519-8677


Judging will be based on:
Quality assurance issues such as:
proper product use and placement
cleanliness and use of application equipment
Safety
Handling of cattle.

TIME will not be a factor!

Tentative Days Agenda (depending on number of entries):
9:00 AM "Chute Out Comnetition


11:30 AM Lunch


12:30 PM Beef Quality Assurance Issues Presentation Dr.
Todd Thrift


2:00 PM Presentation of Awards
Cowboy "Chute" Out
Four man ranch teams will work a group of four calves To register a ranch team, contact one of the South Florida
administering vaccinations, pour-on products, implants, ear Beef Forage Program Extension Agents listed to the left.
tags, injectable de-wormers and dehorning if calves require it
and complete a processing map for the calf group.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational
information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed,
color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department
of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension
Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating.




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