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Title: Eric Williams : his scholarship, work, and impact : a conference at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture : February 15-16, 2002 brochure
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Title: Eric Williams : his scholarship, work, and impact : a conference at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture : February 15-16, 2002 brochure
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
Publication Date: 2002
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: Trinidad and Tobago -- Caribbean
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Bibliographic ID: UF00089094
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Map of Trinidad & Tobago
        Page 10
    Back Cover
        Page 11
Full Text
"Eric Williams:


Schol


arship,


His
Work


"flu Eustacoilliams
ISHt- iSB


February 1


-16, 2002


A Conference at the Schomburg Center
for Research in Black Culture
-515 Malcolm X Blvd.
New York, NY 10037
(212) 491-2200
Co-sponsored by Princeton University, Program in African American Studies and
The Government of Trinidad and Tobago


and Impact"








Hi Scoasip Wok an Impac


"I was born here, and here I stay, with the people of Trinidad
and Tobago, who educated me free of charge for nine years at
Queen's Royal College and for five years at Oxford, who have
made me whatever I am, and who have been or might be at
any time the victims of the very pressure which I have been
fighting against ... I am going to let down my bucket where I
am, right here with you in the British West Indies."


Dr. Eric Eustace Williams (1911-1981)
"The University of Woodford Square" June 21, 1955



















Cover Photo: University of Florida, Eric Williams Website
(http://palmm.fcla.edu/eew)








Eri Williiams


Dr. Eric Eustace Williams

Dr. Eric Eustace Williams is perhaps most well known in two roles:
as a consummate historian, first Prime Minister of Trinidad and
Tobago and head of government for twenty-five years until his
death in 1981.

In addition to his bibliography of over 600 articles, lectures, and
speeches, his major publications include The Negro in the
Caribbean (1942); History of the People of Trinidad and Tobago
(1962); British Historians and the West Indies (1969); and From
Columbus to Castro: The History of the Caribbean, 1492-1969
(1970).

He was trained at Oxford University, receiving the doctorate in 1938
in history, writing a controversial dissertation on the abolition and
emancipation of British West Indian Slavery. Published as
Capitalism and Slavery (1944), this landmark study, popularly called
"The Williams Thesis," continues to inform today's ongoing debate
and remains on "the cutting edge of slave trade research in
academic circles" (New York Times Book Review, November
1997).

After a teaching appointment as a professor of social and political
science at Howard University, he returned home, entered the
political arena with his founding of the People's National Movement
and led his country to Independence from Britain in 1962.

The University of Virginia/Johns Hopkins Journal, Callaloo, vol. 20,
no. 4 (Fall, 1997), Eric Williams and the Postcolonial Caribbean,
and Selwyn Carrington's and Heather Cateau's Capitalism and
Slavery Fifty Years Later (Peter Lang, 2000) offer a range of
perspectives on Dr. Williams' legacy as scholar and statesman. A
selection of his political speeches has been published as Eric E.
Williams Speaks (ed. Selwyn Cudjoe, Calaloux/University of
Massachusetts, 1993).







Eric W[illiams:
Hi Scoarhp Wok an Impac


The Eric Williams Memorial Collection

The Eric Williams Memorial Collection was inaugurated at the
University of the West Indies (Trinidad and Tobago) by the Hon.
Basdeo Panday, Prime Minister, and current US Secretary of State
Colin Powell on March 22, 1998. The Collection has been named
to UNESCO's prestigious Memory of the World Register, the United
Nations' effort to preserve the world's historical and cultural heritage
for posterity.
Heralded by Powell as a "tireless warrior in the battle against
colonialism," Williams, a distinguished scholar and the first Prime
Minister of Trinidad and Tobago, was head of government for a
quarter of a century until his death in 1981. He is the author of the
seminal work Capitalism and Slavery, among many others.
The Collection includes some 7,000 volumes covering a wide range
of disciplines; papers from Williams' alma mater, St. Catherine's
College, Oxford University, where he was made an Honorary
Fellow; personal, political and family memorabilia; correspondence
from Heads of State, as well as academic colleagues such as
W.E.B. DuBois and Charles S. Johnson; a substantial portion of the
over 600 speeches, documents, publications, lectures and books
that comprise Williams' bibliography; an Oral History Project; as well
as over 150 calypsoes with trenchant social commentary about Eric
Williams' policies and persona. There is also a museum containing
a wealth of memorabilia of the period, with numerous photographs
depicting the seven decades of Dr. Williams' life and multifaceted
career. A three-dimensional replica of his study completes the
exhibit.
From February 15-March 2, 2002 portions of the Eric Williams
Memorial Collection Museum will be exhibited at the New York
Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture,
during regular operating hours. Participants of the conference and
members of the public are encouraged to visit this display that was
designed by Kamo Designs and Productions, digital imaging by
Cyan Studios, both of Trinidad and Tobago.







Friday February 15, 2002


9:00am-9:45am
PLENARY SESSION

Welcome and introduction of Keynote speaker:
Howard Dodson, Chief, Schomburg Center

Keynote speaker:
Hon. Rex Nettleford, Vice Chancellor,
University of the West Indies

Welcome Remarks:
His Excellency A.N.R. Robinson
President, The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago


10:00am-11:30am
WILLIAMS AND THE MAKING OF THE CARIBBEAN

Chair: Linda Heywood, Howard University

"Eric Williams, ca. 1943-Early Political Stirrings of a Scholar Activist"
Tony Martin, Wellesley College

"Williams and the 1970 State of Emergency"
Colin Palmer, Princeton University

"Eric Williams and the Chaguaramas Dispute, 1957-1960"
Cary Fraser, Pennsylvania State University

Comment: The audience


11:30am-12:30pm
LUNCH

12:30pm-1:00pm
SLIDE PRESENTATION

"The Use of a Heliconia as a Political Symbol in the Caribbean"
Sandra Barnes, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine








Friday February 15, 2002


1:00pm-3:00pm
ERIC WILLIAMS AND ISSUES OF RACE, THE STATE, AND
POLITICAL ENDS

Chair: Carlton Wilson, North Carolina Central University

"Eric Williams and the Ethnic, Racial, and Color Stratification of
the Caribbean"
William Darity, University of North Carolina and Duke University

"Williams, the State, and Economic Development"
Selwyn Ryan, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine

"What's America for the Goose is Britain for the Gander: Exploring
the Relationship Between Eric Williams and C.L.R. James"
Grant Farred, Duke University

"Eric Williams: Protagonist or Antagonist of Caribbean
Integration?"
Sharon Alexander-Gooding, University of the West Indies,
Cave Hill

Comment: The audience


3:15pm-4:45pm
ERIC WILLIAMS AND NATIONAL POLICY

Chair: Winston James, Columbia University

"Eric Williams and Public Sector Reform"
Roland Baptiste, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine

"Eric Williams and Tobago: Policies and Attitudes"
Learie Luke, South Carolina State University

"Eric Williams and the Labor Movement in Trinidad and Tobago,
1960-1980"
Jerome Teelucksingh, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine

Comment: The audience








Friday February 15, 2002


5:00pm-6:30pm
WILLIAMS AND CARIBBEAN INTEGRATION

Chair: Saje Mathieu, Princeton University

"We Integrate or We Perish: Forbes Burnham, Eric Williams and the
Regional Integration Movement"
Cecilia McAlmont, University of Guyana

"Williams and the Problem of Economic Autonomy in the
Caribbean"
Gabraelle Lane, Independent Scholar

"Constructing West Indianness: Williams, Race, Regional Identity,
and the West Indies Federation"
Eric D. Duke, Michigan State University

Comment: The audience








Saturday February 16, 2002


9:00am-10:50am
ERIC WILLIAMS, THE SCHOLAR

Chair: Sean Greene, University of Pennsylvania

"The Nineteenth Century Origins of Capitalism and Slavery"
Demetrius Eudell, Wesleyan University

"Capitalism and Slavery Revisited"
Dale Tomich, State University of New York, Binghamton

"Williams, the Free Coloreds, and Abolition: A Reassessment
Edward Cox, Rice University

"The Use and Abuse of Capitalism and Slavery"
Chris McCauley, University of California, Santa Barbara

Comment: The audience

11:00am-12:30pm
WILLIAMS, THE RESEARCHER AND THEORIST

Chair: Watson Jennison, University of Virginia

"Williams, the Bibliophile and Scholar!"
Brinsley Samaroo, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine

"Williams: Publishing in the Journal of Negro History"
David Barry Gaspar, Duke University

"Refiguring the Black Atlantic: Re-reading Capitalism and Slavery in
the Time of Transnationality"
Rinaldo Walcott, York University

Comment: The audience

12:30pm-1:30pm
LUNCH








Saturday February 16, 2002


1:30pm-3:30pm
WILLIAMS, WOMEN, SCHOLARSHIP AND POLITICAL
CHANGE

Chair: Carole Boyce Davies, Florida International University

"Eric Williams: The Social Construction of a Movement
Intellectual"
Maurice St. Pierre, Morgan State University

"The Black Woman in Williams' Capitalism and Slavery"
Hilary Beckles, University of the West Indies, Mona

"Williams, Claudia Jones, and the Politics of Change"
Lydia Lindsey, North Carolina Central University

"Williams, and his Impact on Caribbean Historiography"
Selwyn Carrington, Howard University
Comment: The audience

3:45pm-5:30pm
ERIC WILLIAMS AND THE LARGER WORLD OF
SCHOLARSHIP

Chair: Selwyn Carrington, Howard University

"Williams and the Chinese Optic"
Jiang Shixue, Institute of Latin American Studies, Beijing, China

"The Function of History: Williams, Woodson, Dubois, and the
Counter Narrative of History"
Derrick E. White, Ohio State University

"The Portrait of Dr. Eric Williams in Earl Lovelace's 'Salt'"
George Ramos, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine

"Eric Williams: Past, Present, and Future of Caribbean Studies"
Fannie Theresa Rushing, De Paul University

Comment: The audience

5:30pm
CLOSING
RECEPTION FOLLOWING LANGSTON HUGHES LOBBY








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FEBRUARY 15-16, 2002

A Conference at the Schomburg Center
for Research in Black Culture

FEBRUARY 15,2002 MARCH 2,2002
An Exhibition of the Eric Williams
Memorial Collection







The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
515 Malcolm X Blvd.
New York, NY 10037
(212) 491-2200




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