• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Chair's message
 URP fall orientation at Lake...
 APA Florida 2008
 Student mentoring program
 Student Planning Association...
 Professional mentoring program
 Faculty news
 Alumni stories
 Alumni articles
 Student news
 Dr. Barley's Memorial Lecture...














Group Title: URP news
Title: URP news. Vol. 2. Issue 1
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089085/00003
 Material Information
Title: URP news. Vol. 2. Issue 1
Series Title: URP news
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Urban and Regional Planning, College of Design, Construction & Planning
Publisher: Department of Urban and Regional Planning, College of Design, Construction & Planning
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: November 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089085
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Chair's message
        Page 1
    URP fall orientation at Lake Wauberg
        Page 2
    APA Florida 2008
        Page 3
    Student mentoring program
        Page 4
    Student Planning Association (SPA)
        Page 5
    Professional mentoring program
        Page 5
    Faculty news
        Page 6
    Alumni stories
        Page 7
    Alumni articles
        Page 8
    Student news
        Page 9
    Dr. Barley's Memorial Lecture Series
        Page 10
Full Text






















Chair's Message

The Fall 2008 semester started with an orientation at Lake
Wauburg to welcome new and returning students. The Student
Planning Association (SPA) paired each new student with a second
-year student as student mentor. The student mentors and mentees
had a chance to get to know each other and to mingle with the fac-
ulty. The San Felasco Section of Florida Chapter of American
Planning Association (APA) demonstrated its support through a
monetary contribution and also sent Joan Lizbeth Brown to the
orientation to welcome our students.

Our Gator Planners had a strong and visible presence at the Florida APA conference in
Miami. A large number of alumni, students and faculty showed up at the Urban and Re-
gional Planning Alumni reception sponsored generously by Bilzin Sumburg, Attorneys at
Law. At the meeting, our department's founding Chair, Professor Emeritus Earl Starns,
was honored for the Florida APA Award for Lifetime Achievement. This is the second
year in a row that our URP emeritus professors have received that honor (Dr. Bartley was
honored for the Lifetime Achievement Award in September 2007). Furthermore, our Ph.D.
student, Iris Patten, received the 2008 Outstanding Student Award at the conference.

Continuing the honor roll, Professor Ilir Bejleri received $150,000 as the first year install-
ment of a $500,000 grant proposal from the Florida Department of Transportation Safety
Office to develop a statewide geospatial web-based system for mapping and analysis of
traffic accidents. The GeoPlan Research Center received three prestigious awards in a row,
the "Special Achievement in GIS" award at ESRI's 28th Annual User Conference in recog-
nition of their sustained outstanding work in the GIS field, the "2008 Exemplary Human
Environment Initiatives (EHEI)", and the "Exemplary Ecosystem Initiative (EFI)" from the
Federal Highway Administration of the US Department of Transportation for developing a
collaborative transportation decision making process that protects the natural, cultural and
built environment. Moreover, Dr. Schneider's book, Crime Prevention and the Built Envi-
ronment, has been identified by a team of academic editors and advisers as one of the top
ten resources on the topic of criminology.

Our alumni continue to make us proud in the planning field. In this issue of the URP
Newsletter, we'll share two successful stories of our alumni, Michael Marshall, class of
1994 and Daniel Williams, class of 1999.

With the support of Dr, Bartley's family, URP faculty, students, and alumni the first lec-
ture of the Ernest R. Bartley Memorial Lecture Series will be held at 5:30 PM on Novem-
ber 21, 2008 in the Ocora at the Graham Center for Public Service in Pugh Hall on the UF
campus. Former Florida Senator and Governor Bob Graham will give the presentation
titled "Growth, Growth Management and Sustainability in a Distressed Economy: where
are we and where are we going?" Please come and join us in honor of Dr. Bartley and his
extraordinary contributions to the University of Florida and the Department of Urban and










VOLUME 2, ISSUE I


SChair's Message (Continued)
Regional Planning.


We have initiated a professional mentoring program to team up professional planners with our
students. The first 25 professional planners have graciously agreed to serve as mentors to our
students.

We have some personnel changes to our faculty. Professor Kristin Larsen received tenure and
was promoted to Associate Professor. Congratulations! Dr. Jay Stein left the department and
went to the State University of New York in Plattsburgh as a provost. We are in the process of
recruiting a new faculty member that is expected to come onboard in spring 2009.

Finally, as some of you know and I am happy to report to you again that our Urban and Regional
Planning program has been ranked 15th nationally in the Planetizen 2009 Guide to Graduate Ur-
ban Planning Programs putting URP among other top 25 planning programs such as the Massa-
chusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Cornell University, and University of Cali-
fornia, Berkeley. URP's Masters program was ranked 1st in the nation for non-resident tuition
under $15,000/year and 2nd for resident tuition under $6,500/year. The program was also ranked
in the top ten in both the growth management and historic preservation specialties. We should all
be proud of our great accomplishments.

As always, we look forward to your involvement in any capacity in our program. Please drop us
a line about your news and come visit us when you have a chance.


Zhong-Ren Peng, Chair and Professor


The Urban and Regional Planning orientation at Lake
Wauburg was a chance to meet the professors and learn more
about the department. As a first-year graduate student and
newly planted Florida/Gainesville resident, I especially appre-
ciated the opportunity to meet and become (re)acquainted with
one another. Instead of the common college staple of pizza
and pop, we ate barbeque pork sandwiches with coleslaw and
baked beans, along with various fruits and juices.


L- I


After we were fed and conversations among first-years, sec-
ond-years, and faculty alike filled the Cypress Lodge, the ori-
entation was in full swing. Dr. Zhong-Ren Peng gave the
Welcoming address to both the graduate students and the at-
tending members of the San Felasco Section of FAPA. Dr.
Christopher Silver gave the opening remarks for the orienta-
tion, with Dr. Kristin Larsen following with a brief review of the program. Up next was the entire
URP faculty as each faculty member introduced themselves and their area of specialization within
the department. As the President of SPA, Chad Riding introduced the first-year students to the
Student Planning Association. To everyone's delight, individual student introductions did not
happen, which gave first-years more time to meet one-on-one with their student mentors and/or
faculty advisors, as well as to take in some of the water activities Lake Wauburg has to offer. The
day was informative, relaxed, and a great way to get the semester started.

New students, returning second years, and faculty enjoyed a barbeque buffet and a chance to min-
gle informally at the URP Orientation at Lake Wauburg on August 29th.


By Katie White


URF


PAGE 2









VOLUME 2, ISSUE I


APA Florida in Miami: Making Memories

Perched along the waterfront of bustling downtown Miami, the 2008 APA
Florida conference offered a balmy sociable atmosphere to connect with
planners and an educational milieu to discover new techniques for sustain-
able planning and design. Truly incorporating sustainability in all planning
aspects seems daunting, especially when considering that the methods for
measuring sustainability are heavily debated and that the United Nations
includes an extensive suite of over 50 core indicators for assessing the sus-
tainability of development. Yet the conference presented several straight-
forward initiatives that addressed individual components of sustainability,
such as sustaining water supplies, car-sharing, and sustainable affordable
housing. Unfortunately, planning is sometimes missing from the dialogue
of sustainability. Doug Farr, a keynote speaker, discussed the LEED neighborhood rating system, now in pilot
project stages, that combines the principles of smart growth, new urbanism and green building. Utilizing these
familiar objectives, this method appears to be a step towards developing a more comprehensive approach. Addi-
tionally, individual cities have shown innovative leadership, such as Se-
attle's climate change action plans which identify specific targets and
deadlines for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Many speakers spoke
of the need to mobilize political will, create healthy partnerships, and
assimilate context-sensitive public participation. The array of emerging
applications exemplified the trend towards greater integration of sustain-
ability in planning. As more initiatives are effectively implemented, plan-
ners could become a powerful force in leading our communities to
greener living.

The tremendous UF turnout at the conference demonstrated our interest
in sustainability and desire to simply become better planners. In fact, the
UF attendance broke records this year; there were over 25 students and faculty! There was a mix of both first and
second year students and the conference proved to be a great venue to network and bond with classmates. Unde-
niably, UF boasts a diverse and impressive group of actively involved Gator planners students and faculty from
other schools even commented on how well the UF group seemed to genuinely get along! The conference offered
many social events perfect for making connections. Friendships are crucial in the field of planning, as you never
know who might become your mayor, or regulator, or when you might need professional advice. Together with
new friends, many of us embarked on our own mobile workshop on the MetroRail, touring Miami and the histori-
cally significant Miami Beach Art Deco District. The sight of students dressed in business attire snapping pictures
of artfully landscaped sidewalks, pedestrian streets and classic building entryways along Ocean Drive in a sea of
scantily clad Miamites was priceless. Having never been to Miami, I visited local treasures recommended by Mi-
ami's best their planners and was introduced to Cuban reggae and learned the true meaning of Miami chic. The
camaraderie and verve of the UF students shined and captured the attention of other students. Overall the confer-
ence experience positively augmented our graduate education and left me with unforgettable memories.

By Jen Cannon




I I
IOn behalf of the professors, alumni, and students of the Department of Regional and Urban Planning, we would like'
Ito thank the Bilzin Sumberg Law Firm for hosting such a wonderful reception to kick of the 2008 FAPA conference.'
IAttendees were graced with an assortment of delectable foods and beverages along with wonderful door prizes. We
'would especially like to thank fellow Gators Howard Nelson and Carter McDowell for extending a warm welcome to.
lall of the attendees. The reception provided a great opportunity for alumni, professors, and students to come togetherI
land for Dr. Peng to detail the exciting new programs and changes upcoming within the College and URP. We left the I
reception that evening with a profound respect for my predecessors and a heightened responsibility to emulate their1
achievements.
I I
IBy Russ Provost

-\ -


PAGE 3

















Student Planning Association (SPA) is very proud to report the success of a new program implemented this semester. As suggested
by students and faculty, we established a mentoring program by which incoming students were paired with returning students over
the summer to help with the transition of entering graduate school, quell any fears or anxieties, and answer the questions any first
year grad student may have. As incoming students had the opportunity to speak with current students before even setting foot on
campus, and returning students had the chance to connect with future classmates, the program proved truly beneficial to everyone
involved. While all incoming students and most returning students were paired through our mentoring program, below is an account
of the experience of Lan Feng, a new student from China, and Chad Riding, her second year mentee.


Mentor Experience

II
This year I have had the opportunity to be a mentor to a new student, Lan Feng. She is from Beijing, China, and has come here to
Study planning, particularly sustainable development. She arrived here in mid August while the Olympics were going on in her
home town. I was able to show Lan around Gainesville, taking her to stores to show where she could get school supplies, com-
puter accessories, and home products. It was a neat experience learning how going shopping in the United States is very different
from China.
I I
I was also able to help Lan get adjusted to graduate school. I explained to her how the program works, such as which classes to
take, how to choose a thesis topic, and how you graduate. I felt that this information was important to know now so she could
plan ahead for which classes to take. It helped me remember what it was like to just be entering graduate school and gave me
perspective on my wonderful experiences here in grad school. I am thankful to have this opportunity to help someone else make
the most of her experience.

by Chad Riding
-------------------------------------------------------------S/

Mentee experience

With the help of Chad as my mentor, I was able to quickly and smoothly transition into the academic life at UF and daily life in
Gainesville and the United States. When I sent Chad an email about which classes to take as a first semester URP student, he was
quick to respond with useful suggestions and detailed explanations, explaining the process by which I could discover my unique
capabilities and special interests through some of the required courses, and then do specific research by selecting certain courses in
the following semesters. Without Chad's thoughtful advice, I would have naively chosen all electives for my first semester.

Perhaps more important than directing me to the appropriate classes, however, Chad also helped me transition to life in the United
States by showing me where to do my shopping. While it is useful to know where BestBuy is for my technological needs, the situa-
tion was increasingly grave when I was troubled by bed bugs. Chad immediately drove me to the store to buy pest control spray and
plastic bags with which to protect my clothes, proving to be not only an academic mentor, but a valuable friend.

I am glad to be Chad's mentee, not only because he selflessly helps me, but also because I have the unique opportunity to help him.
As Chad is interested in the Chinese culture, I am able to improve his language skills, discuss the latest Chinese news with him, and
make comparisons between Chinese and American cultures. The pairing has been worthwhile and enjoyable for both of us.

I am already excited to be a second year mentor for an incoming student next year and have the opportunity to impact someone in
the same ways that Chad has impacted me as a mentor.

By Lan Feng






URP NEWS


PAGE 4


VOLUME 2, ISSUE I










VOLUME 2, ISSUE I


When I was elected as President of the Student Planning Association (SPA) for
the 2008-2009 academic year, I was excited about the opportunities that lay
ahead. Aside from the typical responsibilities of president of an organization, I
knew it was my responsibility to make the final year as a URPer for second year
students, and the first year for our incoming students, a memorable one. With the
program's enthusiastic students, faculty, staff, and SPA Executive Board, I knew
that making the year a great one would be easy.

The year began with a positive note: our annual orientation for new students,
though this year we moved the location to Lake Wauberg, UF's own lake with accompanying hosting facilities. The
event proved to be a wonderful opportunity for new students to meet their fellow URPers and learn about the pro-
gram, for returning students to reunite with each other and faculty after the summer, and to chow down on barbeque
- though next year SPA will be sure to plan for more time to enjoy the lake! Only a couple of weeks later, most of us
found ourselves in Miami, at APA Florida's annual conference, where we attended sessions based on the confer-
ence's theme of sustainability, mingled with students from other schools and professional planners at the relaxed
evening socials, and explored a vibrant and diverse city.

With all of these activities packed into the first three weeks of classes, SPA is trying its best to keep the momentum
alive by planning activities for the remainder of the semester. We recently watched the first Presidential debate to-
gether, and while our political views may differ, it led to lively discussions about the future of the country. In No-
vember we are looking forward to spending a day working with the Alachua Conservation Trust to help protect local 0
habitat and remove invasive species. And as a testament to the quality of the program and its students, we have been
invited to attend an event sponsored by the Florida Planning and Zoning Association, with whom we hope to work
closer in the future. Additionally, we're working on solidifying plans for a restaurant night, which will serve as both
a social get-together for the department, and a fundraiser, as a portion of the restaurant's proceeds that evening will
go directly to SPA. The semester will culminate with the holiday social, celebrating the end of another semester of
hard work and the upcoming holiday break.

As SPA President, I look forward to working with such a passionate department this year. If nothing else, we plan on a
good time with supportive friends to help us through the inevitable ups and downs of grad school!

By Chad Riding






I I
SThe Department of Urban and Regional Planning seeks to connect planning professionals with graduate students in its new mentor
I program. The primary purpose of this program is to provide students, particularly those in their first year of the Master's program in
I urban planning, with a link to a practicing planner that can provide them with the wisdom which comes with professional experi-
I ence. While the nature of the relationship is entirely up to mentor and mentee, Dawn Jourdan, program coordinator and assistant
I professor of urban planning, hopes that mentors will provide students guidance on issues like course choice, specialization, intern-
Iships, thesis topic selection, and career development. The program provides another meaningful way for Gator alums to stay con-
nected to the university as they get to know the next generation of Gator planners. Those interested in participating in this program
should contact Dr. Jourdan at (352) 392-0997 ext. 428 or dawnjourdan@ufl.edu.

By Dr. Dawn Jourdan



--
--
I -- -- -- -^---


PAGE 5










VOLUME 2, ISSUE I


When I was elected as President of the Student Planning Association (SPA) for
the 2008-2009 academic year, I was excited about the opportunities that lay
ahead. Aside from the typical responsibilities of president of an organization, I
knew it was my responsibility to make the final year as a URPer for second year
students, and the first year for our incoming students, a memorable one. With the
program's enthusiastic students, faculty, staff, and SPA Executive Board, I knew
that making the year a great one would be easy.

The year began with a positive note: our annual orientation for new students,
though this year we moved the location to Lake Wauberg, UF's own lake with accompanying hosting facilities. The
event proved to be a wonderful opportunity for new students to meet their fellow URPers and learn about the pro-
gram, for returning students to reunite with each other and faculty after the summer, and to chow down on barbeque
- though next year SPA will be sure to plan for more time to enjoy the lake! Only a couple of weeks later, most of us
found ourselves in Miami, at APA Florida's annual conference, where we attended sessions based on the confer-
ence's theme of sustainability, mingled with students from other schools and professional planners at the relaxed
evening socials, and explored a vibrant and diverse city.

With all of these activities packed into the first three weeks of classes, SPA is trying its best to keep the momentum
alive by planning activities for the remainder of the semester. We recently watched the first Presidential debate to-
gether, and while our political views may differ, it led to lively discussions about the future of the country. In No-
vember we are looking forward to spending a day working with the Alachua Conservation Trust to help protect local 0
habitat and remove invasive species. And as a testament to the quality of the program and its students, we have been
invited to attend an event sponsored by the Florida Planning and Zoning Association, with whom we hope to work
closer in the future. Additionally, we're working on solidifying plans for a restaurant night, which will serve as both
a social get-together for the department, and a fundraiser, as a portion of the restaurant's proceeds that evening will
go directly to SPA. The semester will culminate with the holiday social, celebrating the end of another semester of
hard work and the upcoming holiday break.

As SPA President, I look forward to working with such a passionate department this year. If nothing else, we plan on a
good time with supportive friends to help us through the inevitable ups and downs of grad school!

By Chad Riding






I I
SThe Department of Urban and Regional Planning seeks to connect planning professionals with graduate students in its new mentor
I program. The primary purpose of this program is to provide students, particularly those in their first year of the Master's program in
I urban planning, with a link to a practicing planner that can provide them with the wisdom which comes with professional experi-
I ence. While the nature of the relationship is entirely up to mentor and mentee, Dawn Jourdan, program coordinator and assistant
I professor of urban planning, hopes that mentors will provide students guidance on issues like course choice, specialization, intern-
Iships, thesis topic selection, and career development. The program provides another meaningful way for Gator alums to stay con-
nected to the university as they get to know the next generation of Gator planners. Those interested in participating in this program
should contact Dr. Jourdan at (352) 392-0997 ext. 428 or dawnjourdan@ufl.edu.

By Dr. Dawn Jourdan



--
--
I -- -- -- -^---


PAGE 5










VOLUME 2, ISSUE I


Christopher Silver, our Dean in the College of Design, Construction and Planning and Professor in the Department of Urban
and Regional Planning has had many recent accomplishments. He has published two books, one titled Planning and De-
centralization: Contested Spaces for Public Action in the Global South and the other Planning the Meagacity: Jakarta,
Indonesia in the Twentieth Century. This past Summer, Dr. Silver served as a moderator for Civic Designers at the Inter-
national Planning History Society Conference in Chicago in July, was a panelist at the roundtable for Global Inventory of
Planning Education with the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning and Association of European Schools of
Planning also in Chicago in July, and was a session moderator for Historic Preservation in Jakarta for the Forum of the
Pacific Rim Council on Urban Development in May located in Jakarta, Indonesia. Dr. Silver also served as Co-Convenor
for the International Planning History Society Conference from July 11th through the 13th in Chicago where he Organized a
program of 72 sessions, prepared book of abstracts for over 300 papers, and conducted review process for 110 papers for
refereed proceedings.

In addition to his responsibilities as Dean, Dr. Silver is currently an editor for the Journal ofPlanning History and co-editor
for the Special Centennial Issue of the Journal of the American Planning Association. He also serves as co-Chair for the
Coordinating Committee for the Global Planning Education Association Network and chair for the Nominating Committee
for the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning. For the Provost's Initiative, Dr. Silver co-developed Cities of the
World for on-line instruction. Dr. Silver has also received many awards and recognition this past year as well including his
inducted into the College of Fellows for the American Institute of Certified Planners in April 2008, being elected Secretary
General of the International Planning History Society, and being the recipient of the Laurence Gerckens Prize for Sustained
Excellence in the Teaching of Planning History from the Society for American City and Regional Planning. We are very
fortunate to have Christopher Silver in our College of Design, Construction and Planning.

By Katie Fields





Ilir Bejleri, received $150,000 as the first year installment of a $500,000 grant proposal to develop a statewide geospatial
web-based system for mapping and analysis of traffic accidents (crashes). The system will support crash reporting and
analysis for planners, engineers, law enforcement officers, educators and other professionals interested in reducing inju-
ries and improving traffic safety in Florida's roadways.

By Dr. Ilir Bejleri





Dr. Earl Starnes received the Life Time Achievement Award at this year's FAPA Conference f
in Miami, FL for his lifetime passion and significant contributions to Florida's planning and I I
growth management. Dr. Starnes served as a county commissioner in Miami-Dade County in I
the 1960s, Director of the Division of Mass Transit Operations in the Florida Department of 1
Transportation, and Director of State Planning in the Florida Department of Administration
during the early 1970s. In 1975, he became the founding Chair of the Department of Urban I I
and Regional Planning at the University of Florida and stayed in the faculty until his retire- I I
ment. He practiced architecture and planning for 40 years 1 I
and is fellow in both the American Institute of Architects I I
and the American Institute of Certified Planners.
I I


Photo courtesy ofJulia "Alex" Magee, Executive Director, Florida chapter, APA


PAGE 6










VOLUME 2, ISSUE I


Lessons Learned? The History of Planning in Florida
Richard G. RuBino and Earl M. Starnes
Sentry Press, Tallahassee, FL, 2008

The idea for writing Lessons Learned? The History of Planning in Florida came during a lunchtime conversa-
tion between long-time friends, Richard RuBino and me at the Depot on the Dock, in Cedar Key, Florida. We were lei-
surely enjoying a coastal meal with our wives and talking about our experiences in planning, when one of us leaned
across the table and said, "We've got lots of experience behind us. Let's write a history of planning in Florida from our
often insider perspective." The other blinked for a moment and then enthusiastically replied, "Let's do it!"
We thought it would go quickly, and that we knew what we were getting into. Little did we realize that we were
committing ourselves to more than four years of being "un-retired". We served on government-appointed statewide com-
mittees, we had been employed full or part-time with the executive or legislative sides of state government, and we kept
involved in local, regional and state planning. Both of us have served as urban planning professors and administrators in
FSU and UF.
We wanted to write a history of planning in Florida, with an emphasis of the 1950, 60s and 70s. After all, we had
lived though most of its recent history. The book was to be more than just about the recent history of planning-or
growth management, as many people now think of it. We wanted to go back into the history of Florida and its earliest
planning and development; back into the planning experiences of the early 20th century, and even back to the plans lay out
by the Spaniards and the aboriginal Americans before them.
Little is done in isolation, so we also wanted to discuss the national environment within which planning events in
Florida were taking place. Hence, our book evolved into both a history of planning in Florida and, in lesser detail, a his-
tory of planning in the United States.
We wanted the book to be more than a textbook. We wanted it to be of value to a wide audience of academicians
(e.g., political scientists, geographers), students, professional planners, politicians, lawyers, architects, administrators,
historians, and other people interested in learning how planning in Florida got to where it is today and why it is what it is
now. We believed there were lessons to be learned from Florida's experience with planning-and there are. In our last
chapter, we conclude with lessons learned, not learned and lessons partially learned.
We tried to make this history of planning in Florida as complete as we could, yet far more waits to be done by
other writers. There are many lessons to be learned from this history, but perhaps the greatest lesson is that it is not just
the process of planning that determines its success, because the economic and political environment within which plan-
ning operates exerts an even greater influence.

For the authors:
Earl M. Starnes, PhD, FAICP. P.O. Box 234,Cedar Key, FL 32625
www.lessonslearedflorida.com
This book is available from the authors, University of Florida and Florida State University Bookstores and Amazon.com.

By Earl Starnes




DANIEL W ILLIAMS

UF URP alumni, graduate of Fall 1999, Daniel Williams, is making the Gator Nation proud and upholding the Gator alumni tradi-
tion with his recent publish, Sustainable Design. Currently a Seattle-based architect and urban planner, Daniel is a nationally rec-
ognized expert in sustainable architecture and planning. His projects range from residences to regional plans and connect ecology,
economic development, transportation, agriculture, education, and natural resource protection. His book, written for architects,
planners, landscape architects, engineers, public officials, and change agent professionals, presents sustainable design, conceptual
and case studies, and information on continued learning in sustainability. The book "challenges professionals to rethink architec-
ture and to see their projects not as objects but as critical, connected pieces of the whole, essential to human health as well as to
regional economy and ecology". For more information regarding Daniel Williams and his book including an excerpt and the table
of contents, please go to: http://www.wilev.com/WilevCDA/WileTitle/productCd-0471709530.html

Sustainable Design: Ecology, Architecture, and Planning by Daniel Williams, named in the top 10 books on urban and regional
design by Planetizen and short listed for the RIBA top book of 2008.

\ By Katie Fields #


PAGE 7










PAGE 8 VOLUME 2, ISSUE I


M ICHAEL M MARSHALL

Michael Marshall, UF URP graduate of Fall 1994, has recently earned a position as Redevelopment Director for Temple Terrac
FL. Michael's experience includes redevelopment projects that incorporate multiple uses retail, residential, office and a
based on the New Urbanism style of development. In his new position, Michael will be overseeing the street enhancement pr
jects, the business facade improvements, and all the other peripheral details associated with the massive undertaking of downtov
S redevelopment on the southeast corner of Bullard Parkway and N. 56th Street. In Temple Terrace, F]

By Katie Fields







Sponsored by the University of Colorado at Boulder and by the Washing- -
ton State University, last year, as a volunteer, I taught a course in Planning
Information Systems to faculty and students from the Kabul University and
from the Kabul Polytechnic University in Afghanistan.

The first morning after my
arrival, I heard from the hotel,
host that an hour after my plane
had landed, a suicidal bomb
had been captured at the same
airport. The news had no effect
on me. By then, I was already living in a hotel enclosed by fortifi
walls, protected and surrounded by a heavily armed military squadron
In less than 24 hours my universe had re-arranged.

Kabul, with a population disputed between 3 and 5 million, is perha
the most tortured and the most destroyed town in the world. It has been the capital of Afghanistan since 1776.
formal master-planning started in 1920. The town is wedged betwe
.. Ihoullhlains and it is split in two by the river that runs through a narrow
c ,o rc Its neighborhoods have experienced systematic destruction di
,IIL the last 25 war years, which have caused 1.5 million dead, ma
llo ic wounded or mutilated, and 5 million refugees.

BuL .ia night Kabul was a magic
10"11 The numerous mud
Ilouises carved into the sur-
-loLnlding mountains were lil
\\ illi little lights. They joined
Slthe Lapestry of stars in Kabuls
notorious low and open skies
which inspired Rumi, a Sufi poet of the 13th century, to call Kabul 'the
town of 1,000 splendid suns'.

I have been teaching the same course in UF for close to a decade but I haV c
never encountered a more learned, intelligent, and yet modest class than
the one I met in Kabul. I remain forever indebted to this group of current and to-be colleagues for their intellect
insights in the subjects we discussed. Never before had I experienced sharing knowledge with people who h
brutally been forced into the extremes of human survival and whose lives had been trapped and stolen for a quar
of a century. What I discovered was dignity and tolerance and temperance, all blended with a peaceful determinati
to look forward, to build, and to progress. It was a humbling.

By Juna 1,,. 1",


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VOLUME 2, ISSUE I


To refer to Iris Patten as an award-winning student would be somewhat of an understate- I
ment. As both a Masters and PhD student in Urban and Regional Planning, Iris's hard work I
has been recognized by numerous awards. In 2006 Iris was a member of the winning team I
for the Witters Competition, as well as receiving the WRS Infrastructure & Environment I
Inc. Award which recognized her outstanding achievement in planning information and
analysis. Iris was the runner up for the 2007 Best Masters Thesis Award from the National I
Center for Smart Growth Research and Education, and was also an AICP Award Recipient
from the American Planning Association that same year. In 2007 Iris was also awarded a
three-year McKnight Doctoral Fellowship.
SDr. Paul Zwick accepting
The College of Design, Construction and Planning presented Iris with the 2008 Multicultural I the 2008 FAPA Out-
and Diversity Award as well as a Certificate of Award for Outstanding Contribution and I standing Student Award
Service to the College and University Community. At the recent annual conference of the I for Iris Pattten.
Florida Chapter of the American Planning Association in Miami, Iris was recognized for her -- --
outstanding service as an APA Florida Student Representative. She was also received the 2008 FAPA Outstanding Stu-
dent Award.

But over and above all of these awards, what makes Iris an exceptional person is her commitment to helping others. She
has formed her own non-profit organization that supports educational, informational, and research activities that increase
public participation in urban planning activities among underserved or underrepresented communities. Currently she is
helping the Lincoln Gardens/Carver City Civic and Homeowners Association, Inc. to develop a community plan and de-
sign guidelines for future development. She is also working with the JL Zwane Community Center in Cape Town, South
Africa to develop cross cultural activities and curriculum for leadership and technology in their after-school program. Iris
is also working with the Community Building Group, Inc. to develop a plan for cross cultural exchange activities and re-
view plans and activities for construction of a water reservoir in Sissene, Burkina Faso in West Africa.

Where Iris finds the time to do all the things she does remains a mystery to most of the department. Yet despite her hectic
workload, Iris still manages to find time for any student that comes in search of help or advice. This is what makes her so
much more than just an award-winning student. She is an asset to our College and Department, and an inspiration to those
of us who believe that planning really can make a difference in the world. And, did I mention that she is always smiling?
with property values" and "make sure you get all your ducks in a row." I now understand exactly how important it really
is.

By Liz Thompson


Please fill out and turn in the form below to join the URP network!


NIVERSITY o Name Current Position

UF ILORID Address--
College of Design, Construction and Planning BusinessAddress
Department of Urban and Regional Planning
P.O. Box 115706
Gainesville, FL 32611-5706
Phone

Phone: (352)-392-0997
E-mail Address Business Phone


Graduation Year
Interest in Involvement in the URP Alumni Network:
Student Mentor, Speaker, Financial, etc.


PAGE 9











UNIVERSITY of

UF I FLORIDA
College of Design, Construction and Planning
Department of Urban and Regional Planning
P.O. Box 115706
Gainesville, FL 32611-5706


Phone: 352-392-0997
Fax: 352-392-3308


URP NEWS

STAFF:

Editors Katie Fields and
Chad Riding
Faculty Contributors-
Dawn Jourdan
Ilir Bejieri
Richard Schneider


Student Contributors-
Katie White
Lan Feng
Jen Cannon
Russ Provost
Other Contributors-


Juna Papajorgji
Liz Thompson


I http://www.dcp.ufl.edu/urp/


Earl Starnes


Bob Graham to Initiate the Ernest R. Bartley Memorial Lecture Series


Former Florida Senator and Governor Bob Graham will present the first lecture in the Ernest R.
Bartley Memorial Lecture Series at 5:30 PM on November 21, 2008. The lecture will be held in the .
Ocora at the Graham Center for Public Service in Pugh Hall on the UF campus.

Graham received his undergraduate degree in political science at UF in 1959 before going on to
Harvard law School and then a career in politics. As a state representative, senator and then two-
term governor he was a strong supporter of planning and environmental policy and worked with Dr.
Bartley and with URP founding chair Dr. Earl Starnes to craft and enact growth management and
environmental protection legislation. Dean's Silver's invitation letter to Senator Graham noted:

This Lecture Series honors a man whose contributions as a teacher and a scholar spanned
generations of students at the University of Florida. A legendary planning practitioner, his
work influenced the form of countless communities in our state and elsewhere. As one of
Bart's most illustrious former students and as someone who played such a pivotal role in
the genesis of Florida's landmark planning and growth management legislation, it is particularly fitting that you serve as
the lead-off speaker.

A Miami native, Graham spent almost four decades in state and national leadership positions. He served 10 years on the Senate
Select Committee on Intelligence, including 18 months as its chair. Graham authored two books, including "Intelligence Mat-
ters" (Random House, 2004) and is a widely sought-after public speaker. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the
Woodrow Wilson Award for Public Service, the National Park Trust Public Service Award and the Everglades Coalition Hall of
Fame.

The Lecture Series is funded by the Bartley family and by donations from alumni, faculty, students, friends and supporters of the
UF Department of Urban and Regional Planning.


By Dr. Richard Schneider


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