• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Chair's message
 Message from the Planning Advisory...
 Remembering and honoring Ernest...
 Planning Advisory Council (PAC)...
 Hometown Democracy Symposium at...
 Planning Day sponsors and other...
 Student co-op program: Newberry,...
 Perspectives from a graduating...
 Urban and Regional Planning awards...
 Sponsorship opportunities
 Words from a new planner
 Current faculty research














Group Title: URP news
Title: URP news. Vol. 1. Issue 2.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089085/00002
 Material Information
Title: URP news. Vol. 1. Issue 2.
Series Title: URP news
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Urban and Regional Planning, College of Design, Construction & Planning
Publisher: Department of Urban and Regional Planning, College of Design, Construction & Planning
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: May 2008
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Bibliographic ID: UF00089085
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Chair's message
        Page 1
    Message from the Planning Advisory Council
        Page 2
    Remembering and honoring Ernest R. "Bart" Bartley
        Page 3
    Planning Advisory Council (PAC) 2007-2009
        Page 3
    Hometown Democracy Symposium at Planning Day
        Page 4
    Planning Day sponsors and other donors
        Page 5
    Student co-op program: Newberry, Florida
        Page 6
    Perspectives from a graduating student
        Page 6
    Urban and Regional Planning awards dinner 2008
        Page 7
    Sponsorship opportunities
        Page 8
    Words from a new planner
        Page 9
    Current faculty research
        Page 10
Full Text


















Chair's Message

I have been in my job at the University of Florida for eight
months and continue to be amazed by the energy and caliber of
our faculty, students and alumni, and by the loyalty of the Gator
Nation. I am very proud to be part of it. I am pleased to share
with you some news since our last newsletter.

Our faculty has received recognition for their great accomplish-
ments. Dean Christopher Silver and Gene Boles were named a
Fellow of the AICP. Prof. Ilir Bejleri received the UF Research
Foundation Professorship Award. This is a very prestigious -
award to reward distinctive contributions to research and scholarship. Ilir is the fourth pro-
fessor in our department after Profs. Paul Zwick, Richard Schneider, and Ruth Steiner to
receive this award, an indication of the strength of our faculty. Prof. Joseli Macedo re-
ceived the International Educator of the Year Award 2007 from the College of Design,
Construction and Planning. Ruth Steiner has received a research grant from the Center for
Multimodal Solutions for Congestion Mitigation to study transportation impact assessment
based on vehicle miles of travel. Our distinguished GeoPlan Center has just received a
"Special Achievement in GIS" award at ESRI's 28th Annual User Conference. This award
is being given to user sites around the world in recognition of their outstanding work in the
GIS field.

We have initiated a "Planning Day" program, a day for the department to celebrate the
successes of our alumni and students, seek advice from our Planning Advisory Council,
and to bring awareness to the field of urban and regional planning by addressing critical
and often controversial planning issues. The first Planning Day was held on April 18, 2008
at the Paramount Hotel in Gainesville, FL. In the morning, the faculty met with members
of the URP Planning Advisory Council (PAC). The PAC elected David Tillis as its Chair,
Tracy L. Crowe as Vice Chair and Michael C. Holbrook as Secretary. In the afternoon, a
symposium on the "Future of Hometown Democracy" was held to discuss efforts to take
local planning decisions to the voters. A group of prominent panelists presented argument
about the pros and cons of the rise of "Ballot Box Planning" in Florida and other parts of
the United States. In the evening, the department hosted its annual awards dinner to recog-
nize students, alumni and friends.

As some of you know, our long-time professor, mentor and friend Dr. Ernest R. "Bart"
Bartley passed away on January 22, 2008. To honor Dr. Bartley's memory and extraordi-
nary contributions to the University of Florida and to the Department of Urban and Re-
gional Planning, the department is working on establishing a Dr. Ernest R. Bartley Memo-
rial Lecture Series. The Series is a joint effort of the PAC, alumni, students and the family
of Dr. Ernest R. Bartley. The vision is to invite our alumni and friends to come back to the
University to pay tribute to Dr. Bartley's legacy, to participate in planning-related discus-
sions with a nationally prominent speaker, and to reconnect with the URP Gator Nation.
Our goal is raise enough funds to have an endowment to support this annual lecture series.


/








VOLUME I, ISSUE 2


URP NEWS


Chair's Message (Continued)
The first donation has been made by Dr. Bartley's family.

We are also initiating a student mentoring program. We are planning to build a one-to-one mentoring
program between the first- and second-year students so that first-year students have someone to talk to
before and after they get here. We are also planning to have a professional mentoring program for all
our students so that they can get some insights and guidance from professional planners in the field be-
fore they graduate. This would be very important for our students. If you are interested in this mentor-
ing program, please let us know by sending an e-mail to Ms. Ella Littles at elittlesidcp.ufl.edu or call
us at 352-392-0997. Your experience and advice would help our students and our program tremen-
dously. We are planning a new student orientation at Lake Wauberg from 1:30 to 4:30 PM on August
29, 2008. You are invited to come meet our students and faculty, and enjoy the party and company.

We are also expanding our international study program to offer our students more opportunities to
I study abroad and engage with international planning activities. We just joined the Network for Euro-
pean and U.S. Regional and Urban Studies program, which allows our students to study and conduct
research in European universities, and students from European countries to study at the University of
Florida. Our Brazil program has been running strong in its third year. We are adding programs to Ma-
laysia and soon to China. In addition, more opportunities are being planned for scholar and student
exchanges with planning programs across the world.

We look forward to your involvement in any capacity in our program, and hope you are as excited as
we are to move our department to the next level. Please come to see us and experience the excitement
and the high caliber of our students, faculty and staff!

Zhong-Ren Peng, Chair and Professor

Message from the Planning Advisory Council

The Planning Advisory Council (PAC) had not met in a while, and when we convened on April 18, we
welcomed returning and new PAC members as well as "returning" and new professors and staff.
Among the new faces were our new Dean of the College, Christopher Silver, our new Department
Chair, Zhong-Ren Peng, and new Assistant Professor Dawn Jourdan. It is an exciting time in the pro-
fession and a very exciting time in the Department, particularly now that sustainability and sustainable
development has become main stream. Ten years ago, very few people were talking about sustainabil-
ity, but now it is the topic of conversation from the classroom to the boardroom and it has moved from
discussion to implementation. Florida's economy and environment are inexorably linked- the key to a
healthy economy is a healthy environment. I think the Department can be a leader in preparing stu-
dents to be practitioners that keep Florida's economy and environment healthy and vibrant and keep
the State competitive in the world economy.

The Planning Advisory Council is a group of planning and development related professionals, some
of whom are alumni, dedicated to helping the Department and the program remain strong, relevant
and responsive by providing curriculum advice, alumni outreach and strengthened ties to the pro-
fession. We formed three committees-Development and Membership, Professional Relationship
and Program Advisory- which gives a good overview of our focus going forward. While all three
are important, I am particularly interested in strengthening ties with alumni, one of the tasks of the
Professional Relationship committee. Our over 400 alumni are among leaders in the profession not
just in Florida and represent a tremendous talent pool and resource for the program and its students.
We have lost track of many of you and we want to find you and reconnect you with each other and
the Department. If each of you who read this newsletter would simply respond with just 5 names
and contact information of classmates we can build our alumni list.

The enthusiasm at the meeting was palpable and I look forward to working with my fellow PAC mem-
bers and the Department staff to further strengthen the program and Department.

Dave Tillis
PAC Chair


PAGE 2







VOLUME I, ISSUE 2


Remembering and Honoring Ernest R. "Bart" Bartley (1919-2008)

Please help us honor Bart's memory and extraordinary contributions to the University and to
urban planning by providing a donation to support the Ernest R. Bartley Memorial Lectuic
Series. Gifts for the Series will be used to form an endowment to fund an annual lecture by .
nationally prominent speaker on planning policy, planning law, growth management, zoninlh,
or a related field. The first gift to the endowment was presented by the Bartley family .it
URP's recent Annual Awards Dinner on April 18, 2008.

Bart was an institution at the University of Florida, having served as a faculty member foi
almost 60 years, with three decades as a professor and professor emeritus in the Department
of Urban and Regional Planning. As a planning consultant he helped shape hundreds of zon-
ing ordinances around the state and was the principle author of Florida's original growth
management legislation. He was one of the primary consultants to Alaska's Constitutional Convention and was
honored in 2005 by the Alaska legislature on the 50t anniversary of statehood. Bart was a Fellow of the Ameri-
can Institute of Certified Planners and was commended in 2007 by the Florida Chapter of APA for "Outstanding
Achievements in the Field of Planning."

He mentored generations of students and faculty (who could forget "get your ducks in a row" and "planning is
politics"?) and we hope that alumni can give something back so that future generations will continue to benefit
from his legacy.

Checks to support the Ernest R. Bartley Memorial Lecture Series should by made out to the University of Flor-
ida Foundation and sent to Evelyn Cairns, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, PO Box 115706,
Gainesville, Florida 32611-5706.

We also ask you to share a Dr. Bartley story with us that we can publish in the Newsletter.

Thank you,


Prof. Richard H. Schneider
URP Fundraising Committee


Zhong-Ren Peng, Ph.D.
Professor and Chairman
PAC Executive Director
Urban and Regional Planning
University of Florida

David Tillis
PAC Chair
Bonita Bay Group
www.bonitabaygroup.com/

Tracy 1. Crowe, AICP
PAC Vice-Chair
Owner and Principal Planner
Land Design Innovations, Inc.

Michael C. Holbrook, R.L.A., A.S.L.A.
PAC Secretary
Manager of Planning
Bowyer-Singleton & Associates,
Incorporated

Jeff Bielling
Chair: San Felasco Section of the


Florida Chapter of the American Robert W. Hopkins District Administrator
Plnnnina A socinatinn


Robert W. Crime
State Project Development Engi-
neer, Florida Department of Trans-
portation

Jack Dangermond, President
Environmental Systems Research
Institute

Richard and Suzanne Doty
GIS Associates Inc

Luke A. Frantz, P.E.
President and Chief Operating
Officer
WRS Infrastructure & Environ-
ment, Inc.

Kimberly Gill
Sorrento, FL


Managing Director, Travel Infor-
mation
AAA

Valerie Hubbard, AICP
Akerman Senterfitt, Attorneys at
Law

Krista Kelly, AICP
Principal Planner
Hillsborough County City-County
Planning Commission


Jimmy Moses
Moses Tucker Real Estate
hl l' ii r 1 1n l I i ii
index .html

Mark W. Nelson, P.E.
Vice President
Jones Edmunds & Associates

John Pla, President
Venture Realty of North Florida,
Inc.


William Kercher, Partner
Glatting, Jackson, Kercher, Anglin, Barry Rutenberg
Lopez, Rinehart Barry Rutenberg Homes


Scott Lagueux AICP
Senior Associate
LandDesign I Charlotte NC


E. Tyson Smith, AICP
Attorney at Law
White & Smith, LLC


C. Ray Maxwell
Reedy Creek Improvement District


PAGE 3







VOLUME I, ISSUE 2


Remembering and Honoring Ernest R. "Bart" Bartley (1919-2008)

Please help us honor Bart's memory and extraordinary contributions to the University and to
urban planning by providing a donation to support the Ernest R. Bartley Memorial Lectuic
Series. Gifts for the Series will be used to form an endowment to fund an annual lecture by .
nationally prominent speaker on planning policy, planning law, growth management, zoninlh,
or a related field. The first gift to the endowment was presented by the Bartley family .it
URP's recent Annual Awards Dinner on April 18, 2008.

Bart was an institution at the University of Florida, having served as a faculty member foi
almost 60 years, with three decades as a professor and professor emeritus in the Department
of Urban and Regional Planning. As a planning consultant he helped shape hundreds of zon-
ing ordinances around the state and was the principle author of Florida's original growth
management legislation. He was one of the primary consultants to Alaska's Constitutional Convention and was
honored in 2005 by the Alaska legislature on the 50t anniversary of statehood. Bart was a Fellow of the Ameri-
can Institute of Certified Planners and was commended in 2007 by the Florida Chapter of APA for "Outstanding
Achievements in the Field of Planning."

He mentored generations of students and faculty (who could forget "get your ducks in a row" and "planning is
politics"?) and we hope that alumni can give something back so that future generations will continue to benefit
from his legacy.

Checks to support the Ernest R. Bartley Memorial Lecture Series should by made out to the University of Flor-
ida Foundation and sent to Evelyn Cairns, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, PO Box 115706,
Gainesville, Florida 32611-5706.

We also ask you to share a Dr. Bartley story with us that we can publish in the Newsletter.

Thank you,


Prof. Richard H. Schneider
URP Fundraising Committee


Zhong-Ren Peng, Ph.D.
Professor and Chairman
PAC Executive Director
Urban and Regional Planning
University of Florida

David Tillis
PAC Chair
Bonita Bay Group
www.bonitabaygroup.com/

Tracy 1. Crowe, AICP
PAC Vice-Chair
Owner and Principal Planner
Land Design Innovations, Inc.

Michael C. Holbrook, R.L.A., A.S.L.A.
PAC Secretary
Manager of Planning
Bowyer-Singleton & Associates,
Incorporated

Jeff Bielling
Chair: San Felasco Section of the


Florida Chapter of the American Robert W. Hopkins District Administrator
Plnnnina A socinatinn


Robert W. Crime
State Project Development Engi-
neer, Florida Department of Trans-
portation

Jack Dangermond, President
Environmental Systems Research
Institute

Richard and Suzanne Doty
GIS Associates Inc

Luke A. Frantz, P.E.
President and Chief Operating
Officer
WRS Infrastructure & Environ-
ment, Inc.

Kimberly Gill
Sorrento, FL


Managing Director, Travel Infor-
mation
AAA

Valerie Hubbard, AICP
Akerman Senterfitt, Attorneys at
Law

Krista Kelly, AICP
Principal Planner
Hillsborough County City-County
Planning Commission


Jimmy Moses
Moses Tucker Real Estate
hl l' ii r 1 1n l I i ii
index .html

Mark W. Nelson, P.E.
Vice President
Jones Edmunds & Associates

John Pla, President
Venture Realty of North Florida,
Inc.


William Kercher, Partner
Glatting, Jackson, Kercher, Anglin, Barry Rutenberg
Lopez, Rinehart Barry Rutenberg Homes


Scott Lagueux AICP
Senior Associate
LandDesign I Charlotte NC


E. Tyson Smith, AICP
Attorney at Law
White & Smith, LLC


C. Ray Maxwell
Reedy Creek Improvement District


PAGE 3
















By Dr. Dawn Jourdan

The Department of Urban and Regional Planning hosted its first Planning
Day on April 18, 2008, bringing together faculty, students, practicing plan- ,
ners, and local residents to share in a discussion of the controversial proposed '' I"
Hometown Democracy Amendment This Amendment, not currently sched- '
uled for consideration on the November ballot, would require local govern- 'K
ments to hold citizen referenda each time they propose an amendment to their -",
comprehensive plans. Roger Caves, professor of Planning and Urban Studies I
at San Diego State University, gave a keynote address exploring the rise of ,,-
ballot box zoning and planning efforts around the nation. Shaw Stiller, gen- .
eral counsel for the Florida Department of Community Affairs, discussed the ,, ..
agency's position on Hometown Democracy, tracing the movement back to *' 44 A 4 'f aq
legislative decisions which have been eroding the power of the State's Growth
Management laws. Ross Burnaman, vice president of Florida Hometown Democracy, explained the citizen-based initiative
to place this referendum on the local ballot. Support for efforts to place the referendum on the ballot was voiced by citizen
activist and school teacher, John Dunn, and Paula Stahmer, lawyer and conservation committee chair of the local chapter of
the Sierra Club. Charles Pattison and Ryan Houck, executive directors from 1000 Friends of Florida and Floridians forl
Smarter Growth respectively, explained the primary reasons their groups opposed the measure and described their efforts tol
introduce legislation that would increase citizen participation in local decision-making without the passage of this amend-i
ment. The citizens' need for improved participation and more responsive state and local legislatures was the key theme of
the event. Planners with AICP certification were able to earn two hours of certificate maintenance credit for attending this
workshop. Efforts to prepare for next years' Planning Day are already underway.
II
Dawn Jourdan, esq., Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of
Florida. I
--- ---------------------------- -
By Lee Hendricks

Students and professors alike turned out in force for the Hometown Democracy Symposium that started the Department's 'Planning
Day.' Professor Dawn Jourdan organized the panel, which had a spirited debate on the merits and machinations of the movement to
make comprehensive plan changes a matter of public referendum. Around 100 attended the two-hour debate.
Invited to give the keynote talk, Professor Roger Caves of San Diego State University discussed his state's experience with similar
procedures enacted in the past. Some California municipalities have struggled with ballots that can run to the tens of pages, or worse, as
a result of Hometown Democracy; however, proponents say that changes to the nature of the planning process are more than worth it.
Speaking next was Ross Burnaman, the man spearheading the ballot initiative in Florida that, if successful, would give Florida a similar
system of comprehensive plan map changes by referendum. The long-time organizer's remarks were well received; he described Home-
town Democracy Florida as a reaction to a broken system, where too many elected officials are complicit with developers, and the plan-
ning process fails to protect Florida's environmental heritage.
Standing in the middle was Charles Pattison, the executive director of 1000
t' 4 4 ' ' ti Friends of Florida. While sharing many of the concerns of the Hometown Democ-
Houck, the political director of Floridians for Smarter Growth, a lobbying body
funded by homebuilders and the state Chamber of Commerce. Houck's remarks
sparked a number of sharp exchanges with other members of the panel.
P FAfter students, guests, and professors had a chance for questions, Planning Day
continued with a dinner where many students were honored and Jay Stein was
SI tapped as the Student Planning Association's Teacher of the Year.
p I Lee Hendricks is a graduate student in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at
p the University of Florida.

q*1 .5 4 1>14> 4 1>14> 4 1> 14> 4


URP NEWS


PAGE 4


VOLUME 1, ISSUE 2














The Symposium and the Student Awards were made possible by the generous contributions of the following individu-
als and firms.

Gold Level
David Tillis, Regional General Manager, Bonita Bay Group, http://www.bonitabaygroup.com/

Silver Level
Gail Easley. The Gail Easley Company, established in 1994, provides growth management and planning services
throughout Florida and nationally. V. Gail Easley, FAICP, president and owner, is a certified planner with over 30
years professional experience. Easley has worked extensively with state and local governments on growth manage-
ment plans and land development regulations, has written books and other publications on topics such as variances,
conditional uses, unified land development codes, ethics, and urban growth areas. Easley is an adjunct instructor at the
University of Florida and regularly lectures at national, regional, and state conferences and training events.
Glatting Jackson Kercher Anglin, Inc. is a team of talented, passionate professionals who excel at planning, urban
design, environmental services, landscape architecture and transportation planning and engineering. Founded in 1974,
the firm serves regional, national and international markets with headquarters in Orlando, Florida and offices in West
Palm Beach, Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; and Denver, Colorado.
James C. Nicholas, Professor Emeritus, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Florida
Zhong-Ren Peng, Chair and Professor, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Florida
Richard H. Schneider, Professor, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Florida
Christopher Silver, Professor and Dean, College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
E. Tyson Smith, Attorney at Law, White & Smith, LLC, Charleston, SC
Smith Hulsey & Busey, a long established, full service Florida business law firm. It has a reputation for excellence in
the following business-critical practice areas: Bankruptcy, Complex Litigation, Corporate, Securities and Business
Law, Environmental, Governmental Affairs and Lobbying, Health Care, Intellectual Property, Labor and Employment,
Public Finance, Real Estate and Land Use, Tax, Trusts and Estates.

Bronze Level
Eng-Denman & Assoc. Inc. has been providing civil engineering and land surveying services to municipalities of dif-
ferent sizes as well as private developers to the Gainesville, Florida area for over 30 years.
Jimmy Moses, Principal, Moses Tucker Real Estate, Little Rock, AR
Earl Starnes, Professor Emeritus, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Florida
Paul Zwick, Professor and Associate Dean, College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
Women for Wise Growth, http://www.treecity.net/wwg/index.html

Other Donors or Donation to Other Activities, August 2007- May 2008

Ruth Bartley, Susan Miller and Dr. Bartley's family
Margaret and Brendan Dwyer, Tampa, FL
Scott Koons, Gainesville, FL
Janice Fleet, URP Alum
Stanley Latimer, Assistant In, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Florida
James C. Nicholas, Professor Emeritus, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Florida
Zhong-Ren Peng, Chair and Professor, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Florida
Richard H. Schneider, Professor, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Florida
Ruth Steiner, Associate Professor, Department of Urban and Regional planning, University of Florida
Paul Zwick, Professor and Associate Dean, College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida


VOLUME I, ISSUE 2


PAGE 5

















By Chad Riding

Since this past summer I have had the opportunity to work in a co-op position in Newberry, Florida. My co-op position is actually a combina-
tion of an internship and a research assistantship that will continue throughout my stay at UF. I work for the university, but my work goes on
in the Newberry, Florida Planning Department. Newberry, as you may remember, is a small town about twelve miles west of Gainesville.
During the recent housing boom, Newberry saw its population swell from 3,600 in 2000 to almost 5,000 in 2007, with much more growth on
the way. The affordable housing prices and country living attracted most of the newcomers. Needless to say, there are several planning issues
associated with growth-traffic, demographic change, and environment-that are making planning quite interesting.

In part, my internship in Newberry is interesting because I am getting used to Florida planning. I did an internship in summer 2007 in Madera,
California and got used to California planning. Gone are the General Plan, the Conditional Use permits, the Special Area Plans, CEQA, and the
State Clearinghouse. In are the Comprehensive Plan, the Comp Plan Amendments, Concurrency, Developments of Regional Impact, and DCA.
Wetlands are actually a major issue here, as are hurricane evacuation routes on the Florida Strategic Intermodal (Transportation) System (SIS).
My experience has been that once you get past the different names and laws, the major difference is that the state government plays a much
bigger role in day-to-day operations.

The Newberry Planning Department is also big in contributing to the community. Newberry is a participant in
Florida's Main Street program. As part of that program, a Newberry Fall Market Festival was held in October.
Local vendors and city representatives came to the festival, and local businesses donated a bounce house. A
local radio station was also recruited to broadcast from the event. Overall, it was a successful exercise in how
planning and community organizations can work together to help revitalize local businesses and community
spirit.

Chad Riding is a graduate student in Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Florida from Fresno, California.
1 He is interested in planning for rural communities. He completed his undergraduate degree at Brigham Young Univer-
sity in Provo, Utah.










By Allison Abbot

As my cohorts and I complete our final days as URP graduate students, we have taken time to reminisce about the past two years that have
deeply influenced our identities as urban planners. Completing thesis research and enduring headaches over graduate school formatting
requirements aside, we feel well-prepared to take on our new roles in forming the fabric of the world. As such, we have felt the need to
impart our knowledge to those entering their second year while also informing alumni of the goings on of the department.

The graduating class of 2008 has been the true "guinea pig" class of the new mandatory thesis requirement. Despite some initial hedging, all
of us learned the importance of understanding the intricate details of urban issues. Topics ranged from planning issues in designing a united
Berlin; the benefits and struggles of a minority community's efforts in revitalization; an evaluation of HOPE VI projects; and addressing barri-
ers to affordable housing, among others. With aid from dedicated faculty members, our final projects were more than just a requirement;
resulting in arguments and findings that could be applied to the communities we worked with. That experience alone made the hours of
staring at blank computer screens and receiving red-inked drafts well worth the effort. Our advice to current URP students is to choose
thesis topics that reflect your passion and verve for our field. As planners, we are driven to affect positive change; a thesis provides a meas-
urable medium through which to take on that role.

Dr. Peng's sentiments at the 2008 Annual Awards Banquet regarding an "URP Gator Nation" have been taken to heart by the 2008 class.
The development of a mentoring program to connect students to past graduates is indicative of the renewed alumni network we look for-
ward to being a part of.

Allison Abbot is a GRADUATING Urban and Regional Planning Student


PAGE 6


VOLUME I, ISSUE 2

















By Chad Riding

Since this past summer I have had the opportunity to work in a co-op position in Newberry, Florida. My co-op position is actually a combina-
tion of an internship and a research assistantship that will continue throughout my stay at UF. I work for the university, but my work goes on
in the Newberry, Florida Planning Department. Newberry, as you may remember, is a small town about twelve miles west of Gainesville.
During the recent housing boom, Newberry saw its population swell from 3,600 in 2000 to almost 5,000 in 2007, with much more growth on
the way. The affordable housing prices and country living attracted most of the newcomers. Needless to say, there are several planning issues
associated with growth-traffic, demographic change, and environment-that are making planning quite interesting.

In part, my internship in Newberry is interesting because I am getting used to Florida planning. I did an internship in summer 2007 in Madera,
California and got used to California planning. Gone are the General Plan, the Conditional Use permits, the Special Area Plans, CEQA, and the
State Clearinghouse. In are the Comprehensive Plan, the Comp Plan Amendments, Concurrency, Developments of Regional Impact, and DCA.
Wetlands are actually a major issue here, as are hurricane evacuation routes on the Florida Strategic Intermodal (Transportation) System (SIS).
My experience has been that once you get past the different names and laws, the major difference is that the state government plays a much
bigger role in day-to-day operations.

The Newberry Planning Department is also big in contributing to the community. Newberry is a participant in
Florida's Main Street program. As part of that program, a Newberry Fall Market Festival was held in October.
Local vendors and city representatives came to the festival, and local businesses donated a bounce house. A
local radio station was also recruited to broadcast from the event. Overall, it was a successful exercise in how
planning and community organizations can work together to help revitalize local businesses and community
spirit.

Chad Riding is a graduate student in Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Florida from Fresno, California.
1 He is interested in planning for rural communities. He completed his undergraduate degree at Brigham Young Univer-
sity in Provo, Utah.










By Allison Abbot

As my cohorts and I complete our final days as URP graduate students, we have taken time to reminisce about the past two years that have
deeply influenced our identities as urban planners. Completing thesis research and enduring headaches over graduate school formatting
requirements aside, we feel well-prepared to take on our new roles in forming the fabric of the world. As such, we have felt the need to
impart our knowledge to those entering their second year while also informing alumni of the goings on of the department.

The graduating class of 2008 has been the true "guinea pig" class of the new mandatory thesis requirement. Despite some initial hedging, all
of us learned the importance of understanding the intricate details of urban issues. Topics ranged from planning issues in designing a united
Berlin; the benefits and struggles of a minority community's efforts in revitalization; an evaluation of HOPE VI projects; and addressing barri-
ers to affordable housing, among others. With aid from dedicated faculty members, our final projects were more than just a requirement;
resulting in arguments and findings that could be applied to the communities we worked with. That experience alone made the hours of
staring at blank computer screens and receiving red-inked drafts well worth the effort. Our advice to current URP students is to choose
thesis topics that reflect your passion and verve for our field. As planners, we are driven to affect positive change; a thesis provides a meas-
urable medium through which to take on that role.

Dr. Peng's sentiments at the 2008 Annual Awards Banquet regarding an "URP Gator Nation" have been taken to heart by the 2008 class.
The development of a mentoring program to connect students to past graduates is indicative of the renewed alumni network we look for-
ward to being a part of.

Allison Abbot is a GRADUATING Urban and Regional Planning Student


PAGE 6


VOLUME I, ISSUE 2















After a successful Planning Day, Urban and Regional Planning (URP) Students, Family and Friends, Alumni, Faculty, and Staff
convened to participate in the department's annual awards dinner. Over 70 people attended the April 18th ceremony, which also of-
fered an opportunity to celebrate Dr. Ernest Bartley's considerable contributions to the department, college, and university. Dr.
Zhong-Ren Peng, Chair of the department, opened the awards program with words of introduction and greeting. Dr. Kristin Larsen,
chair of the Awards Committee, then followed with the student awards presentations with the President of the San Felasco Section of
the Florida APA, Jeff Bielling, presenting that organization's first student award. Dr. Richard Schneider, member of the Awards
Committee, presented the Distinguished Alumnus Award to Erik Bredfeldt, Planning and Development Services Director for the
City of Gainesville and graduate of the program in 1993. Dr. Ruth Steiner, who was a friend of Margaret Raynal, presented the
award in her honor. Dr. Schneider then noted the initiatives underway to recognize Dr. Ernest Bartley's decades of service and com-
mitment to the program, including a lecture series. He then introduced Student Planning Association (SPA) representative Lauren
Simmons, who presented a plaque in memory of Dr. Ernest Bartley to Dr. Bartley's wife Ruth Bartley and daughter Susan Miller.
The plaque will commemorate Dr. Bartley's office of many years at 466 Architecture Building. Susan Miller accepted the plaque on
behalf of the Bartley family and warmly reminisced about the joy her father took in teaching in the program. Next, the students took
the stage to award the Teacher of the Year to Dr. Jay Stein. The students presented their Top 10 List of Reasons to be a URP Student
and closed the awards ceremony with a show of pictures taken from throughout the year. Everyone very much enjoyed the event,
and we look forward to celebrating outstanding students again next year.















Mark Ludlow receives the San Felasco Dr. Richard Schneider presents SPA representative Lauren
Section Award from Jeff Bielling Distinguished Alumnus of the Simmons presents the Bartley
Year to Erik Bredfeldt plaque to daughter Susan Miller

The awards made were as follows:
Carl Feiss Urban and Environmental Design Award -Michelle O'Carroll.
Peter A. Kanavos Kate Wilson.
Margaret E. Raynal Award JeffDavis. These award were made possible by gener-
Ulla Rydberg Award Andrew Persons. ous contributions from our alumni and
WRS Infrastructure & Environment Inc. Award friends over the years. This year, we have
added the San Felasco Section of the Florida
In Memoriam Of Mario Ripol Jake Petrosky. addd the Sa n Fasco tion o the F da
APA Award that is sponsored by the San
AICP Outstanding Student Award Allison Abbott. Felasco Section of the Florida APA.
Judith Mucci Scholarship Emily Stallings.
Suncoast Section of the Florida APA Award Wade Reynolds. Thank you!
Florida Planning and Zoning Association Award Shane Laakso. Prof Kristin Larsen
San Felasco Section of the Florida APA Award Mark Ludlow. Chair of the Award Committee
Distinguished Alumnus of the Year Erik Bredfeldt.
Teacher of the Year Dr. Jay Stein.


VOLUME 1, ISSUE 2


PAGE 7








VOl I 11 M F I I r ; S F 7


Sponsorship Opportunities

As you may know, the University of Florida has a big budget cut ($22 million in October 2007 and
$47 million for 2008-2009). The Department of Urban and Regional Planning has a very limited
budget and there are many activities and programs for which we could certainly use your assistance.
In return for your underwriting of these activities, we would provide appropriate publicity about your
support. For example, we would include a prominent credit in the Newsletter. The following is a list
of events/items for which your support would be very beneficial to URP and its students.

URP Newsletter published twice each year, the Newsletter highlights the activities of the URP
Gator Nation including student and faculty research, speakers, alumni spotlight, and special events.
This newsletter is distributed to over 400 alumni and friends of the Department of Urban and Re-
gional Planning.
Sponsorship A sponsor or sponsors are needed to underwrite the costs of publishing and dis-
tributing the Newsletter.
Purchase Newsletter Ad Show your support of URP by purchasing an advertisement for your
company.

Dr. Ernest R. Bartlev Memorial Lecture Series An annual lecture series in honor of Dr. Barley
has been initiated by the department. Dr. Bartley served URP for over 30 years where he taught
many a planning student to understand that" Planning is Politics.". Your gift to this lecture series
will honor the memory of Dr. Bartley and allow URP to bring prominent speakers to UF to address
current issues in planning.

Planning Day 2009 After the successful Planning Day 2008, we are already planning for Planning
Day 2009, which will also feature a program on a current planning topic of concern to Florida plan-
ners. Sponsors are needed to underwrite the costs of this event. Sponsors receive recognition in all
program materials and complimentary registrations at selected levels of sponsorship.
Platinum Level Sponsor $1,500
Gold Level Sponsor $1,000
Silver Level Sponsor $500
Bronze Level Sponsor Less than $500 or In-Kind Contributions

New Student Welcome Picnic, Fall 2008 This picnic will be held at Lake Wauberg to welcome
new students and welcome back current students for the new school year. This event will allow new
students to meet with faculty and current students in a relaxed atmosphere. Sponsors of this event are
invited to attend come have some fun!

Co-op Position Is your company interested in training the next generation of planners? URP has a
co-operative program in which students work, under the direction of a UF urban planning professor,
on projects for your company. You pay the student's tuition, a small stipend for a faculty member,
20 hours per week during the semester and full time in summer. URP can recruit the best and the
brightest and your company gets research related to your current projects.

Student Scholarship One of our goals is to expand scholarship to students. You could designate
your support specifically to student scholarship.

If you have questions or need additional information about sponsoring any event or item please con-
tact Dr. Zhong-Ren Peng, Chair and Professor, (352) 392-0997 ext 429, zpeng@dcp.ufl.edu. You can
also give on-line at hups \ "\ .uff.ufl.edu/OnlineGiving/FundDetail.asp?FundCode=000805

---------------------- 4


URP NEWS


PA rF a











VI

By Jenny Wheelock
Greetings URPers! I am excited to be writing what I hope will be the first of many "recent alumni" guest columns for the
URP newsletter. Today I'm writing a little about what the "real world" is like for me, and also how my URP experience helped pre-
pare me to be where I am today.
I started working at the City of Orlando as a Planner in the Land Development Studio in February. (As a side note to all of
you who are looking ahead to graduation and finding a job, I applied for the job in September, had two interviews in December, was
offered the job in mid-January, and then took an additional month to complete the hiring process and HR background screening.) I
work in "current planning," which generally falls between permitting and comprehensive ("long term") planning. My boss likes to
say that Land Development is "where the rubber meets the road."
We deal with two boards: the Board of Zoning Adjustment (BZA) and the Municipal Planning Board (MPB). The BZA hears vari-
ance cases (when projects don't or can't meet the zoning requirements in the Land Development Code, they can apply for a variance
to the standard common projects that go to BZA include those that will protrude into side yard setbacks or those that don't meet the
design standards of a particular area). The MPB hears more types of cases, including future land use changes, re-zoning, conditional
uses, and master plans. The Land Development Studio is also the first step in platting and subdividing property.
A typical day for me consists of a few meetings, usually with homeowners, developers, or various contractors (architects,
engineers, private planners, builders, etc.) who want to make improvements to their property in ways that go beyond simply applying
for building permits. Of course, we also have internal meetings to prepare for public hearings and share information on the current
projects. The rest of my time is spent researching and analyzing my cases, and preparing staff reports that are given to the members
of the boards and to the general public. On Fridays, I am "planner on call," which means I answer all the random questions that peo-
ple call us or come into City Hall to ask.
My time spent in URP prepared me well for this job by giving me a solid foundation of knowledge about planning, both
technically and theoretically. While I do not use ArcMap, we use a program called Knowledger to look up information and create
maps I have learned it quickly because of my working knowledge of GIS. While I don't work in Transportation or Urban Design, I
often coordinate with those departments in analyzing my cases. While I don't deal with comprehensive plan updates or DCA, under-
standing the process helps me put the Land Development Code into its greater context, and explain the difference between future
land use and zoning to customers when I am "planner on call." General knowledge of concepts like green building, CPTED, and
active living through design has been helpful in meetings, as they come up often. Because I work in Land Development, the most
applicable class I took was Growth Management Powers, taught by the late Dr. Ernest Bartley. It is extremely helpful to know the
legal side of planning often I hear Dr. Bartley's words echoing through my head: "Planning is playing with property values" and
"make sure you get all your ducks in a row." I now understand exactly how important it really is.

Jenny Wheelock is a recent graduate (Fall '07) from the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University ofFlorida.
She entered the program in January '06, and can be reached atjenny.wheelock@gmail.com.


Please fill out and turn in the form below to join the URP network!


Name
UNIVERSITY of Name

UF I FLORIDA Address
College of Design, Construction and Planning
Department of Urban and Regional Planning
P.O. Box 115706
Gainesville, FL 32611-5706
Phone


Current Position


Business Address


Phone: (352)-392-0997


E-mail Address


Graduation Year


Business Phone


Interest in Involvement in the URP Alumni Network
Student Mentor, Speaker, Finanaal, etc.


VOLUME 1, ISSUE 2


PAGE 9










UNIVERSITY of

UFIFLORIDA
College of Design, Construction and Planning
Department of Urban and Regional Planning
P.O. Box I 15706
Gainesville, FL 32611-5706


Phone: 352-392-0997
Fax: 352-392-3308


URP NEWS Student Contributors-
Allison Abbott
STAFF:


Editor- Chad Riding, crid-

ing@ufl.edu
Faculty Contributors-

Dawn Jourdan

Kristin Larsen


Lee Hendricks

Chad Riding
Other Contributors-

Jenny Wheelock

David Tillis


Richard Schneider


http://www.dcp.ufl.edu/urp/


* Zhong-Ren Peng published two articles
as the first author: "Mobility of the Chi-
nese Urban Poor A Case Study of Hefei
City," in The Chinese Economy (with co-
authors Yi Zhu and Shunfeng Song); and
"A Standard-based Integration Framework
of Distributed Transit Trip Planning Sys-
tems." in journal of the Intelligent Transpor-
tation Systems (with Co-author Eok Kim).
* Richard H. Schneider is completing an
international survey of law enforcement
and planning agencies relative to the prac-
tice and use of Crime Prevention Through
Environmental Design (CPTED) strategies.
The work is a collaborative project with
the Gainesville Police Department, the
Florida Design Out Crime Association,
and the National Institute of Crime Pre-
vention. It is being supported by grants
from the latter two organizations. This is
the first-ever survey of its kind and the
results will be reported at international
conferences and in academic and profes-
sional journals.
* Ruth Steiner participated in four confer-
ences related to her research on the role
of school siting in children's travel to
school this spring: the Annual meeting of
the Transportation Research Board in
Washington, DC, the Society of Behav-
ioral Medicine in San Diego, a symposium
sponsored by the Devoe Moore Center at
Florida State University and the Active
Living Research Conference in Washing-
ton, DC. This research, which is a two-


year effort funded by the Robert Wood
Johnson Foundation's Active Living Re-
search, involves Dr. Bejleri and five re-
search assistants. The first set of results
from the research has been accepted for
publication in the Transportation Research
Record. She has joined the Research Board
of the Southeast Transportation Center.
* Kristin Larsen is continuing to work on
her biography of Clarence Stein, entitled
Clarence Stein and the Emergence of the
Complete Community, currently under con-
tract with the Center for American
Places, Staunton, VA, in association with
the Clarence Stein Institute for Urban and
Landscape Studies, distributed by the Uni-
versity of Chicago Press. Her article "The
Radburn Idea as an Emergent Concept:
Henry Wright's Regional City" is to be
published in Planning Perspectives. Work
also continues with colleagues Ilir Bejleri,
Bill O'Dell, and Eric Kramer on the Flor-
ida Affordable Housing Suitability Model.
* Dawn Jourdan, esq., Ph.D. is anticipating
the 2008 publication of an article, with
Elizabeth Garvin, entitled "Through the
Looking Glass:" in the Florida State Univer-
sity Environmental and Land Use Law Re-
view. In addition, Dawn's review of the
book, "A New Weave of Power, People &
Politics The Action Guide for Advocacy
and Citizen Participation" will appear in the
next issue of the International Journal of
Mass Emergencies and Disasters. Dawn
participated in a panel presentation at the


National Conference of the American Plan-
ning Association on the use of landbanking
as a tool to meet regional fair share re-
quirements for affordable housing in rural
areas. She will present a paper on the
same topic this summer at the joint AE-
SOP/ACSP conference in Chicago.
James C. Nicholas has co-authored a
book "A Guide to Impact Fees and Housing
Affordability" to help practitioners design
and implement impact fees that are equita-
ble.
Book: A Guide to Impact Fees and Housing
Affordability, Arthur C. Nelson, Liza K.
Bowles, Julian C. Juergensmeyer. and James
c. Nicholas, Island Press, 2008.
* Earl M. Starnes co-authored with Rich-
ard RuBino from Florida State University
the book "Lessons Learned? The History of
Planning in Florida." With four years of
research and collaboration of many years of
planning practice, the authors trace the
planning experience of Spanish Florida into
statehood and the 21st Century. Land
speculation, localism and community par-
ticipation are themes evolving as lessons
learned are strained from state and local
planning and development management
policies.
Book: Lessons Learned? The History of Plan-
ning in Florida, Richard G. RuBino and Earl
M. Starnes, Tallahassee, FL, Sentry Press,
Tallahassee, 2008.


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