• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Welcome message from the Chair
 Ernest Bartley honored with Lifetime...
 URP fundraising opportunities
 Center for Building Better...
 Student internships: modeling downtown...
 Student practicum in Dunnellon,...
 URP alumni network
 Current faculty research






Group Title: URP news
Title: URP news. Vol. 1. Issue 1.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089085/00001
 Material Information
Title: URP news. Vol. 1. Issue 1.
Series Title: URP news
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Department of Urban and Regional Planning, College of Design, Construction & Planning
Publisher: Department of Urban and Regional Planning, College of Design, Construction & Planning
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: January 2008
 Subjects
Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089085
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

URPNEWS1207 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Welcome message from the Chair
        Page 1
    Ernest Bartley honored with Lifetime Achievement Award
        Page 1
    URP fundraising opportunities
        Page 2
    Center for Building Better Communities
        Page 2
    Student internships: modeling downtown Asheville, NC
        Page 3
    Student practicum in Dunnellon, FL
        Page 3
    URP alumni network
        Page 4
    Current faculty research
        Page 5
Full Text




















Welcome Message from the Chair

Welcome to the first edition of URP further recognition at the national
News, an alumni and student newslet- and international level.
ter for the Department of Urban and We also are scheduling an event
Regional Planning at the University of for early spring, called Planning Day,
Florida! This newsletter marks our tentatively scheduled for February
new emphasis to rejuvenate our ties 15, 2008, to bring alumni, our pre-
with alumni! sent students and faculty together.
Planning Day will be an opportunity
URP is on the move. We have for you to meet our students, to
many changes and new initiatives that catch up with each other, to meet
will lead us to a more prominent with our new faculty, and to see
future. First, I was delighted to come our exciting new program initia-
tives and research and teaching
to Florida in fall 2007 from the School projects and research anderway. We'll
-i projects that are underway. We'll
of Architecture and Urban Planning at provide further information about
the University of Wisconsin- Law, similar to that held by Dr.
the University of Wisconsin- JPlanning Day in the near future.
Milwaukee where I worked for I I Jim Nicholas, who is now profes-encourage your participa-
n sor emeritus. We encourage your participa-
years as a tenured full professor and tion and involvement in any capac-
Director of the Center for Advanced Third, we are in the process ity as we attempt to integrate stu-
Spatial Information Research. of revamping our website, re- dents, alumni, and faculty of the
Second, the Department welcomes viewing our core specializations, Urban and Regional Planning pro-
Dr. Dawn Jourdan, from Texas A&M focused research areas, curricu- gram into the Gator Planning Na-
University. Dr. Jourdan is a planner lum, graduate funding opportuni- tion!
ties and doctoral program to
and lawyer and will have a joint ap-
pointment in the Levin College of strengthen our identity and gain
Zhong-Ren Peng, Chair and Professor



Ernest Bartley Honored with Lifetime Achievement Award


By Allison Abbott

Dr. Bartley was honored for the Florida APA Award for Lifetime Achievement at
the Florida APA Conference in September 2007. He was one of the principal authors
of the landmark 1975 Florida Local Government Comprehensive Planning Act, which
was the original enabling legislation for growth management in Florida. He served the
department for over 30 years, and the university for almost 50 years counting his
teaching in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Dr. Bartley was presented his Lifetime Achievement award at a special faculty and URP student Lauren
student retirement celebration at Lillian's Music Store held in Gainesville. Presently, Simmons presents Dr.
URP students are raising money to dedicate his office within the department as the Bartley with the FAPA
Ernest Bartley Urban Planning Office. His contributions to the department are count- Award for Lifetime
less and we wish him the best as he enjoys his second retirement! Achievement at Lillian's

Allison Abbott is a graduate student in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at Music Store in
the University of Florida. Gainesville, FL
























Welcome Message from the Chair

Welcome to the first edition of URP further recognition at the national
News, an alumni and student newslet- and international level.
ter for the Department of Urban and We also are scheduling an event
Regional Planning at the University of for early spring, called Planning Day,
Florida! This newsletter marks our tentatively scheduled for February
new emphasis to rejuvenate our ties 15, 2008, to bring alumni, our pre-
with alumni! sent students and faculty together.
Planning Day will be an opportunity
URP is on the move. We have for you to meet our students, to
many changes and new initiatives that catch up with each other, to meet
will lead us to a more prominent with our new faculty, and to see
future. First, I was delighted to come our exciting new program initia-
tives and research and teaching
to Florida in fall 2007 from the School projects and research anderway. We'll
-i projects that are underway. We'll
of Architecture and Urban Planning at provide further information about
the University of Wisconsin- Law, similar to that held by Dr.
the University of Wisconsin- JPlanning Day in the near future.
Milwaukee where I worked for I I Jim Nicholas, who is now profes-encourage your participa-
n sor emeritus. We encourage your participa-
years as a tenured full professor and tion and involvement in any capac-
Director of the Center for Advanced Third, we are in the process ity as we attempt to integrate stu-
Spatial Information Research. of revamping our website, re- dents, alumni, and faculty of the
Second, the Department welcomes viewing our core specializations, Urban and Regional Planning pro-
Dr. Dawn Jourdan, from Texas A&M focused research areas, curricu- gram into the Gator Planning Na-
University. Dr. Jourdan is a planner lum, graduate funding opportuni- tion!
ties and doctoral program to
and lawyer and will have a joint ap-
pointment in the Levin College of strengthen our identity and gain
Zhong-Ren Peng, Chair and Professor



Ernest Bartley Honored with Lifetime Achievement Award


By Allison Abbott

Dr. Bartley was honored for the Florida APA Award for Lifetime Achievement at
the Florida APA Conference in September 2007. He was one of the principal authors
of the landmark 1975 Florida Local Government Comprehensive Planning Act, which
was the original enabling legislation for growth management in Florida. He served the
department for over 30 years, and the university for almost 50 years counting his
teaching in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Dr. Bartley was presented his Lifetime Achievement award at a special faculty and URP student Lauren
student retirement celebration at Lillian's Music Store held in Gainesville. Presently, Simmons presents Dr.
URP students are raising money to dedicate his office within the department as the Bartley with the FAPA
Ernest Bartley Urban Planning Office. His contributions to the department are count- Award for Lifetime
less and we wish him the best as he enjoys his second retirement! Achievement at Lillian's

Allison Abbott is a graduate student in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at Music Store in
the University of Florida. Gainesville, FL







-------------------- -
PAG E 2 *

2 URP Fundraising Opportunities


By Dr. Richard Schneider

URP is beginning a concerted fund-raising drive as part of an overall effort to more closely connect
alumni, faculty and students, and to support new activities as well as on-going commitments to our
students. The faculty has contributed their own funds to kick off the campaign and we are asking you
S.1-." to also invest in the future of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Florida I know you
probably have gotten a letter from the UF Foundation. But I want to emphasize the importance of
your contribution to your department in support of the following activities.

Periodic newsletters (such as this one) about student and faculty projects and including, among
other things, information about fellow alums: where are they and what they are doing.
Scholarships, fellowships and assistantships to deserving students (some of you were beneficiar-
ies of these when you were here)
Student book awards
Endowed lectureships, courses, professorships and chairs
Endowed student awards, presented annually
Endowed and named classrooms, lecture halls, and faculty offices
An opportunity to name the Department
A "Distinguished Planner in Residence" program
i v Traveling fellowships for students and faculty
ets ~ Sponsorship of "Planning Day" which will be an opportunity for alums, students, faculty and
a nd* planning practitioners to meet and, as the case may be, to re-connect
i *" l International planning initiative to engage planning in the context of globalization and interna-
tionalization.

A sia.S" We ask you to consider making a contribution to the UF Department of Urban and Regional Plan-
aso sp*oke, ning. There are many opportunities and levels to do this. You can send your gift (any bit helps) to the
^W]lo L department or give on-line at https://www.uff.ufl.edu/OnlineGiving/FundDetail.asp?FundCode=000805

Dr. Peng and other faculty will be contacting URP alumni with more information relative to these
mb.e of e opportunities. We appreciate your support as we move forward with an exciting teaching, research
and service agenda in 2008 and beyond.

Dr. Richard Schneider is a Professor in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning.





* Center for Building Better Communities

pBy Lauren Simmons and Kaycee Mertz

ln firm Under the leadership of Gene Boles, the Center for Building Better Communities is under rapid growth and playing
more important roles in Florida's community planning. The Center's mission is to provide comprehensive planning
and services to small and local communities in an academic and research setting. Over the last couple of years,
CBBC has worked with Florida Department of Community Affairs and a variety of local governments on diverse
planning projects, specifically comprehensive planning, transportation planning and best practices development..
Some of the CBBC's research projects over the past year include: the Transportation Element for the Comprehen-
sive Plans for the Cities of High Springs and Zephyrhills, the Best Practices Guides for Small City Transportation
Planning, the Small Cities Tool Kit for the Department of Community Affairs and the Land Development Regulations
for the City of Archer.

CBBC not only provides planning assistance to Florida communities through Gene Boles and other faculty expertise,
it also has become a center for our graduate students to obtain real world planning experience. Many master's and
Ph.D. students have been working there throughout the year, providing services to our communities by utilizing
their planning knowledge and skills learned in the classroom.


Lauren Simmons & Kaycee Mertz are graduate URP students and assistants for the Center for Building Better Communities.


URP NEWS







-------------------- -
PAG E 2 *

2 URP Fundraising Opportunities


By Dr. Richard Schneider

URP is beginning a concerted fund-raising drive as part of an overall effort to more closely connect
alumni, faculty and students, and to support new activities as well as on-going commitments to our
students. The faculty has contributed their own funds to kick off the campaign and we are asking you
S.1-." to also invest in the future of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Florida I know you
probably have gotten a letter from the UF Foundation. But I want to emphasize the importance of
your contribution to your department in support of the following activities.

Periodic newsletters (such as this one) about student and faculty projects and including, among
other things, information about fellow alums: where are they and what they are doing.
Scholarships, fellowships and assistantships to deserving students (some of you were beneficiar-
ies of these when you were here)
Student book awards
Endowed lectureships, courses, professorships and chairs
Endowed student awards, presented annually
Endowed and named classrooms, lecture halls, and faculty offices
An opportunity to name the Department
A "Distinguished Planner in Residence" program
i v Traveling fellowships for students and faculty
ets ~ Sponsorship of "Planning Day" which will be an opportunity for alums, students, faculty and
a nd* planning practitioners to meet and, as the case may be, to re-connect
i *" l International planning initiative to engage planning in the context of globalization and interna-
tionalization.

A sia.S" We ask you to consider making a contribution to the UF Department of Urban and Regional Plan-
aso sp*oke, ning. There are many opportunities and levels to do this. You can send your gift (any bit helps) to the
^W]lo L department or give on-line at https://www.uff.ufl.edu/OnlineGiving/FundDetail.asp?FundCode=000805

Dr. Peng and other faculty will be contacting URP alumni with more information relative to these
mb.e of e opportunities. We appreciate your support as we move forward with an exciting teaching, research
and service agenda in 2008 and beyond.

Dr. Richard Schneider is a Professor in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning.





* Center for Building Better Communities

pBy Lauren Simmons and Kaycee Mertz

ln firm Under the leadership of Gene Boles, the Center for Building Better Communities is under rapid growth and playing
more important roles in Florida's community planning. The Center's mission is to provide comprehensive planning
and services to small and local communities in an academic and research setting. Over the last couple of years,
CBBC has worked with Florida Department of Community Affairs and a variety of local governments on diverse
planning projects, specifically comprehensive planning, transportation planning and best practices development..
Some of the CBBC's research projects over the past year include: the Transportation Element for the Comprehen-
sive Plans for the Cities of High Springs and Zephyrhills, the Best Practices Guides for Small City Transportation
Planning, the Small Cities Tool Kit for the Department of Community Affairs and the Land Development Regulations
for the City of Archer.

CBBC not only provides planning assistance to Florida communities through Gene Boles and other faculty expertise,
it also has become a center for our graduate students to obtain real world planning experience. Many master's and
Ph.D. students have been working there throughout the year, providing services to our communities by utilizing
their planning knowledge and skills learned in the classroom.


Lauren Simmons & Kaycee Mertz are graduate URP students and assistants for the Center for Building Better Communities.


URP NEWS







VOLUME I, ISSUE I


Student Internships: Modeling Downtown Asheville, NC

By Nathaniel Wingfield

Over the summer I interned in my hometown of Asheville, NC. After decades of stagnation, the city has entered its third golden era of eco-
nomic growth. (For context, its second golden era coincided with the roaring twenties.) The creative destruction accompanying economic
growth spared downtown Asheville through most of the 20th century, leaving many landmark historic buildings intact. Our downtown is archi-
tecturally rich, and residents rightfully want to keep it so. The latest wave of growth has locals on the defensive, as hotels and condominium
developments spring up. Many are concerned that new development will dilute the historic architectural character of downtown, or that tall
new buildings are simply out of place.

Needless to say, the citys planning staff is feeling the heat. To help in the design review process, they asked me to build a 3D model of all build-
ings in the central business district. To build an accurate model, I first had to gather lots of data. I traced building footprints using aerial photo-
graphs. Then I hit the street to measure each building's height with a range-finder, a handheld laser device that inspired endless curiosity in
passersby. Finally, I photographed several hundred buildings in the most central parts of downtown. Using my measurements, I modeled the
buildings in 3D using Google SketchUp. The photographs I used for texturing, to give each building a recognizable facade.

City staff will use the finished model for visualizing proposed buildings in the urban context where they might eventually be built. Used respon-
sibly, the model will be a powerful tool for demonstrating to city council members and concerned residents the impact of a proposed building
on Asheville's urban form and skyline.

Nathaniel Wingfield is a graduate student in Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Florida


I_-------------------------,'''''5


Student Practicum In Dunnellon, FL


By Marcus Oberlander
I I
The premise behind taking the Practicum course is to gain knowledge of the planning process outside of what we learned in
class through lectures and books. The knowledge obtained through the courses which established our planning foundation
can now be applied to the issues and challenges in the real world. This semester's Practicum course was taught by Gail Eas-
ley, who has had 30 years of experience in both the public and private sectors. The focus of the course was on the compre-
hensive plan updates in the city of Dunnellon, which is located in southern Marion County, has a population of approxi-
mately 2,000 people, and is located near the Withlacoochee and Rainbow Rivers and has one of the largest natural springs in
the state of Florida. Dunnellon has not updated its comprehensive plan since 1991, and there are many challenges that the
residents of this City and surrounding areas now face involving growth and pollution. The conservation of environmental
resources and the preservation of the community's character are the top two priorities that have been voiced by the residents
and elected officials. Our charge was to update the comprehensive plan related to the recreation and open space element, the
aquifer protection section, and wastewater treatment facilities section of the infrastructure element.

The residents were very enthusiastic to have our help and contributed to the success of this course. Assistance was provided
to further our efforts and not to hinder our progress. The importance of our work was not just compiling data and analysis
and creating goals, objectives, and policies, but to understand the community as a whole. What does the City of Dunnellon
want to accomplish? What does the City of Dunnellon need to accomplish? How can the city manage growth as well as con-
serve the City's natural resources? These are issues that a planner deals with on a daily basis, and it especially becomes criti-
cal with smaller towns that have limited available resources related to planning and growth management.
I
The words "thank you" were so wonderful to hear from people that really appreciated our help. After all of the workshops
have been held and all of the reports have been written, as a group we can smile knowing that what we have done has made a
difference to a community both now and into the future.
II
Marcus Oberlander is a graduate student in Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Florida..

-. ........................................


PAGE 3







VOLUME I, ISSUE I


Student Internships: Modeling Downtown Asheville, NC

By Nathaniel Wingfield

Over the summer I interned in my hometown of Asheville, NC. After decades of stagnation, the city has entered its third golden era of eco-
nomic growth. (For context, its second golden era coincided with the roaring twenties.) The creative destruction accompanying economic
growth spared downtown Asheville through most of the 20th century, leaving many landmark historic buildings intact. Our downtown is archi-
tecturally rich, and residents rightfully want to keep it so. The latest wave of growth has locals on the defensive, as hotels and condominium
developments spring up. Many are concerned that new development will dilute the historic architectural character of downtown, or that tall
new buildings are simply out of place.

Needless to say, the citys planning staff is feeling the heat. To help in the design review process, they asked me to build a 3D model of all build-
ings in the central business district. To build an accurate model, I first had to gather lots of data. I traced building footprints using aerial photo-
graphs. Then I hit the street to measure each building's height with a range-finder, a handheld laser device that inspired endless curiosity in
passersby. Finally, I photographed several hundred buildings in the most central parts of downtown. Using my measurements, I modeled the
buildings in 3D using Google SketchUp. The photographs I used for texturing, to give each building a recognizable facade.

City staff will use the finished model for visualizing proposed buildings in the urban context where they might eventually be built. Used respon-
sibly, the model will be a powerful tool for demonstrating to city council members and concerned residents the impact of a proposed building
on Asheville's urban form and skyline.

Nathaniel Wingfield is a graduate student in Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Florida


I_-------------------------,'''''5


Student Practicum In Dunnellon, FL


By Marcus Oberlander
I I
The premise behind taking the Practicum course is to gain knowledge of the planning process outside of what we learned in
class through lectures and books. The knowledge obtained through the courses which established our planning foundation
can now be applied to the issues and challenges in the real world. This semester's Practicum course was taught by Gail Eas-
ley, who has had 30 years of experience in both the public and private sectors. The focus of the course was on the compre-
hensive plan updates in the city of Dunnellon, which is located in southern Marion County, has a population of approxi-
mately 2,000 people, and is located near the Withlacoochee and Rainbow Rivers and has one of the largest natural springs in
the state of Florida. Dunnellon has not updated its comprehensive plan since 1991, and there are many challenges that the
residents of this City and surrounding areas now face involving growth and pollution. The conservation of environmental
resources and the preservation of the community's character are the top two priorities that have been voiced by the residents
and elected officials. Our charge was to update the comprehensive plan related to the recreation and open space element, the
aquifer protection section, and wastewater treatment facilities section of the infrastructure element.

The residents were very enthusiastic to have our help and contributed to the success of this course. Assistance was provided
to further our efforts and not to hinder our progress. The importance of our work was not just compiling data and analysis
and creating goals, objectives, and policies, but to understand the community as a whole. What does the City of Dunnellon
want to accomplish? What does the City of Dunnellon need to accomplish? How can the city manage growth as well as con-
serve the City's natural resources? These are issues that a planner deals with on a daily basis, and it especially becomes criti-
cal with smaller towns that have limited available resources related to planning and growth management.
I
The words "thank you" were so wonderful to hear from people that really appreciated our help. After all of the workshops
have been held and all of the reports have been written, as a group we can smile knowing that what we have done has made a
difference to a community both now and into the future.
II
Marcus Oberlander is a graduate student in Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Florida..

-. ........................................


PAGE 3



















Let us


know what


great


things you



are doing!


As part of our campaign to keep in touch with alumni, we ask
that you fill out the form below and return it to the department
to become a part of our alumni network!

Once you are in the URP Alumni Network you will receive in-
formation on upcoming events, student, alumni and faculty ac-
complishments, and more!

If you prefer, in lieu of the form, feel free to email your informa-
tion to Ella Littles at elittles@ufl.edu.

For more information, please visit our URP website at http://
www.dcp.ufl.edu/urp/. We look forward to your participation in
the URP Alumni Network!


Happy Holidays!


Name Current Position
UF UNIVERSITY o
SFLORIDA Address
College of Design, Construction and Planning Business Address
Department of Urban and Regional Planning
P.O. Box 115706
Gainesville, FL 32611-5706
Phone

Phone: (352)-392-0997
http://www.dcp.ufl.edu/urp/ E-mail Address Business Phone

Graduation Year
Interest in Involvement in the URP Alumni Network
Student Mentor, Speaker, guest lecture, others (please circle one and
specify others if you so choose.)


. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...







- -----------------------_-------- -


UF UNIVERSITY of

UF IFLORIDA

College of Design, Construction and Planning
Department of Urban and Regional Planning
P.O. Box I 15706
Gainesville, FL 32611-5706
Phone: (352)-392-0997


Current Faculty Research


* Dean Christopher Silver: "Planning
the Megacity: Jakarta, Indonesia in the
Twentieth Century" by Routledge, 2007.
In May, Silver chaired a session of the
Consultation Forum on the Revitaliza-
tion of Kota Tua, Jakarta, Indonesia,
sponsored by the Pacific Rim Council
on Urban Development and the Provin-
cial Government of Jakarta.
* Paul Zwick Professor of URP, and
Margaret Carr, Professor of Land-
scape Architecture, published "Smart
Land Use Analysis: The LUCIS Model"
in March 2007 by ESRI Press. The pair
were awarded the APA National Award
for Best Use of Technology by a Uni-
versity.
* Zhong-Ren Peng, together with Dr.
Yaoyu Li at the University of Wiscon-
sin-Milwaukee, has won the prestigious
Honda Initiation Grant award in 2007
for their research integrating the intelli-
gent transportation systems with the
plug-in hybrid electric vehicles to opti-
mize power management, increase fuel
efficiency and reduce emissions.
* Richard H. Schneider recently pub-
lished the book Crime Prevention and the
Built Environment (Routledge 2007) with
co-author Ted Kitchen. He is also the


author of a chapter for the United Na-
tions-HABITAT's Global Report on Hu-
man Settlements 2007 (Earthscan Publica-
tions Ltd.) on "Urban Crime and Violence
Conditions and Trends," contributing
author of two other chapters on emerging
policy and trends for crime prevention
planning and editor of nine city case stud-
ies for the report.
* Ruth Steiner, Associate Professor, is a
member of a team of researchers who
brought the Center for Multimodal Solu-
tions for Congestion Mitigation (CMS) a
new U.S. Department of Transportation
Tier I university transportation research
center to UF. The center will examine
congestion on both passenger and freight
transportation systems and will develop
solutions for enhanced multimodal con-
nectivity and coordination, accessibility,
system interoperability and transportation
community outreach.
* Professor Emeritus Earl Starnes is com-
pleting a book with co-author, Richard
Rubino (of Florida State University) on
History of Planning in Florida, Lessons
Learned. The book, which describes how
planning and growth management have
tried to contend with the combined


forces of land exploitation and localism, will
be published this fall by Century Press.
* Assistant Professor Kristin Larsen,
Associate Professor Ilir Bejieri and
William O'Dell, Associate Director of
the Shimberg Center for Affordable
Housing in the Rinker School of Building
Construction, received a $500,000 grant
from the Wachovia Foundation. Over the
next three years, they will develop a model
to identify and assess the suitability of sites
for affordable housing development and
preservation. The affordable housing suit-
ability model has applications for state
agencies, local governments, for-profits,
lending institutions, community develop-
ment corporations and other non-profits.
* Joseli Macedo, Assistant Professor, com-
pleted her fourth Summer Study Abroad
program in Brazil. Students from across
the U.S. spend six weeks in Brazil; they visit
S5o Paulo, Maringi, and Curitiba, where
they spend most of their time. They work
with students at the Federal University of
Parana and also attend lectures in various
planning agencies in the city.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs