• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 A Red Cross nurse
 Roosevelt's rough riders
 Schley and Cook on the bridge of...
 Raising the flag at Santiago
 Dewey at Manila
 Wounded comrades
 Sampson at Santiago
 A naval reserve girl
 Hobson and the "Merrimac"
 A military band
 The returning hero
 Cousins
 Back Cover






Title: Gallant little patriots
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089020/00001
 Material Information
Title: Gallant little patriots
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.), plates ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Humphrey, Maud, b. 1868
Humphrey, Mabel ( Illustrator )
Frederick A. Stokes Company
Publisher: Frederick A. Stokes Company
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1899
 Subjects
Subject: Heroes -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Patriotism -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Boys -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Girls -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
War -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Fourth of July -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Nurses -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Wounds and injuries in literature -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Red Cross and Red Crescent -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Flags -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Dreams -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
War stories   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1899   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1899   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1899
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with numerous full-page colour-plates after paintings in water-colour by Maud Humphrey ; and with illustrations in black-and-white together with new stories and verses by Mabel Humphrey.
General Note: Pictorial cover.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Frontispiece and plates printed in colors.
General Note: Title page engraved; printed in red and black.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089020
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223827
notis - ALG4080
oclc - 48797878

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
    A Red Cross nurse
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Roosevelt's rough riders
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Schley and Cook on the bridge of the "Brooklyn"
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Raising the flag at Santiago
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Dewey at Manila
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Wounded comrades
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Sampson at Santiago
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    A naval reserve girl
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Hobson and the "Merrimac"
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    A military band
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The returning hero
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Cousins
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Back Cover
        Page 40
        Page 41
Full Text








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A RED CROSS NURSe,


COPYRIGHT. 1899,BY FREDERICK A.STOKEI
PRINTED IN AMERICA.


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GALLANT


LITTLE


PATRIOT


WITH NUMEROUS FULL-PAGE COLOUR-PLATES
AFTER PAINTINGS IN WATER-COLOUR BY

Maud Humphrey


AND WITH ILLUSTRATIONS IN
TOGETHER WITH NEW STORI

Mabel Hum


NEW YORK
Copyright, 1899, by
FREDERICK A. STOKES
PUBLISHERS


BLAC.K-AND-WHITE
ES AND VERSES BY


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COMPANY


Printed' in A Im e rica


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N ,Now, just sit still,
\ '/ Papa, and let me
put my head down on your
shoulder, just so. There! Now
I'll tell you all about what we've been doing to-day. It
was only me and Nellie-Harry wouldn't play. I guess
he thinks he's too big, but WE had lots of fun.
"We went over to Nellie's and were just
going to play house, just as we most always
do,-She's the Mama, t' ,you know, and I'm the
Papa,-when, what do ''; '' you think we saw out of
the window? Oh, just GUESS-No, sir-ee! it
wasn't an effelant. Who do you s'pose ever saw
an effelant over at Nellie's! It was a lady
with a cap on-most like the man down at the
bread store-and a big, white apron, and the fun-
niest little red mark on her arm! And, Papa,
she was so PRETTY! most as pretty as Mama.
"Nellie asked her. Mama what kind of bread
she s'posed the lady made, but her Mama said I
she didn't make bread at all. She was a Red
Cross Nurse. Me and
Nellie didn't think cross ,
nurses was nice, but
Nellie's Mama said she
'-. .wasn't cross, really, only --
-<'t cross,






A RED CROSS NURSE.


they just called her that. And, Papa, she went
'way, 'way off and left her Papa and Mama
just to take care of the poor, wounded
soldiers. Wasn't she the goodest! Yes,
sir! gooder than me, or even NELLIE!
"Then Nellie said, 'Oh, Robbie,
let's play I'm a Red Cross Nurse, and
you be the soldier I'm to take care of.'
"You know, I just love to be a
soldier, so we asked Nellie's Mama
for something to play with, and,
what do you think? She gave
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INellie the loveliest cap, and a apron, and even the
pretty red mark for her sleeve. Why, that's the
Red Cross-I should think you'd know! Then
we went up to the nursery, and, my! but
we had a good time. I had a blanket to put
over me and a really, truly pillow to put under my
head. And then Nellie, she pinned
a hanksniff around my head, 'cause
some bad, wicked man had shooted me.
I just played he had, you know.
-- "Nellie, she made me some lovely medsin, too. It
was strawberry jam with water, but we played
"" { it was just horrid; so I HAD to take them.
'I wanted to save my sword; but Nel-
lie wouldn't let me, cause soldiers
"- ,--" !don't take their swords to bed.
7 "But, anyway, I think I'd rather
be a poor, sick soldier and have strawberry medsin and truly pillows,
than to be a cross red nurse, no, I mean a RED CROSS NURSE.
Wouldn't you Papa ?"



















































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O O S VE LT R O U G R ID E R COPYRIGHT, 1899 1 .; L, ':v, (Ci' ,: '1
















ROOSEVELT'S ROUGH RIDERS.


LITTLE Teddy Hunt had got up a company of '____
"Rough Riders" with himself for "captain." ,-A--
"I have to be, fellers," he said, 'cause my name's .
Theodore, just like Colonel Roosevelt."
So it rested, and the remainder of the company-
just two very small boys- seemed to look up to him
with as much admiration and -trust as the real "rough rid-
ers" did to their noble Colonel.
"And, Mama," Teddy said, I must have a uniform,
'cause how would anyone know I was a rough rider?"
So Teddy strutted forth in all the glory of linen and
yellow and a "truly rough rider hat." Of course the -.--
other rough riders couldn't be left behind, and soon
they, too, were in fine, new uniforms.
Back of Teddy's house was a little rise of ground .
that they had picked out as "San Juan Hill," and now '
that they were uniformed they were going to '"
make the famous charge.





ROOSEVELT'S ROUGH RIDERS.


A dry-goods box, in-which a -door and window had been cut to
furnish a house for Teddy's new puppy until a proper house could be
made for it, was to be a Spanish block house, and at this they rushed
bravely, waving their flags and shouting like little Indians.
As soon as they reached it they began the "battle" with much
banging of wooden swords and many kicks. Suddenly a shrill
"Gobble, GOBBLE, GOBBLE!" came warningly from the block
house, and the head of Grandpa's big turkey gobbler was thrust out
of the door. It was quickly followed by the whole body of the
bird, and with long strides and great flapping of wings he chased
those poor, scared, little rough riders down San Juan Hill. Little
boys, however, can climb fences, and even very angry turkeys can
not do that; so Colonel Roosevelt and his men stood safe and sound
at the foot of the hill in much less time than it has taken me to
tell you about it.
The excited enemy gobbled angrily by the fence for a few
moments, and then, his wounded feelings being somewhat relieved,
he strutted proudly back up the hill shaking out his ruffled feathers.
As soon as the boys could get breath enough to speak, little George
gasped out, Do you 'member-what the-rough riders did-when
-they got DOWN-again, Teddy?"






































































SCHLEY AND COOK ON TMHE BRIDGE OF THE BROOK LYN. COPYR' C.T.899.,YeRtDERICU ... 'h'P..
PRINTED -IN AMEFR*.:A





SCHLEY AND COOK ON THE
BRIDGE OF THE "BROOKLYN."


61W A/E'VE been having a perfectly AWFUL
fight! My sailors is all killed and
Mr. Schley's sailors is all killed, and most of
S-. the Spaniards is killed-there's only just enough
left .for us to chase.
"We've got a doctor. Sometimes I'm doctor, you know, instead
of being Cook-not the cook that gets dinner, and breakfast, and
supper, Captain Cook-and then Edie is nurse. We have to take
Pussy for the wounded sailor though, 'cause Edie won't let us take
her dolls.
"But I'm Captain Cook now, and we're on Brooklyn bridge. Yes,
it is Brooklyn bridge, 'cause Papa said it was, 'the bridge of the
BROOKLYN!' And we're on a ship, too. It must have been a
N'A-WFUL big ship to have Brooklyn bridge on it-bigger'n the
FERRY, I should say!
We've got a flag, too,
'cause this is a flag ship !
That doesn't mean it's
-.made of flags. It's just -
eblled that, 'cause the Ad-, A
miral sails on it.
"Commodore Schley,
now, he's got spy glasses !
.(No, THEY'RE not opera
-glasses! Did you think
they were ?) That's'cause
he has to see the enemy
blow up! We're shoot-





SCHLEY AND COOK ON THE BRIDGE OF THE "BROOKLYN."


00, ing them with big cannons. See my gi
ner down there ? 'WAY under the
chair O-o-o-o-e-e-u My! I
1viMOST tumbled into the water
4 and bumped my head on the canno
might have broked the gunner or got
or something. I DIDN'T sqi
Schley! 'I was just calling to the
"You keep on looking a litt
and I'll get some gingerbread from Dinm
DON'T it smell good !-and I'll get some mor
mean bullets, too. 0
"You wait for me-I'll be back 9 2
soon. Vjij


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drowned
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RAISING THE FLAG AT SANTIAGO.


COPYRIGHT. 1899, BY FREDERICW A.STOKES COMPANY'
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RAISING THE FLAG

AT SANTIAGO.


-\WHAT do you think of a little American of five years who had
not seen his country since he was six weeks old, and who
spoke Spanish as well as English ?
He lived in Santiago, Cuba, until the war came, when he and
his Mama were sent away to a safe place. Papa, however, couldn't
get away.
So when Santiago surrendered and the Stars and Stripes" were
flying over the city, no one was happier than little Jamie.
The night he and his Mama returned to Papa and their lovely
home again, Jamie curled up on the floor with his head against his
Papa's knee and&Tistened to the story of how the brave American
soldiers had fought and conquered.
\Vhen Jamie finally went to bed, he had such a funny dream.
He dreamed that he was a "really truly" soldier, and was going
to fight the Spaniards; so he went and told his little tin soldiers
about it. Would you believe it ? He heard them answer him!
They said in their little tin voices, "We'll go to war and help you
raise the flag over the city. Three cheers for Captain Jamie!"
Then they marched to the corner where Jamie's little flag was
standing and with much grunting carried it over to him.


~;





RAISING THE FLAG AT
Put it up," they squeaked; "put it up!"
S"Where?" said Jamie.
S"On the government building," they called.
Jamie looked all around to see what they
,could mean, and finally put it on top of his
little play-house.
-"That's right, that's right," piped the little
thin voices. "Now, three cheers for the flag!
-lH urrah! Hurrah! Hurrah!"
SThen they marched around the room-
.ro\cr tables, chairs, and even over the "gov-
lernment building," and finally they started to
walkk over Jamie. One even got up on his
..nose and -! he waked up, and the
Iflv that had been buzzing and had REALLY
1 walked on his nose flew away.
He raised his head and looked over in the
^corner-there were his soldiers just as he had
lett them, and there was his flag.
S"Never mind, little soldiers," he said, "if
Ixe didn't truly do it last night we will to-day.
Hurrah for the flag! I say, too."
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DEW-Y AT MANILA.


COPYRIGHT. 1899,13BY rREDCF-. 4 IIOVIE COMPAPIIV
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DEWEY AT MANILA.


Soft brown eyes and curling, golden hair,
Cheeks that flame like sunset's ruddy glow,
Curving lips, but military air-
See our baby admiral standing there,
Pointing out his ships that we may know!


There's


the Spanish


fleet-though


scarcely


large -
There the Olympia, with waving flag;
This small dolly for the Spanish
crew
i,,, Is there very much that he
can do?
Hardly strange the battle
-._ seems to lag!


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DEWEY AT MANILA.






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AreStill our se's cap!ky" urges on the fight,
For he kCalling out his orders to his men.
Andill the other ships ne'er come in sight?
Can they all have foundered in the night?
He will use his spy-glass-look again.

But what's seen there looming up ahead?
Waving sails? No, some one coming on.
Ah, he knows those waving ribbons red
Are on Nurse's cap! The joy has sped,
For he knows that he must go to bed.
And Manila's admiral has gone!

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WOUNDED CO/RADES.


COPYRtCwr. k899 BY FREOERCICU 5-TOVE- COMpskv
PINTED tN AMERICA















c, WOUNDED
COMRADES.


6 IT'S just DREFFUL, isn't it, Lala? This
life in Porto-what ? Where did
Uncle Tom say he was ? I just wish you
could talk, 'cause I think you know what he
'/ said,-you wag your tail and wink 'yes,' as
"-" if you did. Wonder how it seems not to
talk!
"Anyway it's drefful hot where
Uncle Tom was,-he said those
tiny little bullets he showed us made
it so. And we did have a fight,
too, didn't we, Mr. Jones ? I most I
roasted.
-"You're a soldier now, you know,
Lala, and I'm going to call you
Mr. Jones.
"Wooh! You MUSTN'T kiss my
face and get me all wet! You give





WOUNDED COMRADES.


such awful BIG kisses. 'Spose I'd kiss you that
way, how'd You like it?
"Yes, Mr. Jones, we're both of us hurted pretty
) bad. Does your head pain you
Svery-Now, Lala, DON'T stick
i, ^ your tongue out and laugh at
me, 'cause your head and leg
both HURT you, do you HEAR? 6
"Will you have a drink o'
water, Mr. Jones? It's nice
and cool, and I got a new tin
dipper for us. Bridget let me take it to play with.
"Ah, aren't you thirsty! WHY! MR. JONES!
I want some, too! and you've gone and drinked it ALL UP!
"You're a bad soldier, and you must go to your tent, sir. My arm
.s getting very lame, La-, I mean, Mr. Jones. I hope you're feeling
setter ?
"P'raps we'd both better go and lie down in our tent. You could
stick your paw in any way, and we'll play the rest of us is in.
"Come on, Mr. Jones. Come along."


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SAMPSON AT SANTIAGO.





SAMPSON AT SANTIAGO.


S,,\ E ES, my birthday comes on the Fourth of July. I was
four years old last Fourth, and Papa let me have some
i1 real fire-crackers besides my torpedoes. I had some boats,
Stood, for birthday presents--I haven't got 'em any longer,
cause they blowed up. Mama says she doesn't care, as long as I
didn't blow up, too; but I do, 'cause next Fourth I can't have any
more fire-crackers, Papa says.
"I wasn't naughty, 'cause he didn't say, 'Don't light those fire-
crackers.' He just said, 'Be careful of them till I get back, Ted,'
and I was. I didn't hold any in my hand to fire off, and Jim
does that.
"I told Mama where I was going, too, when she asked me. I
told her I was going to show the coachman my new boats, and I
did. But I couldn't stay there all day bothering Pat, so I just went
down to the lake and played I was Sampson when he shooted at
Santiago, but I couldn't make noise enough
without the crackers.
"I just HOLLERED. I said bang, BANG,
BANG !-loud as that-but it was awful
little, and I HAD to shoot off my fire-crackers.
Then I lighted my punk, and I only just
touched it to the cracker's little grey tail. Wasn't
that CAREFUL? Once I had to jump, 'cause
the tail was pretty short and the cracker went i
Sfst BANG! so sudden I most tumbled into
the water, but I was careful not to tumble.
"The nicest noise was when I stuffed a real \ //
big cracker into each smokestack, but it hurt 6
the boats some. It kind o' blowed them to '





SAMPSON AT SANTIAGO.


pieces, and it made such a noise -that Pat
L -1 and Papa and everybody came to see what ".
was the matter. One of the pieces hit my r
head and kind o' hurt, and it made a funny / \
lump.
"It made a lovely noise, but I haven't any I boats now. Wish
I had!
"They shut me up in the house all the rest of the day,
but I came down to supper. 'Twas a good supper, too
cakes and chocolate \ and then ice cream!
t/-. "Grandpapa ,' asked how I was
,. feeling. I told him 'first rate. I GEN'-
RALLY preferred /\ the fresh air, but
the house was more comfortable in warm weather.'
"Grandpa coughed till his face got awful red, and Papa took a
drink o' water so suddenly he choked,
and they all acted VERY funny--most
as if they wanted to laugh.
"I didn't see anything very funny
'bout Papa's choking, but some people 1j
is queer!" "
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A NAVAL RESERVE GIRL.


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COPYRIGHT. 1899 BY FREDERICK A STOKES COMPANY.
POINTED IN AMERICA.











A NAVAL RESERVE GIRL.



LULU'S Uncle Charlie had been away on the ship
Yankee," and when he came back he brought her
a lovely hat-band of which she was very proud. What she
loved best, however, was his spy-glass.
Once Uncle Charlie had held it for her to look through, and
Saway down the street she had seen her Papa looking as big as
though he were right at her side.
Nursie was packing, and Lulu was standing in front of the
wonderful case on the wall. She gazed longingly at it.
Lifting the lid of the case, she peered eagerly in. So shiny
and black it was, and made just to look off to sea with. She
\was going to the sea-shore- Uncle Charlie would WANT her
to look at some real ships.
"I think I'd better take it"! she said, and so she
put it carefully in the trunk where she could
"'sprise Nursie with it."
Three days afterward a very quiet little girl
stole from their cottage at -
Nantucket with something

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A NAVAL RESERVE GIRL.


"shiny and black" hugged tightly in her arms. She
perched herself on the post that stood at the end of the
pier. The wind was blowing hard, but Lulu never
S minded.
Puff! it came and set the long, heavy glass dancing, so she put it
down on the pier. Puff! it came again stronger than before, and, lift-
ing her cap, carried it far out to sea.
Her pretty white hat with the "Yankee" band was lost! and, weep-
ing, she stumbled back to the house to tell Mama all about it.
"I looked it, Mama," she sobbed, holding the glass out to her
mother. "I -thought Uncle- Charlie- would say 'Lu-lu, take-
it, dear,'- and-I did. And-I lost-my-pretty-ca-cap! And
- I'm sor-ry- Mama-dear."
"Yes, dear," she said gravely, "it was naughty to bring it without
asking Uncle. Now you must write and tell him how sorry you are,
sweetheart, and tell him we will send it back to-morrow. My little
girl will never be so naughty again, will she?
"Now, dearie, kiss me and run off and tell Nurse
to write Uncle Charlie at once."
Lulu skipped away, much happier for having told
Mama, but she doesn't like to speak of spy-glasses
even now.
"They're too big for little girls," she says, "and,
besides, I lost my cap." ,












































































R-OBSON AND THE MERRIMAC.


COPYRIGHT. 1899,BY FREDERICK S TO.' S COIMP~l
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HOBSON AND THE "MERRIMAC."


ALL during breakfast Papa and Mama had been talking of Hob-
son. Little Harold was very quiet, but he was so interested
in hearing what they said that he picked up the cream pitcher to
drink out of instead of his glass of milk.
After breakfast Ellen, ,__ the nurse, and Harry went
out on the broad piazza; for Mama wanted Harry
to be out of doors while the air was still fresh and
cool.
The sun was shining on the garden and making the
dewy flowers sparkle like many colored jewels
in the sunlight, while the 1 ", breeze kept their
dainty heads "nid, nid, nodding" like hap-
py children.
Br-r-r-r-r-r, went the big I \ bumble-bee,
clumsily bumping from flower j '- to flower, and
as the sun grew warmer Harry ,, j found his eye-
lids were growing very heavy. 'j-".
He was getting drowsy, and
began to settle himself for a nap when, thump! something hard
bumped down on his sleepy little head. It was Ellen's thimble.
She didn't move to get it, however, and Harry turned curiously
around to see what she could be doing.
What! Could it be? Yes, Ellen was fast asleep.





THE ''MERRIMAC."


So Harry was "as good as" alone. His eyes were wide open
now and as bright as the brass buckle on Papa's
belt that he had been playing with.
I,' Very carefully he got up, put Ellen's thimble
in her lap, picked up his little boats, soldiers
,T"'' and the belt and walked softly down into the yard.
.. *,He was going to play Hobson. The old door
from the hen house would make a fine raft, lying.
right by the water as it did. His soldiers would
-- be his men," and there were his firecrack-


ers and "punk" that
he had brought down
with him so he could
"blow up the ship, just like Hobson."
But Hobson took off his clothes, and so, of
course, must Harry.
Finally he was ready, even to the belt. It took
him some time to get the MERRIMAC into the O
water, but at last it slid in with a splash, and
he was Hobson.
I wonder what Hobson did with
his 'firetrackers,'" he thought. "Oh! r I know."
Then he lighted one and laid it care fully down on the
edge of the raft.
He was waiting to "see it go," when he
heard his.Mama cry,
''Oh, H u Harry, my precious baby! I
thought -you were lost. Ellen and I have been
looking ) everywhere for you."
DON'T, Mama," he answered as she snatched him up in her
arms. But what else he might have said was smothered by kisses.


HOBSON AND


















Li


t\ o5AYLr #n -ti~


COPYRIGHT, B99, BY FREOEP Cm A S TOiES COMP-af
SPRINTED IN -MERIC-


TME MILITARY BAND.














A MILITARY BAND.


Br-r-r-umty-ty-bum! hear my
great drum!
Stand off, make way, for the
band to come.
Hear the boys shout, "What's
it about ?"
They cannot wait for the band
to get out.
II.


Toot-tootle-te toot!
a flute;


I haven't


But my trumpet is clearer,
and louder to boot.


4`'





A MILITARY BAND.





SM music and gaiety on
every hand.
}- In II. _
Come, girls and boys, help make a noise;
Bring all your fifes and your musical toys.
We must have fun! Where is your gun?
T'read double time, then start off at a run.
IV.
March, march around; hear the sweet sound.
Hark to the melody! Like was ne'er found.
This is the way; see how we play!
Won't all you children come join us to-day?


n



















































































s i, '


THe RETURNING HERO.


COPYRIGHT. F189 a' FREDEPICE A STOVES COMPN t
PRINTED INp AMERICA


Q~O`~
















THE RETURNING HERO.

UNCLE Tom was home from the war at last, and his
small nephew and nieces never seemed to tire of listening to his
"stories." Over and over again he told them of the rousing reception
that had been given the soldiers all along their way home. Beautiful
young ladies had waved their handkerchiefs and thrown flowers to
them, and even old gentlemen had been as enthusiastic as the small
boys were and had cheered as loudly.
The children had finally learned to play "returning hero." Usually
they only "played throw flowers" at little Tom, the hero, as they could
not get real flowers.
One day, however, Flossie appeared at her little cousin's home wav-
ing a great bunch of pink roses over her excited little head.
"Come on, Tommy," she called. "Come on. Now you can be a
soldier, and Jean and I will throw THESE at you! Look!"
and she waved them so wildly that she almost knocked
Their pretty pink heads off against the door post.
Out they ran, and Tommy marched up and down to the
time of his own voice, shouting Bum! Bum! bum, bum,
Sv BUM! while the two girls behaved in every way as an
^ enthusiastic crowd should.





THE RETURNING HERO.
I


SFirst Jean "was governor" and pre-
sented Tommy with a sword while Flos-
Ssie waited eagerly for her turn to throw
Sthe flowers. She started by pulling off
the heads of the roses, 'cause they
couldn't have throwed stems and all, you know," and threw them
gravely at Tommy who was still marching proudly up and down.
Suddenly one rose struck him in the eye, and then the fun began.
They made such a noise in their frolic that Uncle Tom came
to see the cause. Seeing the wreck of the flowers he looked horri-
fied and then threw back his head and laughed.
"Well, youngsters," he said, "Miss iMarion will have to wait
until to-morrow for her roses; but you, Flossie, you rascal! The
next time you want to play beautiful young lady' just take
some other flowers than those I have bought for Miss Marion, to
do it with."
As he went back into the house Flossie said,
"I think he's mean to want those flowers just ,
for a GIRL! when you are a poor wounded
soldier, too." '










































































































COUSI NS.


COPYRIGHT, 1899,BYFREDEFP-. A TC, LrtE COM.ar.I
PRINTED IN :ME riA


S,





.41













COUSINS.


6 JusT listen to me, Louie Howard, and I'll tell ypu something
teacher told us in kindergarten this morning.
"You have hundreds and hundreds o' cousins!
"Yes, you HAVE, Louie, 'cause teacher said so. They live 'way
across the Atlantic ocean! I knew you'd be surprised-I was.
"Don't you wish we'd had them all at my last birthday party?
Only thing would have been, they'd have eaten up all the ice cream.
Just think of hundreds and hundreds of plates of ice cream. My!
It most makes my mouth freeze to think of it! Guess they'd all
love me if I gave 'em hundreds of plates of ice cream.
"Don't you know who they are
/.' NOW? Why, they're the little
/ English children, 'course! Our
.-4 great great great grandpas and
theirs were cousins, oh, a VERY
/ Yi long time ago, so we're cousins,
1 too.
S "We had some tableaux; Louie!
You know what tableaux are? ,
Why, you dress up and can't
even wink, and you sit as STILL! < '--
Stiller'n Sunday school-and rT
everybody looks at you and says, --





COUSINS.
S 'How sweet! and 'Dear children! We
---.- weren't dear children-we were tableaux.
LU "I was Jonathan-that's the little Amer-
_-_ ican boy-and Georgie was Johnny Bull,
__ the little English boy, and we shook hands,
P-1" 'cause he was glad he-no, I think it was
ME-beat Spain. We were the cousins, you know. That's how
the teacher came to tell about the little English boys and girls.
"Mamie was Spain, and she looked so PRETTY! I wouldn't have
even played beat her if I'd known, 'cause I like Mamie, don't you ?
"We had curtains, too-I helped draw them. Once I stuck my
foot in the fringe, and I walked between them, FAST, and sat down
right out in front of the audience. I didn't mean to, and I didn't
laugh, but they did. I just said 'Ow!' Teacher picked me up,
and we both said audiences were VERY rude. I didn't pull the
curtains any more, 'cause I'd slapped my hands down kinder hard,
and they felt funny.
"After the tableaux we played games and had supper and some
really truly mottoes that snapped so loud that Mamie cried. I didn't
cry, I just jumped a LITTLE and upset my lemonade.
"I brought you home a motto, Louie, dear, 'cause I was sorry
you couldn't go, but you will NEXT time, won't you "






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