• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Advertising
 Frontispiece
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Book I. Border warfare
 Book II. Rogers's rangers
 Book III. Disaster
 Book IV. Wolfe
 Book V. Within Quebec
 Book VI. Without Quebec
 Book VII. English victors
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Tales of English history
Title: French and English
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089015/00001
 Material Information
Title: French and English a story of the struggle in America
Series Title: Tales of English history
Alternate Title: French and English a tale of frontier war
Physical Description: 519 p., 7 leaves of plates : ill., map ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Everett-Green, Evelyn, 1856-1932
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: T. Nelson and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publication Date: 1899
 Subjects
Subject: Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Indians of North America -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Frontier and pioneer life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Youth and death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
War -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Massacres -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile fiction -- United States -- French and Indian War, 1755-1763   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1899
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by E. Everett-Green.
General Note: Title page printed in red and black
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089015
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225872
notis - ALG6154
oclc - 02464892

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Half Title
    Advertising
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Half Title
        Page iii
    Title Page
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
    List of Illustrations
        Page vii
    Book I. Border warfare
        Page viii
        A western settler
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 16a
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
        Friends in need
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
        Philadelphia
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
        An exciting struggle
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
    Book II. Rogers's rangers
        Page 86
        A day of vengeance
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 102a
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
        Robert Rogers
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
        The life of adventure
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 130a
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
        Vengeance and disaster
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
            Page 162
    Book III. Disaster
        Page 163
        Page 164
        A tale of woe
            Page 165
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
            Page 175
            Page 176
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
            Page 184
        Escape
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 186a
            Page 187
            Page 188
            Page 189
            Page 190
            Page 191
            Page 192
            Page 193
            Page 194
            Page 195
            Page 196
            Page 197
            Page 198
            Page 199
            Page 200
            Page 201
            Page 202
        Albany
            Page 203
            Page 204
            Page 205
            Page 206
            Page 207
            Page 208
            Page 209
            Page 210
            Page 211
            Page 212
            Page 213
            Page 214
            Page 215
            Page 216
            Page 217
            Page 218
            Page 219
            Page 220
            Page 221
        Ticonderoga
            Page 222
            Page 223
            Page 224
            Page 225
            Page 226
            Page 227
            Page 228
            Page 229
            Page 230
            Page 231
            Page 232
            Page 233
            Page 234
            Page 235
            Page 236
            Page 237
            Page 238
            Page 239
            Page 240
    Book IV. Wolfe
        Page 241
        Page 242
        A soldier at home
            Page 243
            Page 244
            Page 245
            Page 246
            Page 247
            Page 248
            Page 249
            Page 250
            Page 251
            Page 252
            Page 253
            Page 254
            Page 255
            Page 256
            Page 257
            Page 258
            Page 259
            Page 260
        Louisbourg
            Page 261
            Page 262
            Page 263
            Page 264
            Page 265
            Page 266
            Page 266a
            Page 267
            Page 268
            Page 269
            Page 270
            Page 271
            Page 272
            Page 273
            Page 274
            Page 275
            Page 276
            Page 277
            Page 278
            Page 279
        Victory
            Page 280
            Page 281
            Page 282
            Page 283
            Page 284
            Page 285
            Page 286
            Page 287
            Page 288
            Page 289
            Page 290
            Page 291
            Page 292
            Page 293
            Page 294
            Page 295
            Page 296
            Page 297
            Page 298
        The fruits of victory
            Page 299
            Page 300
            Page 301
            Page 302
            Page 303
            Page 304
            Page 305
            Page 306
            Page 307
            Page 308
            Page 309
            Page 310
            Page 311
            Page 312
            Page 313
            Page 314
            Page 315
            Page 316
    Book V. Within Quebec
        Page 317
        Page 318
        The impregnable city
            Page 319
            Page 320
            Page 321
            Page 322
            Page 323
            Page 324
            Page 325
            Page 326
            Page 327
            Page 328
            Page 329
            Page 330
            Page 331
            Page 332
            Page 333
            Page 334
            Page 335
            Page 336
            Page 337
        The defences of Quebec
            Page 338
            Page 339
            Page 340
            Page 341
            Page 342
            Page 343
            Page 344
            Page 345
            Page 346
            Page 347
            Page 348
            Page 349
            Page 350
            Page 351
            Page 352
            Page 353
            Page 354
            Page 355
        Mariners of the deep
            Page 356
            Page 357
            Page 358
            Page 359
            Page 360
            Page 361
            Page 362
            Page 363
            Page 364
            Page 365
            Page 366
            Page 367
            Page 368
            Page 369
            Page 370
            Page 371
            Page 372
            Page 373
            Page 374
            Page 375
        Hostilities
            Page 376
            Page 377
            Page 378
            Page 379
            Page 380
            Page 381
            Page 382
            Page 383
            Page 384
            Page 385
            Page 386
            Page 387
            Page 388
            Page 389
            Page 390
            Page 391
            Page 392
    Book VI. Without Quebec
        Page 393
        Page 394
        In sight of his goal
            Page 395
            Page 396
            Page 397
            Page 398
            Page 399
            Page 400
            Page 401
            Page 402
            Page 403
            Page 404
            Page 405
            Page 406
            Page 407
            Page 408
            Page 409
            Page 410
        Days of waiting
            Page 411
            Page 412
            Page 413
            Page 414
            Page 415
            Page 416
            Page 417
            Page 418
            Page 419
            Page 420
            Page 421
            Page 422
            Page 423
            Page 424
            Page 425
            Page 426
        A daring design
            Page 427
            Page 428
            Page 429
            Page 430
            Page 431
            Page 432
            Page 433
            Page 434
            Page 435
            Page 436
            Page 437
            Page 438
            Page 439
            Page 440
            Page 441
            Page 442
        In the hour of victory
            Page 443
            Page 444
            Page 445
            Page 446
            Page 447
            Page 448
            Page 449
            Page 450
            Page 451
            Page 452
            Page 453
            Page 454
            Page 455
            Page 456
            Page 457
            Page 458
    Book VII. English victors
        Page 459
        Page 460
        A panic-stricken city
            Page 461
            Page 462
            Page 463
            Page 464
            Page 465
            Page 466
            Page 467
            Page 468
            Page 469
            Page 470
            Page 471
            Page 472
            Page 473
            Page 474
            Page 475
        Surrender
            Page 476
            Page 477
            Page 478
            Page 479
            Page 480
            Page 481
            Page 482
            Page 483
            Page 484
            Page 485
            Page 486
            Page 487
            Page 488
            Page 489
            Page 490
            Page 491
        Friendly foes
            Page 492
            Page 493
            Page 494
            Page 495
            Page 496
            Page 497
            Page 498
            Page 499
            Page 500
            Page 501
            Page 502
            Page 503
            Page 504
            Page 505
            Page 506
            Page 507
        The last
            Page 508
            Page 509
            Page 510
            Page 511
            Page 512
            Page 513
            Page 514
            Page 515
            Page 516
            Page 517
            Page 518
            Page 519
    Back Matter
        Back Matter
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text























































































IV,




















FRENCH AND ENGLISH.

















HISTORICAL TALES

BY


2E. 3Everett=mreen.



In handsome crown RSo volumes, cloth extra, gilt top. Price 5s. each.



A CLERK OF OXFORD, and His Adventures in the Barons' War.
THE YOUNG PIONEERS; or, With La Salle on the Mississippi.
IN TAUNTON TOWN. A Story of the Rebellion of James, Duke of Monmouth, in r685.
SHUT IN. A Tale of the Wonderful Siege of Antwerp in the Year 1585.
THE LOST TREASURE OF TREVLYN. A Story of the Days of the Gunpowder Plot.
IN THE DAYS OF CHIVALRY. A Tale of the Times of the Black Prince.

LOYAL HEARTS AND TRUE. A Story ofthe Days of" Good Queen Bess."
THE CHURCH AND THE KING. A Tale of England in the Days of Henry VIII.



It post Svo volumes, cloth extra. Price 3s. 6d. cach.
TOM TUFTON'S TRAVELS.
TOM TUFTON'S TOLL.
DOMINIQUE'S VENGEANCE. A Story of France and Florida.
THE SIGN OF THE RED CROSS. A Tale of Old London.
MAUD MELVILLE'S MARRIAGE. A Tale of the Seventeenth Century



PI post So volumes, cloth ertra. Price as. 6d each.
EVIL MAY-DAY. A Story of r157.
IN THE WARS OF THE ROSES. A Story for the Young.

THE LORD OF DYNEVOR. A Tale of the Times of Edward I
THE SECRET CHAMBER AT CHAD. A Tale.



Published by
T NELSON AND SONS, London, Edinburgh, and New York.




















































-I:~s J
A I;l .
~p5,


"'Dragging the wounded with them, at risk of their own lives."


Page 424


Aw





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. yfe/lson an/ (Jos









French and


English


A Story of the Struggle in America





By

E. EVERETT-GREEN
Autlor: of "A Clerk of Oxford," The Young Pioneers," "Shut In,"
Dominiue's Vengeance," Tke Sign of the Red Cross,"
dr'c. &c.














T. NELSON AND. SONS
London, Edinburgh, and New York
18PP





















CONTENTS.





Book 11
BORDER WARFARE.
A WESTERN SETTLER,
FRIENDS IN NEED,
PHILADELPHIA, ....
AN EXCITING STRUGGLE, .... ..



JBook EE.
ROGERS'S RANGERS.
A DAY OF VENGEANCE,
ROBERT ROGERS, ....
THE LIFE OF ADVENTURE,
VENGEANCE AND DISASTER,


JBoo EJTE,1

DISA STER.


A TALE OF WOE,
ESCAPE,
ALBANY,
TICONDEROGA, ..









CONTENTS.


6Sook Ei.

WOLFE.

A SOLDIER AT HOME,
LOUISBOURG,
VICTORY, ....
THE FRUITS OF VICTORY,


Book V.

WITHIN QUEBEC.

THE IMPREGNABLE CITY,....
THE DEFENCES OF QUEBEC,
MARINERS OF THE DEEP,
HOSTILITIES,...


lBook YE.

WITHOUT QUEBEC.

IN SIGHT OF HIS GOAL, ....
DAYS OF WAITING, ....
A DARING DESIGN,
IN THE HOUR OF VICTORY,


00ook vEE.

ENGLISH VICTORS.
A PANIC-STRICKEN CITY, ....
SURRENDER,...
FRIENDLY FOES, ....
THE LAST, .... ...






















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

BY

T~laI Ibaget.




"DRAGGING THE WOUNDED WITH THEM, AT RISK OF THEIR
OWN LIVES," .... .. .... .... rontispiece.

"HE FELL FACE DOWNWARDS UPON THE GROUND," .... 16

IMAP SHOWING THE SCENE OF THE WAR BETWEEN FRENCH
AND ENGLISH, .... .... .... .. .... 85

"THE CHIEF BOUNDED INTO TIE AIR, AND FELL BACK
HELPLESS," .... ... ....... 103

" 'YOU ARE ROGERS'S RANGERS !" .... .... .... 131

" THEY SPRANG UPON THE PAINTED SAVAGES, AND KILLED
EVERY ONE, .... ... .... .... 186

"THEY DASHED UP THE SLOPE TOWARDS THE BATTERY," .... 266























MSook 1.



BORDER WARFARE.















FRENCH AND ENGLISH.




CHAPTER I.

A WESTERN SETTLER.

H UMPHREY ANGELL came swinging along through
the silent aisles of the vast primeval forest, his
gun in the hollow of his arm, a heavy bag of venison meat
hanging from his shoulders.
A strange, wild figure, in the midst of a strange, wild
scene: his clothes, originally of some homespun cloth, now
patched so freely with dressed deerskin as to leave little
of the original material; moccasins on his feet, a beaver
cap upon his head; his leather belt stuck round with
hunting-knives, and the pistol to be used at close quarters
should any emergency arise.
He was a stalwart fellow, as these sons of the forest had
need to be-standing over six feet, and with a muscular
development to match his stately height. His tawny hair
had been darkened by exposure to hot suns, and his hand-
some face was deeply imbrowned from the influences of
weather in all seasons. His blue eyes had that direct yet







A WESTERN SETTLER.


far-away look which comes to men who live face to face
with nature, and learn to know her in all her moods, and
to study her caprices in the earning of their daily bread.
Humphrey Angell was not more than twenty years of
age, and he had lived ten years in the forest. He had come
there as a child with his father, who had emigrated in his
young life from England to the settlement of Pennsylvania,
and had afterwards become one of the scattered settlers
on the debatable ground between the French and English
borders, establishing himself in the heart of the boundless
forest, and setting to work with the utmost zeal and indus-
try to gather round himself a little farmstead where he
could pass his own later years in peace, and leave it for
an inheritance to his two sons.
Humphrey could remember Pennsylvania a little, al-
though the life in the small democratic township seemed
now like a dream to him. All his interests centred in the
free forest, where he had grown to manhood. Now and
again a longing would come upon him to see something of
the great, tumultuous, seething world of whose existence he
was dimly aware. There were times in the long winter
evenings when he and his brother, the old father, and the
brother's wife would sit round the stove after the chil-
dren had been put to bed, talking of the past and the
future. Then old Angell would tell his sons of the life
he had once led in far-away England, before the spirit of
adventure drove him forth to seek his fortune in the
New World; and at such times Humphrey would listen
with eager attention, feeling the stirring of a like spirit







A WESTERN SETTLER.


within him, and wondering whether the vast walls of the
giant forest would for ever shut him in, or whether it
would be his lot some day to cross the heaving, mysteri-
ous, ever-moving ocean of which his father often spoke,
and visit the country of which he was still proud to call
himself a son.
Yet he loved his forest home and the free, wild life he
led. Nor was the element of peril lacking to the daily lot
--peril which had not found them yet, but which might
spring upon them unawares at any moment. For after
years of peace and apparent good-will on the part of the
Indians of the Five Nations, as this tract of debatable land
had come to be called, a spirit of ill-will and ferocity was
arising again; and settlers who had for years lived in peace
and quietness in their lonely homes had been swooped
down upon, scalped, their houses burnt, their wives and
children tomahawked-the raid being so swift and sudden
that defence and resistance had alike been futile.
What gave an added horror to this sudden change of
policy on the part of the Indians was the growing convic-
tion throughout the settlement that it was due to the
agency of white men.
France, not content with the undisputed possession of
Canada, and of vast tracts of territory in the west and
south which she had no means of populating, was bitterly
jealous of the English colony in the east, and, above all, of
any attempts which it might make to extend its western
border.
Fighting there had been already. Humphrey had







A WESTERN SETTLER.


heard rumours of disasters to the English arms farther
away to the south. He had heard of Braddock's army
having been cut to pieces in its attempt to reach and
capture the French Fort Duquesne, and a vague uneasiness
was penetrating to these scattered settlers, who had hitherto
lived in quietness and peace.
Perhaps had they known more of the spirit of parties
beyond their limited horizon, they would have been more
uneasy still. But habit is an enormous power in a man's
life. Humphrey had gone forth into the forest to kill
meat for the family larder three or four days in the week,
in all seasons when the farm work was not specially
pressing. He came back day by day to the low-browed
log-house, with its patches of Indian corn and other crops,
its pleasant sounds of life, the welcome from the children,
the approval of father and brother if the day had been
successful, and the smiles of the housewife when he dis-
played the contents of his bag. It was almost impossible
to remember from day to day that peril from the silent,
mysterious forest threatened them. They had lived there
for ten years unmolested and at peace; who would care to
molest them now ?
And yet Humphrey, who knew the forest so well-its
mysterious, interminable depths, its trackless, boundless
extent, rolling over hill and valley in endless billows-he
knew well how silently, how suddenly an ambushed foe
might approach, spring out from the thick, tangled shelter
to do some murderous deed, and in the maze of giant timber
be at once swallowed up beyond all danger of pursuit.







A WESTERN SETTLER.


In the open plains the Indian raids were terrible
enough, but the horrors of uncertainty and ignorance which
enveloped the settlers in the forests might well cause the
stoutest heart to quail when once it became known that
the Indians had become their enemies, and that there was
another enemy stirring up the strife, and bribing the fierce
and greedy savages to carry desolation and death into the
settlements of the English colonists.
Whispers-rumours-had just begun to penetrate into
these leafy solitudes; but communication with the outside
world was so rare that the Angell family, who had long
been self-supporting, and able to live without the products
of the mother colony away to the east, had scarcely
realized the change that was creeping over the country.
The old man had never seen anything of Indian warfare,
and his sons had had little more experience. They had
been peaceful denizens of the woods, and bore arms for
purposes of the chase rather than for self-preservation from
human foes, as did the bulk of those dwellers in the woods
that fringed the western border of the English-speaking
colony.
"We have no enemies; why should we fear ?" asked
Charles, the elder brother, a man of placable temperament,
a fine worker with the axe or plough, a man of indomi-
table industry, endurance, and patience, but one who had
never shown any desire after adventure or the chances of
warfare. He was ten years older than Humphrey; and
the brothers had two sisters now married and settled in
the colony. The younger brother sometimes talked of







A WESTERN SETTLER.


visiting the sisters, and bringing back news of them to the
father at home; but Charles never desired to leave the
homestead. He was a singularly affectionate husband and
father, and had been an excellent son to the fine old man,
who now had his time of ease by the hearth in the winter
weather, though during a great part of the year he toiled
in the fields with a right good will, and with much of his
old fire and energy.
Humphrey was nearing home now, and started whistling
a favourite air which generally heralded his approach, and
brought the children tumbling out to meet him in a rush of
merry welcome. But there was no answering hubbub to be
heard from the direction of the house, no patter of little
feet, no lowing of kine. Humphrey stopped suddenly
short in his whistling, and bent his ear forward as though
to listen. A faint, muffled, strangled cry seemed to be
borne to his ears. Under his bronze his face suddenly
grew white. He flung the heavy bag from off his back,
and grasping his gun more firmly in his hands, he rushed
through the narrow pathway, and came out upon the clear-
ing around the little farmstead.
In the morning he had left it, smiling in the autumn
sunshine, a peaceful, prosperous-looking place, homely,
quaint, and bright. Now his eyes rested upon a heap of
smoking ruins, trampled crops, empty sheds; and upon a
still more horrible sight-the remains of mangled corpses
tied to the group of trees which sheltered the porch. It
was enough to curdle the blood of the stoutest hearted,
and freeze with horror the bravest warrior.







A WESTERN SETTLER.


Humphrey was no warrior, but a strong-limbed, tender-
hearted youth; and as he looked at the awful scene before
him, a blood-red mist seemed to swim before his eyes. He
gasped, and clutched at the nearest tree-trunk for support.
Surely, surely it was some fever-dream which had come
upon, him. It could not, it should not be a terrible
reality !
"Humphrey, Humphrey help, help !"
It was the strangled, muffled cry again. The sound
woke the young man from his trance of horror and amaze-
ment. He uttered a hoarse cry, which he scarcely knew
for his own, and dashed blindly onwards.
"Here, here! This way. By the barn! Quick!"
No need to hasten Humphrey's flying feet. He rushed
through the trampled fields. He gained the clearing about
the house and its buildings. He reached the spot indicated,
and saw a sight he would never forget.
His brother Charles was tightly, cruelly bound to the
stump of a tree which had been often used for tethering
animals at milking-time just outside the barn. His clothes
were half torn from off his back, and several gaping, bleed-
ing wounds told of the fight which had ended in his
capture. Most significant of all was the long semicircular
red line round the brow, where the scalping-knife had
plainly passed.
Humphrey's stout knife was cutting through the cruel
cords, even while his horrified eyes were taking in these
details.
When his brother was released, he seemed to collapse for







A WESTERN SETTLER.


a moment, and fell face downwards upon the ground, a
quiver running through all his limbs, such as Humphrey
had seen many a time in some wild creature stricken with
its death-wound.
He uttered a sharp cry of terror and anguish, and avert-
ing his eyes from the awful sights'with which the place
abounded, he dashed to the well, and bringing back a
supply of pure cold water, flung it over his brother's pros-
trate form, laving his face and hands, and holding a small
vessel to his parched and swollen lips so that the draught
could trickle into his mouth.
There was an effort to swallow, a quiver and a struggle,
and the wounded man opened his eyes and sat up.
"Where am I-what is it?" he gasped, draining the
cup again and again, like one who has been near to perish
with thirst. 0 Humphrey, I have had such an awful
dream!"
Humphrey had so placed his brother that he should not
see on opening his eyes that ghastly sight which turned
the younger man sick with horror each time his eyes
wandered that way.
Charles saw the familiar outline of the forest, and his
brother's face bending over him. He had for a moment
a vague impression of something unspeakably awful and
horrible, but at that moment he believed that some mis-
chance had befallen himself alone, and that he had im-
agined some black, nameless horror in a fevered dream.
A shiver ran through Humphrey's frame. His blue eyes
were dazed and dilated. What answer could he make ? He
(965)










































































"LHe feliface downqlQ(rds upon the ground."


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Page 16.







A WESTERN SETTLER.


busied himself with dressing the wounds upon his brother's
chest and shoulders, from which the blood still oozed
slowly.
"What is it ?" asked Charles once again; how did I
come to be hurt ?"
Humphrey made no reply, but a groan burst unawares
from his lips. The sound seemed to startle Charles from
his momentary calm. He suddenly put up his hand to his
brow, felt the smart of the significant red line left by the
scalping-knife, and the next moment he had sprung to his
feet with a sharp, low cry of unspeakable anguish.
He faced round then--and looked!
Humphrey stood beside him shoulder to shoulder, with
his arm about his brother, lest physical weakness should
again overpower him. But Charles seemed like one turned
to stone.
For perhaps three long minutes he stood thus-speech-
less, motionless; then a wild cry burst from his lips, ac-
companied by a torrent of the wildest, fiercest invective
-appeals to Heaven for vengeance, threats of undying
hatred, undying hostility to those savage murderers whose
raid had made this fair spot into a desolation so awful.
Humphrey stood still and silent the while, like one spell-
bound. He scarcely knew his brother in this moment of
passionate despair and fury. Charles had been a silent,
placable man all his life through. Born and bred in the
Quaker settlement, till he had taken to the life of the
forest he had been a man of quiet industry and toil rather
than a fighter or a talker. A peaceful creed had been his,
(965) 2







A WESTERN SETTLER.


and he had perhaps never before raised a hand in anger
against a fellow-creature.
This made the sudden wild and passionate outburst the
more strange and awful to Humphrey. It was almost as
though Charles was no longer the brother he had known
all these years, but had been transformed into a different
being by the swift and fearful calamity which had swept
down upon them during these past few hours.
"I will avenge-I swear it! As they have done, so
shall it be done unto them. Eye for eye, tooth for tooth,
life for life-is not that written in the Scriptures'? The
avenger of blood shall follow and overtake. His hand shall
.not spare, neither his eye pity. The evil-doer shall be
rooted out of the land. His place shall be no more found.
Even as they have done, so shall it be done unto them."
He stopped, and suddenly raised his clasped hands to
heaven. A torrent of words broke from his lips.
0 God, Thou hast seen, Thine eyes have beheld. If
it had been an open enemy that had done this thing, then
could I perchance have borne it. If it had been the un-
tutored savage, in his ignorant ferocity, then would I have
.left Thee, O Lord, to deal with him-to avenge! But the
white brother has risen up against his own flesh and blood.
The white man has stood by to see. He has hounded on
the savages He has disgraced his humanity 0 Lord
God, give him into my hands! let me avenge me of mine
adversary. Let the ignorant Indian escape if Thou wilt,
but grant unto me to slay and slay and slay amid the ranks
of the white man, who has sold his soul for gain, and has







A WESTERN SETTLER.


become more treacherous and cruel than the -Indian ally
whose aid he has invoked. Judge Thou betwixt us,
0 Lord; look upon this scene! Strengthen Thou mine
arm to the battle, for here I vow that I will henceforth
give my life to this work. I will till the fields no more.
I will beat my pruning-hook into a sword. I will slay,
and spare not; and Thou, O God of battles, shalt be with
me. Thou shalt strengthen mine arm; Thou shalt give
unto me the victory. Thou shalt deliver mine enemy into
mine hand. I know it, I see it! For Thou art God, and
I am Thy servant, and I will avenge upon him who has
defied Thee this hideous crime upon which Thine eyes have
looked !"
Humphrey stood by silent and awed. An answering
thrill was in his own heart. He had averted his eyes from
the ghastly spectacle of those charred and mangled corpses;
but they turned upon them once more at this moment, and
he could not marvel at his brother's words. He, too, had
been trained to peaceable thoughts and ways. He had
hoped that there would soon be an end of these rumours of
wars. His immediate forefathers had been men of peace,
and he had never known the craving after the excitement
of battle. Yet as his brother spoke there came upon him
a new feeling. He felt his arm tingling; he felt the hot
blood surging through his veins. He was conscious that
were an enemy to show face at that moment between
the trees of the forest, he would be ready to spring upon
him like a wild beast, and rend him limb from limb with-
out pity and without remorse.







A WESTERN SETTLER.


But the Indians had made off as silently and as swiftly
as they appeared. Not a vestige of the band remained
behind. And there was work for the brothers at that
moment of a different sort, and work which left its last-
ing mark upon the memory and even upon the nature of
Humphrey Angell.
Together the brothers dug a deep grave. Reverently
they deposited in it all that was left of the mortal remains
of those whom they had loved so tenderly and well: the
kindly house mother, to whose industry and thrift so much
of their comfort had been due; the little, innocent, prat-
tling children and brave little lads, who were already
learning to be useful to father and mother. None of
them spared-no pity shown to sex or age. All ruth-
lessly murdered; husband and father forced to watch the
horrid spectacle, himself a helpless prisoner, waiting for
his doom.
Humphrey had not hitherto dared to ask the question
which had been exercising him all the while-how it was
that his brother's life had been spared. He also wanted
to know where the old man their father was; for the
corpses they had laid in the grave were those of Charles's
wife and children.
Charles noted his questioning glance around when the
grave had received its victims, and he pointed to the smok-
ing ruins of the house.
"He lies there. They bound him in his chair. They
tied the babe down in his cradle. They set fire to the
house. Heaven send that the reek choked them before







A WESTERN SETTLER.


the fire touched them! They lie yonder beneath the
funeral pyre-our venerable sire and my bonny, laugh-
ing babe !"
He stopped short, choked by a sudden rush of tears;
and Humphrey, flinging down his spade, threw himself
along the ground in a paroxysm of unspeakable anguish,
choking sobs breaking from him, the unaccustomed tears
raining down his cheeks.
The brothers wept together. Perhaps those tears saved
Charles from some severe fever of the brain. He wept
till he was perfectly exhausted, and at last his condition
of prostration so far aroused Humphrey that he was
forced into action.
He half lifted, half dragged his brother into one of the
empty barns, where he laid him down upon some straw.
He rolled up his own coat for a pillow, and after hastily
finishing the filling in of the grave, he went back into
the forest for his game-bag, and having kindled a fire,
cooked some of the meat, and forced his brother to eat
and drink. It was growing dark by that time, and the
blackness of the forest seemed to be swallowing them up.
A faint red glow still came from the direction of the
burning homestead, where the fire still smouldered amid
the smoking ruins. Humphrey closed the door of the
barn, to shut out the sight and also the chill freshness of
the autumn night.
SHe lay down upon the straw beside his brother, worn
out in body and mind. But there could be no thought
of sleep for either man that night; the horror was too


\







A WESTERN SETTLER.


pressing and ever-present, and anguish lay like, a physical
load upon their hearts.
The silence was full of horror for both; in self-defence
Humphrey began to speak.
"When was it, Charles? I was in the forest all day,
and I saw and heard nothing. The silence was never
broken save by the accustomed sounds of the wild crea-
tures of the wood. No war-party came my way. When
was it ?"
"At the noon-tide meal. We had all gathered within
doors. There was none to give warning of danger.
Suddenly and silently as ghosts they must have filed
from out the forest. We were already surrounded and
helpless before the first wild war-whoop broke upon our
ears!"
Charles put up his hands as though to shut out that
awful yell, the echoes of which rang so long in the ears
of those who had heard it. Humphrey shivered, and his
hands clinched themselves nervously together.
"Why was I not here to fight and to die ?"
"Better to live-and to avenge their blood !" answered
Charles, with a gleam lighting his sunken eyes. He was
silent awhile, and then went on with his narrative.
"It was not a fight; it was only a slaughter! The
children rushed screaming from the house, escaping the
first rush of the painted savages when they burst in upon
us. But there were others outside, who hacked and
slashed them as they passed. I had only my hunting-
knife in my belt. I stood before Ellen, and I fought







A WESTERN SETTLER.


like ten demons! God is witness that I did all that one
man could. But what avail against scores of such foes ?
Three corpses were heaped at my threshold. I saw them
carrying away many others dead or wounded. Our
father fought too; and Ellen backed into the corner
where the gun stood, and with her own hands she shot
down two of the savages. Would to heaven she had
shot at the white'one, who was tenfold more of a fiend!
But he shall not escape-he shall not escape! I shall
know his face when I see it next. And I will not go
down to the grave till he and I have stood face to face
once more, when I am not bound and helpless, but a
free man with weapons in my hand. That day will
come; I read it in the book of fate. The Lord God,
unto whom vengeance belongeth, He will cause it to come
to pass!"
Humphrey was afraid of these wild outbursts, as likely
to bring on fever; and yet he could not but desire to
know more.
A white man? Nay, brother; that is scarce to be
believed. A white man to league himself to such deeds as
these!"
"Ay, a white man--a Frenchman. For I called upon
him in our tongue, and he answered me in the same, but
with that halting accent which I know belongs to the sons
of France. Moreover, he made no secret of it. He called
us dogs of English, who were robbers of the soil where
none had right to penetrate save the subjects of his royal
master. He swore that they would make an end of us,







A WESTERN SETTLER.


root and branch; and he laughed when he saw the Indians
cutting down the little ones, and covering their tender
bodies with cruel wounds; nor had he any pity upon the
one white woman; and when I raved upon him and
cursed him, he laughed back, and said he had no power
to allay the fury of the savages. Those who would
preserve themselves safe should retire within the bounds
of the colony to which they belong. France would have
an end of encroachment, and the Indians were her friends,
and would help her to drive out the common foe !"
Humphrey set his teeth and clinched his hands. The
old instinctive hatred of centuries between French and
English, never really dead, now leaped into life in his breast.
He had heard plenty of talk during his boyhood of France's
boundless pretensions with regard to the great New World
of the West, and how she sought, by the simple process of
declaring territory to be hers, to extend her power over
millions of miles of the untrodden plains and forests,
which she could never hope to populate. He had laughed
with others at these claims, and had thought little enough
of them when with father and brother he set out for the
western frontier. There was then peace between the
nations. Nor had it entered into the calculations of the
settlers that their white brethren would stir up the
friendly Indians against them, .and bring havoc and de-
struction to their scattered dwellings. That was a method
of warfare undreamed of a few years back; but it was
now becoming a terrible reality.
But your life was spared ?" said Humphrey at last;







A WESTERN SETTLER.


"and yet the scalping-knife came very close to doing its
horrid work."
"Yes: they spared me-he spared me-when he had
made me suffer what was tenfold worse than death; yet
I wot well he only thought to leave me to a lingering
death of anguish, more terrible than that of the scalping-
knife! They knew not that I had any to come to my
succour. When he drew off the howling Indians and
left me bound to the stump, he thought he left me to
perish of starvation and burning thirst. It was no mercy
that he showed me-rather a refinement of cruelty. I
begged him to make an end of my wretched life; but he
smiled, and bid me a mocking farewell. Great God of
heaven and earth, look down and avenge me of mine
adversary! I trust there are not many such fiends in
human shape even in the ranks of the jealous and all-
grasping French. But if there be, may it be mine to
carry death and desolation into their ranks! May they
be driven forth from this fair land which they have helped
to desolate! May death and destruction come swiftly
upon them; and when they fall, let them rise up no more "
"Amen!" said Humphrey solemnly; and the brothers
sat in silence for a great while, the gloom hiding them the
one from the other, though they knew that their hearts
were beating in sympathy.
The war has broken out," said Humphrey at last.
" We can perchance find our place in the ranks of those
who go to drive out the oppressive race, whose claims are
such as English subjects will not tolerate."







A WESTERN SETTLER.


"Ay, there will be fighting, fighting, fighting now till
they are driven forth, and till England's flag waves proudly
over this great land i" cried Charles, with a strange con-
fidence and exultation in his tones. "England will fight,
and I will fight with her. I will slay and slay, and spare
not; and I will tell this tale to all wherever I go. I will
hunt out mine enemy until I compass his death. They
have despoiled me of home, of wife, of children. They have
taken away all the joy of life. The light of my eyes is
gone. Henceforth I have but one thing to live for. I
bare my sword against France. Against her will I fight
until the Lord gives us the victory. The world shall know,
and all ears shall tingle at the tale which I will tell. There
shall be no quarter, no pity for those who use such means
as those which have left me what I am to-night !"
Humphrey could not marvel at the intensity of the
ferocity in Charles's tones. It sounded strange in one of
so gentle and placable a nature; but he had cause-he
had cause!
"Think you that the man was other than one of those
wild fellows who run from all law and order in the town-
ships and become denizens of the wood, and little better
than the wild Indians themselves? We have heard of
these coureurs de bois, as they are called. There are laws
passed against them, severe and restrictive, by their own
people. Perchance it were scarce just to the French to
credit them with all that this man has done."
"Peace, Humphrey," was the stern reply. We know
that the French are inciting the Indians against our peace-







A WESTERN SETTLER. 27

ful settlers, and that what has happened here to-day is
happening in other places along our scattered frontier.
The work is the work of France, and against France will
I fight till she is overthrown. I have sworn it. Seek
not to turn me from my purpose. I will fight, and fight,
and fight till I see her lying in the dust, and till I have
met mine enemy face to face and have set my foot upon his
neck. God has heard my vow; He will fight for me till
it be fulfilled."

















CHAPTER II.


FRIENDS IN NEED.

IT was not to be surprised at that, after that terrible
day and night, Charles should awake from the rest-
less sleep into which he had dropped towards dawn in a
state of high fever.
He lay raving in delirium for three days, whilst
Humphrey sat beside him, putting water to his parched
lips, striving to soothe and quiet him; often shuddering
with horror as he seemed to see again with his brother's
eyes those horrid scenes upon which the fevered man's
fancy ever dwelt; waking sometimes at night in a sweat
of terror, thinking he heard the Indian war-whoop echoing
through the forest.
Those were terrible days for Humphrey-days of a
loneliness that was beyond anything he had experienced
before. His brother was near him in the flesh, but
severed from him by a whole world of fevered imaginings.
Sometimes Humphrey found it in his heart to wish that the
Indians would come back and make a final end of them
both. All hope and zest and joy in life seemed to have
been taken from him at one blow. He could neither think







FRIENDS IN NEED.


of the happy past without pangs of pain, nor yet face a
future which seemed barren of hope and promise.
He could only sit beside his brother, tend him, nurse
him, pray for him. But the words of prayer too often
died away upon his lips. Had they not all prayed together,
after the godly habit of the household, upon the very
morning when this awful disaster fell upon them ? Were
these vast solitudes too far away for God to hear the
prayers that went up from them ?
Humphrey had never known what awful loneliness could
engulf the human spirit till he sat beside the fevered man
in the vast solitude of the primeval forest, asking in his
heart whether God Himself had not forsaken them.
It was the hour of sundown, and Humphrey had gone
outside for a breath of fresh air. He looked ten years
older than he had done a few days back, when he had
come whistling through the forest track, expecting to see
the children bounding forth to meet him. His eyes were
sunken, his face was pale and haggard, his dress was
unkempt and ragged. There were no clever fingers now
to patch tattered raiment, and keep things neat and trim.
There was an unwonted sound in the forest! It was dis-
tant still. To some ears it would have been inaudible;
but Humphrey heard it, and his heart suddenly beat
faster.
The sound was that of approaching steps-the steps
of men. A few minutes more and he heard the sound
of voices too. He had been about to dash into the shed
for his gun, but the fresh sounds arrested his movement.







FRIENDS IN NEED.


He had ears as sharp as those of an ambushed Indian,
and he detected in a moment that the men who were
approaching the clearing were of his own nationality. The"
words he could not hear, but he could distinguish the
intonation. It was not the rapid, thin-sounding French
tongue; it was English-he was certain of it! And a
light leaped to his eyes at the bare thought of meeting a
brother countryman in this desolate place.
Probably it was some other settler, one of that hardy
race that fringed the colony on its western frontier. Miles
and miles of rolling forest lay between these scattered
holdings, and since war was but lately begun, nothing had
been done for the protection of the hapless people now
becoming an easy prey of the Indians stirred up to molest
them.
Humphrey knew none of their neighbours. Forest
travelling was too difficult and dangerous to tempt the
settler far away from his own holding. If it were one of
these coming now, most likely he too had suffered from
attack or fear of attack, and was seeking a friend in the
nearest locality.
He stood like one spell-bound, watching and waiting.
The sound of steps drew nearer to the fringe of obscuring
forest trees; the sound of voices became plainer and
more plain. In another minute Humphrey saw them-
two bronzed and stalwart men-advancing from the wood
into the clearing. They came upon it unawares, as was
plain from their sudden pause. But they were white men;
they were brothers in this wild land. There was some-







FRIENDS IN NEED.


thing like a sob in Humphrey's throat, which he hastily
swallowed down, as he advanced with great strides to
Ineet them.
"You are welcome," he said. "I had thought the
Indians had left no living beings behind them in all this
forest save my brother and myself."
No introductions were needed in this savage place;
the face of every white man lit up at sight of a like
countenance, and at the sound of the familiar tongue.
The men shook hands with a hearty grip, and one said to
Humphrey,-
"You have had Indians here ? "
Humphrey made an expressive gesture with his hand.
"This was a week ago as fair a holding as heart of man
could wish to see in this grim forest. You see what is
left to-day "
"Your house is burnt down, as we plainly see. Have
you lost aught beside ? Has human blood been spilt ?"
"The corpse of my venerable father, and that of a bold
baby boy, lie beneath yon heap of ruins which made their
funeral pyre. In yonder grave lie the mingled corpses of
my brother's wife and four fair children, hacked to death
and half burnt by the savages. And yet this work is not
the work of savages alone. With them we have dwelt at
peace these many years. The shame, the horror, the dis-
grace of it is that we owe these horrors to the white sons
of France, who hound on the savages to make these
raids, and stand by to see them do their bloody work!"
The two strangers exchanged glances-meaning glances







FRIENDS IN NEED.


-and one of them laid a hand upon Humphrey's shoulder,
looking earnestly into his eyes the while.
"Is it so in very truth? So have we heard in
whispers, but it was a thing we could scarce believe. We
have travelled far from the lands of the south to join our
brethren of the English race. We heard rumours of wars
cruel and bloody. Yet it seemed to us too strange a
thing to believe that here, amid the hostile, savage Indians,
white man could wage war with white man, and take the
bloody heathen man as his ally, instead of the brother
who bears the name of Christ!"
Humphrey looked with some wonder and fascination
into the face of the youth who spoke. It was a refined
and beautiful face, notwithstanding the evidences of long
exposure to sun and wind. The features were finely cut,
sensitive and expressive, and the eyes were very luminous
in their glance, and possessed strangely penetrating powers.
In stature the young man was almost as tall as Humphrey,
but of a much slighter build; yet he was wiry and
muscular, as could well be seen, and plainly well used to
the life of the wild woodlands. His dress was that of the
backwoods, dressed deerskin being the chief material
used. Both travellers wore moccasins on their feet, and
carried the usual weapons of offence and defence.
Yet Humphrey felt as though this man was in some
sort different from those he had met in the woods at rare
times when out hunting. His voice, his words, his
phraseology seemed in some sort strange, and he asked
him wonderingly,-







FRIENDS IN NEED.


From whence are you, friends ?"
"From the land of the far south-from the rolling
plains. of the giant Mississippi, that vast river of which
perchance you have heard ?"
"Ay, verily," answered Humphrey, with a touch of
bitterness in his tone. I have heard of that great river,
which the French King claims to have discovered, and
which they say he will guard with a chain of forts
right away from Canada, and will thus command all the
New World of the West, pinning us English within the
limits of that portion of land lying betwixt the ocean and
the range of the Alleghany Mountains," and Humphrey
waved his hand in that direction, and looked questioningly
at the men before him. He had an impression that all
who came from the far south, from the colony of Louisiana,
as he had heard it called, must be in some sort French
subjects. And yet these men spoke his own tongue, and
seemed to be friends and brothers.
"That was the chimera of the French Monarch more
than a century ago. Methinks it is little nearer its ac-
complishment now than when our forefathers, acting as
pioneers, made a small settlement in a green valley near to
the mouth of the giant river, waiting for the King to send
his priests and missionaries to convert the heathen from
their evil ways; and found a fair Christian realm in that
fair land."
"Then were your forefathers French subjects ?" asked
Humphrey, rather bewildered. "If so, how come you to
speak mine own tongue as you do ?"
(95) 3







FRIENDS IN NEED.


"I come of no French stock!" cried the companion
stranger, who had remained silent until now, looking
searchingly round the clearing, and examining Humphrey
himself with curiosity; "I have no drop of French blood
in my veins, whatever Julian may have. I am Fritz
Neville. I come of an English family. But you shall
hear all later on, as we sit by our fire at night. I would
hear all your tale of desolation and woe. We, for our part,
have no cause to love the French oppressors, whose ambi-
tion and greed seem to know no bounds. Can you give
us shelter by your hearth to-night ? Food we have of
our own, since we find game in sufficient abundance in
these forest tracks."
As he spoke he unslung from his shoulders a fine young
fawn which they had lately shot, and Humphrey made
eager answer to the request for hospitality.
"Would that we had better to offer! But the home-
stead is burnt. My brother lies sick of a fever in yon
shed-a fever brought on by loss of blood and by anguish
of mind. I have been alone in this place with him hard
upon a week now, and to me it seems as though years
instead of days had passed over my head since the
calamity happened."
"I can well believe that," said the first speaker, whom
his companion had spoken of as Julian. "There be times
in a man's life when hours are as days and days as years.
But let me see your brother if he be sick. I have some
skill in the treatment of fevers, and I have brought in
my wallet some simples which we find wonderfully helpful







FRIENDS IN NEED.


down in the south, from where I come. I doubt not I can
bring him relief."
Humphrey's face brightened with a look of joyful relief,
and Fritz exclaimed heartily,-
"Yes, yes, Julian is a notable leech. We all come to
him with our troubles both of body and mind.-Lead on,
comrade. I will cook the supper whilst you and he tend
the sick man; and afterwards we will tell all our tale,
and take counsel for the future."
It was new life to Humphrey to hear the sound of
human voices, to feel the touch of friendly hands, to know
himself not alone in the awful isolation of the vast forest.
He led the way to the rough shed, which he had contrived
during the past days to convert into a rude species of
sleeping and living room. He had made a hearth and a
chimney, so that he could cook food whilst still keeping
an eye upon his sick brother. He had contrived a certain
amount of rude comfort in Charles's bed and surroundings.
The place looked pleasant to the wearied travellers, for it
was spotlessly clean, and it afforded shelter from the keen
night air.
They had been finding the nights grow cold as they
journeyed northward, and Fritz rubbed his hands at sight
of the glow of the fire, and set to work eagerly upon his
culinary tasks; whilst Julian and Humphrey bent over
Charles, the former examining the condition of his pulse
and skin with the air of one who knows how to combat
the symptoms of illness.
He administered a draught, and bathed the sick man's







FRIENDS IN NEED.


temples with some pungent decoction of herbs which he
prepared with hot water; and after giving him a small
quantity of soup, told Humphrey that he would probably
sleep quietly all night, and might very likely awake
without any fever, though as weak as a child.
And in effect only a short time elapsed before his eyes
closed, and he sank into a peaceful slumber, such as he
had not known throughout the past days.
"Thank God you came !" said Humphrey with fervour;
"I had thought to bury my brother here beside his wife,
and .the loneliness and horror had wellnigh driven me
mad. If he live, I shall have something left to live for;
else I could have wished that we had all perished to-
gether !"
Nay," cried Fritz from the fire, we can do better than
that: we can join those who have the welfare of the
country at heart. We can punish proud France for her
ambition and encroachments, and perchance-who knows?
-England's flag may erelong proudly wave where now
only the banner of France has floated from her scattered
forts."
But just at this moment Humphrey could not be roused
to any patriotic fervour. The sense of personal loss and
horror was strong upon him. His thoughts were turning
vaguely towards the mother country from which his
fathers had come. For the moment the wild West was
hateful to him. He could not face the thought of taking
up the old life again. He had been uprooted too suddenly
and ruthlessly. The spell of the forest was gone. Some-







FRIENDS IN NEED.


times he felt that he never wished to look upon waving
trees again.
As they partook of the well-cooked supper which Fritz
had provided, and afterwards sat smoking their pipes
beside the fire, whilst the wind moaned and sighed round
the corners of the shed, and whispered through the trees
around the clearing, he told these strangers the whole
history of his life, and how it had seemed to be suddenly
cut in half a week ago, whilst the last half already began
to look and feel to him longer than the first.
There was no lack of sympathy and interest in the faces
of his hearers. When they heard how a Frenchman had
been with the Indians upon their raid, Fritz smote the
ground heavily with his open hand, exclaiming,-
"That is what we heard as we journeyed onward;
that is the rumour that reached us even in the far south.
It was hard to believe that brother should turn against
brother out here in these trackless wilds, amid hordes of
savage Indians. We said it must surely be false-that
Christian men could not be guilty of such wickedness
Yet it has proved all too true. We have heard stories
during our journey which have filled our hearts with
loathing and scorn. France is playing a treacherous, a
vile and unworthy game. England is no match for her
yet-unprepared and taken at a disadvantage. But you
will see, you will see f She will arise from sleep like a
giant refreshed! And then let proud France tremble for
her bloody laurels !"
His eye flashed, and Julian said thoughtfully,-






FRIENDS IN NEED.


"Ay, truly has she stained her laurels with blood; and
she is even now staining her annals with dark crimes,
when she stirs up the savage Indian to bring death and
desolation to those peaceful settlers with whom they have
so long lived as friends. God will require their blood at
the hands of France. Let her beware! for the hour of
her destruction will not be prolonged if she sells herself
to sin."
There was a long silence then between the three men;
it was at length broken by Humphrey, who looked from
one to the other, and said,-
"You have not yet told me of yourselves. Who are
you, and whence do you come? I have heard of vast
plains and mighty rivers in the south and west, but I
know nothing beyond these forest tracks which lie about
our desolated home."
Fritz signed to Julian to be the speaker, and he leaned
his back against the wall, clasping his hands behind his
head. The fire-light gleamed upon his earnest face and
shone in his brilliant eyes. Humphrey regarded him with
a species of fascination. He had never seen a man quite
of this type before.
"Have you ever heard," asked Julian, "of that great
explorer La Salle, who first made the voyage of the great
river Mississippi, and founded the infant colony of Louisi-
ana, albeit he himself perished by the hand of an assassin
in the wilderness, before he had half achieved the object
to which he was pledged ?"
"I have heard the name," said Humphrey; I used to







FRIENDS IN NEED.


hear the men of Philadelphia talk of such things when I
was a boy. But he was a Frenchman."
"Yes, and came with a commission from the King of
France hard upon a century ago. My great-grandfather
and his father were of the company of La Salle, although
they bore their part in a different expedition from that
which is known to the world."
"Are you then French?" asked Humphrey, half dis-
appointed, though he could not tell why.
Julian smiled, reading the thought in his heart.
"French in little beside name," he replied. "My great-
grandfather, Gaspard Dautray, was half English through
his mother, an Englishwoman; and he married Mary
Neville, an English maiden, from whose family Fritz there
is descended. In brief, let me tell you the story. Long
before La Salle had penetrated the fastnesses of the west,
there had grown up in a green valley a little colony of
English, outcasts from their own land by reason of their
faith. They had lived at peace for long with the Indian
tribes; but when more white men began invading their
country, jealousy and fury were awakened in the hearts
of the Indians, and this little settlement was in great
danger. In their extremity this little colony sent to La
Salle, and though he himself was absent, his lieutenant
sent them a band of men to aid them in defending their
lives and property, and in routing the attacking Indian
force.
But it was no longer safe to remain in the green valley
which had sheltered them so long. They heard of the






FRIENDS IN NEED.


lands of the south, down the great mysterious river, and
they resolved to seek an asylum there.
"With the company of La Salle, and yet not attached
to it, was a holy man whom all the world called Father
Fritz; a priest, yet one who followed not the Pope of Rome,
but loved each Christian brother, and recognized only one
Church-the Church of the baptized. He went with the
little band, and they made themselves a new home in the
land of the south. They were beloved of the Indians
about them. Father Fritz taught them, baptized such as
were truly converted, and lived amongst them to a hoary
old age, loving and beloved; seeking always to hold them
back from greed and covetousness, and teaching them that
the hope for which they must look was the coming of the
Lord Jesus Christ Himself to reign upon the earth."
Julian paused, looking thoughtfully into the fire.
Humphrey heaved a great sigh, and said half bitterly,-
"But the Lord delayeth His coming, and men wage
war against their brethren."
Yes, verily; yet I think that should make us long the
more for the day which will surely come. However, let
me tell my tale. The great enterprise of France in the
south and west has come to but a very small thing. No
chain of forts guards the great river. The highway from
Canada to the south has never been opened up. France
is speaking of it to this day. These very hostile move-
ments towards England are all part and parcel of the old
plan. She still desires to hold the whole territory by this
chain of forts, and shut England in between the sea and







FRIENDS IN NEED.


those mountains yonder. You have heard, I doubt not,
how England is resolved not to be thus held in check.
Major George Washington and General Braddock have
both made attacks upon Fort Duquesne, and though both
have suffered defeat owing to untoward causes and bad
generalship, the spirit within them is still unquenched.
Fort Duquesne, Fort Niagara, Fort Ticonderoga-these
are the three northern links of the chain, and I think
that England will never rest until she has floated her flag
over these three forts. We have come from far to the
heart of that great struggle which all men know must
come. The day of rest for us seemed ended. We have
been travelling all through the long, hot summer months,
to find and to be with our countrymen when the hour of
battle should come."
Humphrey looked from one to the other, and said,-
"There are only two of you. Where are all the rest
from your smiling valley of the south ? Were you the
only twain that desired to join the fight ?"
"A dozen of us started, but two turned back quickly,
discouraged by the hardness of the way, and a few died of
fever in the great swamps and jungles. Others turned
aside when we neared the great lakes, thinking to find an
easier way. But Fritz and I had our own plan of making
our way to New England, and after long toil and travel
here we are at the end of our journey. For this indeed
seems like the end, when we have found a comrade who
will show us the way and lead us to the civilized world
again !"







FRIENDS IN NEED.


"Ay, I can do that," answered Humphrey; "I know
well the road back to the world. Nor is it a matter of
more than a few days' travel to reach the outlying town-
ships. I have often said I would go and visit our sisters
and friends, but I have never done so. Alas that I
should go at last with such heavy tidings !"
"Heavy tidings indeed," said Fritz, with sympathy;
"yet we will avenge these treacherous murders upon those
who have brought them to pass."
"That will not restore the dead to life," said Humphrey
mournfully.
"No, but it will ease the burning heart of its load of
rage and vengeance."
Humphrey's eyes turned for a moment towards his
sleeping brother. He knew how welcome would be such
words to him-that is, if he awoke from his fever dreams
in the same mood as they had found him.
"And yet," said Julian thoughtfully, "we have been
taught by our fathers that brothers should live at peace
together, even as we in our valley lived long at peace with
all and with one another. So long as the memory of our
venerable Father remained alive there was all harmony and
concord, and every man sought his brother's well-being as
earnestly as his own."
"Can you remember the holy man?" asked Humphrey,
with interest.
"No; but my father remembered him well. He was
well grown towards manhood before the venerable old man
died at a great age. My grandfather has told me story







FRIENDS IN NEED.


after story of him. I have been brought up to love and
revere his memory, and to hold fast the things which he
taught us. But after his death, alas! a new spirit gradu-
ally entered into the hearts of our people. They began
to grow covetous of gain, to trade with the Indians for
their own benefit, to fall into careless and sometimes
evil practices. Before my father died he said to me
that the Home of Peace was no longer the place it once
had been, and that he should like to think that I might
find a better place to live in, since I was young and had
my life before me."
"Was that long ago ?"
"Just a year. My mother had died six months earlier.
The dissensions of the parent countries had begun to reach
to us. We had been French and English from the begin-
ning, but had dwelt in peace and brotherly good-will for
nigh upon eighty years. We had married amongst our-
selves, so that some amongst us scarce knew whether to
call themselves French or English. But for all that dis-
union grew and spread. Stragglers of Louisiana found
their way to us. They brought new fashions of thought
and teaching with them. Some Romish priests found us
out, and took possession of the little chapel which Father
Fritz had built with such loving care, and the Mass was
said instead of that simpler service which he had drawn up
for us. Many of us the priests dubbed as heretics, and
because we would not change our views for them, they
became angry, and we were excommunicated. It has been
nothing but growing strife and disunion for the past two







FRIENDS IN NEED.


years. I was glad to turn my back upon it at last, and
find my way to a freer land, and one where a man may
worship God according to his conscience; albeit I have
no desire to speak ill of the priests, who were good men,
and sought to teach us what they deemed to be the
truth."
"I am a Protestant," said Humphrey; "I know little
about Romish devices. I was taught to hate and abhor
them. We dwelt among the Quaker folk of Pennsylvania,
but we are not Quakers ourselves. Out here in the wilds
we must live as we can. We have the Bible-and that
is all."
"People say of the Quakers that they will not fight!"
said Fritz suddenly. "Is that so ?"
"I know not," answered Humphrey; "I think I have
heard my father say something of that sort. But surely
they will fight to avenge such things as that!" and he
made a gesture with his hand as though indicating the
burnt homestead and the graves of the murdered woman
and children.
"If they be men they surely will. You will go and tell
them your story, Humphrey ?"
"Ay, that I will!" answered Humphrey, between his
shut teeth.
Fritz sat staring into the fire for some time, and then he
too broke out with some heat.
Yes, it is the same story all over. It was the French
who came and spoiled our happy home. If they had let
us alone, perchance we might have been there still, hunting,







FRIENDS IN NEED.


fishing, following the same kind of life as our fathers-at
peace with ourselves and with the world. But they came
amongst us. They sowed disunion and strife. They were
resolved to get rid of the English party, as they called it.
They were all softness and mildness to them. But those in
whom. the sturdy British spirit flourished they regarded
with jealousy and dislike. They sowed the seeds of dis-
union. They spoiled our valley and our life. Doubtless
the germs were there before, but it was the emissaries of
France who wrought the mischief. If they could have
done it, I believe they would have taught the Indians to
distrust us English; but that was beyond their power.
Even they held in loving reverence the name of Father
Fritz, and none of his children, as they called us all alike,
could do wrong in their eyes. So then it was their policy
to get rid of such as would not own the supremacy of
France in all things. I was glad at the last to go. We
became weary of. the bickerings and strife. Some of the
elders remained behind, but the rest of us went forth to
find ourselves a new home and a new country."
Humphrey listened to this tale with as much interest as
it was possible for him to give to any concern other than
his own. Something of that indignant hatred which was
springing into active life all through the western continent
began to inflame his breast. It had been no effect of
Charles's inflamed imagination. The French were raising
the Indians against them, and striving to overthrow En-
gland's sons wherever they had a foothold beyond their
immediate colonies. It was time they should arise and






46 FRIENDS IN NEED.

assert themselves. Humphrey's eyes kindled as he sat
thinking upon these things.
"I too will go forth and fight France," he said at last;
and with that resolve the sense of numb lethargy and
despair fell away from him like a worn-out garment, and
his old fire and energy returned.















CHAPTER III.


PHILA DEL PHIA.

T WILL go and tell my tale in the ears of my country-
men," said Charles, with steady voice but burning
eyes, "and then I will go forth and fight the French, and
slay and slay till they be driven from off the face of the
western world !"
The fever had left Charles now. Some of his former
strength had come back to him. But his brother looked
at him often with wondering eyes, for it seemed to him
that this Charles was a new being, with whom he had but
scant acquaintance. He could not recognize in this stern-
faced, brooding man the quiet, homely farmer and settler
whose home he had shared for so long.
Their new comrades were glad of the rest afforded them
by the necessity of waiting till Charles should be fit to
move. They had been travelling for many months, and
the shelter of a roof-even though it was only the roof of
a shed-was grateful to them.
Fritz and Charles took a strong mutual liking almost
from the first. Both were men of unwonted strength and
endurance, and both were fired by a strong personal
enmity towards the French and their aggressive policy.







PHILADELPHIA.


Julian told Humphrey, in their private conferences,
something of the cause of this personal rancour.
"There was a fair maid in our valley--Rn6e we called
her-and her parents were French. But we were all
friends together; and Fritz and she loved each other, and
were about to be betrothed. Then came these troubles,
and the priest forbade REn6e to wed a heretic; and though
she herself would have been faithful, her parents were
afraid. It seemed to all then that the French were going
to be masters of the land. There was another youth who
loved her also, and to him they married her. That was
just before we came away-a dozen of us English youths,
who could not stand the new state of things and the strife
of party. Fritz has neither forgotten nor forgiven. The
name of France is odious in his ears."
"And in yours too ?" asked Humphrey.
Julian's face was grave and thoughtful.
"I have my moments of passionate anger. I hate
everything that is vile and treacherous and aggressive.
But I would seek to remember that after all we are
brothers, and that we all bear the name of Christ. That
is what Father Fritz of old sought to make us remember.
Perhaps it comes the easier to me in that I have French
blood in my veins, albeit I regard myself now as an
English subject. I have cast in my lot with the English."
Humphrey and Julian drew together, much as did
Charles and Fritz. Julian was a year or two older than
Humphrey, and Charles was several years older than
Fritz; but all had led a free open-air life, and had tastes







PHILADELPHIA.


and feelings in common. They understood wood-craft
and hunting; they were hardy, self-reliant, courageous.
It was of such men as these that the best soldiers were
made in the days that were at hand; although the mili-
tary leaders, especially if they came from the Old World
with its code of civilized warfare, were slow to recognize it.
A heavy storm of wind and rain-the precursor of the
coming winter-raged round the little settlement for
several days, during which the party sat round their fire,
talking of the past and the future, and learning to know
each other more and more intimately.
Charles recovered rapidly from the loss of blood and
the fever weakness., His constitution triumphed easily
over his recent illness, and he was only longing to be on
the road, that he might the sooner stand face to face
with the foe.
And now the storm was abating. The sun began to
shine out through the driving wrack of clouds. The
woodland tracks might be wet, but little recked the
travellers of that.
They bound upon their backs as much provision as
would suffice for their immediate needs. They looked
well to their arms and ammunition. They had mended
their clothes, and were strong and fresh and full of courage.
The journey before them seemed as nothing to the pair
who had traversed so many thousands of miles of wood
and water. And the settlers had friends at the other
end who would remember them, and have tears of sym-
pathy to shed at hearing their terrible tale.
(965) 4







PHILADELPHIA.


The brothers stood looking their last upon the clearing
which had for so long been their home. In Humphrey's
eyes there was an unwonted moisture; but Charles's face
was set and stern, and his lips twitched with the excess
of restrained emotion. His eyes were fixed upon the
mound which hid from his view the corpses of wife and
children. Suddenly he lifted his clinched hand towards
heaven.
"Strengthen, O Lord, this right hand of mine, that it
may be strong against the nation whose crimes bring
desolation upon Thy children. Be with us in the hour
of vengeance and victory. Help us to render unto them
even as they have rendered to us."
Julian and Fritz had withdrawn themselves a little,
respecting the inevitable emotion which must come to
men at such a moment. Humphrey turned away, and
took a few uncertain steps, half blinded by the unwonted
smart of tears in his eyes. He had come almost to hate
this place of terrible associations; and yet it wrung his
heart for a moment to leave those nameless graves, and
that little lonely spot where so many peaceful and happy
hours had been spent.
Julian's hand was on his arm, and his voice spoke in
his ear.
"I know what it feels like; I have been through it.
The smart is keen. But it helps us to remember that
we are but strangers and pilgrims. It is perhaps those
who have no abiding city here who most readily seek that
which is theirs above."







PHILADELPHIA.


Humphrey pressed Julian's hand, feeling vaguely com-
forted by his words, although he could not enter fully
into their significance.
To Charles Julian said,-
"We must remember, even in our righteous wrath, that
God has said He is the avenger. We can trust our wrongs
in His hands. He will use us as His instruments if He
thinks good. But let us beware of private acts of ven-
-geance of our own planning. We must not forget the
reverse of the picture-the mercy as well as the anger
of God. We must not take things out of His hands into
our own, lest we stumble and fall. We have a command-
ment to love our enemies, and to do good to those that
hate us."
Charles looked fixedly at him.
I have not forgotten," he said, in his strange, slow way;
"I was brought up amongst those who refuse the sword,
calling themselves servants of the Prince of Peace. We
shall see which the Lord will have-peace or war. Do
you think He desires to see a repetition of such scenes as
that?"
Charles pointed sternly to the ruined homestead-the
grave beside it, and his gloomy eyes looked straight into
those of Julian; but he did not even wait for an answer,
but plunged along the forest track in an easterly direction.

In a wide street in Philadelphia, not far from the
Assembly Rooms where such hot debates were constantly
going on, stood an old-fashioned house, quaintly gabled,







PHILADELPHIA.


above the door of which hung out a sign-board intimating
that travellers might find rest and refreshment within.
The whole house was spotlessly clean, and its aspect
was prim and sober, as was indeed that of the whole city.
Men in .wide-brimmed hats and wide-skirted coats of
sombre hue walked the streets, and talked earnestly to-
gether at the corners; whilst the women, for the most
part, passed on their way with lowered eyes, and hoods
drawn modestly over their heads, neither speaking nor
being spoken to as they pursued their way.
To be sure there were exceptions. In some quarters
there were plenty of people of a different aspect and bear-
ing; but in this wide and pleasant street, overlooked by
the window of the hostelry, there were few gaily-dressed
persons to be seen, but nearly all of them wore the dress
and adopted the quaint speech of the Quaker community.
From this window a bright-faced girl was looking
eagerly out into the street. She wore a plain enough
dress of grey homespun cloth, and a little prim cap covered
her pretty hair. Yet for all that several little rebellious
curls peeped forth, surrounding her face with a tiny
nimbus; and there was something dainty in the fashion
of her white frilled kerchief, arranged across her dress
bodice and tied behind. She would dearly have loved to
adorn herself with some knots of rose-coloured ribbon,
but the rose tints in her cheek gave the touch of colour
which brightened her sombre raiment, and her dancing
blue eyes would have made sunshine in any place.
She had opened the window lattice and craned her head







PHILADELPHIA.


to look down the street; but at the sound of a footstep
within doors she quickly drew it in again, for her mother
reproved her when she found her hanging out at the
window.
"What is all the stir about, mother ?" she asked;
"there be so many folks abroad, and they have been
passing in and out of the Assembly Rooms for above an
hour. What does it all mean? Are they baiting the
Governor again ? Are they having another fight about
the taxes ?"
"Nay, child, I know not. I have been in the kitchen,
looking to the supper. Thy father came in awhile back,
and said we had guests arrived, and that he desired the
supper to be extra good. That is all I know."
"Something has happened, I am sure of that!" cried
the girl again, "and I would father would come and tell
us what it is all about. He always hears all the news.
Perhaps the travellers he is bringing here will know. I
may sit with you at the supper-table, may I not, mother ?"
"Yes, child; so your father said. He came in with a
smile upon his face. But he was in a great haste, and
has been gone ever since. So what it all means I know
not."
Susanna-for such was the name of the girl-became at
once interested and excited.
"0 mother, what can it be? Hark at that noise in
the street below! People are crying out in a great rage.
What can it be ? It was so that day a week agone, when
news was brought in that some poor settlers had been







PHILADELPHIA.


murdered by Indians, and the Assembly would do nothing
but wrangle with the Governor instead of sending out
troops to defend our people. Do you think something
can have happened again ?"
The mother's face turned a little pale.
"Heaven send it be not so!" she exclaimed. "I am
always in fear when I hear of such things-in fear for
my old father, and for my brothers. You know they live
away there on the border. I pray Heaven no trouble will
fall upon them."
Susanna's eyes dilated with interest, as they always did
when her mother talked to her of these unknown relations,
away beyond the region of safety and civilization.
To be correct, it should be explained that Susanna was
not the real daughter of the woman whom she called
mother; for Benjamin Ashley had been twice married, and
Susanna had been five years old before Hannah Angell
had taken the mother's place. But she never thought of
this herself. She remembered no other mother, and the
tie between them was strong and tender, despite the fact
that there was not more than thirteen years' difference
in age between them, and some girls might have rebelled
against the rule of one who might almost have been a
sister.
But Susanna had no desire to rebel. Hannah's rule
was a mild and gentle one, although it was exercised with
a certain amount of prim decorum.. Still the girl was
shrewd enough to know that her father's leanings towards
the Quaker code had been greatly modified by the influence







PHILADELPHIA.


of his wife, and that she was kept less strictly than he
would-have kept her had he remained a widower.
Hannah bustled away to the kitchen, and Susanna,
after one more longing look out of the window towards
the crowd assembled in the open space beyond, followed
her, and gave active assistance in the setting of the supper-
table.
A young man in Quaker garb, and with a broad-brimmed
hat in his hand, entered the outer room, engaged in hot
dispute with another youth of different aspect, whose face
was deeply flushed as if in anger.
"Your Franklin may be a clever man-I have nothing
against that!" he exclaimed hotly; "but if he backs up
the stubborn Assembly, and stands idle whilst our settlers
are being massacred like sheep, then say I that he and
they alike deserve hanging in a row from the gables of
their own Assembly House; and that if the Indians break
in upon us and scalp them all, they will but meet the
deserts of their obstinacy and folly!"
"Friend," said the other of the sober raiment, "thee
speaks as a heathen man and a vain fellow. The Lord
hath given us a commandment to love one another, and to
live at peace with all men. We may not lightly set aside
that commandment; we may not do evil that good may
come."
"Tush, man! get your Bible and look. I am no
scholar, but I know that the Lord calls Himself a man
of war-that He rides forth, sword in hand, conquering
and to conquer; that the armies in heaven itself fight







PHILADELPHIA.


under the Archangel against the powers of darkness.
And are we men to let our brothers be brutally murdered,
whilst we sit with folded hands, or wrangle weeks and
months away, as you Quakers are wrangling over some
petty question of taxation which a man of sense would
settle in five minutes? I am ashamed of Philadelphia!
The whole world will be pointing the finger of scorn at
us. We are acting like cowards-like fools-not like
men! If there were but a man to lead us forth, I
and a hundred stout fellows would start forth to the
border country to-morrow to wage war with those vil-
lainous Indians and their more villainous allies the crafty
sons of France."
"Have patience, friend," said the Quaker youth, with
his solemn air: "I tell thee that the Assembly is in the
right. Who are the Penns-these proprietaries--that
their lands should be exempt from taxation? If the
Governor will yield that point, then will the Assembly
raise the needful aid for keeping in check the enemy,
albeit it goes sorely against their righteous souls. But
they will not give everything and gain nothing; it is
not right they should."
"And while they wrangle and snarl and bicker, like
so many dogs over a bone, our countrywomen and their
innocent children are to be scalped and burnt and
massacred ? That is Scripture law, is. it? that is your
vaunted religion. You will give way-you will yield
your principles for a petty victory on a point of law, but
not to save the lives of the helpless brothers who are







PHILADELPHIA.


crying aloud on all hands to you to come and save
them !"
The Quaker youth moved his large feet uneasily; he,
in common with the seniors of his party, was beginning
to find it a little difficult to maintain a logical position in
face of the pressing urgency of the position. He had
been brought up in the tenets which largely prevailed in
Pennsylvania at that day, and was primed with numerous
arguments which up till now had been urged with confi-
dence by the Quaker community. But the peace-loving
Quakers were beginning to feel the ground shaking
beneath their feet. The day was advancing with rapid
strides when they would be forced either to take up arms
in defence of their colony, or to sit still and see it pass
bodily into the hands of the enemy.
Susanna was peeping in at the door of the next room.
She knew both the speakers well. Ebenezer Jenkyns had
indeed been paying her some attention of late, although
she laughed him to scorn. Much more to her liking was
bold John Stark, her father's kinsman; and as there was
nobody in the room beside these two, she ventured to go
a step within the doorway and ask,-
"What is the matter now, Jack ? what are you two
fighting about so hotly ?"
"Faith, 'tis ever the same old tale-more massacres and
outrages upon our borders, more women and children
slaughtered! Settlers from the western border calling
aloud to us to send them help, and these Quaker fellows
of the Assembly doing nothing but wrangle, wrangle,







PHILADELPHIA.


wrangle with the Governor, and standing idle whilst their
brothers perish. Save me from the faith of the peace-
makers !"
Again the other young man moved uneasily, the more
so as he saw the look of disdain and scorn flitting over the
pretty face of Susanna.
Thee does us an injustice, friend," he said. "Was it
not Benjamin Franklin who a few months back gave such
notable help to General Braddock that he called him the
only man of honesty and vigour in all the western world ?
But the Lord showed that He would not have us attack
our brother men, and Braddock's army was cut to pieces,
and he himself slain. When the Lord shows us His mind,
it is not for us to persist in our evil courses; we must be
patient beneath His chastenings."
"Tush, man! the whole campaign was grossly mis-
managed; all the world knows that by now. But why
hark back to the past ? it is the present, the future that
lie before us. Are we to let our province become overrun
and despoiled by hordes of savage Indians, or are we to
rise like men and sweep them back whence they came ?
There is the case in a nut-shell. And instead of facing it
like men, the Assembly talks and squabbles and wrangles
like a pack of silly women !"
"Oh no, Cousin Jack," quoth Susanna saucily, say
not like women! Women would make up their minds to
action in an hour. Say rather like men, like men such as
Ebenezer loves-men with the tongues of giants and the
spirit of mice; men who speak great swelling words, and







PHILADELPHIA.


boast of their righteousness, but who are put to shame by
the brute beasts themselves. Even a timid hen will be
brave when her brood is attacked; but a Quaker cannot
be anything but a coward, and will sit with folded hands
whilst his own kinsmen perish miserably!"
This was rather too much even for Ebenezer's phleg-
natic spirit. He seized his broad-brimmed hat and clapped
it on his head.
"Thee will be sorry some day, Susanna, for making
game of the Quakers, and of the godly ones of the earth,"
he spluttered.
Go thee to the poultry-yard, friend Ebenezer," called
Susanna after him; "the old hen there will give thee a
warm welcome. Go and learn from her how to fight. I
warrant thee will learn more from her than thee has ever
known before-more than thine own people will ever teach
thee. Go to the old hen to learn; only I fear thee will
soon flee from her with a text in thy mouth to aid thy
legs to run!"
"Susanna, Susanna!" cried a voice from within, whilst
Jack doubled himself up in a paroxysm of delight, "what
are you saying so loud and free? Come hither, child.
You grow over-bold, and I cannot have you in the public
room. With whom are you talking there ?"
"There is only Jack here now," answered Susanna
meekly, although the sparkle still gleamed in her eyes;
"Ebenezer has just gone out. I was saying farewell to him."
Come back now, and finish setting the table; and if
John will stay to supper, he will be welcome."







PHILADELPHIA.


John was only too glad, for he took keen pleasure in
the society of Susanna, and was fond of the quaint old
house where his kinsman lived. He rose and went into
the inner room, where Hannah received him with a smile
and a nod.
Susanna would have asked him what special news had
reached the town that day, but the sound of approaching
feet outside warned her of the return of her father with
the friends he was bringing to supper. She flew to
the kitchen for the first relay of dishes, and Hannah
left her to dish them up, whilst she went to meet the
guests.
Jack and the maid-servant assisted Susanna at the
stove, and a few minutes passed before they entered the
supper-room, where the company had assembled. When
they did so, the girl was surprised to note that her mother
was standing between two tall strangers, one of whom had
his arm about her, and that she was weeping silently yet
bitterly.
Susanna put down her dishes on the table and crept to
her father's side.
What is the matter ? she asked timidly.
Matter enough to bring tears to all our eyes-ay, tears
of blood! answered Ashley sternly. These two men are
your mother's brothers, who arrived to-day-just a short
while back-as I hoped with pleasant tidings. Now have
we learned a different tale. Their old father and Charles's
wife and children have been brutally murdered by Indians,
and he himself escaped as by a miracle. We have been







PHILADELPHIA.


telling the tale to the Assembly this very afternoon. Ah,
it would have moved hearts of stone to hear Charles's
words! I pray Heaven that something may soon be done.
It is fearful to think of the sufferings which our inaction
is causing to our settlers in the west!"
"It is a shame-a disgrace! exclaimed Jack hotly,
and then he turned his glance upon the two other men
who were seated at the table, taking in the whole scene in
silence.
Both wore the look of travellers; both were tanned by
exposure, and were clad in stained and curious garments,
such as betokened the life of the wilderness. Jack was
instantly and keenly interested. He himself would will-
ingly have been a backwoodsman had he been able to
adopt that adventurous life.
Ashley saw the look he bent upon the travellers, and he
made them known to one another.
These friends have travelled far from the lands of the
south, and have been friends in need to our kinsmen yon-
der. Fritz Neville and Julian Dautray are their names.-
Susanna, set food before them. Your mother will not be
able to think of aught just now. We must let her have
her cry out before we trouble her."
The rest of the party seated themselves, whilst in the
recess by the window Hannah stood between the brothers
she had parted from ten years ago, listening to their tale,
and weeping as she listened.
Ashley turned to his two guests, who were eating with
appetite from the well-filled platters placed before them.







PHILADELPHIA


and he began to speak as though taking up a theme which
had lately been dropped.
"It is no wonder that you are perplexed by what you
hear and see in this city. I will seek to make the point
at issue as clear to you as it may be. You have doubtless
heard of the Penn family, from whom this colony takes its
name. Much we owe to our founder-his wisdom, liber-
ality, and enlightenment; but his sons are hated here.
They are absent in England, but they are the proprietaries
of vast tracts of land, and it is with regard to these lands
that the troubles in the Assembly arise. The proprietaries
are regarded as renegades from the faith; for the Assembly
here is Quaker almost to a man. They hate the feudalism
of the tenure of the proprietaries, and they are resolved
to tax these lands, although they will not 'defend them,
and although no income is at present derived from them."
Have they the power to do so? asked Julian.
"Not without the consent of the Governor. That is
where the whole trouble lies. And the Governor has no
power to grant them leave to tax the proprietary lands.
Not only so, but he is expressly forbidden by the terms of
his commission to permit this taxation. But the Assembly
will not yield the point, nor will they consent to furnish
means for the defence of the colony until this point is
conceded. That is where the dead-lock comes in. The
Governor cannot yield; his powers do not permit it. The
Assembly will not yield. They hate the thought of war,
and seem glad to shelter themselves behind this quibble.
For a while many of us, their friends, although not exactly







PHILADELPHIA.


at one with them in all things, stood by them, and upheld
them; but we are fast losing patience now. When it
comes to having our peaceful settlers barbarously murdered,
and our western border desolated and encroached upon;
when it becomes known that this is the doing of jealous
France, not of the Indians themselves, then it is time to
take a wider outlook. Let the question of the proprietary
lands stand over till another time; the question may then
be settled at a less price than is being paid for it now,
when every month's delay costs us the lives of helpless
women and children, and when humanity herself is crying
aloud in our streets."
Ashley, although he had long been on most friendly
terms with the Quaker population of the town, was not
by faith a Quaker, and was growing impatient with the
Assembly and its stubborn policy of resistance. He felt
that his old friend Franklin should know better, and show
a wider spirit. He had acted with promptness and patriot-
ism earlier in the year, when Braddock's luckless expedi-
tion had applied to him for help. But in this warfare he
was sternly resolved on the victory over the Governor, and
at this moment it seemed as though all Philadelphia. was
much more eager to achieve this than to defend the borders
of the colony.
Hitherto the danger had not appeared pressing to the
eastern part of the colony. They were in no danger from
Indian raids, and they had small pity for their brethren on
the western frontier. Between them and the encroaching
Indians lay a population, mostly German, that acted like a







PHILADELPHIA.


buffer state to them; and notwithstanding that every post'
brought in urgent appeals for help, they passed the time
in wrangling with the Governor, in drawing up bills pro-
fessing to be framed to meet the emergency, but each one
of them containing the clause through which the Governor
was forced to draw his pen.
Governor Mirris had written off to England stating the
exceeding difficulty of his position. His appeals to the
Assembly to defend the colony were spirited and manly.
He was anxious to join with the other colonies for an
organized and united resistance, but this was at present
extremely difficult. Others before him had tried the same
policy, but it had ended in failure. Petty jealousies did
more to hold the colonies apart than a common peril to
bind them together. Political and religious strife was
always arising. There was nothing to bind them together,
save a common, though rather cold, allegiance to the En-
glish King. Now and again, in moments of imminent peril,
they had united for a common object; but they fell apart
almost at once. Each had its own pet quarrel with its
Governor, which was far more interesting to the people at
the moment than anything else.
Julian and Fritz listened in amaze as Ashley, who was
a well-informed man and a shrewd observer, put before
them, as well as he was able, the state of affairs reigning
in Pennsylvania and the sister states.
"I am often ashamed of our policy, of our bickerings,
of our tardiness," concluded the good man; "yet for all
that there is stuff of the right sort in our people. We







PHILADELPHIA.


have English blood in our veins, and I always maintain
that England is bound to be the dominant power in these
lands of the west. Let them but send us good leaders and
generals from the old country, and I will answer for it
that the rising generation of New England will fight
and will conquer, and drive the encroaching French back
whence they came !"
















CHAPTER IV.


AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.

IT was an exciting scene. Susanna stood at the window,
and gazed eagerly along the street, striving hard to
obtain a sight of the seething crowd in the open square.
She could see the tall, haggard form of her Uncle
Charles, as she called him. He was standing upon a little
platform that his friends had erected for him in front of
the Assembly Rooms, and he was speaking aloud to the
surging crowd in accents that rang far through the still
air, and even reached the ears of the listeners at the
open window.
For once Hannah made no protest when the girl thrust
out her head. She herself seemed to be striving to catch
the echoes of the clear, trumpet-like voice. Her colour
came and went in her cheeks; her breast heaved with the
emotion which often found vent in those days in a fit of
silent weeping.
Mother dear, do not weep; they shall be avenged!
Nobody can listen to Uncle Charles and not be moved.
Hark how they are shouting now-hark! I can see
them raising their arms to heaven. They are shaking







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


their fists in the direction of the windows of the Assembly
House. Surely those cowardly men must be roused to
action; they cannot hear unmoved a tale such as Uncle
Charles has to tell !"
"Yet even so the dead will not be restored to life; and
war is a cruel, bitter thing."
"Yes, but victory is glorious. And we shall surely
triumph, for our cause is righteous. I am sure of that.
And Julian Dautray says the same. I think he is a very
good man, mother; I think he is better than the Quakers,
though he does not talk as if he thought himself a saint.
0 mother, there is Uncle Humphrey looking up at us!
I pray you let me go down to him. I long so greatly to
hear what Uncle Charles is saying. And I shall be safe
in his care."
"I think I will come too," said Hannah, whose interest
and curiosity were keenly aroused; and after signalling as
much to Humphrey, they threw on their cloaks and hoods,
and were soon out in the streets, where an excited crowd
had gathered.
"The posts have come in," said Humphrey, as they
made their way slowly along, "and there is news of fresh
disasters, and nearer. In a few minutes we shall have
more news. Men have gone in who promise to come out
and read us the letters. But the bearers themselves
declare that things are terrible. The Germans have been
attacked. A Moravian settlement has been burnt to the
ground, and all its inhabitants butchered. Families are
flying from the border country, naked and destitute, to







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


get clear of the savages and their tomahawks. Every-
where the people are calling aloud upon the Assembly to
come to their succour."
The crbwd in the street was surging to and fro. Some
were Quakers, with pale, determined countenances, still
holding to their stubborn policy of non-resistance to the
enemy, but of obstinate resistance to the Governor and the
proprietaries. The sight of these men seemed to inflame
the rest of the populace, and they were hustled and hooted
as they made their way into the Assembly; whilst the
Governor was cheered as he went by with a grave and
troubled face, and on the steps of his house he turned and
addressed the people.
"My friends," he said, "I am doing what I can. I have
written to the proprietaries and to the government at
home. I have told them that the conduct of the Assembly
is to me shocking beyond parallel. I am asking for fresh
powers to deal with this horrible crisis. But I cannot
look for an answer for long; and meantime are all our
helpless settlers in the west to be butchered ? You men
of the city, rise you and make a solemn protest to these
obstinate rulers of yours. I have spoken all that one man
may, and they will not hear. Try you now if you cannot
make your voice heard."
"We will, we will!" shouted a hundred voices; and
forthwith knots of influential men began to gather together
in corners, talking eagerly together, and gesticulating in
their excitement.
And all this while Charles, wild-eyed and haggard, was







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


keeping his place on the little platform, and telling his
story again and again to the shifting groups who came and
went. Men and women hung upon his words in a sort of
horrible fascination. Others might talk of horrors guessed
at, yet unseen; Charles had witnessed the things of which
he spoke, and his words sent thrills of horror through the
frames of those who heard. Women wept, and wrung
their hands, and the faces of men grew white and stern.
But upon the opposite side of the square another orator
was haranguing the crowd. A young Quaker woman had
got up upon some steps, moved in spirit, as she declared, to
denounce the wickedness of war, and to urge the townsmen
to peaceful methods. Her shrill voice rose high and pierc-
ing, and she invoked Heaven to bless the work of those who
would endure all things rather than spill human blood.
But the people had heard something too much of this
peaceful gospel. For long they had upheld the policy of
non-resistance. They had their shops, their farms, their
merchandise; they were prosperous and phlegmatic, more
interested in local than in national issues. They had been
content to be preached at by the Quakers, and to give
passive adhesion to their policy; but the hour of awaken-
ing had come. The agonized cries of those who looked to
them for aid had pierced their ears too often to be ignored.
Humanity itself must rise in answer to such an appeal.
They were beginning to see that their peace policy was
costing untold human lives, amid scenes of unspeakable
horror.
They let the woman speak in peace; they did not try







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


to stop her utterances. But when a brother Quaker took
her place and began a similar harangue, the young men
round raised a howl, and a voice cried out,
"Duck him in the horse-pond! Roll him in a barrel!
Let him be tarred and feathered like an Indian, since he
loves the scalping savages so well. Who's got a toma-
hawk ? Let's see how they use them. Does anybody
know how they scalp their prisoners ? A Quaker would
never miss his scalp; he always has his hat on!"
A roar of laughter greeted this sally; and a rush was
made for the unlucky orator, who showed a bold front
enough to the mob. But at that moment public attention
was turned in a different direction by the appearing upon
the steps of the Assembly Rooms of a well-known citizen
of high repute, who had until latterly been one of the
peace party, but who of late had made a resolute stand,
insisting that something must be done for the protection of
the western settlers, and for the curbing of the ambitious
encroachments and preposterous claims of France.
This grave-faced citizen came out with some papers in
his hand, and the crowd was hushed into silence.
Overhead anxious faces could be seen looking out at the
window. It was not by the wishes of the Assembly that
such letters were made public; but many of them had
been addressed to James Freeman himself, and they could
not restrain him from doing as he would with his own.
My friends," he said, and his voice rose distinct in the
clear air, "we have heavy tidings to-day. You shall hear
what is written from some sufferers not far from Fort







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE,


Cumberland, where forty white men, women, and children
were barbarously murdered a few days back. 'We are
in as bad circumstances as ever any poor Christians were
ever in; for the cries of the widowers, widows, fatherless
and motherless children are enough to pierce the hardest
of hearts. Likewise it is a very sorrowful spectacle to see
those that escaped with their lives with not a mouthful to
eat, or bed to lie on, or clothes to cover their nakedness or
keep them warm, but all they had consumed to ashes.
These deplorable circumstances cry aloud to your Honour's
most wise consideration how steps may speedily be taken
to deliver us out of the hand of our persecutors the cruel
and murderous savages, and to bring the struggle to an
end.'"
The reader paused, and a low, deep murmur passed
through the crowd, its note of rage and menace being
clearly heard. The speaker took up another paper and re-
commenced.
This comes from John Harris on the east bank of the
Susquehanna: 'The Indians are cutting us off every day,
and I had a certain account of about fifteen hundred
Indians, besides French, being on their march against us
and Virginia, and now close on our borders, their scouts
scalping our families on our frontier daily.'"
Another pause, another murmur like a roar, and a voice
from the crowd was raised to ask,-
And what says the Assembly to that?"
"They say that if the Indians are rising against us, who
have been friendly so long, then we must surely have done







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


something to wrong them; and they are about to search for
the cause of such a possible wrong, and redress it, rather
than impose upon the colony the calamities of a cruel
Indian war !"
A yell and a groan went up from the crowd. For a
moment it seemed almost as though some attack would be
made upon the Assembly House. The habits of law and
obedience were, however, strong in the citizens of Phila-
delphia, and in the end they dispersed quietly to their own
homes; but a fire had been kindled in their hearts which
would not easily be quenched.
Days were wasted by the Quakers in an unsuccessful
attempt to prove that there had been some fraud on the
part of the Governor in a recent land-purchase from the
Indians. And they again laid before the Governor one of
their proposals, still containing the clause which he was
unable to entertain, and which inevitably brought matters
to a dead-lock.
The Quakers drew up a declaration affirming that they
had now taken every step in their power, "consistent with
the just rights of the freemen of Pennsylvania, for the
relief of the poor distressed inhabitants," and further de-
clared that we have reason to believe that they themselves
would not wish us to go further. Those who would give
up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary relief
and safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
The Governor, in a dignified reply, once more urged upon
them the absolute necessity of waiving for the present the
vexed question of the proprietary estates, and passing a bill







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


for the relief of the present sufferers; but the Quakers re-
mained deaf and mute, and would not budge one inch from
their position.
All the city was roused. In houses like that of
Benjamin Ashley, where people were coming and going the
whole day long, and where travellers from these border
lands were to be found who could give information at first
hand, the discussion went on every day and all day long.
Ashley himself was keenly excited. He had quite broken
away from a number of his old friends who supported the
Assembly in its blind obstinacy. Nobody could sit by un-
moved whilst Charles and Humphrey Angell told their tale
of horror and woe; and, moreover, both Julian Dautray
and Fritz Neville had much to tell of the aggressive policy
of France, and of her resolute determination to stifle and
strangle the growing colonies of England, by giving them
no room to expand, whilst she herself claimed boundless
untrodden regions which she could never hope to populate
or hold.
Fresh excitements came daily to the city. Early one
morning, as the tardy daylight broke, a rumble of wheels
in the street below told of the arrival of travellers. The
wheels stopped before Ashley's door, and he hastily finished
his toilet and went down.
In a few moments all the house was in a stir and com-
motion. A terrible whisper was running from mouth to
mouth. That cart standing grimly silent in the street
below carried, it was said, a terrible load. Beneath its
heavy cover lay the bodies of about twenty victims of







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


Indian ferocity; and the guardians of the load were stern-
faced men, bearing recent scars upon their own persons,
who ate and drank in stony silence, and only waited till
the Assembly had met before completing their grim
mission.
The thing had got wind in the town by now, and the
square space was thronged. The members of the Assembly
looked a little uneasy as they passed through the crowd,
but not a sound was made till all had gathered in the
upper room.
Then from out the yard of the inn was dragged the
cart. No horses were fastened to it. The young men of
the city dragged it out and pushed it along. The silent,
grim-faced guardians walked in front. As it reached the
square the crowd sent up a groaning cry, and opened right
and left for the dreadful load to be set in position before
the windows of the great room where the Assembly had met.
Then the cover was thrown back, and yells and cries
arose from all. Shouts were raised for the Assembly to
come and look at their work.
There was no resisting the mandate of the crowd.
White and trembling, the members of the Assembly
were had out upon the steps, and forced to look at the
bodies of their victims. The crowd hooted, groaned,
yelled with maddened fury. The advocates of peace
shrank into themselves, appalled at the evidences of
barbarities they had sought to believe exaggerated. It
was useless now to attempt to deny the truth of what
had been reported.







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


Back they slunk into the Assembly House, white and
trembling, and for the moment cowed. The cart was
moved on, and stopped in front of house after house where
notable Quakers dwelt who were not members of the
Assembly. They were called to come to their windows
and look, and were greeted with hisses and curses.
The very next day a paper, under preparation by a
number of the leading citizens, at the suggestion of the
Governor, was presented to the Assembly under the title
of a Representation."
It contained a stern appeal for the organization of mea-
sures of defence, and ended by the dignified and significant
words,-
"You will forgive us, gentlemen, if we assume characters
somewhat higher than that of humble suitors praying for
the defence of our lives and properties as a matter of grace
or favour on your side. You will permit us to make a
positive and immediate demand of it."
The Quakers were frightened, incensed, and perplexed.
Their preachers went about the streets urging upon the
people the doctrine of non-resistance, and picturing the
horrors of warfare. The Assembly debated and debated,
but invariably came to the conclusion that they must
withstand the Governor to the last upon the question of
taxation.
All the city was in a tumult and ferment; but when
the news came that a settlement only sixty miles away,
Tulpehocken by name, had been destroyed and its in-
habitants massacred, even the advocates of peace grew







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


white with fear, and the House began to draw up a militia
law-the most futile and foolish perhaps that had ever
been suggested even by lovers of peace-in the vain
hope of appeasing the people.
But the people would not be appeased by a mere
mockery. They clamoured for the raising of money for a
systematic defence of their colony, and the ground was cut
from beneath the feet of the Assembly by a letter received
from England by the Governor, not indeed in response to
his recent urgent appeals, but still written with some know-
ledge of the unsettled state of the country. In this letter
the proprietaries promised a donation of five thousand
pounds as a free gift for the defence of the provinces
threatened in so formidable a manner, provided it was re-
garded as a gift and not as any part of a tax upon their
estates, which were to remain free according to the old
feudal tenure.
The Assembly upon hearing this could hold out no
longer. They were forced by the clamour of public opinion
to strike out the debated and debatable clause from the
long-contested bill, and immediately it was passed into law
by the Governor.
"Ay, they have come to their senses at last-when it
is wellnigh too late !" spoke John Stark, with a touch of
bitterness in his tone. They will furnish money now; but
what can be done with the winter just upon us ? For
six months we must lie idle, whilst the snow and ice wrap
us round. Why was not this thing done before our
settlements were destroyed, and when we could have







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


pushed forth an army into the field to drive back the
encroaching foe, so that, they would never have dared to
show their faces upon our border again?"
Charles looked up with burning eyes.
What say you? Six months to wait ? That will
not do for me! My blood is boiling in my veins; I
must needs cool it! If these laggard rulers, with their
clumsy methods, cannot put an army in the field before
the spring, surely there are men enough amongst us to
go forth-a hardy band of woodsmen and huntsmen-and
hunt and harry, and slay and destroy, even as they have
done!"
"That is what the Rangers do!" cried Stark, with
kindling eyes; "I have heard of them before this. The
Rangers of New England have done good work before
now. Good thought, good thought! Why not form
ourselves into a band of Rangers ? Are we not strong
and full of courage, seasoned to hardship, expert in our
way with gun or axe? Why should we lie idle here
all the long winter through ? Why not let us forth to
the forest-find out where help is needed most, and
make here a dash and there a raid, striking terror into
the hearts of the foe, and bringing help and comfort to
those desolate inhabitants of the wilderness who go in
terror of their lives? Why not be a party of bold
Rangers, scouring the forests, and doing whatever work
comes to hand? Men have banded themselves together
for this work before now; why may not we do the
like ?"







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


"Why not, indeed?" cried Fritz, leaping to his feet.
"I pine in the restraint of thi_ ,town; I long for the
forest and the plain once more. My blood, too, is hot
within me at the thought of what has been done and will
be done again. Let us band ourselves together as brothers
in arms. There must be work and to spare for those
wvho desire it."
Ashley thoughtfully stroked his chin, looking round the
circle before him. He was a shrewd and thoughtful man,
and there was nothing of cowardice in his nature, although
he was cautious and careful.
"It is not a bad thought, Nephew John," he said; "and
yet I had been thinking of something different for some
of you intrepid and adventurous youths to do. I had
thought of sending news of the state of parties here to
our friends and kinsmen in England. When all is said
and done, it is to England that we must look for help.
She must send us generals to command us, and she must
help us with her money. There are many families across
the water who would open their purses on our behalf
right generously were our sad case made known to them.
Letters are sent continually, but it is the spoken tale
that moves the heart. I had thought to send across
myself to such of our friends and families as still regard
us as belonging to them. If they made a response such
as I look for, we should soon have means at our disposal to
augment what the tardy Assembly may do by an auxil-
iary force, equipped and furnished with all that can be
needed. But you cannot be in two places at once. What







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


think you, my young friends ? Will you serve your dis-
tressed brethren better as Rangers of the forest, or as emis-
saries to England?"
Why not divide our forces ? asked John Stark;
"there are enough of us for that. I have often heard
Humphrey speak of a wish to cross the sea, and to visit
the land from which we have all come. Why not let
him choose a comrade, and go thither with letters and
messages, and tell his tale in the ears of friends? and
whilst they are thus absent, why should not the rest of us
make up a party of bold spirits, and go forth into the
wilderness, and there carry on such work of defence and
aggression as we find for us to do ?"
"Ay. I have no love for the unknown ocean," said
Charles; I have other work to do than to visit new lands.
I have a vow upon me, and I cannot rest till it be ac-
complished."
Humphrey and Julian looked at each other. Already
they had spoken of a visit to England. Both desired to
see the lands of the Eastern Hemisphere from whence
their fathers had come.
Hitherto they had not seen how this could be accom-
plished; but Ashley's words opened out an unexpected
way. If the citizens of Philadelphia wanted to send
messengers to their friends across the water, they would
gladly volunteer for the service.
"If Julian will go with me, I will gladly go," said
Humphrey.
I will go, with all my heart," answered Julian at once;







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


"and we will seek and strive to do the pleasure of those.
who send us."
Ashley's face beamed upon the pair. He knew by this
time that no better messenger than Julian Dautray could
be found. He had a gift of eloquence and a singularly
attractive personality. His nature was gentle and refined
--curiously so considering his upbringing-and he had a
largeness of heart and a gift of sympathy which was
seldom to be met with amongst the more rugged sons of
the north.
He had made- himself something of a power already in
the circle into which he had been thrown; and when it
was known amongst Ashley's friends and acquaintance:
that his wife's brother, together with Julian Dautray,
would go to England with their representations to friends
and to those in authority, a liberal response was made as
to their outfit and introductions, and the young men were
surprised to find themselves suddenly raised to a place of
such importance and distinction.
It was an exciting time for Susanna and for all in the
house. John Stark came to and fro, bringing news that
he had found fresh volunteers to join the band of Rangers,
who were already making preparations for departure upon
their perilous life of adventure.
Some of the older citizens looked doubtful, and spoke
of the rigours of the winter; but John laughed, and
Charles smiled his strange, mirthless smile, and all declared
themselves fearless and ready to face whatever might be
in store. Come what might, they would go to the help







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


of the settlers, be the Assembly ever so dilatory in send-
ing help.
"But you will not get killed?" Susanna would plead,
looking from one face to the other. She was fond of John,
who had been like a brother to her all her life; she had a
great admiration for handsome Fritz, who often spent whole
evenings telling her wonderful stories of the far south
whilst she plied her needle over the rough garments the
Rangers were to take with them. It seemed to her a
splendid thing these men were about to do, but she shrank
from the thought that harm might come to them. She
sometimes almost wished they had not thought of it, and
that they had been content to remain in the city, drilling
with the town militia, and thinking of the coming spring
campaign.
We must take our chance," answered Fritz, as he bent
over her with a smile on one of those occasions. You would
not have us value our lives above the safety of our dis-
tressed brethren or the honour of our nation ? The things
which have happened here of late have tarnished England's
fair name and fame. You would not have us hold back,
if we can help to bring back the lustre of that name ? I
know you better than that."
"I would have you do heroic deeds," answered Susanna,
with quickly-kindled enthusiasm, "only I would not have
you lose your lives in doing it."
"We must take our chance of that," answered Fritz,
with a smile, "as other soldiers take theirs. But we shall
be a strong and wary company; and I have passed already
(965) 6







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


unscathed through many perils. You will not forget us
when we are gone, Susanna ? I shall think of you sitting
beside this comfortable hearth, when we are lying out
beneath the frosty stars, with the world lying white be-
neath us, wrapped in its winding-sheet!"
"Ah, you will suffer such hardships! they all say
that."
There was a look of distress in the girl's eyes; but
Fritz laughed aloud.
"Hardship! what is hardship ? I know not the name.
We.can track game in the forest, and fish the rivers for it.
We can make ourselves fires of sparkling, crackling pine
logs; we can slip along over ice and snow upon our snow-
shoes and skates, as I have heard them described, albeit I
myself shall have to learn the trick of them-for we had
none such methods in my country, where the cold could
never get a grip of us. Fear not for us, Susanna; we shall
fare well, and we shall do the work of men, I trow. I
am weary already of the life of the city; I would go forth
once more to my forest home."
There was a sparkle almost like that of tears in the
girl's eyes, and a little unconscious note as of reproach in
her voice.
"That is always the way with men; they would ever
be doing and daring. Would that I too were a man!
there is naught in the world for a maid to do."
"Say not so," cried Fritz, taking the little hand and
holding it tenderly between his own. "Life would be but a
sorry thing for us men were it not for the gentle maidens







AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.


left at home to think of us and pray for us and welcome
us back again. Say, Susanna, what sort of a welcome
will you have for me, when I come to claim it after my
duty is done? "
She raised her eyes to his, and the colour flooded her
face.
"I shall welcome you back with great gladness of heart,
Fritz, and I shall pray for you every day whilst you are
away."
And not forget me, even if other fine fellows of officers,
such as we begin to see in our streets now, come speaking
fine words to you, and seeking to win smiles from your
bright eyes ? You will keep a place in your heart still
for the rough Ranger Fritz ? "
Susanna's eyes lighted with something of mischievous
amusement, and then as she proceeded grew more grave
and soft.
"My good mother will take care that I have small
converse with the gay young officers, Fritz. But in truth,
even were it not so, I should never care for them, or
think of them as I do of you. You are facing perils
they would not. You are brave with the bravery of a
true hero. It is with the Rangers of the forest that my
heart will go. Be sure you break it not, Fritz, by too
rashly exposing yourself to peril."
"Sweetheart! was his softly-spoken answer; and
Susanna went to her bed that night with a heart that
beat high with a strange sweet happiness, although the
cloud of coming parting lay heavy upon her soul.







84 AN EXCITING STRUGGLE.

A few days later, Humphrey and Julian, fully equipped
with instructions, introductions, money and other necessaries,
left the city, ready for their homeward voyage; and in
another week the small but hardy band of Rangers, with
their plain and meagre outfit, but with stout hearts and
brave resolves, said adieu to those they left behind, and
started westward for that debatable ground upon which
a bloody warfare had to be fought to the bitter end.


































MAP SHOWING THE SCENE OF THE WAR BETWEEN FRENCH AND ENGLISH.


6 71
























JBook H.,



ROGERS'S RANGERS.















CHAPTER I.


A DAY OF VENGEANCE

T O the west! to the west! to the west!
Such was the watchword of the band of sturdy
Rangers who set forth from Pennsylvania to the defence
of the hapless settlers.
They were but a handful of bold spirits. It was little
they could hope to accomplish in attempting to stem the
tide of war; but their presence brought comfort to many
an aching heart, and nerved many a lonely settler to in-
trench and defend his house and family, instead of giving
way to utter despair.
There was work for the little band to do amongst these
scattered holdings. John Stark urged upon such settlers
as had the courage to remain to build themselves block-
houses, to establish some sort of communication with one
another, to collect arms and ammunition, and be ready to
retire behind their defences and repel an attack. For the
moment the Indians seemed glutted with spoil and with
blood, and were more quiet, although this tranquillity was
not to be reckoned upon for a day. Still, whilst it lasted
it gave a breathing-space to many harassed and desperate






A DAY OF VENGEANCE.


settlers; and Fritz could give them many valuable hints
as to the best method of intrenching themselves in block-
houses. He had seen so many of these upon his long
journey, and understood their construction well.
Everywhere they found the people in a state of either
deep despondency or intense exasperation. It seemed to
them that they had been basely deserted and betrayed by
their countrymen, who should have been prompt to send
to their defence; and although the arrival of the Rangers,
and the news they brought of future help, did something
to cheer and encourage them, it was easy to see that they
were deeply hurt at the manner in which their appeals
had been met, and were ready to curse the Quakers and
the Assembly who had calmly let them be slaughtered
like brute beasts, whilst they wrangled in peaceful secu-
rity over some disputed point with the Governor.
"Are you Rogers's men ?" was a question which the
Rangers met again and again as they pursued their way.
"No," they would answer; "we know of no Rogers.
Who is he, and why is his name in all men's mouths ?"
This question was not always easy to get answered.
Some said one thing and some another; but as they
pursued their western way, they reached a settlement
where more precise information was to be had.
"Have you not heard of Robert Rogers, the New
Hampshire Ranger ? Well, you will hear his name many
times before this war is closed. He has gathered about
him a band of bold and daring spirits. He has lived in
the forest from boyhood. He has been used to dealings







A DA Y OF VENGEANCE


with both English and French settlers. He speaks the
language of both. But he is stanch to the heart's core.
He is vowed to the service of his country. He moves
through the forests, over the lakes, across the rivers.
None can say where he will next appear. He seems
everywhere-he spies upon the foe. He appears beneath
the walls of their forts, snatches a sleepy sentry away
from his post, and carries him to the English camp, where
information is thus gleaned of the doings of the enemy.
He and his band are here, there, and everywhere. We
had hoped to have seen them here by this. Colonel
Armstrong sent a message praying him to come and help
him to attack a pestilent nest of savages which is the
curse of his life. We had hoped you were the forerunners
of his band when you appeared. But in these troublous
times who can tell whether the messenger ever reached
his destination? "
"But if we are not Rogers's men, we are Rangers of
the forest," cried Stark, who was leader of the party.
"We can fight; we are trained to the exercise of arms.
We will push on to this Colonel Armstrong, and what
aid so small a band can give him that we will give."
"He will welcome any help from bold men willing to
fight," was the answer they got. "Pray Heaven you be
successful; for we all go in terror of our lives from the
cruelty of Captain Jacobs. If he were slain, we might
have rest awhile."
Captain Jacobs ?"
So they call him. He is a notable Indian chieftain.






A DAY OF VENGEANCE.


Most likely the French baptized him by that name.
They like to be called by some name and title which
sounds like that of a white man. He lives at the Indian
town of Kittanning, on the banks of the Alleghany, and
he is upheld by the French from Fort Duquesne and
Venango. They supply him with the munitions of war,
and he makes of our lives a terror. Colonel Armstrong
has been sent by the Governor to try to fall upon him
unawares, and oust him from his vantage-ground. If the
town were but destroyed and he slain, we might know a
little ease of mind."
The eyes of the Rangers lighted with anticipation.
This was the first they had heard of real warfare. If
they could lend a hand to such an expedition as this, they
would feel rewarded for all their pains and toil.
"Captain Jacobs, Captain Jacobs!" repeated Charles,
with a gleam in his sombre eyes; tell me what manner
of man this Captain Jacobs is."
"I have seen him once-a giant in height, painted in
vermilion, and carrying always in his hand a mighty
spear, which they say none but he can wield. His eyes
roll terribly, and upon his brow is a strange scar shaped
like a crescent-"
"Ay, ay, ay; and in his hair is one white tuft, which he
has braided with scarlet thread," interposed Charles, pant-
ing and twitching in his excitement.
"That is the man-the most bloodthirsty fire-eater of
all the Indian chiefs. Could the country but be rid of
him, we might sleep in our beds in peace once more, instead







A DAY OF VENGEANCE.


of lying shivering and shaking at every breath which
passes over the forest at night."
"Let us be gone!" cried Charles, shaking his knife in
a meaning and menacing fashion; "I thirst to be there
when that man's record is closed. Let me see his end;
let me plunge my knife into his black heart! There is
another yet whom my vengeance must overtake; but let
me fall upon this one first."
"Was he one of the attacking party that desolated
your homestead ?" asked Stark, as they moved along in
the given direction, after a brief pause for rest and re-
freshment.
"Ay, he was," answered Charles grimly. "I could not
forget that gigantic form, that mighty spear, that scar and
the white tuft! He stood by, and laughed at my frantic
struggles, at the screams of the children, at the agony of
my gentle wife. A fiend from the pit could not have
been more cruel. But the hour is at hand when it shall
be done to him as he has done. His hand lighted the
wood pile they had set against the door of the house.
Let him suffer a like fate at our hands in the day of
vengeance!"
Spurred on by the hope of striking some well-planted
blow at the heart of the enemy, the hardy band of
Rangers pushed their way through the forest tracks,
scarcely pausing for rest or sleep, till the lights of a little
camp and settlement twinkled before them in the dusk,
and they were hailed by the voice of a watchful sentinel.
"Friends," cried Stark, in clear tones-" Rangers of the







A DAY OF VENGEANCE.


forest-come to the aid of Colonel Armstrong, hoping to
be in time for the attack on Kittanning."
"Now welcome, welcome!" cried the man, running
joyfully forward; and the next minute the little band was
borne into the camp by a joyful company of raw soldiers,
who seemed to feel a great sense of support even from the
arrival of a mere handful.
"Rogers's Rangers are come! the Rangers are come!"
was the word eagerly passed from mouth to mouth; and
before the new-comers could make any explanation, they
found themselves pushed into a fair-sized building, some-
thing in the form of a temporary block-house, and con-
fronted with the Colonel himself, who received them with
great good-will.
"You are from Captain Rogers?" he said; "is one of
you that notable man himself ?"
Stark stepped forward to act as spokesman, and was
shaken warmly by the hand.
"Rangers we are, but not of Rogers's company," he said.
"Indeed, when we started forth from Philadelphia to the
succour of the distressed districts, we had not even heard
the name of Rogers, though it is now familiar enough.
We heard, however, that you were in need of the help of
Rangers, and we have come with all haste to your camp.
We wish for nothing better than to stand in the forefront
of the battle against the treacherous and hostile Indians.
Although not of Rogers's training, you will not find us faint
of heart or feeble of limb. There are a dozen of us, as
you see, and we will fight with the best that we have."







A DAY OF VENGEANCE.


"And right welcome at such a moment," was the cordial
answer, "for the men I have with me are little trained to
warfare; and though they will follow when bravely led,
they are somewhat like sheep, and are easily thrown into
confusion or turned aside from the way. To-night you
shall rest and be well fed after your march, and on the
morrow we will make a rapid secret march, and seek to
fall upon the foe unawares."
The Rangers were as hungry as hunters, and glad
enough to sit down once more to a well-spread table. The
rations were not luxurious as to quality, but there was
sufficient quantity, which to hungry men is the great
matter. The Colonel sat with them at table, heard all
they had to tell of the state of the country from Philadel-
phia westward, and had many grim tales to tell himself of
outrages and losses in this district.
"We lost Fort Granville at harvest-time, when the
men were forced to garner their crops, and we had to send
out soldiers to protect them. The French and Indians set
upon the Fort, and though it was gallantly defended by
the lieutenant in charge, it fell into their hands. Since
then their aggressions have been unbearable. Captain
Jacobs has been making the lives of the settlers a terror
to them. We have sent for help from the colony, with
what success you know. We have sent to the Rangers
under Rogers, and had hoped to be reinforced by them.
But if he cannot help us, it is much to have stout-hearted
friends come unexpectedly to our aid. Have you seen
fighting, friends ? or are you like the bulk of our men-







A DAY OF VENGEANCE


inured to toil and hardship, full of zeal and courage,
ready to wield any and every weapon in defence of pro-
perty, or against the treacherous Indian ? "
"Something like that," answered Stark; "but we can
all claim to be good marksmen, and to have good weapons
with us. Our rifles carry far, and we seldom miss the
quarry. I will answer for us that we stand firm, and that
we come not behind your soldiers in steadiness, nor in the
use of arms at close quarters."
"That I can well believe," answered the Colonel, with a
smile; "I have but a score of men who have been trained
in the school of arms. The rest were but raw recruits a
few months ago, and many of them have little love of
fighting, though they seek to do their duty. Well, well,
we must not sit up all night talking. We have a hard
day's march before us to-morrow, and we must needs make
all the speed we can. Indian scouts might discover our
camp at any moment, and our only chance is to fall upon
the Indian town unawares. They do not look for attack
in the winter months-that is our best protection from
spies. And so far I think we have escaped notice. But
it may not last, and we must be wary. We will sleep till
dawn, but with the first of the daylight we must be
moving. The way is long, but we have some good guides
who know the best tracks. We ought to reach the town
soon after nightfall; and when all are sleeping in fancied
security, we will fall upon them."
The Rangers were glad enough of the few hours of sleep
which they were able to obtain, and it was luxury to them







A DAY OF VENGEANCE.


to sleep beneath a roof,-and to be served the next morning
with breakfast which they had not had to kill and cook
themselves.
The men were in good spirits too. The arrival of the
little body of Rangers had encouraged them; and as the
company marched through the forest, generally in single
file, the new-comers scattered themselves amongst the
larger body, and talked to them of what was going for-
ward in the eastern districts, and how, after long delay,
reinforcements were being prepared to come to the aid
of the hapless settlers.
That was cheering news for all, and it put new heart
into the band. They marched along cheerily, although
cautiously, for they knew not what black scouts might
be lurking in the thickets; and if the Indians once got
wind of their coming, there would be little hope of success-
ful attack.
On and on they marched all through, the keen winter
air, which gave them fine appetites for their meals when
they paused to rest and refresh themselves, but made
walking easier than when the sun beat down pitilessly
upon them in the summer. There had been no heavy
snow as yet, and the track was not hard to find. But the
way was longer than had been anticipated, and night had
long closed in before they caught a glimpse of any settle-
ment, although they knew they must be drawing near.
The guides became perplexed in the darkness of the
forest. The moon was shining, but the light was dim and
deceptive within the great glades. Still they pushed on







A DA Y OF VENGEANCE.


resolutely, and the Rangers gradually drew to the front,
goaded on by their own eagerness, and less disposed to feel
fatigue than the soldiers, who were in reality less hardy
than they.
All in a moment a strange sound smote upon their ears.
It was the roll of an Indian drum. They paused suddenly,
and looked each other in the face. The rolling sound
continued, and then rose a sound of whooping and yelling
such as some of their number had never heard before.
"It is the war-dance," whispered one of the guides;
and a thrill ran through the whole company. Had they
been discovered, and were the Indians coming out in a
body against them ?
For a brief while they were halted just below the top
of the ridge, whilst a few of the guides and Rangers crept
cautiously forward to inspect the hollow in which they
knew the village lay.
Colonel Armstrong was one of this party, and he, with
Stark and Fritz, cautiously crept up over the ridge and
looked down upon the Indian town below.
The moon lighted up the whole scene. There was no
appearance of tumult or excitement. The sound of the
drum and the whooping of the warriors were not accom-
panied by any demonstration of activity by those within
the community. Probably some war-party or hunting-
party had returned with spoil, and they were celebrating
the event by a banquet and a dance.
The soldiers were bidden to move onward, but very
cautiously. It was necessary that they should make the




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