• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Half Title
 A rose-leaf
 Saucy Jesper
 The coffee-mill which grinds...
 Beauty and the horse
 The king and the miller
 The three pennies
 The little mare
 Greyfoot
 The master fool
 What the Christmas star sees
 Never mind the money
 The bull and the princess at the...
 The sunshine
 The lawyer's advice
 Peter Humbug and the white cat
 A funny fellow
 Peter fiddle-de-dee
 The covetous man
 Doctor and detective
 Hans Humdrum
 The boy who went to the Northw...
 A fearless boy
 Fortune and knowledge
 The suitor
 Lost and found
 The wonderful pot
 Money will buy everything
 Brave against his will
 The Jutlander and his stocking...
 The trial
 The princess who said
 The obstinate shoemaker
 The merchant
 The cunning man in Hilltown
 Princess Rosamund
 The knapsack
 The garden of childhood
 The man without a heart
 James, the huntsman
 Mother's pet
 Bend the bough in time
 The boiled eggs
 Three happy tailors
 The pike
 The deacon's dream
 The deacon's wife
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Danish fairy & folk tales
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089006/00001
 Material Information
Title: Danish fairy & folk tales a collection of popular stories and fairy tales : from the Danish of Svend Grundtvig, E.T. Kristensen, Ingvor Bondesen, and L. Budde
Alternate Title: Danish fairy and folk tales
Danish folk tales
Physical Description: 9, 293, 6 p., 32 leaves of plates : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bay, J. Christian ( Jens Christian ), 1871-1962
Grundtvig, Sven, 1824-1883 ( Author )
Kristensen, Evald Tang, 1843-1929 ( Author )
Bondesen, Ingvor, 1844-1911 ( Author )
Budde, L ( Leopold ), 1836-1902 ( Author )
Harper & Brothers ( Publisher )
Publisher: Harper & Brothers
Place of Publication: New York ;
London
Publication Date: 1899
 Subjects
Subject: Magic -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Kings and rulers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fairies -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Folklore -- Denmark   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1899   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Folk tales -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1899
Genre: Children's stories
Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
Folk tales   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by J. Christian Bay.
General Note: Cover title: Danish fairy tales.
General Note: Also published in Continental classics series with title: Danish folk tales.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00089006
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222015
notis - ALG2248
oclc - 01401335
lccn - 99001643

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Dedication
        Dedication
    Preface
        Preface 1
        Preface 2
        Preface 3
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    List of Illustrations
        List of Illustrations 1
        List of Illustrations 2
    Half Title
        Half Title
    A rose-leaf
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Saucy Jesper
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 8a
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The coffee-mill which grinds salt
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Beauty and the horse
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 18a
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The king and the miller
        Page 21
        Page 22
    The three pennies
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 26a
        Page 27
    The little mare
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 30a
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Greyfoot
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 38a
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 40a
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 42a
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    The master fool
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    What the Christmas star sees
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Never mind the money
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    The bull and the princess at the Glass Mountain
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    The sunshine
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    The lawyer's advice
        Page 84
        Page 84a
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Peter Humbug and the white cat
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    A funny fellow
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Peter fiddle-de-dee
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 102a
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
    The covetous man
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
    Doctor and detective
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    Hans Humdrum
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 126a
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 128a
        Page 129
        Page 130
    The boy who went to the Northwind
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    A fearless boy
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 138a
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 140a
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    Fortune and knowledge
        Page 144
        Page 144a
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 148a
        Page 149
    The suitor
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
    Lost and found
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 156a
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 160a
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
    The wonderful pot
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
    Money will buy everything
        Page 170
        Page 170a
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Brave against his will
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 176a
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 182a
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 186a
        Page 187
        Page 188
    The Jutlander and his stockings
        Page 189
    The trial
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
    The princess who said
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
    The obstinate shoemaker
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
    The merchant
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 204a
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 210a
        Page 211
        Page 212
    The cunning man in Hilltown
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 214a
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 216a
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
    Princess Rosamund
        Page 220
        Page 220a
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
    The knapsack
        Page 226
        Page 226a
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 232a
        Page 233
        Page 234
    The garden of childhood
        Page 235
        Page 236
    The man without a heart
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 238a
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
    James, the huntsman
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 254a
        Page 255
    Mother's pet
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 260a
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
    Bend the bough in time
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
    The boiled eggs
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
    Three happy tailors
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
    The pike
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
    The deacon's dream
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
    The deacon's wife
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
    Advertising
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



















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[Page 243
"HE PAID NO ATTENTION TO HER TEARS AND PRAYERS"






Danish

Fairy &Folk ales
A Collection of Popular Stories and
Fairy Tales. From the Danish of
SVND GRUNDTVIG, E.T. KRISTENSEN
INGVOR BONDESEN, and L. BUDDE
By
J. Christian Bay
Profusely Illustrated






NEW YORK AND LONDON
HARPER & BROTHERS PUBLISHERS
1899































































Copyright, 1899, by HARPER & BROTHERS.

All rights reserved.

























TO

HELMUTH OLE CHRISTIAN BAY

FATHER'S OWN BOY

WHO ALWAYS LIKED A MAOUW-BOOK"















PREFACE


HE fairy tales and popular stories gath-
ered in this volume are "Danish" only
insomuch as they have been collected
among the population of Denmark, and
are colored by the thinking and doing of the people
of this country. It would be difficult, indeed, to
apply the name of any nationality to any of the
numerous popular stories gathered by a host of ar-
dent and studious collectors in the different Euro-
pean countries. Very few of all these tales can be
truthfully said to have originated in the native land
of those into whose spiritual life they have entered.
The framework of all genuine European fairy and
folk tales are of Indo-European origin. The stories
have spread from one country to another, and from
one individual to another, without losing their
original typical character; they have become dis-
seminated among the population by means of liv-
ing words-words which sound and are heard-
which breathe into the listening ear the glee and






PREFACE


woe of the hero; the sorrows of the faithful against
whom foul play is started, and the many insignifi-
cant yet collectively important details and inci-
dents that produce the obligate tears or smiles.
Whether told in the Jutlander's broken dialect,
the singing tone of the Fynboer," or in the Zea-
lander's rolling provincialism, these tales are built
upon the same foundation, and become adapted,
through sympathies roused, or indignation called
forth, to the receptive powers of the listeners with
which the story-teller is always familiar. Thus the
form in which we receive a story from some old
woman, or nurse, depends in a certain measure
upon the ways and habits of the population which
has preserved the tale. At the same time, the in-
genuity and the memory of the narrator are impor-
tant factors in producing the dramatic or moral
tenor appreciated by the listener. Hence the same
story may be found in Denmark, Germany, Servia,
or England, comprising the same facts and founded
upon one common "plot," with the exception of
certain details; but the mode of telling, the tinge
of nationality or of individual peculiarities-these
are as different as the momentous charm produced
in telling.
The folk tales of the Danes are prominently illus-
trative of the ways and habits of this nation. In-
terwoven as they are with the best and brightest
thoughts, hopes, and aspirations of "the plain peo-
ple "-the rural population-they cannot but repre-






PREFACE


sent certain essential features of popular belief and
aspiration. They are never better understood than
when told by an old farmer in his frieze coat, "tas-
selled cap of red," and wooden shoes with straw in
the bottom. In fact, there is no better means of
communication from man to man than the living
word.
May this train of Danish kings and queens, wise
men and fools, princes and beggars, peasants and
burghers, soldiers, fairies, and trolls-may they
all be kindly welcomed by our American boys and
girls!
The sources from-which most of these stories
were gathered are principally the works of the late
Professor Svend Grundtvig, one of the most con-
scientious Danish folk-lore students. In addition
thereto, the collections of E. Tang-Kristensen, Ing-
vor Bondesen, and Molbech have been consulted.
The writings of Budde, Jens Kamp, and a few oth-
ers have supplied a few tales, and in a few cases
personal memories were called to assistance.
Mrs. Dora Bay, my wife, and Miss Mary Whit-
comb, of the Iowa State Historical Department,
have given me much good advice, for which I am
truly grateful.
J. C. B.






















CONTENTS


PAGE
A ROSE-LEAF . . . I
SAUCY JESPER .... ............ 4
THE COFFEE-MILL WHICH GRINDS SALT . .. .II
BEAUTY AND THE HORSE . . .. 14
THE KING AND THE MILLER. . . 21
THE THREE PENNIES . . . .23
THE LITTLE MARE .............. 28
GREYFOOT . . . .. 35
THE MASTER FOOL . . . .. 47
WHAT THE CHRISTMAS STAR SEES
I. UNDER THE ANGEL'S WINGS . .. .53
II. A CHRISTMAS GIFT . .. 57
III. NUMBER 101 .. . . 61
NEVER MIND THE MONEY. . . .. 67
THE BULL AND THE PRINCESS AT THE GLASS MOUNTAIN 73
THE SUNSHINE ...... ......... SI
THE LAWYER'S ADVICE .... . .84
PETER HUMBUG AND THE WHITE CAT . .. .87
A FUNNY FELLOW .............. 97
PETER FIDDLE-DE-DEE . . . 99
THE COVETOUS MAN. . . .. .06
DOCTOR AND DETECTIVE . . . III








CONTENTS
PAGE
HANS HUMDRUM. . . . ... 119
THE BOY WHO WENT TO THE NORTHWIND ... 13
A FEARLESS BOY . . . 135
FORTUNE AND KNOWLEDGE. . ... 144
THE SUITOR . . . .. 150
LOST AND FOUND . . . 155
THE WONDERFUL POT . . .. 164
MONEY WILL BUY EVERYTHING . .. 70
BRAVE AGAINST HIS WILL ... ..... .175
THE JUTLANDER AND HIS STOCKINGS . .. .189
THE TRIAL . . . ... .190
THE PRINCESS WHO SAID:- . . 194
THE OBSTINATE SHOEMAKER . . .. 199
THE MERCHANT. . . . .202
THE CUNNING MAN IN HILLTOWN . . 213
PRINCESS ROSAMUND. . . .. .220
THE KNAPSACK . . . ... .226
THE GARDEN OF CHILDHOOD . . 235
THE MAN WITHOUT A HEART . . .. .237
JAMES, THE HUNTSMAN . . .. 247
MOTHER'S PET . . . 256
BEND THE BOUGH IN TIME . . .264
THE BOILED EGGS . . . 268
THREE HAPPY TAILORS . . .. .272
THE PIKE . .. . .. 82
THE DEACON'S DREAM.. .. . .. .289
THE DEACON'S WIFE . . .. 292























ILLUSTRATIONS





"HE PAID NO ATTENTION TO HER TEARS AND
PRAYERS . . .. Frontisiece
"THE WONDERFUL PROCESSION" . .. Facing p. 8
"A BEAUTIFUL YOUNG PRINCE STOOD BEFORE HER" 18
"'I AM THE COUNT OF RAVENSBURG" 26
"THE SHABBY RIDER AND HIS HORSE" . 30
"THE COURIERS LANDED AND DELIVERED THEIR
MESSAGE". ... . . 38
S' DEAR GREYFOOT, DO NOT WALK SO FAST !' 40

THE MISFORTUNE OF THE PRINCESS. ... 42
" OH, PSH-A-AW!'" . . 84
"'LOOK WHAT I HAVE FOUND !' ...... 102
"THE ANIMAL JUMPED THE GARDEN FENCE" .. 126
"THE TAIL SLIPPED OUT OF HIS HANDS" .. 128
"'EXCUSE ME,' SAID HANS" .. . 138
"'YOU SEEM TO BE A BRAVE BOY'" ..... 140
"FORTUNE AND KNOWLEDGE TOOK A WALK TO-
GETHER . . 144
IN THE HANGMAN'S HANDS . . 148
"'THAT IS A DOG'S LIFE'" . .. 156
" THE PRINCESS RECEIVED HIM GLEEFULLY" 160









ILLUSTRATIONS

THE WRITING ON THE WALL. . .Facingj. 170
"A LITTLE TAILOR WAS SITTING .... 176
"HE SWOONED AWAY". . .. 182
"THE TAILOR MADE FOR THE CHAPEL" 186
"NONE OF THEM WAS WILLING TO COMPLY 204
"THE GHOST CONDUCTED HIM INTO THE CELLAR" 210
" 'IT IS A SHEEP-PAINTER "' ...... 214
"SUCH A POT MUST BE A GREAT MARVEL" 216
ROSES, PEARLS, AND GOLD PIECES ..... 220
" SO HE GAVE THE OLD WOMAN ONE OF HIS PEN-
NIES" . ...... .. 9 226
" EVIL-SMELLING POWDER FELL OUT ". ... 232
"ASSUMED THE SHAPE OF A GHOST'S FIGURE". 238
" 'NOW WE MUST CALL THE KING OF THE DWARFS'" 254
" BOTH KNELT DOWN AND DRANK .. .. 260



















DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES
















DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES



A ROSE-LEAF

AD the fountain of speech dried up, or
why did silence prevail in the High
Council of Babylon?
There they were, seated in a circle,
all the wise fathers of the great city; all were ab-
sorbed in deep meditation, fixing their glances upon
the ground as if expecting that help and advice
would grow up, like herbs and flowers.
What had brought the High Council of Babylon
into such a state of helplessness and confusion ? It
was a small slip of parchment upon which were
written these words: "Abdul Kader asks Babylon to
show him hospitality."
Abdul Kader-the light of the Orient, the wisest
among wise men-whose speech was vivifying as
balsam, refreshing as rain. He asked Babylon to
open its gates for him-Babylon, the city of thou-






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

sands, numbering already hundreds of thousands.
Were he admitted, ten would follow, and hundreds
would follow the ten, and thousands would follow
the hundreds.
But the worthy man must not be treated like an
unwelcome beggar. He could not be refused ad-
mittance! And yet-
Suddenly the doors were opened, and Soleiman,
the Elder, entered the hall. The marks of wisdom
were written by age upon his forehead.
When he saw the lines written upon the slip of
parchment he remained standing in the middle of
the hall. Every one gazed at him, but a long time
elapsed; then a ray of light gleamed from his eyes,
and seizing a costly cup, he said to the Council,
"Arise, and follow me."
They all followed him to the fountain near the
gate of the city. Here Soleiman filled the cup
with water, and when it was unable to hold another
drop, he lifted it, and with a kind smile, but with-
out speaking, held the golden chalice towards
Abdul Kader, as if wishing to say: Behold! Baby-
lon is like this cup which cannot hold another
drop of water; Babylon has not room for another
man.
But Abdul Kader smilingly reached down, picked
a rose-leaf from the ground, and cautiously placed
it on the surface of the water in the cup. He spoke
not, but Soleiman extended his hands towards him,
and the Council forming a procession, conducted






A ROSE-LEAF

him to the hall. Abdul Kader had solved the
problem.
A wise man is like the rose-leaf on the water.
The leaf floats on the surface without exerting any
pressure; the wise man is no source of trouble to a
community. He beautifies it.















SAUCY JESPER


HERE was once a king who lived far, far
away in a country the name of which
no one knows. He had an only daugh-
ter, who was of so sad and melancholy
a disposition that no one remembered having ever
seen her smile. She was now a grown girl, pretty
and good, but always sorrowful and downcast; if
she did not weep she was melancholy, and showed
such low spirits that it seemed utterly impossible
for any one to cheer-or to gladden her.
The king was of a very amiable disposition, and
indeed a very able man to manage his country;
but the condition of his daughter caused him such
deep distress and anxiety that he became gloomy
and was out of humor. He had only this one
child, and she would, of course, inherit the king-
dom when he died. She looked so downcast, how-
ever, that he feared she might suffer an early and
untimely death.
The king consequently made known throughout
the land that he who could win a smile from the
princess would be honored with her hand in mar-







SAUCY JESPER

riage and ascend the throne with her when he,
himself, died. There were many who came and
tried their best, but no one could even make her.
smile. They only succeeded in making twofold
fools of themselves, first, when they attempted to
amuse her, and, second, when they were obliged to
return home with a long face-disappointed.
His majesty grew tired of witnessing all their
endeavor: both the merriment he had to look at
and the jokes to which he must listen wearied him;
but he was disappointed, especially, when he
looked at his daughter, who remained as gloomy
and sour-faced as before, in spite of all their pranks
and jokes. A new order was now given to the effect
that those who came and tried, without success, to
make the princess laugh, should be dipped in tar,
rolled in feathers, and sent away in disgrace. This
edict lessened the number of contestants, but the
princess remained as downhearted as before.
In the same land there lived a man who had three
sons; the eldest was called Peter, the second Paul,
and the youngest Saucy Jesper. They lived a quiet,
secluded life, hence a long time passed before they
learned of the king's edict, and how easily their
fortunes were made if they could win a laugh from
the princess. Peter thought he might as well do
his best, and try. His mother gave him a good
knapsack, and his father a purse filled with money.
Thus equipped, he started on his journey.
On his way he met an old woman who drew a
5






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

small sledge after her. She stopped and asked him
for a bite of bread and.a penny. Peter answered,
however, that he had no more of each than he
would need in the long voyage before him. "Your
voyage may be an unhappy one," said the woman.
But Peter did not listen to her; he went on, an-
nounced himself at the royal palace, and was ush-
ered into the presence of the king and the princess.
He now began singing the funniest songs ever heard
-this was the art in which he trusted-and one
after another he sang the most amusing airs, but
with no effect; the princess remained gloomy as
ever. Peter was accordingly dipped in tar, rolled
in feathers, and dismissed from the palace. His
mother used a whole barrel of butter in removing
all the tar from him.
If Peter did not succeed, Paul might have better
fortune, at least he thought so, and wished to try.
He, too, received a good-sized knapsack and a purse;
and he, too, met the old woman, who asked for a
bite of bread and a penny. But as he also refused
to help her, she left him saying that his journey
might not bring him happiness. When Paul was
called into the presence of the king and the princess,
he tried his art, which was to tell the funniest stories
anybody had ever heard, and with which he had
amused many other persons. He did his best; both
he and the king laughed heartily, but the princess
only yawned. So he met Peter's fate and returned
home in a miserable condition.






SAUCY JESPER

Saucy Jesper was not frightened by the awful
fate of his two brothers, but declared he would start
on the same errand. "What are you thinking of !"
said his parents. How can you imagine that you
will ever succeed when both of your brothers failed ?
And yet they are better men than you. They know
-songs and stories, and you know nothing but how
to make such a fool of yourself that one can both
laugh and cry over it."
"To laugh is sufficient," said Jesper. As no
amount of reasoning would move him, and as he was
determined to go, his mother gave him a piece of
dry bread, and his father one penny, whereupon he
left with no one's blessing.
When he had walked a while, and needed rest, he
seated himself at the road-side and began eating
his dry bread. While he was thus engaged, an old
woman came along the road, drawing a small sledge
after her. She stopped and begged for a bite of
bread and a penny. Jesper at once gave her what
remained of his bread, and his one penny.
"Whither are you going ?" asked the woman.
"To the king's palace. I think I can make the
princess laugh, and then I shall marry her," an-
swered Jesper.
How will you do it ?" continued the woman.
Jesper said he did not know, but hoped he would
get an idea.
"I think I can help you," said the woman,
"since you helped me. You may have my sledge-
7







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

you will notice there is a little bird carved on the
back. When you seat yourself in it, and say 'Pip,
little bird !' it will drive along, until you cry stop.
When any one touches the sledge the bird will say
'Pip.' If then you call 'Hold on !' they must re-
main where they are until you bid them 'Let go!'
Be careful that no one shall steal your vehicle, and
I think you will be successful."
Jesper thanked her kindly for the good gift, seated
himself in the sledge, said "Pip, little bird !" and
was at once carried as swiftly along the road as if
drawn by a pair of the best horses. All who saw it
became so astonished that they nearly dropped nose
and mouth from surprise. Jesper did not care, how-
ever; he drove straight onward until evening, when
he stopped at an inn to rest for the night. He tied
the sledge to his bed in order to prevent its being
stolen. But the people at the inn having seen him
arrive were, of course, very curious to know more
about the remarkable vehicle. Late at night, when
everybody thought he was asleep, one of the ser-
vant-girls, anxious to examine the wonderful sledge,
stole slyly into the room. But as soon as she
touched the sledge the bird said "Pip !" "Hold
on !" commanded Jesper, and there the girl stood,
unable to tear herself loose. Soon another girl stole
into the room and took hold of the sledge. "Pip!"
cried the bird again. "Hold on !" shouted Jesper.
There were three servant girls at the inn, all
equally curious, so at length the third one came
8




























































" THE WONDERFUL PROCESSION"






SAUCY JESPER

in and was caught like the rest. There all three
stood.
Early in the morning, before any one was up,
Jesper took his sledge into the court-yard, the girls,
of course, following. Appearing not to see or hear
them, he took his seat, saying "Pip, little bird !"
and the sledge immediately began to move on as
the day before. The girls, who were not prepared
for such an event, ran as fast as they could, and you
may be sure that they had a most excellent exer-
cise at this early hour of the day.
After a while they passed a church. It so hap-
pened that the minister and the sexton were about
to walk in; but when they became aware of the
singular procession, they stopped and gazed at it in
great astonishment. The minister became angry
and called to the girls to stop. As they did not
obey him, he ran after them and tried to hold them
back. Pip !" said the bird. "Hold on !" added
Jesper, and the minister was obliged to follow, run-
ning at the top of his speed. The sexton, who saw
this, and considered it his duty to assist the minis-
ter, ran after them and caught hold of the reverend
gentleman's coat-tails. "Pip!" "Hold on!" said
Jesper again, and the poor sexton was forced to
dance along with the rest.
They soon reached a blacksmith-shop, the owner
of which was standing near the road with a pair of
tongs in one hand, and in the other one some hay
he was reaching to a horse which he had just been
9






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

shoeing. This blacksmith was a merry fellow, and
when the procession passed him he burst into
laughing and reached for the sexton with his tongs.I
"Pip!" said the bird. "Hold on!" cried Jesper ; and
the blacksmith was, himself, forced to fall in line.
Some geese came walking slowly along. When they
saw the hay in the blacksmith's hand, they could not
afford to miss the opportunity, but rushed after and
snapped at it. They could not tear themselves loose
again, however, but were obliged to join the parade.
Very soon Jesper and his followers arrived at
the palace, and passing through the gate, in great
speed, drove three times around the court-yard.
The girls wept and cried; the minister and the sex-
ton panted and yelled; the blacksmith laughed and
swore, and the geese quacked and hissed.. The
whole court came out and looked at this wonderful
procession. The king laughed until the tears stood
in his eyes, and when he turned around-behold!
there the princess was standing, laughing as if she
would never stop, and wiping the tears from her
eyes with her handkerchief.
"Stop!" cried Jesper. The sledge obeyed. "Let
go!" was the next command. The geese, the black-
smith, the sexton, the minister, and the girls im-
mediately disappeared in different directions.
But Jesper skipped up-stairs to the princess.
"Now you are cured," said he, and now you are
mine !" And thus it came to pass that Saucy Jesper
came into possession of the princess and the kingdom.
















THE COFFEE-MILL WHICH GRINDS SALT

HERE was once a little boy by the name
of Hans. As his parents died while he
was very young, his grandmother took
care of him and taught him reading and
writing, and to be a good boy. When she became
very old, and thought she was about to die, she
called the little boy to her and said: "I am old,
Hans, and may not live long. You were always a
good boy, and therefore you shall have my only
treasure, a coffee-mill which I have always kept at
the bottom of my old chest. This coffee-mill will
grind all that you wish. If you say to it, 'Grind
a house, little mill,' it will work away, and there
the house will stand. When you say, 'Stop, little
mill,' it will cease to grind."
Hans thanked his grandmother kindly, and
when she died, and he was, alone in, the world, he
opened the chest, took the coffee mill, and went
out into the world. When he had walked a long
distance, and needed something to eat, he placed
the mill on the grass and said, "Grind some
bread and butter, little mill." Very soon Hans had
TI






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

all that he needed, and then he bid the mill to
stop.
The next day he came to a large seaport, and
when he saw the many vessels, he thought it would
be pleasant to see more of the great world. He
therefore boarded one of the ships and offered his
service to the sailors. As it just happened that the
captain needed a boy of Hans's age, he told him to
stay.
As soon as the ship was out of port, the sailors
commenced abusing Hans. He bore the harsh
treatment as well as he could, and when he had
nothing to eat the mill ground all that he wished.
The bad men wondered how he could always be
contented, although they gave him but little to eat.
One day one of them peeped through a hole in the
cabin door and discovered how the coffee mill
served him. Now the sailors offered a large sum
of money to Hans if he would sell his treasure.
He refused, however, saying that it was all that his
good old grandmother had left him. So one day
these wicked men threw Hans overboard and seized
the mill. As they were in need of some salt, they
bid it grind for them. The mill immediately be-
gan its work, and soon they had enough. Now they
asked it to stop, but as the one who had peeped
through the hole into the boy's cabin had not
learned the exact command, the mill refused to
obey, and before long the ship was filled with salt.
The men grew desperate, but none of them was






COFFEE-MILL WHICH GRINDS SALT

able to find a way out of the difficulty. So at
length the ship sank down with the mill, the salt,
and all the wicked men. The men were drowned,
but the mill is yet standing at the bottom of the
sea, grinding away, and for this reason the water
in the ocean has and always will have a salt taste.
















BEAUTY AND THE HORSE


HERE was once a merchant whose busi-
ness was so immense that he was the
wealthiest tradesman known. He had
three daughters, one of whom was
named Beauty. One day the merchant received
word from friends far away, informing him of the
failure of one of his connections, and he at once
prepared himself for a journey to that place. The two
older daughters asked him to buy all sorts of finery
and dresses for them, but Beauty asked for nothing
at all. When the merchant left, these two girls had
rubbed their eyes with onions in order to look as if
they were sorry to bid him good-bye; but Beauty
needed no such artifice; her tears were quite
natural.
So the merchant went away, and in due time
arrived at the place where the tradesman of whom
he had heard the bad news was living. But instead
of obtaining money, as he hoped, he was kicked and
beaten so violently that it seems a great wonder he
came away without losing his life. Of course he
had now nothing to do but return, so he mounted
14






BEAUTY AND THE HORSE


his horse and turned homeward. Towards evening
he unfortunately lost his way, and when it became
quite dark he knew no better than to ride in the
direction of a light which was shining from a dis-
tance. At length he reached a beautiful little palace,
but although it was lighted, there seemed to be no
one at home. After a while he found a shelter and
food for his horse -pure oats, and nothing else.
The animal might well dance for joy, for both man
and beast were wellnigh exhausted from the long
ride. When the horse had been provided for, the
master stepped into the palace. There a light was
burning, and a table was laid for one person, but no
one was to be seen. As the merchant was tired,
he sat down without invitation, and ate a hearty
supper. A fine bed was there, too, and when he
had eaten enough he stretched himself among the
pillows and enjoyed a good night's rest.
The next morning everything appeared as on the
evening before. The horse was well supplied, and
as breakfast was ready on the table, the merchant
seated himself, doing justice to the good meal. As
he was now ready to leave, he thought it might be
well to look over the premises, and glancing into
the garden he perceived some exquisite flowers. He
went down, intending to carry some of them home
with him as a present for Beauty; but no sooner
had he touched them than a horse came running
towards him as fast as it could trot, saying: "You
thoughtless man; I was good to you last night, I
15






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

gave you shelter and provisions, and now you
would even take with you the most beautiful flow-
ers in my garden."
The merchant immediately begged pardon, say-
ing that he had intended the flowers as a gift for
Beauty, his daughter.
"Have you several daughters ?" asked the horse.
Yes, I have three, and Beauty is the youngest
one," he replied.
"Now you must promise me," said the horse, "that
you will give me the daughter whose name is
Beauty ; if you refuse, I will take your life."
Well, the merchant did not wish to lose his life,
so he promised to bring his daughter to the palace,
whereupon the horse disappeared among the trees,
and the man rode home.
As soon as he reached his house, the two older
daughters came out and asked him for the fine
things which they were expecting. But Beauty
came and bid him welcome. He produced the
flowers and gave them to her, saying, These are
for you, but they cost your life;" and he then told
her how he had been obliged to make the fatal
promise to the horse, in order to save his life.
Beauty at once said, "I am willing to follow you,
father, and am always glad to help you." They
started on their journey, and soon arrived at the
palace.
As before, no one was to be seen, but the mer-
chant found food for his horses and a good stable.






BEAUTY AND THE HORSE


The table was also laid for two persons, and there
were two beds. Having done justice to the supper,
father and daughter retired and slept soundly.
When they awoke the next morning, they found
breakfast ready for both, ate heartily, and having
exchanged many loving and tender words, they
separated, the father riding away. We will let him
proceed, and see what occurred at the palace.
Shortly before dinner time the horse arrived.
He came into the room and said, "Welcome,
Beauty !" She did not feel very glad, and had all
she could do in keeping her tears back. "Yofi
shall do nothing but walk around in these rooms
and in the garden," continued the horse. "Your
meals are provided for. I shall come home every
day at noon; at other times you must not expect
me."
Time passed, and Beauty felt so lonely that she
often longed for noon, when the horse came home,
and she could talk with him. She gradually came
to look at him more and more kindly; but one
thing caused her great distress, namely, that she
had no news from her father. One day she men-
tioned this to the horse.
Yes," said he, I understand that very well. In
the large room you will find a mirror in which you
can see all that you are thinking of."
She was happy to learn this, and went straight
into the room where the mirror was hanging. As
soon as she thought of her father, her old home






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

was visible in the glass, and she noticed how he
was sitting in his chair with a sorrowful expression
upon his countenance, while his two daughters
were singing and dancing. Beauty felt sorry over
this state of affairs, and the next day she told the
horse what she had seen.
Your father is sorry, I suppose," said the horse,
"because he has lost you. He will soon feel better,
however."
But on the next day, when Beauty consulted the
mirror, her father looked pale and ill, like one who
is deadly sick; both of her sisters were dressed for
a ball, and neither of them seemed to care for the
weak man. Beauty burst into tears, and when the
horse came home, asking what ailed her, she told
him of the bad state of affairs, wishing that he
would allow her to return and nurse her poor father
during his illness.
"If you will promise to come back," said the
horse, "you may return and stay for three days;
but under no condition must you break your word."
Beauty told him she would come back in three
days.
"To-night," resumed the horse, "before going to
bed, you must place the mirror under your pillow,
saying: 'I wish to be home to-morrow.' Then
your wish will be fulfilled. When you desire to re-
turn, you must do likewise."
The next morning, when Beauty awoke, she was
at her old home. Her father became so glad to see






















































"A BEAUTIFUL YOUNG PRINCE STOOD BEFORE HER"







BEAUTY AND THE HORSE


her again that he at once felt a great deal better.
She cared so well for him that the next day he was
able to be up, and on the third day he was almost
well. As he wished her to stay with him a few days
longer, she complied, thinking that no harm would
come from it. On the third day after, however,
when she looked into the mirror, she saw the horse
stretched on'the ground in front of the bench which
was her favorite seat in the garden. She now felt
that it would be impossible for her to remain longer,
hence in the evening, before going to bed, she
placed the mirror under her pillow, saying: "I
wish to be at the palace to-morrow morning."
She promptly awoke in the palace the following
morning, and hurrying into the garden she found
the horse so very sick that he could not stand on
his legs. Beauty knelt down and asked him to for-
give her for staying away longer than she had
promised. The horse asked her if she could not
persuade herself to stay with him all her life, but
she answered that it would seem very singular to
live with a horse all her lifetime. The poor animal
now sighed so deeply that she took pity on him and
said, fearing that he might die then and there, that
she would always stay with him and never leave
him. As soon as she had made this promise, the
horse vanished, and a beautiful young prince stood
before her. He seized her hand and asked whether
she was not sorry for the promise she had made.
No, she said, she would rather stay with him now
19






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

than when he was in the shape of a horse. He now
told her that both he and the whole land had been
enchanted by his wicked step-mother, who had con-
verted him into a horse, and told him that only
when a beautiful young girl would promise to stay
with him, in his altered shape, would the enchant-
ment be over. He wanted to marry Beauty, and
live in the palace which belonged to him.
So they sent for her father to take up his resi-
dence with them, and now the marriage was per-
formed and celebrated in a splendid manner. They
lived long and happily together, the prince and his
Beauty.















THE KING AND THE MILLER


NCE there was a wealthy miller who
lived near the high-road. Above his
door he had written these words: "Here
lives a man who is free from sorrows
and trouble." One day the king, happening to pass
the house, stopped and read the inscription. I
shall give him trouble," thought he, and having
ordered the miller to appear before him, he gave
him three questions to be answered to the king's
satisfaction within three days. If he failed to
answer the questions, he must forfeit his life.
As the miller walked about in the fields ponder-
ing on this difficult problem, his shepherd asked
what grieved him, since he looked so troubled. "It
is of no use to tell you," answered the miller, "for
you cannot help me." "Yes," said the shepherd,
"if you will only tell me all about it, I am ready to
help you." So the miller told him all. "Oh, is it not
worse ?" exclaimed the shepherd. "If I may borrow
your clothes, I will answer the questions for you."
On the appointed day the king returned, and the
shepherd received him in the miller's clothes.






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

The first question was: "How long will it take
me to make a voyage around the world ?" "May I
take time to consider?" asked the shepherd. The
time was granted him, and in a little while he said:
" If your Majesty follow the sun, it will take only
twenty-four hours." "That is well enough," said
the king, "but can you tell me how much I am
worth in my full equipment ?" The shepherd an-
swered : Our Saviour was sold for thirty pieces of
silver, therefore your Majesty cannot be worth
more than twenty-nine." This answer was also
well received; but at last the king said: "Now I
shall ask the third question, and you must have no
time for consideration. Can you tell me what I am
thinking ?" "Yes," replied the shepherd ; "your
Majesty thinks you are speaking to the miller; but
I am only his shepherd."
The king at once declared himself satisfied, and
the miller escaped further trouble.















THE THREE PENNIES


ANY years ago an old soldier was dis-
charged from the army. He received in
consideration of his excellent and faith-
ful service a small loaf of rye -bread
and three pennies, whereupon he was at liberty to
go whither he pleased. As he was walking along
the high-road, he met three men; the one carried
a shovel, the second a pickaxe, and the third a
spade. The soldier stopped, looked at them, and
said, Where are you going ?" I will tell you,"
answered one of them. "To-day there was buried a
man who owed each of us one penny, and now we
will dig him up, since we are determined upon get-
ting our dues." "What an idea!" returned the
soldier; you had better leave the dead man alone.
At any rate, he is at present unable to pay you even
one penny, so don't disturb his peace !" "It is all
very fine for you to talk," answered the man ; "but
we must have the money, and up he must come."
When the soldier felt that his fair words could
not settle the matter, he said, "Here, I have two
pennies; will you take them and promise to leave







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

the dead man undisturbed?" "Two pennies are
not to be refused," said the man again, "but they
will pay only two of us. What can you give the
third one, since he is bent upon having his share ?"
As the soldier saw that there was no dealing with
these three wretches, he resumed: Since you are so
desperately determined, here is my third and last
penny. Take it, and be content." Now all three
were well satisfied, so they pursued their way with
the three pennies in their pockets.
When the soldier had advanced a distance, a
stranger came walking along. He looked rather
pale, but saluted the soldier in a very civil manner,
and followed him along the road without uttering
a single sound. At last they reached a church, and
here the stranger turned to his companion, saying,
"Let us walk in !" The soldier looked wistfully at
him, and answered: "That would not do. What
business have we in the church at midnight ?" "I
tell you," replied the stranger, "we must walk in !"
Upon this they entered the church and walked
straight up to the altar. There was an old woman
sitting with a burning light in her hand. "Take a
hair from her head, and smell at it !" commanded
the stranger. The soldier complied, but nothing
remarkable happened. The stranger asked him to
repeat the action, which he did; but there was no
effect. The third time, however, when he tore a
whole tuft of hair from the woman's head, she
became so furious that she darted off, out above
24






THE THREE PENNIES


the church, carrying the whole leaden vault with
her.
The two men went out of the church and down
to the beach, where they found the whole leaden
vault. Turning to the soldier, the stranger said,
"Sit up; we will put to sea !" Is that so ?" re-
marked the soldier, who understood nothing of all
this. "I see no ship, however." "Let me manage
it all," says the stranger ; just seat yourself by me
on the vault Beyond the sea there is a princess
of whom it was predicted that she would be married
only to a man who should come across the sea in a
leaden ship. Here you will be able to make your
fortune." The leaden vault now floated out upon
the open sea, and landed them safely on the other
side. Great was the joy and happiness throughout
the country, and the marriage between the soldier
and the princess was celebrated with such pomp
and splendor as was never seen, before or after.
When the ceremony had been performed, and the
carriage was standing in front of the church door,
bride and groom entered, with the stranger who
had followed the soldier all along. The coachman
asked to what place he might drive them. Drive
away, as fast as you can, towards the side where the
sun will rise," said the stranger, and in a little while
they were carried along at a furious rate. Some-
where they saw a large herd of cattle. They stopped,
and the soldier called the herdsman to the carriage
door, asking who he was. I am the Count of Ra-







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

vensburg," answered the shepherd, "and yonder is
my castle." The stranger again bid the coachman
drive as fast as possible. In a little while they
rushed up to Ravensburg Castle. As they were
ready to alight from the carriage, there was some
one who knocked hard at the gate. It was the herds-
man, who was anxious to come in. The stranger
walked to the gate, inquiring what he could do for
him. He wished to come into the castle, he said,
for it belonged to him, and he had a right to de-
mand admittance. The stranger meditated a little,
whereupon he told the herdsman-who was a con-
jurer-that he might be allowed to come in, but
first, he must suffer the whole fate of the rye.
"The fate of the rye!" repeated the conjurer;
"what do you mean by that?" "I mean," answered
the stranger, "that next fall you must be sown deep
in the ground, and towards spring, when you come
up, you must ripen in the sunshine and grow in the
rain until you are ready for the harvest. Then you
will be mowed and dried, and kept in the barn, until
at length you will be threshed." "How is that !"
cried the conjurer; "am I to be threshed ?" "Of
course you are," replied the stranger. "First you
will be threshed, and then taken to the mill and
ground." "Ground, too !" shouted the conjurer;
" will I be ground also?" "Yes, both ground and
sifted," answered the stranger. But the conjurer,
hearing this, became so furious that he burst all
into flint-stones.












































" 'I AM THE COUNT OF RAVENSBURG"'






THE THREE PENNIES

The stranger now bid good-bye to the princess
and the soldier, shook hands with them, and said:
" Now I have seen you married to the princess; the
troll of Ravensburg is dead and gone, and his castle,
with all its treasures, is yours. I was as good to
you as you were to me when you gave away your
three pennies for my sake !" "What do you say ?"
exclaimed the soldier ; "I never thought of those
three pennies again!" "I know that," answered the
stranger, "and otherwise I would not have been able
to help you. However, I bid farewell to you and
your wife, for I must return to the place where I
belong."















THE LITTLE MARE


NCE there was a king whose only son
was the most beautiful youth ever seen.
He was a tender -hearted and noble-
minded boy, but haughty and conceited
on account of his rank, his beauty and accomplish-
ments. As he was himself handsome, he liked all
that was fair and graceful, but hated anything ugly
or hideous; he would always say that he grew sick
when looking at what was displeasing to his eyes.
It happened one day, when he went hunting with
his comrades, and the party was camping near the
high-road to enjoy a good breakfast, that they no-
ticed an old man who came along the road riding
a miserable mare. This old man was very un-
pleasant to look at, as he was hump-backed and
one-eyed, had a crooked neck, and of course was
poorly dressed. The mare was not prettier than
her rider; she was a small, fleshy, long-haired jade,
lame in one fore-leg.
Pooh," said the prince, get that ugly old fellow
and his hideous mare out of the way. I cannot en-
dure the sight of anything so shocking." The
28







THE LITTLE MARE


courtiers were at once ready to obey him, and soon
the shabby rider and his horse were driven out of
the prince's sight.
The old man was not, however, what he appeared
to be, but a great and mighty conjurer, who did not
always present himself in such a wretched shape.
One day when the prince was walking alone in the
woods, the old man suddenly stood before him and,
touching him with his staff, said: "Now you try
and see what it is to be a mare like mine, and that
you shall be until an innocent young princess calls
you her dearest friend." The moment he had ut-
tered these words, the prince was transformed into
just such an ugly little mare as the one which he
could not bear to look at.
At the home of the prince every one was alarmed
at his disappearance, and no one knew what had
become of him. In the mean time he walked about
in the woods as a common little mare, not at all
satisfied with himself. He knew it would be useless
for him to return to his father's palace, as no one
would know or care for him. When he had been
walking about in the forest for a couple of days, a
little boy who gathered wood happened to see him,
and approaching him he patted his back and talked
kindly to him. The little mare followed the boy
wherever he went, and finally they came to the
boy's home just outside of the forest.
Look, father," said the boy," here I bring us a new
horse instead of the old one which died yesterday."
29






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

"That is a poor bargain," answered his father;
"this one is an utterly miserable animal. It is
hardly worth its feed; but we will try it, anyway."
So the little mare was put in the stable, and the
next day, when the man hitched her to his plough,
he found that she served him well. "She works
better than she looks," said he to Hans-this was
the boy's name; you must feed her well; in course
of time she may prove a great help." Hans thought
a great deal of his little mare, as he called her; he
curried and fed her with great care, and treated
her kindly. Of course she was obliged to work for
her food; but towards spring, when the fields had
all been tilled, the farmer said to his son: "To-
morrow you may go to town with the mare and
have two of her hoofs shoed, for now I will sell
her."
Hans was not pleased with this, for he would
rather keep his little mare. When he came to
town and had her two hoofs shoed a one-eyed man
came walking along, fell into talk with him, and at
length asked if he would sell the animal. "Two
hundred dollars is the price," answered Hans, jok-
ingly. "That is too much for her," said the man;
"but well and good, I will pay it." "No," said
Hans again, "she does not belong to me; she is the
property of my father, and I have no permission
to sell her." "Then you may go home and ask
permission," said the man. Hans declined, how-
ever; he mounted and rode home, but did not











































' THE SHABBY RIDER AND HIS HORSE"






THE LITTLE MARE


mention to his father the offer of the two hundred
dollars which had been made him.
Shortly afterwards there was a horse-market in
town, and the farmer now said to his son: "Go
and make the mare look pretty; I wish to take her
to the market." Hans was very sorry, and asked
his father if he would not allow him to take the
mare to the market. His father, however, desired
to go himself. "Then father must ask three hun-
dred dollars for her," said Hans. "You must be
mad, boy," answered his father; I know myself the
value of the horse. She is not worth even one
hundred dollars." Now Hans told that some one
had made him an offer of two hundred. "Then
you are a great fool," said his father, giving him a
good box on his ear. He mounted the mare and
rode away to the market-place. He was thinking,
however, of what Hans had said, and when any one
inquired how much he asked for the mare, he an-
swered, briskly: "Three hundred dollars." The
buyers laughed at him and said that was a large
price for such an old jade, worth not even one hun-
dred. The farmer did not lower the price, how-
ever, and at length an old one-eyed man came up
to him; he did not haggle about the price, but paid
it at' once and took the mare. The farmer went
home, and was well pleased with the profit he had
made. Hans wept, however, and was very sorry.
The next morning, when his father looked for him,
he was not to be found. "He has run after the






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

mare," said Hans's mother, and thus they satisfied
themselves.
Hans had, indeed, run after his little mare. In
town he succeeded in finding out that the man who
had bought her had gone with her to a place a hun-
dred miles away. He was thought to be a rich and
a great man, and presumably he belonged some-
where at the king's palace. Hans at once started
on his long journey, and finally had all the hun-
dred miles behind him. He went straight to the
king's palace, and applied for a place as groom.
This was granted him, but the mare was not to be
found in the king's stables.
One day Hans found a small carriage out in the
court-yard, and what should be attached to it but
his own dear little marei He was of course de-
lighted to find her again, and patted and talked
kindly to her. It so happened that at the same
moment the king's youngest daughter-as yet a
mere child-came running past; when she saw
Hans standing by the little mare she came up to
him and said: "Such a little pet I would like to
have; I could use it both for riding and driving.
Don't you think so, Hans?" Yes, Hans was quite
certain; he told her that he knew the animal to be
the swiftest and most pleasant in existence. The
little princess skipped up to her father and asked
him to buy the mare for her. "That ugly little
beast!" said the king; no, there are enough pretty
horses in my stable, and you may select for your-






THE LITTLE MARE


self the one you like best." She had taken such a
fancy to the mare, however, that she went on beg-
ging and praying, until the king assented and bought
the animal for her. "Now take good care of her,
Hans," said the little princess. Hans readily prom-
ised, and kept his word so well that every day the
little mare grew more and more beautiful. The
princess drove with and rode on her, and liked her
very much.
Some time afterwards the king's oldest daughter
-for he had two daughters and no sons-had been
fishing in a pond in the garden. She happened to
lose a ring which had belonged to her mother, and
as it was both a great treasure and a talisman, she
and her father were alike unhappy over her misfort-
une. The king ordered a careful search for it,
but all were unsuccessful. At last the king pro-
claimed that he who could find the ring could be
married to the princess and be endowed with one-
half of the kingdom. Many princes and noblemen
from this and other countries came and searched,
but no one found the ring, although several actually
lost their lives by exercising too much zeal.
In the mean time the little princess liked her
mare better and better every day; she both kissed
and patted it, and had it shoed with splendid gold
shoes.
One day, when Hans was watering the little mare
by the pond, he noticed a beautiful goldfish in the
water, and at once jumped for it, without, however,
c 33







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

succeeding in catching it. But a couple of days
after, when he again watered the mare, she kicked
the same goldfish to the shore. Hans seized the
fish and brought it to the king's kitchen, where
every one was anxious to see it. When it was cut
open the missing ring rolled out. Then the king
said to his oldest daughter: "Well, now, you will
have to marry Hans!" She was willing enough,
and so was Hans; but, he said, the honor was really
due rather to the little mare which had kicked the
fish ashore with her hoof.
When the little princess heard this she skipped
down to the stable, folded her arms around the
mare's neck, kissed her, and said: "No, you shall
not be married to my sister, she may take Hans;
but I am going to keep you always, for you are my
dearest friend." As soon as she had uttered these
words the mare was gone, and she was embracing
a beautiful young prince. He thanked her, and told
her all about his punishment, and how he had now
been set free. Afterwards they walked up to the
king, and their marriage was celebrated on the same
day when Hans was united with the other princess.
The beautiful prince went home to his father
with his bride, and his return caused great happi-
ness throughout the land. He is no more haughty
or conceited, but noble and good, and happy with
his little princess. Hans is also happy with his
princess, and is now in possession of the whole king-
dom, the old king having died.
34














GREYFOOT


HERE was once a king of England whose
daughter was very famous. She was
the most beautiful princess ever seen or
heard of. But she had one great fault
-namely, that she was haughty and proud. Of
course she had many suitors, but all were refused,
and as she possessed a sharp tongue, she moreover
scorned them, giving nicknames to every one who
was bold enough to woo her.
At that time there was a young prince in Den-
mark. The fame of her beauty had reached him,
and he sent word, asking for her hand in marriage.
The princess answered, however, that she would
rather earn her bread by spinning all her life than
marry such a poor and miserable prince. The
messengers were obliged to return with this un-
favorable response.
The young prince had determined, however, that
he would win her. He despatched fresh messengers
with letters, and sent her a gift consisting of six
beautiful horses, white as milk, with pink muzzles,
gold shoes, and scarlet rugs. Such horses had
35







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

never been seen in England before, hence the king
put in a good word for the Danish prince: He
who could send such a gift of betrothal must by all
means be considered her equal. But the beautiful
princess ordered the grooms to cut off the manes
and tails of the six steeds, to soil them with dirt,
and turn them over to the messengers, whom she
instructed to tell the prince that rather than be
married to him would she sit in the street and sell
earthen-ware.
When the messengers returned, relating all that
the princess had said and done, the Danish king
became so incensed that he wanted to put to sea
with all his ships and revenge this insult. His son
asked him, however, to desist from any such action;
he wished to attempt once more, by fair means.
If he were unsuccessful, he would himself know
how to take revenge. To this his father assented.
The prince now built a ship, so beautiful and
costly that its like had never been. The gunwale
was artistically carved with all sorts of animals;
deer, dragons, and lions were seen jumping about,
and the stem and stern were richly gilded. The
masts were mounted with gold, the sails made of
silk, every second canvas being red, and the remain-
der white. This ship was manned with the hand-
somest lads in the country, and the prince gave
them a letter to the king of England and his proud
daughter, the princess, asking her to accept him,
and receive the ship as his gift of betrothment.
36







GREYFOOT


The gorgeous ship rapidly crossed the sea and
stopped immediately outside of the royal palace.
It commanded general attention, no one having seen
such a magnificent vessel before. The couriers
landed and delivered their message. Now the king
used his best efforts to persuade his daughter: A
suitor so wealthy and munificent, so true and de-
voted as this prince, certainly deserved a favorable
answer.
The princess graciously listened to his entreaties,
feigning an intention to think the matter over until
the next day. But at night she gave orders to sink
the ship, and in the morning she told the couriers
to return as best they could; that she would rather
beg her food at the doors than call their poor fellow
of a Danish prince her husband.
The couriers returned to Denmark with this dis-
dainful answer, and with the tidings of the fate of
the king's ship, which was now, with its gilded
masts and its silken sails, at the bottom of the
sea. Upon hearing this, the king at once deter-
mined to man his fleet and take a bloody revenge.
The prince dissuaded him, however, vowing solemn-
ly that he would make the haughty princess repent
the disdain with which she had treated him.
Upon this he left Denmark quite alone, and
reached England, no one knowing him. Disguised,
as he was, in an old hat, dingy clothes, and wooden
shoes, he arrived at the palace towards evening and
asked the herdsman for a bite of bread and a couch.
37







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

He obtained both, and during the night kept com-
pany with the cows in the stable. The next morn-
ing the beggar-Greyfoot, so he called himself-
sought and obtained permission to help in driving
the cattle to their watering-place. The latter hap-
pened to be situated exactly outside of the windows
occupied by the princess. Greyfoot now opened a
bundle which he had brought with him, and pro-
duced a golden spindle which he proceeded to use
in driving forth the cows. The princess, who was
standing at one of the windows, saw the spindle,
and taking at once a great fancy to it, she sent
some one down to inquire whether the beggar were
willing to sell it. Greyfoot answered that he did
not care to sell it for money; the price he asked
was permission to sleep outside of her door the
following night. No, said the princess; she could
not think of such a price. "Very well," answered
Greyfoot; "that settles the matter, and I keep my
spindle." The princess had taken it into her head,
however, that she must possess the beggar's treasure,
but as she did not like any one to know that such
a poor-looking man was admitted to the palace, she
sent a secret message by one of her maids, telling
him to come late at night, and to be gone early in
the morning. This he did.
When the princess looked out of the window the
next morning, she noticed Greyfoot chasing the
cows with a golden reel, and at once sent one of
her maids down to inquire whether it could be
38






































"THE COURIERS LANDED AND DELIVERED THEIR MESSAGE"






GREYFOOT


bought. "Yes," said Greyfoot, "and the price is
the same as yesterday." When the princess heard
this she was not a little astonished by the audacity
of the beggar, but as the treasure could be obtained
in no other way, she assented, and everything pass-
ed as on the previous night.
The third morning Greyfoot drove the cattle to
the watering-place, as usual, but this time he was
using a weaver's shuttle of pure gold. She sent
for him, and when he appeared in her presence she
said: Now, Greyfoot, how much do you ask for
this treasure of yours? Will you take a hundred
dollars for it ?" No," answered Greyfoot, "it can-
not be bought for money. If you will permit me
to sleep inside the door of your room to-night, you
may have it." "I think you are mad," said the
princess. "No, I cannot hear of any such price.
But I am willing to pay you two hundred dollars."
"No," said Greyfoot again; "it must be as I say:
If you want the shuttle, you must pay the price
which I ask. Otherwise, I will keep the treasure
myself."
The princess looked at her maids, and they looked
back at her, and all looked at the magnificent shut-
tle. She must possess it, whispered the maids; they
would sit in a circle around her, keeping guard the
whole night. Finally the princess told Greyfoot
that he might come late at night; they would let
him in. He must be careful, however, and tell no
one, since they were all running a great risk. When
39






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

it grew late, and the princess was about to fall
asleep, the maids were all sitting around her, each
one holding a lighted candle in her hands. 'Grey-
foot entered, and quietly stretched himself on a
rug near the door. But as the maids were not
accustomed to much waking, one by one they be-
came drowsy, and very soon every one in the room
was soundly asleep. As the ladies had rested little
during the two previous nights, it was no wonder
that the sun did not wake them very early the next
morning.
The king, who was accustomed to see his daughter
at the breakfast-table, became alarmed when she
did not appear as usual, and hastened to her rooms.
Imagine his surprise when he found, outside of her
door, an old hat and a pair of well-worn wooden
shoes. Opening the door quietly, he stole into the
room. There the princess was, fast asleep, with all
her maids; and so was Greyfoot, on the rug inside
the door. Usually the king was a very amicable
and quiet man, but when this spectacle met his
eyes he became angry. He controlled himself,
however, and called his daughter's name aloud.
She awoke, and so did the maids, who at once es-
caped in all directions. But the king turned to his
daughter and said: I now see what kind of com-
pany you prefer, and although it is in my power to
let this fellow hang and have you buried alive, I will
allow you to keep each other. The minister shall
unite you in marriage, whereupon you will both be





















" 'DEAR GREYFOOT, DO NOT WALK SO FAST !"


UF






GREYFOOT


sent away. I will never bear the sight of you
again." The king left them, and shortly afterwards
the minister appeared with two witnesses. The
haughty princess was married to Greyfoot, the
beggar; then the couple were at liberty to go
whither they desired.
When they passed the barn-door Greyfoot turned
to the princess, saying: We cannot walk on the high-
road in this style; you must change your clothes be-
fore we depart!" So they paid a visit to the herds-
man's wife, who gave the princess-now Greyfoot's
wife-a gown of linsey-woolsey, a woollen jacket, a
cape, and a pair of heavy shoes. That fits better,"
said Greyfoot, and they walked away.
At first they walked each on his own side of the
road, without speaking; but in a little while the
princess raised her eyes to look at the man who
was now her rightful husband. To her astonish-
ment she observed that he was neither old nor
ugly, but really a handsome young man, in spite of
his old and dingy clothes. Being not accustomed
to walk very far, especially with such heavy foot-
wear, the princess soon felt exhausted, and said:
"Dear Greyfoot, do not walk so fast!" "No," he
returned, as I have now been burdened with you,
I suppose I cannot leave you on the open road."
So he entered the next house and hired an old
carriage, the bottom of which was covered with
straw. They now drove on, until at length they
arrived at a seaport. Greyfoot immediately sought







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

and obtained passage for himself and his wife, as
servants, and the princess felt much relieved when
at last they were out of her father's domains, al-
though she had no idea of their destination.
The voyage ended in Denmark, and when they
had safely landed, Greyfoot proceeded to rent a
small hut in the neighborhood of the royal palace.
It consisted of only one little room with a stone
floor and an open fireplace, where she must prepare
their frugal meals. In a little while Greyfoot went
out, and returned with an old spinning-wheel and a
large bundle of tow, of the meanest quality. While
you work with this," he said, "I must try to find
some occupation, as best I can. Neither of us can
afford to be idle."
Thus time passed slowly and quietly. Greyfoot
had secured work at the palace as a wood-cutter,
and returned every evening with a loaf of bread
and a few pennies. His wife was spinning until her
finger-tips were scorched, and her knees shaking
under her. One evening Greyfoot brought home a
wheelbarrow filled with earthen-ware. This he had
bought on credit, he said, and she was in duty
bound to go to town the next day and sell the
things. She of course made no objections. The
next day Greyfoot went to his work, as usual, and
his wife set out for the town with her earthen-ware.
But when she had just managed to sell a few of
them, a troop of stately knights came galloping
down the street. One of the horses became wild
42







































































THE MISFORTUNE OF THE PRINCESS






GREYFOOT


and rushed in among her articles, which went into
a thousand pieces under the heavy hoofs which
trampled upon them. The riders pursued their
way; but the poor princess returned to the hut,
and, sitting down, wept bitterly.
In the evening, when Greyfoot returned, she
told him of her misfortune. Now we are utterly
unfortunate," said he, "for I have no money with
which to pay for these articles. You will now have
to sew a wallet, go from door to door, and beg for
victuals and pennies, until our debts have been
paid." The princess did as he bid her, and was glad
that her husband did not scold her for her ill fort-
une. She begged at every one's door, bringing
home, at length, several pieces of bread and some
pennies.
"That will not bring us very far," said Greyfoot,
when the princess had displayed the contents of
the wallet. "I have now found a good place for
you at the palace. They are preparing for a wed-
ding, and to-morrow you are to lend a hand in the
kitchen. Do your best and make yourself useful;
maybe they will keep you and pay you good wages.
To-morrow you will obtain your meals and twenty
pennies."
The next morning, before Greyfoot's wife went
away, her husband said: "To-day I must stay at
home; I have felt an illness coming upon me,
so I will rest and try to get better." She burst
into tears, and told him that when he was ill she
43







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

could not think of leaving him. When he answered,
however, that she was expected, and necessarily
must go, she kissed him good-bye, hoping that he
would soon feel better, and promising to return as
speedily as possible.
"The haughty princess" spent the whole day
among the pots and pans in the royal kitchen.
When she returned to the hut, Greyfoot told her
that he felt better, and further related how an
order had been issued announcing that the Prince
of Denmark was to be married to a Russian prin-
cess. Her costly bridal-gown had arrived, but the
princess herself, having been detained by wind and
waves, was unable to arrive in .due time for the
ceremony, and on the following day every girl and
woman was to present herself at the palace and be
measured. She who filled the measure would be
selected as the bride's deputy. "And you," con-
cluded Greyfoot, "you must put in an appearance.
If you are fortunate, your wages may be sufficient
for paying our debts." V
In the morning Greyfoot declared that he felt
worse than on the day before, but would not keep
her from going. She hesitated, but as he insisted,
she threw her arms around him, kissed him, and left.
The royal measure was busy among the many
women assembled in the court-yard, and it seemed im-
possible to find any one who was the right measure.
But when at length he reached Greyfoot's wife, he
declared that she was the very person they wanted.
44






GREYFOOT


Now she was taken into the palace, and attired in
the gorgeous gown, the bridal veil, and a pair of
exquisite slippers. When finally the crown was
placed on her head, every one declared that the real
princess could hardly be prettier. In a little while
a beautiful carriage drawn by six milk-white horses
was seen at the door, and Greyfoot's wife was
asked to enter. The prince was already seated in
the carriage; she had never seen him, but remem-
bered having heard of him in past days.
They drove along the road until they came to
Greyfoot's hut. Seeing already at a distance that
it was afire, the poor woman in the carriage uttered
a piercing shriek, and cried: "My husband! save
him, for Heaven's sake! He was ill when I left
him, and may not have escaped." The prince now
spoke to her for the first time, and said: If that
ugly wood-cutter is your husband, you had better
leave him; he is no husband for you." But she an-
swered: "He is my husband, and was always good
andkind to me. How could I leave him? Even if
you offered me the place which I am now occupying
for your real bride, I would refuse it, and gladly re-
turn to the hut where I have lived the happiest
part of my life !"
The prince smilingly answered: You are my real
bride, and kept your word when you said that
rather than marry me would you earn your bread
by spinning, or by selling earthen-ware, or beg for
it at the doors."







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

Now she recognized him, and throwing her arms
around him, she said that her sufferings had been
of great benefit to her, and that she would now stay
with him forever.
Thus the haughty princess of England became
queen of Denmark. This happened so long ago,
however, that hardly any one remembers having
seen her. But the story is true, nevertheless.















THE MASTER FOOL


HERE once lived a woman who had a
very foolish boy. One day, when she
had been churning, the lad wished to
go to town and sell the butter. His
mother objected to this, saying it would not do at
all, as he had never been in town before; but as he
coaxed and pleaded for her permission, she at last
consented, gave him a roll of butter, whereupon he
went away.
The boy trudged along, and finally reached a
large stone. Supposing this stone to be the town,
he addressed it very politely, asking if it cared to
buy some butter. Of course the stone made no re-
ply. "I'll tell you," said the boy, "that my butter
is of a good quality. If you wish, you may have a
taste of it." Without waiting for permission, he
smeared a bit of butter on the stone, and as it was
a very warm day, it melted in the heat. Thinking
that the stone-or the town-ate it with delight,
the boy resumed : I observe that you seem to like
it. You may as well buy the whole, and I am will-
ing to wait for the money until to-morrow." So






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

he smeared the rest of the butter on the stone, and
returned home. His mother at once asked him
who had bought the butter, and what price he had
received for it. "I sold it to the town and gave
him credit until to-morrow," answered the boy.
" How so?" pursued his mother. "You sold it to
the town, you say? Why, that's nonsense. I
would like to know to whom in town you sold it !"
"Well," returned the lad, "I tell you that I sold it
to the town, just as you told me to do." "All right,
then," observed his mother; "we got rid of the
butter, anyway. It was, of course, foolish to let you
have it."
Next day the boy wanted to go and collect the
money. His mother declared that it would be of
no use: she knew he would secure nothing. But
he would not listen to her; he went on his own ac-
cord, and arrived at the stone. "I have come,"
said he, "to collect the money for the butter you
bought of me yesterday." The stone did not utter
a single word, however. Now the boy became
angry. "You wretch !" cried he; yesterday you
bought my butter, and to-day you refuse to pay for
it-nay, even to answer me. Upon my word, I will
show you that I am not to be trifled with." Thus
he took hold of the stone and struggled with it un-
til it tipped over, whereupon he found that it had
covered a pot filled with money. Not hesitating
for a moment, he picked it up and returned home
with it.






THE MASTER FOOL


When the woman saw her son return with so
much money, she was greatly astonished, and pro-
ceeded to ask him where and how he had procured
it. "I obtained it from the town, mother," an-
swered he. "At first it refused both to pay and
even to answer, so I grew angry, turned it over, and
took all its money. I was sure, all the time, that it
had enough to pay with; but it was stubborn, and
did not wish to pay." I don't comprehend your
foolish talk," answered his mother. How could
you overthrow the town? Never mind, however ;
you realized a great deal of money."
Some time passed, and the woman slaughtered
her cow. The boy wished to take the meat to town
and sell it; so a large piece was put into a basket,
with which he started off. This time he really
came to town. When he had walked about the
streets for a while, he met several dogs which bark-
ed at him. "How do you do !" said the boy. "Do
you wish to buy some meat?" The dogs barked
again. "Very well," answered our friend; "you
may taste it." The dogs at once began to eat it.
"Take all of it, then," said he, throwing the re-
mainder before them; "to-morrow I will come for
the money."
Next morning he returned and found the dogs in
the street. Having saluted them, he told them
that he had come for the money. The dogs barked
and barked, but produced no money. "What !"
cried he; "do you refuse to pay me? Indeed, I
D 49






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

will teach you manners." As one small dog car-
ried a pretty collar, he considered it one of the
prominent members of the party, and seizing it,
placed it under his arm, saying: "I see that you
refuse to pay what you owe me; but I will teach
you something else before we part. Depend
upon that!" Having delivered this speech, he
repaired to the king's palace, the dog under his
arm.
The king had a daughter who was very beauti-
ful, but always downcast and afflicted. Her father
had declared that he who was able to cheer her
and make her laugh would be at liberty to marry
her and ascend the throne with her when he him-
self died.
When the boy arrived at the palace one of the
sentinels stopped him, forbidding him to pass.
"How?" exclaimed the boy. "Am I not permitted
to seek my rights by the king, when I am being
cheated by villains? What a confounded state of
affairs!" "What is your errand, then?" inquired
the sentinel. The boy proceeded to tell him all,
whereupon he was allowed to pass on condition of
promising to pay the sentinel one-half of the money
for the meat. Soon he was stopped by another
guard, who also made him promise to pay one-half
of the money which he hoped to obtain. At length
he reached the king's rooms, and his presence was
announced. When the king appeared the boy told
him how wrongly he had been treated. The king







THE MASTER FOOL


merely shrugged his shoulders, and said: "If you
have sold the meat to the dogs you must see how
you can obtain your money. I cannot help you
collect it." "Well," said the boy to the dog,
catching hold of his collar and giving him a thor-
ough shaking, "you are a good specimen, aren't
you ?"
Upon this the king's daughter, who had listened
to the whole story, was unable to keep herself from
laughing. "Now you may secure a good price for
your meat," said the king to the lad, "for you are
free to marry my daughter." "No, I don't care for
her," answered he. "You don't!" said the king;
well and good, I will give you a sum of money,
for really I would rather that you should not marry
her." Money I don't care for," declared the boy.
"If money cannot satisfy you," inquired the king,
"what do you wish ?" "I wish sixty raps of basti-
nado for my meat," declared the boy. You shall
have them," answered the king, "although that
seems a poor reward." Come here," continued he,
turning to his men, and give this boy sixty raps
of bastinado." "No, thank you," said he; "the
sentinels must receive them; they forced me to
promise each of them one-half of the payment for
the meat." Thus the guardsmen received their
dues. Listen to me !" now said the king. "I am
sure that you are not so foolish as you seem. Will
you not marry my daughter ?" "Yes, I will," an-
swered the boy ; "since the soldiers have received






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

what was due to them, and are entitled to no more."
He was accordingly married to the princess, and
they lived long and happily together. It seems
to me that this was well done by such a foolish
boy!
















WHAT THE CHRISTMAS STAR SEES

I

UNDER THE ANGEL'S WINGS

N the dim twilight a young mother sits
by the window. Her little son, her only
one, is on her lap. It is so charming to
sit quietly in a corner near the window,
while darkness gently, settles about you, and watch
the stars rise from the deep shadows in the sky,
glittering forth, one by one.
She clasps her arms fondly around her little boy,
and says, softly: "Look, how all the small stars
smile and twinkle at us. They have something to
tell."
"What is it, mama?" asks her little boy. His
mother continues:
"'We are but very small spots,' say the stars to
you and to me, of all the splendor within the sky.
But soon Christmas comes with the child Jesus,
and to him it all belongs. He sends an angel
through the darkness, with gifts for all his children
below. The angel keeps them under his wings.
53







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

He will give you all that you wish for, that you
may know how well Jesus loves you.'"
Does he love you, too, mama?" asks the little
boy. She nods.
"And papa?"
Yes," she says, drawing a long breath, "he loves
him so well that neither papa nor I really know
how well."
"That was my testimonial!" exclaims a merry
voice behind them-papa's voice. They had not
seen him enter the room. "Well, what do you
wish, little one? Wish, wish, while it is time!"
The little boy meditates and seems irresolute.
On a sudden he looks smilingly into their faces,
and says: "First, I must find my place under the
angel's wings."
"He knows how to wish for plenty, the little
fellow!" exclaims his father. "He wants all at
once."
Look!" ejaculates the boy, pointing to the sky.
A light is kindled there. Slowly, in a wide, gleam-
ing circle, it shoots across the firmament, and dis-
appears within it.
"A shooting-star! Your wish will be fulfilled,
my own boy," says his mother, clasping the child
more tightly in her arms, while he claps his hands
delightedly.
"Have it; have it all!" merrily resumes his
father. "But you must be sure and return home.
Do not let the angel fly away with you! I would
54







WHAT THE CHRISTMAS STAR SEES

not lose you for all the wealth of heaven, my little
boy."
"Oh, do not say it in such a manner," exclaims
his wife, pressing her hand against her heart in
sudden alarm; "you make me so afraid."
"My pious little wife!" answers he; "how can
these foolish shooting-stars frighten you? Now I
leave you for my work, and in the mean time you
may cherish your hopes about divine things. A
mother does this all the better when she is alone."
With moistened eyes she turns towards him,
whispering: "I wish both of us could do it."
I am more easily contented than both of you,"
he returns, smiling upon her; "I shall not ask for
heaven, but am contented with the earth, where I
have you and the boy."
Kissing his two dear ones, he leaves them. A
young man, with all the joy in life yet before him,
he is so.wise and self-reliant, so strong and good,
too.
But mother sits alone with her little son. One
shooting-star falls after another, and for every one
of them she takes him more firmly in her arms.

Another evening: Christmas night.
The young mother again sits alone with her little
boy, her only one, on her lap. It is sad to sit with
such a treasure in your arms, while the darkness
settles about you-it is sad to watch the glowing
cheeks and the eyes which sparkle, not from a yearn-
55







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

ing or glee, but because the violent coughing takes
his breath away and shakes the little body. Mother
folds her quivering hands around the glowing fore-
head. Father is sitting immovable, watching his
child.
Healthy and fresh, with rosy cheeks, did he fall
asleep the previous evening; hot and feverish did
he awake in the morning. The Christmas joy van-
ished, giving room for the shadows of anxiety which
fell upon the home. The physician came and went
during the day; now he is expected back.
Suddenly the coughing stops, a gleam of relief
spreading upon the child's countenance. He re-
covers his breath and turns to his mother, whisper-
ing:
"Mama! Will I find my place under the angel's
wings to-night ?" This was his thought and longing
for many days and weeks. But mother can only
nod; she dares not venture to answer the question.
"Mama, kiss me! Papa, come here !"
His mother bends over him, and his father kisses
the little face. There is a happy smile, a faint
struggle, and a deep silence at last.
In the room, where stood a Christmas-tree which
will not be lighted, sits the young mother, alone.
The door is opened, and her husband walks softly
in. Bending over her, he looks into her tearless eyes.
"The shooting-star," he says, at length, "spoke
the truth. Your boy and mine is now under the
angel's wings. We both believe it, you and I."
56






WHAT THE CHRISTMAS STAR SEES

She feels that she is alone no more.
A feeble ray from the Christmas star reaches the
sorrow as well as the joy. Its blessed light comes
from the little figure under the angel's wings.



II

A CHRISTMAS GIFT

We are in the large city. The clocks show that
it is late in the afternoon. The streets are crowded
with people who all know that the following night
is Christmas Eve, and are anxious not to be late
on any account.
Straight through the crowds a little boy and girl,
brother and sister, are rushing along, closely fol-
lowed by a big dog and a small puppy. The latter
is really rolling along rather than trudging with
the rest of the company. When there seems to be
danger ahead, the big dog snatches her offspring
from the ground, carrying the little ball-like creat-
ure in her mouth, until the number of rapidly mov-
ing feet diminishes, and the passage becomes less
dangerous. This little company of four is as busy
as if some one's life depended upon its movements,
and such is, indeed, the case.
The big dog's name is Ada, and she is doomed to
be hanged. The puppy has no name; but he will
be drowned.






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

Ada had developed of late two rather disagree-
able habits. One of these is that she is always
abundantly well supplied with puppies. Although
she does not mean to give any one trouble with her
large family, the latter surely gives her considerable
cause for worry. Mama says that the puppies are
dirty little fellows, and papa declares that there is
no end of bother on their account. At length he
becomes impatient, and in his extreme annoyance
declares that in the afternoon Ada must be hanged,
and the puppy drowned. No pleading or coaxing
helped this time, as had been the case before; papa
would not listen; he was too seriously annoyed.
What a great sorrow had descended upon the
children to darken the bright Christmas Day! For
over an hour they were crying over the poor puppy
and his dear mother, upon whose soft pelt their little
heads had often rested. But, suddenly, John is
struck by an idea. Lifting his head from the
soft pillow he dries his eyes, and says: "I know,
sister, what we must do. We will make somebody
a Christmas present of Ada and the dear puppy. I
never heard that anybody was allowed to hang or
drown their Christmas gifts."
Emma assented at once, whereupon all four
started on their expedition. They determined to
go first to Aunt Lizzie, who was so tender and
good.
"Here we are, Aunt Lizzie!" they cried, when at
length they were confronted by this lady; "here is







WHAT THE CHRISTMAS STAR SEES

Ada and the puppy. We are going to make you a
Christmas present of them, Aunt Lizzie!"
"God forbid!" exclaimed Aunt Lizzie, "I will
never keep them in my house. What are you think-
ing of?"
"Oh, do take them, auntie!" prayed Emma. "If
nobody will have them, they must be killed."
"Tut, tut, children," said the dear old lady, by
way of comforting. "They are only a couple of
animals, after all."
"Animals?" ejaculated Emma. "It's Ada and
her pup, Aunt Lizzie, please remember."
Upon this the four comrades went away in a
rather disconsolate state of mind. After all, Aunt
Lizzie was not as nice as they had thought her.
Now she should not get the two sweet animals, even
if she went down on her knees and prayed for them.
They went from one house to another. At every
place they presented their Christmas gift, but with-
out success. It was continually declined, and the
situation grew more and more painful.
Now they were, as above described, rushing on-
ward in high speed.
Suddenly Emma stopped, flushed and breathless.
"I cannot walk farther," declared she; "I am get-
ting too tired. But let us go and make Uncle Peter
a Christmas present of Ada and the pup !"
No, I am afraid of that," answered John; Uncle
Peter is so queer, says mama; he can't bear to see
any one around."






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

"Yes, but mama says that he has humane feel-
ings, anyway. I don't know what that is. I heard
mama say that he had once had great sorrows.
Now, I don't know what that is, either; but some
days ago I gave him the first stocking I had made
for my big doll, and he smiled at it, and kissed me.
Let us go and bring him our Christmas presents!
I wonder what mama means by great sorrows, but
it must be something dreadful." Emma turned
around and led the procession, until all were stand-
ing in a row before Uncle Peter's rocking-chair.
Here, Uncle Peter," say the children-" here we
bring you Ada and her pup; they are a Christmas
gift for you."
"How is that?" asks Uncle Peter, in wonder.
But Emma's arms are already around his neck, and
she sobs into his ear: "Ada and her pup were to
be killed, and that would be so--so dreadful to
us, such a great sorrow, Uncle Peter. You know
what that means, for you have had some yourself,
haven't you !"
What is the matter with Uncle Peter? He starts,
suddenly pushing Emma away from him, presses
botl hands against his forehead, but suddenly jumps
from his chair and walks up to Ada, addressing her
in his deep, strong voice: "Do you wish to stay by
such an old fellow as I, old lady ?"
Ada proceeds to make an appropriate remark in
her own tongue. Uncle Peter seems to understand
her answer; he turns to the children, exclaiming:
60o






WHAT THE CHRISTMAS STAR SEES

"I never heard the like Ada says she intends to
keep Christmas here for her pup, and we are in-
vited, all three !"
How could Ada think of such a thing! Well,
there is no moment to be lost; it is already late in
the afternoon. A number of hurried visits are
made to many different stores, and at length the
preparations are finished.
A beautiful Christmas-tree is lighted in Uncle
Peter's study. His furniture looks quite amazed at
the strange spectacle.
But the door is opened, admitting the surprised
faces of mama and papa. Uncle Peter nods and
beams upon them with his large, benevolent face.
"Children, children!" exclaims mama. "Why
did you run away in such a manner? Papa and I
were very uneasy about you."
"We could not come home yet, mama," objects
John. "Ada keeps Christmas for her puppy, and
we are all invited, you know !"
A ray from the Christmas star kisses his eager,
upturned face, and his mother follows its example.



III

NUMBER 101

"Follow me," whispers the twinkling star, "to
narrow dwellings, where hearts grow faint and






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

weary; to dreary places, where the name which
a mother gave her child is changed into a num-
ber."
There is a large and quiet-looking building, lonely,
situated in the outskirts of the city, with high and
firm walls, the monotony of which is broken by no
ornament except the regular lines of small, curious
windows. These look, in fact, rather like the small,
deep-set eyes of an old, irascible bachelor than
spaces through which the sunlight, which God gave
to mankind before anything else was created, can
penetrate the darkness within and conjure away
the shadows.
Twilight settles upon the large building, and one
window after another is lighted. They look like
long rows of tired, sleepy eyes, as they shine foith,
in a thoughtless, passive manner, through the misty
evening air. Do they tell us of the many deadened
hopes and stifled aspirations of those who dwell
under the roof of this building?
They do. Behind every one of them a spoiled
life is slowly dragged along under the benumbing
influence of the sombre place, under a code of rules
and regulations as rigidly enforced as observed,
under a system which induces forgetfulness on one
important point above all-namely, that man's acts
are not always man's nature.
Prisoner Number ioi-name forgotten-is proud
of having behaved well. Soon his time will be out,
so he will again become an honest member of






WHAT THE CHRISTMAS STAR SEES

society. The crime was bought by the sacrifice of
so and so many years of freedom, bought and
honestly paid for. An honest deal, and nothing
else, says Number 1oi.
I see him behind the little window at the right
end of the second row, as he sits on a narrow bench,
leaning forward, with his elbows upon his knees
and with folded hands, glancing through the iron
bars into the darkness outside, towards one little
twinkling star high above the black earth and its
codes of rules and regulations.
Number io1 is thinking, although there is-
officially-no personality behind the thoughts.
Halloo!" cry the thoughts, undaunted by the heavy
doors and iron bars; but the well-known places and
figures do not return the greeting as confidentially
as of old. There is one sweet, girlish face at the
remembrance of which the prisoner's heart waxes
warm, although it is not known-officially-that
Number 101 possesses a heart; but it turns away
from him like all the other acquaintances, whereat
he clinches both hands against the small speck of
the dark sky visible through the little window in
the wall.
"That is not the right way to treat a prisoner
who served his time," say the thoughts. Beware!
Any one who scoffs.at me, exonerated as I am now,
will be duly punished, like all other offenders.
There is justice even for an offender when he has
paid his debts to justice."






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

The thoughts pursue their course from one place
to another, and Number ioi holds his head high,
for he has paid his debts.
But in the centre of the whirling mass of thoughts
there is one dark point which seems to frighten the
thinker, like a vacuum horrifies nature. It seems
possessed of a singular influence, both attractive
and repulsive. The thoughts are afraid of this
dark point, and yet they must approach it. Pris-
oner Number 101 buries his head in his two
strong hands,but "visions come again" of things
departed.

A woman in a ragged dress is standing on the
market-place. She has sold her last lamb; baby's
lambkin must change owner, that money might be
procured. Even baby cannot live on her love for
her sweet lambkin; even sweet baby-healthy and
fresh in her rags-needs a crumb of bread now and
then.
The poor woman sells her lamb, and her five thin
fingers are eagerly seizing an equally thin roll of
paper money. Tears rise in her eyes, as they came
into a pair of blossom-blue ones at home when
lambkin departed.
There is a rush of feet. Five strong fingers grasp
the tiny roll of money with which lambkin was
bought, and Prisoner Number o10 darts away into
the crowd.
Stop thief !"






WHAT THE CHRISTMAS STAR SEES

Number lo--name already forgotten-stands be-
fore the bar and tells frankly of his guilt.
"How could you do it ?" asked the judge, look-
ing from his strong, well-built figure to the poor
woman in her ragged dress.
The strong man bends his head before the stern
gaze of the man of law. He wishes to fall on his
knees and pray forgiveness; but to produce a scene
in the court-room where inquisitive eyes are watch-
ing from every corner, trying to catch every bit of
sensational news-that would never do. So the
guilty man hides his feelings, and no sensation oc-
curs, and as there are no extenuating circumstances,
he must pay his debt in full.

Number ioi lifts his head and waves his hand at
the dark thoughts, repeating: "I have paid it all."
"You have not," say the thoughts.
"I have," firmly asserts the prisoner.
You could not," repeat the thoughts. "Do you
not know that you could pay none of your debts,
even by sacrificing your whole life?"
"When I leave this room a free man, I am ex-
onerated, and no one will dare say a word about
the debt," continues the lonely man.
But the thoughts are persistent, and resume:
"People will scowl at you, and close their doors on
you; nay, even be afraid to touch you. No man or
woman can ever blot out the brand for theft which
you carry."






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

"They dare not do it. There is justice in the
land, and I am exonerated. No one shall scowl at
me."
Steps sound and resound in the spacious halls
outside; at length a rap at the door starts Number
ioi from his revery. At nine o'clock the light is
made out; it is time to go to bed, and the prisoner
knows it.
At nine sharp Number ioi is in bed, like all other
prisoners. The light goes out, and darkness rolls
its mask down over the lonely man. But thoughts
will roam about, so far and wide, until one little
figure after another finds its way in under the
mask, and carry the sleeper's spirit away into
dreamland.
No man or woman can ever blot out-
The little twinkling star lifts the dark veil, and
sheds its silver rays upon the figure in the narrow
bed, in the narrow room, behind the high walls.
Prisoner Number ioi has gone to sleep with a
smile upon his face, dreaming that he has returned
to baby, for whom he brings a new lambkin with
beautiful, white wool, and a golden collar.















NEVER MIND THE MONEY


HERE was once a man who had three
daughters, each of whom was married
to a mountain troll. Their father once
wished to pay them a visit, and before
he went away his wife handed him a rather dry
loaf of bread. When he had walked along for a
while he became tired and hungry, so he seated
himself on the eastern slope of a hill, and com-
menced eating his dry bread. The hill was sud-
denly opened, and his oldest daughter appeared be-
fore him, saying: "Why do you not come in and
see me, father ?" Well," answered her father, had
I known that you were living here, and if I had
seen any entrance, I should have walked in."
Soon afterwards the troll returned home. His
wife told him that her father had come, and asked
him to go and buy meat for a soup. "Oh, we may
have that much more easily," said he, whereupon
he ran a large iron nail into a heavy piece of timber
and knocked his head against it, tearing large pieces
of meat out of his cheeks. He seemed to suffer
no inconvenience from this, and they all had a







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

wholesome soup. Afterwards the troll gave the
old man a sack filled with money, whereupon they
separated, the man returning home. When he
arrived not very far from his house, he suddenly re-
membered that one of his cows was sick, so he left
the sack in the road, and, hurrying on, asked his
wife if the cow had died.
"What are you thinking of !" exclaimed she; "no
cow has died." "Well," answered he, "then you
must come out and help me carry in a sack of
money." "A sack of money!" repeated his wife,
very much astonished. "Yes," replied he, "a sack
of money, indeed. Is that so remarkable?" Al-
though she did not trust his story, she obeyed, and
followed him to the place. But when they arrived
there no money was to be found. A thief, in the
mean time, had carried it away. Now the wife be-
came angry and grumbled at her husband. "Well,
well," he said; "never mind the money I learned
something which I will not forget." "What did
you learn ?" inquired she. "Never mind!" repeated
he. "I will not forget it."
Some time after, the man desired to visit his second
oldest daughter. His wife again handed him a loaf
of dry bread, and when he became hungry and
thirsty he seated himself on the eastern side of a
hill and commenced eating. While he was thus
engaged his second oldest daughter came out of
the hill and asked him to step in, which he did
cheerfully enough. Soon afterwards the troll, her







NEVER MIND THE MONEY


husband, returned home. It had become dark, so
his wife asked him to go and buy some candles.
"Candles!" he repeated, "those we have already."
Upon this he thrust his fingers into the fire. When
he drew them out they were themselves luminous,
without being hurt, in any respect, by the flames.
The old man was now given two sacks filled with
money, and stumbled homeward. When he came
near his house, he again remembered that his cow
was yet sick; he therefore left the sacks in the
middle of the road, ran on home, and asked his wife
if the animal had recovered. "What is the matter
with you?" said his wife. "Why do you come run-
ning as if the house were ready to fall ? You need
not trouble yourself a bit; the cow is well." He then
asked her to assist him in carrying home the two
sacks of money. Although she did not believe his
tale, he pleaded and talked until she consented to
follow him. But when they arrived at the place a
thief had again been there, and the money was
gone. No wonder that the wife abused her hus-
band. He said, however, only these words: "Well,
you don't know what I have learned !"
In a short time the man prepared himself to visit
his youngest daughter. When he arrived at a hill,
he sat down and ate some of the dry bread which
his wife had given him. His daughter came forth
immediately-this was the southern side of the hill-
and took him into her dwelling. Soon her husband,
the troll, made his appearance. As they needed
69






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

fish, his wife wished him to go and buy some. He
answered, however, that they might procure some
much more easily: she must give him her winnowing-
trough and her bale. Upon this the troll and his wife
seated themselves in the trough and put to sea.
When they had arrived at a short distance from the
shore the troll asked: "Are my eyes green?" "No,"
answered his wife, "not yet." When they had pro-
ceeded a little farther he repeated his question.
" Yes," answered she; now they are green." The
troll immediately jumped into the water and baled
so many fish out of the sea into the trough that
soon it could hold no more. When they had landed,
the whole company had a hearty meal. The troll
finally gave his father-in-law three sacks filled with
money, and with these he started home.
When he had almost reached his house, he thought
once more of the cow. Placing the sacks of money
on the ground, and his wooden shoes on top of
them, to prevent their being stolen, he hastened to
his house, asking if the cow were still alive. In the
mean time, however, the same thief that had been
there before had his eye upon the money. He
stole it all, leaving the wooden shoes behind him.
When the couple came out for the sacks and found
nothing but this pair of old shoes, the wife scold-
ed at a great rate. Her husband remained quiet,
however, saying only: "Never mind the money!
I have learned a good lesson." What did you
learn?" asked she; "it would be well worth know-







NEVER MIND THE MONEY


ing." "Yes," replied he, "you will know some
day !"
Some time afterwards the wife wished for some
soup, and said to her husband: Will you not go to
town and buy a good piece of soup-meat?" "We
don't need to buy it," answered he, it may be had
more easily;" whereupon he knocked his head
against a large nail in the wall. The blood streamed
from a wound in his forehead,.and he was obliged
to remain in bed for a long time thereafter. After
he had finally recovered, one day it was found that
there were no candles in the house, so his wife
asked him to go and buy some. "No," said he,
"that is unnecessary;" whereupon he thrust his
hand into the fire. Of course he was severely
burned and obliged to figure on the sick list for
another length of time.
When he was up again, it one day happened that
they wished for some fish. Now the man deter-
mined to show what he had learned; he asked for
his wife's winnowing-trough and a bale, and they
both put to sea. In a little while the man asked:
"Are my eyes green?" "No," answered his wife,
"how could they be green?" When they had gone
a little farther he repeated his question. "What
nonsense!" exclaimed she. "How could they
ever become green ?" "My dear wife," said he
again, "will you not be good and say they are
green ?" "Why, yes; they are green," answered
she.






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

As soon as the man heard this, out he jumped
into the sea, with his bale, in order to bring up the
fish. He was obliged, however, to stay where he
was, and was never seen again.















THE BULL AND THE PRINCESS AT THE
GLASS MOUNTAIN

N a certain town there once lived two
families, each of which consisted of a
man, his wife, and a grown son. When
the one man's wife and the other wife's
man died, the remaining couple was married,
and thus the two boys came to live together.
The man's son took care of the cows and a bull
which was so large and savage that every one was
afraid of him. The boy never had anything but
dry bread-crusts to eat; but one day the bull asked
him if he did not feel hungry. The boy told him
he did. Stroke my back, then," said the bull. The
boy complied, receiving at once a butter-cake and
a large piece of sausage which tasted splendidly.
In the evening, when he returned home, he was
unable to eat his supper, and his step-mother asked
him, therefore, if the bull had not already given
him some. This he denied, however.
The next day she sent her own son along to the
pastures, and told him to watch and see if his step-
brother received anything from the bull. It hap-






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

opened exactly as on the day before; he stroked the
bull's back, and received a delicious butter-cake
and a large piece of sausage. He could eat no sup-
per at night, and his step-mother at once declared
that both the boy and the bull must be burned.
There was now a large pile of wood heaped up, and
the boy and the bull placed on top of it. But the
boy at once seated himself on the animal's back,
whereupon the bull rushed up to the woman, who
was looking on, seized her on his horns, and threw
her straight into the fire.
The bull now darted into the woods with the boy.
In a little while they noticed some apple-trees bear-
ing the most beautiful-looking apples. He was
warned by the animal not to touch them, but the
more he looked at them, the more he wished to eat
one. The very moment he made this wish the for-
est began to quiver, and the bull asked whether he
had not broken the rules and taken an apple. He
denied having done so. "Feel in your pockets,"
said the bull. There was, indeed, an apple in one
of his pockets, but he was willing to throw it away.
"That would not help us," said the bull again. At
the same moment a troll with three heads came
running towards them, roaring: Why do you steal
my apples?" "Come, if you dare !" cried the bull;
and seizing the troll on his horns, he threw him
high in the air. "You may have them all," shout-
ed the troll, "if you will leave me alone." That
depends upon your giving us the black horse which
74






THE BULL AND THE PRINCESS


is now in your stable," answered the bull. No,
that would not do. So the bull again seized him,
throwing him into the air as high as the tree-tops.
"Yes, yes," yelled the troll; he was willing to give
them what they wanted, if they would leave him
alone. So they took the horse and departed.
When they came far into the forest, they saw
some apples which were prettier even than the first
ones, and the boy could not help wishing that one
of them was his. He had hardly realized his wish
before the forest commenced quivering, and a troll
with six heads appeared before them. "Come here,
if you dare !" cried the bull, seizing the troll and
throwing him into the tree-tops. "Stop, stop!"
called the troll. "Well," resumed the bull, "will
you give us the spade and shovel which you have
at home?" No, they could not have them. The
bull again caught and pitched him from one tree-
top into another. "Yes, yes," yelled the troll, you
may have them, if you will leave me alone." This
they did.
After resuming their journey they reached in a
little while some trees with apples more beautiful
than those which they had already seen. Now be
sure and take none !" said the bull. The boy could
not help wishing for some, however, and no sooner
had his wish been realized than a troll with nine
heads came forward. Like the two others, he was
kicked about by the bull, until he promised to give
them a bag of mist which he had in his possession.






DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

They now proceeded on their journey until they
arrived at two hills; here they stopped, and the bull
said to the boy: Dig a hole in the ground and bury
me here; place the spade and the shovel on top of
me, and cover me with earth. When you have
done this, you must go to the palace yonder and
apply for a position as groom. A year from to-day
you must return and dig me up. Remember, how-
ever, to bring one dish of water, one of blood, and
one of milk with you." He promised to remember
and to obey, but of course he did not like to bury
his friend. Having done so, nevertheless, he walk-
ed up to the palace, where he had no difficulty in
securing a place as groom. Afterwards he was told
that in a few days a troll was to come and carry the
beautiful princess who lived there away with him.
She would be placed on the top of a glass mountain,
however, and if any one could ride up to her and
take a silver apple from her hand on the first day,
a golden apple on the second day, and kiss her on
the third day, he would be allowed to marry her.
Of course there was a great stir and doings around
the palace, when, on the appointed day, a large
number of men tried to ascend the mountain. No
one was able to reach the top, and several even
broke their arms and legs in attempting. Finally
the boy.came riding on his black horse. He was
dressed in black, and rode straight up to the prin-
cess, from whose hand he took the apple. She, too,
was dressed all in black.







THE BULL AND THE PRINCESS


The next day the same thing was repeated. No
one but the young man reached the top of the
mountain. He was dressed, like the princess, in
yellow, and having reached her, he seized the gold-
en apple from her hand.
On the third day the boy appeared in a white
dress. He rode up to the princess, who was her-
self dressed in white. But when he bent down and
kissed her, she managed to tear a small piece of
cloth from his coat, and put it aside. All the spec-
tators were, of course, very anxious to know the
name of the clever person who had been able to ride
where a great many skilled and practised noble-
men had broken their limbs. Hence, they sur-
rounded the mountain from all sides to meet him
when he came back; but when he perceived this, he
opened the bag of mist which he had carried along
with him, emptied it at the top of the mountain,
and thus produced such a fog that no one saw him
when he passed, in spite of their careful watch.
As they were very anxious to know who had
saved the princess, the king issued invitations for
a great party to all who had taken part in the chiv-
alrous sport. He intended to find out if the man
whom all desired to see were among them. The
jewellers now became very busy. Every one who
could afford it had silver and gold apples made,
but none of them was found to be the right one.
Finally the groom came forward on his black horse.
Riding up to the princess, he threw his silver apple
77







DANISH FAIRY AND FOLK TALES

in her lap, and she recognized it at once as her own;
but the young man immediately rode away again.
The next day all the guests were required to pro-
duce their golden apples. Many came and showed
their treasures, but the right one was not found.
At last the groom came riding along, dressed in
yellow, and flung his apple into the lap of the prin-
cess, who knew it again as her own. He rode away
at once, however, before any one had seen him.
On the third day the king ordered that if the
stranger should appear, the gates must be closed as
soon as he entered the palace, in order that it might
be known who he was. The young man appeared
in due time, mounted on his horse and dressed in
white, and the gates were promptly closed as soon
as he had entered the court-yard. It did not seem
to affect him in the least; he rode forward, appar-
ently unconcerned. Of course every one recog-
nized him as the one who had ascended the glass
mountain, and they perceived that a corner of his
coat was missing. Now all became very busy in
tearing off bits of their coats, but to no effect at
all; for when they were all brought into the pres-
ence of the princess, the piece of cloth in her pos-
session fitted exactly, and only, to the groom's coat,
and she was at once sure that he, and no one else,
had saved her, and wished to be married to him.
At first the king was not quite satisfied, hearing
that the young man was only his groom; but as
the princess insisted, and as the boy was also will-
78




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