• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Mission statement
 General production philosophy
 Non-discrimination policy
 Judicial process for academic honesty...
 Building security
 Building usage and rules
 Computer design studio operational...
 Scholarships
 Degree programs
 Appendix






Group Title: School of Theatre and Dance handbook, University of Florida
Title: School of Theatre and Dance handbook, University of Florida. 2008-2009.
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 Material Information
Title: School of Theatre and Dance handbook, University of Florida. 2008-2009.
Series Title: School of Theatre and Dance handbook, University of Florida
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: School of Theatre and Dance, College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Publisher: School of Theatre and Dance, College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008-2009
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Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Preface
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Mission statement
        Page 5
        Page 6
    General production philosophy
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Non-discrimination policy
        Page 9
    Judicial process for academic honesty violations
        Page 10
    Building security
        Page 11
    Building usage and rules
        Page 12
    Computer design studio operational policies
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Scholarships
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Degree programs
        Page 21
        Undergraduate programs
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
        Graduate program
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
    Appendix
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
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        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
Full Text










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Florida's Premier College of Fine Arts






SCHOOL OF THEATRE AND DANCE

HANDBOOK

2008-2009


School of Theatre and Dance Internet site: http://www.arts.ufl.edu/theatreanddance














HANDBOOK 2008-2009


Effective Dates: All information in this School of Theatre and Dance Handbook is effective
beginning July 1, 2008. Policies, procedures, rules, etc. apply to all students, events, etc. for the
2008-2009 academic year. Students should adhere to degree program requirements in the
Handbook and/or University Catalog for their assigned catalog year.


Availability: This Handbook is posted on the web at:
http://www.arts.ufl.edu/theatreanddance/pages/whatvouneed/downloads/downloads.asp. Current
Handbook pages reflecting policy changes from the previous year's Handbook will be posted.








Table of Contents


In tro d u c tio n ............................ ..................................................... ............... .. 5
M iss io n S tate m e n t ................................................ ... .............. ................ .. 5
General Production Philosophy.......................... ...... ........................ 7
Non-Discrimination Policy............................................................ 9
Judicial Process for Academic Honesty Violations..................... ............... 10
B u ild in g S e c u rity .......................................................... 1 1
Building Usage and Rules.......... .................................... ...............12
Computer Design Studio Operational Policies...................................................... 13
S c h o la rs h ip s ..................................................... .............................. 15
D om estic S cholarships................................ ........ .......16
International Scholarships ....................................... ................ 18
Degree Program s ................................. ..................................... ..... 21
Undergraduate Programs ............. ................ .................22
General Education. .......... ............. ..................... 23
Theatre Core.................................. .......... ........... 24
BA Theatre Program Goals........... ...... .............. 24
BFA Theatre Components................................ ...........25
BFA Dance Program G oals..................................... .............. 27
Certificate in Dance in Healing........... .................................28
Undergraduate Admissions/Auditions..................... .............. 29
Auditions for Entrance into BFA Program............ .. .................30
Magna or Summa Cum Laude Honors..........................................31
Ju ry P ro ce d u re s........................................ ................. 32
Senior Projects ................ ..... .... ... .........................34
Undergraduate Probation and Academic Information.............................36
Theatre Students' Play Checklist....................................... ................37
Dance Students' Choreographer Checklist ...................................40
Dance Theory Reading List............. ......................... .............. 42
MFA Theatre Program ................................................................. 44
Project Report............................................................... ........ 47
A p p e n d ix ........................................................... ... ................ ..... 5 2
Faculty and Staff Listing ....................... ............... ......... ............ 53
Other Im portant Num bers................ ............................... ..... .......... 54
Websites of Interest............... ......... .......... .... ..........54
C critical Dates.................................................. .... ... ... ................ 55
School of Theatre and Dance 2008-2009 Seas.....................................56
O organizations and Special Events........... ..........................................58
S e n io r P roje ct (fo rm ) ................................................................. 6 0
Individual Study (form) ............................................... ... ........ 61
Production Practicum (form)............. ........... ... ...............62
A dvising Sheets.................................. ................... ........... 63
Faculty Resources ...................................... ........... .......... 73

Production Policy Manual.............. .....................additional booklet























































4








SCHOOL OF THEATRE AND DANCE


The School of Theatre and Dance at The University of Florida is a part of one of the largest and most
comprehensive public land-grant research universities in the United States. The fundamental
purpose of the University, to which the School fully subscribes, is to expand humankind's
understanding of the natural world, the mind, and the senses, across many disciplines and cultures.
The University's institutional purpose includes serving cultural institutions, preserving knowledge,
generating creative activity in both pure (theory) and applied (production) forms, participating in a
community of artists/scholars, and selecting and developing talented students. The faculty and staff
of the University of Florida embrace a threefold mission of education, research, and service.

The School of Theatre and Dance, within the University's College of Fine Arts, understands as its
goal, together with the Schools of Music and Art and Art History, to pursue with vigor the highest
standards of artistic and intellectual excellence for its faculty, its students, and its community, and to
ensure the continued vitality of the arts as the quintessential multicultural and multidisciplinary
enterprise in an increasingly pragmatic world. The arts celebrate the greatest achievements of the
past and provide a road map for the creation of the future. Theatre and dance share with all the arts
the mission of addressing both the hearts and minds of humanity. This precept guides all School of
Theatre and Dance activities, both academic and practical. Our mission embraces our students, as
well as local and global communities.


Mission Statement

The mission of the School of Theatre and Dance shall be to educate and train artists, scholars, and
teachers; and to provide for its students a foundation of professionalism and dedication to their art
within a climate of diversity, discovery, and risk. It strives to develop in its students and audiences
an enduring passion for theatre and dance.

Educate and Train

The fundamental purpose and primary responsibility of the School, through its various degree
programs, is the education and training of the next generation of artists, scholars, and teachers,
enabling them to compete successfully in the professional world. Education and training are taken
as inseparable. Ideally, stage and classroom are engaged in constant mutual exchange. The School
aims for the union between academic and applied knowledge, theory and practice, experience and
reflection, within an integrated curriculum that is sensitive to the intellectual needs of the individual
student, and to the practical needs of an ever-changing marketplace. As part of a university, the
School understands that it contributes also to a larger civilizing project and that the complete artist is
the thinking artist who augments the mastery of concrete skills with an acute consciousness of the
cultural environments and the broader realm of arts and ideas. Conversely, it provides many non-
major students with their first exposure to theatre and dance and nurtures the audiences of the
future. To ensure the fusion of education and training, the School promotes collaboration among the
several areas within the School, as well as interdisciplinary cooperation with departments and
programs on this and other campuses. The faculty is composed of nationally and internationally
recognized practicing artists, teachers, and scholars committed to research and creative activity.








The School:
S offers the degrees of Bachelor of Fine Arts with an emphasis in Performance, Dance, and
Production, Bachelor of Arts in General Theatre, and the Master of Fine Arts, as well as
several minor tracks in Theatre and Dance;
S requires that its majors and minors gain experience in the production process;
S expects its majors to take rigorous academic classes both in and outside of the School;
S supplements the curriculum by residencies of guest artists; and,
S participates in state, regional, national, and international organizations and events.

Professionalism and Dedication

The School of Theatre and Dance places its emphasis on its professionally oriented BFA and MFA
programs. The School recognizes that professionalism in the arts encompasses, beyond excellent
training and education, four elements: First, a combination of reliability, dedication, and self-
discipline, which theatre and dance as collaborative arts demand; Second, the mastery of
fundamental skills and principles, as well as the flexibility to adjust to new and changing demands in
the arts; Third, the pursuit of the highest attainable standards fostered within an environment of
constant self-examination, openness to analysis and evaluation, and an awareness of the standards
observed by peer institutions and the professional world; Fourth, artistic vision based on integrity.
The School pursues its professional standing in a number of ways including:
S membership in and support of the aims and standards of NAST, NASD (pending
accreditation), URTA, ACDFA, ACTF, and ATHE;
S systematic evaluation of the progress of its BFA and MFA students through auditions,
portfolio reviews, and regular juries.
Diversity, Discovery, and Risk

Discovery and often radical innovation have sustained and renewed theatre and dance during their
histories. The greatest enemies of an artist are complacency and mediocrity. If anything is certain, it
is that theatre and dance of the 21st Century will look nothing like that of the 20th. We seek to
create artists for the 21st Century, without fully knowing what the century may hold. Today our
sense of discovery and our espousal of risk must be concentrated on more than ourselves. If art is
to have meaning in the global community, it must be transgressive in the most positive sense of the
word, not only receptive to, but affirming of diverse cultures and ideas, from within or beyond our
borders. As the diversity of our students increases, so must the creative diversity of our work. The
School of Theatre and Dance is committed to the pursuit of multicultural artistry in theory and
practice, and it understands the diverse culture in its broadest sense by geography, race, ethnicity,
gender, class, sexual orientation, disability considerations, etc. The School demonstrates it's
commitment to diversity by:
S an ongoing effort to recruit and retain a diverse faculty and student body;
S the support of student performances in innovative formats;
S international activities in production exchanges; and,
S interdisciplinary and multicultural programs, including, but not limited to residencies, lectures,
productions, festivals, and conferences.








GENERAL PRODUCTION PHILOSOPHY
The production program is the laboratory for the curriculum and supports the mission of the School
of Theatre and Dance.
It shall be the purpose of the School of Theatre and Dance to provide a climate for discovery, choice,
and fulfillment in the development of artists, craftsmen, scholars, teachers, and audiences through
practice, study, and experience.
The School of Theatre and Dance embraces a policy of non-traditional, color-blind casting. Casting
choices are the prerogative of an individual director. Directors, however, are not limited to traditional
typecasting. Decisions are based upon the quality of the audition, the director's concept of the role,
and the educational mission of the School.

THE THEATRE PRODUCTION PROGRAM
The qualitative focus of the production program is to present the most effective and affective dance
and theatre performances possible. It also provides a laboratory for students and the opportunity for
practical application of classroom exercises and theories.
Today's theatre design and production depend heavily on the complex electronic and mechanical
systems used in professional theatre, film, and television production. The production curriculum is
designed to meet the diverse aesthetic and technological demands of contemporary society. This
curriculum provides academic instruction and professional training for careers in costume design,
scene design, and lighting design.
Students enrolled in theatre production: costume design, lighting design, and scene design will
complete course work in all three areas. Selected independent study, advanced electives, and
production assignments in THE 4950 focus on the specialization.
A portfolio is required. For more information, consult the School of Theatre and Dance
Undergraduate Advisor, Kevin Austin.








PRODUCTIONS FOR BFA/MFA STUDENTS IN THEATRE PERFORMANCE
Students selected for the pre-professional degree programs (BFA, MFA) are expected to fill most
important roles in major season productions. These students will audition prior to the general
population for each semester's productions. The performance faculty will observe their auditions
and will advise the directors regarding casting to enhance the BFA and MFA students' education and
the quality of productions. These students will receive special consideration in casting; however, like
all auditionees, they must win roles in competitive, open auditions. Directors will make the final
determinations in casting.
After casts have been selected, BFA/MFA students will meet individually with a panel of at least two
faculty members, who will evaluate the audition and advise future actions. Auditions are juried
events. Continuation in the pre-professional degree programs is contingent upon successful:
auditions
performances
classroom work
juries.

Lack of success in any of these areas will result in probationary status and/or elimination from the
specialized degree programs.



Selection of plays is based on a formula for a four-year cycle that offers opportunity for
experiencing the widest possible spectrum of genres and periods of dramatic literature. In a
four-year cycle the following should be offered:

1 non-western production 2 non-realistic productions
2 Shakespeare plays 1 representative play by a great
2 new plays modern playwright
4 dance Repertoire Concerts 2 productions with the emphasis on
2 pre-19th Century heightened multiculturalism
language productions 2 modern dance productions
4 musical theatre productions 1 experimental workshop production
4 African dance productions e.g. ,adaptation








NON DISCRIMINATION POLICY


Trust enables us to maintain a climate encouraging of diversity, discovery, and risk; a cornerstone of
the mission of the School of Theatre and Dance. In honor of the trust we all work to build in classes
and daily interactions, and in recognition of the trust we all bring to the university community that its
policies and procedures will protect us, the University of Florida Non-Discrimination Policy follows
(6C1-1.006):

6C1-1.006 University of Florida; Non-Discrimination Policy.

(1) The University shall actively promote equal opportunity policies and practices conforming
to laws against discrimination. The University is committed to non-discrimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political
opinions or affiliations, and veteran status as protected under the Vietnam Era Veterans'
Readjustment Assistance Act. This commitment applies in all areas to students, Academic
Personnel (AP), Technical, Executive, Administrative, and Managerial Support (TEAMS) staff,
University Support Personnel System (USPS) personnel, and Other Personnel Services (OPS)
employees. The University realizes that it must continue to intensify its concern and devote itself to
the elimination of conditions from which discrimination spring. In this respect the University accepts
the responsibility for solving problems related to these matters. Accordingly, the University will
continue to search for the most appropriate ways and means to provide an effective and enduring
contribution to the improvement of these relationships.
(2) It is the policy of the University that each employee and student be allowed to work and
study in an environment free from any form of discrimination. Sexual harassment is a form of sex
discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and is conduct unbecoming a State
employee as provided in Section 110.227, F.S.
(a) Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, or requests for sexual
favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:
1. Submission to such conduct or request is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or
condition of an individual's employment or academic status
2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct or request by an individual is used as the basis
for employment or academic decisions affecting such individual, or
3. Such conduct or request has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an
individual's work or academic performance or of creating an intimidating, hostile work-related or
academic environment.
(b) Disciplinary Action.
1. Any employee or student of the University who is found to have sexually harassed another
employee or applicant for employment or student will be subject to disciplinary action up to and
including dismissal or expulsion.
2. Any employee or student in a supervisory capacity who has actual knowledge by direct
observation or by receipt of a complaint of sexual harassment involving any of those employees he
or she supervises or over whomever he or she has managerial authority, and who does not
investigate, and, if appropriate, take corrective action or report the matter directly to the President or
the President's designee, shall be subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal or
expulsion.

(3) Complaints and Appeal Procedures. Any employee or student who believes that he or she
is a victim of discrimination, including sexual harassment as defined above, may pursue informal
resolution of the complaint or may file a formal written complaint in accordance with University Rules
6CI-1.0063 and 6C1-4.012 F.A.C. Employees and students may contact the Vice Provost for
Affirmative Action Programs to seek assistance in informally resolving the complaint or in filing a
formal complaint or grievance.








JUDICIAL PROCESS FOR ACADEMIC HONESTY VIOLATIONS


Instructors should meet with the student to explain the nature of their suspicions and listen to the
student's account of the incident. If the instructor still believes the student is responsible for cheating,
plagiarism, misrepresentation, bribery, conspiracy, or fabrication, then he/she can recommend a
sanction to the student. This sanction can include a grade penalty and an educational seminar. If the
student accepts the grade penalty and sanction, then he/she will admit responsibility and complete
the Faculty Adjudication Form (FAF) as appropriate. The instructor should send the FAF with
recommended sanction to Student Judicial Affairs in 202 Peabody Hall within 24 hours of being
completed. A disciplinary file will be created for that student. If the student does not accept
responsibility for your sanction, he/she may choose to have the case heard by the Student Conduct
Committee or the Student Honor Court. Again, the instructor should send the FAF and all original
documentation to Student Judicial Affairs in 202 Peabody Hall within 24 hours, so that a disciplinary
file can also be created. The student must schedule an appointment with the Assistant Dean and
Director of Student Judicial Affairs or his/her designee within 48 hours to discuss the hearing
options. The instructor will be asked to be a witness at either type of hearing.

Students found responsible for a first offense violation at a hearing will generally receive a grade
penalty, conduct probation, an educational sanction, or any combination thereof. A formal hearing is
required for a second offense. The instructor is to contact Student Judicial Affairs at 392-1261 to
determine if the student has a prior academic honesty violation. A finding of responsibility for a
second offense typically results in suspension from the University of Florida for a period of time.

While a student is under review for academic dishonesty, it is important for him/her to continue class
until the matter is resolved. The student cannot drop a class in which there is an unresolved
allegation. If the student is found responsible, he/she may not withdraw from the class. A student
who does withdraw from the class will be reinstated. If the student is found responsible for academic
dishonesty, the faculty member is accountable for adjusting the student's grade to reflect the grade
penalty agreed upon when grades are due at the end of the semester.








Building Security

In the event of an emergency call 911
Report any suspicious behavior or security issues to the University of Florida Police
Department at 392-1111
The building is closed 7 days a week from 11:00 pm-7:00 am.
The building is closed on University of Florida Home Football Games unless the Director of
the School gives express permission.
In the event that the University of Florida is closed, there are absolutely no rehearsals,
shows, or any other use of this building allowed.
All rooms are to remain locked when not in use.

Weekdays:
The building is open for use during normal academic business Monday through Friday from
8:00 am-5:00 pm.
During that time, rooms are scheduled by the Production Manager and are available on a first
come first served basis unless they are already scheduled for academic use.

After Hours on Weekdays:
The building is closed from 5:00 pm-11:00 pm to undergraduate students who are not
accompanied by a graduate student with keys.
Graduate students with keys may use the building from 5:00 pm-11:00 pm. They must take
responsibility to lock up. They are to make sure no one else is in the building that does not
have permission when they leave.

Weekends:
The building is available on weekends (except Home Football Game Days) from 8:00 am-
11:00 pm to graduate students with keys and undergraduate students who are accompanied
by graduate students with keys.

School Productions:
Rehearsals can only be called during the times of 6:00 pm-11:00 pm on weekdays and 8:00
am-11:00 pm on weekends.
Some dance productions rehearse during weekday hours.
At 11:00 pm the building must be vacated and locked.
o Any Directors notes or clean-up must be completed before 11:00 pm.
Stage Managers are responsible for clearing and securing the building on evenings when
they have a show in rehearsal or performance.
o In the event there is more than one show in rehearsal or performance, the last Stage
Manager in the building must clear and secure the building.
o Stage Managers must never clear and secure the building alone.
Each evening the Stage Manager must submit a Security Report to Production Manager,
School Director, and Technical Director.
o This report must include: time in and out of building, if all exterior doors were locked,
and who, if anyone, was still in the building when the Stage Manager left.








Building Usage and Rules

* All rooms in the Nadine McGuire Theatre and Dance Pavilion are laboratories for use
exclusively by School of Theatre and Dance faculty, staff, and students.

* No external group, student, or otherwise, may use any of the School of Theatre and Dance
facilities without a Contract.

* All Rehearsal Spaces are to be booked through the Production Manager two weeks prior to
need. Scheduling is dictated by show or event needs with no Non-School event having
inherent priority. Scheduling conflicts are to be resolved by the Production Manager with
appeal to the School Director.

* Ric Rose must approve use of Dance Studios in addition to being booked through the
Production Manager.

* Absolutely no Street Shoes are allowed in any of the Dance Studios (G-006, G-010, G011).
Shoes designed for dance are only allowed in the Dance Studios.

* Aerial Dance equipment may not be used without a dance faculty member present.

* No activities are allowed that scar or mark the floor. This includes tap dance.

* No food or drink is allowed in the studios. Capped water bottles are permitted. Any spills
must be cleaned up immediately.

* Hair and body products that leave residue on the floor are not allowed in any of the spaces.

* No tape or any other marks are allowed on any of the floors without the express permission
of the Scenic Studio Supervisor.

* No painting or building in any of the Studios.

* All furniture and other objects must be stacked and/or moved from the center of the room
towards the walls, in an organized manner, after every use.

* Pianos must be returned to their original placement and may not be moved between rooms
without the express permission of the Scenic Studio Supervisor.

* Injuries must be reported immediately to faculty or staff.

* School Productions always have precedence. Spaces for Non-School Events are on a first
come, first serve basis. There is always the potential you will be asked to leave because of
School events and needs.

* See page 31 in Production Policy Manual for information on the Stephen C. O'Connell Center
Dance Studio Room 2450








Computer Design Studio Operational Policies


Introduction:
The computer design studio was initiated to provide support for the design of scenery, costumes,
lighting, and sound for the School of Theatre and Dance. Design courses in all areas now utilize
computer technology in the design process to some degree. Some areas currently rely heavily on
the use of this technology, while others are just beginning to use the technology. The use of
computers in theatrical design is now widespread throughout the industry, and our curriculum
reflects this trend. The studio is intended to augment the UF computer policy (see CFA web pages
for details, www.arts.ufl.edu). Use of the studio has specific purposes, rules, and requirements. Its
primary goal is to serve the production program. It also serves as a teaching studio for faculty
members teaching small design classes. Designated computers in room 216 may be used for
general purposes when they are not required to serve the production program. The teaching lab is
primarily for use by classes, and the open lab is only available to School of Theatre and Dance
students during normal hours.

Storage of Data/Files:
All stations are equipped with CD Rom readers and USB ports on the front of the machine. NO
DATA OR FILES SHALL BE SAVED TO THE HARD DRIVES OF ANY STATION. Please provide
your own USB travel/jump drives for your data. User accounts and data will be cleared periodically.

Software Restriction:
The installation of personal software in any lab computer station is strictly prohibited. Only UF
licensed software shall be permissible on these stations. A violation of this rule shall result in the
loss of studio privileges.

Food and Beverages:
Under no circumstances are any food or beverage allowed in the computer design labs. A violation
of this rule shall result in the loss of studio privileges.

Printing:
At this time, the school shall absorb the costs for printing documents related to school productions
and academic projects. This shall include paper and ink for plotters and paper and ink for networked
printers. Currently two plotters reside in the lab, a 24" black and white and a 36" black and white, as
well as a color and an 8.5" x 11" laser printer. Plotters shall only be used to support the production
program.

Attitude towards printing:
It is expected that our Theatre and Dance students will respect the privilege and convenience of this
lab and treat it accordingly. We anticipate that students and faculty alike will be conscious of the use
of ink and paper and will endeavor to be reasonable and sensitive in the use of expendable
materials. At this time, it is reasonable for designers to expect to print a full set of drawings of their
design work after all revisions are complete for their own records. We expect printing to be used in a
judicious and efficient manner. By being conservative with the use of ink and paper, we hope to
continue to be able to provide these supplies at no additional charge. Student lab fees will be used to
maintain a stock of paper and ink. Please follow a few simple rules:
1. Print only as many copies as needed.
2. Minimize use of "fills" and "hatches" when printing for the scenic and costume
studios.
3. Print final versions of your designs at the end of your design process.
4. Print during "off peak" use times (early morning or evening). Printing may occupy
the station for a while and slow it down.
5. Make additional copies from the "blue line" machine in the Theatre for
additional "shop copies."









Use of stations:


1. Work with Clean hands. A dirty keyboard or a dirty mouse spread germs and is
disrespectful of others who use the machines.
2. Do not ask the machine to work faster than it can. Work at a speed that is
appropriate for the application you are working in. A "frozen" computer is often
caused by an operator asking too much of the machine's capabilities.
3. DO NOT TOUCH THE SCREENS. The screens will not appreciate fingerprints on
their surface. Use the mouse as a pointer. Use a dry cloth only to clear any
smudges on the screens. Any other method can damage the surface coating.
4. Respect the technology.








2008-2009 THEATRE AND DANCE SCHOLARSHIPS


Requirements: 3.0 GPA in school courses.
Faculty will recommend students for consideration for the NAMED SCHOLARSHIPS, while students
apply for the general ones. Students applying for awards from GENERAL FUNDING should submit
a letter of application and resume as detailed below.

NAMED SCHOLARSHIPS Faculty recommended

(1) JIM RICHARDSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP @ $1,000. Upper division or graduate
student. Recipient may hold scholarship for two years (maximum).

(2) M. STOUGHTON THEATRE SCHOLARSHIP @ $500. Recognizes outstanding undergraduate
in performance, production, and dance (1 each).

(3) ETHEL INGRAM THEATRE SCHOLARSHIP @ $200. Recognizes outstanding students: a
graduate student, a production student, a performance student, a dance student, or a graduating
senior.

(4) BRASK MUSICAL THEATRE AWARD @ $100. Recognizes outstanding student in Musical
Theatre.

(5) LAWRENCE BAYNARD HUBBELL SCHOLARSHIP IN THEATRE STUDIES @ $1,000.
Recognizes an upper division or graduate student.

(6) CATHRYN LOMBARDI SCHOLARSHIP @ $1,000. Recognizes a musical theatre student.

AWARDS FROM GENERAL FUNDING Students submit letter of application and resume directly to
the Director of the School of Theatre and Dance by April 1, 2007.

Applicants write a letter to the awards committee and submit a resume which gives evidence of
their outstanding contribution to the School during the current academic year. The letter must
have the endorsement (signature only required) of at least one faculty member. Applications are
to be submitted directly the to Director by April 1, 2007.

(1) CONSTANS THEATRE AND DANCE SCHOLARSHIP @ $500. Recognizes outstanding upper
division or graduate students.

(2) CONSTANS THEATRE SUMMER REP SCHOLARSHIP @ $500. Established to assist design
and production students participating in Summer Repertory Theatre.

(3) SPECIAL Variable. Recognizes special, financial needs of talented students.








NATIONALLY COMPETITIVE AWARDS: DOMESTIC SCHOLARSHIPS


Beinecke Scholarship: http://www.beineckescholarship.ora/
Forjuniors who are US citizens or nationals planning to attend graduate school in the arts,
humanities, and social sciences. Each scholar receives $2000 immediately prior to entering graduate
school and an additional $30,000 while attending graduate school.

Carnegie Junior Fellows Program: http://www.ceip.ora/files/about/about iunior.asp
For graduating seniors (or students who have graduated during the last academic year) who are
interested in political science and international policy. Each year this highly competitive fellowship is
given to 8-10 graduates nationwide to work on the Carnegie Endowment's projects such as non-
proliferation, democracy building, trade, US leadership, China-related issues, and Russian/Eurasian
studies. Junior Fellows are hired for approximately one year, starting August 1, and are paid a gross
salary of $2,500 per month and full benefits.

Goldwater Scholarship Foundation: http://www.act.org/goldwater
This scholarship is intended for current sophomores and juniors who intend to pursue careers in
mathematics, natural science, or engineering. Students who wish to pursue medical research, but
not the practice of medicine, are included. Award covers tuition, fees, books, and room and board
up to a maximum of $7,500 per year.

Homeland Security Scholarship and Fellowship: http://www.orau.qov/dhsed/
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security provides undergraduate and graduate awards to
students interested in pursuing the basic science and technology innovations that can be applied to
the mission of the DHS. Areas of study include: physical, biological, social and behavioral sciences
including science policy, engineering, mathematics, and computer science.

Javits Fellowship Program: www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/HEP/iegps/iavits. html
The Javits Fellowship is for students undertaking study at the doctoral and Master of Fine Arts (MFA)
level in selected fields of the arts, humanities, and social sciences. A majority of the awardees have
no graduate credits. You must have your GRE score by application date.

Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation: http://www.iamesmadison.com/
Designated for students in history and social sciences, especially political science, who plan to enter
secondary school teaching; at least one award per state; includes expenses paid summer workshop.

Mellon Fellowships in Humanistic Studies: http://www.woodrow.org/mellon/
Mellon Fellowships provide $13,000 is for the beginning year of graduate study. The Mellon is
designed for students planning to pursue a career in teaching and scholarship in the humanities. Up
to 80 awarded nationally.

Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship: http://www.clw.org/scoville/
For college graduates to gain a Washington perspective on key issues of peace and security with a
monthly stipend of $1800 and travel expenses; students spend six to nine months in Washington.
Prospective Fellows are expected to demonstrate excellent academic accomplishments and a strong
interest in issues of peace and security.

Soros New American Fellowship: http://www.pdsoros.org/
The Fellowships are grants for up to two years of graduate study in the United States. A New
American is an individual who (1) is a resident alien; i.e., holds a Green Card or, (2) has been
naturalized as a U.S. citizen or (3) is the child of two parents who are both naturalized citizens.

Truman Scholarship Foundation: http://www.truman.gov








This award is forjuniors who are preparing for a career in government or another area of public
service. Students should be active in community service and campus leadership positions. The
award offers a total of $30,000, of which $3,000 is for the senior year and the remainder for graduate
studies.

Udall Scholarship Foundation: http://www.udall.gov
Sophomores and juniors are encouraged to apply for this award, which covers tuition, fees, books,
and room and board, up to a maximum of $5,000 for one year. The award is intended for students in
the following categories: anyone intending to pursue a career in environmental public policy or
Native American/Alaska Native students interested in careers related to health care and tribal public
policy.








NATIONALLY COMPETITIVE AWARDS: INTERNATIONAL
HOW TO APPLY FOR AWARDS THROUGH THE HONORS PROGRAM

1. Read all of the information materials provided on the Honors Program website for the various
scholarships. You can access the site at: http://www.honors.ufl.edu/scholarships.html

2. That site provides links to the individual foundations sponsoring awards. You can search the
website of the organization directly. There you will find not only helpful information, but the
necessary application forms.

3. Fill out the forms, paying particular attention to the essay portions. These are extremely
important, since they represent your opportunity to tell the jury about yourself and to convince
the reader that you are truly worthy of the award. Be sure that your essays are clear, well-
written, and say what you want to tell about yourself and your background. You should have
faculty advisors review them. The Awards Advisor in the Honors program will offer
suggestions as well.

4. Turn in your completed application to the Honors Office, 140 Tigert Hall, by the deadline
listed above. ALL materials should be submitted, including transcripts and letters of
reference. The letters may be sent by campus mail or delivered by you. If you deliver them,
make sure the writer has sealed the envelope and signed across the seal! Otherwise the
letter is not considered official.

5. A committee will review your application. Some of the awards require an interview, such as
the Rhodes or Truman. If your award does have an interview, you will be asked to submit
some available times. If your application is strong enough, we will interview you and will call
you to set up the time.

6. Once the committee has reviewed the applications, we will notify you about our decision.
Those candidates who are nominated by UF may (and probably will) need to do some
revisions or provide additional materials. Stay in touch and be prepared to continue working
on your application should you be selected as a UF nominee.

7. For any additional information or assistance, contact the Awards Advisors by visiting their
web site at http://www.honors.ufl.edu/staff.html

Churchill Scholarship Program of the United States: http://www.gates.scholarships.cam.ac.uk/
Study abroad; designed for the exceptional student in mathematics, science and/or engineering to
pursue graduate study at Churchill College of Cambridge University. Awards cover all tuition and
fees, $7,200-$9,000 living allowance, depending on length of academic program, and $500 travel
allowance. Only 10 awarded annually.

Fulbright Program: http://www.iie.org/fulbright/
Research awards for work in other countries. All disciplines. For students in all disciplines at all
levels before the Ph.D. Guidelines differ for each country, so it is imperative that students consult
and read carefully the Fulbright handbook and/or web site.

Gates Cambridge Trust: http://www.gates.scholarships.cam.ac.uk/
The Gates Cambridge Scholarships are available for graduate study or for study for a second
Bachelor's Degree as an Affiliated Student at the University of Cambridge, England.

Marshall Scholarships: http://marshallscholarship.org
Study in the United Kingdom. Open to all fields of study in fine arts, arts and humanities, social
sciences, sciences, business, and engineering. Available subjects vary according to the university.








Competition includes essay, campus, and district interviews. Students must be under age 26,
preferably single. Only 40 awarded nationally but 5 must come from the southern area.

Mitchell Scholarships: http://www.us-irelandalliance.org/
These Scholarships will allow American post-graduates to pursue one year of study at institutions of
higher learning in Ireland and Northern Ireland. The Scholarship will be awarded to students who
have shown both academic distinction and the potential for leadership. There are no restrictions as
to academic field of study.

National Science Foundation: http://www.ehr.nsf. ov/dqe/programs/qrf/
Open to all U.S. citizens at the beginning of their graduate study in the mathematical, physical,
biological, engineering sciences, the behavioral and social sciences, and the history or philosophy of
science. Students should have completed no more than 20 hours of graduate study. However,
Women in Engineering applicants may already hold the MA Degree.

National Security Education Program: http://www.aed.org/nsep/
NSEP Fellowships support students in the study of languages, cultures, and world regions critical to
U.S. national security. Specifically, students must study in areas of the world other than Western
Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Students must be enrolled in or applying to a
graduate degree program in the U.S., and are required to seek employment with an agency or office
of the federal government involved in national security affairs. Campus contact is Dr. Susanne Hill,
UF International Center.

Rotary International: www.rotary.org/
Rotary International, a world-wide civic organization, provides generous and highly prestigious
scholarships for post-baccalaureate foreign study. Requirements include at least junior standing, a
plan to study abroad, and possessing the qualities to be a strong "ambassador of goodwill" before,
during, and after the time you study abroad.

Rhodes Scholarship: http://www.rhodesscholar.org/
Study at Oxford. Open to all fields of study in fine arts, liberal arts & sciences and some business
and engineering. Students apply during their senior year for 2 years of study at Oxford. Applicants
must be single and under age 24. Competition includes written essay, campus, state, and regional
interviews. Only 32 awarded, including 4 from the southern area.























































20









Degree Programs








UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM


The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree Programs in Theatre prepare graduates to
pursue additional academic degrees, or enter professional theatre, or allied fields such as
communication, public relations, etc. The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance prepares graduates to
pursue additional academic degrees or enter professional dance, teaching, or allied fields. Of those
pursuing advanced degrees, BA graduates traditionally enter MA or PhD programs, and BFA
graduates generally pursue a MFA. Regardless of degree or career expectations, students complete
a core of foundation courses in theatre and dance in addition to general education courses required
by the University of Florida.

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN THEATRE: In addition to a liberal arts background, the BFA
Degree prepares the aspiring theatre professional in an area of emphasis through a rigorous
classroom, laboratory, studio, and performance course of study. Tracks in Acting, Music
Theatre, and Design are offered.

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN DANCE: In addition to a liberal arts background, the BFA
Degree prepares the aspiring dance professional through a rigorous classroom, laboratory,
studio, and performance course of study. Area of emphases such as
Performance/Choreography, World Dance, Dance in Medicine, or Theatre may be chosen with
dance area approval.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GENERAL THEATRE: In addition to a broad liberal arts background,
the BA Degree provides the student with creative experience and academic preparation through
a classroom and laboratory course of study, with studio and performance work required.

Theatre Minors: The Theatre Minor is designed for students who wish to pursue the study of
theatre while maintaining a separate primary academic interest. The Theatre Minor has both
required and elective components, providing a solid general background and the opportunity to
tailor the minor program to meet individual interests. The General Theatre Minor is 17 credits
and the Production Minor is 18 credits.

Dance Minors: The Dance Minor is designed for students who wish to pursue the study of dance
while maintaining a separate primary academic interest. The Dance Minor has both required and
elective components, providing a solid general background and the opportunity to tailor the minor
program to meet individual interests. The Dance Minor is 17 credits.

For information on degree program requirements, contact Kevin Austin, undergraduate advisor
for the School of Theatre and Dance.

Current Students, please refer to www.isis.ufl.edu for your individual tracking and course
requirements.

New and potential students should visit www.registrar.ufl.edu/catalog for current year tracking
and course requirements.








GENERAL EDUCATION


General Philosophy

The purpose of general education at the University of Florida is to lay a foundation for lifelong
enrichment of the human experience and for lifelong contribution to society. The objective is to
encourage all-around development of students as individuals and as members of society so that they
may bring balance and perception to every field of their activity.

In summary, the goal of general education at the University of Florida is to prepare students to:
think clearly and independently in fields outside their specialty;
express ideas effectively in speaking and in writing;
develop a basic understanding of mathematics and language;
gain understanding of people and the complexity of societies, both their own and others;
develop aesthetic interest and sensibility; and
gain an understanding of the scientific method and the societal consequences of research as
exemplified by biological and physical sciences.

General Requirements

All students will take a minimum of 36 semester hours of credit from lists of courses especially
constructed to provide intellectual balance and breadth. These lists are found in the Undergraduate
Catalog. The general education requirement categories are listed below with any specific course
requirements for the various theatre tracks in brackets.

English Composition C .... ......... ........... ..................... ..... ............. 3 cr.
M them atical Sciences M .................................................... ................... ................. 6 cr.
H um anities H .......................... ................... ............. ........... .. .................. 9 cr.
Production: Art History 1 & 2; History of Theatre 1
Theatre: History of Theatre on Stage 1 & 2, African American Theatre
Dance: Dance Appreciation for the 21st Century, Introduction to Music Literature
Social and Behavioral Sciences S ...................... .. ....................... 9 cr.
Physical and Biological Sciences (both areas) P and B* ............ .. ..... .............. 9 cr.

Six credits must also reflect an International component I

*BA students required to take 6 hours of physical science, 6 hours of biological science, 1 hour of
either physical or biological lab.








THEATRE CORE

The Theatre core courses challenge the student to:

* understand and appreciate the art form, the artist, and the collaborative process;
* understand the structure and content of representative dramatic literature important in history
and culture;
* understand the creative process and the functions of individual practitioners;
* understand and develop basic skills required in theatre/dance practice;
* understand and develop valid artistic criteria and their applications to drama and theatre;
* understand the major trends in the development of theatre arts and dramatic literature; and
* understand architecture, decor, fashion, art, music, and movement as reflections of specific
cultures.




BA THEATRE PROGRAM GOALS

In addition to the theatre core challenges and courses, the BA program challenges the student to:
* show proficiency in a foreign language;
* explore theatre studies in a broad liberal arts context;
* tailor a program to meet degree requirements; and
Create an individual emphasis unique to his/her career goals.








BFA THEATRE COMPONENTS


A. ACTING

1. Develop the voice and body as disciplined expressive instruments.
2. Understand and experience the art, craft, and process of performance and its relationship to
the other elements of production.
3. Demonstrate the ability to project self into imaginary circumstances, evoked through
improvisation and texts, alone, and in ensemble.
4. Demonstrate an ability to analyze, create, and project a variety of characters, drawn from
different genres and periods, and ensemble.
5. Demonstrate the unique collaborative skills necessary to assimilate and realize the vision of
playwright, director, and designer in performance.
6. Demonstrate the ability to apply makeup for a variety of characters using varied materials
and techniques as aids in characterization.
7. Understand traditional and innovative techniques appropriate for varying production formats.
8. Demonstrate the ability to articulate the creative process as performance: acting/dancing.

B. DIRECTING

1. Demonstrate the ability to conceptualize, analyze, articulate (orally and in writing), and
defend an approach to the play script as performed.
2. Demonstrate the ability to identify performance and production problems, to propose and test
solutions to those problems, and to assume responsibility for their solution.
3. Demonstrate sensitivity to, knowledge of, and aptitude for the art, craft, and process of
moving the script onto the stage.
4. Demonstrate the unique communication skills required of one who must inspire, shape, and
fuse the individual and collective contributions of all collaborative personnel.
5. Demonstrate the ability to view performances objectively and to apply and articulate critical
aesthetic standards.
6. Understand traditional and innovative techniques appropriate for varying production formats.
7. Demonstrate the ability to articulate the creative process as performance.

C. MUSIC THEATRE

1. Develop the highest possible level of performance as a performer/singer/dancer.
2. Understand and experience the art, craft, and process of performance and its relationship to
the other elements of production.
3. Develop the basic theatrical and movement skills including mime, stage combat, makeup,
and dance as appropriate to musical theatre.
4. Provide opportunities to develop the basic musical skills including voice performance,
musicianship, and music theory.
5. Provide opportunities to develop a high level of skill in sight singing.
6. Provide opportunities for performance in workshop and full productions of musical theatre in
a variety of formal and informal settings.
7. Develop repertory and techniques for auditions.
8. Demonstrate the unique collaborative skills necessary to assimilate and realize the vision of
playwright, director, and designer in performance.








D. TECHNICAL


1. Demonstrate skills in recording and communicating design plans through mechanical
drawing, pattern drafting, model building, plotting, and rendering.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of management skills relative to time, cost, space, personnel, and
safety.
3. Demonstrate knowledge of basic machinery, equipment, tools, hardware, and materials used
to realize theatre designs.
4. Demonstrate current technological and media literacy.

E. HISTORY

1. Understand the major trends in development of theatre art, dramatic literature, art, and
music.
2. Understand and demonstrate knowledge of the history of decor to include furniture,
decorative arts, and architecture (including theatre architecture).
3. Understand and demonstrate knowledge of the history of costumes and textiles, including
techniques for producing costumes for the stage.
4. Understand and demonstrate knowledge of lighting and sound, its development and control.

F. DESIGN

1. Demonstrate the principles of two-dimensional and three-dimensional design aesthetics as
applied to the theatre arts of set, light, and costume.
2. Demonstrate sensitivity to, knowledge of, and aptitude for the art, craft, and process of
moving the script onto the stage.
3. Demonstrate the ability to apply a conceptual approach to production; organizing, developing,
and guiding the creative collaboration with designers, performers, and technicians.
4. Demonstrate the unique collaborative skills necessary to assimilate and realize the visions of
playwright, performer, director, and designer in performance.
5. Demonstrate the ability to articulate the creative process as production.
6. Understand traditional and innovative techniques appropriate for varying production formats.

G. PROFESSIONAL

1. Demonstrate research, artistic, and technical skills in the realization of a major project.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic business of the profession.
3. Assess abilities in relation to career expectations.








BFA DANCE PROGRAM GOALS


1. Develop proficiency in modern dance, ballet, jazz, and world dance with mastery in modern.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of appropriate traditional and innovative techniques.
3. Demonstrate competency through public performance.
4. Develop visual and aural perceptions as related to performance quality, movement composition,
and production design.
5. Demonstrate competency by developing a composition for public performance.
6. Demonstrate knowledge of historical and cultural dimensions of dance.
7. Understand and evaluate contemporary thinking about dance and related arts.
8. Develop a critical sense of what constitutes a serious work of dance and recognition of ideas and
goals embodied in the work.
9. Make informed assessments about quality in works of dance.
10. Develop an informed view of the interaction of art and society for the 21st Century.

DANCE TECHNIQUE CLASS REGISTRATION INFORMATION
UF dance courses are open and available to all eligible UF students
Eligible for DAA 1000-Fundamentals of Dance:
All non-dance majors. This is a course for beginning your formal dance study. It fulfills a General
Education (H) credit.
Eligible for Basic Modern, Ballet, Jazz (DAA 2104, DAA 2204, DAA 2504):
Students who have successfully completed Fundamentals of Dance and have permission of
instructor.
Students whose prior dance training is approved as equivalent to Fundamentals of Dance. (See a
member of the dance faculty. If the faculty member finds your background to be comparable, he/she will give
you a permission slip to register for a basic level course.)
Eligible for Intermediate or Advanced Modern, Ballet, Jazz, or Music Theatre Dance Styles (DAA
3108 or DAA 4110, DAA 3208 or DAA 4210, DAA 3548)
All students must complete DAA 2104 to be eligible for Intermediate or Advanced Modern
Technique. You may get a permission slip for an intermediate or advanced level class from your
present UF dance instructor, or...
Take a Placement Class:

Modern or Jazz:
1. Attend the corresponding class the prior semester and ask the instructor for placement.
2. Attend the FIRST CLASS meeting of the term for which you wish to register.

Ballet:
1. For Fall 2008, the Ballet Placement Class will be held on the first day that the class meets.
Please attend the first class. This will be the only placement class for this course for Fall
2008.
2. For Spring 2009, the Ballet Placement Class will be held on the first day that the class meets.
Please attend the first class. This will be the only placement class for this course for Spring
2009.

For all courses with departmentally controlled numbers, take your permission slips to Kevin
Austin, Undergraduate Advisor.








CERTIFICATE IN DANCE IN HEALING


The dance area, in conjunction with the Center for the Arts in Healthcare Research and Education
(CAHRE), offers a Certificate in Dance in Healing. The Certificate recognizes students' special
competency and achievement in the use of movement to enhance health and healing.

Students who complete the requirements for the Certificate in Dance in Healing leave the University
of Florida with unique capabilities and experiences. This Certificate, recognizing these special skills,
can serve as a credential for developing complementary career options and will encourage
healthcare facilities to expand or initiate arts programs.

Requirements: To qualify for the Certificate in Dance in Healing, the student must attain a 3.0
average in the following courses. Students should note that all the listed courses have pre-
requisites. Please see the Dance Coordinator or Advisor.

Course

Intermediate or Advanced Modern Dance (min. 2 credits)
Dance Composition 1 (2 credits)
Improvisation or Dance Composition 2 (2 credits)
Dance in Medicine (min. 2 credits)
Dance Clinical Practice, DAN 4930 (3 credits)
To include a minimum of 120 hours of clinical work and a 3,000-4,000
word paper supporting the clinical study.

Procedures: Students interested in obtaining this certificate should apply by their junior year.
Students should contact the Coordinator of Dance who will appraise them of Certificate requirements
and arrange the clinical work through CAHRE. The Coordinator will send student information to the
School of Theatre and Dance Undergraduate Advisor, who will verify the successful completion of all
requirements.

Visit http://www.arts.ufl.edu/CAHRE/certificate.asp for more information and application.








UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS/AUDITIONS


UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS

Admissions to the Bachelor of Fine Arts and Master of Fine Arts Theatre and Dance Degree
programs are based on artistry and scholarship. Placement in the program will be determined
through audition/portfolio interview, academic credentials, diagnostic testing, and personal interview.
Admission to the Bachelor of Arts Degree program is based upon scholarship: 2.0 GPA and a
grade of C or above in three of the following four courses--TPP 2110 Acting 1; THE 2020
Introduction to Theatre for Majors; and either TPA 2232c Beginning Costume and Makeup or TPA
2202c Stagecraft.
Admissions to the Minor Programs are based upon scholarship (2.0 or above).

POST-BACCALAUREATE STATUS:

The University of Florida has extremely limited space for Post-Baccalaureate students.

The following are the only instances and conditions that admission may be granted.

1. To satisfy pre-requisites for admission to graduate school. However, students who wish to
prepare themselves for a graduate program at UF should be admitted conditionally to the graduate
program rather than as Post-Baccalaureate status. A contract should be written in conjunction with
the School, carefully delineating what the student needs to do to pursue graduate school.

2. Students who need to expand their credentials to become certified to teach or who wish to
complete a second degree in an OFF-CAMPUS program.

UNDERGRADUATE ADVISEMENT

Once you become a theatre or dance major, your initial advisement session will be with the School
of Theatre and Dance Undergraduate Advisor. See Kevin Austin regarding academic and
administrative matters. The Undergraduate Theatre Coordinator, Dr. Ralf Remshardt, and
Undergraduate Dance Coordinator, Ric Rose, serves as Career Advisor.
Before registration each semester, you are to see Kevin Austin during his scheduled hours. It is the
student's responsibility to see the Advisor.
Ultimately, the responsibility for fulfillment of all University and School requirements rests with the
student including applying for graduation at the Registrar's Office (222 Criser Hall) according to
posted deadlines. Check ISIS for accuracy each semester.








AUDITIONS FOR ENTRANCE INTO THE BFA PROGRAM


BFA THEATRE PERFORMANCE AUDITIONS/PRODUCTION PORTFOLIO REVIEWS

The BFA Degree prepares the aspiring professional in an area of emphasis through classroom,
laboratory, studio, and performance courses of study. Admission to the program will be based on
artistry and scholarship. Placement in the program will be determined through audition/portfolio
review and academic credentials.
BFA auditions and portfolio reviews will be held twice each year. Specific information available
online from the following websites:
* BFA Theatre -
"http://www.arts.ufl.edu/theatreanddance/pages/whatyouneed/auditions/theatre.asp"
* BFA Dance -
"http://www.arts.ufl.edu/theatreanddance/pages/whatyouneed/auditions/dance.asp"
* BFA Design -
"http://www.arts.ufl.edu/theatreanddance/pages/whatyouneed/auditions/design.asp"

Auditions and reviews will be adjudicated on the basis of the student's potential for success in the
program. Students may audition for the BFA Degree program before entering or while attending the
University of Florida, but must be admitted before accumulating 90 hours. Upon admission to the
program, the student becomes responsible for all published regulations of the College of Fine Arts.
Admittance to the BFA program is selective; therefore, students are expected to maintain a
significant profile in performance and production work within the School of Theatre and Dance, and
academic work while at the University. Artistic and academic progress will be evaluated each term.


FALL 2008 SCHEDULED AUDITIONS and PORTFOLIO REVIEWS
BFA in DANCE AUDITIONS October 17, 2008. McGuire Pavilion, 9:30am-2:30pm. Send an
audition form to Ric Rose, 225 McGuire Pavilion, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL 32611-5900 or
email: rarose@ufl.edu
BFA in ACTING and MUSICAL THEATRE AUDITIONS-October 18, 2008, Constans Theatre,
9:00am-12:00pm Contact Tiza Garland, or email: tgarland@ufl.edu
BFA PRODUCTION PORTFOLIO INTERVIEWS-October 18, 2008, McGuire Pavilion, 9:00am-
12:00pm. Contact Professor Paul Favini, email: favinip@ufl.edu for more information.








MAGNA OR SUMMA CUM LAUDE HONORS


ALL CANDIDATES FOR MAGNA OR SUMMA CUM LAUDE MUST CONSULT WITH THE
SCHOOL ADVISOR REGARDING NOMINATION, COMMITTEE FORMS, AND DEADLINES FOR
THE SUBMISSION OF HONORS THESIS. THE COMPLETED THESIS WILL BE ACCEPTED BY
THE HONORS COMMITTEE NO LATER THAN 5:00 PM TWO WEEKS PRIOR TO THE FINAL
THESIS SUBMISSION DATE.

REQUIREMENTS

A. Eligibility
A minimum 3.75 upper division GPA is required for eligibility. All students with a minimum 3.40
upper division GPA will graduate Cum Laude. Students must be nominated by the School of
Theatre and Dance Advisor to qualify for an Honors distinction. Please see the School of Theatre
and Dance Advisor the semester prior to graduation for eligibility requirements and deadlines.
Students graduating in summer must submit their Honors Thesis the spring prior to graduation.
B. BFA Candidates in Performance, Production, and Dance
1. All candidates will be required to submit a written document/scholarly paper of some 12-15
pages ("Honors Thesis") that will demonstrate capability in research and in conceptual,
creative, or analytical thinking. The paper should demonstrate familiarity with the terminology
in the field of performance, production/design, or dance.
2. Students may use the work they undertake in THE 4959 or DAN 4959 (Senior Project) as the
foundation of the Honors Thesis. However, the submissions for Senior Project paper and
Honors Thesis may not be identical.
3. If the Honors Thesis is drawn from a practical project or performance, production majors
must include design documentation to support the paper. Performance majors must include
slides of the performance. Dance majors should include a videotape/DVD/website if it
presents no infringement of copyright laws.
4. The candidate will choose two faculty advisors, complete the Honors Thesis form, and return
the form to the Undergraduate Academic Advisor prior to undertaking the Honors Thesis.
When the faculty advisors are satisfied with the candidate's work, they will make a
recommendation on Magna Cum laude or Summa Cum laude to the full faculty. The faculty
will make a decision based on these recommendations as well as the abstracts of the Honors
Thesis. To ensure a smooth process, completed Honors Thesis must be submitted to the
Honors Committee no later than two weeks prior to the final thesis submission. The deadline
for Honors Thesis submission is set by the Honors College and is available on the Registrar's
"Critical Dates" website at http://www.registrar.ufl.edu/.
C. BA Candidates in Theatre
BA candidates follow the same procedure as BFA candidates. However, the Honors Thesis may
be extensions of THE 4970 (BA Senior Project). The BA Honors Thesis may consist of a
conventional research paper, an original play, or a dramaturgical protocol. A design project, with
proper documentation, will also be accepted.

For further information about Honors Theses and to download an Honors submission form
please visit the Honors web site at "http://www.honors.ufl.edu/upperdivisionhonors.html"








JURY PROCEDURES


ACTING AND MUSICAL THEATRE

Following each semester's juries, the acting faculty will discuss each student's progress.
Their discussion will be based upon observations of auditions of various performances, of
class work, etc. Their remarks will be organized and catalogued by the student's advisors
and will become part of the student's permanent file. In the week following auditions,
students should make appointments with their advisors in order to receive evaluation. At
these meetings, students will be advised of their status in the program. Students may
also speak with other members of the acting faculty for clarification and/or advice.

DANCE

Fall semester evaluations will be informal discussions scheduled as needed to enhance
communication. Either the student or the faculty may request an evaluation meeting.

Formal juries will be held during the spring semester. Students will prepare resumes,
self-evaluations, and portfolios. Self-evaluations should use the above criteria in
reference to the students' activities during the year and may include discussion of
progress toward specific individual goals. Resumes and self-evaluations will be turned in
to the faculty by an announced deadline prior to the jury date. The student will bring
his/her portfolio to the jury meeting.

The dance faculty will evaluate students based upon observations of work in classes,
performances, and other professionally related activities. Students will schedule jury meetings
with the faculty on announced dates. At the jury meeting, the student should be prepared to
discuss his/her goals and accomplishments for the year as well as future plans. Faculty will write
jury reports based upon their evaluations and the meetings. These reports will become part of
the student's permanent record.

Fall juries are now required for all dance freshman and senior students and by request for all
others. They will be scheduled on the reading days.

Spring juries will be held during Finals week. Students will make individual appointments.
Appointment time options will be announced in early April.

PRODUCTION

Production/Design students will participate in a jury at the end of the fall semester. At this
time, they should be prepared to present a resume and portfolio. The portfolio may
include photos, slides, drawing, and projects from classes and production assignments.
At this time, the design faculty will discuss evaluations with the students.








BFA JURIES


BFA students are expected to perform key roles in productions. They must participate in
each semester's block auditions, portfolio reviews, or Floridance auditions, and may accept
responsibilities in non-school productions only when they do not preclude full participation in
University of Florida productions. Success is based on how thoroughly and successfully
responsibilities are met. BFA students are juried, evaluated, and advised each semester.

Jury evaluations are based on the above criteria, as well as other faculty observations. Failure to
meet expected standards in all criteria in any semester results in probation. Failure to remove
probationary status in the following semester may result in advisement out of the program.

SENIOR PROJECTS

All Senior Project students must have the Senior Project proposal signed by a faculty supervisor
and presented to the School of Theatre and Dance Advisor before the student can register for that
class and section. No exceptions will be made. Individual study registrations will also be bound by
the same rules as the Senior Project.

PRODUCTION GUIDELINES: SENIOR PROJECT AND SHOWCASE

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

The Senior Project and Showcase Series are designed to provide an environment for
experimentation and risk taking, promoting the creation of original works. Students should feel free
to choose material/projects and develop them on their own. With this freedom, the student also
accepts responsibility as a theatre artist.

OBJECTIVES

To explore the creative process
To engage in freedom of expression
To explore the dynamics between artist and audience
To share the aesthetic experience
To create original work

PROCEDURE

Select a project
Submit a proposal form to the Project Advisor, the Undergraduate Coordinator, and the
Undergraduate Advisor, which includes:

(1) Project title
(2) Statement of purpose/nature of experiment
(3) Date/time of performance and performance space
(4) Persons involved








THE 4959 SENIOR PROJECT FOR BFA DEGREES. F, S, SS 2 credits
The Senior BFA student will select a final project in his/her major area of interest. Performance
students may elect to use roles won through audition on Constans Theatre Stage or the Center for
the Performing Arts (CPA), or may develop a project of sufficient difficulty in Studio Showcase.
Production students may elect to use projects in design, stage management, or assistant
design/technical direction on Constans Stage or CPA. Off-campus projects are discouraged, as
shop and personnel support is often unpredictable.

LOGISTICS: BFA students must acquire a Project Advisor appropriate to the focus of their project.
Once a project has been agreed upon between the student and Project Advisor they must submit their
proposal to the appropriate Undergraduate Coordinator using the THE 4959 BFA Senior Project
Proposal Form. The Undergraduate BFA Acting Coordinator is Tiza Garland and the Design
Coordinator is Paul Favini. Once the project has been approved by the Undergraduate Coordinator
the proposal form must be turned in to the Undergraduate Advisor, Kevin Austin. All forms should
be submitted to the Undergraduate Advisor the semester before the project is to be
undertaken.

Meeting times are to be arranged between the BFA Student and the Project Advisor. The student is
responsible for keeping the Project Advisor up-to-date on his/her progress. The Project Advisor will
attend rehearsals or performances, shop sessions, production meetings, fittings, etc. within reason -
upon the student's request. During the project, BFA Students will keep a complete journal and record
of research, sketches, drawings, budget, and promptbooks, as appropriate to your project. (Prior to
your project, clarify with your Project Advisor all the expectations for your BFA Senior Project.) No
senior project will be scheduled during the last two weeks of each semester.
Upon completion of the project, the student will turn in a 10-12 page process paper to their Project
Advisor. In order to guarantee sufficient time for grading, the submission date will usually be no later
than one week before the final day of classes.

GRADING: The project grade is assessed by the Project Advisor, based primarily on the quality of
the written work submitted. The student must work to achieve a "B" or above.


THE 4970 SENIOR PROJECT FOR BA DEGREE. F, S 1 credit
PURPOSE OF COURSE: The Senior Project in the BA is designed as a capstone project for the
Bachelor of Arts in General Theatre track. Students enroll in THE 4970, usually during the last
semester of their senior year.

REQUIREMENTS: The Senior Project shall consist of a significant piece of work that will
demonstrate the students' expertise in both the academic and practical fields of the theatre, resulting
in a document of substantial length (usually 10-20 pages). Possible choices are: dramaturgical
work on a production, yielding a dramaturge's protocol; a major research paper on a topic of
practical importance; the creation of a World Wide Web site; an archival research project using
resources such as the Belknap Collection or the School's own archives and primary documents, etc.
The BA Senior Project will not usually be a performance project.

LOGISTICS: At the beginning of their final semester, the student contacts the Undergraduate
Coordinator of the School to enroll in the course and to agree upon a suitable project or topic. A
project must be established no later than the end of the second week of classes.
The Undergraduate Theatre Coordinator, Dr. Ralf Remshardt, will be the instructor of record for THE
4970 and the default faculty supervisor for all BA Senior Projects. However, every student is free to
choose an alternate faculty supervisor. There are no regularly scheduled meetings. The student is
responsible for keeping the faculty supervisor up-to-date on his/her progress. In the case of a project








connected to a production (e.g., dramaturgy), the faculty supervisor will attend rehearsals or
performances within reason upon the student's request.

It is the responsibility of the student to select a project and to inform the Undergraduate Advisor of the
nature of the project in writing on the BA Senior Proposal Sheet. At that time, a submission date will
be negotiated, which will be considered binding.

GRADING: The project grade is assessed by the project Advisor, based primarily on the quality of
the written work submitted. The grade must be a "B" or better.

DAN 4959 SENIOR PROJECT FOR BFA IN DANCE PERFORMANCE. F, S, SS 2 credits
BFA in Dance Performance track majors are required to complete two senior projects, one in
choreography and one in production/direction. These projects are individually selected in
consultation with the project supervisor (a member of the dance faculty), and must meet the
following standards of choreography and production:
CHOREOGRAPHY
This should be a piece of choreography of the quality, scope, and aesthetic stance to warrant
presentation in either a mainstage or more intimate concert. Therefore, it should be a group work of
at least five minutes that successfully realizes its artistic purpose. In some cases, solo works may
be of sufficient scope. If the piece is co-choreographed, each choreographer using it as a senior
project must be responsible for the choreography of at least five minutes. The maximum time
acceptable (including co-choreographed pieces) is twenty minutes.
The student must meet all production responsibilities (e.g., providing information, meeting with
designers, meeting deadlines, etc.). In addition, he/she may be asked to arrange extra showings
and/or conferences with the supervisor.

DANCE PRODUCTION
The purpose of this project is to allow the student the opportunity (and experience) to synthesize and
apply all the information he/she has accrued toward the full realization of a dance performance. The
types of project possibilities are:
assisting the faculty in large projects; or
being responsible for a smaller project in any of the following capacities:
as a Company based producer (manager, director, etc.)
self produced and/or "home" programs;
a package produced/presented by others and/or touring;
as a presenter.
The project supervisor will work with the student to develop an outline of responsibilities specific to
the project. It is recommended that the student wishing to be independently responsible for a
production keep his/her project within the scope of a 30-minute program.








UNDERGRADUATE PROBATION
Academic Probation is dictated by the University and requires all theatre and dance students
to maintain a 2.0 grade point average or above. (See Undergraduate Catalogue for more
information.)

PROBATION
(from the Undergraduate Catalog 2008-2009)
The intent of academic probation is to serve notice formally that a student may not be making
satisfactory progress. The conditions of academic probation are intended to specify the achievement
standards required to graduate, to identify unsatisfactory academic performance at an early date, to
provide occasion for counseling, and to give students whose ultimate success is in question further
opportunity to demonstrate their ability to meet academic expectations. Academic probation can
occur for the following reasons:
* Students may be placed on probation by their college for failure to maintain normal academic
progress in their degree program. College probation will be removed when the college determines
that satisfactory academic progress has been demonstrated.
* Undergraduate students with less than a 2.0 cumulative grade point average for University of
Florida course work and a grade point deficit of fewer than 15 shall be placed on academic
probation.
* Academic probation will be continued for all undergraduate students as long as they have a
grade point deficit of fewer than 15. It will be removed when the grade point deficit has been reduced
to zero. Should the grade point deficit increase to 15 or more, the student will be dismissed from the
university.

Artistic Probation indicates that theatre students must, in the following semester, demonstrate
that they possess the requisite qualities to achieve success in their area. If a theatre student
has not been cast in a role or production position for two successive semesters, he/she will
be required to present a Showcase Production to persuasively demonstrate credentials for
success in the future.


IMPORTANT ACADEMIC INFORMATION
No grade below "C" in any required course will be accepted toward completion of
the degree.
No required course may be taken S-U. However, the BA foreign language requirement
may be taken S/U.
Current syllabi are on file in the School office.
Students should be aware that the University Undergraduate Catalog requires that nine
credit hours be completed during summer terms.
Only illness and real emergencies are valid reasons for I's and X's. Too many I and X
grades constitute an abuse and create problems for both students and faculty. These
grades will be awarded only in extraordinary circumstances.
A student's general education program follows the University Catalog for the year the
student entered the University. The theatre or dance degree program follows the
requirements published in the University Catalog for the year the student enters the
School.








THEATRE STUDENTS' PLAY CHECKLIST
The play checklist contains one hundred plays you should have read by the time you
graduate. Regard this list not as complete or inalterable, but merely as the basic canon which
supplies you with a grounding in dramatic literature. Your real reading starts where this list
ends! The plays marked with asterisks can be replaced by another significant play by the
same author (*) or of the same period and genre (**).
Antiquity Greece
1. Aeschylus, The Oresteia (Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers, The Eumenides)
2. Sophocles, Oedipus Rex
3. Sophocles, Antigone
4. Euripides, Medea*
5. Euripides, The Bacchae
6. Aristophanes, Lysistrata*
Antiquity Rome
7. Plautus, The Menaechmi*
8. Terence, The Brothers*
9. Seneca, Thyestes*
Middle Ages (Europe/Japan)
S10. Anonymous, Quem Quaeritis Trope(s)
S11. Anonymous, Everyman
S12. Anonymous, Second Shepherd's Pageant**
S13. Kan'ami, Matsukaze**
Tudor and Stuart England
14. Marlow, Doctor Faustus
S15. Shakespeare, As You Like It*
S16. Shakespeare, Hamlet
S17. Shakespeare, Henry V*
S18. Shakespeare, King Lear
S19. Shakespeare, Macbeth
S20. Shakespeare, The Tempest
S21. Jonson, Volpone*
S22. Webster, The Duchess of Malfi
Spanish Golden Age And French Neoclassicism
S23. Lope De Vega, Fuente Ovejuna
S24. Calderon, Life is a Dream
S25. Racine, Phaedra
S26. Moliere, Tartuffe
S27. Moliere, The Misanthrope*
Restoration and 18th Century England
S28. Congreve, The Way of the World**
S29. Behn, The Rover**
S30. Gay, The Beggar's Opera**
S31. Sheridan, The School for Scandal**
18th Century France, Italy, and Germany
S32. Beaumarchais, The Barber of Seville*
S33. Goldoni, The Servant of Two Masters*
S34. Lessing, Minna von Barnhelm








19th Century
S35. Goethe, Faust Part One
S36. Kleist, The Prince of Homburg
S37. Buchner, Woyzeck
S38. Gogol, The Inspector General
S39. Dumas, fils, Camille**
S40. Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac
S41. Stowe/Aiken, Uncle Tom's Cabin
S42. Boucicault, The Octoroon**
Modern Theatre Britain and Ireland
S43. Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest
S44. Shaw, Major Barbara*
S45. Shaw, Heartbreak House*
S46. Synge, The Playboy of the Western World
S47. Beckett, Waiting for Godot
S48. Beckett, Endgame*
S49. Pinter, The Homecoming
S50. Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead*
S51. Churchill, Top Girls*
Modern Theatre Scandinavia
S52. Ibsen, A Doll House
S53. Ibsen, Ghosts
S54. Ibsen, The Wild Duck
S55. Strindberg, Miss Julie
S56. Strindberg, A Dream Play*
Modern Theatre Russia
S57. Chekhov, The Seagull
S58. Chekhov, The Cherry Orchard*
S59. Gorki, The Lower Depths
S60. Mayakovsky, The Bedbug
Modern Theatre Germany, Austria, Switzerland
S61. Hauptmann, The Weavers
S62. Wedekind, Spring's Awakening
S63. Brecht, The Good Person of Sechuan*
S64. Brecht, Mother Courage and Her Children
S65. Durrenmatt, The Visit
S66. Weiss, Marat/Sade
S67. Handke, Kaspar*
S68. Muller, Hamletmachine
Modern Theatre Belgium, Italy, Spain, and France
S69. Maeterlinck, The Intruder*
S70. Jarry, King Ubu
S71. Pirandello, Six Characters in Search of an Author
S72. Garcia Lorca, Blood Wedding
S73. Sartre, No Exit
S74. lonesco, Rhinoceros
S75. Genet, The Balcony*
S76. Fo, Accidental Death of an Anarchist








Modern Theatre Eastern Europe
S77. Molnar, Liliom
S78. Capek, R.U.R.
S79. Witkiewicz, The Madman and the Nun*
S80. Havel, The Memorandum
Modern Theatre United States
S81. O'Neill, The Emperor Jones*
S82. O'Neill, Long Day's Journey Into Night
S83. Glaspell, Trifles
S84. Treadwell, Machinal
S85. Miller, Death of a Salesman
S86. Miller, The Crucible*
S87. Williams, The Glass Menagerie
S88. Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire
S89. Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun
S90. Albee, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
S91. Baraka, Dutchman
S92. Shepard, Buried Child*
S93. Shange, spell #7*
Modern Theatre Africa
S94. Fugard/Kani/Ntshona, Sizwe Bansi is Dead
S95. Soyinka, Death and the King's Horsemen
Five Plays of the Contemporary Theatre (after 1980) These will change frequently!
S96. Mamet, Glengarry Glen Ross
S97. Hwang, M Butterfly
S98. Wilson, The Piano Lesson
S99. Guare, Six Degrees of Separation
S100. Kushner, Angels in America Millennium Approaches/Perestroika
Plus: Seven books that are essential reading for theatre majors:
1. Aristotle, The Poetics
2. Stanislavski, An Actor Prepares
S3. Artaud, The Theatre and Its Double
S4. Brecht, Brecht On Theatre
S5. Grotowski, Towards a Poor Theatre
S6. Brook, The Empty Space
S7. Goldman, The Performer's Freedom
Recommended theatre histories:
SBrockett, History of the Theatre (7th Edition)
SBrown, Ed., The Oxford Illustrated History of the Theatre








Dance Students' Choreographers Checklist


1. Alvin Ailey
2. Richard Alson
3. Lea Anderson
4. Karole Armitage
5. Gerald Arpino
6. Fredrick Ashton
7. George Balanchine
8. Pina Bausch
9. Talley Beatty
10. Laurie Booth
11. Matthew Bourne
12. Trisha Brown
13. Ron K. Brown
14. Christopher Bruce
15. Jonathan Burrows
16. Rosemary Butcher
17. Carolyn Carlson
18. Lucinda Childs
19. Michael Clark
20. Robert Cohan
21. Jack Cole
22. John Cranko
23. Merce Cunningham
24. Siobhan Davies
25. Anne Teresa DeKeersmaeker
26. Agnes DeMille
27. Laura Dean
28. David Dorfman
29. Isadora Duncan
30. Katherine Dunham
31. Douglas Dunn
32. Nacho Duato
33. Eiko and Koma
34. Mats Ek
35. Garth Fagan
36. Eliot Feld
37. William Forsythe
38. Bob Fosse
39. Loie Fuller
40. Jean-Claude Gallotta
41. David Gordon
42. Martha Graham
43. Neil Greenberg
44. Eric Hawkins
45. Hanya Holm
46. Lester Horton
47. Doris Humphrey
48. Robert Joffrey
49. Bill T. Jones
50. Kurt Joos
51. Larry Keigwin
52. Michael Kidd








53. James Kudelka
54. Jiri Kylian
55. Daniel Larrieu
56. Bella Lewitsky
57. Jose Lim6n
58. Katherine Lizt
59. Murray Louis
60. Lar Lubovitch
61. Maguy Marin
62. Susan Marshall
63. Leonide Massine
64. Donald McKayle
65. Kenneth McMillan
66. Bebe Miller
67. Meredith Monk
68. Mark Morris
69. Graeme Murphy
70. Lloyd Newson
71. Daniel Nagrin
72. Vaslav Nijinsky
73. Bronislava Nijinska
74. Alwin Nikolais
75. Ohad Naharin
76. Robert North
77. Kazuo Ohno
78. David Parsons
79. Pilobolus
80. Steve Paxton
81. Inbal Pinto
82. Stephen Petronio
83. Eleo Pomare
84. Pearl Primus
85. Jerome Robbins
86. Marie Rambert
87. Shapiro & Smith
88. Ted Shawn
89. lan Spink
90. Anna Sokolow
91. Gus Solomons Jr.
92. Ruth St. Denis
93. Elizabeth Streb
94. Kei Takei
95. Paul Taylor
96. Glen Tetley
97. Twyla Tharp
98. Anthony Tudor
99. Doug Varone
100. Charles Weidman
101. Mary Wigma
102. Reggie Wilson
103. Jawole Willa Jo Zollar








Dance Theory Reading List

1. Copeland/ Cohen. What is Dance?: Oxford University Press, 1983

2. Steinberg, Cobbett. The Dance Anthology: New American Library, 1980

3. Martin, John. The Modern Dance. A. S. Barnes and company, Inc., 1933.

4. Foster, Susan. Choreography & Narrative: Ballet's Staging of Story and
Desire Bloomington & Indianapolis: Indiana University Press 1996.

5. Fernandes, Ciane. Pina Bausch and the Wuppertal Dance Theater: The Aesthetics of
Repetition. New York: Peter Lang Publishing Inc., 2001.

6. Foster, Susan, ed. Reading Dancing: Bodies in Contemporary American Dance.
Berkeley, Los Angeles, London: University of California Press, 1986.

7. Corporealities Dancing, Knowledge, Culture, and Power. London, New
York: Routledge, 1996.

8. Felicia McCarren. Dance Pathologies: Performance, Poetics, Medicine. Stanford: Stanford
University Press, 1988.

9. Franko, Mark. The Work of Dance: Labor, Movement, and Identity in the 1930's.
Middleton: Wesleyan University Press, 2002.

10. Franko, Mark. Dance as Text: Ideologies of the Baroque Body. Cambridge
[England] New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press, 1993.

11. Franko, Mark, and Annette Richards. Acting on the Past: Historical Performance
Across the Disciplines. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press,
published by University Press of New England, 2000.

12. Burt, Ramsay. Alien Bodies: Representations of Modernity, 'Race', and Nation in
Early Modern Dance. London & New York: Routledge, 1998.

13. Thomas, Helen. The Body, Dance and Cultural Theory. New York: Palgrave
Macmillan, 2003.

14. Sachs, Sid. Yvonne Rainer: Radical Juxtapositions 1961-2002. Philadelphia:
The University of the Arts, 2003.


15. Desmond, Jane. Meaning in Motion: New Cultural Studies of Dance, Durham:
Duke University Press, 1997.

16. Wigman, Mary. The Language of Dance. London: Macdonald & Evans, 1966.


17. Lepecki, Andre. Of the Presence of the Body: Essays on Dance and Performance Theory.
Middletown, Conn: Wesleyan University Press. 2004.

18. Laban, Rudolf von. Laban's Principles of Dance and Movement Notation. 2d ed.
Boston: Plays, inc., 1975.









19. Massumi, Brian. Parables for the Virtual Movement, Affect, Sensation. Post-Contemporary
Interventions. Durham : Duke University Press, 2002.

20. Brandstetter, Gabriele, and Hortensia Volkers, eds. ReMembering the Body.
Ostfildern-Ruit: Hatje Cantz Publishers, 2000.

21. Irigaray, Luce. An Ethics of Sexual Difference. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press,1993.

22. Manning, Susan. Modern Dance Negro Dance: Race in Motion. Minneapolis: University of
Minnesota Press, 2004.

23. Goellner, Ellen W. and Jacqueline Shea Murphy, Bodies of the Text: Dance as Theory,
Literature as Dance Rutgers University Press, 1994

Essay:
24. Daly, Ann. "Movement Analysis: Piecing Together the Puzzle," The Drama Review 32, No. 4,
New York University/Tisch School of the Arts. New York MIT Press, 1988.








THEATRE GRADUATE PROGRAM


The Master of Fine Arts is a terminal degree for practical theatre artists. Graduates are
prepared to enter professional theatre, teaching, or allied fields.
MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN ACTING: The MFA in Acting Degree challenges and
focuses the advanced artist-scholar through a rigorous classroom, laboratory, studio, and
performance course of study. It requires intensive and extensive sequential study.
MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN PRODUCTION: Costume, Light and Scene Design
The MFA in Design and Technology focuses and challenges advanced designers and
technologists in developing their artistic expression commensurate with the expectations
of professional performing arts. Through rigorous classroom, laboratory and studio
projects the course of study culminates in a realized thesis production.

THEATRE MFA: ACTING
Acting Core
The MFA in Acting candidate must demonstrate knowledge and competency commensurate with the
curricular objectives of the BFA program in theatre. Diagnostic evaluation will determine
qualifications. Insufficient preparation for the MFA may result in additional course work or Post-Bac
status.
The graduate theatre core component challenges student to:
* Demonstrate the ability to assimilate, articulate, and communicate the creative process.
* Demonstrate knowledge of traditional and innovative techniques.
SDemonstrate mastery and refinement of the artist's tools in area of specialization.
* Demonstrate knowledge of dramatic literature in performance.
* Demonstrate ability to analyze, research, and explore.
* Demonstrate the ability to apply research, selectivity, and skills to the realization of an artistic
product.
* Demonstrate the ability to view objectively and sensitively and to articulate and apply
discriminating aesthetic standards.
* Apply knowledge of business procedures in career planning and implementation.
* Demonstrate written and oral sophistication.
* Develop a unique personal aesthetic.

Master of Fine Arts in Acting Core Courses Include: Credits
THE 6525 & 6526 History, Literature & Criticism 1 & 2 6
TPP 6237 & 6238 MFA Company Workshop I & II 3-5 each
THE 6941 Internship 6
THE 6565 Seminar in Creative Process 3
THE 6973c Project in Lieu of Thesis 6

ACTING

Demonstrate sound theories of research and analysis in creating characters from
plays of all periods and genres.
Demonstrate ability to act convincingly in plays of all periods and genres.
Demonstrate mastery of body and voice.
Demonstrate the ability to communicate the performer's methods, processes, and
procedures in preparing and executing roles.
Demonstrate knowledge, sensitivity, flexibility, and intuition in functioning as a
member of an ensemble.
Demonstrate expertise in the unique collaborative skills necessary to assimilate and
realize the visions of playwright, designer, director, and performer in performance.








Apply research, artistic, and technical skills in the creation of at least two significant
roles in production.

MFA THEATRE PRODUCTION COMPONENTS

Assimilate architecture, decor, fashion, arts, music, and movement as a reflection of
specific cultures.
Demonstrate expertise in communication of design plans with director, performer, and
technical staff.
Demonstrate leadership in management of design execution relative to time, cost,
space, machinery, equipment, personnel, and safety.
Demonstrate the ability to communicate the designer's methods, processes, and
procedures.
Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of theatrical design as applied to scenery,
costume, lighting, design, and theatrical crafts.
Demonstrate expertise in the unique collaborative skills necessary to assimilate and
realize the visions of playwright, performer, director, and designer in performance.
Demonstrate research, artistic, and technical skills in conceptualizing and realizing
two major productions: organizing, developing, and guiding the execution in
collaboration with director, designers, performers, and technicians.
Demonstrate expertise in principles and practice of at least two areas of theatrical
design, including scenic design, costume design, lighting design, and theatrical crafts.

MFA AUDITION
Interviews and auditions are required of all applicants requesting graduate admission into the School
of Theatre and Dance. Often, faculty representatives invite prospective graduates to auditions
through contacts at SETC conventions and URTA, as well as interviews at USITT and ATHE.
Auditions for entering graduates are held on campus in the presence of the theatre performance
faculty. Interviews are also required of candidates before and after school auditions.
MFA JURIES AND PORTFOLIO REVIEW
MFA students are admitted to the program and, when possible, supported with assistantships to
form the core of the acting and production company. They must participate in each semester's
auditions/portfolio reviews and may only accept assignments at other theatres when they are not
engaged for University of Florida productions. Success (and continuation of financial assistance) is
based on how thoroughly and successfully responsibilities are met. Graduate students are juried
and evaluated twice a year, based on the following criteria.
1) Artistic Growth and Potential for Success in the Professional Theatre: Members of the faculty
observe students' work in recital performances and in various produced showcases. These
scenes and/or production projects with other performances, provide the basis for discussion.
2) Academic Achievement: Students' performance in classes is scrutinized and evaluated by the
faculty. In order to remain in good standing, graduate students must maintain a 3.0 minimum
grade point average. Any grade below B in students' major area of study results in probation.
3) "Cast-ability" and Production Ensemble: Graduate students are expected not only to perform
pivotal roles and production positions in productions; they are also expected to serve as role
models for younger students. This responsibility precisely equates the students' function in all
production ensembles. Graduate students are, therefore, evaluated on such qualities as
rehearsal and performance discipline, as well as interpersonal skills and relationships.
Collegiality, collaboration, cooperation, and general demeanor are included in evaluation.
4) Teaching/Production: Teaching/production assistants are required to work approximately 13 1/2
hours per week to fulfill the contractual obligations of 33% assistantships and approximately 20
hours per week for a 46% assistantship. Graduate Assistants work under faculty supervisors
who submit written evaluations of the quality of work to the Director. These letters compose an
employment evaluation. After reviewing these documents, students may file rebuttals, which are
kept in the students' employment files.








MFA Performance Internship:
MFA acting students are required to complete 6 credit hours of off-campus industry internship,
preferably in the third year of the program. This internship is defined as a full-time, full semester
working experience with a reputable theatre company or theatrical industry agency. The duties of
the internship may be specified by the students in conjunction with the specific institution where the
internship occurs. Students are required to submit a letter from the on-site supervisor at the location
of the internship explaining the expected nature of the internship and the start and stop dates for the
experience. Students must also fill out an evaluative form and receive signatures approving the
perspective internship from the Head of Graduate Actor Training, Graduate Studies Coordinator, and
the Director of the School of Theatre and Dance before and at the end of the internship experience.

MFA Performance Comprehensive Examination:
MFA acting students are required to complete an examination of comprehensive knowledge during
the third year of the program covering areas that may include theater history, literature and criticism,
acting theory, mastery of voice and movement techniques, principles of directing, aspects of cultural
studies, and questions designed to demonstrate the expression of a sophisticated and unique
personal aesthetic. The examination is comprised of questions submitted by members of the
graduate performance faculty. Students are allowed one week to complete all sections of the
examination and must verify the examination dates with the head of graduate actor training or
Graduate Performance Advisor at the beginning of the third year of program studies (within one
week of the beginning of the term). The advisor will prepare each student's questions for the
determined date(s) of the exam. Students will submit in a typed copy of the completed examination
adhering to all rules of current MLA standards and formats for academic writing, including works
cited and bibliography pages. The Graduate Performance Advisor will make copies of the
examination for distribution to the entire performance faculty and arrange for an examination defense
session within one to two weeks following the completion of the examination by the student and the
reception of the complete exam by all members of the graduate faculty. All such examinations and
defenses must be completed before one week preceding the end of the academic semester in which
the exam is administered.

MFA Performance Project in Lieu of Thesis:
The MFA performance project-in-lieu of thesis is expected to be a major role or in a main stage
production during the third year of study. Usually, these assignments will be made and confirmed
during the preceding spring term before the student enters the third year of study. The thesis role or
design assignment may be one that has been suggested by the student. However, the assignment
of thesis roles is the ultimate and direct responsibility of the head of graduate actor training in
consultation and collaboration with the graduate performance faculty and the Director of the School
of Theatre and Dance. Role assignments should be made with concerns for the best interests of the
student actor, the needs and opportunities for casting in the current production season, and the
agreement of each production director. In preparation for the thesis project, each actor assigned a
thesis role must present written background research work for the role to the production director and
to the head of graduate actor training at the time of, or before, the first official rehearsal for the
production. This research work must include a bibliography. Following the rehearsal process and
performance of the thesis role, the student will have no more than two weeks in which to submit a
project summary of the process. The thesis project summary report should not exceed 5-10 type-
written pages. The student will then prepare a project report abstract, as required by the Graduate
School of the University (not to exceed 2-3 pages) and a finished copy of the full performance project
report to be submitted no later than one week before the last day of classes in the semester the
thesis role has been performed. Each student is assigned a Supervisory Committee at the
beginning of the second year of study to assist and advise in this process.

Failure to meet expected standards of all criteria in any semester results in probation. Failure to
remove probationary status in the following semester may result in termination of assistantship or
dismissal from the program.








MFA PROJECT REPORT
All students must submit a satisfactory document that describes and evaluates their project-in-lieu-
of-thesis. The document should provide the performer with the opportunity to review his/her process
in concise and concrete terms and demonstrate a procedure for approaching future projects. Above
all, it should focus on a high level of reflection, demonstrate the performer's close familiarity with the
terminology and methodology of the field and with his/her instruments emotional, verbal, and
analytical. The reader of the document should be able to gather important information on the
process and product of a theatre artist. The document contains an evaluation, an annotated
bibliography, and an appendix. It is important that the performer consciously approach the MFA
thesis role with a view to its eventual analysis and documentation. The performer is required to keep
a detailed journal from the first reading of the play or discussion of the production. The journal will
serve to reconstruct the working process.

Students preparing to write their documents should secure a copy of GUIDE FOR PREPARING
THESES AND DISSERTATIONS from the Graduate School. Even though MFA candidates do not
follow all the guidelines discussed in the manual, they will find much valuable information in this
document.

Each candidate is responsible for conforming to regulations governing format, final term procedures,
and dates for submitting to his/her Supervisory Committee.

The Graduate School issues deadline dates for each term. The dates and instructions therein
supersede those listed in the Graduate Catalog calendar. Copies of deadline dates and related
forms and materials are available in the Editorial Office, 109 Grinter Hall (GRI). These deadlines are
firm. Additional deadline dates are issued by the College of Fine Arts and the School of Theatre and
Dance.

ADVISEMENT
Advisement and counseling of graduate students is conducted by Dr. Mikell Pinkney, Graduate
Performance Advisor. In the second semester of study, he/she is assigned a Supervisory
Committee comprised of two graduate faculty members. This committee supervises the project-in-
lieu-of thesis and its accompanying report. A supervisory committee chair and member advise and
assist the student with the completion of the final project-in-lieu-of-thesis.


RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE AND CHAIR
The Chair of the candidate's Supervisory Committee is basically responsible for the level of
scholarship exhibited in the Project Report. The manuscript must demonstrate a high level of
professional competence, and only the Supervisory Committee can give the candidate the guidance
and instruction necessary to achieve this goal.

The Chair of the Committee will be assigned to the performer from the beginning of the process.
The Chair will be available to answer any questions concerning modes of analysis and
documentation, but will not interfere with the director's role. It is the responsibility of the Chair of the
Committee to ascertain that the candidate's report is written in acceptable English, in an appropriate
scholarly style, and that it is carefully proofed prior to submission to the Graduate Faculty of the
College of Fine Arts.

At the candidate's final examination, each member will certify on the line above his/her name on the
signature page that he/she has read the final version of the manuscript and found it acceptable in
scope and quality. The Report of Final Examination form accompanies the Project Report.

The Graduate Advisor for the School of Theatre and Dance distributes a schedule of deadline dates
for the semester to students expecting to graduate and the Chairs of their Supervisory Committees.








These dates are based on deadline dates established by the Graduate School and the College of
Fine Arts. Students submit materials to the Chairs of the Supervisory Committees in conformance
with the deadline dates. The Committee Chair advises when he/she is completely satisfied with the
document. At that point, the student presents a clean copy of the complete document (Evaluation
and Bibliography) to the Second Reader for his/her comments and suggestions. The student
reviews these notes with his/her Chair. After the student and the Committee Chair have agreed
upon incorporation of the Second Reader's notes, the final, complete document, with all supporting
materials, is submitted to the full Committee for final review before the oral defense and submission
of the document to the Graduate Faculty of the College of Fine Arts. No reader should hold the
document for longer than one week and no writer should expect the document to be returned in less
than one week.

FINAL TERM PROCEDURES FOR THE MFA DEGREE
Registration
All degree candidates must be registered for at least three credit hours during the term the final
examination is given and the term the degree is conferred.

Degree Application
By approximately the second week of the final term (consult the deadline dates for the exact date),
all candidates must apply at the Registrar's Office, 222 Criser Hall, for a degree to be awarded at the
end of that term. This application may be made on the Audit Information Sheet filed with registration;
care must be taken to cite the correct degree, term, and year. This application must be renewed by
the candidate each term that graduation is expected. Candidates who do not meet this deadline will
not be permitted to graduate during that term. The Dean's Office must be informed if any candidate
wishes to remove his/her name from the graduation list of Fine Arts.

Requirements for Graduation
It is essential that all candidates check with the Records Office (288 GRI) to be sure that all
requirements for graduation have been met or will be met in the final semester. Petitions of degree
requirements and transfer of credit will be entertained by the Graduate School no later than the term
preceding the one in which the candidate is to receive the degree. Consult the deadline dates for
the exact date.

Preparation for Final Examination
Every candidate should ascertain the School, College, and Graduate School deadlines for submitting
the manuscript. He/she should schedule the final examination to allow time to make corrections in
order to meet final submission deadlines.

Submission of Proiect Report and Supporting Documentation
The project report is submitted to the Graduate Faculty of the College of Fine Arts in approximately
the 13th week of classes. The Project Report must be defended and in final form prior to
submission. Only the Chair of the Committee may request an extension of time in cases of
extremely unusual circumstances.
No later than the dates specified, candidates must submit the following materials:
1. Two complete copies of the Project Report to the Dean of Fine Arts, typed on 20 pound,
100% rag bond, fully signed and inserted in the specified expanding folder. Appendix pages
need not be duplicated on rag bond paper.
2. Signed final Examination Report accompanies the Project Report.
3. Three copies of the abstract (two page maximum), separate and without page numbers,
copied on 20 pound, 100% rag bond; two copies to the Graduate School and one copy to the
Dean of Fine Arts.
4. Profile of Position after Graduation (available in 109 GRI) to the Graduate School.
5. A library binding processing fee of $12.80 is required for all students. Pay at S113 Criser and
submit the receipt in your expanding envelope.








Style Guide
The School of Theatre and Dance requires use of the current edition of the MLA Handbook
for Writers of Research Papers, by Joseph Gibaldi in writing the Project Report.

Number of Copies
The candidate supplies two copies in individual, letter-sized, heavy-duty, expanding fiber envelopes
with elastic, string, or Velcro closures to the College of Fine Arts' Dean's Office. Each envelope
should be labeled on the upper-left flap with surname, initials; major schools; degree; e-mail address
or telephone number; and month and year of graduation. A library binding processing fee of $12.80
is required for all students. Please pay at S113 Criser and submit the receipt in your expanding
envelope. The student may prepare a personal copy and should also check if their supervisory
committee chair would like a personal copy. Personal copies are not submitted to the Dean's Office;
however, students may submit extra signature pages, which will be signed and returned to the
student for inclusion in personal copies.

Printing and Copying
The report must be printed on thesis paper, double-spaced, one side only, in any standard
typeface. It must be uniform in size, face, and color throughout the manuscript. Do not use
bold-faced fonts. The use of a word processing program is strongly encouraged. All type
must be sharp, clear, and clean, with no weak areas.

Paper stock for the manuscript is 8 1/2" x 11" bond, 20 pound, 100% rag content, whether
cotton, linen, or fiber. Locally available brands include Southworth, Parchment Deed, and
Eatons. Hold a sheet up to the light; correct paper stock will be watermarked with brand
name and 100% fiber content. This paper is not required for the document appendix except
for the signature page. Copies of abstracts submitted separately must be on thesis-bond
paper.
Corrections
The appearance of the finished work should be neat, clean, and without noticeable
corrections.
Final copies of all manuscripts must be submitted in the specified expanding folder.
Length, Spacing, and Margin Requirements
The length of the Project Report is no fewer than 7,500 and no more than 15,000 words
(approximately 25-50 pages).

All standard manuscript copy (between lines of text and between paragraphs) should be
typed double-spaced as per the MLA Handbook.

The margin on the left side of should be 1%" top. Right and bottom margins should be at
least 1". All text, including page numbering and footnoting (if applicable), should fall within
these margins.

A 2" margin from the top of the page should be used for the first page of the Evaluation,
Acknowledgments, Table of Contents, and Bibliography.
Preliminary Pages
Preliminary pages of every manuscript must include a Title Page, a Table of Contents, and
an Abstract, and may include a Dedication and Acknowledgments. All are counted; only the
Acknowledgments, Table of Contents, and Abstract are numbered with small Roman
numerals. Sequence is as follows: Title Page, Dedication, Acknowledgments, Table of
Contents, Abstract.








Title Page
Titles must be consistent in every respect, including punctuation and hyphenation, on the
Title Page, the Abstract, and supplementary forms. Check punctuation, hyphenation,
underlining, spelling, capitalization, and so forth. Copy, spacing, and paper bond must meet
Graduate School requirements.
Use legal name on the Title Page, Abstract, and all forms. Do not use first name and initial in
one place and first and middle name in another.
Table Page
Table of Contents should list the following items: Acknowledgments, Abstract, Evaluation,
Annotated Bibliography, and Appendix. Separate appendix items should be listed and
indented under the main title.
Abstract
Immediately preceding page one of main text, the Project Report must include an Abstract
that describes the content and organization of the report. Abstracts cannot exceed two
pages and must conform to standard margin requirements. Copy, spacing, and paper bond
must meet Graduate School requirements.
Evaluation
The Evaluation section is the main body of the Project Report. Organization and content
allow for creativity in this manuscript; it reflects primary areas of concern for individual
students and projects. The thrust of this section, however, must be evaluative. Processes of
research, analysis, rehearsal, and performance may be explored. It should offer readers
insight into an performer's or designer's process and product. This report must be written in
"appropriate scholarly style."
The following is a suggested format:
1. Introduction (ca. 500 words). May contain comments on the process of
choosing the play and/or role; other pertinent comments.
2. Text analysis (ca. 1,000 1,500 words). A concise discussion of the text,
placing it within its history, genre, critical tradition, etc., and including a brief
performance history. Use of secondary materials (reviews, criticism) is
strongly recommended. The point of the text analysis is to demonstrate the
performer's awareness of the problems and possibilities of the role as they
emerge from the text.
3. Documentation and analysis of rehearsal process and performance
preparation (ca. 5,000-6,000 words). This main section of the thesis allows
the performer to demonstrate his/her sophistication in using techniques
learned in the MFA program, for constructing a performance and thinking
about the process. In this section, the performer should be explicit about
his/her methodology and refer to standard terminology and acting literature.
The approach can be either chronological (charting progress) or thematic
(documenting selected areas of concentration). The writer should avoid being
merely anecdotal and should draw on the acting diary to establish a clear
sense of the process of understanding and exploring the role. The emphasis
should be on problem solving, demonstrating how the specific challenges of
the role were met. The section should conclude with an analysis of the
methods used and their adequacy to the project.

4. Performance (ca. 500-1,000 words). A brief discussion of the performance of
the role should note whether the rehearsal period accomplished a
comprehensive preparation for the live performance (and if not, why?), how
the performance progressed from opening to closing, and citing verbal
feedback and criticism as well as any written reviews.








5. Conclusion (ca. 300-500 words). Final summary evaluation of the thesis
project.

Bibliography
All research sources are listed in correct bibliographic format.
Appendix
The Appendix section of the Project Report reflects the performer's process and must include
a copy of the printed program in plastic binder and production slides or photographs in plastic
holders with credit to photographer.
Biographical Sketch
A biographical sketch is required of all candidates. The biographical sketch should be in
narrative form. It typically includes the educational background of the candidate.
Signature Page
Committee Chairs will supply the correct format for the signature page.







Appendix








FACULTY LISTING


Kevin Marshall, Director, Professor, Room 214, 273-0501. email: kmarshall@arts.ufl.edu
Joan Frosch, Assistant Director, Professor, Co-Director of the Center for World Arts, Room 213,
273-0502. email: jfrosch@arts.ufl.edu
Tim Altmeyer, Assistant Professor, Room 232, 273-0503. email: taltmeyer@ufl.edu
Kevin Austin, Assistant in Advising, Room 233, 273-0519. email: kaustin@arts.ufl.edu
Dr. Rusti Brandman, Professor Emeritus, Co-Director of the Center for the Arts in Healthcare
Research and Education, Room 223, 273-0504. email: drdance@ufl.edu
Kathy Byrne, Adjunct Lecturer, McCarty C 3rd Floor, 392-0246. email: kathybyrne@ufl.edu
Yanci Bukovec, Assistant Professor, Room 231, 273-0517. email: yanci@ufl.edu
Kelly Drummond Cawthon, Associate Professor, Room 230, 273-0516. email:
kcawthon@ufl.edu
Mihai Ciupe, Associate Professor, Room 206, 273-0509. email: mciupe@ufl.edu
Mohamed DaCosta, Lecturer in African Performing Arts, Room 235, 273-0521. email:
dacostal@ufl.edu
Meredith Farnum, Adjunct Lecturer, McCarty C 3rd Floor. email: mereholl@ufl.edu
Paul Favini, Associate Professor, Coordinator of Design, Room 204, 273-0507. email:
favinip@ufl.edu
Stacey Galloway, Assistant Professor, Room 205, 273-0508. email: sgallowa@ufl.edu
Isa Garcia-Rose, Adjunct Professor, 273-0500. isa@ufl.edu
Tiza Garland, Assistant Professor, Room 226. 273-0518. email: tgarland@ufl.edu
Aimee Green, Graduate Assistant, Room 235. 273-0521.
Zak Herring, Lecturer/ Technical Director, Room G-016. 273-0524 email:zakh@ufl.edu
Pam Kaye, Adjunct Lecturer, McCarty C 3rd Floor, email: pkaye@ufl.edu
Stan Kaye, Associate Professor, Room 207, 273-0510. email: stankaye@ufl.edu
Tony Mata, Associate Professor, Room 228, 273-0514. email: tmata@ufl.edu
Angela McDonough, Adjunct Lecturer, 239-272-6677. email: ammdance@yahoo.com
Patrick Pagano, Lecturer, Room 229, 273-1483. email: ppagano@arts.ufl.edu
Dr. Mikell Pinkney, Associate Professor, Room 203. 273-0512. email: mpinkney@ufl.edu
Neta Pulvermacher, Assistant Professor, Room 236. 273-0522. email: neta@ufl.edu
Dr. Ralf Remshardt, Associate Professor, Room 227. 273-0513. email: drralf@ufl.edu
Ric Rose, Associate Professor, Coordinator of Dance, Room 225. 273-0506. email:
rarose@ufl.edu
Kathy Sarra, Adjunct Professor, McCarty C 3rd Floor, 392-0246. email: kmsarra@aol.com
Jill Sonke, Adjunct Faculty Lecturer in Dance in Medicine, Co-Director of the Center for the Arts
and Healthcare Research and Education (CAHRE), Phone: 265-0768. email: jsonke@ufl.edu
Ken Tosti, Guest Artist, 352-281-9309
Dr. Judith Williams, Professor, International Production Program Coordinator, Room 210,
273-0511. email: jwbw@ufl.edu
Dr. David Young, Graduate Research Professor, Room 224, 273-0505. email: youngd@ufl.edu
STAFF LISTING

Todd Bedell, Lab Manager, Constans Theatre Scenic Studio Supervisor, Room G-016, 273-
0524. email: tbedell@ufl.edu
Kate Glennon, Teaching Lab Specialist, Constans Theatre Costume Studio, Room G-238, phone
273-0525. email: kglennon@ufl.edu
Frances Jones, Office Manager, Atrium, 273-0515. email: fjjones@ufl.edu
Barry Luther, Coordinator Administrative Services, Room 234, 273-0520. email:
bluther@arts.ufl.edu
Vance McKenzie, Master Electrician, Room G-208, 392-9946. email: vancemmckenzie@ufl.edu
Sarah White, Production Manager, Mezzanine, 273-0526. email: swhite@arts.ufl.edu








OTHER IMPORTANT NUMBERS


Acrosstown Repertory Theatre 619 S. Main Street, 32601 371-1321
website: acrosstown.org/
.. ...... s. ... .. .... .................................................... .... .... ...... .... ........ . a.. .. ... ................ ---------
I Alpha Psi Omega Reitz Union Student Organizations 337-5781
...Computer Help Desk........ F.AA. 392.........-67. 93
Constans Theatre Box Office Hours: 12:00 pm 5:00 pm 392-1653
Monday through Friday fax: 392-5100
........................................................................ ............................................ ............ .. ....... ... ... ......... ......... ................................... .. ...
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the 315 Hull Road; PO Box 112750 392-1900, x 323
Performing Arts Box Office website: www.cpa.ufl/ticket sales: 392-2787
Dance Alive! Judy Skinner 371-2986
dalive@bellsouth.net
Faculty Support 2215 Turlington 392-7249
website: www.fsc.ufl.edu
Fax in Scenic Studio T109 CON 392-1268
.......................................................................................................................... ..................................................................................................................................
Film Studies 4008 Turlington (Robert Ray, 392-0777
Director)
website: web.english.ufl.edu/film/
Fine Arts College Council (FACC) Dean Marcia Isaacson, Advisor, 392-0207
101 Fine Arts Dean's Office
Fine Arts Dean's Office 101 FAA 392-0207
Florida Players Reitz Union Student Gov't area 392-1665 x 323, opt.
office, 590
Florida Theatrical Association Kevin Keegan 954-463-5180
Floridance website: www.gatorbuzz.uc.html
Gainesville Community 4039 NW 16th Blvd., 32605 376-4949

...ainesville Symphony Orchestra Leslie Odom (UF contact) 336-5448
Graduate Office Yon Hall 4C 392-1138
Hippodrome Box Office 25 E. Second Place, 32601 373-5968
website: hipp.gru.net (fax: 371-9130)
Instructional Resources (OIR) Turlington Equipment 2-0371
Film Library 2-0313
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------0 3 1
O'Connell Center Campus 392-5500
School of Art and Art History Third floor of FAC 392-0201
...,s c Ih Lo A .t n A ....y ................. ......... T f .... ........................................................................................ ..
School of Music Music Building 392-0223
Student Health Center Infirmary Building 392-1161


WEBSITES OF INTEREST


Alachua County, FL website:
CARE:
Fine Arts Website:
Gainesville, FL website:
Gatorlink home page:
Isis home page:
Registrar home page:
Theatre and Dance home page:
UF main page:


www.co.alachua.fl.us/
www.arts.ufl.edu/cahre
www.arts.ufl.edu/
www. state.fl.us/gvl/
www.gatorlink.ufl.edu/
www.isis.ufl.edu/
www. registrar. ufl.edu/
www.arts.ufl.edu/theatreanddance/
www.ufl.edu/










CRITICAL DATES


All deadlines are effective at 5:00 p.m. on the
should be submitted to the appropriate office,
Criser Hall.


last date unless indicated otherwise. All paperwork
generally the Office of the University Registrar in 222


2008-2009 Academic Dates Fall Spring

Registration August 21-22 5-Jan
Classes Begin 25-Aug 6-Jan
Drop/Add
(11:59 pm of last day) August 25-29 January 6-9, 12
Late Registration
(11:59 pm of last day) August 25-29 January 6-9, 12
Withdrawal with no Fee Liability
(11:59 pm of last day) 29-Aug 12-Jan
Fee Payments
(3:30 pm, Financial Services) 5-Sep 16-Jan
Residency Reclassifications 5-Sep 16-Jan
S-U Grade Option 12-Sep 23-Jan
Degree Applications 19-Sep 30-Jan
Withdrawal, All Courses, with 25% Refund
(W assigned) 19-Sep 30-Jan
CLAST Exam October 4 (tent.) February 21 (tent.)
Drop or Add a Course by College Petition 24-Nov 10-Apr
Withdrawal from UF
(W assigned) 24-Nov 10-Apr
Classes End 10-Dec 22-Apr
Honors Theses due to College Advising
Offices 10-Dec 22-Apr
Reading Days no classes December 11-12 April 23-24
Final Exams December 13, 15-19 April 25, 27-30, May 1
Commencement December 19-20 April 30 and May 1-3
Final Grades available
(evening, on ISIS) 22-Dec 4-May
Degree Status available
(late afternoon, on ISIS) 23-Dec 5-May
Holidays no classes September 1: Labor Day January 19:
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
October 24-25: Homecoming
March 7-14: Spring Break
November 11: Veterans Day


November 27-29:
Thanksgiving









School of Theatre and Dance 2008-2009 Performance Schedule


Fall

George Washington's Boy
By Ted Lange
Directed by Mikell Pinkney
Constans Theatre
September 19-20 at 7:30 pm
September 21 at 2:00 pm
September 23-26 at 7:30 pm
September 28 at 2:00 pm

Cloud Nine
By Caryl Churchill
Directed by Kathy Byrne
Nadine McGuire Black Box Theatre
October10 at 7:30 pm
October 12 at 2:00 pm
October 14-18 at 7:30 pm
October 19 at 2:00 pm

The Rocky Horror Show
By Richard O'Brien
Directed by Tony Mata
Constans Theatre
November 7-8 at 7:30 pm
November 9 at 2:00 pm
November 11-14 at 7:30 pm
November 16 at 2:00 pm

BFA Dance Showcase
McGuire Pavilion Studio G-6
October 30th November 2nd

Agbedidi Dance and Drum
Directed by Mohamed DaCosta
Constans Theatre
December 5-6 at 7:30 pm
December 7 at 2:00 pm








Spring


Electronic City
By Falk Richter
Translated by Daniel Brunet
Directed by Ralf Remshardt and
Kelly Drummond Cawthon
Nadine McGuire Black Box Theatre
January 30-31 at 7:30 pm
February 1 at 2:oo pm
February 3-7 at 7:30 pm
February 8 at 2:oo pm

Glengarry Glen Ross
By David Mamet
Directed by Tim Altmeyer
Constans Theatre
February 27-28 at 7:30 pm
March 1 at 2:oo pm
March 3-7 at 7:30 pm
March 8 at 2:oo pm

How I Learned to Drive
By Paula Vogel
Directed by David Young
Nadine McGuire Black Box Theatre
March 20-21 at 7:30 pm
March 22 at 2:oo pm
March 24-28 at 7:30 pm
March 29 at 2:oo pm

Pride and Prejudice
By John Jory
Based on Jane Austen's novel
Directed by Judith Williams
Constans Theatre
April 10-11 at 7:30 pm
April 14-18 at 7:30 pm
April 19 at 2:oo pm

BFA Dance Showcase
McGuire Pavilion Studio G-6
April 16th 19th


Tickets available
at the University Box Office,
by calling 352-392-1653 or at www.ticketmaster.com








ORGANIZATIONS AND SPECIAL EVENTS


SCHOOL OF THEATRE AND DANCE CONVOCATION
Fall semester: August 25 at 4 pm in the Constans Theatre
Spring semester: April 22 at 4 pm in the Constans Theatre
All Theatre and Dance students are required to attend.

FLORIDA PLAYERS
Florida Players is a student theatre company funded by UF Student Government with the purpose of
producing plays, fostering appreciation and interest in theatre at the University of Florida, and
preparing students for the professional world. Membership is open to all UF students willing to be
involved in various facets of the organization ranging from performance to community outreach
programs. Meetings are held the first Wednesday of every month and active membership is
maintained by attendance. Florida Players' office is located in the student government area on the
third floor of the Reitz Union. Visit them on the web at http://www.floridaplayers.org.

ALPHA PSI OMEGA
The Eta Tau cast is part of the national honorary society Alpha Psi Omega. The organization
promotes and publicizes theatre at the University of Florida and recognizes student and
faculty excellence in dramatic activities. Applications for membership are available once a
semester, and initiation times are posted. The Alpha Psi Omega office number is 337-5781
(located in the Reitz Union).

FLORIDA MOD PROJECT
The MOD project is a modern dance repertory company of the University of Florida School of
Theatre and Dance. Admission is by audition and membership is for a minimum of one year.
Members have the opportunity to work with professionals on producing guest, faculty, and
their own choreography in various local and touring traditional and extraordinary performance
venues. Contact professor Kelly Drummond Cawthon, Advisor, 273-0516, or email:
modproject@aol.com.

AGBEDIDI AFRICA DANCE AND DRUM
Agbedidi is the University of Florida's African dance and drum ensemble. Students may
participate as dancers, drummers, or both. Membership is by audition and participation in
World Dance and Intercultural Performance DAA 2381 Director Mohamed DaCosta may be
reached at 273-0521. Professor Joan Frosch, may be reached at 273-0502. Email:
jfrosch@arts.ufl.edu or dacostal@ufl.edu

JACARE BRAZIL DANCE
Jacare Brazil Dance is the dance ensemble dedicated to performances with the musical
ensemble, Jacare Brazil. Membership is by audition and participation in World Dance and
Intercultural Performance DAA 2381. Directors Aimee Green and Professor Larry Crook may
be reached at 392-0223 x 235 or at Icrook@ufl.edu.

THEATRE STRIKE FORCE
Theatre Strike Force is a student organization with the purpose of presenting improvisational
theatre which focusing on social concerns. The group performs primarily in a street theatre
context to reach an audience of those who would not ordinarily think of attending a theatre.

SONG AND DANCE/GATORTONES
Song and Dance/Gator Tones is a cabaret ensemble which performs for various community
organizations to combine entertainment and fund-raising functions. Membership is by








audition. Faculty Coordinator of Song and Dance/GatorTones is Tony Mata, 273-0514.
Email: tmata@ufl.edu

DIVERSITY ARTISTS PROJECT
Diversity Artists Project (DAP) is an annual project that uses the arts as a catalyst for social
change. Sponsored by the Center for World Arts in cooperation with the School of Theatre
and Dance, audition and participation in Diversity Artists Project, DAA 4930 is required. DAP
features a residency by an internationally known company, performances, and community
outreach. Director of DAP is Professor Joan Frosch, 273-0502.

STUDENT ADVISORY BOARD
A board comprised of student volunteers will meet each semester with the School Director for the
purpose of discussing school philosophy, policies, and concerns.

HOLIDAY PARTY/THE SPRING HONORS
An annual holiday party planned by the Florida Players Social Committee occurs at the end
of the fall term and the Spring Honors Evening is held at the end of the spring semester to
celebrate and recognize outstanding work and talent. Both events are dress-up affairs.

FINE ARTS COLLEGE COUNCIL
The Fine Arts College Council (FACC) is composed of student representatives from each of
the College's Department/Schools. FACC is concerned with enhancing the artistic and
academic environment within the College. The Council represents all students,
organizations, and clubs within the College and encourages cooperation, understanding, and
solidarity in matters relative to the curriculum, student affairs, faculty, and administration.
FACC promotes and funds selected projects and scholarships that are of value to students in
the College of Fine Arts. Although voting privileges are governed by the Council's
Constitution, all students in the College are invited and encouraged to participate in FACC
meetings and activities. 2008-2009 FACC officers have not yet been elected. Dean Marcia
Isaacson is FACC Advisor (101 FAA) and may be reached at 392-0207.












University of Florida


School of Theatre and Dance


SENIOR PROJECT


College of Fine Arts


N.B. YOU WILL NOT BE REGISTERED FOR THE COURSE UNTIL THE SENIOR PROJECT
FORM IS APPROVED AND SIGNED BY THE UNDERGRADUATE ADVISOR. ALL PARTS
MUST BE COMPLETED.


NAME:


UFID#:


SENIOR PROJECT (Check appropriate course number)


DAN 4959
THE 4959
THE 4970


Credit Hours Faculty Advisor:
Credit Hours Faculty Advisor:
Credit Hours Faculty Advisor:


TERM for which this Senior Project applies:


Fall 200


Spring 200_


(Print)


Summer 200 A B C


Write a brief statement of purpose including a short outline of the major points
and ideas to be explored in this Senior Project.


Student Signature:


Date:


After you get the faculty advisor and School Director's signatures, please return this form to the
undergraduate advisor, 233 Nadine McGuire Pavilion, for approval and registration.


OFFICE USE ONLY
APPROVED DENIED

Faculty Advisor: Date:
School Director (BFA): Date:
Undergraduate Coordinator (BA): Date
Undergraduate Advisor: Date:
(Signatures)











School of Theatre and Dance


INDIVIDUAL STUDY


N.B. YOU WILL NOT BE REGISTERED FOR THE COURSE UNTIL THE INDIVIDUAL STUDY
FORM IS APPROVED AND SIGNED BY THE UNDERGRADUATE ADVISOR. ALL PARTS
MUST BE COMPLETED.


NAME: UFID#:

INDIVIDUAL STUDY (Check appropriate course number)

DAN 4905 Credit Hours Instructor's Name:
THE 4905 Credit Hours Instructor's Name:

TERM for which this Individual Study applies:

Fall 200 Spring 200 Summer 200 A_ B_ C

Write a brief statement of purpose including a short outline of the major points
and ideas to be explored in this Individual Study.











STUDENT SIGNATURE: DATE:

After you get the faculty signature, please return this form to the undergraduate advisor. 233
Nadine McGuire Pavilion, for approval and registration.


OFFICE USE ONLY

APPROVED DENIED

FACULTY SIGNATURE: DATE:

ADVISOR SIGNATURE: DATE:


University of Florida


College of Fine Arts











School of Theatre and Dance


PRODUCTION PRACTICUM


N.B. YOU WILL NOT BE REGISTERED FOR THE COURSE UNTIL THE PRODUCTION
PRACTICUM FORM IS APPROVED AND SIGNED BY THE UNDERGRADUATE ADVISOR.
ALL PARTS MUST BE COMPLETED.


NAME: UFID#:

PRODUCTION PRACTICUM:

TPA 4946 Credit Hours Instructor's Name:

TERM for which this Production Practicum applies:

Fall 200 Spring 200 Summer 200 A_ B_ C_

Write a brief statement of purpose including a short outline of the duties,
responsibilities, and total hours included in this Production Practicum.











STUDENT SIGNATURE: DATE:

After you get the faculty signature, please return this form to the undergraduate advisor, 233
Nadine McGuire Pavilion, for approval and registration.


OFFICE USE ONLY

APPROVED DENIED

FACULTY SIGNATURE: DATE:

ADVISOR SIGNATURE: DATE:


University of Florida


College of Fine Arts









233 McGuire Pavilion, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL 32611-5900 2008-09
Advisor: Kevin Austin, (352) 273-0519
Director: Kevin Marshall
The BA curriculum is designed for students who desire a liberal arts education with an emphasis in theatre. Transfer
students with an AA Degree may be required to complete additional courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences basis
distribution. Students must earn a grade of C or better in each. These courses may not be taken S-U.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEATRE-GENERAL THEATRE


Tracking classes are in bold print
1. Fall
TPP 2110 Acting 1"
THE 2020 Introduction to Theatre*
Social/Behavioral Science (GE)
Biological Science (GE)
Mathematics (GE)


cr. 2.
3 TPP 3111
3 TPA 2202c


Spring
Acting 2
Stagecraft*
Physical Science (GE)
Composition (GE)


Dance Appreciation for 21st Century 3
Beg. Costume* 3
Beg. Makeup* 1
Script Analysis 3
Foreign Language 5


History of Theatre 1 (H/I)


4.
TPP 3311 Directing
Theatre Elective
THE 4950 Production & Performance
SBiological Science (GE)
Foreign Language


6.
3 THE4111


Production & Performance 1
Mathematics (GE) 3
Physical or Biological lab
Social/Behavioral Science (GE) 3
Upper Division Elective 3
Upper Division Elective 3
16

Diversity/Multi Amer Theatre (HI) 3
Theatre Elective 3
Theatre Elective 3
Upper Division Elective 3
Upper Division Elective 3


History of Theatre 2 (H/I)
Social/Behavioral Science (GE)
Physical Science


Upper Division Elective
Upper Division Elective


8.
THE 4481 Dramaturgy or
TPP 4600 Playwriting
Theatre Elective
Theatre Elective
THE 4970 Senior Project/ BA Majors
Upper Division Elective
Upper Division Elective


* A grade of B or better must be earned in TPP 2110, THE 2020, TPA 2202c,TPA 2232c and TPA 2120c in order to continue in the BA
program.

Elective Requirement. An upper division elective is any 3000/4000 level course. At least 18 hours of upper division electives must be from courses
outside the School of Theatre and Dance. Lower division courses can be accepted if they are part of an approved minor
All students pursuing the BA Degree must consult Advisor before attempting the elective portion of
this program.


3.
DAN 2100
TPA 2232c
TPA 2120c
TPP 3650


5.
THE 4110
THE 4950


7.
THE 3234


Total Undergraduate Credits: 120










233 McGuire Pavilion, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL 32611-5900
Advisor: Kevin Austin, (352) 273-0519
Director: Kevin Marshall


2008-09


The College of Fine Arts has a selective admissions policy that requires an audition or portfolio submission for admission in the
majority of programs. Consult the Advisor for additional information regarding admission requirements.
Tracking classes are in bold print.

BFA in THEATRE PERFORMANCE-ACTING


1.
TPP 2110
THE 2020
TPA 2202c
DAA 1000


3.


Fall
Acting 1
Introduction to Theatre
Stagecraft
Fundamentals of Dance
Mathematics (GE)


TPP 3113 Acting 3
TPP 3650 Script Analysis
TPP 2282 Movement Training 1 or Voice 1
TPA 3214 Introduction to Light & Sound
Physical/Biological Science (GE)


5.
TPP 4140 Acting: Period Styles 1
TPP 4287 Voice Training 1 or Movement 1
THE 4950 Production & Performance
THE 4930 African American History OR
THE 3234 Diversity & Multi Cultural
Social/Behavioral Science (GE)

7.
THE 4110 Theatre History on Stage 1 (GE)
TPP 4221 Audition Workshop
TPP 3251 Fundamentals of Musical Theatre
Elective
Elective



9. Summer
THE 4945 Summer Theatre Repertory


2.
TPP 3111
TPA 2232c
TPA 2120c



4.
TPP 4114
TPP 3283
THE 4950




6.
TPP 4144
TPP 4288





8.
THE 4111
THE 4959


Spring
Acting 2
Beginning Costume
Beginning Makeup
Mathematics (GE)
Compostion (GE)


Acting 4
Movement 2 or Voice 2
Production & Performance
Physical/Biological Science (GE)
Social/Behavioral Science (GE)
Elective


Acting: Period Styles 2
Voice 2/ Movement 2
Elective
Social/Behavioral Science (GE)
Physical/Biological Science



Theatre History on Stage 2 (GE)
Senior Project
Theatre Elective
Theatre Elective
Theatre Elective


Total Undergraduate Credits: 124


Recommended Electives:
THE 4481 Production Dramaturgy
TPP 3124 Improv & Social/Political Issues
TPP 3311 Directing
TPP 4531 Stage Violence
TPP 4730 Stage Dialects


TPA 2248
TPA 4601
TPP 2260
TPP 4600


Advanced Stage Makeup
Stage and Theatre Management
Acting for the Camera
Playwriting Workshop









233 McGuire Pavilion, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL 32611-5900
Advisor: Kevin Austin, (352) 273-0519
Director: Kevin Marshall


2008-09


The College of Fine Arts has a selective admissions policy that requires an audition or portfolio submission for admission
in the majority of programs. Consult the Advisor for additional information regarding admission requirements.
Tracking classes are in bold print.

BFA in THEATRE PERFORMANCE-MUSICAL THEATRE


1.
TPP 2110
THE 2020
DAA 1000




3.
TPP 3113
TPP 2282
MUT 1001
DAA
MVV 1411
TPP 2250



5.


Fall
Acting 1
Intro. to Theatre for Majors
Fund. of Dance Technique
Composition (GE)
Mathematics (GE)



Acting 3
Fundamentals of Voice Production
Rudimentary Theory*
Dance*
Voice
Song & Dance for the Theatre
Physical/Biological Science (GE)


MUT 1121 Music Theory 1
TPP 3251 Fundamentals of Mus. Theatre Acting
DAA Dance*
MVV 1411 Voice
MUS 2211 English Diction
TPP 2250 Song & Dance for the Theatre
Humanities (GE)
MVK 1111 Secondary Piano 1


7.

THE 4110
THE 4950
TPP 3253
MVV 1411


Elective
Theatre History on Stage 1 (GE)
Production & Performance
Adv. Studies in Musical Theatre Act.
Voice
Physical/Biological Science (GE)


2.
TPP 3111
MVV 1411
TPP 2250
DAA 2204



4.
TPP 4114
TPA 2202c
MVV 1411
DAA
TPP 2250




6.
TPA 2232c
TPP 3252
DAA
MVK 1112
TPP 2250
MVV 1411
TPA 2120c


Spring
Acting 2
Voice
Song & Dance for the Theatre
Basic Ballet
Mathematics (GE)
Social/Behavioral Science


Acting 4
Stagecraft
Voice
Dance*
Song & Dance for the Theatre
Social/Behavioral Science




Beginning Costume
Music Theatre Acting Styles
Dance*
Secondary Piano 2
Song & Dance for the Theatre
Voice
Beginning Makeup
Social/Behavioral Science


THE 4285or History of Arch. for Stage
THE 4260 Designers or Costume History
THE 4111 Theatre History on Stage 2
THE 4959 Senior Project
TPP 2250 Song & Dance for the Theatre
THE 4950 Production & Performance
Theatre Elective
Physical/Biological Science


Total Undergraduate Credits: 124

* Specific courses approved by dance faculty as appropriate to student's technical level.
** TPP 2250 Song and Dance for the Theatre may be repeated up to 6 credits for ensemble credit.









233 McGuire Pavilion, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL 32611-5900
Advisor: Kevin Austin, (352) 273-0519
Director: Kevin Marshall


2008-09


The College of Fine Arts has a selective policy that requires an audition or portfolio submission for admission to the majority programs.
Consult the Advisor for additional information regarding admission requirements.
Tracking classes are in bold print.


BFA in THEATRE PRODUCTION Costume Design


Fall
Introduction to Theatre
Acting I
Beginning Costume
Stagecraft
Mathematics (GE)


Costume patterning
Adv Costume Construction
Script Analysis
Production & Performance
Social/Behavioral Science (GE)
Physical/Biological Science (GE)


2.
TPA 2074
TPA 2120c
TPA 2075




4.
THE 4260
TPA 4049
THE 4950


6.
Intro to Light & Sound 4 TPA 4049
Scene Design 3 THE 4260
Art History 1 (GE-HN) 3 ARH 2051
Production & Performance 1
Social/Behavioral Science (GE) 3 THE 4950
Physical/Biological Science (GE)

8.
Theatre History on Stage 1 (GE-HN) 3 THE 4111
Light Design 3 TPA
Adv Costume Design 3
History of D6cor for the Stage 3 THE 4959
12 THE 4950


Spring
Drawing & Rendering
Beginning Makeup
Scene Painting
Mathematics (GE)
Composition (GE)
Social/Behavioral Science (GE)


Costume History OR
Costume Design
Production & Performance
Theatre Electives
Physical/Biological Science (GE)


Costume Design OR
Historic Costumes for the stage 3
Art History 2 (GE-HN) 3
Theatre Electives 6
Production & Performance 1 14
3
16

Theatre History on Stage 2 (GE-HN) 3
Costume Technology Elective 3
Theatre Elective 3
Senior Project 2
Production & Performance 1


9. Summer
THE 4945 Summer Repertory


Total Undergraduate Credits: 124

Suggested Theatre Electives: TPA 4930 Costume Technologies Workshop (possible topics: Advanced Crafts, Fabric
Modification, Draping, Tailoring), TPA 4239 Pattern Making: Draping, TPA 2248 Advanced Stage Makeup
1. All students must complete five THE 4950 (P&P) courses of 1 credit each.
2. All students must complete 21 credits of theatre electives appropriate to their production major of costume, scene or
light design.
3. All students must complete within their major or as a theatre elective TPA 4049 Costume Design, TPA 4020 Light
Design. and TPA 4066 Scene Design.
4. It is recommended that students use the general education courses in Humanities and Social/Behavioral Science
semesters 3 & 5 to fulfill Gordon rule (Communication) requirements. ARH 2050 and 2051, THE 4110 and 4111 are
not Gordon Rule Writing courses.


1.
THE 2020
TPP 2110
TPA 2232c
TPA 2202c



3.
TPA 4239
TPA 3238
TPP 3650
THE 4950


5.
TPA 3214
TPA 4066
ARH 2050
THE 4950



7.
THE 4110
TPA 4020
TPA 5047
THE 4285









233 McGuire Pavilion, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL 32611-5900 2008-09
Advisor: Kevin Austin, (352) 273-0519
Director: Kevin Marshall
The College of Fine Arts has a selective admissions policy that requires an audition or portfolio submission for admission in the
majority of programs. Consult the Advisor for additional information regarding admission requirements.
Tracking classes are in bold print.


BFA in THEATRE PRODUCTION-Light Design
1. Fall cr. 2. Spring cr.
TPA 2202c Stagecraft 4 TPA 3214 Introduction to Light and Sound 4
THE 2020 Introduction to Theatre 3 TPA 3208 Drawing/Drafting for the Stage 3
TPP 2110 Acting 1 3 Social/Behavioral Science 3
TPA 2074 Drawing & Rendering 3 Composition (GE) 3
Mathematics (GE) 3 Mathematics (GE) 3
16 16


Light Design
Script Analysis
Production & Performance
History of Decor for the Stage
Social/Behavioral Science (GE)
Physical/Biological Science (GE)


TPP 2110 Acting 1 or THE 4930 History of
Architecture for Designers
THE 4950 Production & Performance
TPA 4021 Lighting Design 2 or Theatre Elective
TPA 4066 Scene Design
Social/Behavioral Science (GE)
ARH 2050 Art History 1 (GE)


Theatre History on Stage 1 (GE)
Theatre Elective
Theatre Elective
Theatre Elective


4.
THE 4260
THE 4950
TPA 2232c
TPA 2120c




6.


Costume History
Production & Performance
Beginning Costume
Beginning MakeUp
Elective
Physical/Biological Science (GE)


THE 4950 Production & Performance
TPA 2232c Beginning Costume
Theatre Elective
Physical/Biological Sciences (GE)
ARH 2051 Art History 2 (GE)
THE 4930 Beginning Makeup


8.
THE 4111
THE 4950
THE 4959


9. Summer
THE 4945 Summer Repertory

Total Undergraduate Credits: 124


Theatre History on Stage 2 (GE)
Production & Performance
Senior Project
Theatre Elective
Theatre Elective


1. All students must complete five THE 4950 (P&P) courses of 1 credit each.
2. All students must complete 21 credits of theatre electives appropriate to their production major of costume, scene or
light design.
3. All students must complete within their major or as a theatre elective TPA 4049 Costume Design, TPA 4020 Light
Design and TPA 4066 Scene Design.
4. Students are required to complete TPP 2110 Acting 1 and a choice between History of Architecture for Stage
Designers or Costume History.
5. It is recommended that students use the general education courses in Humanities and Social Behavioral Science
semesters 3 & 5 to fulfill Gordon rule (Communication) requirements. ARH 2050 and 2051, THE 4110 and 4111 are
not Gordon Rule Writing courses.


3.
TPA 4020
TPP 3650
THE 4950
THE 4285




5.


7.
THE 4110










233 McGuire Pavilion, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL 32611-5900 2008-09
Advisor: Kevin Austin, (352) 273-0519
Director: Kevin Marshall
The College of Fine Arts has a selective admissions policy that requires an audition or portfolio submission for admission in the
majority of programs. Consult the Advisor for additional information regarding admission requirements.
Tracking classes are in bold print.


BFA in THEATRE PRODUCTION Scene Design


Fall
Stagecraft
Introduction to Theatre
Acting I
Mathematics (GE)
Social/Behavioral Science (GE)


TPA 4066 Scene Design
THE 4285 History of D6cor and Architecture
for the Stage
THE 4950 Production & Performance
TPP 3650 Script Analysis
Social/Behavioral Science (GE)
Physical/Biological Science (GE)


5.
TPA 4020 Light Design
Theatre Elective
THE 4950 Production & Performance
ARH 2050 Art History
Social/Behavioral Science (GE)4
Humanities (GE)


Theatre History on Stage 1 (GE)
Theatre Elective
Theatre Elective
Theatre Elective


2.
TPA 3208
TPA 2074




4.
TPA 2075
TPA_
THE 4950
TPA 3214


6.
TPA 4049
TPA 2232c
THE 4930
THE 4950
ARH 2051




THE 4111
THE 4959
THE 4950


Spring
Drawing/Drafting for the Stage
Drawing & Rendering
Elective
Composition (GE)
Mathematics (GE)


Scene Painting
Scene Design II
Production & Performance
Introduction to Light & Sound
Physical/Biological Science (GE)


Costume Design
Beginning Costume
Beginning Make-up
Production & Performance
Art History 2 (GE)
Physical/Biological Science (GE)



Theatre History on Stage 2 (GE)
Senior Project
Production & Performance
Theatre Elective
Theatre Elective
Theatre Elective


9. Summer
THE 4945 Summer Repertory


Total Undergraduate Credits: 124

1. All students must complete five THE 4950 (P&P) courses of 1 credit each.
2. All students must complete 21 credits of theatre electives appropriate to their production major of costume, scene or
light design.
3. All students must complete within their major or as a theatre elective TPA 4049 Costume Design, TPA 4020 Light
Design and TPA 4066 Scene Design.
4. It is recommended that students use the general education courses in Humanities and Social Behavioral Science
semester 5 to fulfill Gordon Rule (Communication) requirements. ARH 2050 and 2051, THE 4110 and 4111 are not
Gordon Rule Writing courses.


1.
TPA 2202c
THE 2020
TPP 2110



3.


7.
THE 4110









Advisor: Kevin Austin, kaustint@arts.ufl.edu, (352) 273-0519
Director: Kevin Marshall
The College of Fine Arts has a selective admissions policy that requires an audition or portfolio submission for admission in the majority of programs.
Consult an academic Advisor for additional information regarding admission requirements.


Tracking classes are in bold print.
233 McGuire Pavilion, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL 32611-5900
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN DANCE


Fall
Basic Modern Dance
Basic Ballet


2.
DAA_
DAA


DAA 2331 West African Dance
DAN 2100 Dance Apprec. 21st Cen (GE-H/N)
Science (GE)
Mathematics (GE)


Spring
Modern Dance as placed*
Ballet or Jazz as placed *


DAN 4180 Professional Dev. Sem.
TPA 2232c Beg. Costume
Mathematics (GE)
Composition (GE)


2008-09

cr.
2
2

1
3


Modern Dance as placed*
Ballet or Jazz as placed*
Dance Composition 1
Introduction to Music Lit. (GE-H/I)
World Dance & Inter. Perf. (GE-H/I)
Social & Behavioral Science (GE-S)



Intermediate Modem Dance*
Intermediate Jazz* or
Intermediate Ballet *
Dance Composition 3
Introduction to Light & Sound
World Dance
Humanities (GE)


4.
DAA_
DAA_
DAA 2611
THE 4950
TPP 2110


6.
2 DAA 3108
DAA 3508
2 DAA 3208
2 THE 4950
4 APK 2100c
3 DAA 3615
3 DAN 4430


Modern as placed *
Ballet or Jazz as placed *
Dance Composition 2
Production & Performance
Acting I
Social & Behavioral Science (GE-S)
Physical/Biological Science (GE)


Intermediate Modem Dance*
Intermediate Jazz* or
Intermediate Ballet*
Production & Performance
Applied Human Anatomy (GE-B)
Dance Composition 4
Laban
Social & Behavioral Science (GE-S)


Summer Dance Intensive


(It is also recommended that students use at least 3 of the required 9 credits for a Gen. Ed. and/or elective)


Advanced Modem Dance*
Advanced Jazz* or
Advanced Ballet*
Senior Project
Dance History (GE-H/I)
Repertory
#Approved Elective
#Approved Elective


2 8.
DAA 4110
2 DAA 4510
2 DAA 4210
3 DAN 4959
1 DAN 4180
3 DAE 4300
2 DAA 4930


Advanced Modem Dance*
Advanced Jazz* or
Advanced Ballet*
Senior Project
Professional Dev. Sem.
Dance Teaching Methods
Repertory
# Approved Elective


Total Undergraduate Credits: 124
* Specific courses approved by dance Advisor as appropriate to student's technical level. At least 2 semesters each of Intermediate and Advanced Modem and 1
semester each of Intermediate and Advanced Jazz and Ballet are required.
# Approved electives are chosen with dance coordinator approval and may provide an emphasis in Theatre, PI ii.., 1n.,, I_ ... i.. i l. I.
World Dance, or Dance in Medicine. Electives may not be used to fulfill general education requirements.


1.
DAA 2104
DAA 2204


3.
DAA_
DAA_
DAA 2610
MUL 2010
DAA 2381



5.
DAA 3108
DAA 3508
DAA 3208
DAA 3614
TPA 3214
DAA 2381


Summer:
DAA 4920


7.
DAA 4110
DAA 4510
DAA 4210
DAN 4959
DAN 4124
DAA 4930









233 McGuire Pavilion, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL 32611-5900 2008-09
Advisor: Kevin Austin, (352) 273-0519
Director: Kevin Marshall
DANCE MINOR
OBJECTIVES: the Dance Minor is designed for students who wish to pursue the study of the performing art
of dance while maintaining a separate primary academic interest. It has both required and elective
components, thus providing both a solid general background and the opportunity to tailor the minor program to
meet individual interests. This program is designed to bring the student in close contact with not only
classroom expertise in technique, but the enriching artistic and production aspects of dance.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:
Student must first complete Modem Dance (at appropriate level) at UF with a grade of B of higher to
be accepted into the Dance Minor program. After this criterion is met, the student will meet with the
Dance Minor advisor for approval to enter the program and to establish a program of study. This
course counts toward the fulfillment of the Dance Minor.
The Dance Minor is comprised of a total of 17 hours: a core of 10-11 credits plus 6-7 hours of
emphasis as approved by the Dance Minor Advisor.
It normally takes four semesters to complete the Dance Minor.
At least 12 of these hours must be completed at the University of Florida.
All courses must be completed with a grade of"C" of better. No S/U grades will be allowed.

REQUIRED CORE COURSES:
course title credit grade term
DAA Modem Dance (at appropriate level). Must achieve grade 2
f "B" of higher
DAN 2100 or Dance Appreciation (Fall only) or 3
DAN 4124 Dance History (Fall only)
DAA Technique** (choose between modem, ballet, jazz, world 2-3
dance)
DAA 2610 Dance Composition 1 (Fall only) (pre-rec. is Basic Modem) 2
DAN 4905 Independent Study (Assignment in Dance Area) 1

EMPHASIS:
Choose emphasis 6-7 credits from the list of courses below with Dance Minor Coordinator approval:
Course title credit grade term
DAE 4300 Dance Teaching Methods (Spring only) 3
DAN 3775 Dance in Medicine 2-3
DAA Additional technique course** 2-3
DAA Composition 2 (Spring only) 2
DAN 4430 Laban 2
DAA 4930 West African 2
DAA 4920 Summer Dance Intensive (audition only) 3 max.
THE 4950 Production & Performance (100 hrs invested 1
towards the T&D production season)
DAA 4930 Special Topics (Dance Improv, Pointe, etc. 1-3


233 McGuire Pavilion, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL 32611-5900
Advisor: Kevin Austin, (352) 273-0519
Director: Kevin Marshall


2008-09








233 McGuire Pavilion, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL 32611-5900 2008-09
Advisor: Kevin Austin, (352) 273-0519
Director: Kevin Marshall

THEATRE MINOR
Emphasis: General Theatre
Name: ID#:
1. Total credits required: 17

a. A total of 11 credits must be completed at the University of Florida
b. All courses for minor must be with a grade of "C" or better (no S/U grades).
c. Only one "4905" course (individual study) will be allowed, and then only with prior, written permission of the
instructor.
d. Eight credits must be at the 3000 level or above.
e. Elective performance/design courses may be taken only with prior, written permission of instructor or school
Advisor.

2. It is required that all students planning to minor in Theatre with emphasis in General Theatre consult with the School
of Theatre and Dance Advisor (233 McGuire Pavilion) to select a program of study. A copy of approved program
will be forwarded to the College of Fine Arts and to the student's major college. Students may begin minor
requirements as a freshman.

course credits title grade term
-THE 2000 3 iTheatre Appreciation
_TPP 2100 3 -Acting for Non-majors
Choose two of the following three: (6 credits)
course credits title grade term
THE 3234 3 -Diversity & Multiculturalism in the American Theatre OR
-THE 4930 African American Theatre
|*DAN 2100 3 Dance Appreciation for the 21st Century
TPP 3124 3 Improvisation and Social/Political Issues (Strike Force)
-Repeatable up to 6 credits
Elective: (3 credits) Theatre or Dance elective. See School Advisor. Space availability and/or instructor permission may be
required.
course credits title grade term
3

JTHE 4950 1 IProduction & Performance
ITHE 4950 1 Production & Performance


Course approval (Obtain signature of Advisor)
I recommend this student for Theatre Minor and have approved the above program.



Theatre Advisor
3. Fill out the "Application for Optional Minor" available in the Office of the Registrar. Once you reach 60 credits, it
must be signed by your current college and the School of Theatre and Dance's Advisor. Submit application to
Criser Hall.


FALL ONLY








233 McGuire Pavilion, PO Box 115900, Gainesville, FL 32611-5900
Advisor: Kevin Austin, (352) 273-0519
Director: Kevin Marshall
THEATRE MINOR
Emphasis: Production Design/Technical


Name:


2008-09


UF ID#:


1. Total hours required: 18-19
a. A total of 12 hours must be completed at the University of Florida.
b. All courses for minor must be with a grade of "C" or better (no S/U grades).
c. Eight hours must be at the 3000 level or above.
2. It is required that all students planning to minor in Theatre with emphasis in Production consult with the School
of Theatre and Dance Advisor (233 McGuire Pavilion) to select a program of study.
............................................................ ....................... ................................................................................................................................................................. ................................... ....................................
course hours title I rade term
THE 2000 3 Theatre Appreciation


1 Production & Performance
1 Production & Performance
Chose one of the following tracks:

3 Drawing and Rendering
4 Stagecraft
3 Drawing and Drafting for the Stage
3 Scene Design


Lighting Design
TPA 2202c
TPA 3214
TPA 3208
TPA 4020

Costume Design
TPA 2074
TPA 2232c
TPA 2120c
TPA 4239 AND
TPA 3238 OR
TPA 4049


Stagecraft
Intro to Lighting and Sound
Drawing and Drafting for the Stage
Lighting Design


Drawing and Rendering
Beginning Costume
Beginning Makeup
Costume Patterning
Advanced Costume Construction
Costume Design


4. Fill out the "Application for Optional Minor" available in the Office of the Registrar or online at
http://www.reg.ufl.edu/pdf/minorapp .pdf

Course approval (Obtain signature of Advisor)
I recommend this student for Theatre minor and have approved the above program.


Theatre Advisor


THE 4950
THE4950

Set Design
TPA 2074
TPA 2202c
TPA 3208
TPA 4066


~I








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