• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Minerals in dark honey
 Honey facts
 Main
 Special recipe index














Title: Florida honey and its hundred uses
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088985/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida honey and its hundred uses
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Horton, Waldo.
Publisher: State of Florida, Dept. of Agriculture,
Publication Date: 1938
Copyright Date: 1938
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088985
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: akd9467 - LTUF
25722871 - OCLC
001962790 - AlephBibNum

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
    Foreword
        Page 3
    Minerals in dark honey
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Honey facts
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Main
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Special recipe index
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
Full Text

J, #g \


and Its Hundred Uses


m" h *


I~
4St


40J


Department of Agriculture
Nathan Mayo, Commissioner
Tallahassee, Florida


Honey


i b 2
2;j
0.a












No. 66 Special Series April, 1938


Florida Honey

and

Its Hundred Uses


By


WALDO HORTON, M. D.
and
ISABELLE S. THURSBY
(Reprint)


STATE OF FLORIDA
Department of Agriculture
NATHAN MAYO, Commissioner
Tallahassee


For further information address
FLORIDA STATE BEEKEEPERS' ASSOCIATION


No. 66


Special Series


April, 1938













Foreword


From the angle of its plant life, Florida is peculiarly
fitted as a honey producing state. The winters are short
with relatively high temperatures, the blooming season is
long and the flora is rich both in numbers and varieties.
Several plants, such as tupelo, mangrove, gallberry, saw-
palmetto and citrus (all native except citrus) yield honey
that rank in quality with the best.

The indiscriminate and at times wholesale burning of
woods and fields is the greatest single drawback to the
development of the honey producing industries of the
state. Manifestly, it is impossible for bees to secure sup-
plies of honey if the plants upon which they depend are
either destroyed or prevented from flowering by fire. The
apiarist finding himself in a fire devastated area may be
forced to move to other fields or abandon his undertaking
entirely. On the part of rural populations there is dire
need of a changed viewpoint as related to the handling of
fire throughout the state.

In the following pages, Miss Isabelle S. Thursby and
Dr. Waldo Horton have furnished information on the culi-
nary and dietary uses and values of honey that is most
important. It is hoped that this publication will assist in
bringing about a larger use of this wholesome sweet, and,
realizing the value of honey and the value of the plant life
upon which supplies depend, there may follow some change
in the attitude of the general public toward those native
sources of honey supplies upon which, both now and in
the future, the beekeeping industries of the state must
depend.

H. HAROLD HUME,
Assistant Director; Research.

University of Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station,
Gainesville, Florida, Jan. 1933.










Minerals in Dark Honey

From the Chemistry Division of the University of
Wisconsin have come numerous papers which are of much
interest to beekeepers. During the past twenty years a
number of these papers dealing with the oils found in
horsemint have received attention in the Beekeepers Item.
In 1932 Kathora Remy of San Antonio read a short article
on the chemistry of honey before the Texas Academy of
Science. This paper likewise was mentioned in the Item.
In 1932 Dr. H. A. Schuette and Kathora Remy published
a paper in the Journal of the American Chemical Society*
that had to do with the color of honey and the mineral
content. They showed that from analysis of many samples
of honey originating in numerous honey producing sec-
tions in the United States and Hawaii it was very probable
that the darker the color of the floral honey the higher the
per cent of mineral content. In their analyses they show
the varying amounts of silica, iron, copper, and manga-
nese. Based on the statements made in the paper of
Schuette and Remy the Item editorially mentioned the fact
that in all probability it was the mineral content in the
darker honey which had made these honeys more popular
with people that use large amounts of honey.
In 1937 Schuette and Huenink in "Food Research"*
published an extensive article in which the per cents of
silica, phosphorus, calcium, and manganese found in light
and dark honeys are contrasted and commented upon. In
this paper notes as to the varying amounts of these min-
erals in various beekeeping localities throughout the world
are discussed. In the summary of this the authors say:
"In an examination of 35 samples deemed to include
representatives of most of the honeys produced commer-
cially in the United States, it has been found that there
apparently exists a qualitative relationship between degree
of pigmentation, as revealed by the present-day practice
of color-grading this food, and mineral content."
In January 1938 in the same Journal* Schuette and
Triller present a paper telling of sulphur and chlorine as
it is found in honey. Numerous samples of honey from
representative honey producing districts were analyzed
and the same apparent relationship between the minerals
sulphur and chlorine and the degree of color was rather
definite. There was no general uniformity of occurrence
of sulphur and chlorine through the samples utilized.








Investigations in beekeeping have largely taken the
mystery out of the beehive. The chemists are at the pres-
ent time taking the mystery out of honey and are estab-
lishing a very definite reason why honey is one of the best
of foods. The earliest investigations were relative to the
enzymes, invertase, diastase, and catalase. As later chemi-
cal analyses of foods indicated that small per cent of cer-
tain elements were necessary for a proper balance in the
foods, the food chemists have ceased to investigate the
very complex organic chemical compounds and turned their
attention to the inorganic material found in honey. To
the ordinary beekeeper the method of finding out how
much sulphur or iron is contained in honey is a greater
mystery than the hidden activity within the beehive is
to the reading public. For the benefit of the beekeeper
whom we know is much interested in knowing how these
discoveries are made, this explanation is given.
The samples of honey are secured. Then the honey
is freed from water and all organic compounds by means
of heat. The remainder called ash is as a rule a white
fluffy substance. This substance which is very small in
proportion to the honey used is weighed on the most deli-
cate of scales and then placed in solution in various liquids.
By the addition of solutions of other chemicals and watch-
ing the changes which take place the chemist is able to
tell to a very accurate degree the exact mineral and the
amount thereof which is found in that portion. Then
by combining the findings of all portions the total mineral
content of the honey is obtained. Beekeepers appreciate
the work of the chemists as they know that work of this
kind gives definite information that can be depended upon
in the formulation of sales talks.-H. B. PARKS, San An-
tonio, Texas.

Schuette, H. A., and Triller, Ralph E., 1938. Mineral constituents of
honey. III. Sulfur and Chlorine. Food Research 3, 543.











Honey Facts


Honey is wholesome, natural food.
It keeps indefinitely, if stored in a warm, dry place.
It gives sweetness plus flavor.
It may wisely be substituted for sugar or molasses.
It is a highly energy giving food; especially easily assimi-
lated.
It contains small amounts of mineral matter and vitamins.
It possesses slight laxative properties and helps many with
constipation.
For those OVER-WEIGHT, used moderately, it gives some
sweet without fear of the heavy fat production of
cane sugar.
It is an ideal milk modifier (plus water) for infants.
It will not harbor bacteria and will actually kill them (by
hygroscopic action).
Most all pure honeys granulate in time, some hard,
some 'mush like'; beat or 'work' a granulated honey and
you make a delicious, fine-grain 'spread' of it. Any granu-
lated honey can be reduced to its original consistency and
flavor by heating in a waterbath at 125F. for a half
hour or more. Heating above 130F. removes some of its
delicate aroma and flavor.









SCIENTISTS FINDING NEW USES FOR HONEY

The power of honey to absorb and retain moisture
gives it many industrial uses, in addition to its value as
food, studies by the Bureau of Chemistry and Soils show.
This quality of honey, called "hygroscopicity," will make
for greater use of the honey grades not adapted to home
use.
Bureau studies included the behavior of honeys of
different flower origin-white clover, tupelo, buckwheat,
tulip poplar, and mesquite. All these honeys are found
useful in commercial baking of bread, cake, and cookies.
When these products are made with part honey in place
of sugar, they lose less moisture after being stored 7 days
than bread, cake, and cookies made with other sweetening
agents. Buckwheat honey gives particularly good results.
Honey is also useful in candy making. It is suggested
for curing tobacco, in the same way that sugar and maple
sugar are used. Among other industries that offer outlets
for comparatively large quantities of honey are brewing,
wine making, and vinegar manufacture.








8 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



Florida Honey

By Dr. Waldo Horton

Nature's Own Sweet Nature's Oldest Sweet
Chemistry is now corroborating experience and prov-
ing that our honey from sub-tropical and tropical plants
contains more minerals and is more health-giving. We
have more variety than almost any state, to please those
who like a change of flavor. For those who like it standard
and always the same a Florida blend is recommended.

FOOD VALUE
In infancy milk is a balanced and sufficient food. As
we become more active a higher calorie addition becomes
necessary. But foolish and taste-tickled mankind have
gone too far with varieties and mixtures. Sane thinkers
are now reverting to the more simple. In this very genera-
tion we are sure to see increasing thousands going back to
the more elemental, natural foods. The Biblical recommen-
dation of milk and honey, (Num. 13-27; Gen. 43-11; Ps.
19-10; Math. 3-4; Is. 7-15), should again be taken seriously.
Honey is a monosaccharide sugar, chiefly fruit sugar.
This sugar is the natural end-product of digestion, so that
honey is already digested and easily assimilable. It is
sweeter than cane sugar but also contains more water and
the amount varies in honeys from different flowers.
There are many kinds of honey, almost as many as
there are different flowers, though some flowers do not
produce nectar (honey). Bees gather the nectar, and in
the hive process it and store and condense it in the comb
as honey. Extracted honey is thrown out of the comb by
an extracting machine and strained, and is used on the
table and in cookery like syrup.
Honey adulterated with cheap syrup is not so com-
mon as thought, on account of the rigid Pure Food Law,
but if there is real reason to suspect this aduleration, a
sample sent to Gainesville or Washington will disclose the
truth.








HONEY IN FLORIDA


CARE

Honey absorbs atmospheric moisture, granulates
rapidly if cold; hence keep it in a warm dry place where
you would keep salt.
Keep under tight cover; insects like it, too.
Do not keep in refrigerator! (Perhaps comb honey,
a short time).
Granulated honey is not spoiled honey; in fact nature
does that to preserve it. Some people like granulated
honey. If you wish it liquid like new, heat in waterbath
at 1250 or 130 F. for an hour.
Comb honey is hard to keep prime here for many
weeks outside of beehive. (65 F. dry storage is needed).
Remember good honey properly kept does not spoil and
is still delicious when a year or two old. (A few careless
drops of water or impurity may make it spoil).
Before serving thick extracted honey, set container in
warm water a few minutes; this makes it pour more easily.
Honey, being imperishable, can be purchased in large
quantities and stored.


SAW PALMETTO HONEY
This is Florida's most universally produced and used
honey. It usually grades amber color, sometimes dark
amber and occasionally light amber; all becoming darker
with age. Its mild flavor and odor are characteristic and
pleasing. Medium body.
Because its source-plant is used somewhat in medicine,
it is thought by many to be unusually health-giving. It
granulates slowly. Use for both table and cooking. Much
Florida honey found in our stores has at least some of this
mixed in by the bees.











. J I


^. ikV
, ,* 4-


If '


SAW PALMETTO (Serenoa)
Floridian, but thrills at this? Just hear the hum of the bees!


What native


N7








HONEY IN FLORIDA


CABBAGE PALM HONEY
A thin bodied, light amber honey of very mild flavor
and odor. Excellent for cookery and sweetening drinks
where mild flavor is desired.

TUPELO HONEY
This is produced from the tupelo gum tree (Nyssa)
which grows along the streams in West Florida. It is
light amber in color, of heavy body and mild flavor. It
has the most varied use of Florida honeys, having been
tried scores of ways and not found wanting. It does not
granulate; hence is much sought for by packers to blend
with other honeys to keep down their granulation.

ORANGE BLOSSOM HONEY
Makes us think of weddings and the perfume-laden
air of springtime. In all the kingdom of beedom what
sweeter words than Orange Blossom! To stand in an
orange grove and watch these little workers hustle from
blossom to blossom makes one realize that they too, regard
it the choicest of nature's golden sweets.
In cooking and candy-making few honeys carry over so
much distinct flavor. At the fountain, in the tea room, as
well as the diet kitchen, its exquisite possibilities have yet
been scarcely thought of.

Because of its peculiar distinction it is much counter-
feited. As many as twenty different mixtures, colors and
flavors have been called orange blossom honey. Genuine
orange blossom honey is light amber in color, heavy in
body, has the real aroma of the grove in bloom and does
not darken or change flavor much with age. In aging it
granulates readily.

GALLBERRY HONEY
This honey is produced from the gallberry bush (Ilex
glabra), which grows in flatwoods sections and blossoms
usually in May. It is almost a water white honey, with a
heavy body and very mild flavor and is considered one of
our finest honeys. Due to the damage done this plant by
burning the woods, very little gallberry honey has been


11








12 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


P, A


F'

h
\,


CABBAGE PALM (Sabal)
Walk near these blooms in July and you may think you have
discovered a swarm of bees. It is only normal industry working the
many thousands of tiny blossoms.







HONEY IN FLORIDA


produced in recent years in Florida. It is almost too fancy
a honey to use in baking, but is wonderfully adapted for
icings, ice cream and for direct sweetening in other des-
serts where mild flavor is desired.

MANGROVE HONEY
From the salt-marshes of South Florida came large
quantities of another of our 'best' honeys. Black mangrove
(Avic. nitida) produces a delicious flavored honey almost
as light colored as gallberry, light in body but unusually
sweet, due to a large content of dextros.
Holds an enviable place with many devotees and gain-
ing popularity fast.

OTHER COMMERCIAL FLORIDA HONEYS
These are Wild Sunflower from the Everglades region,
a delicious fall honey of amber or light amber color and
good body; Partridge Pea, which is a darker, stronger prod-
uct, excellent for cooking and baking; and Goldenrod, a
popular fall honey.
Besides these nine, Florida produces over a score of
others, but rarely distinct or in pure state enough to be
seen commercially.
Sub-tropical honeys are rich in minerals and vitamins!




















- -


WHITE TUPELO GUM (Nyssa Ogeechee)
Housekeepers from Spotless Town will admire this real Florida apiary of over 200 colonies, located in
the great tupelo belt along the Apalachicola river. Many carloads of this astonishing honey (which does
not granulate) are produced yearly.


"~4$
~rei
---~


-, -.aiM. W








HONEY IN FLORIDA 15

HONEY COOKERY
By Isabelle S. Thursby

Honey is one of the oldest known human foods and
was considered one of the choicest by the ancients. In
those days honey was the nectar of the gods. And even to-
day no food is more interesting than honey. The very
name of honey carries an appeal possessed by no other
food. There are many reasons why this delicious, natural
unrefined, unmanipulated sweet should be used abundantly
in the diet, not only in its natural state but as an ingredient
of cooked food.
Many people think of honey primarily as a delicious
spread for bread-hot biscuit, waffles and griddle cakes.
But when included in cookery processes not only does it
supply the sweetening, but its distinctive, individual flavor
combined with the other ingredients, produces a delectable
blend of flavor that not only is different but is intriguing
as well.
The use of more honey in cookery is to be encouraged
because of its superior flavor, food and health value and
availability.
A new set of recipes is not necessary in order to use
honey for one can substitute by following a few basic
principles.
First: Remember that one cup of honey contains 1/4
cup of.liquid.
Second: Deduct I cup liquid from the recipe when
using 1 cup honey.
Third: Florida honey is very sweet, so no alteration
need be made in the recipe regarding sweetening power,
as one cup of honey is equal to one cup in sweetening.
Liquid or granulated honey is equally satisfactory to use.
Fourth: Honey retains moisture to a greater extent
in the product than does sugar. In making frostings this
fact should be taken into account and the product should be
cooked to a higher density than is done when using sugar.
Fifth: In using honey as the sweetening agent in the
place of granulated sugar, the difference in composition
and flavor must be considered.









16 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


ORANGE BLOSSOMS
Makes one think of weddings and the perfume-laden air of
springtime. To stand in an orange grove and watch the bees hustle
from blossom to blossom, makes one realize that they too regard it
the choicest of nature's golden sweets.









HONEY IN FLORIDA


Different honeys have definitely characteristic flavors
and aromas, hence the flavor of any product made by a
given recipe will vary with the kind of honey used. The
milder honeys should be used for salads, fruit sauces, mer-
ingues and beverages, whereas the stronger honeys are
perfect for gingerbread, spice cake, and for combinations
that contain chocolate.

HONEY IN BAKING

Bread and honey for thousands of years have been
recognized as a most acceptable food. Breads, cakes,
cookies and waffles baked with a small amount of honey
have a distinctive flavor that is very pleasing to most
palates, and for those cakes and cookies where moist keep-
ing is desired, honey is desirable.

Honey has long been associated with crisp, tender,
golden waffles. Now honey is often baked in them or, bet-
ter and more delicious still, honey may be served as a sauce
or paste by creaming together one part butter with 2 parts
honey-beating smooth. Appetizing and satisfying are hot
honey muffins, crisp and brown, spread with honey butter
or honey in the comb. Honey pecan muffins are delicious
for Sunday supper with chicken salad and honey. Whole
wheat or oatmeal muffins are very popular with children.
Cakes and cookies made with honey, baked when conveni-
ent, ready when needed, may be kept on hand constantly
for use on busy days, or for surprise guests.

HONEY CREAM WAFFLES

1 egg beaten very lightly 2 cups milk
4 tsp. baking powder 1/4 cup butter or butter substi-
2 cups flour tute melted
1 tsp. salt 3 tbsp. honey

Mix shortening, honey and salt with beaten egg. Sift
baking powder and flour together. Stir in alternately
with flour and milk until full amount has been added. By
using this regulation honey batter and adding nuts, candied
or dried fruits, one may obtain a delicious result. Try also a
honey pecan or a honey date waffle.


17










18 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


CI,
_ ~


4 A


GALLBERRY (Inkberry) (Ilex glabra)
The berry itself may taste like gall and look like ink, but the
bee takes wondrous Nature while at her best and gathers for her
human friends from the chasteness of the bloom, one of the four
finest honeys of Florida.








HONEY IN FLORIDA 19


HONEY OATMEAL MUFFINS

1 cup milk 3 tbsp. fat
1 2 cups flour 1 cup honey
112 cups oatmeal ,,2 tsp. salt
1 egg 3 tsp. baking powder

Mix dry ingredients, add milk, beaten egg, honey and
melted fat, (slightly cooled). Mix but do not beat. Place
in greased muffin irons. Bake in hot oven (400 F.) 30
minutes.


HONEY AND NUT BRAN MUFFINS

cup honey 1 cup bran
1 cup flour 1 tbsp. melted butter
I4 to /2 tsp. soda 1'/2 cups milk
/4 tsp. salt 3 cup finely chopped pecans

Sift together the flour, soda and salt, and mix them
with the bran. Add other ingredients, and bake for 25
minutes in a hot oven in gem tins.


HONEY BISCUITS

2 cups flour /2 tsp. salt
1-3 cup fat 4 tsp. baking powder
2-3 cup milk

Sift flour, baking powder and salt, add milk gradually
and combine to a dough consistency. Pat out into a sheet
1/ inch thick. Cream 14 cup butter with 14 cup strained
honey. Use part of this mixture for spreading on the
dough. Roll up and cut off like cinnamon rolls. Use the
balance of the butter and honey mixture and spread thickly
over bottom of pan. Arrange rolls, allowing 1/2 inch space
around each. Bake in a hot oven (375 F.) 12 to 15
minutes. Cinnamon may be added to the butter and honey
mixture and raisins or candied fruit may be chopped and
sprinkled over the biscuit dough before rolling, if desired,
or nut meats may be used in the same way.








20 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


MANGROVE TREE









HONEY IN FLORIDA


HONEY OATMEAL BREAD


2 cups rolled oats
2 cups scalded milk or
boiling water
1 yeast cake
4-5 cups flour
1 tsp. salt


%' cup honey
/2 cup lukewarm water
2 tbsp. shortening
toptional-1 cup chopped
pecans or candied orange
peel)


Pour scalded liquid over the oats and shortening.
Cover and let stand until lukewarm. Dissolve yeast cake
in the warm water, add honey and stir into the oatmeal.
Add 11,2 cups flour, beat well, cover and allow to rise for
1 hour until light. Then add the salt, the rest of the flour
and the nuts or candied peel and enough flour to make a
dough and knead until smooth. Place in a greased bowl,
cover and let stand again in a warm place until doubled in
bulk. Shape into small loaves, put into well greased pans,
filling them a little more than one-half full. Let rise to top
of the pan and bake 50 minutes in a hot oven.

HONEY ORANGE GRAHAM BREAD


1 cup scalded milk
1 tsp. salt
1-3 cup lukewarm water
1/2 cups graham flour
4 tbsp. honey


1 yeast cake
11/2 cups bread flour
/2 cup candied orange peel
1/2 cup pecan nut meats


Mix milk, honey and salt. When lukewarm add yeast
cake dissolved in lukewarm water, and flour. Mix and then
add orange peel and nuts, cut in small pieces. When thor-
oughly mixed, let rise until double in bulk. Shape into
loaves in bread pan and let rise again until double its
bulk. Bake in a 350 to 380 F. oven from 40 to 60 minutes.
This mixture can be baked in muffin tins and served while
hot.

HONEY NUT BREAD


% cup honey
1 egg
1 cup milk
3 cups flour


3 tsp. baking powder
/2 tsp. salt
1 cup nut meats, chopped


Mix, put into a greased and floured loaf pan. Let
stand about one hour. Bake in a slow oven for about 40
minutes or one hour.









22 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


GOLDENROD









HONEY IN FLORIDA 23


HONEY DOUGHNUTS
1 egg 1 cup sweet milk
1 cup honey 2 tbsp. shortening
2 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. salt
Flour
Cream honey and shortening together, add the egg well
beaten and the other ingredients. Mix well and add flour
enough to roll out and cut easily. Fry in hot fat. The
honey will keep these delicious doughnuts moist much
longer than usual.

HONEY GINGERBREAD
/2 cup fat 3, cup honey
1/4 cup sugar (brown) 1 egg
'/2 cup sour milk /2 tsp. soda
/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/8 tsp. cloves
1 tsp. baking powder V4 tsp. salt
112 cups flour /2 tsp. ginger
Sift dry ingredients. Cream fat and honey, add brown
sugar, egg, sour milk and sifted dry ingredients. This will
be a thin batter, but do not mind that. Bake in a well-
greased pan for 25 minutes in a moderate oven (350 to 375
F.) This is a delicious gingerbread and may be kept for
several days, reheating before serving. Serve with or
without Honey Meringue icing.

HONEY MERINGUE (7 Minute Icing)

/2 cup honey (strained or
1 egg white granulated)
Place honey and unbeaten egg white in top of double
boiler. Cook seven minutes, beating with dover egg beater
while cooking. Remove from double boiler, beat and spread
as desired.

DATE BARS
1 cup honey 1 cup flour
3 eggs 1 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt 1 cup dates
1 tsp. vanilla 1 cup nut meats
Beat the eggs well and add the honey, salt and vanilla.
Mix and sift the flour and baking powder, add the dates








24 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


I.L


BLACK MANGROVE (AVICENNIA NITIDA)
Another botanical paradox of Florida is this shrub-like tree
which grows with its feet in salt water (marshes) and produces
large quantities of one of our most delicious sweets.


lu:c: i








HONEY IN FLORIDA


and nuts (cut in small pieces), then combine with the egg
mixture. Pour into a greased, shallow pan, spread one-
fourth inch thick. Bake in a moderately hot oven 30 to
40 minutes. Cut in strips before removing from the pan.
Store in a crock or cake box for several days, as the da*'
bars improve after standing. Roll in powdered sugar be-
fore serving.

HONEY OATMEAL COOKIES
1 cup honey 2 cups flour
2-3 cup fat 2 tsp. soda
/2 tsp. salt 2 tsp. baking powder
2 eggs, beaten 1 tsp. cinnamon
2 cups rolled oats 1 cup chopped raisins
Cream the fat and honey together, then add the eggs.
Mix and sift the flour, soda, baking powder, cinnamon,
and salt, and add to the wet mixture together with oatmeal.
Dust the raisins with some of the flour and add them to
the dough, mixing well. Drop by teaspoonfuls on a greased
pan. Bake in a moderate oven 10 to 12 minutes.

DROP COOKIES NO. 1
1 cup fat V2 tsp. salt
/4 cup sugar /2 tsp. vanilla
/2 cup strained honey 2 drops almond extract
2 cups flour 2/ cup nut meats
2 eggs /2 cup raisins
1/2 tsp. soda
Cream fat and sugar thoroughly. Add honey, beaten
eggs and flavoring. Sift flour, soda and salt together and
add to first mixture. Combine with lightly flour nuts
and raisins. Drop by dessert spoonfuls on oiled baking
sheet. Bake in moderate oven (350 to 375" F).

LEMON NUT DROP COOKIES NO. 2
1/2 cup butter 2 egg whites whipped
2 egg yolks, beaten /2 cup sugar
Grated rind one lemon 1 tsp. salt
3 tbsp. lemon juice 1 cup honey
312 cups pastry flour Shredded cocoanut if desired
Cream the butter, beat in the sugar and add the egg
yolks and lemon. Then stir in three cups of flour and the
salt and soda sifted together, alternately with the honey.
Fold in the beaten egg whites and stir in the nut meats,
floured with the remaining fourth cup of flour. Drop by
teaspoons onto a buttered baking pan two inches apart.
Bake in a moderate oven (350 F.) from 15 to 25 minutes.
Sprinkle with shredded cocoanut before baking, if desired.


25







26 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


,1'


CORAL VINE (Antigonon)
A distant cousin of northern buckwheat-much liked by the bees.
In larger plantings would help beautify our roadside fences, and
produce another distinct honey. The same can be said of several
other ornamental honey plants: Assonia, Yucca, Vitex.


;r
4
~ -I


II








HONEY IN FLORIDA 27


HONEY NUT BROWNIES
1/4 cup butter '/ cup sugar
2 ounces chocolate 1/2 cup flour, sifted with /4 tsp.
1/2 cup honey baking powder
2 eggs 1 cup chopped nut meats
Butter and chocolate should be melted together, then
add honey, then flour and baking powder, then nuts. Bake
45 minutes in a slow oven. For immediate use it is better
to use /' sugar and 1 2 honey. Cut in strips one-half inch
wide and 2 inches long. To pack away in a jar, use all
honey instead of part sugar and do not use until after two
weeks. Roll strips in powdered sugar before packing.


CHOCOLATE REFRIGERATOR COOKIES


1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup shortening
/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking powder
21/2 cups flour
/2 cup honey


1 egg
1/4 tsp. soda
1/2 cup pecans
4 to 6 tbsp. cocoa, depending
upon degree of chocolate
flavor desired.


Cream sugar, honey, shortening and egg. Add dry in-
gredients, then nuts, shape in a loaf or place in refrigerator
cookie mold. Chill several days to allow sufficient ripening
of dough. Slice off and bake in hot oven (400 F.) for
about 12 minutes. After baking, if allowed to stand for
several days, the cookies will improve in flavor.

HONEY FUDGE SQUARES


12 cup cocoa or 2 squares
bitter chocolate
1-3 cup shortening
/2 cup pecans, or black wal-
nuts
1/4 tsp. soda
Pinch salt
1 tsp. baking powder
12 cup honey


1/2 cup brown sugar
1 cup chopped dates, or candied
orange peel
1 egg
2 cups flour
1/4 cup sour cream, or /4 cup of
evaporated milk to which has
been added /4 tsp. vinegar


Melt chocolate over hot water if squares of chocolate
are used. Blend the melted chocolate or cocoa with honey,
brown sugar and shortening. Add 1 egg, then sour cream.
Add sifted ingredients. Then add the nuts and dates
or peel. Spread batter to about 2 inch depth in flat
pan and bake in moderate oven about 35 minutes. When
cool, cut in squares.


























tj










LATE VALENCIA ORANGE TREES
l -. ,, '.. ,

., .. ".", ..-l,.-"." ." '" ..
LATE~~ VAECAOAG RE









HONEY IN FLORIDA


HONEY COOKIES
1 cup honey '/2 tsp. ground cloves
1/4 cup butter 2 tsp. cardamon seed
1-3 cup pecans cut in pieces 2 tsp. baking powder
Grated rind of 1 lemon 24 cups flour
/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
Heat the honey and butter together for about 5 min-
utes; add all the other ingredients except the baking pow-
der, and mix thoroughly. When somewhat cooled, sift in
the baking powder and mix again. Let stand over night.
Roll thin and cut into cakes of desired size and shape. Place
on greased baking sheet or in shallow pan; if desired deco-
rate with bits of citron and halves of almonds. Bake to
an amber color (about 8 to 10 minutes at 350 F.)

HONEY COOKIES
/2 cup butter Grated rind of 1 lemon
34 cup sugar 3 cups flour
1 egg and 4 tsp. baking powder
1 egg yolk 1 egg white
12 cup honey Pecans, chopped
Cream the butter and sugar together and add the egg
and egg yolk beaten together, the honey, lemon rind, and
the flour sifted with the baking powder. More flour may
be required. The dough should be stiff enough to be easily
handled. Take a small portion of dough at a time, knead
slightly, roll into a thin sheet and cut into cookies of any
desired shape. Set the shapes on a greased pan. Beat the
white of the egg (left for the purpose) a little; use it to
brush over the top of the cookies in the pan, then at once
sprinkle on some finely chopped pecans and a little granu-
lated sugar. Bake in a moderate oven (about 10 minutes
at 350 F.).

HONEY ORANGE CUP CAKES
1-3 cup butter 12 cup sugar
1 orange juice and rind 2 eggs well beaten
21/2 cups pastry flour 1/4 tsp. salt
2 tsp. baking powder 3 cup broken walnut meats
34 cup honey
Cream the butter and add the sugar gradually. Beat
in the orange juice and rind and the eggs. Mix together the
flour, salt and baking powder. Stir in the broken walnut
meats and mix well. Add alternately to the cake mixture
with the honey and bake in cup cakes 15 to 25 minutes at
350 F. If desired, ice with Honey Meringue Icing.








































FLORIDA SUNFLOWER (Helianthus Floridius)
Grows in many parts of the State, but in Everglades Region, takes the secretion of nectar seriously and
much fine honey is the result.









HONEY IN FLORIDA 31


HONEY MERINGUE ICING (Boiled)
1 egg white 1 cup honey
4 tbsp. water 1 tsp. cream of tartar
Pinch of salt
Combine all ingredients and cook slowly over low heat
or in a double boiler, beating constantly until mixture stands
up in peaks. It may be beaten until creamy when removed
from heat. This is a delicious meringue topping. It does
not set on the outside, but is creamy and fluffy.

SPICED JELLY ROLL
3 eggs 1 tsp. baking powder
3/ cup sugar 1/ tsp. salt
1/4 cup water minus 1 tbsp. 14 tsp. cloves
'2 tsp. vanilla 1 tsp. cinnamon
%3 cup strained honey 2 tbsp. melted butter
1 cup flour
Beat yolks, add sugar, honey, water and vanilla. Sift
flour, baking powder, salt, and spices, and add to first
mixture. Add melted butter and fold in egg whites. Bake
in shallow pan lined with well oiled paper in a hot oven
(375 F.) for 20 minutes. When baked, invert on a cloth
dusted with powdered sugar. Remove paper, trim off
edges, spread with spiced roselle or blackberry jam. Roll
cloth around cake and allow to "set" for a short time.

PECAN HONEY CAKES
41/ cups flour 1 cup strong coffee
1 tsp. salt 1/4 Ib. sliced candied citron
1 tsp. soda 1/4 lb. sliced candied orange or
1 tsp. cinnamon grapefruit peel
1 tsp. cloves 1/4 lb. sliced guava paste
1 tsp. allspice /2 cup shortening
2 tbsp. cocoa 1 cup brown sugar
1 cup honey 1'2 cups chopped pecans
2 eggs
Sift flour, salt, soda, spices and cocoa together. Mix
the chopped nuts and sliced fruit peel through the flour
with the finger tips. Cream the shortening; stir in the
sugar gradually. Add the beaten eggs and honey. Stir
in the fruit and flour mixture alternately with the coffee.
Spread the mixture on well-oiled baking sheets or shallow
pans, making a layer about 1' inch thick. If baking sheets
are used, leave a space about 11 inches wide at the open
end to allow for spreading. Bake in a moderate oven (350
F.) for 20 to 30 minutes.






























tol
LC1














Shwig ar o aLarge ApiaryPa int~ Pamto Na apaFoia








HONEY IN FLORIDA


The hot cake may be spread with thin layer of icing
made by stirring lemon juice into confectioners sugar (3 to
4 tbsp. lemon juice for 2 cups sugar). Cut in 2-inch squares
when cool.

Store in a tightly covered box for at least one week.
Yields about 120 squares.

ORANGE HONEY COCOANUT CAKES

2 cup shortening 3 tsp. baking powder
12 cup sugar 12 tsp. salt
12 cup orange honey % cup milk
5 egg yolks 1 tbsp. grated orange rind
1% cups all-purpose flour 1 tbsp. orange juice

Cream shortening; add sugar gradually and cream well.
Add honey and mix well; add the very well beaten egg yolks.
Sift flour once before measuring. Sift flour, baking pow-
der and salt together. Add to creamed mixture alternately
with the milk. Add orange rind and juice. Bake in well
greased and floured pan for 40 minutes in moderate oven
(350 F.). Ice with Honey Cocoanut Meringue.

HONEY COCOANUT MERINGUE ICING
1-3 cup honey 2 egg whites
1-16th tsp. salt 12 cup toasted cocoanut

Heat honey to 240 F., or until it spins an 8-inch
thread. Pour slowly into stiffly beaten egg whites and
beat with egg beater constantly. Add salt and continue
beating until mixture is fluffy and will hold its shape.

Spread on warm cake and sprinkle top with the cocoa-
nut, lightly toasted. Place pan of cake on board or in an-
other pan to prevent further browning and return cake to
oven to set meringue. Bake 10 minutes in very slow oven.

To toast cocoanut: Place 1 package cocoanut and 2
tsp. butter in pan and toast very slowly in oven, stirring
frequently to prevent burning.








34 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


A shrub or tree of swamps of North Florida, with an exquisite
bloom much adored by the bees. The honey is light and mild.

HONEY SPONGE CAKE

1 cup cake flour 1/4 tsp. salt
12 cup sugar 1/ tsp. vanilla
12 cup strained honey 34 tsp. cream of tartar
5 egg whites 2 tbsp. boiling water.
5 egg yolks

Sift and measure flour and sugar. Beat egg yolks un-
til thick and lemon colored. Add sugar and beat well; add
honey and combine lightly. Add boiling water a tablespoon
at a time. Beat 1/. minute, add flavoring and flour and
lastly fold in the beaten egg whites. Pour into a tube pan
and bake for 50 minutes in a very moderate oven (300 F.).
When baked, invert on cake cooler and allow to cool before
removing from pan.









HONEY IN FLORIDA


HONEY
1/2 cup shortening
4 egg whites
34 cup water or milk
4 tsp. baking powder
21/4 cups flour (sifted tx
before measuring)


CITRON NUT CAKE
3/4 cup honey (mildly
flavored)
34 cup sugar (white)
1 cup sliced citron
ice 1 cup chopped pecans


Blend shortening, honey and sugar to a cream; add
liquid and flour in which baking powder and salt have been
sifted. Stir only until mixed and then add nuts and citron,
folding in lastly the stiffly beaten egg whites. Pour into
layer cake tins or flat oblong pan lined with waxed paper.
Bake in moderate oven (350' F.) for 45 minutes to 1 hour,
depending on depth of cake.
Other fruits or nuts may be used such as preserved
watermelon rind or candied orange peel. Ice with Honey
Icing.

HONEY ICING


2 cups powdered sugar
4 tbsp. heavy cream
Enough milk to give good
spreading consistency


14 cup honey
2 tbsp. melted butter
Citron slices to decorate cake


Blend butter and honey; add heavy cream and salt.
Blend with powdered sugar and add just enough milk to
give spreading consistency. Ice cake and decorate with
citron slices. Put iced cake in cake box for two or three
days before using. This cake may be kept from two to
four weeks before using, as the honey keeps it moist and
fresh and improves the flavor.

HONEY SPICE CAKE


1 cup shortening
1-3 cup sugar
112 tsp. cinnamon
3 cups pastry flour
1 cup sour milk
1 tsp. vanilla flavoring
/2 tsp. salt


3/4 cup strained honey
/2 tsp. cloves
4 tsp. baking powder
1/2 cup nut meats (broken)
1/2 tsp. soda
2 eggs


Cream shortening and add the sugar. Beat in the
honey. Beat the yolks of eggs and add. Sift dry ingredi-
ents. Add 1% cup to nuts and add these to the mixture. Add
the remaining dry ingredients alternately with sour milk
and vanilla. Fold in the beaten whites. Bake in a well
greased loaf pan in a moderate oven (350 F.) for 45
minutes.









36 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


FLORIDA HONEY FRUIT CAKE


1 cup shortening
3 eggs
/2 cup citron
/2 cup candied gingered
watermelon rind
12 lb. figs
/2 cup honeyed orange strips
or honey orange marma-
lade
/4 cup prunes
'/2 lb. dates
'/2 cup coffee


11/2 cups pecans
2 cups honey
3 cups flour
1/4 tsp. each cloves, salt, nutmeg
and allspice
'/2 tsp. soda
1 tsp. cream of tartar
% tsp. cinnamon
/4 cup candied pineapple
1 lb. raisins


Run figs, prunes, dates through food chopper. Add
candied orange peel and raisins. Over this pour the honey
and let stand from four days to a week.
Shred pineapple and citron. Sift dry ingredients, re-
serving /. cup flour to mix with nuts, watermelon rind
and pineapple. After the fruit and honey mixture has
stood long enough, cream shortening and add to honey fruit
mixture. Add the beaten eggs, then sifted dry ingredients,
coffee and the floured nuts, pineapple, citron and gingered
watermelon rind shreds.
Bake slowly (225 F.) for three hours if in one-pound
tins. If the entire mixtures is baked in one cake (five
pounds) bake from four to five hours, depending on the
depth of the cake. Brush top of cake with warm honey,
wrap in heavy waxed paper, pack away in covered crock
for at least a month. Before wrapping in cellophane for
gift mailing or before serving, decorate top with honeyed
orange peel, pecans, citron or pineapple. Yields five pounds
fruit cake.

HONEY PIES
Pies have never lacked in popularity and made the
honey way are of especially fine flavor and are good hot
or cold.

HONEY PECAN PIE


2 tbsp. butter
3 eggs
3/4 to 1 cup honey
1/4 tsp. salt


1 cup pecans, broken, depending
on sweetness and richness de-
sired


Beat eggs slightly. Add honey and butter warmed and
salt. Mix well, put in partly baked pie shell and bake in a
moderate oven about 35 minutes.








HONEY IN FLORIDA


HONEY PUMPKIN PIE

1 1 cups steamed and strained 1 cup honey
pumpkin 1 tsp. cinnamon
1 cup cream 3 eggs, well beaten
1 cup milk

Mix ingredients in order given and bake in one crust.
Top with honey meringue. Or garnish each piece with a
mound of whipped cream with honey in its center.


HONEY APPLE PIES

Make an apple pie as usual, but do not use any sugar
after the apples-just the butter and cinnamon, and do
not use a top crust. After it is baked, drizzle > to 3 cup
honey over the apple filling and sprinkle one-half cup pecan
pieces and let stand until apples become soft and absorb
all the honey. Pears, peaches, loquats are all delicious
used in the same way.


HONEY CREAM PIE

1/2 cup honey 1 1 cups milk
4 tbsp. flour 2 egg yolks
1/4 tsp. salt 1'2 tbsp. butter

Blend flour with a part of the liquid (cold) until it is
smooth. Add the salt, honey and remainder of the liquid.
Cook in a double boiler until thick, stirring frequently.
Slowly pour a part of this cooked mixture over the beaten
egg yolks, stirring constantly. Return to the double boiler
and beat until the egg is cooked. Lastly add the butter.
Pour this filling into a previously baked pastry shell. Cover
with a meringue made from the two egg whites slightly
sweetened with honey. Brown the meringue in the oven.








38 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

HONEY LEMON PIE

3 cup honey 1 lemon, juice and grated rind
8 tbsp. flour 2 egg yolks
1/2 cup cold water /2 to 1 tbsp. butter
1 cup boiling water

Blend the flour and cold water until smooth; add the
honey and grated lemon rind; slowly add the boiling water,
stirring constantly. Cook in a double boiler until thick.
Stir in the lemon juice. Slowly add part of this cooked
mixture to the beaten yolks, stirring constantly. Return
to the double boiler and heat until the egg is cooked. Lastly,
add the butter.

Pour this filling into a previously baked pie crust and
cover with a meringue made from the two egg whites
slightly sweetened with honey and flavored with a drop or
two of lemon extract. Brown meringue in the oven.

The flavor of the honey and lemon blend well in this
pie filling.


HONEY DESSERTS

Its flavor and sweetness are such that honey combines
well with fruits, both raw and cooked, so that it is an ex-
cellent addition to desserts.


A honey of delicate flavor, like orange, gallberry, or
mangrove, should be used. It makes a delectable sweeten-
ing for whipped cream and for desserts. It supplies both
sweetening and flavor and for salad dressings when pre-
pared for fruit salads. If granulated, the honey should be
liquefied over hot water before it is combined with other
ingredients.








HONEY IN FLORIDA


HONEY TANGELO TAPIOCA

1 cup honey 2 tbsp. sugar
Pinch salt 1 cup shredded cocoanut
1/2 cup quick cooking tapioca 2 cups tangelo sections
3 cups boiling water Whipped cream

Heat honey and water in double boiler, add pinch of
salt, sugar and tapioca. Cook for 15 minutes, stirring
frequently. Add shredded cocoanut and cook until it
thickens. Cool and pour over tangelo sections, stirring
lightly with a fork to mix through the tapioca. Put in
refrigerator to chill very thoroughly. Serve with whipped
cream or honey meringue. Sliced peaches, pineapple, man-
go, banana, guava, tangerine, or Temple orange sections,
or a combination of fruits all provide delicious variations.
NOTE: The tangelo is a citrus fruit resulting from
a cross between the tangerine and grapefruit-a combina-
tion of delightful flavor.

HONEY CUSTARD (Baked)

4 cups scalded milk 1/4 tsp. salt
5 eggs Nutmeg
8 tbsp. strained honey

Beat eggs sufficiently to unite whites and yolks but
not to make them foamy. Add other ingredients, mix thor-
oughly and pour into individual custard cups. Sprinkle
lightly with nutmeg. Set cups in a pan of warm water,
place in oven. Bake in moderate oven until when a knife
is inserted into custard it comes out clean. Remove cups
from water immediately. Serve hot or cold.

HONEY CUSTARD (Boiled)

2 cups milk 21/ tbsp. strained honey
3 egg yolks '/2 tsp. vanilla
Salt-few grains

Heat milk and honey in a double boiler. Beat egg
yolks, add to yolks the hot milk mixture and return to
boiler to finish cooking. When the mixture coats a silver
spoon, remove from fire. Chill, add flavoring.









40 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


HONEY MOUSSE
1/4 cup powdered sugar 12 cup candied orange peel or
/2 cup shredded pineapple kumquat
(drained) 1 cup cream-whipped
2 egg whites 1 tsp. vanilla extract
/2 cup honey (warmed) /2 cup pecans
Mix pineapple, honey, chopped nuts, peel and flavor-
ing. Cool. Beat the egg whites until stiff and add pow-
dered sugar. Beat cream until fairly stiff. Fold all in-
gredients together and freeze either in paper mousse cups
or in freezing trays of the refrigerator.

HONEY ROLL
2 cups rice or corn flakes 1 cup honey
1 cup nuts-chopped 16 marshmallows-cut in small
1 cup dates-cut in small pieces
pieces
Roll flakes fine and combine carefully with other in-
gredients and make into a roll. Then cover with more
rolled flakes and place in refrigerator until thoroughly
chilled-8 to 10 hours. Serve with whipped cream sweet-
ened and flavored with honey. Easy to make and very de-
licious.

HONEY BANANA MOLD
2 tbsp. gelatine 12 cup honey
1/4 cup cold water 3 bananas (mashed through
11/2 cups milk sieve)
1 lemon 1 cup whipped cream
Soak gelatine in cold water until soft. Heat milk, re-
move from fire and stir in gelatine. Add honey, mashed
bananas, and lemon juice. Set in a cool place and when
it begins to thicken fold in the whipped cream. Chill
thoroughly.

HONEY ICE CREAM
One quart thin cream; 3/ cup delicately flavored honey.
Mix and freeze in the usual way.
HONEY CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM
3 cups milk 2 squares of chocolate
3 eggs 1/ tsp. salt
1 qt. cream 1/2 cups mild honey
Make a boiled custard of the milk, melted chocolate,
honey, eggs and a little vanilla. When cool add the cream
and freeze.









HONEY IN FLORIDA


FROZEN HONEY CUSTARD
4 egg yolks Pinch of salt
2 cups water 1 cup honey
2 cups rich milk
Beat the egg yolk; add the salt and water. Cook over
boiling water two minutes, stirring constantly. Cool. Add
milk and honey. Freeze with 1-8 salt-iced mixture. Yield,
1% quarts.

HONEY GINGER SHERBET
2 quarts water 3 cups honey
6 lemons 1 tbsp. gelatine
Cold water /2 cup syrup from preserved
'/2 cup preserved ginger, ginger
cut fine 2 egg whites
Boil water and sugar together for five minutes. Add
lemon juice, gelatine softened in a little cold water, the
syrup and preserved ginger. Freeze to a mush, then stir
in the beaten egg whites, and continue freezing.

GRAPEFRUIT SHERBET
1 pt. boiling water 2 cups honey
4 cups grapefruit juice Juice 1 lemon
2 tsp. gelatine Shredded or candied orange
2 tbsp. cold water peel
Soften gelatine in cold water. Add boiling water and
honey. Stir until dissolved, cool and add fruit juices. Cool
and freeze in three parts of ice to one part of salt. Garnish
each serving with shredded candied cherries or strips o'
candied orange peel.

HONEY STRAWBERRY SHERBET
1 pint strawberries 2 cups water
2 lemons 1 egg white
7/ cup honey
Mix the strawberries (which have been put through
a sieve), lemon juice, water and honey and let stand sev-
eral hours to blend. Put into a freezer and when it begins
to freeze add beaten egg white. Freeze with 8 parts ice to
1 part salt and pack with 3 parts ice to 1 part salt. Makes
1 quart.









42 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


HONEY PLUM PUDDING NO. 1


1 cup grated raw carrots
1 cup grated raw sweet
potato
'/ cup chopped dates
/2 cup candied orange peel,
citron or pineapple
1 cup honey
1/4 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon


1/ tsp. nutme
/2 tsp. allspice
/4 tsp. cloves
/2 tsp. soda
V2 cup flour
1 cup raisins
2-3 cup suet
ground)


Combine ingredients in order given. Stir until mix-
ture is well blended. Pour into well greased Pyrex refrig-
erator dish (1 qt. size) or Pyrex casserole; put cover on
and bake in oven at 250 degrees F. for 21/ hours. Remove
from oven, cool without removing cover. Serve with Honey
Butter.


The above plum pudding recipe is an easy one to make,
is inexpensive and when served with a small topping of
Honey Butter instead of the proverbial powdered sugar
hard sauce, is everything taste satisfaction requires. Make
up a dozen or more and use the extra ones as Christmas
remembrances.


HONEY PLUM PUDDING NO. 2


1/2 cup oatmeal (measured
after cooked)
V2 cup allbran
1 cup seedless raisins
1 cup pecans
1/4 cup citron
/4 cup dates
3% cup flour


1/2 tsp. soda
2 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. allspice
1 tsp. nutmeg
1 cup honey
1 egg
/2 cup jelly (Honey guava jelly
is recommended)


Combine ingredients in order given. Bake in a cov-
ered greased pudding mold or in a covered Pyrex dish for
21 hours at about 250 F.


(chopped or









HONEY IN FLORIDA 43

HONEY CITRON STEAMED PUDDING
12 cup chopped suet Reserve 1/4 cup of this flour
3 cup finely sliced citron for dredging
3/4 cup nut meats '/2 cup sweet milk
1, cup honey /2 tsp. soda dissolved in a
Juice and rind of 12 lemon little hot water
1% cup flour /2 tsp. salt
Steam 21/ hours in well greased pudding mold with
horn. Steam in a deep vessel which has a tight cover and
a rack in order that the water may circulate freely under
mold. If necessary to add more water during steaming
process, be sure water is boiling.
Remove from mold while still hot and serve with hard
sauce or honey.

DATE PUDDING

3% cup honey 1/4 tsp. salt
2 eggs 1/2 cup whole wheat bread
/2 cup chopped dates crumbs
1/2 cup chopped nut meats '/2 cup flour
1 tsp. baking powder
Dust the dates and nuts with a portion of the flour.
Sift the remaining flour with the salt and baking powder.
Add the beaten eggs to the honey, then the crumbs, the
sifted dry materials, and the dates and nuts. Mix well,
pour into a greased baking dish and bake 20 minutes in a
moderately hot oven.
Serve with cream hard sauce or Honey Butter.

HONEY BUTTER

2 parts honey 1 part butter
Let butter stand in room temperature until it is soft.
Add honey and stir until perfectly blended. Place in glass
jar which can be tightly covered and stand in refrigerator.

Uses for Honey Butter

Plend with chopped nuts as simple topping for sponge
cakes.
As a service for hot biscuits, griddle cakes, waffles,
instead cf serving honey and butter separately.
Delicious on nut bread for tea service.









44 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


HONEY CARROT PUDDING


1 cup grated carrots
1 cup raisins
1 cup honey
1 tsp. soda
1 egg


1 cup grated potatoes
1 tbsp. mixed spices
1 cup flour
1 tsp. salt
1 cup suet


Steam for three hours. Serve with Honey Butter or
Honey Kumquat Sauce.


HONEY KUMQUAT SAUCE


1 cup honey
/2 to 4 cup finely chopped
fresh kumquats, seeded


1 cup orange juice
/8 tsp. salt
1 tbsp. butter (may be omitted)


Combine the i 'ients and let stand over hot water,
without cooking, ft. It 30 minutes to blend the flavors.
Serve as a sauce on ice cream.


SALADS, SALAD DRESSII G AND SANDWICHES

FROZEN FRUIT SALAD


12 cup honey meringue
12 cup Honey Salad
dressing


21/2 cups prepared fruit, pine-
apple, orange hearts and
loquats, or guava, mango
1 papaya


Add fruit to the salad dressing and fold in whipped
cream. Turn into freezing tray of automatic refrigerator
and freeze.


HONEY SALAD DRESSING


2 egg yolks
Pinch of salt
/2 cup cream, sweet or
slightly sour


1/4 cup honey
Juice of /2 lemon
21/2 tbsp. salad oil
/8 tsp. paprika


Beat egg yolks, then pour in the hot honey. Cook for
a moment, beating continually, then fold in the salad oil,
lemon juice, the cream beaten stiff and the seasonings.








HONEY IN FLORIDA 45

HONEY MAYONNAISE
1 egg 6 tsp. lemon juice
1 tsp. salt 1'2 cupful salad oil
2 tbsp. honey Paprika
1 tsp. mustard 1-ew grains cayenne
6 tsp. honey vinegar

Into a conical shaped bowl break an egg and add the
salt, honey, mustard, dash papr k_., the cayenne and 1 tbsp.
honey vinegar. Beat thoroughly with a good egg beater
and add the oil, 1 tbsp. at a time, beating thoroughly after
each addition until 1. cupful is ad.,-d and the dressing is
thick. Then the oil can be added in larger quantities at a
time. When one cupful has been added, dilute with the
rest of the oil. Use altogether 1 V, c"' :s of oii, beat vigor-
ously all the time during the m Wheil finished,
dressing should be smooth and thic (.


HONEY CREAM DRESSING
2 tbsp. honey 1 tsp. prepared mustard
1 cup whipped cream e n : j , ,

Mix the mustard and honey together and stir in cup
of whipped cream. Adds a pi, lancy to pineapple salad
combinations.


HONEY CHEESE DRESSING
2 oz. American cheese 3 tbsp. whipped cream
2 tbsp. honey 1 cupful honey mayonnaise
Mash cheese, add whipped cream, then honey. Stir
in honey mayonnaise. This dressing is nice for peas, to-
matoes, or asparagus salad.


HONEY PEANUT BUTTER SPREAD
12 cupful honey /2 cupful peanut butter
Blend peanut butter and honey. More honey may be
added if a sweeter paste is desired. Excellent on hot
buttered toast or as a dressing for sweet sandwiches.








46 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

HONEY OATMEAL OR NUT BREAD AND CREAM CHEESE
SANDWICHES

Spread thin slices of honey oatmeal or nut bread (at
least three days old) with honey cream cheese paste. Place
buttered slices with cheese spread slices together, cut cross-
wise and allow three triangles to each serving.

HONEY CREAM CHEESE PASTE
1 cake cream cheese 3 tbsp. chopped salted
3 tbsp. honey pecans
Mix into paste.

CHICKEN AND GREEN PEPPER SANDWICHES
Spread 20 thin slices of bread with butter; then on 10
of them place thin slices of white meat of cooked chicken;
on other 10 spread a mixture of chopped green pepper and
honey salad dressing. Place crisp white lettuce on the lat-
ter; press together with chicken covered slices, cut and
serve with chilled olives and sliced tomato as garnish.

HONEY AND CREAM CHEESE SANDWICHES
Mix honey with cream cheese and use as filling for
sandwiches. Chopped nuts, dried or crystallized fruit or
peanut butter may be added to the cheese.

HONEY, MILK AND OTHER DRINKS

"A land flowing with milk and honey," was the de-
scription of Canaan, hence, honey and milk even in biblical
times were recognized as valuable foods. Honey sweetened
fruit-ades, iced tea and coffee are given an added flavor
that is very delicious. The amount to use depends on per-
sonal taste. Honey is convenient to use in hot tea, just a
teaspoonful or more from the honey jar as desired, but for
cold drinks the honey should be blended with a little warm
water, before adding the iced beverage.

HONEY MILK SHAKE
Mix one dip of ice cream with 1/ cup honey. Add 1
cup milk and shake well in malted milk mixer.








HONEY IN FLORIDA


HONEY EGG MILK SHAKE
2 eggs 6 tbsp. honey
Thin cream Chipped ice
112 cups ice water
Beat eggs well and pour into glass fruit jar or shaker.
Add remaining ingredients and shake. Yield, 3 servings.
May top each glass with whipped cream.

HONEY ORANGE COCKTAIL
Mix juice of 6 oranges, 6 tbsp. honey and few grains
of salt. When ready to serve, shake up with ice cubes and
add shreds of yellow orange rind. Decorate with sprig
of mint.

VITALITY COCKTAIL
Juice of 2 oranges, juice of 1 lemon, yolk of 1 egg,
warm honey. Beat the ingredients together and drink
every morning.

HONEY COCOA
4 tbsp. cocoa 1 cup cold water
2 to 4 tbsp. honey 3 cups milk
Dash of salt
Mix cocoa, sugar, salt, and water in upper part of
double boiler and place over direct heat. Stir until smooth;
boil 2 minutes. Place over hot water, add milk and heat.
Beat well, using rotary egg beater, and serve at once.

HONEY ICED CHOCOLATE
Blend 2 tsp. cocoa with 3 tsp. honey. Let 1 cup milk
come to boiling point. Remove scalded milk from fire, add
honey and cocoa mixture and pinch of salt. Stir well. Pour
this mixture in iced tea glass filled with cracked ice. Top
with whipped cream. For hot chocolate, omit ice and add
!1 cupful of scalded milk.

HOLLYWOOD HONEY PUNCH
Juice 12 lemons 1 pt. guava juice
Juice 12 oranges 1 pt. shredded pineapple
3 quarts water Honey to sweeten
1 pt. tamarind juice
Warm honey and add to water. Blend and add fruit
juices and shredded pineapple and chill. When ready to
serve, garnish with thin slices of lemon and orange and
pour over ice.








48 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

GUAVA HONEY PUNCH

1 cup honey 1/4 cup lemon juice
2 cups pared and seeded /2 cup orange juice
guavas and juice Mineral or ice water
2 cups water

Simmer the honey and water together until blended,
set aside to cool. Force the guavas through fruit press
and combine the pulp with the orange and lemon juice. Add
to the cold syrup and let chill thoroughly. Just before serv-
ing, strain and dilute to taste with mineral or ice water.
Peaches, plums, mangoes, may be used the same way as
guavas.


TROPICAL COOLER

Guava juice Cracked ice
Juice fresh limes, calamon- Honey to taste
dins or tangelos
Blend well and serve with thin slices of fruit.


HONEY ICE CREAM SUNDAE


Over a serving of ice cream-usually vanilla or choco-
late is preferred-pour a generous stream of gallberry,
orange or mangrove honey.


HONEY WITH VEGETABLES AND MEATS


Carrots, green or wax beans, beets, squash, turnips,
sweet potatoes, and other vegetables-important in the diet
-are bettered flavored through the addition of a small
amount of honey.

Use a teaspoonful of mild honey to each cup of vege-
tables when adding other seasonings.








HONEY IN FLORIDA


HONEY BUTTERED BEETS
2'2 cups beets, cooked and 4 tbsp. vinegar or lemon juice
sliced 2 tbsp. butter
'2 cup boiling water 4 tbsp. honey
1 tbsp. flour
Blend butter and flour, add hot water and stir until
smooth. Add other ingredients and pour over the beets
that have been placed in a buttered baking dish. Cook 20
minutes in moderate oven.

HONEY CUSHAW EN CASSEROLE
2 cups cushaw, pared and 3 tbsp. butter
thinly sliced 1 tsp. salt
1 cup apples pared and 12 to 34 cup honey, warmed
thinly sliced
Place a layer of cushaw in buttered baking dish, then
a layer of sliced apples. Add salt, dot with butter, and
cover with honey. Add another layer of cushaw and apples
and dress as before with seasonings.
Top with a layer of cushaw, brush with butter and
bake in a hot oven for 45 minutes, covering the first half
of the time. Sweet potatoes may be baked in the same way
as cushaw or other winter squash.
Delicious to serve with broiled chicken or honeyed ham.

BAKED SWEET POTATO WITH HONEY AND MARSHMALLOW
Scrub sweet potatoes as for ordinary baking. Bake
until soft. Then with sharp knife cut across on top. In
this opening drop first 1 tsp. honey, then press in half a
marshmallow. Return to oven and heat for just a few sec-
onds. The honey is absorbed almost immediately by the
hot sweet potato and marshmallow is toasted just enough
by the few seconds of reheating. Serve at once. Espe-
cially nice for crown roast of pork, roast chicken, or turkey.

FRIED SWEET POTATOES
Boil 10 medium large sweet potatoes with skins on.
When about two-thirds cooked, remove from fire, run cold
water over them. Pare, slice in '-inch slices and put in
frying pan well greased. Fry until browned, then add a
mixture of 1/, cup honey and 14 cup brown sugar. Stir
through sweet potatoes, let remain over low flame for
three minutes. Serve at once. (27 servings.)








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


HONEY WAY CHILI

1 cup diced celery 1 qt. red beans (cooked or
1 cup chopped onions canned)
4 cups ground beef 1 pt. water
1 tsp. chili powder 1 tbsp. salt
1 pt. tomato puree 6 tbsp. honey

Fry beef, onions, and celery slowly for about one hour.
Should be thoroughly browned-being careful not to burn
onions or celery. Place one quart of red beans either cooked
or canned, 1 pint tomato puree, 1 pint water, and 1 tbsp.
salt in kettle. Let come to boil, then add fried meat and
vegetables. Simmer slowly for two hours. Then add chili
powder, and just before serving stir in honey. Serve piping
hot.


FESTIVE HONEYED HAM

For a delicious ham which requires a minimum amount
of holiday preparation, the ham should be given its pre-
liminary cooking the day before. The whole or half ham is
brought to a boil, then simmered, allowing 20 minutes to
the pound. Use from 1 to 2 cups of pineapple juice in the
water in which the ham is boiled.
Remove ham from liquid, skim and pour over the
skinned ham 2 cups of honey (for ham weighing 9 to 10
lbs.). Let stand over night. In the morning add enough
liquid which has been reserved from the boiling liquor for
basting purposes. Rub the skinned surface with bread
crumbs, then baste frequently with the honey liquid to
which has been added a cup of raisins or 1 cup spiced roselle'.


HONEYED HAM AND PINEAPPLE

Brown a rather thick slice of cured ham in a baking
dish, pour 4 tbsp. honey over ham and stick 3 or 4 cloves
in the ham. Place pineapple rings on ham and bake in
moderate oven, covered for the first 10 minutes. In place
of pineapple, apples, sweet potatoes, or carrots may be used
and pork chops may be substituted for the cured ham.









HONEY IN FLORIDA


BAKED APPLES WITH HONEY
Bake apples with a bit of water until tender. Butter
may be added if desired. Remove from oven, drizzle honey
over hot apples. The hot apples will readily absorb the
honey and by the time of serving, the honey will have per-
meated the apple tissue and blended to form a perfectly
delightful dish.

HONEY BAKED HAM
1 lean ham (weighing from 7 1 tsp. cinnamon
to 9 lbs.) 1 qt. honey vinegar or pickle
15 cloves juice
Celery leaves from one bunch Honey raisin sauce
of celery Soda
/2 cup honey Boiling water
2 eggs, beaten
Thoroughly wash the ham, rub soda over the surface;
rinse in cold water. Celery leaves, cloves, cinnamon, honey
vinegar and 1,i cup honey should be placed in a kettle full
of boiling water. In this place the ham and simmer until
perfectly tender-about five hours. Remove the skin after
taking ham from kettle, and brush with beaten egg and
honey (2 eggs beaten blended with 1/i cup honey). Stick
in about 30 cloves at even intervals and brown in very hot
oven.
Serve with Honey Raisin Sauce.

HONEY RAISIN SAUCE
1 cup raisins V2 cup water
1 cup honey
Cook very slowly until raisins are soft but not mushy.
Add honey and a teaspoonful of lemon juice and serve over
ham slices.

HONEY CONFECTIONS
Home made candies are always a special treat, but
when honey is used in their making, they are doubly de-
licious. In candy making, honey imparts its own indi-
viduality to the product and opens up a wide range of in-
teresting opportunities in the candy way.








52 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


HONEY FUDGE
2 cups white sugar 2 inch square chocolate
1 cup milk 1 tsp. vanilla
,41 cup honey

Allow to cook to soft ball stage. Cool. Beat 20 min-
utes after cool.

HONEY CARAMELS
2 cups granulated sugar 2 cups rich milk
2 cups honey 1 tsp. vanilla
/2 cup butter

Choose a heavy iron, aluminum or copper kettle for
cooking. Stirring occasionally, boil sugar, salt and honey
to 245' F. Add butter and milk gradually, so that the
mixture does not stop at any time. Cook rapidly to firm
ball stage (256 F.). Stir constantly because the mixture
becomes very thick and sticks easily at the last. Add
vanilla and pour into a buttered pan.

Cool thoroughly before cutting. Cut with a heavy,
sharp knife, using a saw-like motion. Yield, 2 lbs., or 45
caramels 3/xl'/ inches.

HONEY PEANUT BRITTLE
2 cups sugar 1 cup water
1 cup honey 1V tsp. salt
1 tbsp. butter 2 cups roasted peanuts

Put sugar, honey, salt and water in saucepan. Stir
until sugar is dissolved. Cook to 300 F. Remove from
fire. Add butter and peanuts. Stir just enough to mix
thoroughly. Pour out on a well greased marble slab or
baking sheet into very thin sheets. Allow to cool and break
into irregular pieces.

HONEY BUTTER SCOTCH
2 cups honey 1 cup butter
2 cups sugar 1 tbsp. cinnamon

Boil ten minutes or to crack stage, 290 F., and then
pour into a buttered pan and when cold cut in squares.








HONEY IN FLORIDA 53

HONEY DIVINITY
2 1/3 cups sugar /4 tsp. salt
,2 cup honey 1 cup water
4 tsp. vanilla % cup cocoanut or nut
2 egg whites meats
Put sugar, honey, salt and water into a sauce pan and
cook, stirring until the sugar is completely dissolved. Con-
tinue cooking, without stirring, until a firm ball is formed
in cold water, or until 268 F. is reached. Wash down any
sugar crystals that may form. Remove from fire and
slowly pour the syrup over the egg whites which have been
beaten until stiff during the latter part of the cooking of
the syrup. Beat during this addition. Continue beating
until the candy will hold its shape when dropped from the
spoon. Add vanilla and nuts or cocanut; mix thoroughly.
Drop from teaspoon onto waxed paper.
If taken off when temperature of 262 F. has been
reached, it can be used for the following:
Stuffing dates-Making cocoanut balls-Shaping in
balls and dipping in chocolate.
This may be varied by the addition of candied fruits
or nuts. These chocolates thus made are delicious.

ORANGE BLOSSOM TAFFY
2 cups orange blossom honey 2 cups sugar
1 cup boiling water 1 tsp. vanilla
Put honey, sugar and water into sauce pan; stir until
sugar is well dissolved. Place on fire and cook to 270' F.
Remove from fire; add vanilla. Pour out on a well-buttered
dish. When cool enough to handle, pull until creamy and
stiff like other taffies.

HONEY TAFFY
2 cups sugar 2/3 cup water
2 cup strained honey 1 tsp. vanilla
Put all of the ingredients except the vanilla into a
sauce pan and cook, stirring only until sugar is dissolved.
Continue cooking until a hard ball forms in cold water or
the temperature 263 F. is reached. Remove from fire
and pour into buttered pan. When cool enough to handle,
pour vanilla into center of the mass, gather the corners








54 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Remove from the pan and pull. When candy is white
and rather firm, stretch out into a long rope and cut into
pieces of desired size, using scissors for the cutting. Nut
meats may be added just before the taffy is ready to cut,
which must be worked in during the pulling.

HONEY ORANGE STRIPS
Remove the peel from 3 oranges in quarter sections,
then cut into strips with scissors. Cover the rind with
salt water in the proportion of 1 tbsp. of salt to 1 quart of
water and let stand over night. Drain and cover with cold
water, then bring to the boiling point; repeat with process
three times. Then if tender, rinse in cold water, drain, then
simmer very slowly in 1 cup of honey from 45 to 60 min-
utes. Remove the rind with a fork, drain and lay on waxed
paper. Allow to dry for a day or two. The strips may then
be coated with chocolate, if desired.

Grapefruit may be prepared in a similar way but grate
rind carefully before cooking tender in an abundance of
water. Drain, then cook the peel in a syrup made with 2
cupfuls of honey, 2 tbsp. lemon juice or grapefruit juice.

Cook the grapefruit strips one hour or more, then al-
low them to stand all night in the honey syrup. Remove
with a fork and lay on waxed paper for a day or two. These
may be coated with milk chocolate or bitter chocolate.








HONEY IN FLORIDA


HONEY SPECIALTIES

HONEY MERINGUE (Uncooked)

Electrical Beater: Use one egg white to one-half cup
honey, placing in bowl of electrical mixer and turning to
speed 2, allowing mixture to whip until it peaks.

Hand Beating: Place one-fourth or one-third cup
honey in bowl with one egg white and beat with double
Dover or Ladd improved (ball bearing type) beater until
stiff.

This mixture keeps indefinitely when kept uncovered
in refrigerator. Honey meringue made with granulated
honey keeps just as well and in some cases has been found
to whip up more easily by hand than when strained honey is
used.

Honey meringue may be used as a topping just as
whipped cream or marshmallow is used, on top of pie; for
toasting as ordinary meringue; on sweet potatoes; mix with
rice krispies and use as a paste to spread on butter wafers
for tea; as a dressing for fruit salad; delightful for date
tortes. The amount of honey used depends entirely upon
the individual preference for the honey flavor.
Add 2 tbsp. melted butter to 1 cup meringue for a
good gingerbread topping.

HONEY TOASTS

Trim slices of bread (slices should be about 3/-inch
thick). Toast properly, then butter and brush with honey.
Reheat enough to have toast absorb honey and serve piping
hot.

HONEY CINNAMON TOAST

Spread slices of fresh toast with butter, brush with
honey (about 1 tbsp. honey for each slice) sprinkle with
cinnamon and oven toast enough to blend cinnamon and
honey.








56 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

HONEY NUT BREAD TOAST
Place thin slices of honey nut brown bread on thin pan,
oven toast both sides, spread with butter and honey. Cut
in triangles and serve open face.
These breads must be oven toasted and very carefully
turned over on flat tin with spatula so that the slices will
remain intact. Hot honey nut bread toast is delicious when
spread with orange marmalade immediately when removed
from oven.
Any of these toasts must be served piping hot to be
good.

MISCELLANEOUS
HOT HONEY LEMONADE
Hot honey lemonade is particularly valuable in re-
lieving the grippe. When suffering from a cold, take a
hot honey lemonade just before retiring.
Four tbsp. lemon juice mixed with 4 tbsp. honey. Add
1 cup boiling water. Drink hot.
PRESERVES, CONSERVES, JAMS AND JELLIES
Honey may be substituted for part, or in some cases
for all, of the sugar in jelly, jam, preserves and conserves.
In general, it is found that products made with honey or
part honey have good appearance, color, flavor and con-
sistency. The flavor of honey combines with that of some
fruits somewhat better than with that of others. The flavor
is usually more pleasing in conserves made from a combi-
nation of fruits, or with jams or butters in which spices
are used, than in the preserves made from one fruit alone.
In using the honey, two precautions should be ob-
served:
1. Since honey has a tendency to foam considerably
when heated, there is some danger of the products "cooking
over" at the beginning of the cooking period, if not watched
carefully.
2. Since honey is part water, it is necessary to cook
the product in which it is used slightly longer in order to
obtain the desired consistency.
In jelly making with honey, use fruits giving good
pectin acid test. To each cup of fruit juice use 3/4 cup of
honey or half honey and half sugar and cook rapidly to
the usual jelly test.








HONEY IN FLORIDA


PEAR AND GINGER CONSERVE
12 lb. green ginger scraped 4 oranges
and chopped 3 lemons, juice and thinly
6 Ibs. honey shredd d peel
8 lbs. pears weighed after 2 cups pecans or black walnut
paring and coring meats
1 pint water
Cook the ginger, orange and lemon peel with a pint of
water until tender, then add honey, orange and lemon
juice; cook, put in the pears chopped coarsely and cook
until pears are tender. Add nut meats. Cook five minutes
longer. Pour in small hot jars and seal, boiling hot.

HONEY KUMQUAT PRESERVES
Clean kumquats and puncture carefully. Drop into
slightly salted water and soak over night; next day pour
off salted water, cover well with fresh and bring to a
boil. Drain and cover again with fresh water and cook
until tender. Drain.
To one pint of fruit add 1 2 pint of sugar, 1i pint
orange honey and one pint of water or orange juice. Drop
fruit in the boiling syrup and simmer until clear and syrup
is slightly thickened. Plump over night in the same vessel,
covering tightly while still boiling and removing from fire.
The second or third day place back on fire and cook until
syrup is heavy. Pack in jars as any preserve, or if candied
kumquats are desired for immediate consumption, drain,
put on wire rack to dry and, while still sticky, roll in granu-
lated sugar.








58 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



I. HONEY
CLASSES FOR HONEY

1. The following shall be the classes for honey for ship-
ment out of Canada:-
(a) Extra White-When in liquid form the honey shall
be no darker in colour than a reading of 13 mm.
on the Pfund Honey Grader.
(b) White-When in liquid form the honey shall be
no darker in colour than a reading of 30 mm. on
the Pfund Honey Grader.
(c) Golden-When in liquid form the honey shall be
no darker in colour than a reading of 47 mm. on
the Pfund Honey Grader.
(d) Light Amber-When in liquid form the honey
shall be no darker in colour than a reading of 81
mm. on the Pfund Honey Grader.
(e) Dark Amber-When in liquid form the honey shall
be no darker in colour than a reading of 109 mm.
on the Pfund Honey Grader.
(f) Dark-When in liquid form the honey shall be
darker in colour than a reading of 109 mm. on the
Pfund Honey Grader.
(g) Unclassified-Shall only include honey in retail
or consumer containers and not marked with a
specific colour classification.

(2) The following shall be the classes for honey other than
for shipment out of Canada:-
(a) White-When in liquid form the honey shall be no
darker in colour than a reading of 30 mm. on the
Pfund Honey Grader.
(b) Golden-When in liquid form the honey shall be
no darker in colour than a reading of 47 mm. on
the Pfund Honey Grader.
(c) Amber-When in liquid form the honey shall be no
darker in colour than a reading of 81 mm. on the
Pfund Honey Grader.








HONEY IN FLORIDA 59

(d) Dark-When in liquid form the honey shall be
darker in colour than a reading of 81 mm. on the
Pfund Honey Grader.

GRADES FOR HONEY
2. The following shall be the grades for honey:-
No. 1 GRADE
(a) (i) "No. 1" which shall be free from damage and
practically free of foreign material;
(ii) of moisture content not exceeding 17.8 per
cent; or with a minimum specific gravity
reading of 1.4184 at 68 degrees Fahrenheit
referred to water at the same temperature, in
the domestic classes of "White," "Golden,"
"Amber" and "Dark" and in the export
classes of "Extra White," "White," and
"Golden" and
(iii) of moisture content not exceeding 18.6 per
cent, or with a minimum specific gravity
reading of 1.4129 at 68 degrees Fahrenheit
referred to water at the same temperature,
in the export classes of "Light Amber," "Dark
Amber" and "Dark."

No. 2 GRADE
(b) (i) "No. 2" which shall be free from damage and
fairly free of foreign material;
(ii) of moisture content not exceeding 18.6 per
cent, or with a minimum specific gravity
reading of 1.4129 at 68 degrees Fahrenheit re-
ferred to water at the same temperature.

No. 3 GRADE
(c) (i) "No. 3" consisting of honey which does not
meet the requirements of the foregoing grades
but is free from serious damage and fairly
free of foreign material and of moisture con-
tent not exceeding 20 per cent, or with a
minimum specific gravity reading of 1.0433
at 68 degrees Fahrenheit referred to water at
the same temperature.








60 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


(d) When honey is granulated, it may, at the
option of the packer, be further graded as
being of fine, medium or coarse texture, but
no honey shall be so marked until it is granu-
lated.
Definition of Terms:
(i) "Damage" means injury caused by turbidity,
overheating or any objectionable flavour or
aroma from floral source, honey-dew, smoke
taint or other flavour or aroma foreign to
honey;
(ii) "fairly free" means that honey or its surface
is as clear as if strained at temperature of
not more than 130 F. through a standard
bolting cloth of 23 meshes to the inch;
Note.-Honey which at ordinary extracting room
temperature has been strained without pressure through a
single thickness of ordinary fine cheesecloth and thereupon
allowed to settle usually will be fairly free of foreign
material.
(iii) "practically free" means that the honey or
its surface is as clear as if strained at tem-
perature of not more than 1300 F. through a
standard bolting cloth of 86 meshes to the
inch;
Note.-Honey which at ordinary extracting room
temperature has been strained without pressure through a
double thickness of ordinary fine cheesecloth and thereupon
allowed to settle usually will be practically free of foreign
material.
(iv) "serious damage" means any injury, defect
or deterioration seriously affecting the edi-
bility or shipping quality of the honey;
(v) "turbidity" means cloudiness caused by pol-
len grains, minute air bubbles, finely divided
wax particles, or other substances that de-
tract from the clearness of the honey.
In order to allow for variations incident to proper
classification, grading and packing, not more than 10 per
cent by count of containers in any lot graded as No. 1 or
No. 2 shall contain honey that differs from the class or
grade as marked on the containers, but no tolerance shall








HONEY IN FLORIDA


be allowed for any honey that is below the next lower class
or grade. No tolerance shall be allowed for serious damage
in honey graded as No. 3.

PACKAGE MARKS

3. Every person who packs, sells, offers for sale, or has
in his possession any honey intended for sale, shall be
responsible that each package is plainly and indelibly
marked as follows:-

(a) For shipment out of Canada-
(i) The words "Canada" or "Canadian" and
"Honey."
(ii) The class and grade.
(iii) The mark (B) directly following the grade
where the aroma or flavour of buckwheat
honey can be detected.
(iv) The registration number or registered trade
name identifying the shipper.
(v) The lot numbers as required in subclause (1)
of clause 11 of the regulations.
(vi) The net weight of the honey contained.
(vii) The words "Liquid Honey" provided the
honey has been treated to preserve its origi-
nal liquid form.

(b) For shipment other than out of Canada-
(i) The name of the province of origin and the
word "Honey." (Note.-The words "Can-
ada" or "Canadian" may also appear if de-
sired.)
(ii) The class and grade.
(iii) The mark (B) directly following the grade
where the aroma or flavour of buckwheat
honey can be detected.
(iv) The registration number or registered trade
name identifying the shipper.
(v) The net weight of the honey contained.








62 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

(vi) The words "Liquid Honey" provided the honey
has been treated to preserve its original
liquid form.
(2) With the exception of lot numbers, all marks re-
quired shall be distinctly legible block letters of
size reasonably in proportion to the size of the
package and not less than % of an inch in length
and except in the case of barrels, half-barrels and
casks shall be placed on a single face or side of the
package which surface shall bear no additional
mark or stamp other than those placed thereon by
an inspector.

CONTAINER MARKS
4. Other than for shipment out of Canada, every person
who packs, ships, sells, offers for sale, or has in his
possession any honey intended for sale, shall be re-
sponsible that each container is plainly and indelibly
marked as follows:-
(a) Glass containers-
Name and address of the packer or of the first
dealer and the word "Honey." The letters shall be
of size reasonably in proportion to the size and
design of the label.
(b) All other containers-
(i) Name and address of the packer or of the first
dealer.
(ii) The name of the province of origin and the
word "Honey."
NOTE.-Where applicable, the province of origin may
be included in the address.
(iii) The class and grade.
(iv) The mark (B) directly following the grade
where the aroma or flavour of buckwheat
honey can be detected.
(v) The words "Liquid Honey" provided the
honey has been treated to preserve its origi-
nal liquid form.








HONEY IN FLORIDA


(2) All marks required by the preceding subclause
shall appear on a single face or side of the con-
tainer and be in distinctly legible block letters of
minimum size as follows:-
(i) On containers up to, and including, ten pounds
capacity, one-eighth inch in length.
(ii) On containers of more than ten pounds ca-
pacity, one-quarter inch in length.
(3) Any person who ships honey other than his own
pack may use a number to designate the packer
provided a list of the names and addresses of all
packers with corresponding numbers allotted is
filed annually with the Department. In such cases
the name and address of the shipper as well as the
packer's allotted number shall be marked on the
container.
5. In the case of granulated honey only, the words "Fine"
or "Medium" or "Coarse" may be added after the class
and grade designation on containers and packages, to
indicate the texture of the honey, e.g., "Golden No. 1
Coarse." Where such indication of texture is made it
shall be in letters of the same size as the class and
grade marks.

CONTAINERS AND PACKAGES
6. Honey shall be packed in clean, sound and strongly con-
structed containers.

(2) Containers of honey shall be packed in clean, well
constructed packages in good condition and which
are not defaced by old markings.

(3) Containers of extracted honey shall be securely
closed by means of "screw caps," "friction top
lids," "bungs" or otherwise as may be approved by
the Department.

REGISTRATION

7. Every person who assembles or ships honey for export
or interprovincial trade shall register thereto by mak-
ing application to the Department. The fee for regis-
tration shall be One Dollar ($1).








64 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

(2) Upon receipt of application for registration to-
gether with the fee of $1, a numbered registration
certificate shall be issued to the applicant.
(3) All registration certificates issued shall expire on
June 30 of each year, but in the case of any person
shipping only honey of his own production shall be
renewable without fee.

SANITARY CONDITIONS
8. The following sanitary conditions shall be observed
and maintained:-
(a) All buildings or rooms in which honey is extracted,
packed or stored shall be maintained in a clean and
sanitary condition.
(b) All appliances including extractors, pumps, tanks,
uncapping machines or other equipment used in
the handling of honey from the apiary to the final
containers shall be kept clean and sanitary.
(c) All operations in connection with the preparation
and packing of honey shall be carried on carefully
and with strict cleanliness.
(d) All persons engaged in the preparation, handling
and packing of honey shall be free from any com-
municable disease and the covering used by them
to protect their clothing or persons shall be of ma-
terial easily cleaned and shall be kept reasonably
clean.
(e) No lavatory, sink, cesspool or building in which
animals are housed shall be so situated or main-
tained as to permit any odours or fumes therefrom,
to pervade any room or building in which honey is
being extracted, packed, handled or stored.
(f) All honey intended to be used for food found by
an inspector in any apiary, packing plant or ware-
house, to be in any way unfit for food purposes shall
be placed under detention and held for disposal
as the Minister may direct.
(g) All vehicles used for the transportation of honey
shall be clean and sanitary to the satisfaction of
the inspector.








HONEY IN FLORIDA


GENERAL
9. The applicant for inspection shall be responsible that
notification is given the inspector, in sufficient time
prior to date of shipment, to allow him to take samples
for determination of moisture and other grade require-
ments.
10. No person shall use for packing honey any container
or package that has been previously marked without
first completely obliterating such markings when same
are inconsistent with the marks required by the regu-
lations.
11. When there is any noticeable difference in the colour
or quality of the honey or when honey from different
packers or producers is included in one shipment the
person submitting the honey for inspection shall sub-
mit each variation of each class, grade or pack in
separate lots, each lot bearing a distinguishing mark.
(2) Where any shipment of honey is submitted for in-
spection in a place considered unsuitable by the
inspector or not sorted into separate lots or not
bearing the distinguishing marks or where there
is any irregularity in the distinguishing marks the
inspector may refuse to inspect such honey until
it has been arranged, sorted and marked as re-
quired by the regulations.
12. Every person contravening any of the provisions of
these regulations shall be liable upon summary con-
viction to a fine not exceeding two hundred dollars and
not less than ten dollars and in default of payment of
the fine to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one
month unless the fine is sooner paid.















SPECIAL RECIPE INDEX


A


Apples, Baked with Honey



Bread-
Honey Gingerbread
Honey Orange Graham
Honey Nut
Honey Oatmeal



Cakes-
Florida Honey Fruit
Honey Citron Nut
Honey Spice
Honey Sponge
Orange Honey Coconut
Pecan Honey
Spiced Jelly Roll

Candies-
Honey Butter Scotch
Honey Caramels
Honey Divinity
Honey Fudge
Orange Blossom Taffy
Orange Strips, Honey
Peanut Brittle, Honey
Taffy, Honey


Date Bars

Doughnuts, Honey ..

Dressing-
Honey Cream
Honey Cheese
Honey Mayonnaise
Honey Salad .....-





Fried Sweet Potatoes



Gingerbread, Honey



Ice Cream-
Honey .....-

Honey Chocolate ..



Jams, uses of honey


Biscuits, Honey
Butter, Honey


Page
34
33
34
33
31
31
29

50
50
51
50
51
52
50
51


Cookies-
Chocolate Refrigerator
Drop Cookies No. 1
Drop Cookies No. 2 (Lemon
Nut)
Honey
Honey
Honey Fudge Squares
Honey Nut Brownies
Honey Oatmeal

Conserves-
Pear and Ginger Conserve

Cup Cakes-
Honey Orange

Custards-
Frozen Honey .
Honey (Baked)
Honey (Boiled) -. ...-


Drinks-
Guava Honey Punch
Honey Cocoa .
Honey Iced Chocolate
Hollywood Honey Punch
Honey Orange Cocktail
Honey Egg Milkshake
Honey Milkshake
Lemonade, Hot Honey
Tropical Cooler -
Vitality Cocktail .......-


Icing-
Honey Meringue or Boiled
Honey Coconut Meringue
Honey .. -- -.


Page
54


Jellies, uses of honey


Page
46
45
45
45
45
45
44
54
46
45


Page













Page
Meats-
Honey Baked Ham ...... 49
Festive Honeyed Ham ..... 48
Honeyed Ham and Pineapple 48

Meringue-
Honey ... .. ..... 21
Honey (uncooked) ...... 52


Pies-
Honey ---
Honey Apple ..
Honey Cream ..
Honey Lemon .
Honey Pecan .. -
Honey Pumpkin

Preserves, uses of honey


Roll, Honey


Sherbet-
Grapefruit
Honey Ginger
Honey Strawberry

Sauce-
Honey Kumquat
Honey Raisin .


Page

35
35
36
36
35
35

54



Page
38


Mousse, Honey ...

Muffins-
Honey and Nut Bran
Honey Oatmeal ..


Preserves, Honey Kumquat

Puddings-
Honey Banana Mold
Honey Carrot ..
Honey Citron Steamed
Honey Date
Honey Plum No. 1
Honey Plum No. 2
Tapioca, Honey Tangelo


Roll, Spiced Jelly


Salad, Frozen Fruit
39
39 Sandwiches-
39 Chicken and Green Pepper.
Honey Cream Cheese Paste..
Honey and Cream Cheese
42 Honey Peanut Butter Spread
49
Sundae, Honey Ice Cream


Honey Cinnamon Toast
Honey Nut Bread...


Page
Vegetables-
Honey Buttered Beets ...... 47
Honey Cushaw En Casserole 47


Page
Honey Way Chill ............ 48
Baked Sweet Potato with
Honey and Marshallow .... 47


Waffles, Honey Cream


Toasts-
Honey











INDEX


A


Apples. Baked with Honey



Baked Apples with Honey
Baking with Honey
Banana. Mold. Honey
Beets, Honey Buttered
Biscuits. Honey
Boiled Icing
Brownies. Honey Nut



Cabbage Palm Honey
Cake, Florida Fruit
Cake, Honey Citron Nut
Cake, Honey Spice
Cake, Honey Sponge
Cake, Orange Honey Coconut
Cakes, Pecan Honey
Cake, Spiced Jelly Roll
Caramel, Honey
Care of Honey
Chili, Honey Way
Chocolate, Honey Iced
Cocoa, Honey
Cocktail. Honey Orange
Cocktail. Vitality
Commercial Honeys
Confections, Honey



Date Bars
Desserts, Honey
Divinity. Honey
Doughnuts, Honey
Dressing, Honey Cheese



Facts about Honey
Food Value



Gallberry Honey -
Gingerbread, Honey


Page
49


Page
49
15
38
47
17
29
25


Page
9
34
34
34
33
31
31
29
50
7
48
45
45
45
45
11
49


Page
21
36
51
21
43


Page
5
6


Page
9
21


Page
Ham, Honey Baked ... 49
Ham, Festive Honeyed 48
Ham, Honeyed with Pineapple 48
Honey, basic principles in
cookery of ....... 13
Honey, baking ........- 15
Honey Butter, uses of 41-42
Honey, Cabbage Palm 9
Honey, care of ............. 7
Honey, Commercial --- 11
Honey, Confections ........ 49
Honey, Cookery of ...... ..- 13
Honey, Desserts ................ 36
Honey, facts about ...-- 5
Honey, food value ........ 6
Honey, Gallberry ..... 9


B

Bread, Honey Gingerbread
Bread, Honey Oatmeal
Bread. Honey Orange Graham
Bread. Honey Nut
Butter, Honey
Butter. Honey-Uses of
Butterscotch. Honey

C

Conserves, Pear and Ginger
Conserves, Uses of Honey ..
Cookery of Honey
Cookies, Chocolate Refrigerator
Cookies, Drop No. 1 .
Cookies, Drop No. 2 ...
Cookies, Honey ...
Cookies, Honey
Cookies. Honey Nut Brownies
Cookies, Honey Oatmeal
Cooler, Tropical ....
Cup Cakes, Honey Orange
Cushaw, Honey En Casserole
Custards, Honey (Baked)
Custard, Frozen Honey
Custard, Honey (Boiled)


D

Dressing, Honey Cream
Dressing, Honey Mayonnaise
Dressing, Honey Salad
Drinks


F

Fudge, Honey ..
Fudge Squares, Honey

G

Goldenrod Honey ...


H


Honey, Goldenrod ....
Honey, Mangrove
Honey, Meringue (uncooked)
uses of . -
Honey, Orange Blossom
Honey, Partridge Pea
Honey, preservation of
Honey, Saw Palmetto -
Honey Specialties ..
Honey, Tupelo ....
Honey, uses in Jams, Jellies,
Conserves, Preserves ....
Honey, with vegetables and
m eats ....... ..- ...
Honey, Wild Sunflower ......


P



F





















I





I




4


'age



age
21
19
19
19
41
41
50


'age
55
54
13
25
23
23
27
27
25
23
46
29
47
37
39
37



'age
43
43
42
4-46



Page
50
25


Page
11



Page
11
11

52
9
11
7
7
52
9

54

46
11











Page
Ice Cream, Honey -- 38
Ice Cream, Honey Chocolate 38
Icing, Honey ...-- .... 33


Page
Jams, Uses of Honey 54


Page
Kumquat, Honey Preserves ..- 55


Page
Lemonade, Hot Honey 54

Page
Mangrove Honey .....--. 11
Mayonnaise, Honey 43
Meats with Honey ...... 46
Merinque, Honey 21
Merinque, Honey (Uncooked)
uses of --.... --... 52
Meringue, Honey (Uncooked) 52

Page
Orange Blossom Honey .........- 9

Page
Partridge Pea Honey .....---. 11
Peanut Brittle, Honey ........ 50
Pie, Honey -- 35
Pie, Honey Apple ............. ...... 35
Pie, Honey Cream .......... 36
Pie, Honey Lemon -- 36
Pie, Honey Pecan -_.. 35
Pie, Honey Pumpkin 35
Potato, Baked Sweet with
Honey & Marshmallows .... 47
Potato, Fried Sweet ........... 47

Page
Recipes, see special index ......
Roll, Honey .......-- --.--.- 38

Page
Sandwiches, Honey and Cream
Cheese ....- ....... ... - 44
Sandwiches, Honey Cream
Cheese, Paste -. 44
Sandwiches, Chicken and
Green Pepper 44
Sandwiches, Honey Peanut
Butter Spread 43
Sauce, Honey Kumquat ......... 42

Page
Taffy, Honey ...... 51
Taffy, Honey Orange Blossom 51
Tapioca, Honey Tangelo -. 37
Toast. Honey .... .... ........... 53

Page
Vegetables with Honey ...... 46


I

Icing, Honey Coconut Meringue
Icing, Honey Meringue ....




Jellies, Uses of Honey ...........

K



L


M








0
O


P











R


Page
32
29



Page
54


Page


Page


Page
Milkshake, Honey Egg 45
Milkshake, Honey ....... 44
Miscellaneous 54
Mousse, Honey ............ 38
Muffins, Honey and Nut Brown 17
Muffins, Honey Oatmeal ..... 17


Page
Orange Strips, Honey ...- 52

Page
Preservation of Honey ..... 7
Preserves, Honey Kumquat. 55
Preserves, Uses of Honey..... 54
Pudding, Honey Carrot 42
Pudding, Honey Citron
Steamed ....---- 41
Pudding, Honey Date ...... 41
Pudding, Honey Plum No. 1 40
Pudding, Honey Plum No. 2 40
Punch, Guava Honey - 46
Punch, Hollywood Honey -. 45

Page
Roll, Spiced Jelly ............. 29


Page
Sauce, Honey Raisin ........- 49
Salad, Frozen Fruit ........ 42
Saw Palmetto Honey ....... 7
Sherbet, Grapefruit 39
Sherbet, Honey Ginger 39
Sherbet, Honey Strawberry 39
Specialties, Honey ........... 52
Sundae, Honey Ice Cream 38


Page
Toast, Honey Cinnamon .. 53
Toast, Honey Nut Bread 53
Tupelo Honey 9


Page


Waffles, Honey Cream


Wild Sunflower Honey




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs