• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Frontispiece
 Our baby's Bible alphabet
 Back Cover






Title: Our baby's Bible alphabet
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088954/00001
 Material Information
Title: Our baby's Bible alphabet
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Yonge, Charlotte Mary, 1823-1901
Spiel, George ( Illustrator )
Boland, K. E ( Copyright holder )
Juvenile Publishing Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Juvenile Publishing Co.
Place of Publication: S.l
Publication Date: c1899
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Picture books for children -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Initial teaching alphabet -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Alphabet books -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1899   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1899
Genre: Alphabet books   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry
 Notes
General Note: Pictorial cover.
General Note: Contains prose and verse; without music.
General Note: "Train up a child in the way he should go ; and when he is old, he will not depart from it"--Proverbs xxii, 6"--t.p.
General Note: "Copyright 1899 by K.E. Boland"--t.p.
Statement of Responsibility: charmingly written by Aunt Charlotte ; with original drawings by George Spiel.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088954
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225278
notis - ALG5550
oclc - 49459037

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Introduction
        Page 4
    Frontispiece
        Page 5
    Our baby's Bible alphabet
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
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        Page 46
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        Page 51
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        Page 96
        Page 97
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        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
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        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Back Cover
        Page 123
        Page 124
Full Text





.: Arl. .


AA
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4L






LjI Pi,'.







OUR BABY'S




BIBLE ALPHABET



CHARMINGLY WRITTEN
BY
AUNT CHARLOTTE


"Train up a child in the way he should go; and when he is old, he will ,ot depart from it."
-PROVERBS xxii, 6.



WITH ORIGINAL DRAWINGS
BY
GEORGE SPIEL


COPYRIGHT 1899, BY K. E. BOLAND


JUVENILE PUBLISHING CO.






ROME little children, one and all,
While mamma to you reads
Of Bible tales you all should know,
The Christ who fills your needs.

How Adam lived in Eden;
How Daniel knew no fear;
How the ravens fed Elijah;
How weak, Goliath's spear.

Of Bethlehem where Christ was born;
Of Felix scared by Paul;'
Of Thomas, Peter, Zaccheus,
Of Herod, worst of all.

In fact, we've brought them all to you,
From Scripture's golden store.
We know you'll like them-every one-
And ask each day for more.

So treat with care this little book,
Keep every page from stain;
Tear not a leaf, nor cover break,
That you may read again.






THE ALPHABET.
---T- ___


\i7 Ij


He, in Eden did dwell.
Would you know all his story?
The Bible will tell.
















































ADAM AND EVE DRIVEN FROM THE GARDEN OF EDEN






THE ALPHABET.


.. BE--H'. -. L E H E, M
S/)/1,B E T H L E H EM


' i//// Bethlehem, Bethlehem,
" \i W h (*c v c V


VV L Je qc


K.


a lowly


manger


.On a Christmas morn.


In


1 0 vv L, V uo


or'll,


OI Iga q


















frf


M5" -"------


II- I -=
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,A, iI ,,y j A _


I wX ~- :
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MI -mE
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,,' _:_ ._ _
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Im al



.:'


'--_, -.= ---









ANNUNCIATION TO THE SHEPHERD
..r Igi ?' ---

.. .... ... .. !liI ---- -
r _.
.. .. .--- -'--.. .-= ': ,',/,ilI ',I 'I :

... '= -=
,- I TLO ,- t' '; ,... :; i





THE ALPHABET.


Lt--


the lovHRing

the loving


Who died that


Savior,


we might


To all the little children,


he did give.


live;


H-is bl~es'sing-

























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411 111116,
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R'IT H
H BL C




If'
Aotll i











CHRIST BLESSING LITTLE CHILDREN











/4


j,*,
-, :


DANIE


Daniel in the lion's den


A wicked


king


did throw;


touched him not,


him safe, you


know..


God, kept













































DANIEL TOLD BELSHAZZAR THE MEANING OF HIS DREAM





THE ALPHABET.


did from Ahab


In safety


he- was led;


ravens


Mfi'.1'1"


- Thee


bread.













































ELIJAH RESTORING THE WIDOW'S CHILD









I_-_-
^-22,
re-^


Felix


heard


FELIX.

the words


of Paul,


And he


was badly


scared;


For he had been


a wicked


he had dared.


ii- ai,


God 's


teaechirigs







SI





-- : : :-
v













-; ---:-
Ii,



~r










J Wk i





Ne,

























THE APOSTLE PAUL'S REPRQOF
,"Many of them also which used curious arts brought their books together, and burned them
before all men." ,
: IT


iWi





THEAPOTLEPAL'SREPOO
"IMn fte lowihue uiu rsbruh hi ok oehr n undte
befreallme."






THE ALPHABET.


r l '
1,


LI


Goliath


"I'll meet


But David


said to great


King


Saul,


your troops alone."


took his trusty sling


And slew him with a stone.













































































DAVID THROWING THE STONE


~-;~

1,
~-~ ~---;~5~
ss


~s~ ~ed~Ba~Yl~g~R~d~



~--- --~
i~k~H~Y~ y,





THE ALPHABET.


FJ














Herod was a wicked king
Who told his soldier's bold,
That Christ must die and they must kill
All baby boys not two years old.

















































SLAYING OF THE INNOCENTS






THE ALPHABET.


/ /I \/

Isaac was on the altar placed,
Abraham's love of God to test,
When an angel came from heaven above


free, his father blest.


ITsaac


M~ade











1VAl








-gI a



(7~



I.


ABRAHAM AND ISAAC






THE ALPHABET.
I/, N, -



--------










/4 -


-n JOSEPH.

Joseph to some merchantmen

Was by his brothers sold;

They dipped his coat in blood of goat

And there a lie they told.















































JOSEPH'S DREAM





I- THE ALPHABET


{EZJAH.1


Keziah


was a lovely


maid,


Fairest


of all to see


In all the land both far and


of Job' was she.


near;


Da-u'ghter
















~--I





;'~

I ,






L __ I I'


FOUR MISFORTUNES CAME TO JOB IN ONE DAY


a.- '


Jrr l


'i
I
:C
r
I:
C3.
'I'





il-e


: ~ ~i






















Lot's wife from Sodom driven out,
Her God she disobeyed;
She looked back once upon her home
And into salt was made.



















































THE DESTRUCTION OF SODOM





THE ALPHABET.


Moses in the, rushes hidden
And found there by a maid,
Wrote ten great laws on slabs of stone,
That God might be obeyed.

















































I-







- .;


MOSES STRIKING THE ROCK


~~~ -'---------- -----~-~-- -- ~ -- 1_-


i i ~j
i


t~-~4~
S,





THE ALPHABET.


j-- -- -- -'- '"- 5 -
... L NOAH-.

Noah built an ark of wood, --:
And when the waters came,
Kept safe all creatures God had made


Until the flood had gone.
















































RETURN OF THE DOVE





THE ALPHABET.




'-42
I At




SB E I E








OBEDIENCE.

Obedience, a word that God

Would have his children guard;

In life it makes, our pathway bright,

In death it brings reward.










































*1W-'l
: .


'1- ,


" .... I '



J: 4-
,pt,. ""
,, ,
a .,,


THE ASCENSION


d



1)





THE ALPHABET.


Peter


lay bound


in prison


"ERise up and follow


me,"


An angel from the Lord did cry,
"Come forth! I'll set you free."


3











































































































































































PLOWING IN EASTERN LANDS


LIl I
~__
_~ __
_ ~__~_~
_i_
__ _^__ __~_ ~~ _
- -- ---
=--~ ------- ---
____
-------~------------ -~-------- --:
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----- ---
----- ------- ------ r--



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---- --- --
~-- ~------- -- ------ I
-- --;-r
--.------~-~---- 1;;-~-~-
-- ;-; ~
-------;------
-- i ="~"~'
-
--- ---

--=-. ~_,,--;;-~-~~;~=,;_~---~-,=~--=-~-----






T _HE ALPHABET. HETAPIaBE I
-CND


-s
____ --~L
-* ,- .,7 _.___J --

NTOFSHfEB'
"- _--


Queen of Sheba from


afar,


To question Solomon

For he was called the


came,

wisest


And had the greatest fame.


111


UOTCJ;i;~


~s~ III--



























I I QI


iTE
















THE .TRUE MOTHER










//I).,


10 I.I


- f//,


Ruth,


sweRUTH.et

sweet maid in Moab


And gleaned


the fields of


wheat.


Blessed


was she by


While kneelin


Boaz


rich


,, ,


~~
`'~``'``~-

ei : -.-..


feet.


at ~his





















































RUTH AND NAOMI




THE ALPHABET.


MSON. ---


Samson was the strongest


man,


The lion


fierce


he fought;


He tore the mighty pillars


And


\ A\


loose,


C- S A



















































THE FALL OF THE TEMPLE





THE ALPHABET.


bted te pMAS.

doubted the power


r of Christ,


His love could not perceive;


But Jesus


spoke


of faith in God,'


And Thomas


Thomas


dc3id. believe,








~~-. -~1~~-~-~--- ~ -. -~- ~ ----= '''~-~ I~.





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lit"
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L'"u V1,1001 Jill








I ,,.
""fill


ai
I


THE EVER FAITHFUL


CHRIST


I






THE ALPHABET.


///L
, /


URIAH.'

was a soldier bold,


war was


very brave;.


To serve his

His life he


king


inl


freely


ga


war for right

wve.


I///


1f]


N-'`


,-
~ 6
'7
/
~IA /
//
P ~-~-
iI~


In













































DEATH OF URIAH


v7- -'Ikl-






THE ALPHABET.


hY~4


>'~ \\~


i1


1ARI .,
/ i] -
/
Ki


in a manger low,


birth to Christ the


King;


"Peace


on earth, good will to men,"


The angels loud did


VIRGI


The Virgin


Gave


^J
fc-".^


'


sing.

























































I i


MARY, THE MOTHER OF CHRIST






THE ALPHABET.


x
k,~A


TV


NANDE,


Wanderer and prodigal:


Who far
His father


away


did


did roam;


a feast


prepare


he at last came home.


W~hen

























i9i~


TH!lrllImIIITU N OF Ti PRODIGAl
THE RETURN OF THE PRODIGAL


AJi* I c 111 I I~ L-- I~(~ '

























'Xodus tells the story


As


Syou


can plainly


well,


see,


How God did lead the Israelites


All safely through the


sea.














































THE CHILDREN OF ISRAEL CROSSING THE RED SEA





THE ALPHABET.


_- q --_


YOUNG CHILDREN.


Young


children dear, to whom Christ


"Suffer them all to cc
Of such the kingdom


)me, [said,
of heaven is,"


Let will of God be done.



















~:'~

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.~.~ .
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'' ''





Ii L


4.~


>?K
f< *





THE ALPHABET.


VI


ZACC


U //
HQ lL


Zaccheus
Obeyed


waited


his every


on the Lord,


call;


ye like him,


my


readers


dear,


one and all.


Be


~And Christ


love




ABCDEFG
HIJKLMN
OPQRSTU
VWXYZ&
abcdefghi
jklmnopqr
stuvwxyz
12 3 4 5 6-7 8 910


































'I.


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JESUS PREACHING TO THE MULTITUDE


I
''
I
.iwj/i I' '''9i;
ii


i '!


---- ~I~






A FARMER'S BOY.





















\What w ill ''Fu d. my, li-ti, mian,
\\ V n \ ''LI ar- tall an!d t n '-
S --rt with a lau*' h. I mran
T .:li. i ,hI, ploi-
SL1-'' .11 .




It muLI.t -be in to I he pir t c
An\ \ x''ar a 'l iit' s.m':;k-frtrck, .
A nd' '.i-t ','" i' r in th fid ,
And ri.-.e at lour o'clock.

r Besi'sL-,; ti h1,unt l fo'r nm. -

S- l~s just what I'd p nil ;'
To be a lam.r ?" .
,
T ,, ,:ri. _- t e l;h:,

'1






































Ai-


c~
m~


,I;~ 3 s = PI
- __
.~ P?
~r


LITTLE BIRDIES ALWAYS SING

AMONG THE BLOSSOMS EVERY SPRING,


, i1 '


'

:'C


-----~-~
-rs


110 tell~B






KIND DEEDS.


Yes thought An-
na, it is more bless-
ed to give than to
receive. This bou-
quet will make
ip Johnnie so happy.
All children are
fond of flowers, as
"" well as grown peo-
:'-: ple. Flowers are
beautiful.
Poor,.sick little fellow,
I hope he will soon be well









I .I' --:.
T.. 1.


4.1~'.
'~-j
b.; 2A rn"'l~

























Poor littk baby-\' sister


1 eFor \-hile I I)'s fl ,ir cIi

YOLi's o1\ jIust tu nlc( "l
two.
Now stand up on your
tip-toes,
And don't you let it fall,
I'll give you some of my dessert
Although you are so small.


II I i; I1I


















I r'l


/:11


THIS IS HOW THEY USED TO WEIGH
LITTLE FOLKS IN GRANDPA'S DAY.





HASTE IS WASTE.-TWO DUNCES.

HASTE IS WASTE.
Live and learn;
Do not burn
Your fingers in the fire.
Do not run,
Just for fun,
Your little legs to tire.
Learn to talk,
Learn to walk,
But do not be in haste;.
Stub your toes,
Hurt your nose,
And learn that haste is waste.

TWO DUNCES.
Little Mildred Rosa Lee
-- Couldn't learn her A, B, C;
While her brother was as bad,
For he couldn't learn to add
SStrange such dunces there
should be
--s young Miss and Master
- ---3- -Lee!








--or~in- r ivoF77- 71 q __ _---, -



a; 1. 11




T

-lj I i;ii


I'M A FIRST-RATE FAIRY, "GOOD-HUMOR" IS MY NAME.





MARY HAD A LITTLE FROG.


Mary had a little lamb-O, no
That in its babyhood had been


it was a frog,
a little pollywog.


When Mary heard his little bleat-I mean she heard
his croak, (cloak."
She said, "I'll make this pretty frog a pretty little
When in the cloak she saw him frisk-I mean she saw


him swim,
Then Mary laughed
were dim.


until with tears her pretty eyes


So long we've sung that little lamb, with fleece so
snowy white, (sight.
That when I'd praise a little frog, that lamb skips into
-LITTLE MEN AN)D WOMEN.










4 ,


". j


SII J.


21


-~
"WHAT'S IN THE BOTTLE? MILK, YOU SAY?
THEN YOU SHALL HAVE IT ALL, TO-DAY."


I?







WORKING FOR
DOLLY.
Si' 1' Yes, I am working,
'i working for Dolly,
1t, i Just as mamma is
P otT working for me;
i< # TO ^ I must sew neatly, very
... \> r -#-- small stitches,
So that her clothes may be pretty to see!
What would you do, dear, if you had no one
To dress you or keep you fit to be seen ?
What should I do if I had no mother
To wash me, and dress me, and keep me clean?



























4,


COME DEAR BOYS, COME TO PLAY,
I HAVE A DOG, A GOOD DOG, TRAY























ANCING I Prancing!
Up and down!
Here we are at Baby Town.
What a racket! What a noise
Laughing girls and shouting boys.
I don't think I will go in
While they're making such a din;
Yes, I'll venture just a minute;
One step more, and I am in it!


LL at once how still they are-
S 0 Then: "Here's AuntieI Hip! Hurrah
Oh, we are so glad you're come I
Willie's got a brand new drum;
Katie has a lovely doll;
And dear Nell a screeching Poll!









OB has got a rocking horse-
So he bought a whip, of course;
Charlie has a box of bricks,
Harry too, some conjuring tricks;
And dear Baby has a rattle;
Did you know that she could prattle?
Oh, she is the sweetest dearly Auntie, draw your chair quite
near."
Little hands hold me so fast, I'm obliged to say at last,
"Yes, my darling little one, I will. stay and share your fun;"
For I cannot get away from the spell, of mirth and play
And I'm fairly settled down
In the midst of Baby Town.




IRST on horseback I must ride,
Bold Bob standing by my side;
In the yacht I try to get,
Just to please my little pet.
Then I can with Dolly play,
And pretend she's Baby "May."
I can make Poor Polly screech,
And the use of bricks can teach.
And on Willie's painted drum, now I beat a fine tum-tum.
I can shake the pretty rattle, and can hear dear Baby prattle.
I can join in games of play till obliged to go away,
All the better for the noise
Of the darling girls and boys.





LITTLE PEOPLE.


A dreary place would be this earth
Were there no little people in it.
The song of life would lose its mirth
Were there no children to begin it.


Life's song indeed would lose its charm
Were there no babies to begin it,
A doleful place this world would be
Were there no little people in it.



























Z~=r..
--,,:. ,. _

















_______=__





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i''

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.1 WATS.TOG T
"IWNSTOG O.






ROY'S HORSES.
When Roy was a little boy he
had many fine horses. I will tell
you about them. His first horse
was nurse's knee. It was a hard
horse to ride, for it could only trot.
SI) Roy was very small when he rode
this horse, so small that he could
not hold his head up. When the
horse would trot, Roy's head would roll round as
though it would drop off; and nurse would sing as
loud as she could:
"Trot away to Boston,
Trot away to Lynn,
Trot away to Boston,
Trot home again."
Roy's next horse was a very
gay one. This was his father's
foot. O, what fine rides Roy
had on. this horse! His father
held his hands so that he
could not fall off.
His next horse was a pretty
tin one. It was a red horse
with a blue mane and tail. He
held his head high, and was







a fine horse to look at, but Roy could
not ride him. He could only lead
him about with a string, so he was
soon tired of him. But Roy had a
great deal of sport with his four-horse
team. He could sit in the arm-chair,
that was the coach, and crack
his whip and make a great deal




of noise. To be sure, the horses were only four chairs,
but Roy held the lines in his hand and said, "Get
up, Charley! Gee! Whoa!" and had
great fun.
Next came the rocking-horse. Ah!
S then Roy was happy! This was a dark
.'_ bay horse,-white mane and
tail made out of real
horse- hair,
called Dick.
# He never
got tired of
Dick till he
had a live
horse.






iS y THE TWINS.
Do you know our Peter and Polly,
So pretty, so plump and so jolly?
i One with merry blue eyes and lips
... like a cherry,
And one with dark hair, and cheeks
brown as a berry?
^----..--" Then this is our Peter and Polly!
Do you know our
Polly and Peter?
One a little and one
a great eater;
One with Jews-
harp and whistle L
and hammer
Just making a
houseful of clamor;
A nd one with the dollies and stories
And lapful of blue morning-glories?
Then this is our Polly and Peter!



























-~i"~$
'"
..
,,

"~


*I -,


If life were only wishes,
How happy we would be.


V"


~' ''






THE WONDERFUL HOUSE THAT
JACK DREW!

This is the house that
Jack drew
On the back of his old
brown slate; -
This is the house that
Jack drew
When the Master
chanced to be late. \
A short stroke here, a
long one there,
'Tis easy as one, two,
three;


"If folk don't know how a house
should go"
Cried J ack, "they may come to mel

Yes, this is the house that Jack
drew,
A strange little house, you'll say;
Feet, arms and eyes-'twould be
I no surprise,
If it jumped up and trotted away
Si






























Little Pearl went out to play;
She thought to have a jolly day.
An old black hen went out there too;
She seemed to say "Who are you?"





FOUR FUNNY FANS.


FOUR FUNNY FANS.


Four funny fans
Had Maud and May
To cool the air
. One summer day:

A palm-leaf broad,
A feather fan,
And one that came


From far Japan;


And for the fourth
May took her hat
And made a fine
Big fan of that.

And then so strong
A breeze had they,
They played it was
A winter day!








































4\\
^V1". -.


NELLIE AT COUSIN ANNA'S.


'' '.?<


~ ~,,,,
;r
;.

:, I~i:






DOLLY'S PRA YEARS.


DOLLY'S PRAYERS.

Dolly, Dolly, Nursie's here,
I must leave you: now, I fear,
Let me only brush your hair,
Kiss me then, and say your prayer.
Put your hands together, so,
Say the words in whispers low,
Pray that you may sleep always,
Safe and sound till break of day.
Pray that never goblin come
To frighten you with fi-fo-fum,
Never rat or bat or mouse
Come a-near your beddy-house.
Pray that when you wake again
I may never cause you pain,
Never beat you, never scold
When I find you getting old.
Pray that brother Alec too
W ill no't Lant tc: ply \ith you,
\Vill not :,prick \'.'u w th a pin
\W hln he t- ie- t,:, l,:I.k within.
I nmut la\e yoLI, Dolly dear,
Nurie'i :'S. t,-tting cross I fear.
T h. r. and now your prayer
," you've said,
~I. t 1 must really go to bed.
L)on't be frightened, dear,
.N j'b "": at all,
i- ." If you want me, Dolly;
t call;
., .. And I'll come to
.fi comfort you,
.' .--_ 1 Go to sleep' then,
: ` ~ ..Dolly, do!

















































.'I

)


DOLLY'S BEDTIME.







LITTLE MISS SONNET.
Prim little Miss Sonnet
Once ordered a bonnet;
The biggest and grandest that ever was seen.
And little Miss Sonnet
She said, "I will don it,"
For I am quite sure it is fit for the Queen."
Then little Miss Sonnet
She put on her bonnet,
And tied a true lover's knot under her chin;
And this wonderful bonnet
Had red roses on it,
With all of them fastened in place with a pin.
So little Miss Sonnet
Went out with her bonnet,
And strutted about for a while in the park;
When the wind took With little Miss Sonnet,
the bonnet And blew them both up
in the sky like a spark.


V
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fnujbt




ISa




















%'i;i


. I


W't


NOW, GIRLS," CALLED TOM FROM THE TALL APPLE TREE.
FOR GRANPA WE'LL SAVE THE NICEST WE SEE."


I


,





ME AND TODDLEKINS.
ODDLEKINS has had a birthday. She
was four years old-and there was a big
frosted cake with four pink candles 7n i
and four Live Things for presents besides.
First there was a round Thing with a
white face, that talked all the time. "Tick tick I tick'
tick!" it said, loud and quick. Then there was a 1 -o
that spun round and round so fast the Boofer Kittv i
couldn't catch it. Then there
was a square box, and when .
Toddlekins opened the cover
out popped a Man with big j
eyes. The Boofer Kitten was
a little bit afraid of that Live
Thing And then there was
a beautiful Yellow Bird in a
gold cage. But they hung
that up so high the Boofer
Kitten couldn't reach it with
the tip end of his paw.
When Toddlekins cut the cake, she gave Me a
big piece. The Boofer Kitten would like to have a.
birthday all his own,with Live Things and a Cake.-Bar-sw

































































A JOLLY LITTLE SAILOR, BUT HONEST AND TRUE.





LITTLE PETER PLUMCAKE'S


ADVENTURES.

What did little Peter do? And
why was his name Plumcake? Lit-
tle Peter tried to do everything that
came into his head; and he was
Called "Plumcake "-well, just because
he was as sweet as sugar and spice
Y- and all things nice.
NAUGHTY PETER PLUMCAKE. Well, one day this delicious child
sat down by a pail and drew off his little wool shoes
and laid them in the water and played with them.
When Mrs. Plumcake came in she
said, "Oh! naughty, naughty Peter
Plumcake!" She caught him up and
ran with him into another room and,
PETER'S LEATHER SHOE M*
put on his leather wOOL .HOES.
shoes. But as quick as she was
not looking, he toddled back to his
pail, and soon had his leather shoes
in the water, and his stockings too-
Vo 4Io FOR PETER. swish-splash-spatter-giggle-O wahe






fun There were no dry shoes this time. Mrs. Plum-
cake set the two damp rosy legs into Father Plum-
cake's tall boots. But at the very first step, down went
Peter on his nose, He kicked off the
Smother-shoes. He kicked off the sister.
shoes too. He said, "Pe-ty won't not "
IN A Row. So Mrs. Plumcake rolled him in a
blanket and laid him in his crib and said to him, "Go
to sleep till your shoes dry, naughty one!"
Peter lay still a minute and looked at the row of shoes
then he turned over and things began to happen. A Tag
Fairy came in. She sat down before him
and said, "Put your foot in my lap!"
He put his foot up, and the Tall Fairy
drew shoe after shoe out of her Magic
Pocket-and flung them all away. Love-
ly little knit socks, slippers of chamois with a. sw
embroidered flowers, trim little boots-she
flung them all aside. "Wet as sop," said
she. "You will have to wear boats." DREAM SHOE.
"Pe-ty won't not wear boats!" he screamed, and sat up
in his crib. There was his foot in his mother's warm hand,
and she was drawing on his soft, dry wool shoe. There
was no Tall Fairy, no Magic Pocket, no wooden shoes.
-BArB TrLA*7B








MOTHER'S BOYS.


They're rough and noisy, glad and gay,
As boys are apt to be;
They love to shout, and romp, and play
In wild and healthful glee.
But in their sports they never fail
To heed each light command,
For mother's "boys" are noble lads,
As any in the land.


I do not dread their future years,
For manly boys, you know,
Make manly men,, who dare to stand
And face a friend or foe.
And youths who chivalrously try
To win their mother's,praise
Are apt to win success as well,
And long and honored days.
































































OVER THE BROOK BRAVE JOHNNY WILL WADE
WITH NED ON HIS BACK-THEY'RE NOT AFRAID.





RHYMES.


[In the following, the various parts of the countenance are touched as the lines are repeated;
and at the close the chin is struck playfully, that the tongue may be gently bitten.]
Eye winker,
Tom Tinker,
Nose dropper.
Mouth eater,
Chinchopper,
Chinchopper.
[Game on a child's features.]


Here sits the Lord Mayor
Here sits his two men
Here sits the cock
Here sits the hen
Here sits the little chickens
Here they run in
Chinchopper, chinchopper,
Chinchopper, chin!


S forehead.
. eyes.
right cheek.
left cheek.
top of nose.
.* mouth.

. chuck the chin.


Solomon Grundy,
Born on a Monday,
Christened on Tuesday,
Married on Wednesday,
Took ill on Thursday,
Worse on Friday,
Died on Saturday,
Buried on Sunday-
This is the end of
Solomon Grundy.


















































I. .































THESE LOVELY DOGS ARE SNIP AND SNAP,

ONE BLACK ONE BROWN AND BOTH CATCH RATS





GALLANTRY.

GALLANTRY.
Once there was a little lad,
I? Long ago, long ago,
He had a copper cent to spare,
t You must know, you must know.

SThis little lad, to tell the truth,
SWas a most open-handed youth,
And when he at the store did meet
-LL. A little lass with face so sweet,

Not long and idly did he stand,
But in his pocket dipped his hand,
And to the lass he said, said he,
I'll buy the treat for you and me."

Then said the lass, If that be true,
I'll take some pep'mints, thanks to you," /---
Then hastened in the lad to try, ,'-
How much his copper cent would buy. i,

Came out again with smiling air,
The snowy peppermints to share.
His copper cent was gone, but then,
The happiest he of little men.
-JINGLES AND JOYS.



























































ir


BABY, AND JOHNNY AND NELLIE SO WISE,

ARE HAVING SUCH FUN MAKING MUD PIES.


--
~L~~-=














In Italy they teach Baby to walk in a funny way.
They put Baby in a little cage. He cannot sit down in it.
So he soon learns to stand on his feet. There are small
wheels all about the bottom of the cage. Baby soon learns
to push, and then, away he rolls! Trot, trot go the
little feet!






























MM



1)'

K ........


WHEN I GROW UP.






yNNr'S ERRAND.


JENNY'S ERRAND.

Now high, now low, now fast, now slow,
Come down the flakes of the pure white snow;
Over the trees and fields they go,
While the frosty winds are blowing.
And there goes dear little Mary Jane-
Her big umbrella you see quite plain-
Toddling along the old farm-house lane.
Where, think you, Jenny is going?

You can not guess; so I'11 tell you where:
There lives a woman, bent down with care,
Dim are her eyes, and grey is her hair,
And to her is wee Jenny going,
With a nice gift this cold, bleak day.
She loves the woman whose hair is grey,
And there she goes with her good dog Tray,
Although it be blowing and snowing.


























It;


1r' 'B


i -i 'I.

.i 1 .,i .

,, _- ;, '" ... : .


..... + ...:...+ -........,.. ............ : ,+...- : . _- =


Is ui unlinY iuIIIIIIIU iiiii IIIIUiiiiniiimii III ll uouII UII .iiilmiituaui miuii nnuiiuimmlm m
IN THE PURE WHITE SNOW WHICH GLISTENS,
LITTLE MAY STANDS STILL AND LISTENS.


/, .1,
11,1 CCII'..


~"
~"' ;








KITTY'S FRIENDS.


Ellie Willie and Baby .
tave a kitten. It is their
very own, they say. All day
long they play with their
kitten in all sorts of ways.
Sometimes Will has her for a circus cat; then
kitty must jump over a stick, chase a toy mouse, and
show off all her tricks. Next, Ell,ie will take her
turn, and rig kitty out in her doll's clothes, and put
her to sleep in the doll's bed, with the doll. She is very
careful not to put the kitty on
the doll, but very often she lies
on the doll, and crushes her nice
clothes all up. How would you Ll V., U..-
like to ha\e your ;~ ,'. ,, :' i
little dolly_ treat- .. .,1.,
ed so? They all .. ""i'
loved k.:itty -very
much.:
... ~0. -. . .-.. o..


I- . .- -.. ._
--I--*IU_Y-;y ,, S_I~_._ l~




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