• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Jack and the beanstalk
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: true story of Jack and the beanstalk
Title: The true story of Jack and the beanstalk
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088951/00001
 Material Information
Title: The true story of Jack and the beanstalk
Alternate Title: Jack and the beanstalk
Physical Description: 48 p. : ill.(some col.) ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Sturgess, Arthur
Collins, Arthur, 1863-1932 ( Author )
Billinghurst, Percy J ( Illustrator )
Langfier, Ltd ( Publisher )
Harrison & Sons ( Printer )
Drury Lane Theatre
Publisher: Langfier, Ltd.
Place of Publication: London ;
Glasgow
Manufacturer: Harrison and Sons
Publication Date: 1899
 Subjects
Subject: Giants -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Mothers and sons -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Circus -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Widows -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Books printed as advertisements -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Folk tales -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Fantasy literature -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1899
Genre: Books printed as advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Folk tales   ( rbgenr )
Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Glasgow
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Arthur Sturgess and Arthur Collins ; illustrated by P.J. Billinghurst.
General Note: On cover: A gift from Drury Lane Theatre; Christmas 1899.
General Note: Pictorial cover, printed in red, green and black.
General Note: Title page printed in colors.
General Note: Date of publication from cover.
General Note: Advertisements precede and follow text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088951
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002250756
notis - ALK2509
oclc - 41166405

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
        Advertising 3
        Advertising 4
        Advertising 5
        Advertising 6
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Jack and the beanstalk
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Advertising
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Back Cover
        Page 49
        Page 50
Full Text

A' GIFT'FRO
DRURY'LANE
THEATRE




CHRISTMAS
18??.




Mary, or Hilda, or whatever
your name may be, you can't
read the following Advt.



If your little baby brother or

sister is not growing nicely, ask
Mamma to change her food tc

Cow's Milk, diluted with Barley
Water made from




Telegraphic Address, Telephone No.
DRURIOLANUS, LONDON." 2589 GERRARD.

Cbeatre 1RoaIl, tcurp lane,
MANAGING DIRECTOR, ARTHUR COLLINS. LTD.,


The Children's Grand Pantomime


"lt h and the 'leanstalk."

NOTE TO OUR READERS.-Al who have enjoyed
reading about the adventures of 'Jack and the Beanstalk'
and want to be in time to see the Pantomime, should ask
their Father and Mother to book what seats they require
as soon as possible, as all the little boys and girls in and
out of London want to see this Pantomime, and there
won't be room for everybody.
Opening night December 26th, 1899, and twice
daily. Box Office open all day from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Prices as follows:-
Ss. a.
First Circle, First three Rows ... o 5 o
,, Other Rows ... ... o 4 o
Grand Circle, First Three Rows ... o 7 o
Other Rows ... ... o 6 o
Orchestra Stalls ... ...... o io 6
Private Boxes to hold s. d. s. d. .. d.
2 Persons o 16 o
Ditto 4 Persons I 1 0 2 2 0 212 6
Ditto 6 Persons 2 12 6
Ditto 8 Persons 4 4 o to7 7 o


BUSINESS MANAGER


SIDNEY SMITH






j Ol OfS -please read.



BABIES cannot digest milk
unless diluted with Barley


Water made from


"The best food for babies is Robinson's
Patent Barley and Milk."
Dr. PYE H. CHAVASSE,
"Advice to a Mother."
"Infants fed on Robinson's Patent Barley
and Milk thrive and flourish."
Dr. ANDREW WILSON, F.R.S.E.
3


. .







ARTISTES__

performing in the Children's Pantomime


"JACK AND THE BEANSTALK"

to be produced at

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY LANE,

Boxing Night, 1899.


Dan Leno.
Herbert Campbell.
Jonnnie Danvers,
Queen and, Le Brun.
H. A Lonsdel.l
George Lake-Grange.
Whimsical Walker,


Nellie Stewart.
Mabel Nelson.
Rita Presano.
Birdie Sutherland,
Mollie Lowell.
Grigolatis
Aerial Troupe.




ADVICE TO MOTHERb.


Don't accept

cheap substitutes
for .


They are not "just as good"
but introduced to'secure
extra profit at the .
expense of the purchaser.
5





GRUEL IS NICE
IF MADE WITH MILK FROM


THE FINEST
FLOUR OF THE OAT
IN THE WORLD.

A Perfect food for-
)evicate VAUren,


inua.s, and t JAd.
6


--------


'uKsing


Xjothers,







h-


JACK WAS ALWAYS VERY POLITE,
EVEN TO GIANTS.


'-y
II















BY
ARTHUR'STURGESS
AND
ARTIIUR'COLLINS
ILLUSTRATED'BY
P.J.BILLINGHURST
lRlll aill








JACK
) AND-THE \
SBEANSTALK



T HIS is the full, true and par-
ticular account of the life of Jack
-we allude to the Beanstalk
Person. Of course, as you are aware,
there were many Jacks in those days,
packs and packs of them. John the
Giant Killer, John Sprat-(you, of course,
remember his antipathy to fat)-John
Horner (so christened because his name
rhymes to "corner"), John, the Moun-
taineering Adventurer, who went up a
hill with a lady named Jill, and many,






8 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.

many others, but this particular Jack was
probably the most deserving of them all.
That is why we tell you his life-at any


DAME TROT FACED THE WORLD
WITH A PLACID SMILE.

rate up to the time when he married the
Princess. After that event, he did nothing
worth mentioning, except wear a crown






JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


and listen to the National Anthem (which
must be very trying after some time).
Now, Jack was the son of a hard


SUCH:! A SWEET, PLAYFUL,
SPECKLED, BONY COW.


working, industrious, comical little
widow named Dame Trot. Dame Trot's






10 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


late husband, Mr. Jog Trot, was a milkman,
and had a nice big dairy with eggs in the
window, labelled "Fresh to-day." They
were really not fresh, but as they were
made of chalk nobody really minded.
Mr. Trot left this dairy to his wife, and
also bestowed upon her his loving family,
i.e. (i.e., although it looks clever, only
means, that is to say "), Jack
and Robert, called, for short, Bobbie.
With these possessions the good little
woman continued to face the world and to
owe the rent-with a placid smile. (Look
at the picture for the smile.)
Bobbie was an extraordinary youth-
so much so that he deserves a paragraph
all to himself. He was a great, big,
healthy-growing child, and so, so lazy!
He absolutely would not work, and it
was no good putting him in a corner,
because the corner would never fit him.
Besides which, he pretended to be




























































JACK MET THE PRINCESS,
AND FELL IN LOVE AT ONCE.


i --II






12 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.

delicate and complained of being ill
when he saw trouble on the carpet.
Of course, his poor, foolish little mother
petted him-the great, big silly! She
simply "spoilt" him. Fancy! sugar
sticks for breakfast! That's what Bobbie
had. But Bobbie, for all that, is not an
example to copy, for he did not marry any
princess like Jack did. No! All he did
was to make a few comic remarks
(which his fond little mother encouraged
him in) and live happy ever after-on
Jack! More shame to him!
So now, you know the family-wait a
bit, though! There was the Cow, of
course. Such a sweet, playful, speckled,
bony beast the Cow was. It was so
light-hearted that even while it was
being milked it would dance-of course,
the horn-pipe. We made that joke up
purposely, and we could go on in the
same humorous vein for some time, !but




JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


mH


UNFORTUNATELY, DAME TROT'S WELL-
PLANNED SCHEME WAS A FAILURE, AND SHE
RETURNED HOME POORER THAN EVER, HAVING
SPENT!HER FARE.






14 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


IT ALMOST MADE JACK CRY TO SELL THE
COW, BUT AS THE COW DIDN'T MIND MUCH,
HE PLUCKED UP COURAGE AND LED THE COW
TO MARKET.





JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


it might delay you. Cows, as a rule, only
dance the barn dance. (There's another!)
Jack really owned the Cow, and they
were very fond of one another.
You would have thought that Dame
Trot and her family were happy. Not
a bit of it. And why? Because the
business did not pay. Your own parents
will explain what this means. If not,
ask some neighbours. They are bound
to know-especially if they keep shops
at which your parents have a running
account. Dame Trot kept a shop, re-
member, but alas! very little money
came into the place. They were ex-
ceedingly needy-and the poor Cow got
thin.
Then the dear, delightful Dame had a
happy thought. You must understand
that across the English Channel there is
a place called France-where the insults
come from. France used to be called






16 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


Gaul-and it is all gall even now-even
in Paris, above all places, where English-


A DEMON IS A BAD-TEMPERED MAN
WHO NEVER GOES TO BED.


men spend so much money. But we must
not dwell on this. This sort of thing is






JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


called politics. Ask your father to explain
politics to you. He will enjoy the task we























THE DEMON AND THE FAIRY MEET
AND RECITE POETRY.


are certain. What we want to tell you is
that in Paris they sometimes have an
B






18 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.

Exhibition. An exhibition is a sort of
toyshop of the World-where you can
show anything you like, and get prizes for
it. So Dame Trot thought to herself, I
will show my Cow and get a prize." This
shows the sort of brain-power she
exercised. Clever !! Rather!
Unfortunately, her well-planned scheme
was a failure. French jealousy conspired
against the Cow's success, and Dame Trot
returned home poorer than ever, having
spent her fare. (By the bye, Blossom,
was the Cow's name and frisky was her
nature. "Than which no more volatile
beast, though a trifle bony," as someone
might have said years ago.)
Whatever did she do then ? Ah, it was
a terrible time for her, poor thing, but she
had one hope. While in the gay city
(mem., Paris is always known as the gay
city) she met a King, who instantly fell in
love with her, as she was rich (the wicked


















































THE KING OPENS THE MARKET
WITH A PROCLAMATION.






20 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


woman told him she was rich, but of
course she wasn't), and promised to marry
her and give her half a crown (half his
crown you know). So the Dame said,
sotto voce (ask someone what this means),
"If the King marries me I shall be rich."
So she waited and waited and waited.
Poor dear!
But (malheureusemeni!), it was not the
real King she had met-but his servant;
and when the Dame heard this she was
annoyed, yes! annoyed!!
A King, you see, is well worth having
as a husband. He is always rich and
always has a brass band with him-so
he never has to go to a Music Hall for
harmony-which saves money and time.
What is a Music Hall? Ah !-
So when Jack heard of his poor
mother's disappointment he came to the
rescue and said: "Mother, we must sell


















































THE DEMON BOUGHT THE COW
WITH MAGIC MONEY.






22 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


the Cow. It will break my heart, but
there is no other way out of the difficulty."
And everybody who was near shouted
Hooray! and danced! Just a little
movement, you know.
Now, Jack was very fond of the Cow and
it nearly made him cry to do such a rash
act; but as the Cow did not mind much,
Jack plucked up courage and led the
Cow to market.
Here we come to a very sad story. Do
you know what a Demon is ? It's a sort
of nasty, bad-tempered man who never
wants to go to bed, and who quarrels with
everybody. There was a Demon who
watched Jack, and (simply out of sheer
contrariness) decided to do him a bad
turn, notwithstanding the fact that a
Fairy was guarding Jack all the time.
The Demon and the Fairy used to meet
daily and recite poetry to each other-all
about Jack. (Very pretty too-but hardly






JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


suitable for critics. Critics say "Give us
Shakespeare! Silly!")




















DAME TROT MET THE REAL KING
WHO BOUGHT HER SUCH NICE THINGS.

Jack arrived safely at the market and
put the Cow up for sale, and (of all people
in the world) the Demon bought it. Very







14 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


THE DAME SAID "HOLD YOUR TONGUE" IN
QUITE A SHARP TONE OF VOICE, AND THREW
THE BEANS OUT OF THE WINDOW. BUT THEY
WERE MAGIC BEANS AND GREW AND GREW







JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


TILL THE BRANCHES SWARMED OVER THE
VILLAGE,, SMOTHERED THE PUMP, AND THE
PLACE LOOKED LIKE EPPING FOREST, ONLY ALL
BEANS.


___





26 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


kind of him? Ah! there you see the
artfulness of the Demon. We will explain
in a moment. Don't be in a hurry!
The real King of the country (a very
pleasant person indeed, and highly recom-
mended) had a daughter-a Princess of
exceeding beauty and with a nice voice.
This Princess while walking over the
meadows, picking daisies, found Jack
working among the hay. So she fell in
love with him. She would!
He, of course, fell in love with her,
although he did know she was a real
live Princess.
So, poor Jack took the money for the
Cow from the wicked Demon and bought
some flowers for the Princess, and made
a pretty speech to her while handing the
bouquet. But alas! the Demon's money
was magic money, and it all turned to
beans! You can imagine how cross the


















































JACK CLIMBS THE BEANSTALK,
AND FINDS HIMSELF IN GIANT LAND.





28 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.

flower-girls got on finding the money turn
into beans. In fact, poor Jack would
have been badly scratched, only the
Princess saved him by saying what her
real rank was. As to the Demon, well! !
there!! scandalous is the word for him!
But, he was just as bad last year.
In the meantime Jack's mother (Dame
Trot) had met the real King (not the
servant whom she had met in Paris), and
he was so attentive and so polite, buying
her this and ordering her that, that the
good woman was quite pleased and
invited him to a little feast on her roof.
(For the sake of fresh air.) But she was
very anxious about Jack and the Cow,
all the same. Wouldn't you be if you
were selling your only Cow.
We would rather (if you don't mind),
draw a curtain on the harrowing scene
that ensued when Jack arrived with a
wretched bag of beans. His mother






JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


(poor woman!) stormed at him and
called him such bad names for his
foolishness. It was in vain he explained
it was not his fault. The Dame angrily
said: "Hold your tongue," in quite a
sharp tone of voice, and threw the beans
out of the window. Then they all went
to bed (and the best thing, too, in our
opinion! What IS the good of
quarrelling ? ).
Now, this is the worst trick we have
ever heard of. What do you think hap-
pened? Why, that artful Demon had
really bought the Cow with magic beans.
And these beans grew and grew in the
night-till the branches swarmed over the
village, blotted out the sky, choked up the
houses, smothered the pump, and the place
looked for all the world like Epping Forest
-only all beans. Nobody knew what on
earth to do-so they all lived on the roofs.
A pretty state of things, too, considering.






33 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.

And this was all through a cross-patch
Demon! Demons ought to be suppressed
by Parliament.
Then the Demon came to Jack and lured
him on to climb the beanstalk. Jack had
nothing else to do-except make love-
so he kissed the poor Princess good-bye
and started up the stalk.
But-you say-why climb beanstalks ?
Because the Demon told him he could
make his fortune if he did so! Naturally,
being in a nice sweet Pantomime, Jack
did not suspect anything wrong, so he
at once consented. Besides, he loved
climbing-like the other Jack who went
up hills and cracked crowns, et cetera.
(Et cetera means-Oh, well, never mind!)
As a matter of fact the Demon was
really up to his tricks again-for where
do you suppose the beanstalk led to?
Why, Giant-land! Yes, really !!


























































JACK SEIZED THE GOLDEN HEN
AND ESCAPED DOWN THE BEANSTALK.


__U___________L______






32 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


Giant-land 's a strange place, but we
cannot quite understand how it can exist
on a beanstalk. Did the beanstalk balance
the land on its top-or does Giant-land
rest on some cloud-or some star-or how
is it arranged? We confess we do not
know. It seems very suspicious-like
to us. Anyhow, it must be there-because
this story proves it.
Up in this land lived the Giants-a
hungry, overgrown, clumsy lot of people,
with nasty beards and smelly pipes-and
every man was taller than our chimney
pots. If we could only have them here on
Earth, they would eat all our food (yes, all
the lot), in about seven days-six hours-
three minutes-we calculate-(this calcu-
lation is done through Schooling).
Mind you, we have been to Giant-land
ourselves; but there the Giants walk
about on stilts-not like real proper
Giants such as those who will be at Drury





JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


Lane Theatre, where Jack will be at
Christmas time.

When Jack got to Giant-land he was
fearfully frightened until he met the Good
Fairy, who cheered him up considerably,
by giving him a Sword to fight with. The
Fairy also told him that the Giant was the
man who had eaten up Jack's father long
ago and was a very rich, wealthy Giant.
It appears that he possessed a golden
hen who laid golden eggs all day long.
Whenever the Giant said Lay" the hen
obliged with a golden egg, so that in time
the wealth accumulated. Why lay golden
eggs? 'How do we know! The Giant's
name was Kruger (pronounced however
you like. It doesn't matter !-ED.).

Further, the Fairy said, the Giant Kruger
had a golden harp, let alone gold mines and
diamonds-and he had captured some of
the British Army and held them prisoners.






34 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


THEY ALL ACTED
AS COOKS.

Jack bravely determined to set them
free and prepared to set out for the Castle.






JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


AT A FAVOURABLE MOMENT
JACK SEIZED THE HARP.
Just then he heard a voice and in came
the Princess. She had missed Jack's





36 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.

society-and besides, she felt a little
curious, as girls will-and she, too, had
climbed the beanstalk-skirts and all!
So, after a very happy meeting and a
love duet to keep their courage up, they
set forth to interview the Giant. Plucky !
You're right.
Now, the Giant was a nasty, old person
who always wore a pipe (which made the
sweet, clean Princess cough, naturally)
and was a most provoking party. You
wait till you see his dinner table, with
the Giant eating up all there is in the
place! You wait till you see him on his
back after Jack has cut down the Bean-
stalk! Ah it is a most thrilling event
in the History of our Empire (cheers).
Well, Jack was successful in his first
attempt. The Giant was a horrid creature,
but Jack did not mind that. While the
Princess was talking to the Giant (artful
thing ) Jack seized the golden hen and







JACK AND THE BEANSTALK. 37


WHAT FUNNY POULTRY
THEY HAVE IN GIANT-LAND.

escaped down the beanstalk, meaning to
return in half-a-minute for the golden






38 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


harp. And what is more, Jack intended
to bring back with him the whole of the
family and their friends-because it
would save time moving the Giant's
valuables. As the Giant wanted some
more cooks this was an easy s-u-b-t-e-r-
f-u-g-e-(this is a hard word).

By-the-by, have you read "Jack the
Giant Killer" ? Splendid story-but not
so true as this one. Nobody could kill so
many as all that! Our Jack killed one
Giant-a Boer who had made a mistake-
hence his name Giant Blunder Boer.

Now, whether Jack was right in helping
himself to the Giant's property, we really
cannot say. We should not like to do it
ourselves, because it might be thought
to be stealing. But, mind you, children,
the Giant had made himself very
offensive all round with his ultimatums-
and ill-treating his English cooks-so






JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


that after all, perhaps, we can afford to
overlook Jack's action.

Unluckily, Jack's theft of the golden
hen was discovered and there was a
pretty nice commotion among the Giants,
we can tell you. They ran about and
tore their hair (what they had, of course),
and said rude things behind Jack's back
(cowards!), but nobody thought of climbing
down the stalk. We suppose they did not
know it was there. At any rate, they were
very cross with the Princess, and perched
her on the Giant's dinner table, as a
prisoner. Didn't she cry, too!

But Jack came back with the King,
his servant, Little Bobbie, and his mother,
Dame Trot-and they all acted as cooks,
until at a favourable moment Jack seized
the harp, the others seized the money-
bags, and the Princess seized the oppor-
tunity to escape.


















































DOWN FELL THE GIANT


WITH A CRASH.





42 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.


Just as Jack touched the Golden Harp,
it cried, "Master, Master!" which woke
the Giant up and sounded the alarm.
Off went Jack, Princess, and everybody,
with the Giants after them. It was an
exciting chase, and might have ended
badly for the brave Jack had not the
sword been in his hand. With one blow
he cut the beanstalk through, and down
came the Giant to earth with a crash-
poor old chap!
Then, of course, Jack was knighted,
married the Princess, sang patriotic songs,
and lived happy ever after. But not until
he had released the English Army from
the thraldom of the Giant Kruger. After
this, Jack's life is a trifle hazy.
Now, children, this is the finish.
There are no more facts to explain until
next year; but if you take our advice
-(unbiased, mind!)-you will insist upon
seeing exactly how all this is done on the




























































JACK\ MARRIES THE PRINCESS,
AND IS HAPPY EVER AFTER.


_1I1__I______X_________s~_-~I~





44 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.

stage at Drury Lane. Jack himself is
nice, but the Giant all over the ground-
well, you haven't the slightest idea what
he does look like. The only thing is to
cry (only don't get smacked) until your
loving parents buy you a nice comfortable
seat for the pantomime of
"JACK AND THE BEANSTALK."
BY
YOURS VERY SINCERELY,
ARTHUR STURGESS
AND
ARTHUR COLLINS.


Designed for Mr. Arthur Collins by Rudolph B. Birnbaum.
Published by Langfier, Ltd., London and Glasgow.
Printed by Harrison & Sons, London.




I wish,
would let
a basin of


Mother, you
me make you
Gruel from


You would find so
much benefit from it.

It is so o *,
Soothing and Nourishing.




Dear Little Children


Will you show this

Advt. to Mamma ?


was probably used by your

great, great, great grand=

mother.


* D Double. 8 Super. F Fine.
"Double Superfine."
46




Baby's_-
Perfect Food.







When made into Barley Water
acts as a digestive to Cows
Milk, to which it must be
added to form a Perfect Food
for Babies.




ARLEY, Barley Water,
A Sprinkle in the pan,
Rise Jim, rise Jim,
There's a nice young man.
Baby, darling, wants her food,
Then indeed she will be good,
Mind she has the Barley Milk,
Made by Robinson of this ilk,

Barley Water made from


IS TI-IE
Best Digesti-ve of Pilk,
KEEN, ROBINSON & Co., LTD., LONDON.
S 48




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