The Baldwin primer

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Baldwin primer
Physical Description:
128 p. : ill. (some col.), music ; 20 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Scripture, May Kirk, 1864-
American Book Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
American Book Company
Place of Publication:
New York ;
Cincinnati ;
Chicago
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Readers (Primary)   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1899   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1899   ( lcsh )
Primers (Instructional books) -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Textbooks -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1899
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Primers (Instructional books)   ( rbgenr )
Textbooks   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Ohio -- Cincinnati
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by May Kirk.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002221771
notis - ALG2001
oclc - 01988252
lccn - 99005668
System ID:
UF00088946:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text














THE BALDWIN PRIMER


































































Painting by F. Morgan.


HERE WE GOI






THE


BALDWIN PRIMER



BY
MAY KIRK


NEW YORK .:. CINCINNATI .*: C0HICAGO
AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY











PREFACE


THE lessons in this book have been prepared in accordance with well-established
Principles of mental science and child study. In addition to the ideas common to most
primers I have adopted the principle of progressive expansion, whereby the more complex
notions of language, number, and form, are built up by successive steps from elementary
ideas. In teaching words the synthetical and analytical methods are followed simultane-
ously. The letters of the alphabet, as set tasks, are deeply impressed on the mind, while
at the same time the child learns to read by recognition of words as wholes; finally he
instinctively unites the results of both methods to a complete and detailed understanding
of the words. Another recognized principle is that of proceeding from the known to the
unknown; in a primer the most familiar objects should form the basis of the lessons.
The script alphabet is as important as the usual Roman alphabet. The child should
learn to read both from the start. Do not begin the writing lessons too soon; they should
be preceded by a considerable amount of free-arm movement at the blackboard or with
the brush. The first lessons in writing must be on a large scale, with movements free
from the shoulder; a brush dipped in ink, a piece of chalk on the blackboard, a good-
sized pencil and the like are the proper materials.
It is not yet sufficiently understood by teachers that the movements of writing cannot
be successfully learned until the child has gained control over his arms, hands, and fingers.
The stick laying, paper folding, modeling, and the songs have this end in view in addition
to the particular facts they are designed to teach.
The choice of familiar objects for the material of each reading lesson gives it a basis
in the child's personal interest. The use of classical pictures is designed to awaken and
develop the instinct for the beautiful.
In giving lessons let the teacher remember certain rules of hygiene. 1. Fresh air
is needed all the time. 2. Marching, running, or other exercises should break up the
strain of a long lesson. 3. The book should be placed in a good light. 4. The book
should be held by the teacher whenever' possible. 5. If placed in the child's hands, he
should hold it as far away from the eyes as possible. The reasons for these rules cannot
be given here ;.it is sufficient to state that they are firmly established on considerations of
common sense and the science of hygiene.
Thanks are due Milton Bradley of Springfield, Mass., for permission to use illustrations
for paper folding and clay modeling; also to Miss Luella Clark and Miss F. B. Gillespy of
the Teachers College, N.Y., for "A Mayday Story" and The Story of the Waves."
M. K.
NEW HAVEN, CONN.

COPYRIGHT, 1899, BY AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY.






















































,










Copyright, 1894, by Photographische Gesellachatt. Pamting by Arthur J. Eleley.
WAIT A MINUTE. (5)






apple
a#^A


ball
/-^


B


0


b


.cat


C


bat


COw


aA


C't


arm
ann-n^





arm


apple

a/z-1-


cow


an arm.


A bat


and


a


A cat and


a ball.


ozaz alh^L a Cazt


7


apple

Oyhyh


a cow.


bat


an


1/^y I


6?n


a, 6 -L.-


,zE


a,4-j






doll
dal


ear


foot
19-0-


a


e


f


D


E
E


F


drum
C^uR//Ym-


'1
kip I

fan
lallx






see a


see an


and an


MOVEMENT EXERCISE.


NOTE.--These are suggestions for exercises with brush, chalk, or pencil. They should
be performed with the left hand as well as with the right.


Sand


1-2


a' -'aZ7d and a u,


J-2e


~c~4L~a
~5~,,


~






I see


I have



Here are



Here are.
y7/^ aA^i




















Here are some butterflies.

One, two, three butterflies.

Two and one are three.



11






apple


^A1-Z1


cziZ/-t


n-/


A cat and an apple.


6~zN~


One doll and one ball.


Oyze ^ d6rzN-#Z 6c


rlO Three eggs and two fans.
CM A*L *i'1 -/^ |iii~^^^


Z caz4


cat


dlO- ,


C~/v2~


II ~.
I; ;
P'
''


doll







PLAY AND WORK.


(1)


n1 I


(7) (3)

(7) (8) (9)


ft


NOTE. The teacher may tell the following story, and have children use sticks, or make
lines with brush, chalk, or pencil to illustrate the points mentioned: -
Story. A little boy who used to watch the soldiers getting ready for war, sometimes saw
them standing up in straight lines ready for marching (Fig. 1). Then he would see them
returning after a long march, all tired out, ready to lie down, some on the ground (Fig. 2) and
some in tents (Fig. 3). The little boy wished he could be a soldier, too, but his mother and
father told him he must first learn many things at home; so he began to learn to read. Here
are the little chair (Fig. 4) and table (Fig. 5) which he used while doing his work. He soon
knew how to make Fig. 6, Fig. 7, and Fig. 8, and he learned that these letters together meant
hat (Fig. 9). Next he learned to write this on his little blackboard (Fig. 10). After his les-
sons he would go out into the barnyard to play with his ladder (Fig. 11). Then he would
climb up into the loft of the barn (Fig. 12) to hunt for eggs. When he grew up to be a young
man he went with the soldiers to war.
















Our flag.


blue


red























F '.:..r. th..: Pti. e Dlin G-Ilr-rn 'rlsin
I love the name of Washington,

I love my country, too,

I love the flag, the dear old flag,

Of red and white and blue.
15





The- cow has four feet.


An eagle has two feet.


A6~& 1~U7$


I see three flags.


Here are five drums.


I have three hats.



4L~ &


- i, 5 -7 C;













hand
hands


finger
fingers


A hand has five


four
five


fingers.


My hand has five fingers.


2
two
II


3
three
III


four


five


IV


B. PRIM. 2


1
one
I


~a/uL-i/z~o


lt








g


G


A


hR


hat



ink
^yZ^


goat


handI
hand
A-TyV


iron
6-47Z


girl


I


J





is has


I am a girl. I have a hat.
I have two hands. I have two eyes.
The goat has two ears.


Ink and iron are black.
~Rvz~ ~Z/a 3~J76Z4R~77~


-L~ ~2~ ~zhe~








J


kK


1.


L


jar
MA^2


kite


lamb
*^zma r


jay


kitty


lion
&-iv&7


~j~e







This is a kite.







Kitty has two



I ,r ".


A


eves.


7i '
-. ,, -.
"- .., ^-L


A L -i-.


I-


NOTE. Only a few words should be written at a time. The movements should be large,
rapid, and free.


Z


~vL


Z













nj


I see a lion.


jay
eagle
fly


wings
bird
sing


c~tc~a~d2 6Zi~


lamb
lion
kite


leaf
leaves
little


T~u-dee


ZG







FIVE LITTLE CHICKADEES.





1. Five lit tie chick a -dees, peep ing at the door;




One flew a way, and then there were four.
CHORUS.


Chick a dee, chick a py and gay;
Chick a dee, chick a dee, hap py and gay;


-I-p--R -p.-


Chick a dee,


chick -
chick -


Four little chickadees
Sitting on a tree;
One flew away,
And then there were three.


Three little chickadees
Looking at you;
One flew away,
And then there were two.


-- C


lee, fly a way!


Two little chickadees
Sitting in the sun;
One flew away,
And then there was one.


One little chickadee
Left all alone;
He flew away,
And then there was none.


FINGER PLAY. The thumb and fingers represent the chickadees. The words of the song
will suggest the movements. Flying movements of the hand and arm may accompany the
chorus after each verse.


~-----(--n


_ L______


F






7w


mouse


nuts
was ^


orange
0-a1z


m


0
o


mouth
^TXW-z


7)z-


N



0


nose


671,6






Do you see the owl?
Can the owl see you? r'
I have a mouth and a nose. -"-i
The mouse has four feet.
An orange will roll.



foot play will do
feet you ball feet
roll can four nose

A ball will roll., 00
I can roll a ball.
The ball is round.
Can you play ball?


25







pP parrot

j s


q


A.

r


Q quarter


R robin

26


/
4


pail


quail






pretty
parrot

robin
quail

bird
birds


rose
roses


The robin and the parrot are birds.
The quail is a bird.
Do you like roses?
Yes, roses are pretty.
Have you a pail?
27






I have some pretty roses.
Four roses and one rose are five roses.


I have a


and a


-r


Can the robin sing?
Yes, he can sing and fly.
Kitty has a red ball.
Will the ball roll?

Is this bird a parrot?
No, it is a quail.


a ball
a sphere
roll


A sphere will roll.


I ~ -


a box
a cube
stand


A cube will stand,


Ag~ ~ u~ ~7J~~o


.. P
\5r




















The Earth. A Doll's House.


Rolls like a ball. Stands like a cube.

A ball is a sphere. A box may be a cube.

CLAY MODELING.



qgl.-



A slice of clay. First step. Modeling a sphere. Modeling a cube.

NOTE. -Care of the clay If the clay is purchased wet, place it in a tub or pail (which
should be kept covered), or an earthen jar. Cover the clay with a damp cloth and keep it damp
by wetting it about once a week. Before using it see that the mass is sgft and elastic. If the
clay is bought dry in lumps or powder, tie it up in a large cloth, as if it were a pudding. Pour
on it enough water to cover it. Let it remain in the water until it is soft enough to knead.
Knead it thoroughly until the mass is perfectly free from lumps. If it is too wet to knead with-
out sticking to the cloth, expose it to the air for a short time.
Modeling a sphere: Holding a piece of clay carefully between the two palms, mold it gently
and rapidly. Turn the fingers backward that the palms may be as flat as possible.
Modeling a cube: Take a piece of clay and roll a sphere rapidly. Then,'holding the
sphere lightly between the thumb and fingers, strike it gently upon a slate ora board three
times; turning it, strike the opposite side; and so on until six faces are made.























































NOTE. -The figures may be made with sticks, or with brush, pencil, or chalk.

30


























A chestnut leaf.


THE BALL.
*++--- rnr---- T--4


A chestnut bur.



From the German.


To and fro the ball is swing ing,



Like the church -bell free ly ring ing; Now it's turn ing



round and round, Free ly turn- ing on the ground.





d


shovel


S


turtle



uphill
u'i"~cM


t


6U~


_d~zne~


shoe
.^AZ^


S


T




U


ZV


upset
U~!"d"^


ZA

















Oh, look at the moon !
She is shining up there.
Oh, mother, she looks
Like a lamp in the air I

Last week she was smaller,
And just like a bow,
But now she is bigger,
And round as an 0.
B. PlIM.-3 33





6/lZ-


I can spin the top.
I have a shoe on my foot.
A turtle can swim.
Jack and Jill went up the hill.
Jack upset the pail.


67 A-Cd A&r&,Z.


61z-


~/~Jv?, d~4~~C~


WI-y

























The yellow ball will roll.,.-
Will the blue ball roll? "bm












I





Jack and Jill went up the hill
To get a pail of water.
Jack fell down and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.


Up Jack got, and home did trot
As fast as he could caper,
And went to bed to mend his head
With vinegar and brown paper.


__






A Cylinder.

A cylinder will roll.
A cylinder will stand.
A cylinder has two ends.
Is a cylinder round?


a


TABLET LAYING.


0@@@@
L
@@@@@


IU.....

I ii i i i i i i I























A red bird.



















leaf ,P '


leaves

A -- s.


rolling
pin


A
drinking
cup


A cylinder will roll.

A cylinder will stand.

CLAY MODELING.




NOTE.- Modeling the cylinder: Make a sphere as in the previous exercise, and roll it on
a slate or a board. This makes the curved face. The flat ends are made by striking the roll
on the ends. If depressions are formed in the ends, they should be filled by pressing clay with
the fingers from edge.


~L~irY~iiYSll~b~P*







violets


V


1/


wW


x a


ax
x AX


x
40


wagon
u/-^^

box
y^^


whip


vase


2~






not


it in

good put

shall we

Shall I whip the horse ?
No, it is a good horse.
Is the box in the wagon?
No, an ax is in the wagon.
We put violets in a vase.


Violets sweet, violets sweet!
Who will buy my .violets sweet?
Violets sweet, violets sweet!
I will buy your violets sweet.
41


no
























CHERRIES RIPE.


-:- --_-i_--^ I I- I I^-- --i--iI
_A -i- -q -do- -
Cher ries ripe, cher-ries ripe! Who will buy my cler-ries ripe?







Cher- ries ripe, cher ries ripe, I will buy your cher ries ripe.
M Io
.- ----I ____ _______ z___---_-__r--I_
ss"--L i---- -=----- ---- \--^-g__

e-. -Fvie-s-re c- -isr---i-p-e, will b--u your cr -rIes ri




NOTE. Game to be played while singing. One child stands in the center of a ring of chil-
dren and holds a basket or apron full of colored balls, which represent the fruit to be sold. The
child who buys takes from the basket the fruit he wishes.


% K
















four five are nine
3 and 2 are 5
2 and 2 are 4
5 and 4 are 9

Five and four are nine.








yY


yacht
4^X>CZ^


Zzebra
zZ y'a


A song sparrow. A barn swallow.
Here are two little birds.
The barn swallow has black wings.






ABC SONG.



A B C D E F G



H I J K L M NO P



Q R S T U V W



Q R S T U V W



X... Y... Z, 0 dear me!


I can not say my A B C.
45








PAPER FOLDING.


A shawl. A window. A book.

NOTE. Teach right and left edges, upper and lower edges, upper right and left corners,
lower right and left corners.
Book: Fold right edge of a square to left edge, having upper corners touching, and crease.
Screen Stand the folded square half open on the table.
Mat: Leave the square folded.
Window Fold a square on both diameters and open.
SShawl: Fold the lower right corner of a square to the upper left corner. Crease and
leave unopened.
Teach diagonal. Teach vertical and horizontal diameters.


A cube.


BLOCK LAYING.

A cylinder.


A sphere.


A cylinder.


A sphere.


~A c-ube.



























































Copyright, 1894, by Photographtiche Geiellechaft.GO D-
GOOD-BYE!


Painting by Arthur J. Eleley.

(47)























I see you!


six


6 VI


seven
' VII


eight
8 VIII






moon


sky





stars


Twinkle, twinkle, little star
How I wonder what you are,
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky!
B. PRIM.-4 49













c-~.- s'I


x72


Mary had a little lamb;
Its fleece was white as snow;
And everywhere that Mary went,
The lamb was sure to go.





dark


catch


this


night


The cat has two eyes and four feet.
Can pussy see at night ?
Pussy's eyes are like this in
the dark.


Pussy's eyes are like this in
the day.
The cat can catch the mouse.


day


Nit


(7aLn A-.y. f -Z-t






Some little mice sat in a
barn to spin.
Pussy came by, and she
Stopped her head in;
" Shall I come in and cut
your threads off ?"
" Oh no, kind sir, you will
snap our heads off."

mice spin little came heads
barn snap pussy come threads

MARCH.
(To be sung with corresponding movements.)



Let your feet tramp, trample Let your hands clap, clap! And



each one make a bow. Tra la, la, la, la, Tra la,



la, la, la, Tra la, la, la, la, la, la.
58





boy red six little white
boys blue big horse five












Here are six boys.
One boy has a flag.
Is it a red, white, and blue flag?
The big boy has the flag.
A little boy has the drum.
One boy has a horse.
Five little boys and one big boy.


C4

























PAPER FOLDING.

















A snowplow. A window with A picnic table.
blinds.


NOTE.-Snowplow: Fold a square on both diagonals. Open the second fold half-way
and stand on the edges of the square.
Window with blinds: Fold a square on its vertical diameter and open. Fold the right and
left edges to meet this diameter.
Picnic table: Fold a square on its horizontal diameter and open. Fold uppei and lower
edges to meet at the diameter. Crease and open half-way. Stand on the long edges of the
oblongs at top and bottom for the table.





STICK LAYING.


I%


tii~n


1 and 1
2-+1
3+1
4+1
5.+1


are 2
S3
=4
=5
= 6


6 and 1 are 7
7+1=8
2+2=4
3+3 = 6
4+2=6
56


5 and 1 are 6
5+2=7
4+2=6
5.+ 3=8
6 +2=8





Papa


Mamma
room
house
who
lives

This is a room in a house.
Who lives in this house?
Is Papa in the room?
Yes, and I see Mamma, too.
Do you see the dog and the bat?


BRUSH WORK.

^ Ax






yes
red
sun
moon


black
lives
house
mouse


The sky is blue.
The moon is round.
The sun is warm.
Pussy has four feet.
I live in a house.
Mamma has a black


-VIll


sky
white
blue
round


violet
little
Papa
Mamma


hat.


IX


O* *
1


* 0S.
S


* a
* O
* *


12R~








This is a woodpecker. '
His bill is black.
Do you see his nest? '
It is in the tree.







SJ< a ,,
CUmC -. r


5~~7 Ie /

cy c4 -yt-^-^j-~n ^J?





















Artist: C. Burton Barker.
sleeps baby little
bed bedroom who

Is this a bedroom?
Yes, I see a bed in it.
Who sleeps in the little bed?
Baby sleeps in the little bed.


60






dog Rover
dogs Jip

paw he
paws she

look Margery
looks girl

like R I does
likes pretty

Painting by Heywood Hardy.

This little girl is Margery.
She has two pretty dogs.
The big dog is Rover.
The little dog is Jip.
Look at Rover's big paw!
Does Rover like Jip ?
He likes the little girl.
61





tea


off

V/


party


A TEA PARTY,
Two little cousins, Ida and May, have a tea
party.
Do you see their little table ?
Why do they not take their hats off?
Who pours the tea for them?
What does Ida keep in her pocket book?
62


cousins


/12~7~t7~ C~Ad-iiSd ~2~


Ida

they

their

what

why


keep



have

table

pours

pocket

book
























Painting by J H. erring.
farm yard
barn hay


* -* -~---


eat
ducks


This is a farm yard.
Hay is in the barn.
Do doves like hay?
One horse is in the barn.


See the pigs and hens.
Do they eat hay?
Do ducks eat grass?
Horses eat hay.


63


pigs
hen


grass
doves


-.N


--








THE FARMER.


IL- "
'" ;- -C
- .4.'


Would you know how does the




farm er, Would you know how does the




farm er, Would you know how does the


A A



farm er Sow his bar -ley and wheat? Look you, so, so, does the




farm er; Look you, so, so, does the farm er; Look you,
A A



so, so, does the farm er Sow his bar ley and wheat.


FINGER PLAY TO "THE FARMER."'-The movements to this song are made only in the
second part of each stanza. The plowing is shown by the action of two children. One, with his
hands stretched out behind him, is the horse; the second holds the hands of the first, and drives
him up and down the cracks in the floor, or the seams in the carpet, thus making straight fur-
rows. For the other occupations the hands and arms can imitate the movements.
84





Would you know how does the farmer,
Would you know how does the farmer,
Reap his barley and wheat ? Etc.
Would you know how does the farmer
Thrash his barley and wheat? Etc.
Would you know how does the farmer
Sift his barley and wheat? Etc.
Would you know how does the farmer
Take home his barley and wheat? Etc.
Would you know how does the farmer
When his day's work is done ?
Look you, so, so, rests the farmer. Etc.
Would you know how does the farmer
When he's rested again?
Look you, so, so, plays the farmer. Etc.


B. PRIM. 5

































:A


S;


NOTE. -To teach the spectrum colors, get a glass prism and a big sheet of white cardboard.
Darken the room and let in a beam of sunlight through an opening in the window shutter. Put
the prism in this streak of light in such a way that the rays are thrown upon the cardboard; a
band of colors like a rainbow will be seen. This band of color is called the spectrum. If the
spectrum is a clear one, at least six. colors can be picked out; namely, red, orange, yellow,
green, blue, violet.


7ZeerS6-


~-ee~yL























Some apples are red.
A pear is green.
Bananas are yellow.


Some apples are green.
Cherries are red.
Do you like plums ?


alzli~


Az-lm


1LZa--cA






These are birds that I know.


Hen.


Turkey.


Swan.


These are animals that I know.


Lamb.


Goat. Dog.


These are flowers that I know.


Pansy.


Pink.


Rose.






horse
horses


head
heads













man h
called l
Painting by J. F. Herring.
These are horses' heads.
How pretty they are!
How many ears has a horse?
How many feet has he ?
A horse's foot is called a hoof.
Here is a hoof.
69







Here are four red poppies.


See the pretty daisies!



I see some blue forget-me-nots.


How many buttercups
do you see?


Here are some green leaves.









The English flag
is red, blue,
and white.


The French flag
is blue, white,
and red.


ten


X


The German flag
is black, white.
and red.

//.


eleven


XI






THE GARDEN.


SFirst let us build the pretty home
of the gardener. Here is .
the fence that closes in
,- the place where he plants fl
all his fruits and flowers. Here is -
his sickle and here is the rake with
which he gathers up all the
rubbish. Here is the wheelbarrow
in which he carts it off; and a
Spail, too, he needs for all
he has to carry. A pair of shears
he finds very useful when he wants to
trim the rose- bushes. Here
are the shears. When
he is thirsty he goes with his
cup to the well that is behind his house. I-I ,
72






On his way back he finds the horse
looking over the fence, as if he
were watching to see that the work .35
is properly done. Then the gardener
thinks of the thirsty flowers and gets
his watering pot to sprinkle them.
A tree in one end of the gar-
den is the home of this little bird,
who likes to nip the pears that
grow on it. Here is a pear,
and here is an apple, and here
are some ripe strawberries, too.
The birds find them all; for the
S gardener grows them for
his children. The children eat
them, and think they are very good.
The gardener has also many pretty
flowers in his garden: red roses and violets.
73








Here is a pretty bird. Is it a robin ?


















V-



THE LITTLE ROBINS.



Two rob in red-breasts in their nest Had lit tie rob ins three,



The moth er bird sat still at home, Her mate sang mer ri ly;



And all the lit tie rob ins said: "Wee, wee, wee, wee, wee, wee!"



And all the lit tie rob ins said: "Wee, wee, wee, wee, wee, wee!"














This is a leaf of This is an Here is an
the apple tree. apple blossom. apple.








,,, This is an apple tree.
It has roots, trunk,
branches, and leaves.
The trunk is like a
.. cylinder.







SONG TICK, TACK.


44
Tick,tack,tick,tack,tick,tack,tick,tack, Lit tie clock saves






me all care. Tick, tack, tick, tack, tick, tack, tick, tack,






Tells me when the right hours are, For eating, for sleeping, for
on~T-g. ^B'~f


play and all, For ris-ing and bathing, it sounds the call;


WMH ~'-4-*^ ^ ^ -?


wo _0_ --

Beat by beat with for -ward back, Ev er tick and ev er tack.




FINGER-PLAY TO "TICK, TACK." -The motion of the pendulum may be imitated by
the swinging of the arms from the shoulder, or by swinging a ball by a string.
76


~L~iT-~ I-~-+ I .IPh ~U












































What time is it?


NOTE.- Cut out two pieces of colored paper like these, and run a pin through the dots.
Then the hands can be moved around the face and an idea of time given; such as dinner-
time, bed-time, etc.
77


I----' -







maple
A I


turn
tt,64z


AUTUMN LEAVES.
The leaves fall off the trees in autumn.
Some leaves turn red in autumn.

Can you draw these leaves?

78


off


oak




1



















































79






gives


bell




clover


THE COW.

The cow gives us milk.
What does the cow eat?
The cow eats grass and clover.
The farmer puts a bell on the cow.
Cows' feet are called hoofs.
Here is a cow's hoof.

0%-e (2n^ a<^. L^ n


milk


eats


~- -------;-















^/J a-td Am (^u mym. un^/ -aA^ ve rru^^t,


Asu uL ta -_u_ and t u,
CyZn6 pta A,&s caYt- wA ,




^Z^c aza* -a-7~ add tA urm^ tA-autS,

A eL w J^M atm/Ly& -tm ri eado-do -fctAJ

B. PRIM. 6 81 -R. L. STEVENSON.





coat wool


The sheep gives us wool.
My coat is made of wool.


66z cdZee^t LJ ccL~e^ aa ~^ym


'~ ife~7LlyJ 'inr~~Rdty-


his made


sheep

Ad~Zeeh.







PAPER FOLDING.


Crown. Boy's Hat.


General's Hat.


NOTE.- Greund form: Fold the diameters and the diagonals of a square. Fold each
corner to the center and do not open. Fold the new corners under to the center and do not
open. Ground Form shows four squares on the upper side and eight triangles on the under
side.
Crown Fold Ground Form, and open. Place the square on the desk witli a diagonal verti-
cal. Fold the upper and lower corners to center. Fold the lower edge thus obtained to the
upper edge and hold firmly together between the thumb and finger at the middle of the two
folded edges. Fold the front upper corners down to the middle of the lower folded edge in front,
and the back upper corner to the middle of the edge at the back. This brings the extreme right
and left corners up even with the corners now made at the middle of the top.
Boy's Hat: Fold the crown and fold back the upper right and upper left corners to the
lower right and lower left corners.
General's Hat: Fold one diameter of a square, open and turn the paper over. Fold one
diagonal, open and fold the other. Take the square at the ends of the diameter and bring them
together backwards, with the outside of the fold touching. Press down together the front and
back triangles. Place on the desk with the long edge of the triangle at the base and horizontal.
Fold the right and left corners of the upper triangle to the apex, and crease. This gives two tri-
angles meeting at their long sides, forming a square in the center of the large triangle. Fold the
right and left corners of this oblique square to the center.






horses
heads
pretty
round
4-;?LAd


robin
peach
some
grapes
Axwz-I

hAix-rA


apples
what
strong
grows

alvdiej
(mwLt


Horses are strong. They have pretty heads.
What can a horse do ? What can a bird do ?
A horse can run. A robin can fly.
The little bird has a nest.
The robin has two wings and a red breast.
Grapes are round. A pear is green.
Some apples are red. Do you like apples ?
The peach grows on a tree.
BRUSH WORK.


nest
breast
wings
fly


-^Le^Ld/t






baby afraid geese has
do hand trying will
hurt are its shall








IO




I'ainung by L. Kuaus.
Is the baby afraid of the geese ?
What do the geese eat?
What has the baby in its hand ?
What are the geese trying to do ?
What shall the baby do ?
The geese will not hurt the baby.






days week


diclv-


I go to school on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,
Thursday, and Friday.


I play on Saturday.


I rest on Sunday.


da7"J 2 jp& oW'Z


5-76/-


-5 /" 'y/? 5'^~


-A1


church


school














Here is a
strawberry blossom.


Here is a
strawberry.


Here is a
strawberry leaf.


Strawberries grow on vines.
The sun and rain help them to grow.
Are strawberries red?


87


A I.


~d~o-eohe~d






AN 1ESOP FABLE.
(To be read to the children.)


THE FOX AND THE STORK.


The Fox poured out some rich soup upon a flat dish, and asked
the Stork to dine with him. But the Stork could not eat the thin
soup with her slender beak, and the Fox made much fun of her.
In return for this, when the Stork invited the Fox, she brought
the dinner on the table in a jug
with a long, narrow neck, so
S that while she herself could put
a i n her beak and eat all she
wished, the Fox could not even
get a taste. He did not like
this very well, but everybody
n'i said that it served him right.





no yes. school catch
IS ^0 ybed ^ cc
day dark tail this


u- a d^ -n dayd tad e t


?z, t/Le. yu- LJ (da~a,



This is a square. This is an oblong.
It has four sides and It has two long sides
four corners, and two short sides.

[ III

















SPRING BLOSSOMS.


buds trees after time
4-SUJ nzej talnlru

Spring is come. Spring comes after winter.
The buds and blossoms are on the trees.
After the buds come the leaves.
In the springtime the grass is green.
The little lambs play in spring.

Do 0 -rW -2&1 /eG .AL90
90
















PUSSY WILLOWS.


ziO-,v_ .
"Oh, you pus sy wil low, Pret ty lit tie thing,


Com ing with the sun shine Of the ear ly spring;


Tell me, tell me, pus sy, For I want to know


Where it is. you come from, How it is you grow!"


Now, my little children,
If you'll look at me
And my little sisters,
I am sure you'll see
Tiny little houses,
Out of which we peep,
When we first are waking
From our winter's sleep.


As the days grow milder,
Out we put our heads,
And we lightly move us
In our little beds;
And when warmer breezes
Of the springtime blow,
Then we little pussies
All to catkins grow.


















PalUting by A. 1l. Uietienbach.
SUMMER DAYS.

children under pick hear



Little children like summer.
They play under the trees. They pick flowers.
They hear the little birds sing.
Is it very warm in summer ?
The grass is green. The leaves are on the trees.


92





2a n iY -- .



it^^ ^^ Utay /~r^,

Ayr A dUtft aan-d aittuL,







5f4 ge iA7n-a, bre^ ta te
cha-a-u t e Lar fxxrdm-, ayyrz.









-LONGFELLOW.
93




















AUTUMN LEAVES.
(To be read to the children and memorized by them.)
"Come, little leaves," said the wind one day -
" Come o'er the meadow with me, and play;
Put on your dresses of red and gold -
Summer is gone, and the days grow cold."
Soon as the leaves heard the wind's loud call,
Down they came fluttering, one and all;
Over the brown fields they danced and flew,
Singing the soft little songs that they knew.
94






























THE DAISY.

The daisy is a field flower.

It has white petals.





95


^u^Iyllglll -oilt, uJ A. it. J.uI&.









skate


ice


sleds


slide

ms Dahl.
WINTER IS HERE.

Snow and ice are on the ground.
Snow and ice are on the trees.
The boys and girls have sleds.
The boys make snowballs.
The boys skate on the ice.
The girls slide on the ice.


96














SNOWFLAKES.
(To be read to the children and memorized by them.)
Whenever a snowflake leaves the sky,
It turns and turns to say "Good-by!
Good-by, dear cloud, so cool and gray!"
Then lightly travels on its way.
And when- a snowflake finds a tree,
"Good day!" it says; "Good day to thee
Thou art so bare and lonely, dear,
I'll rest and call my comrades here."
But when a snowflake, brave and meek,
Lights on a rosy maiden's cheek,
It starts--" How warm and soft the day!
It is summer! "- and it melts away.
B. PRIM. 7 97