Little red people

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Material Information

Title:
Little red people
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 21 x 29 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Deming, Therese O ( Therese Osterheld ), b. 1874 ( Author, Primary )
Deming, Edwin Willard, 1860-1942 ( Illustrator )
Frederick A. Stokes Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Frederick A. Stokes Company
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Indian children -- Juvenile fiction -- North America   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1899   ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1899
Genre:
Children's stories
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
with numerous full-page colour-plates after paintings in water-colour together will illustrations in black-and-white by Edwin Willard Deming and with new stories by Therese O. Deming.
General Note:
Duplicate of part of her "Indian child life" issued simultaneously with the above.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002225351
notis - ALG5623
oclc - 19006862
System ID:
UF00088932:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
    A greedy bear
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Winter fun
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The cliff-dwellers and their pets
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The burro race
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Little Beaver and the tame crows
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Hodgska makes a visit
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    A runaway
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The war dance
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The babies and the woodpeckers
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Back Cover
        Page 31
        Page 32
Full Text







































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LITTLE


RED


PEOPLE


WITH NUMEROUS FULL-PAGE COLOUR-PLATES AFTER PAINTINGS IN WATER-COLOUR
TOGETHER WITH ILLUSTRATIONS IN BLACK-AND-WHITE,
BY EDWIN WILLARD DEMING
AND WITH NEW STORIES


BY THERESE


O. DEMING


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NEW YORK
COPYRIGHT, 1899, BY
FREDERICK A. STOKES COMPANY
PUBLISHERS


PRINTED IN AMERICA







A GREEDY BEAR.



ONCE there was a little PUEBLO Indian boy and his father was one of the best hunters in
the village. One morning he went out into the mountains to shoot deer, the meat of
which was to be dried for the winter supply.
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TRYING TO FIND'SOME GRUBS FOR HER BABIES.
hair rope tight around the little fellow's


Hte was walking very carefully, as ne would nave
frightened the game away if he had made a noise.
Suddenly he heard a sound as if a mama bear
were scolding a cub for being selfish. He looked,
and there, indeed, was an old she-bear turning
over stones and trying to find some grubs for her
babies.
The Indian shot the mama bear and one of the
cubs scampered off as fast as he could go, but the
hunter caught the other little bear and tied a horse-
neck, so he could drag him home to his little TAN-


TSI-DAY.
The two became very good friends, and when TAN-TSI-DAY'S mother brought a bowl of
porridge to her baby, she always put in enough for the baby bear too.






A GREEDY BEAR.
One day the baby bear was naughty, and when TAN-TSI-DAY'S mother had gone into the
house, he took the bowl and ate all the porridge himself, and didn't give his little play-fel.
low any.
The baby was very much surprised, and called his Indian mother.


Do you know how she punished the selfish little bear?


When the next meal-time came,


she just
bear eat
allowed


brought enough of the good porridge for her
with the puppies. I think baby bear won't


to eat with his little


TAN-TSI-DAY, and made that naughty
be such a greedy little fellow when


companion again.


DRAG HIM HOME TO HIS LITTLE TAN-TSI-DAY.








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WINTER FUN.


HE little ASSINIBOIN Indian boys had a great deal of snow in winter, and, as they
have no sleds as white boys have, they took buffalo ribs and slid down hill on
them.
A little boy was walking over the snow one day, on
his snow-shoes, when he thought what fun it would be, if
the boys would all go over on the hill and slide. He
walked through the village, playing he was the town crier,
and called all the little boys out on the hill to slide.
They all took their buffalo ribs and went out, and the
little girls--some who had babies on their backs, and some
S who were only playing-and even the mothers and grand-
mothers went along to see how much fun the boys were
A LITTLE BOY WAS WALKING OVER THE oing to have.
SNOW ONE DAY,ON HIS SNOW-SHOES. Some of the boys fastened the buffalo ribs on their feet,
while others made little sleds by fastening the ribs together and making cross pieces
of wood. Then they started at the top of the hill and came down, one after the other,
shouting and laughing while other boys threw snow at them.




1; -


WINTER FUN.
Several times they went down the hill without any accident, and they were begin-
ning to think nothing could throw them. They all ran up the hill for another long
slide, the first one up was to be the first to start. One started right after the other,
and as the first one was nearly at the bottom of the hill he lost his balance and over
he went. The other boys were close behind him, and as each one came he went over,
and the boys and girls, who were watching thought that was more fun for them than
the sliding had been. Even the three companions who had been throwing sticks over
the snow to see which could make them slide farthest, stopped their game to see how
the boys were piled on top of one another.


THROWING STICKS OVER THE SNOW TO SEE WHICH
COULD MAKE THEM SLIDE FARTHEST.






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THE CLIFF-DWELLERS AND THEIR PETS.


A LONG time ago, before the white people came to live here, the COCHITI Indians
used to live in houses made by hollowing deep holes into the north side of the deep
cautions. They built their houses to face the south, because it was warmer in winter
when the fierce north wind came over the mountains to
S see what damage he could do. Instead of finding houses
to go into, he could only blow against the mountains.
Si The little boys used to climb down the sides of the
cliffs from their homes, and play in the warm sunshine
with their tame foxes and make them jump for dried
meat.
Sometimes they took their bows and arrows and went
S' out to hunt wild turkeys in the arroyos, or deep gullies
around their homes.
/. t night the foxes found a warm place in some house
that had been deserted, perhaps because the opening had
grown too large and the sand had drifted in, or perhaps because it was not sheltered
enough from the snow in winter. The boys would climb to their own houses.





THE CLIFF-DWELLERS AND THEIR PETS.


In those days, the men and boys had to watch from high places to warn the people
of the approach of any of their enemies, because the NAVAJO and APACHE Indians
troubled the PUEBLO Indians a great deal in olden times.
As long as the watchers could see no enemy, the women used to carry water from
the river-which was quite far away-gather wood and till little patches of ground, but
as soon as the enemy came down upon them, they looked for water in wells dug into
the rock to hold the rain when it fell. This water was always saved for cases of this
kind.


SOMETIMES THEY WENT OUT TO HUNT WILD TURKEYS.
























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THE BURRO RACE.



TOM-O-PING was a little PUEBLO Indian boy and one day his father said to him,
"TOM-6-PING take my big black burro over to the cation to feed." TOM-O-PING
didn't say, "wait a minute" to his father, but jumped right on his burro.
As he was going through the pueblo, he
met his three companions, A-GO-YA, TO-A and
BO-PING. TOM-O-PING did not like togo alone
so he asked two of his little friends to jump
on behind him while the third ran along as
best he could, and they would all get their
Ai. own burros and have a race. The boys did
not have to be asked twice, so theyjumped
WHILE BO-PING'S DOG BARKED AT HIS HEELS. on behind TOM-O-PING and then, as they
were anxious to get to racing, they all tried to hurry the poor old burro along by
kicking him in the ribs while BO-PING'S dog barked at his heels. Mr. Burro was
tired and wouldn't endure that long; so in a moment he was standing on his fore-legs
and the three boys were turning somersaults over his head, while the dog was kicked
high in the air. The boys jumped upon his back again and this time were more pa-
tient, so they finally reached the cation where the donkeys were feeding in safety.





THE BURRO RACE.


The three waited for their friend to come and then each boy caught his own little
Animal, and as TO-A was the eldest boy he gave the signal to start. ONE TWO !!
THREE!!! and off they went over fields and prairie, down the old trail and through
the sage brush, shouting and laughing and urging their little steeds along. First Bo-
PING was a little ahead, and then he was glad, for he had been telling how well his
little donkey could go. Then the others whipped their small animals a little harder for
none wanted to be beaten. How they did go! You never saw four little donkeys go
Faster. At last the race came to an end, and the little children, who had gathered to
see the finish, clapped their hands and laughed as TO-A, who was a favorite with them
all, came in just a little ahead of his companions.


THE BOYS WERE TURNING SOMERSAULTS OVER HIS HEAD.
























































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LITTLE BEAVER AND THE TAME CROWS.


ONE day as LITTLE BEAVER was playing on the prairie before his mother's tepee, he
saw his father coming across an arroyo from a hunting trip he had taken.
LITTLE BEAVER looked very intently, for on top of one of the pack horses, he saw
two black things flapping their wings.
As soon as his father had got home and the things were unpacked, he said,
"Come, my little warrior, I want to tell you a story." As soon as his little boy was
on his knees he said: "While I was riding through the woods, I heard something
say, 'Caw, Caw.' At first, I didn't see where it was and then I wished I had my
little bright-eyed boy, for he could see. By and by it said 'Caw, Caw,' again and
then, looking up, I saw an old mother crow standing on a limb, with a little crow
on each side of her. I shot the mother and then climbed the tree and captured
these two little crows and brought them home to my boy."
LITTLE BEAVER was very much pleased, and he used to play a great deal with
these two new pets.






LITTLE BEAVER AND THE TAME CROWS.


Not long after, when the crows had grown
quite big and mischievous, LITTLE BEAVER sat
ALI/outside of the tepee on the ground, to eat some
dinner. The crows saw him and came running
over to him. While LITTLE BEAVER tried to
frighten one away the other would try to steal
his meat and they kept it up quite a while until the little
boy whipped them away. Then the crows felt very
mournful to think they had been beaten, and walked away
with their heads drooping, as if they knew enough to be
ashamed of what they had tried to do.










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HODGSKA MAKES A VISIT.


I WILL tell you of a little red boy going visiting, and perhaps you can fancy why
he liked it so much.
One day a CROw Indian mother called her little boy, HODGSKA, and told him to
get dressed and she would take him to
see his grandfather. HODGSKA was de-
lighted. He came running in, and his





HAD TO PULL UP HIS FEET TO KEEP HIS MOCCASINS DRY. mother's saddle was all decorated with
bright colored flannel and pretty bead work, and HODGSKA had a bright blanket
thrown over his horse's back. The mother rode in front because she had to lead the
way. They followed an old trail for awhile, and HODGSKA was disappointed because
he didn't think that was fun. Then off in the distance he saw a river, and oh how
he wished they would have to cross it!





HODGSKA MAKES A VISIT.


-IODGSKA was delighted when they really started to cross. In splashed the horses,
.and the water kept getting deeper and deeper until it came so high that the little boy
had to pull up his feet to keep his moccasins dry.
After the river had been forded they had to climb over a mountain, and HODGSKA
was glad he had brought his bow and arrows because he might be able to shoot
something to take to his grandfather. They rode very quietly, and little HODGSKA
tried to ride especially quiet because he knew if he made much noise he would
frighten the game. Soon he heard a little noise in the brush and looking over he saw
two pretty deer, but they saw him, too, and ran off just as fast as they could.
HODGSKA heard the little birds chattering and calling to one another and he saw a
bear, but he found nothing he could shoot; so he had to meet his grandfather without
.being able to show what a hunter he had become.


HE SAW TWO PRETTY DEER.






















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A RUNAWAY.


ONCE, after an ARICKARA Indian mother had finished all her packing, as they were
going to move camp, she fixed a travois on her big dog and placed her baby in
the basket. Then all was ready and they were about to start, when a great, ugly
black dog came along, and the two dogs
began to fight.
The squaw whipped them apart, and
S- after she had quieted her poor little
y I a bbaby boy, who had been very much
Frightened, she put him back into his
little carriage, and soon the Indians
-- started.
The squaw walked beside the dog to
THE TWO DOGS BEGAN TO FIGHT. guide him and, also, to amuse her
baby. Indian babies play with little dolls made of buckskin, with long buckskin
fringe for hair. If a feather is placed in the dolly's hair the babies think it is beauti-
fully dressed.
The baby of our story was having a lovely time with his dolly and so his mother





A RUNAWAY.

thought she would just drop back and have a little chat with another Indian mother
while the baby was good.
She had hardly turned around, when that naughty dog saw a great big jack rabbit,
just ahead, and thought it would make a delicious dinner. Off he started. He
jumped right through the rough sage brush, and the poor baby rolled out. His
mother was afraid he would be badly hurt, but he was only frightened. When the
squaw caught the naughty dog again, she tied a rope around his neck and kept tight
hold of it, so he couldn't play another trick on her.
When the Indians stopped and camped, the little boy picked up a stick and
whipped that dog as hard as he could for treating him- so badly during the day's
traveling.


THE LITTLE BOY PICKED UP A STICK.



















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THE WAR DANCE.


SFANCY that little white children don't know that their red brothers like to dress up
in grown-up people's things just as much as they do.
One day several little SIOUX Indian boys decided to have a war dance. They
braided each other's hair, and one little boy was so vain
that, while his companion was braiding his hair, he kept
admiring himself in a little piece of looking-glass that he
Z, held in his hand. After all had their hair finished, they
put on the dance costumes just as they had seen their
fathers do. Each wore the roach on his head, beads
around his neck, and the belt; then each took his little
bow and they started to have the dance.
SWhen the girls heard their little brothers playing out-
side, they went to the doors of their lodges to watch
them. Then the boys had to do their best, of course, to
KEPT ADMIRING HIMSELF IN A LITTLE show the girls what brave warriors they were going to be.
PIECE OF LOOKING-GLASS. An old grandfather was sitting out-of-doors sunning him-
self; so the boys brought a tom-tom, and asked him to make music for them. Then






THE WAR DANCE.


they danced the war dance in earnest-a true imitation of their fathers. They danced
for several hours, until they were so tired they could dance no longer; then they re-
tired to a tepee, which they made believe was their council house, and in council
they decided that the little girls would surely have much more respect for them in
the future.


THE LITTLE GIRLS WOULD HAVE
MORE RESPECT FOR THEM.











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THE BABIES AND THE WOODPECKERS.


ONE day two WINNEBAGO Indian mothers took their little baby boys and put them
on a blanket to play together. They were two happy little children, and after
they had finished the bowl of dinner their mothers had given them, they didn't cry,
.... (,.. but started playing with their little fingers and
3s toes, and trying to catch the little stray rays
of sunshine.
They were sitting in the shade of a little
S sapling, and suddenly they heard a little "tap!
tap!" against the tree. The babies looked all
around, but they couldn't see anything. Then
-4 they heard another, tap tap! just like the
first one. This time they looked at the tree,
THE BADGERS COME OUT OF THEIR HOLES. and, can you tell what they saw? Two great,
big woodpeckers, with great red heads. The babies thought they were such pretty
birds, but they did not know what to say to them, and so were a little bashful;
while the woodpeckers were very curious to know what new kind of animal they had
found.




THE BABIES AND THE WOODPECKERS.
You see there were no nice fat little worms in the young tree, and so the birds
may have thought that the children had a bowl full of their favorite food, and they
had themselves come too late.
Little Indian children learn to know wild animals very early. Sometimes the
badgers come out of their holes to look at them, and then the children are very
much frightened because badgers are wise animals and play many tricks on people.
At night, when they lie awake in their little beds, the children hear the wild geese
talking to one another as they fly over the village. Then the mother tells them what
bird is making the noise, and she also tells them, that when the geese fly south it
will be too cold before very long for their babies to sit out of doors and when they
fly toward the north, Spring is on the way with its beautiful sunshine.


THE WILD GEESE TALKING TO ONE ANOTHER AS THEY FLY.






















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