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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN1 6Small Animal Hospital Grand Opening10Saving Sponge Dog18Cat survives infestation with bobcat fever ADVa ANCING ANIMaAL, HUMaAN aAND ENVIRONMeENTa AL HeaEALThH INSi I DE FloridaWINTeER 2011 VeVETeERINaARIaAN TT ending a terrierSenior UF veterinary student William Jared High checks on Jeffrey, a Parson terrier, in the progressive care area of the new UF Small Animal Hospital on Nov. 8.

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VeVETeERINaARIaANFlorida MMessage from the DDeanSmall Animal Hospital (352) 392-2235 Large Animal Hospital (352) 392-2229 College Administration and Deans Ofce (352) 294-4200 Public Relations (352) 294-4242 Development and Alumni Affairs (352) 294-4256Florida Veterinarian is published by the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine for alumni and friends. Suggestions and comments are welcome and should be emailed to: Sarah Carey, Florida Veterinarian editor, at: careysk@u.edu.Check out the college web site at: www.vetmed.u.eduDean Glen F. Hoffsis D.V.M., M.S. Executive Associate Dean John Harvey D.V.M., Ph.D. Associate Dean for Students and Instruction Paul Gibbs B.V.Sc., Ph.D. Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies Charles H. Courtney D.V.M., Ph.D. Senior Director of Development and Alumni Affairs Karen Legato Assistant Director of Development and Alumni Affairs Patricia Wlasuk Director of Public Relations Sarah K. Carey M.A., A.P.R. Coordinator of Alumni Affairs Jo Ann WinnDr. Carsten Bandt, emergency medicine and critical care specialist, is shown at left with Dean Glen Hoffsis, Vam York and members of the York family, which contributed to the new emergency space. The group is standing inside the emergency entrance to the new UF Small Animal Hospital.OOff with a BangThis new year has started with a bang here at the college, where we are still celebrating the successful grand opening of our new UF Small Animal Hospital in November and optimistic about more good things to come.At the end of October, we held several events, including the ocial dedication with the UF leadership, legislators, donors, and others who made the project possible. It was a special treat to have two emeritus UF CVM deans, Richard Dierks and Kirk Gelatt, attend the ceremony. We hosted a special dedication ceremony for our faculty and sta and followed these events with open houses for veterinarians and the general public. Our hospital strategic plan is focused on delivering exceptional service to the patient, the referring veterinarian and our clients. In the two months since the new hospital opened, we have continued to ne tune our customer service and brainstorm ways to improve our operation at every level. We have made changes to the hospital administrative structure with the appointment of Dr. Dana Zimmel to a new position as chief of sta for both the small and large animal hospitals. One can sense we are making progress on all fronts. is issue of the newsletter will hopefully provide you with a feel for our grand opening activities. We especially want to acknowledge all of our donors, whose meaningful contributions to our new hospital totaled nearly $10 million. To say that we appreciate all that our donors have done for us is a huge understatement, but we will always be indebted to our supporters for all they do for us and in particular, for helping us achieve our dream of opening the spectacular new Small Animal Hospital, which we are convinced is the nest in the world. e project is nearly nalized and the new hospital opened for business on Nov. 1. ere is ongoing work to be done before we nish. e old hospital, which adjoins the new facility, will be renovated and in some cases, repurposed. e pharmacy will expand and the shelter medicine program will move into the former surgery area. e acupuncture and rehabilitation service will have renovated space and the zoo medicine services space will be expanded. In addition, we are constructing a new auditorium that will seat 160 and will accommodate the expected DVM class expansion. One of the best aspects of the facility construction, and one we are proudest of, is that it is all fully funded.

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN3 Glen Hosis Dean e college strategic plan also contains a component for management of DVM student enrollment. We have increased the number of seats for Florida residents from 80 to 88 per class. We also increased enrollment of non-resident students from eight to 12. is provided more opportunities for students to obtain a DVM from UF. Going forward, we plan to gradually increase the number of nonresident students as facilities can be built or adapted to meet these needs and more faculty can be hired to deliver an enhanced education to all of our students. We have already begun the process of increasing faculty numbers. I am excited to announce that, following a national search, we have hired Dr. Paul Cooke to serve as our new chairman of the department of physiological sciences. Dr. Cooke is presently a professor and serves as the Billie A. Field Endowed Chair in Reproductive Biology in the department of veterinary biosciences, University of Illinois. Dr. Cooke will begin his new job at UF in February. I want to thank Dr. Paul Davenport, a professor of respiratory physiology, for his service as interim chair of physiological sciences since Dr. John Harvey vacated the chair position to become our executive associate dean in 2008. e hiring of a new physiological sciences chairman is just the start of what will be a progressive expansion of the faculty in both the basic sciences and in the clinical sciences. Several national searches are currently underway and recruitment eorts will continue for the foreseeable future. e next step will be to develop a strategic plan for research. Our college has gradually slipped in its research funding over the last several years as budgets have been cut and research-intensive faculty have been lost. We will create the strategies to restore and exceed our previous research productivity levels to where we should be, and to what is expected at a top-tier veterinary college. ere are many challenges facing veterinary colleges, and indeed, the profession. ese include concerns for student debt, starting salaries and practice income, supplying rural areas and other underserved careers, recruiting outstanding faculty, funding our programs in an environment of shrinking state budgets and many others. I think your college is on a good course and is poised to make major progress in the near future. Many people are working extremely hard, every day, in our UF Veterinary Hospitals, in our laboratories, and in our administrative oces, to make this happen. It truly does take a concerted eort to eect real change, and also the continuing support from all of you our friends, alumni, donors, referring veterinarians, among others to transform this vision to reality. anks again to everyone for bringing us to this point. We are excited about the future and wish all of you a Happy New Year!Several members of the Florida Veterinary Medical Association are shown inside the medicine treatment room that FVMA contributed to. Dr. Julio Ibanez,, left, and his wife, Maria, named an exam room. UF President Bernie Machen, Chris Machen, Dr. Dale Kaplan-Stein, and Robert Kaplan-Stein stand in front of the exam room donated by the Kaplan-Steins. Dr. Rowan Milner, Hills Professor of Oncology, with Heidi and Rob Ferdinand in front of an exam room contributed by the Ferdinands. Dr. Amy Stone, clinical assistant professor and chief of the primary care and dentistry service, with donors Franklyn and Barbara Meyers. The Meyerses named the primary care and dentistry area. Tom Wagner and Dr. Nanette Parratto-Wagner at an exam room named in memory of her parents and family dog. Dr. Catherine McClellend, veterinary affairs manager for Hill's Pet Nutrition, Inc., and Dr. Christine Jenkins, director of academic affairs for Hill's Pet Nutrition, Inc., stand outside the kiosk that Hill's contributed to. All photos by Ray Carson

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN4 DDONOR PROfFILeE: DDr. NNanette Parrato-WagnerRRoom naming opportunity gave alumna one more way to give thanksFor Nanette Parratto-Wagner, D.V.M., Ph.D., gratitude is a way of life made real by philanthropic giving to UF, which paved the way for her own success, and to encourage others who will follow the veterinary career path.UF gave me a chance to prove that I was capable of achieving my childhood dream, she said. God gave me the talent to accomplish this, but I owed the college much more than the tuition I paid for my education. A 1985 graduate of the UF CVM, Parratto-Wagner initially planned to repay her debt of gratitude to the college by giving annually, for as long as she could, an amount at least equal to the tuition she would have had to pay, had she attended veterinary school at the University of Pennsylvania. at was the only other veterinary school Wagner considered applying to, because she grew up in that state.   I nally had an epiphany and realized that I could move to the promised land Florida, ParrattoWagner said. UF accepted me into graduate school and supported my desire to blend a Ph.D. with a D.V.M. As the years passed, she promised herself that if the opportunity arose to give back in a more meaningful way, she would do so. So annual giving to the college and the Pet Memorial program expanded into the room naming opportunity, Parratto said. When the new UF Small Animal Hospital opened this past fall, Parratto-Wagner named an exam room in memory of her parents, Antoinette N. Parratto and Leonard R. Parratto Jr., and ODee, the Wonder Dog. Parratto-Wagners parents, who were never pet lovers or pet owners, allowed her to pick her rst dog, from a neighbors litter. She chose the runt, and her father named the puppy Oh, God in Italian. My parents adored ODee, possibly more than they indulged me, Parratto-Wagner said. ey would have approved...no, they would have insisted, that we make this sacrice. My husband, being the genius that he is, said yes. Parratto-Wagner feels the new Small Animal Hospital provides an immediate benet to veterinarians and their clients in Florida, southeastern Georgia and the Caribbean. e new hospital contains some one-of-a-kind clinical services that will draw referrals from across the nation and world, she said. e featured services listed on the Website just touch on the most obvious key elements that make this facility unique. Local residents of Alachua County and surrounding areas will benet from the expertise available 24-7 through the new state-ofthe-art emergency service, which integrates into full patient care services, Parratto-Wagner added. e linear accelerator is equivalent to or better than most human hospitals, allowing patients to receive radiation therapy for many more conditions than just cancer, i.e., pain control and arteriovenous malformations, among others, she said. is is the only veterinary facility in the state, and possibly east of the Mississippi, that can provide such a level of care and teach the next generations of veterinarians. One feature Parratto-Wagner, who works as a relief veterinarian for Pershing Oaks Animal Hospital in Orlando, is specically Antoinette and Leonard Parratto, now deceased, indulged their daughters desire for a pet. ODee was Dr. Nanette ParrattoWagners rst dog. Thomas Wagner and Nanette Parratto-Wagner are shown at home with their three dogs. Tom has Scooter in his right hand, Sammy in his left hand, and Nanette has Magoo on her lap. Photos courtesy of Dr. Nanette Parrotto-Wagner

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN5 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN5DDONOR PROfFILeE: RRob and Heidi FerdinandLLongtime hospital clients honor level of care, their dogs with exam room giftHeidi and Rob Ferdinand, residents of Winter Park, Fla., have been clients of the UF Small Animal Hospital for more than 10 years. During that time, they lost Buster, a Labrador retriever, at the age of 13 to lymphoma after seeing him snap back from life-threatening medical problems, not once, but three times.eyve seen their remaining 10-year-old dog, Allie short for Alligator be transformed from a rescue dog with eyes swollen shut and severe skin allergies to a smooth-coated, magnicent golden retriever with bright eyes and a normal life. When UFs new small animal hospital opened in November 2010, the Ferdinands felt compelled to acknowledge, with a signicant nancial gift, the quality of care they have consistently received for their animals. We just have had a really positive experience with the college, so we decided to donate for an examination room, Heidi Ferdinand said. We did this, one, because of the level of care we have received, and two, in memory of our dogs that have had care given to them at UF. Of the two dogs, Buster received care for the longest period of time. He had the most longevity, but we almost lost him from health issues at least three times, Heidi Ferdinand said. Each time, UF veterinarians were able to save him. She said Buster had experienced a ruptured spleen, a bacterial overgrowth infection and nally, lymphoma. He recovered from the rst two things and was treated for lymphoma. However, eventually Busters cancer spread to his brain.Unfortunately, we could not prolong his life, Heidi Ferdinand said. The Ferdinands rescued Allie when she was approximately 6 years old.When we rst brought her to UFs dermatology service, they told us they thought she would not be salvageable because her case was one of the worst theyd ever seen, Heidi Ferdinand said. Its been a great experience to see how her condition has turned around. Now Allies coat is perfect, and she actually looks like a dog. e Ferdinands drive more than two hours for every trip they make to UF, and are glad to do it. e quality of care, the sta here its amazing, Heidi Ferdinand said. People know us by our rst names. We compare it to the Mayo Clinic of human health care. We could go to other specialty practices, but we just feel the level of experience, the care and compassion at UF is not like anyplace else weve experienced. ats why we feel UF is kind of a home away from home. By Sarah Carey impressed by is the completely digitized electronic record keeping system, which she said is more advanced than in most human hospitals. Most people will not get care this carefully monitored, she said. is system is so advanced that it is designed to augment the teaching experience in real time, allowing students to actually see what is happening in the patient during surgeries, something that none of my cohorts were able to do with any regularity. Students will have more exposure to more procedures with much clearer understanding than has heretofore been possible. Parratto-Wagner said she would always be grateful to the UF CVM for oering the education that opened doors to an amazing and varied career. Ive never been bored or broke, she said. Ive always been entertained by my work and couldnt have asked for a better outcome. Giving back was the least I could do. By Sarah CareyRob and Heidi Ferdinand with their dogs, Buster, now deceased, and Allie. Photo courtesy of Heidi Ferdinand

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN6 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN6 We can take care of pets that no one else can take care of, Machen said. By allowing the college to expand enrollment and for all these other reasons, the new hospital is a wonderful addition to UF, but also to the county, the state and the nation. Larry Cretul, outgoing Speaker of Floridas House of Representatives, said the event was one of his last ocial duties. Others have called this building the best in the world, and Ill second that, he said, adding that he had worked with UF for several years to support the project, which has long been on the Legislatures radar screen. Today we take a major step forward, Cretul said. Its no secret people love their pets, and from the standpoint of care, there is no better place than here. is new hospital is good for UF, good for the state and good for pet owners. University of Florida Board of Trustees member Danny Ponce ocially accepted the building on behalf of the trustees. Nancy and I have had a couple of pets, including a Scottish terrier named Montana, who wouldnt put her leg down after we returned home from a Florida-Georgia game, Ponce said. I brought her here to Dr. Dan Lewis, who, by the way, is the best veterinary orthopedic surgeon in the world. It turns out Montana had torn her left rear ACL (anterior cruciate ligament.) I had no idea dogs even had an ACL. Seven years later, shes still doing well. In his introduction of David Guzick, M.D., Ph.D., senior vice president of health aairs and president of the UF&Shands Health System, Hosis noted the uniqueness UF enjoyed by virtue of being a part of such a major health center, and said the veterinary college faculty, and ultimately, hospital patients, beneted from the collaborations this synergy makes possible.Well-wishers gathered inside the festively decorated atrium of the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicines new Small Animal Hospital on Oct. 22 for a dedication and ribbon-cutting, which also recognized donors for their help in bringing the $58 million project to fruition. e stars literally lined up, said college dean Glen Hosis, D.V.M., alluding to the many years of hoping, dreaming, talking and planning that had passed before the facility could nally open its doors. is building were dedicating tonight was talked about by at least two deans before me, he said, adding as Floridas only veterinary college, UF serves an enormous population. Over time, well need more veterinarians, and the old hospital facility was a choke point for our growth. We now have the ability to better serve both students and clinical faculty, and most importantly, the animals we care for. He called the new hospital the nest in the world and thanked the many internal college and UF sta members, current and former administrators, architects, contractors, Floridas state veterinarian, the colleges alumni council and the Florida Veterinary Medical Association, as well as state legislators for their support. UF President Bernie Machen, who makes a rule of not visiting UF buildings while under construction, stood inside the 100,000 squarefoot hospital for the rst time. He called it an incredible moment. e new facility, he said, takes your breath away. Sixty percent of American households have pets, Machen said. People think of their pets as families, and these facilities really are the nations best. He added that the UF veterinary college was one of the special attributes of the university. NNew UUF Small Animal Hospital dedicated OOct. 22Photo by Ray CarsonFrom left to right: Dr. Dana Zimmel, chief of staff, UF Veterinary Hospitals; Danny Ponce, UF trustee; Dr. Jack Payne, senior vice president, UF IFAS; Dr. Glen Hoffsis, CVM dean; Caty Love, UF veterinary student; Dr. David Guzick, senior vice president, UF HSC; Rep. Larry Cretul; Dr. Bernie Machen, UF president; and Dr. Colin Burrows, chairman, department of small animal clinical sciences.

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN7 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN7 ere truly is this one health idea, and what better place to spearhead that idea on campus than right here, Guzick said. Dr. Michael Schaer said to me earlier this evening, is is a shooting star. Grab hold of it, and, congratulations. e new UF Small Animal Hospital triples the previous working space and contains a fully integrated cancer referral and treatment service, including a linear accelerator with cone-beam CT (image guidance) unique to Florida and most of the country. e hospital also has one of the nations only veterinary interventional radiology and cardiology facilities. e building has 22 new examination rooms, 12 surgical suites, including dedicated and custom rooms for laparoscopy and arthroscopy, more treatment areas, including facilities for emergency medicine, intensive care, progressive care and isolation, and an expanded endoscopy room with laser lithotripsy. e hospital oers 24/7 emergency and critical care services as well as primary care and dentistry facilities. By Sarah Carey Photo by Ray Carson

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN8 CClinical UUpdates FLORIDA VETERINARIAN8VV eterinary oncologists break new ground with cancer treatmentWhen Sgt. Troy Fergueson of the Pasco County Sheris Oce and his wife, Laura, held a memorial service in Hudson, Fla., for their beloved dog, a yellow Labrador named Sophie, more than 100 people paid their respects. Among them were lawenforcement ocers, friends, and University of Florida veterinary surgical oncologist Nick Bacon and veterinary technician Amy Beaver, who works with the oncology group at the UF Small Animal Hospital.    e Ferguesons believe UF veterinarians gave them two-and-ahalf more years with Sophie, who was diagnosed in May 2008 with urethral cancer. Sophie became something of a media celebrity after her illness because of several community fundraising campaigns to raise the money needed to save her life. She was celebrated at the service for her contributions to law enforcement and also to the lives of many people she touched as part of her search and rescue work. Sophies life was extended as a direct result of the care she received at UF, Laura Fergueson said. Without treatment, she would have lived maybe a month or two. Sophie was even able to continue her search work, until four months ago. Bacon said Sophie ultimately died of kidney failure, not cancer. Sadly all animals ultimately die, but its unheard of to have that length of survival in a urethral cancer patient, he said. In conjunction with Frank Bova, Ph.D., a professor of neurosurgery associated with the universitys McKnight Brain Institute, UF veterinary oncologists treated Sophie with stereotactic radiosurgery, a new procedure for veterinary medicine that involves sophisticated image guidance and targeted, high-dose radiation, administered through the use of a LINAC Scalpel, a stereotactic linear accelerator invented at UF that has long been used to treat human cancer patients. At the time Sophie was treated, the oncology team was only beginning to use the procedure to treat urethral cancer in dogs. UF became only the second veterinary hospital in the country to use the technique. Since then, UF veterinarians have performed nine urethral and three prostate cancer procedures in dogs. Bacon presented the teams ndings to the Veterinary Cancer Society in Las Vegas Veterinary oncology technician Amy Beaver visits with Sophie during one of her early visits to UFs oncology service for treatment. Photo courtesy of Amy Beaver

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN9 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN9in March, and at the American College of Veterinary Surgeons meeting in Seattle in October. Bacon said the addition of a linear accelerator to UFs Small Animal Hospital, which opened in November, means that stereotactic radiosurgery can now be performed in a veterinary setting instead of the McKnight Brain Institute, although collaborations with faculty and sta there will continue. Having the linear accelerator located on-site in our hospital makes everything quicker and simpler, Bacon said. ere will be no restrictions on when we can do these procedures, so we can treat our patients even more expeditiously and also take advantage of other UF veterinary faculty expertise more easily when we need to. e urethra is found in people and animals and is essentially a tube exiting the bladder through which urine can leave the body. Any tumor, even an early one, can cause complete obstruction, Bacon said. Once there is an obstruction, most animals are put down within days. Even with other types of therapies, most are put down within weeks. Chemotherapy has some eect, but it seems high-dose radiation can also help. Sophie received a combination of radiation and chemotherapy. In some cases, using another technologically advanced method known as interventional imaging, UF veterinarians are able to temporarily alleviate the obstruction with a urethral stent. e oncology program purchased stents with private funding in 2007, and veterinarians learned how to use them, in order to get the urethral and prostate cancer treatment program o the ground, Bacon said. Now we can see a dog with urinary obstruction on day one, diagnose the problem and stent the urethra under one procedure, he said. Without our interventional program, you might not be able to go in and irradiate the tumor afterwards, so its very important to have all of these capabilities on site. In cases of urethral cancer, dogs can be acting entirely normally playing, eating, running, barking but they are unable to urinate, Bacon said. So owners have a dog that one day looks normal, then the next day they are being told they have to put the dog down, he said. It aects dogs with almost no warning, and any dog can be aected, ese dogs are typically euthanized after days to weeks. Four of the nine urethral cancer dogs we treated lived longer than six months, and two lived longer than one year. With the advanced imaging, advanced radiation and advanced surgery we oer, we are really furthering the boundaries of what is treatable in canine cancer. Oncology veterinary technician Beaver said the memorial held for Sophie was a reminder of why she loves her job. A poster she had given the Ferguesons two years ago, which documented Sophies care and treatment at UF in scrapbook form, was on display at the event.It was an armation that Im in the right profession, Beaver said.For more information about the UF Small Animal Hospital or to make an appointment, see www.vethospitals.u.edu or call 352-392-2235. By Sarah Carey Sophies life was extended as a direct result of the care she received at UF. Laura Fergueson Sophie touched many lives as an active member of the K-9 team she was associated with.Photo courtesy of Laura Fergueson

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN10 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN10 CClinical UUpdates When Faye Johnson unexpectedly lost her 16-year-old shih tzu, Royal, to a heart attack in February 2009, she grieved deeply. e dog was one of her last ties to her husband, who had passed away eight years earlier. So she sought out Royals breeder, and by December, she had Regal: a bright-eyed, silky smooth puppy from Royals bloodline that sleeps in the bed with her at night. UUF veterinarians save sponge dog, warn pet owners to monitor animals chewing behaviorPhoto by Sarah Carey

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN11 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN11 But one night Regal was having trouble breathing and woke Johnson up. It became clear he was ghting for his life. When Regal arrived at the UF Small Animal Hospital on July 31, he was immediately seen by the Emergency and Critical Care Service and placed in an oxygen cage. Our initial physical examination showed signs of expiratory respiratory distress, meaning he was having diculty getting air out of his lungs, said Ashley Allen, D.V.M., a small animal medicine and surgery intern who worked closely with Regal. Chest lms showed a suspicious object blocking most of his trachea, or main airway, and severe collapse of the trachea in front of the blockage. Veterinarians also found that Regals stomach was lled with uid and gas, and an ultrasound test revealed the presence of a brous-like foreign body in his stomach. ey discussed their options with Johnson, who gave the UF veterinary team the go-ahead to proceed with anesthesia to pass an endoscope down Regals trachea and, if possible, his stomach as well. With the endoscope, we were able to visualize and remove a foreign object in his trachea, Allen said. Since Regal was doing reasonably well under anesthesia, we were also able to remove several foreign bodies from his stomach. e foreign bodies were pieces of a sponge-like material, but when veterinarians asked Johnson about their ndings, she was stumped. I asked Mrs. Johnson to just look around the house while Regal was with us, just to make sure he didnt have anything hidden anywhere, Allen said. Johnson did, and her ndings surprised everyone: Regal had been eating the stung inside of his dog bed. He was putting his head under the cover of the bed and eating the sponge, Johnson said. ere is a huge hole in the sponge. He must have been eating it for weeks. She added that the bedding Regal had eaten was not visible unless the cover was completely removed. After veterinarians removed the sponge material from Regals stomach, he remained in the hospitals Intensive Care Unit over the weekend. Subsequent rechecks have gone well, and Johnson and UF veterinarians say he is doing very well. He is back to being a happy, playful puppy, Allen said. Mrs. Johnson has disposed of his previous bed and monitors him closely at home. Allen added that Regals case illustrates that with prompt medical attention, patients with critical needs can have a good outcome. Treating these patients successfully often requires a team eort between the multiple clinicians, including the emergency doctor, the radiologist, the internist and the anesthesiologist, she said. I think Regals story also serves as a reminder for owners to provide puppies with toys and bedding that they cannot easily chew up. Its always good to monitor closely any pet playing with a stued toy, and to dispose of the toy if the pet starts tearing it up. Crate training puppies is also a good idea, so that they dont get into things while unsupervised, Allen said. Puppies are much like toddlers who are just learning to walk. ey like to be naughty and get into anything within their reach. In Regals case, Johnson didnt even know he had been chewing on the bedding, Allen added. She is a wonderful owner who loves Regal with all her heart, Allen said. Now that she knows he has a habit of eating things, I think she will be making some environmental changes at home to try to prevent this from happening again. As for Johnson, she is thankful she was able to get her puppy the help he needed to save his life. Without the doctors and the excellent equipment at the UF Small Animal Hospital, Regal would have died, Johnson said. I barely got him there in time. Every person I have come in contact with at the UF Small Animal Hospital has been extremely pleasant and the quality of care cannot be surpassed. For more information about the UF Veterinary Hospitals, visit www.vethospitals. u.edu. By Sarah Carey Without the doctors and the excellent equipment at the UF Small Animal Hospital, Regal would have died, Faye Johnson Photo by Sarah Carey

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN12 CClinical UUpdatesSmall animal expertise boosts treatment of baby horse at UUF LLarge Animal HospitalWhen a quarter horse colt born with a severely deformed right hind limb arrived at the University of Floridas Large Animal Hospital last May, equine veterinarians recognized that traditional methods used for straightening abnormal legs in foals would not work. But several months, procedures and one small animal surgeon later, the foal is living the good life at home in Palmetto, Fla., running and training on four good legs.Traditionally, when you perform an acute correction, you break the leg and then plate it, all at once, said Ali Morton, D.V.M., assistant professor of large animal surgery at UF. In this case, the amount of correction needed would have probably compromised the blood supply and the lower part of the limb likely would have died. ere also is a signicant risk of infection, which is why these types of procedures often fail in horses, even in the best circumstances. Morton then consulted one of her colleagues who treats small animals at the UF Veterinary Hospitals Dan Lewis, D.V.M., a professor of small animal orthopedic surgery and an internationally respected expert on the correction of limb deformities. For more than a decade, Lewis has used a technique in which the deformed bone is cut surgically, and an device called a circular external skeletal xator secures and gradually straightens the bone a process called distraction osteogenesis. e gap that forms between the bone segments lls in quickly with new bone. Dr. Lewis has contributed signicantly to the literature on distraction osteogenesis, so we called him, and he looked at the foals leg, Morton said. Our biggest concern was its size, since at 5 weeks old, this foal weighed 220 pounds and was much bigger than your average dog. Traditionally in horses, the xator is pinned to the bone segments. But it quickly became evident that pins were not the answer. Within 24 hours, the foal bent some of the pins, Morton said. Within 48 hours, he broke one pin. By then, we were at the point of either trying something dierent, or euthanasia. UFs veterinary team was literally down to the wire an olive wire. As a last resort, Lewis contacted John Madden from Smith and Nephew, a company that manufactures circular xators for human patients. e foals xator was made from components used in dogs and cats. Madden provided olive wires, which contain a bead, or olive, secured along the wires length. ese wires, when applied under tension, provided the stability to resist the incredible forces imposed by the 220-pound foal. Lewis was familiar with the product because he had used this human system to successfully stabilize a fracture in a tiger. We didnt know what would happen, but we were willing to try, Morton said. She spoke to Anne Prince, owner of the foal, and explained the options. e Princes own a quarter horse farm in Palmetto, and are longtime clients of the UF Veterinary Hospitals. Mrs. Prince said, Lets try it, Morton said. She said we shouldnt give up unless things got to the point that the foal was suering. So we took out the broken pins and put in four olive wires, and over the course of the following three weeks, it seemed to be working. Five weeks later, additional surgery was performed, during which additional wires were placed for reinforcement. Serial radiographs and measurements conrmed that the deformity had been corrected and the fracture gap just needed to ll in with new bone. In time the leg had healed to the point that veterinarians began to stage removals of rings and wires. A CT scan was performed on the foals leg, and he remained at the UF Large Animal Hospital until his discharge. To my knowledge, this is the rst time sequential correction, which employs a circular xator and distraction osteogenesis, has been used to correct a limb deformity in a horse, Lewis said. Morton credited Lewis and the foals owners, the Princes, along with the foal himself for the cases ultimately successful outcome. e only reason this worked was rst, Dr. Lewis, but also the Princes, who treat all of their animals very well and allowed us to do everything we did, Morton said. e foal was also an excellent patient the entire time. By Sarah Carey Photo by Sarah CareyFLORIDA VETERINARIAN12

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN13 $100,000 To $999,999Arnold & Barbara Grevior Hills Pet Nutrition, Inc.$75,000 To $99,999Victoria I. Ford Doris J. Salsbury (d) Sweetbay Foundation$50,000 To $74,999Charlie & Doris Bloehm Marianne A. Burbach$25,000 To $49,999e Batchelor Foundation, Inc. Jean S. Bidwell Churchill Downs, Inc. Flora & Jerome P. Heilweil e Humane Society of the United States$10,000 To $24,999AKC CAR Canine Support & Relief Fund Louise C. Averill Elinor Patterson Baker Trust Bernice Barbour Foundation, Inc. A. H. Burnett Foundation Caloosa Veterinary Medical Society, Inc. Lourdes C. Corman Walt Disney World Co. Robert L. & Heidi S. Ferdinand FVMA Foundation, Inc. Gilman International Conservation Michael L. & Elissa Greenberg Sean J. & Jodi R. Greene Gulfstream Park Racing Assn., Inc. Hagyard-Davidson-McGee Associates PLLC Dale S. Kaplan-Stein Nestle Purina PetCare Co. Palm Beach County Veterinary Society Harry & Lisa Posin Bernard J. Rudo (d) SCAVMA of Florida Janet K. Yamamoto, Ph.D.$5,000 To $9,999Airport Road Animal Clinic Curtis M. Barnett & Holly Wendell Cliord R. Berry III John S. & April D. Bohatch Charles M. & Carol M. Fischman Noel Fitzpatrick Florida Poultry Federation, Inc. e Harold Wetterberg Foundation IAMS Co. Intervet, Inc. J. I. Kislak Family Fund, Inc. Sam W. Klein Charitable Foundation Irving M. Lerner Merial, Ltd. Harold Morris Trust Fund Novartis Animal Health U.S., Inc. O. L. Moore Foundation Oakhurst Animal Hospital e Oxley Foundation Alan S. Pareira Nanette P. Parratto-Wagner Pasco Florida Kennel Club, Inc. James E. Pennington Pzer Animal Health Pulse Veterinary Technologies LLC St. Jude Medical Sebring Animal Hospital Joyce K. & Paul L. Urban VCA Antech, Inc.$1,000 To $4,999AAEP Foundation, Inc. American Assn. of Bovine Practitioners American Greyhound Council, Inc. John S. Anderson Animal Clinic of Windermere Animal Medical Clinic at West Town Place AVMA/GHLIT AVS of Orange Park, Inc. Baneld Pet Hospital Susan F. Barber-McClure Anthony F. Barbet e Bay Branch Foundation Jack E. & Rebecca L. Beal Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. Walter S. & Magdaline Boyer James M. Brechin Lois A. & Roger W. Brown, Jr. e Brunetti Foundation Colin F. Burrows Canine Rehabilitation Institute Charles Perry Construction, Inc. College of Veterinary Med. Class of 2009 Collier County Veterinary Society, Inc. Morris P. Culpepper III Paul A. Curasi G. Samuel & Judith S. Davis Karen B. Davis James T. Dutton Laura D. Earle-Imre Christopher S. & Tiany Blocker Eich Aurelio E. Fernandez Florida Discount Drugs, Inc. Ruth M. Franczek Kimball G. George Ernest C. Godfrey, Jr. Gulf Gate Animal Hospital, Inc. Halifax Veterinary Center John W. & Elizabeth A. Harvey Hillsborough Animal Health Foundation Glen F. Hosis Julio A. & Maria-Amelia Ibez Innovative Animal Products, Inc. Intervet Inc. Island Animal Hospital of Venice, P.A. John & Martha Carter Foundation Stephen M. Joiner Jacalyn N. Kolk Lakeland Winter Haven Kennel Club, Inc. Katherine R. Laurenzano Rob Leonard Keith E. & Roberta S. Lerner Marta P. Lista Moody C. McCall Delia H. McGehee Carol McLeod Andrew R. Mercak Mr. & Mrs. Keith G. Miller eresa P. Nenezian New Generation Devices, Inc. Paul Nicoletti North Orange Veterinary Hospital Nutramax Laboratories, Inc. Oaks Veterinary Hospital, Inc. Oakwood Animal Hospital LLC Gainesville Oshore Fishing Club, Inc. Scott M. & Catherine A. Peters Matthew C. Peterson Pzer, Inc. Procter & Gamble Co. Quail Roost Animal Hospital, Inc.THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINEHonor Roll of Donors for 2009-2010e 2009-2010 University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine Honor Roll of Donors is a way of recognizing generous gifts to the college. e students, faculty and sta are most appreciative of this support. is years honor roll includes names of all donors of $25 or more between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010. Your name should appear in alphabetical order among donors who made gifts of similar amounts. Many alumni choose to make gifts to the college in the name of their veterinary practice and the practice name is listed. We have included a list of Bequest Society members from the College of Veterinary Medicine. ese members have included the college in their estate planning at a value of $10,000 or more. In spite of our eorts, omissions and errors sometimes occur and we want to know to know about them. If you have questions or corrections concerning your listing, please contact the Oce of Development and Alumni Aairs, College of Veterinary Medicine, PO Box 100125, Gainesville, FL 32610-0125, (352) 294-4256 ext 5200.FLORIDA VETERINARIAN13Donald J. Reese, Jr. John E. & Carolyn Retey Ann L. Riebe John N. Ropes Saint Johns Veterinary Clinic Salzburg Animal Hospital, Inc. Chris Sanchez Santa Fe Animal Hospital, Inc. Michael Schaer Segrest Farms, Inc. Shands at the University of Florida Stephen Shores Simmons Educational Fund SPCA of Tampa Bay, FL, Inc. Merrill R. & Rena B. Stevens Stoney Creek Animal Hospital USRider Equestrian Motor Plan Vet-Stem, Inc. Village Veterinary Denise M. Vondrasek-Kanzler & James A. Kanzler Michael T. Walsh Western Veterinary Conference Westlab Pharmacy, Inc. Marjorie & Stewart A. Zimmerman$500 To $9992 Mule Cattle Co. Actions DogTraining & NightCare Cntr. Donna K. & William H. Anderson Kevin J. Anderson (d) Animal Medical Clinic Aurora Organic Farms, Inc. Bayshore Animal Hospital Bloomingdale Animal Hospital, P.A. Cecilia O. Carey Coastal Veterinary Hospital College Road Animal Hospital Companion Animal Hospital Companion Animal Hospital of Jax Deborah A. Cone Kirsten L. Cooke Charles H. Courtney Cynda Crawford Patricia L. Curtis-Craig Joanna E. Dan Shirley C. & Scott J. Denardo Desoto Veterinary Services Joseph A. & Deborah S. DiPietro Karen-Jo Dolamore E.I. Medical Imaging East Orlando Animal Hospital, Inc. Elaine B. Taylor & Scott B. Taylor Fdtn. Honor RRoll of DDonorsFLORIDA VETERINARIAN13

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN14 Gary W. Ellison Equine Ophthalmology, PA Equine Reproduction LLC Florida Cattlewomen, Inc. Florida Veterinary Specialists, Inc. Fondren Pet Care Center Margaret A. Fuller-Kalb & Charles R. Kalb, Jr. Steeve Giguere Rolando J. Gutierrez Susan A. Halloran Patricia A. Hamilton Henry D. & Stephanie J. Hirsch Raymond & Christy Hottinger Richard Z. Kane Audrey A. Kelleman Tamara F. Kelly Drs. Scott R. & Susan F. Kerns Iskande L. Larkin Kathleen D. Linton Arthur Lugisse Lund Animal Hospital Georgia A. Lyons (d) Lisardo J. Martinez IV Matanzas River Animal Hospital, Inc. Henry James & Christie M. Metz Fdtn. Mobile Pet Vet Era J. Moorer Beth A. & George E. Morris Newtown Animal Clinic LLC Noahs Ark Animal Hospital, Inc. Edward J. Noga Novey Animal Hospital, Inc. Matt G. & Ashley B. Oakes Olive Road Animal Hospital Pasco Hernando Vet. Medical Assn., Inc. Patrick & Toni Walsh Charitable Fdtn. Pet Calls Animal Hospital, Inc. Lesley L. Phillips L. Scott Pierce Patricia J. Pierce Pinellas Animal Hospital Planco Veterinary Care Quail Hollow Animal Hospital Stacy R. Randall Laura B. Raymond Sheilah A. Robertson San Antonio Animal Hospital, Inc. Sarasota Veterinary Center Robert O. Schick Robert J. Snien Southside Animal Clinic David A. Storey Sunset Lakes Veterinary Clinic, P.A. Susan M. Tanhauser-Munn James P. ompson Trail Animal Hospital Claudia Valderrama Veterinary Imaging Center of San Village Square Veterinary Clinic Jonathan R. Wald Marilyn Weekley Col. Gayle E. Wooding omas J. Wronski$250 To $499All Animal Clinic All Creatures Animal Hospital Aloise A. & Robert M. Anderson Animal Clinic Ark Animal Hospital Linda A. Banks Bayonet Point Animal Clinic Beville Animal Hospital Kimberly C. Breeze Steven P. Brinsko Judith B. Broward Nancy L. Burns Maron B. Calderwood-Mays & David L. Mays Care Animal Hospital of Brandon, Inc. Dawn M. Cleaver Karen G. Connary Stephanie S. & Antonio Correa Crossroads Animal Hospital at Kendall Fred S. Cuccinello Carol J. Detrisac Richard E. & E. Carol (d) Dierks Tracy S. DuVernoy East Orange Animal Hospital Edgewood Animal Clinic Gardens Animal Hospital Ellis C. Greiner Peter F. Guild Karen Heard Hilltop Animal Hospital Amanda I. Hosny Natalie M. Isaza Jensen Beach Animal Hospital Chantal M. Jones David P. Kelbert Leigh J. Kemnitz Knowles Snapper Creek Animal Clinic Paul G. Koch William R. Kroll Joseph Lanzi Lillian C. & Douglas R. LeBlanc Karen R. Legato David H. MacMahon Arthur E. Mallock Mary Beth Marks Mary Ellen Markunas Feick Milton J. McKelvie Alfred M. & Nancy B. Merritt Midway Animal Hospital J. Christopher Mixon eresa E. Montgomery Monument Road Animal Hospital, P.A. Gary L. Neuman Parkway Animal Hospital Nancy V. Perry Ponte Vedra Animal Hospital, Inc. Principal Financial Group Fdtn., Inc. Relief Veterinary Services Susan K. Ridinger Emily Rothstein Sabal Chase Animal Clinic Carla W. Salido Shank Animal Hospital, Inc. Southland Animal Hospital & Board JoAnne B. Stapler Chester W. Taylor III Wendy & Mark A. Taylor Timberlane Pet Hospital & Resort UF CVM Class of 2013 Veterinary Center of Sarasota, Inc. West End Animal Hospital eron M. Westervelt Jo Ann Winn Patricia H. Wlasuk Dana N. Zimmel $100 To $249e Acorn LLC Dawn Melissa Adamson Advanced Veterinary Care of Pasco Jill & Jerey L. Anderson Susan E. Anderson Animal Medical Center Animal Medical Clinic, Inc. Douglas F. Antczak A. Barbara Antz-Hanson David B. Aronson Lisa P. Atkinson Laura Baddish Robert M. & Christine M. Barton Alison L. Bawden omas R. Beer Bradley S. Bender Barbara H. Bergin Adam M. Berman Terry B. & Eric C. Besch Margaret A. & Tom Bielecky Blanding Boulevard Animal Hospital Kathleen M. Boehme Michael P. Boniface Rosemarie Borkowski Howard P. Bouchelle III Suzanne C. Brannan Mary R. & Richard B. Bressman Mark C. Brigham Brookwood Financial Partners LP Eric J. Bucki Buck Lake Animal Hospital Daryl D. Buss omas F. Callahan Nancy A. Carpenter Cat Hospital of Sarasota Lisa A. Centonze Eleanor P. Chalmers Robert D. & Jennifer L. Clark Terry Clekis Randi P. Cohen Bettina L. Conrad Lisa A. Conti Joseph N. Covino omas G. Cox Gervais Crawford Olivia Crissey Gretchen B. Cullen May-Li D. Cuypers Francis X. Daly, Jr. Amy Davis West eodore Diktaban Annette E. & Donald F. Doerr Melanie L. Donis Maarten Drost Deidre C. DuBissette Gregg A. DuPont Dennis J. & Judy K. Egan David & Rhonda C. Feitsma Alan N. Finkelstein Robert R. Fisher Susan M. Fitzgerald Florida Rock Industries, Inc. Kristi L. Fox Jackson Katherine M. Francis Ruth Francis-Floyd Marilyn Frank Franklin Lakes Animal Hospital Alexander E. Gallagher Dennis E. Geagan D. Scott & Linda S. Gettings Jill B. & Randall W. Gibb Linda K. Gilbertson Jerey A. Goldberg & Anne M. Koterba FLORIDA VETERINARIAN14Lisa C. Goldburg Eleanor M. Green Daniel R. Grossman Joan A. Hadraba Edward L. Haeussner Patrick H. Hafner Tracy S. Handnger Harry H. Harkins, Jr. Scott Hart Curtis B. & Lynnette M. Hennessey Hernando Animal Hospital Sean M. Hillock Guenther Hochhaus Alfred M. Holt Hoppenstedt Veterinary Hospital Susan J. & Mark L. Horwitz Stacey A. Huber Margaret L. Hughes Glenn D. Huth Ermanno Iaglitsch Garna J. & Leroy A. Jones Lana Kaiser, M.D., D.V.M. John A. Kirsch Wendy J. Kozak Eva D. Krampotich Brian R. Kreitz Charlotte M. Kuczenska S. Allen Kushner Lake Emma Animal Hospital Pamela S. & Murry L. Langtt Julie K. Levy Margaret M. Levy Ethel D. Lindsey Eloise Lockhart-Sample Carrie G. & Steven J. Long Lillian C. & Mark A. Lorenz Christine A. Machen Michele M. & Ben W. MacKay Robert J. MacKay Margo L. MacPherson Robert A. Marrazzo Wade & Marie S. Matthews Joseph A. McClure Anne E. McCollum Genne D. McDonald Sue M. McDonnell Elizabeth C. McGrath Megna K. McNamara Tonya Meyer Judith A. & Edward J. Milcarsky Jean A. & Frank L. Miles Christine E. Miskell Lori K. & Kenneth R. Moe Christy O. Montgomery David L. Moses My Animal Hospital, Inc. Joel B. Navratik Wendy M. Norman Northwood Oaks Veterinary Hospital Cathleen ODonnell Jon ODonnell Kathleen L. Opper Palm Beach Veterinary Specialists John H. Parks Laura L. Pearson Christina P. Pellicane Gail K. Perfect Ronald L. Perry Pet Care Clinic, Inc. Pet Medical Center of Vero Beach Phoenix Mining Equipment Polk Equine P.L. Sharron K. & J. Edward Poppell Antonio Pozzi Andrew B. Prather Honor RRoll of DDonors

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN15 Katherine Preston Destiny L. & Randolph S. Prezzano Andrew Rappaport Rawls Veterinary Hospital Michael S. Ray Louise C. Redner Roger L. Reep Sue N. & Joe L. Reina Lavonne Remebert David M. & Cynthia F. Richardson Adrienne D. Robertson William G. Rodkey Katie Rouillard Rex R. Rowell, Jr. Tina Ruggiero Clare A. Ryan A. Fleet Ryland III Donald E. Sanders Elizabeth M. Santschi SAS Institute, Inc. Lilianne & Miguel Scannone Karl A. Schmidt, Jr. Robert G. Shimp Richard P. Shinn Marclyn Sims Leann B. & Joseph G. Slezak Julie M. Stephens-DeValle Amy E.S. Stone Bruce Sullivan Amy E.S. Stone, Sunrise Animal Hospital, Inc. Roberta J. Swakon Robert G. Tate Karen L. Taylor Megan S. Taylor Sandra A. omas Edward L. ompson Sharon R. Tiberio Tomoka Pines Veterinary Hospital Cathryn E. Turner E. Lynn Turner Alessio Vigani Brian H. & Barbara F. Vitsky Eugene S. Vogel Ryan M. Walczak Gail M. Waldman James P. Waller, Jr. Virginia M. Walsh Michael K. Ward Mary B. & Robert J. Wark Jerey West Weston Road Animal Hospital Elizabeth M. Whitley Richard B. Williams Winter Animal Hospital Wolfe Equine Veterinary Practice Karen E. Wolfsdorf Jennifer A. Woolf Julia A. Wuerz Allen F. Wysocki Linda Yonke Robert E. Young $25 To $99Acacia Animal Clinic Kathy S. & Paul J. Aguirre Mary E. Aiken Amanda B. Alexander Carole A. & Gerald M. Anderson Animal Health & Healing Center Roseann Baars Dena D. Baker Anne Banville Shannon Barnes Bay Vet Consulting, Inc. Felicia J. Bayer Sherri S. Beckman Andy Bennett Carrie L. Benson Sandra L. Black Jonathan S. & Lauri C. Block Boeing Co. Beth A. Buchanan Vivian P. Burke Caleb J. & Michelle Burton Eric W. Butler Carolyn M. & Willis M. Calhoun Erik Cappucci Carol Chalu Wayne & Cynthia L. Chalu Gloria M. Chillon Kathleen M. Chiocca John B. Christoph Carol Clark Jerey D. & Sarah H. Clarke Kate M. Cole Susan Collins Margaret Condron Lee Conger Nann Cooke Amy Corbitt Countryside Animal Clinic Gwendolyn L. & Eric Daniels Nancy P. Davis Lara R. DeRuisseau Katherine E. Desmond Mindy W. Dietterick Docs Animal Clinic Katherine A. Doerr Timothy Dorren Tabitha A. Draughon Debra A. Duguid Jodi E. Ehrlich Federal Animal Hospital Eugene M. Fueyo Rachel A. Garner Mark E. Gendzier Bruce A. Goldberger Kelli J. Gottlich Margaret D. Green Brian Grimo Chad Hackett Robert N. Harper Mary Beth Head Stacy L. Hearrell-Rivera & Aramis C. Rivera Ann E. Heckman Barbara E. Henderson Pamela Heneghan Sharon K. Hiemenz Cathy Honnold Vona Horne Amanda M. House Lia M. Huber Kerry I. Jackson Kristina E. James Stacy A. Jaryno Christine M. Jenkins Judy F. Johns Renee B. & Gerard Kass KPMG Foundation Donna J. Kranzberg Lake Area Animal Hospital, P.A. Karen H. Lim Janis Liro Christine S. Litt Don & Robin Lloyd Gary A. Lukacs Sara K. Lyle Christine Mangone Joan T. Marshall Tonya S. Matheny Earl & Carol Matthews Catherine McClelland Richard F. McKay Genevieve A. Mendoza Jonathan K. Meyers Tracy J. Mieras Roberta V. Mills Robert B. Munsterman Barbara A. & omas D. Noethiger Northwood Animal Hospital, Inc. Sally J. OConnell Elizabeth A. & Skip Olmstead Lisa J. Peters Frederica B. Peterson Charlie & Carol A. Bottary-Phillips Louise Phillips Leslie A. Priest Barbara A. Progulske Dinora Quiles Roger L. Reed Kenneth E. Reheld Donna Repeta-Schuster Sarah G. Robertson Allison H. Rogers Edward Rouillard Elizabeth M. Roy Russell A. Roy Jaclyn Saide Sarah A. Santiago Allison R. Sateren David L. Sausville Beverly Savage Leigh A. Sawyer & Gerald V. Quinnan, Jr. Michael J. Schriver Zoe H. Seale Randy E. Settle Mary & Gary Shue Silver Star Animal Hospital PA Tommie Bayer Siracusa Sheri M. Sleeth Betty L. Souther Sabina Blanco Squires Christine L. St. Jean Wyoma G. & Neil W. Standal George C. Steers Elaine M. Stephenson Christina W. Stewart Donald W. Stieler Jan K. Stottlemyer Kristen S. Sullivan Dolores & Milton M. Sureck Joyce M. & Ben A. Swenson Tad Speedometer LLC Florence M. Tanner Leona omann Mark & Nancy A. orlton Timuquana Animal Hospital Tri-County Animal Hospital R. Elaine & Allen E. Turner Dolores M. Tyneway-Robi Candy & Mark Udell Ans Van Beek-Torkington & Gary E. Torkington VCA Briarcli Animal Hospitals Althaia A. Vitikos Heather L. Wamsley Sarah E. Weldon Mary A. Wertenberger Earl White Charles F. Widger Beverly A. Williams Wanda F. Williams Matthew D. WinterFLORIDA VETERINARIAN15Misty D. Wise Laura L. Wolfe Ariel Y. Womble Christen Woodley Gretchen M. Yost Yvonne C. YoungLess than $25Alison M. Adler-Swearingen Cara R. Anderson Rosas Nicholas J. Bacon Carsten Bandt Cheryl L. Beck Lois M. Behrend Holly K. Blair Boca Village Animal Hospital Gail A. Burton Lynne S. Capece Jenna Cappucci Sarah K. Carey Al Chan Mary P. DeSanto Kenneth R. Dickinson Cherry D. Douglas Susan E. Eveland Michelle Fenwick Gladys Fernandez Flagler Animal Hospital, P.A. Josephine A. & Vincent Gallo Kara A. Gallo Carolanne B. Garlick Susan M. Geren Kelly H. Giesbrecht Leslie Golden Debra C. Hallow Catherine M. Hass Ray M. Kaplan Travis Kuhlka Alan T. Legato Carolina Madera Meredith J. Main Helen A. Mason Claire K. Mazur Brooke J. Minton Northside Animal Hospital Christopher D. Ott Christie Palermo Panhandle Veterinary Service David Rostal Matt Rouillard Beth Sarni Seminole Boulevard Animal Hospital Tammy B. Shastri Briana N. Sherman Ada J. Simon Skyway Animal Hospital, Inc. Paul A. & Susana R. Smith Andrew J. Specht Nicole Spicer David Stelling, D.V.M. Suburban Animal Hospital Vet-I-Care Animal Hospital Malcolm A. Wade Jean M. West Larry E. Williams Weirong Zhang

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN16 Deans Circle of ExcellenceListed below are friends of the college who have joined this premier society that supports unparalleled educational and institutional excellence. is is a cumulative list rather than a scal year list. Lifetime MembersDena Baker Betsy Coville Aurelio & Berta Fernandez Richard & Cheryl Kane Kristy & Scott Lund Nanette Parratto-WagnerFLORIDA VETERINARIAN16Paul Gartenberg Ernest Godfrey Je Godwin John Harvey Bob & Margaret Hase Glen Hosis Amy & Bryan Hu Julio Ibez Jacksonville Veterinary Medical Society Stephen Joiner Dana Kale Juillerat Denise Vondrasek-Kanzler & James Kanzler, Jr.Loyal MembersJohn & Adele Bass Jack & Rebecca Beal James Brechin Frances Carter Luis Castro David Cromer Larry Dee Katherine Doerr Christopher & Tiany Blocker Eich Bob Encinosa Charles and Carol FischmanCollege of Veterinary Medicine Bequest SocietyListed below are friends of the college who have provided documentation that they have included the college as a beneciary in their estate plans. is is a cumulative list rather than a scal year list.Anonymous (17) William E. Adams (d) Jeanne E. Arkin Fredrick Hugh W. Ashford Margaret A. Atwood Dena D. Baker Melanie V. Barr-Allen Jean S. Bidwell Bernard W. Bigger (d) Helen A. Bild (d) Phillip & Sally Bohr Robert & Pauline Boucher Leland W. Brannan Adele Bucci-Machata Marianne A. Burbach Michael A. Burke Helen E. Campbell (d) Sarah K. Carey Victoria L. Clampitt Edward & Jeanette Cole Rachel Rambo Cowley (d) Edna Croland (d) F. Crosman Fitler, Jr. (d) Jacqlin M. Crotty Morris P. Culpepper III Larry G. Dee Richard C. DeKoker (d) Joseph E. Dorsey Jack & Linda Eads Susan E. Ellis Anne C. Fleming Josephine P. Fletcher Dorothy B. Flynn (d) Leonard A. Franz (d) Ann Gasponi (d) Mark E. Gendzier George T. Gwathmey (d) Karl & Roxann Hart Robert B. Hartless II Jeannette M. Hastings (d) eodore H. Heide (d) Amy A. Heimann Carey A. Heinrich Priscilla Henderson (d) Georgia E. Hofmann(d) Arthur & Kathleen Hornsby William S. Hopper Family Trust Jack B. Humphries (d) Scott & Vicki Hunt Jean Imparato (d) Clara S. Inman (d) Joseph E. Jablonski (d) Barbara C. Joslin (d) Richard Z. Kane Marilyn N. Keehr Dorothy R. Klick Jacalyn N. Kolk Joseph A. Korjenek (d) James M. Kosmas Carol Levine (d) Morton J. Levine Dorothy Luder (d) Georgia A. Lyons (d) Carol A. Magarine (d) Arie S. Marable (d) Fran Marino Celia S. Martin Louis G. Matigot (d) Michael J. McNamara Marilyn Middleton Phylis L. McLaughlin (d) Billie K. Miller (d) Jerome & Shirley Modell Beverly A. Moreau Harold Morris Trust Fund Susan Mularski-Dismuke George (d) & Marge Nieves Henry L. Normand (d) Alan & Barbara Pareira Edwina Parkinson Trust Nanette P. Parratto-Wagner Lillian L. Parry (d) Madeline S. Pearson Folke H. Peterson (d) Scott & Maureen Pierce George H. Pollack Kathleen M. Pollack Virginia Quelch Barbara A. Ragan Barbara H. Reark Joseph & Marilyn Renton Diane Reser Susan K. Ridinger Wayne H. Riser (d) William P. Roberts Rob Roknick Robert D. Romine, Jr. Bernard J. Rudo (d) Donna B. Sachs Doris J. Salsbury (d) Helen Samaras Suzanne J. Schwertley William & Brenda Selph Joseph G. Slick Sherilyn K. Solanick Almeda C. Stemple (d) Mark & Nancy orlton Helen Tolmach Anne Troneck (d) Mary Anna Tyson (d) Katrina D. Vanesian Dale Kaplan-Stein Tamara Faulkner Kelly Robert Leonard Marta Lista Moody McCall Michael McNulty Paul Nicoletti James Pennington Richard Rubinstein Stephen Shores Richard Sutli David Tollon Gloria C. Vargo Gerri Voller Roberta H. Waller Wendy A. Wallner (d) Michael & Diane Ward Frances P. Weaver (d) Harriet B. Weeks (d) Robin Weeks (d) Grace T. Wilson (d) (d) = Deceased this Fiscal Year Honor RRoll of DDonors

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN17 GGainesville resident says family dogs survival a holiday miracle Although the holidays were tough this year for the Palmer family of Gainesville, they are grateful for what they call their little survival miracle a toy rat terrier, Bindi, whose presence gives them much to be thankful for.At the beginning of October, I lost my 22-year-old son in a horrible event that will take me a long time to get over, said Elizabeth Palmer, a network administrator at the University of Florida. About three weeks after his passing, another family member and I forgot to check on Bindis location when I left for work. It turns out that she had been left with our larger dogs instead of with her half-sister, Sarah. When my 14and 16-year-old daughters came home from school, they found Bindi in a bloody mess and barely alive. Palmer took the dog to her local veterinarian, who advised her to take Bindi to the UF Small Animal Hospital due to the severity of her injuries. When the family arrived at UF, Bindi was immediately taken back to the emergency area and assessed. e doctors came out and described what they had done and all the care and surgeries that would be needed in hopes of keeping her alive, Palmer said. ey estimated the cost, which was a burden on our family, but we immediately agreed. We were willing to spend whatever we could to keep her alive. e family visited Bindi every day. At rst, it seemed doubtful that she would survive. Bindi sustained a substantial amount of muscle and vascular damage to her left hind leg, and also to her neck and right hind leg, said Marije Risselada, D.V.M., Ph.D., a clinical assistant professor of small animal surgery at UF. We performed two reconstructive procedures on her left hind leg in order to close the entire wound. For the rst six days, UF veterinary surgeons treated Bindi with a specialized wound care system, called vacuum assisted closure, which is a treatment method frequently used by UF veterinary surgeons. Slowly, Bindis condition improved. It seemed like every other day she had another surgery, but in just a couple of weeks, she was ready to go home, with only one wound still left to close, Palmer said. She is our little survival miracle. After she was discharged from UF, Bindi accompanied Palmer to work every day. Palmer wanted to keep a close eye on her pet, and it was convenient to drive across campus with Bindi for additional treatments of the remaining open wound. Once that wound healed, I continued to take Bindi to work with me, Palmer said. She began to love the car rides and the trips down the hall when I would visit my coworkers to help them with their software issues. Charlies death has forever changed my life, Palmer said. It would have been unbearable to have lost Bindi, too. We very much needed this happy ending right now. By Sarah Carey CClinical UUpdatesPhoto by Sarah Carey Photo by Sarah Carey

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN18 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN18CClinical UUpdatesDr. Ashley Allen, a small animal medicine intern, is shown Jan. 7 with Franky in the UF Small Animal Hospitals emergency room. Frankys visit then was a happy one, but last fall he was a critically ill patient in the ER. Photo by Sarah Carey

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN19 A 5-year-old domestic shorthair cat named Franky is at home in Micanopy with his owners after successful treatment at the University of Florida Small Animal Hospital for an infection with a deadly blood parasite most people have never heard of cytauxzoon. Its the rst time UF veterinarians say they remember seeing, much less successfully treating, such a case.UF veterinarians used a new treatment protocol they hope will help them save more animals diagnosed with cytauxzoon, pronounced Sie-Tow-Zoh-aN), also known as bobcat fever, in the future. is parasite is not that rare, but almost all animals aicted with it die quickly, so we usually dont see them here, said Gareth Buckley, VetM.B., a clinical assistant professor and emergency and critical care specialist at UF. Owned by John Prosser and Ann Murray of Micanopy, Franky rst began showing signs of illness in mid-September. We were walking around our yard one morning and noticed Franky was behaving a little strangely, Murray said. He drinking out of the pool, crouched down. We thought we needed to get him to the vet, that maybe he had a bladder infection. Prosser and Murray took the animal to their veterinarian, Dr. Molly Pearson, who kept him overnight for observation. e following morning, Pearson called the couple and recommended they take the cat to UF, as his condition had deteriorated. We brought him over and saw Dr. Ashley Allen from the emergency service, Murray said. She helped us gure out how we needed to proceed. Basic bloodwork was performed and Allen, an intern in small animal medicine and surgery, noticed the presence of parasites in red blood cells. Further diagnostics by UF veterinary pathologists conrmed that the parasite was cytauxzoon. Dr. Allen actually drove to the pharmacy in the middle of the night, since the new treatment protocol we used called for antiprotozoal drugs we do not keep in stock, Buckley said. Franky remained very sick for several days. Veterinarians used diuretics to rid the cat of uid in his lungs -and administered oxygen for two days. Franky became anemic and experienced severe gastrointestinal bleeding that resulted in two blood transfusions during his weeklong hospital stay. He also had a low white cell count, probably due to infection, Buckley said, adding that treatment with the antiprotozoal drugs, antibiotics and nutrition administered through a feeding tube continued until Frankys condition slowly improved. Frankys owners had looked up cytauxzoon infection online and realized their cats illness could be fatal. Yet, they never lost hope. He was struggling hard, but we felt optimistic that Franky was ghting and staying alive, Murray said. It was touch and go for a few days, and Dr. Allen was wonderfully conscientious about keeping us informed and helping us understand the process, Murray said. We knew that she and the other veterinarians were truly pulling for Frankys recovery and that meant so much to us.     Although she and Prosser have two other cats, Ann said Franky was the most people friendly of the three, and had never been sick before. ats partly why we wanted to give him this chance, she said. We always hoped for the best and tried to do whatever we could for him. Soon after Franky went home, he began to improve dramatically, although it took a few days for his appetite to return to normal. Rechecks indicate that Franky is a happy, health cat with no long-term side eects, Buckley said. e important thing is that although infection with this parasite happens when it happens, we want veterinarians as well as members of the public to know that we have now shown that we can successfully treat these cases. e protocol UF veterinarians used to treat Franky was reported at the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicines annual meeting, during a presentation Allen attended. Luckily, Dr. Allen was in that talk, Buckley said. By Sarah Carey UUF veterinarians help cat survive bobcat fever parasiteJohn Prosser and his wife, Ann Murray, with Franky following the cats successful treatment at UF for infection with the cytauxzoon parasite. Photo by Sarah Carey

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN20 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN20 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN20 DDay Ain theLLife of theSmall Animal HospitalAll photos by Russ Bryant

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN21 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN21 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN21 DDay Ain theLLife of theSmall Animal HospitalThe new UF Small Animal Hospital bustled with activity on Nov. 8, just over a week after the facility opened its doors. These Day in the Life photos offer a glimpse of what goes on behind the scenes as we work to help all of our animal patients.

PAGE 22

FLORIDA VETERINARIAN22 LLarge animal faculty member drives multiple agendasAmanda House, D.V.M., is on the road again. Put another way, if shes not, she will be soon.Such is life these days for House, an assistant professor of equine extension and an internist in the UF College of Veterinary Medicines department of large animal clinical sciences. In addition to directing the departments equine research program, House was recently appointed course director for the colleges new practicedbased equine clerkship. She also recently completed a yearlong term as president of the Florida Association of Equine Practitioners. In her new role as clerkship course director, House is in the process of meeting with more than 60 equine veterinarians from across the state. e goal of the clerkship is to provide veterinary students with on-farm primary care experience with horses in physical exams, diagnosis, treatment, herd health, routine medicine, surgery, and practice management. Veterinary students would be assigned to enrolled practitioners for two week rotations. As FAEP president, Houses goal was to drive the groups ambitious agenda, which includes oering continuing education opportunities and professional development to a group of approximately 200 members. So drive she does literally, across the state, meeting, greeting and multitasking as she goes. I have fortunately been able to combine my roles at times, and can occasionally meet with practitioners about the clerkship at FAEP events, said House. I have also oered to make myself available to county extension oces to coordinate special meetings when Im in their area. It can be a scheduling challenge, but I am traveling almost every week. House joined FAEP shortly after accepting a faculty position with the CVM in 2007. She soon was named to the groups board of directors and served as its vice president in 2009. Unexpected changes in the ocer slate meant she ascended to the presidents role this year rather than in 2011, but House hasnt missed a beat. As a member of the associations educational program committee, House has helped organize the 2010 Student Appreciation Day in Ocala and the Promoting Excellence Symposium in Orlando along with additional wet labs or short courses the group decides to oer. In 2010, we had a breeding soundness exam short course in February last year, a wound management short course in July, and an imaging wet lab in November, House said, adding that some of these events are free to members and to UF veterinary students. Twenty-eight students participated in this years UF Student Appreciation Day wet labs on Aug. 28, she said. For several years, the group has funded a $1,000 scholarship to a senior veterinary student. We consider it critical to mentor and give back to young members of our profession, House said. e FAEP Student Appreciation Day Wet Labs has been a tremendously popular event among our students and the practitioners. In addition to promoting high-quality continuing education, the association has worked closely with the Florida Veterinary Medical 22We consider it critical to mentor and give back to young members of our profession. Amanda HousePhoto by Sarah Kiewel Faculty Prole

PAGE 23

FLORIDA VETERINARIAN23 Associations legislative committee on issues aecting equine veterinarians and welfare for horses in the state. Houses extensive network of contacts, formed largely through equine extension and clinical work she has performed over the past three years, has helped enormously in her ability to be eective, not only in her administrative role with FAEP, but as she reaches out to practitioners and potential UF partners while laying the groundwork for the new equine clerkship program. I have to say that the experience and relationships I have been able to establish through FAEP have denitely enhanced what I do at the university, House said. Jackie Shellow, D.V.M., a UF CVM alumna and newly installed FAEP president, called House great to work with and said she had no idea how she juggled everything on her plate. She is well spoken, organized, extremely diplomatic and very good at presenting issues and getting the important across, Shellow said, adding that it was important to the veterinary profession that the professional organizations in the state of Florida represent the practitioners and work closely with the UF CVM. e FAEP is a perfect example of this happening, Shellow said. Working together, we can be a stronger voice for veterinary medicine and for horses in the state of Florida. By Sarah Carey Photo by Sarah Kiewel Photo by Sarah Kiewel Shelter program gets $25K boost The Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association recently joined with the Florida-based Kislak Family Fund to present a $25,000 grant to the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine for a surgical training program that benets injured and ill shelter animals.e innovative UF surgical training program, known as Helping Alachuas Animals Requiring Treatment and Surgery, is one of only two programs in the country that provides a variety of surgical training opportunities for veterinary students while also providing care for shelter animals. e HAARTS program is a perfect example of animal-welfare-friendly surgery training, said Dr. Susan Krebsbach, an HSVMA veterinary consultant. Its a win-win situation because the students get enhanced training opportunities and injured and ill animals receive necessary medical care. Types of procedures performed include fracture repair, mass removal, cystotomy and tooth extractions, among other procedures. Animals accepted into the program come from Alachua County animal rescue groups and the county animal shelter. e HAARTS program has provided invaluable experience to veterinary students by exposing them to surgical techniques they will commonly see in veterinary practice, said Dr. Natalie Isaza, who oversees the HAARTS program. Just as importantly, the program has helped save the lives of more than 200 animals in our community who most likely would have been euthanized due to lack of resources to pay for their care. FLORIDA VETERINARIAN23

PAGE 24

FLORIDA VETERINARIAN24 Honors, Awards, Appointments & AnnouncementsFLORIDA VETERINARIAN24Gibbs named associate deanPaul Gibbs, B.V.Sc., Ph.D., a veterinarian and virologist in the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicines department of infectious diseases and pathology, has been named associate dean for students and instruction at the college. Gibbs has served as a member of UFs veterinary faculty since 1979, when he became a founding member. He has been a full professor in the college since 1981 and also holds joints appointment with the College of Medicines department of molecular genetics and microbiology as well as with the College of Public Health and Health Professions department of environmental and global health. He was instrumental in the establishment of a joint Doctor of Veterinary Medicine/Masters of Public Health degree program oered by the colleges of veterinary medicine and PHHP in 2007. Between ve and 10 freshmen enroll in this program every year. Gibbs is previous past chairman of the colleges curriculum committee and works with state and other governmental agencies to aid in the identication of foreign animal diseases, a subject for which he has developed an online continuing education course for Florida veterinarians. Gibbs also has developed a course in International Animal Health aimed at veterinarians practicing in the developing world. In addition, he has helped Florida middle and high school students learn more about emerging diseases by partnering with science teachers throughout the state to provide them with training tools on emerging diseases. From 1994-1999, Gibbs directed UFs International Center, serving as the universitys chief international ocer. As a virologist, his career focus continues on the international control and eradication of emerging viral diseases having epidemic potential. Gibbs said it was a great privilege to accept his new position at such an exciting and pivotal time. In the 31 years since I was appointed as one of the founding faculty of the college, I have seen the college mature and the university grow in stature and size, Gibbs said. Now, with the new state-of-the-art UF Small Animal Hospital opening soon and an increased student enrollment to 100 students per year, the college is entering a new phase of its history. He said the changing world we live in and particularly the past 10 years have been particularly challenging. e events of 9/11, the spate of emerging diseases, increasing concern over the environment, the exponential increase in computerized information and the recent economic crisis have changed the role of the veterinary profession here in the United States and indeed worldwide, Gibbs said. Veterinarians are now involved in protecting and promoting animal and human health in so many more ways than just a decade ago. He added that the sophistication of modern surgery and medicine continues to grow, along with the number of veterinary graduates who choose to specialize further after receiving their D.V.M. degrees. While many of our graduates continue to enter practice in the U.S., a surprisingly large number are serving in the military, the pharmaceutical industry, state and federal government and other less traditional roles, he said. Our graduates span the globe. e nation expects much of our veterinary students, but they have much to oer. Gibbs added, I hope that in some small way, I can help them be better prepared to meet the myriad challenges of the 21st century and to become citizens of the world.Brooks presents Milne Lecture at AAEPDennis Brooks, D.V.M., Ph.D., a professor of ophthalmology at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, presented the prestigious Frank J. Milne State-of-theArt Lecture at the annual meeting of the American Association of Equine Practitioners in Baltimore in December 2010. Brooks lecture, titled Catastrophic Ocular Surface Failure in the Horse, addressed the latest approaches to handling severe corneal conditions in horses, which he says most practitioners will encounter during their careers. An internationally recognized expert in canine and equine glaucoma, Brooks also specializes in infectious keratitis and corneal transplantation of horses. He has performed close to 300 successful corneal transplants in horses, more than anyone in the world. He received his board certication from the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists in 1984 and has served as a full professor at UFs veterinary college since 1998. Among the numerous awards Brooks has received for his teaching and research are the Pzer Award for Research Excellence and the British Equine Veterinary Associations Sir Frederick Smith Memorial Lecture and Medal. He was named the Western Veterinary Conference Continuing Educator of the Year in the equine category in 2007. In addition, Brooks served as president of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists from 1997 to 1998. He authored the book Equine Ophthalmology, which was published in 2002 and 2007. Two former UF faculty members have also presented the Milne lecture, including Joe Mayhew, B.V.Sc., in 1999, and Alfred Merritt, D.V.M., in 2003. e Milne lecture was created in 1997 to bring a meaningful learning experience to AAEP members and to recognize an individual with a distinguished career in research and discovery who has presented and published their ndings in a specic area of equine health. Dr. Paul Gibbs Dr. Dennis Brooks

PAGE 25

FLORIDA VETERINARIAN25 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN25FLORIDA VETERINARIAN25CVM fundraiser honored by peersKaren Legato, senior director of development and alumni aairs for the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, has become the rst recipient of the University of Florida Foundations Debbie Klapp Memorial Award. Legato was selected by a committee consisting of ve Foundation administrators. Criteria for the award include unique overall achievement, strong collaboration, mentorship, and creativity in approaching job, career and life. Recipients must be employed for at least ve years as a UF fundraiser. A licensed pharmacist, Klapp, who died of cancer in 2007, served for many years as the development ocer for UFs College of Pharmacy and the Warrington College of Business Administration. Debbie was a consummate professional, said Carter Boydstun, senior associate vice president for development at the Foundation. She was a strong advocate for her donors and for her unit. She was creative, aggressive and delightful and an extremely well-rounded person. In addition to her professional role, Klapp was an accomplished golfer and painter who was a great team player, Boydstun said. Debbie embodied everything that a successful development ocer should be. At the time of Klapps untimely death at the age of 56, she had not only gained the largest gift in the history of the College of Pharmacy, but also the largest gift in the history of the Warrington College of Business and UF. e recipient of the Debbie Klapp award most closely mirrors those exceptional professional and personal characteristics that made her loved and admired by her peers, Boydstun added. Legato, a member of the UF veterinary colleges development sta since 1999, has 27 years of professional fundraising experience. She has worked with donor events, corporate solicitations and campus campaigns, and was promoted into her present position at the college in 2008. Having known Debbie personally, I am deeply honored and touched to be the rst person to receive the Debbie Klapp Memorial Award for doing the work I genuinely love, Legato said. Since Legato has been at UF, the college has consistently ranked in the top 10 of the 28 fundraising units across campus, both in terms of money raised and percentage of goal achieved. Mary Ann Kiely, associate vice president for development for the UF Health Science Center and vice president for development of Shands HealthCare, said Legato had done a great job of building a well-rounded development program for the veterinary college, and in doing so, had set the bar high for other development programs. Karen is a hard worker, and is well-liked and respected by her peers here at UF as well as in the national veterinary organizations, Kiely said. Karen did an excellent job raising the prole of the new Small Animal Hospital among her constituency with her passion for animals and her respect and admiration for the faculty at UF veterinary college. Professor emeritus of infectious diseases honored by epidemiology groupPaul Nicoletti, D.V.M., a professor emeritus of infectious diseases at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, was presented with the 2010 Karl F. Meyer-James H. Steele Gold Head Cane Award during the American Veterinary Medical Associations annual meeting in Atlanta recently. e award is the highest honor given to a veterinarian by the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society. e group selects the awardee on the basis of achievements in animal health that have signicantly advanced human health through the practice of veterinary epidemiology and public health. A 1956 graduate of the University of Missouris College of Veterinary Medicine, Nicoletti retired from the UF veterinary faculty in 2003. During his 25 years of service at UF, he taught courses in infectious diseases, epidemiology, public health and food safety. Nicolettis career began at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Missouri, with later duties in Wisconsin, New York, Mississippi and Florida. He served as an epizootiologist in Tehran, Iran, from 1968 to 1972 with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations prior to beginning his academic career at UF in 1978. An internationally recognized expert in brucellosis, Nicoletti has amassed many awards in his career, including Distinguished Service awards from both the University of Missouri and UF. As a tribute to Nicolettis professional contributions and service to the cattle industry, a private $1.3 million contribution was recently made to the UF College of Veterinary Medicine in his name. Dr. Paul Nicoletti Karen Legato and her horse, Gator

PAGE 26

FLORIDA VETERINARIAN26 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN26 Honors, Awards, Appointments & AnnouncementsUF veterinary administrator honored for contributions to animal clinical biochemistryJohn W. Harvey, D.V.M., Ph.D., executive associate dean and a professor of hematology at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, has received the 2010 Heiner Sommer Prize from the International Society for Animal Clinical Pathology. e award is given in recognition of lifetime contributions to the eld of animal clinical biochemistry. As this years winner, Harvey presented the keynote Heiner Sommer Lecture during the societys 14th biannual Congress, held at Oregon State University. A board-certied veterinary clinical pathologist, Harvey has been a member of UFs veterinary college faculty since 1974. His scholastic accomplishments include the publication of 113 refereed papers many describing syndromes not previously recognized in both veterinary and human medicine, three books, 46 book chapters, 56 proceedings papers, 65 abstracts and 31 research grants. He is an accomplished lecturer both nationally and internationally, having participated in more than 250 major seminar engagements throughout the world. Harvey is a past president and treasurer of the society, and has held numerous leadership roles in other organizations, including the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology, of which he is a past president and board member. He has served on the examination committee of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists and has been a member of several other national and state veterinary associations. Earlier this year, Harvey received the 2010 Mark L. Morris Sr. Lifetime Achievement Award for his lifetime contributions to the eld of comparative hematology. Among Harveys other awards are the Norden Distinguished Teaching Award, the American Association of Feline Practitioners Research Award, the Alumni Recognition Award from Kansas State University and the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathologys Lifetime Achievement Award.UF veterinary researcher to chair international scientic groupDaniel Brown, Ph.D., a scientist at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, has been voted chairman-elect of the International Organization for Mycoplasmology, a nonprot scientic group dedicated to the study of a type of bacteria that infect a wide variety of animals and plants. His term will be from 2012 to 2014. An associate professor in the colleges department of infectious diseases and pathology, Brown also chaired the scientic program committee for the 18th International Congress of the IOM, which was held in Chianciano Terme, Italy, in July 2010. Browns work focuses on genetic and taxonomic analyses of pathogenic mycoplasmas and the diseases they may cause in animals and humans. His research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Morris Animal Foundation, the UF University Scholars Program and the MerckMerial Veterinary Scholars Program. Dr. John Harvey Dr. Dan BrownYES! I WANT TO sS UPPORT THe E UU F COLLe E Ge E Of F Ve E TeE Ri I NARy Y Me E Dici ICI Ne EHow to Make a Gift:If you are interested in more information about endowment funds, estate gifts or other methods of giving, please contact: Karen Legato Senior Director of Development and Alumni Aairs UF College of Veterinary Medicine P.O. Box 100125 (352) 294-4256 legatok@u.edu Or visit our website at: www.vetmed.u.edu

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FLORIDA VETERINARIAN27 LLooking BackFLORIDA VETERINARIAN27

PAGE 28

Non-Prot Organization U.S. Postage PAID Gainesville, FL Permit No.94 College of Veterinary Medicine P.O. Box 100125 Gainesville, FL 32610-0125 CCalendar www.facebook.com/UFvetmed Find us on Facebook April 9 UFs annual Spring Weekend, featuring the traditional Orange and Blue Game. e Class of 1986 will hold its 25th anniversary reunion and there will be a Silver Society reception that evening at Emerson Alumni Hall. April 16 Open House is back! Following a two-year hiatus due to construction, the public is invited to attend the UF CVM and SCAVMA Open House. Tours of the UF Veterinary Hospitals will be provided. e free event will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 28 e Florida Veterinary Medical Association will hold its annual conference in Orlando, with a UF CVM alumni reception planned for April 30. Contact Jo Ann Winn at winnj@u.edu for more information. May 13 e traditional sophomore professional coating ceremony will be held at 2 p.m. at the UF Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. May 28 Commencement exercises for the UF CVM Class of 2011 will be held at the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts at 2 p.m. May 1 UF veterinary student Laura Seheult walks a horse from the barn to the clinic for an ophthalmology check-up. Photo by Ray Carson


Florida veterinarian
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Title: Florida veterinarian
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Creator: College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida
Publisher: College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2011
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F I




Tending
S a terrier
Senior UF veterinary
Student William "Jared"
High checks on Jeffrey,
a Parson terrier, in the
S.progressive care area
of the new UF Small
L' Animal Hospital on
Nov. 8.




UNIVERSITY of^^^^ ^^^
INSIE FLRID














Floricd Veterinarian IS publisheCd b the
University of Floridna C 1ollee of Veterinary
.Mledicine for alumni and friends.
Suggestions and comments are welcome
and ShOuId be emliiidcl to:

Sarah Carey. Florida Veterinanrn editor, at:
:a3reysk ,,. 'ufl.edu.

Check out the college web site at:
,www.vetned.utl.edu

Dean
Glen F. Hoffsis
D.V.M.. M.S.
Executive Associate Dean
John Harvey
D.V.M., Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Students
and Instruction
Paul Gibbs
B.V.Sc.. Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Research
and Graduate Studies
Charles H. Courtney
D.V.M.. Ph.D.
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs
Karen Legato
Assistant Director of
Development and Alumni Affairs
Patricia Wlasuk
Director of Public Relations
Sarah K. Carey
M.A.. A.PR.
Coordinator of Alumni Affairs
Jo Ann Winn



mall Animal HOSpital


Large Ainimal Hospital


College AJminilstration and Dean's
Office
i:f.2294-42::0

PF'iblic Relations
:.f.52 294-4242

Development and Alumni Afairs
13521 294-4256


Message from the Dean




Off with a Bang


T his new year has scared \\ich a bang here at the college.
where we are scill celebrating [he SuLiccessful grand opening

of our new LTF Small Animal Hospital in No\ember and

optimistic about more good clhings to come.

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UF President Bernie Machen, Chris
Machen, Dr. Dale Kaplan-Stein, '81,
and Robert Kaplan-Stein stand in front
of the exam room donated by the
Kaplan-Steins.


ur. Jullo loanez, au,
left, and his wife, Maria,
named an exam room.


Several members of the Florida Veterinary Medical Association are shown inside
the medicine treatment room that FVMA contributed to.


The college strategic plan also contains a component for management of DVM
student enrollment. We have increased the number of seats for Florida residents
from 80 to 88 per class. We also increased enrollment of non-resident students
from eight to 12. This provided more opportunities for students to obtain a DVM
from UE Going forward, we plan to gradually increase the number of non-
resident students as facilities can be built or adapted to meet these needs and more
faculty can be hired to deliver an enhanced education to all of our students.
We have already begun the process of increasing faculty numbers. I am excited
to announce that, following a national search, we have hired Dr. Paul Cooke
to serve as our new chairman of the department of physiological sciences. Dr.
Cooke is presently a professor and serves as the Billie A. Field Endowed Chair in
Reproductive Biology in the department of veterinary biosciences, University of
Illinois. Dr. Cooke will begin his new job at UF in February. I want to thank Dr.
Paul Davenport, a professor of respiratory physiology, for his service as interim
chair of physiological sciences since Dr. John Harvey vacated the chair position to
become our executive associate dean in 2008.
The hiring of a new physiological sciences chairman is just the start of what
will be a progressive expansion of the faculty in both the basic sciences and in the
clinical sciences. Several national searches are currently underway and recruitment
efforts will continue for the foreseeable future. The next step will be to develop a
strategic plan for research. Our college has gradually slipped in its research funding
over the last several years as budgets have been cut and research-intensive faculty
have been lost. We will create the strategies to restore and exceed our previous
research productivity levels to where we should be, and to what is expected at a
top-tier veterinary college.
There are many challenges facing veterinary colleges, and indeed, the profession.
These include concerns for student debt, starting salaries and practice income,
supplying rural areas and other underserved careers, recruiting outstanding faculty,
funding our programs in an environment of shrinking state budgets and many
others.
I think your college is on a good course and is poised to make major progress
in the near future. Many people are working extremely hard, every day, in our
UF Veterinary Hospitals, in our laboratories, and in our administrative offices,
to make this happen. It truly does take a concerted effort to effect real change,
and also the continuing support from all of you our friends, alumni, donors,
referring veterinarians, among others to transform this vision to reality.
Thanks again to everyone for bringing us to this point. We are excited about the
future and wish all of you a Happy New Year!







Glen Hoffsis
Dean


Dr. Rowan Milner, Hill's Professor of Oncology,
with Heidi and Rob Ferdinand in front of an
exam room contributed by the Ferdinands.


Dr. Amy Stone, clinical assistant professor and chief
of the primary care and dentistry service, with donors
Franklyn and Barbara Meyers. The Meyerses named
the primary care and dentistry area.


Tom Wagner and Dr. Nanette Parratto-Wagner at an
exam room named in memory of her parents and
family dog.


Dr. Catherine McClellend, veterinary affairs manager
for Hill's Pet Nutrition, Inc., and Dr. Christine Jenkins,
director of academic affairs for Hill's Pet Nutrition, Inc.,
stand outside the kiosk that Hill's contributed to.


FLORIDA VETERINARIAN 3











Room naming opportunity gave alumna one more

way to give thanks


NJ

Thomas Wagner and Nanette Parratto-Wagner are shown at home with
their three dogs. Tom has Scooter in his right hand, Sammy in his left
hand, and Nanette has Magoo on her lap.


F or Nanette Parratto-Wagner, D.V.M.,
Ph.D., '85, gratitude is a way of life
made real by philanthropic giving to UF,
which paved the way for her own success,
and to encourage others who will follow the
veterinary career path.

"UF gave me a chance to prove that I was capable of achieving
my childhood dream," she said. "God gave me the talent to
accomplish this, but I owed the college much more than the tuition
I paid for my education."
A 1985 graduate of the UF CVM, Parratto-Wagner
initially planned to repay her debt of gratitude to the
college by giving annually, for as long as she could, an
amount at least equal to the tuition she would have
had to pay, had she attended veterinary school at the
University of Pennsylvania. That was the only other
veterinary school Wagner considered applying to,
because she grew up in that state.
"I finally had an epiphany and realized that I could -:_-
move to 'the promised land' Florida," Parratto-
Wagner said. "UF accepted me into graduate school and
supported my desire to blend a Ph.D. with a D.V.M."
A Antoir
As the years passed, she promised herself that if the now decE
opportunity arose to give back in a more meaningful desire for
way, she would do so. Wa O'De
Wagner's


"So annual giving to the college and the Pet Memorial program
expanded into the room naming opportunity," Parratto said.
When the new UF Small Animal Hospital opened this past fall,
Parratto-Wagner named an exam room in memory of her parents,
Antoinette N. Parratto and Leonard R. Parratto Jr., and "O'Dee, the
Wonder Dog."
Parratto-Wagner's parents, who were never pet lovers or pet
owners, allowed her to pick her first dog, from a neighbor's litter.
She chose the runt, and her father named the puppy "Oh, God" in
Italian.
"My parents adored O'Dee, possibly more than they indulged
me," Parratto-Wagner said. "They would have approved...no, they
would have insisted, that we make this sacrifice. My husband, being
the genius that he is, said 'yes'."
Parratto-Wagner feels the new Small Animal Hospital provides
an immediate benefit to veterinarians and their clients in Florida,
southeastern Georgia and the Caribbean.
"The new hospital contains some one-of-a-kind clinical services
that will draw referrals from across the nation and world," she said.
"The featured services listed on the Website just touch on the most
obvious key elements that make this facility unique."
Local residents of Alachua County and surrounding areas will
benefit from the expertise available 24-7 through the new state-of-
the-art emergency service, which integrates into full patient care
services, Parratto-Wagner added.
"The linear accelerator is equivalent to or better than most human
hospitals, allowing patients to receive radiation therapy for many
more conditions than just cancer, i.e., pain control and arterio-
venous malformations, among others," she said. "This is the only
veterinary facility in the state, and possibly east of the Mississippi,
that can provide such a level of care and teach the next generations
of veterinarians."
One feature Parratto-Wagner, who works as a relief veterinarian
for Pershing Oaks Animal Hospital in Orlando, is specifically


nette and Leonard Parratto,
eased, indulged their daughter's
r a pet.
was Dr. Nanette Parratto-
first dog.


4 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN





DOO PRFIE Ro and Hidi Fedinn


impressed by is the completely digitized electronic record keeping
system, which she said is more advanced than in most human
hospitals.
"Most people will not get care this carefully monitored," she
said. "This system is so advanced that it is designed to augment the
teaching experience in real time, allowing students to actually see
what is happening in the patient during surgeries, something that
none of my cohorts were able to do with any regularity. Students


will have more exposure to more procedures with much clearer
understanding than has heretofore been possible."
Parratto-Wagner said she would always be grateful to the UF
CVM for offering the education that opened doors to an amazing
and varied career.
"I've never been bored or broke," she said. "I've always been
entertained by my work and couldn't have asked for a better
outcome. Giving back was the least I could do."
By Sarah Carey


Longtime hospital clients honor level of care,


their dogs with exam room gift


H eidi and Rob Ferdinand, residents of
Winter Park, Fla., have been clients
of the UF Small Animal Hospital for more
than 10 years. During that time, they lost
Buster, a Labrador retriever, at the age of 13
to lymphoma after seeing him snap back
from life-threatening medical problems, not
once, but three times.

They've seen their remaining 10-year-old dog, Allie short for
Alligator be transformed from a rescue dog with eyes swollen
shut and severe skin allergies to a smooth-coated, magnificent
golden retriever with bright eyes and a normal life.
When UF's new small animal hospital opened in
November 2010, the Ferdinands felt compelled to
acknowledge, with a significant financial gift, the
quality of care they have consistently received for
their animals.
"We just have had a really positive experience with
the college, so we decided to donate for an exami-
nation room," Heidi Ferdinand said. "We did this,
one, because of the level of care we have received,
and two, in memory of our dogs that have had care
given to them at UF."
Of the two dogs, Buster received care for the
longest period of time.
"He had the most longevity, but we almost lost
him from health issues at least three times," Heidi
Ferdinand said. "Each time, UF veterinarians were
able to save him."
She said Buster had experienced a ruptured
spleen, a bacterial overgrowth infection and finally,
lymphoma. He recovered from the first two things
and was treated for lymphoma. However, eventually
Buster's cancer spread to his brain. Rob and He


"Unfortunately, we could not prolong his life," Heidi Ferdinand said.
The Ferdinands rescued Allie when she was approximately 6 years old.
"When we first brought her to UF's dermatology service, they told
us they thought she would not be salvageable because her case was
one of the worst they'd ever seen," Heidi Ferdinand said. "It's been a
great experience to see how her condition has turned around. Now
Allie's coat is perfect, and she actually looks like a dog."
The Ferdinands drive more than two hours for every trip they
make to UF, and are glad to do it.
"The quality of care, the staff here it's amazing," Heidi
Ferdinand said. "People know us by our first names. We compare
it to the Mayo Clinic of human health care. We could go to other
specialty practices, but we just feel the level of experience, the care
and compassion at UF is not like anyplace else we've experienced.
That's why we feel UF is kind of a home away from home."
By Sarah Carey


1WOW





I L


"T* w


idi Ferdinand with their dogs, Buster, now deceased, and Allie.


FLORIDA VETERINARIAN 5









spinl"


rs gathered inside the

Sive.ly decorated arrium of the
university of Florida College of Veterinary
Medicine's new Small Animal Hospital on
Oct. 22 for a dedication and ribbon-cutting,

which also recognized donors for their
help in bringing the $58 million project to
frLIition.

Tli. [ r[ Ir r ill., Iun,J. up -ud I- ,. .1 in t In .. H ..I
_D \ II itll ij L. i ; 1111 1r,, r l. I , ,. r I II', ,-i,__ .-hL- i id - ll
1 tl..,n _' in.d plhinnin r'u I k .. p 1, ...1 -.i rd ,I iclir, l..l
hi ll, ..p n ir ..1 r
1.1-,, -, 1..'1.- r r, h ,- r,, , '.r v r ill .. .. ..l i. r I-., IF
I, ir r-. ....1, n -_ 1 1 ., I. 1. 'i1.d in i F l. .ri. ..i- , r, .i-
nary college, UF serves an enormous population. "Over time, we'll
need more veterinarians, and the old hospital facility was a choke
point for our growth. We now have the ability to better serve both
students and clinical faculty, and most importantly, the animals we
care for."
He called the new hospital "the finest in the world" and thanked
the many internal college and UF staff members, current and
former administrators, architects, contractors, Florida's state vet-
erinarian, the college's alumni council and the Florida Veterinary
Medical Association, as well as state legislators for their support.
UF President Bernie Machen, who makes a rule of not visiting UF
buildings while under construction, stood inside the 100,000 square-
foot hospital for the first time. He called it "an incredible moment."
The new facility, he said, "takes your breath away."
"Sixty percent of American households
have pets," Machen said. "People think
of their pets as families, and these
facilities really are the nation's best."
He added that the UF veterinary
college was one of the special
attributes of the university.




From left to right: Dr. Dana Zimmel,
chief of staff, UF Veterinary Hospitals;
Danny Ponce, UF trustee; Dr. Jack Payne,
senior vice president, UF IFAS; Dr. Glen
Hoffsis, CVM dean; Caty Love, UF veterinary
student; Dr. David Guzick, senior vice
president, UF HSC; Rep. Larry Cretul; Dr.
Bernie Machen, UF president; and Dr. Colin
Burrows, chairman, department of small
animal clinical sciences.


c', i r.,t [a,. I. I, i',. ,, p i mt n- .... n I t. I n r, i.l..L i t r, j
, lacl,- .n .I ,j Di ill. *. ...in, rlh Ik .,.L r. ,p id rir ,llin ., nr "i'.]
.,r ill rlk. .. r .,n rh, r ir,. .-. I ',, i *i .n 1i6.. ,i.,l d Ju n i.i
L..U F 'uir l '.. r.. h.. i i r, rli r r, i'.l r i t i ri i rn
L .itrr, ~- r.t r l r ....r *.- _' .s p el. ., ,I FI .J ,is H- ....i. i .t

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.I.i..r. rllh. r i ,>. .Id t. 1. in ril'. I',. L .. . 1rl..1.. 1 rl' k iU F
i i I i i. r l ii r p p..i r rl pI r '. I' l l. _' I .. .n r
bL. 'gi i tir L r D ir -1 i-r Ln
T .d t .L. h r. Lt L,. rL ,rnp i".. rI .d l r.i r. l n, d i n I .. ,C .
iP .. l, I. r p, r, An. d Se yr v ye. r n. 1p. .inr s*ti. i
rl'i.rd, i nt. .I r,.r p l i r rl e l r. n Ih..pIr I I -....d ..r liF
. .. ..j .r rl'i,. r i . a m...j h .r p.r. na. rs i
U. n .. .i r, .r F I I 1 *i *r.. t.L .. I .u -r,- i ,i l-.,_. i ., !i-'I. ,,
,i :, till, C ,I : p r,.. r l', I l. .In ..n I-u 1',i "i rl',I r r I. r,.. ,
N ,in. n.ld i kl I Lt kI+,. li -.i pl ,I p r I In l I .i. I _'..rr, I l,
S r. r n- I ir.. l. -.n r in i I .. .. .. I. n r p r l ', 1 ..1 ,, d ir,.,
... rI r, r,,.11 I',,,- ,_. -n 1 1. L F lr. *ri i .. .1 'r L i 1i-' . ,>, -, .il I
brought her herc 1u Dr. Dan Lewis, whu, by the way, is the best
veterinary orthopedic surgeon in the world. It turns out Montana
had torn her left rear ACL (anterior cruciate ligament.) I had no
idea dogs even had an ACL. Seven years later, she's still doing
well."
In his introduction of David Guzick, M.D., Ph.D., senior vice
president of health affairs and president of the UF&Shands
Health System, Hoffsis noted the uniqueness UF enjoyed by
virtue of being a part of such a major health center, and said
the veterinary college faculty, and ultimately, hospital patients,
benefited from the collaborations this synergy makes possible.


6 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN

















spearhead that idea on campus than right here, uuzick said.
"Dr. Michael Schaer said to me earlier this evening, 'This is a
shooting star.' Grab hold of it, and, congratulations."
The new UF Small Animal Hospital triples the previous working
space and contains a fully integrated cancer referral and treatment
service, including a linear accelerator with cone-beam CT (image
guidance) unique to Florida and most of the country.
The hospital also has one of the nation's only veterinary interven-
tional radiology and cardiology facilities.
The building has 22 new examination rooms, 12 surgical suites,
including dedicated and custom rooms for laparoscopy and arthros-
copy, more treatment areas, including facilities for emergency
medicine, intensive care, progressive care and isolation, and an
expanded endoscopy room with laser lithotripsy. The hospital offers
24/7 emergency and critical care services as well as primary care
and dentistry facilities.
By Sarah Carey





























In top left photo, Dr. Rowan Milner, Hills Professor of Oncology,
gives an overview of the uses of the new linear accelerator.
Victoria Ford of Jacksonville is shown at right. Below inset photos
show an angled view of the new hospital and a view of the dog
7 r i walk area from a window inside the new building. Guests gather
for the grand opening ceremony on Oct. 22, top right, and the
new catheterization laboratory is shown in below right photo.
Photos by Ray Carson and Russ Bryant


FLORIDA VETERINARIAN 7










Veterinary oncologists break new ground with

cancer treatment

S... ......' .. ... N .. 0 I- .1Dh-.*JIJ" lhen Sgt. Troy Fergueson of the Pasco

VV County Sheriffs Office and his wife,
Laura, held a memorial service in Hudson,
Fla., for their beloved dog, a yellow Labrador
named Sophie, more than 100 people paid
their respects. Among them were law-
enforcement officers, friends, and University
of Florida veterinary surgical oncologist
Nick Bacon and veterinary technician Amy
Beaver, who works with the oncology group
at chle LF Small Animal Hospital.

Ti K FI-.. is believe UF veterinary, i n rI nir. .- n-
Ik il. ni..l, ,. i-. with Sophie, who was .1j, l i .. .1 ini I -2 I -ith
1., ri I ,- InI r Sophie became somet" r, n, .1 ,- ri I. 'i ter
1I. II I h ; i i ise of several c .i i ,,III 1i1 .1 1 rI II i 1 p II), to
VP rh mI ,nc', needed to sa-x 1l I, ir I J ili. I. I rhle
*--. ,- -. I I. , contributions to law n 1,..r,- n r il .] i l r..
rk Ii.. 1 di. Iny people she touched p iir 4 I-.,- ii-,I n.

p..h I it I. extended as a direct result of the care she
ill k ... ,-,:.i-,d ir _F L..F. i -1 ....0 .id."Withoutt.n--,ir.,she
i,,. t I. ni.- I. 1i. ,I-, .. r .. Cphic -s even able to
,i n 1 r n i .. l1 I.II I p. 11 .
r .- E; i-. .i i -.] , ri L. rli. u l, .] I..l.i.i.n tili..i. not cancer.
Veterinary oncology technician Amy Beaver visits with Sophie during one i-l.], J II I.i II I. ulr.I r 1 I, .]1, I-, r Ir ,.F I-, .-. to have that
of her early visits to UF's oncology service for treatment. length of survival in a urethral cancer patient," he said.
In conjunction with Frank Bova, Ph.D., a professor of neurosur-
gery associated with the university's McKnight Brain Institute, UF
veterinary oncologists treated Sophie with stereotactic radiosurgery,
n -r. .. .r .r ll. r 11.. II 11III ..J. s.. fis 12 (

ri -..i r1l, h h . LIN- I lp ir r in 1 li i k r
FIl.i 1 i _1-L l IF i. r I r .'j I i I .. ] r, L l -11 1r, .]

r l, I..- r , -III ...L r N -. LIP, I L .r, . r L,zr,, h -. I io i, I-
r I .. u I, r F r l. k I, I. I- IF.. F i r IF r ku rI I., ,i o, III
P Lr I. ,r r r h ,_ I n I i i ,p l, ,. v L r r, L r ,_.:] r h ,_ ,- I. .- r _II Ln I L

1]-. i I-.F,., , .,1, rlk, ...i i. r,.,l I IliL, I., ,.pIrl II rl, ,z..i.n,-rry
.r .. _... r l..l" Heri:i- .. ,~
S rt..In, i F r, .- I-, p .-1 r. I.i ii u, r I J
r l-. I. rl.. \ r-..- o C I Ii 1 . -2, r-, -.n ,\ i


8 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN

















in March, and at the American College of Veterinary Surgeons
meeting in Seattle in October.
Bacon said the addition of a linear accelerator to UF's Small
Animal Hospital, which opened in November, means that stereo-
tactic radiosurgery can now be performed in a veterinary setting
instead of the McKnight Brain Institute, although collaborations
with faculty and staff there will continue.
"Having the linear accelerator located on-site in our hospital
makes everything quicker and simpler," Bacon said. "There will be
no restrictions on when we can do these procedures, so we can treat
our patients even more expeditiously and also take advantage of
other UF veterinary faculty expertise more easily when we need to."
The urethra is found in people and animals and is essentially a
tube exiting the bladder through which urine can leave the body.
"Any tumor, even an early one, can cause complete obstruction,"
Bacon said. "Once there is an obstruction, most animals are put
down within days. Even with other types of therapies, most are put
down within weeks. Chemotherapy has some effect, but it seems
high-dose radiation can also help. Sophie received a combination of
radiation and chemotherapy."





"Sophie's life was extended

as a direct result of the care

she received at UF."


Laura Fergueson




In some cases, using another technologically advanced method
known as interventional imaging, UF veterinarians are able to
temporarily alleviate the obstruction with a urethral stent. The
oncology program purchased stents with private funding in 2007,
and veterinarians learned how to use them, in order to get the
urethral and prostate cancer treatment program off the ground,
Bacon said.
"Now we can see a dog with urinary obstruction on day one,
diagnose the problem and stent the urethra under one procedure,"
he said. "Without our interventional program, you might not be


able to go in and 'm l
irradiate the tumor
afterwards, so it's
very important to
have all of these
capabilities on site."
In cases of urethral .d _.
cancer, dogs can al .
be acting entirely ,g
normally playing,
eating, running,
barking -but
they are unable to
urinate, Bacon said. Sophie touched many lives as an active
member of the K-9 team she was
"So owners have associated with.
a dog that one day
looks normal, then the next day they are being told they have
to put the dog down," he said. "It affects dogs with almost no
warning, and any dog can be affected, These dogs are typically
euthanized after days to weeks. Four of the nine urethral cancer
dogs we treated lived longer than six months, and two lived longer
than one year. With the advanced imaging, advanced radiation and
advanced surgery we offer, we are really furthering the boundaries
of what is treatable in canine cancer."
Oncology veterinary technician Beaver said the memorial held
for Sophie was a reminder of why she loves her job. A poster
she had given the Ferguesons two years ago, which documented
Sophie's care and treatment at UF in scrapbook form, was on
display at the event.

"It was an affirmation that I'm in the right profession," Beaver said.
For more information about the UF Small Animal Hospital or to
make an appointment, see www. vethospitals. ufl. edu or call
352-392-2235.
By Sarah Carey


FLORIDA VETERINARIAN 9




Clinial Udate


UF veterinarians save "sponge" dog, warn pet owners to
monitor animals' chewing behavior


I


Dr. AshleyAllen and Dr. Rob Armanzano are shown with Regal in the UF Small
Animal Hospital during a recent check-up.


WTJh en Faye Johnson unexpectedly lost her 16-year-old shih tzu, Royal, to a heart
VVattack in February 2009, she grieved deeply. The dog was one of her last ties
to her husband, who had passed away eight years earlier. So she sought out Royal's
breeder, and by December, she had Regal: a bright-eyed, silky smooth puppy from
Royal's bloodline that sleeps in the bed with her at night.


10 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN












But one night Regal was having trouble
breathing and woke Johnson up. It became
clear he was fighting for his life.
When Regal arrived at the UF Small
in, iLi H-. .,pr il .n il.,, I I, -.vas imme-
.Ji trll, .n1 I-., rlk Einr ._ -, itd Critical
C Ii- '. -, in, L, p l-c.d in in ....*ygen cage.
'i O,.,r ii, pl-, .i ill i.. n rion showed
._ s -.t. ,, .pi I ,, i.pi Lr .. i, stress,
ni. In~ I ii i .j ,-, u ,ilr, getting air
I'.. '... l, %- d .. 1, ln llen, D .V.M .,
i ir. il- l L I ,.I ,-,,. i,. ...r ery intern
. I-, .. .- ..rl.. .1 ,- l. I-, -.-Irl' R 1J 'C hest
hF Lri .. .. .. j ... pi,- ...... ..I-i.,r- blocking
n.. ,r kt Ii ri- l'. ,ic r 1. ni .n ii r, ay, and
.k L i. ll C p ... t rlk. rr I I -. i. 1 II, 'ront of the

\cr,,r n iLi I- II, i,. n. rli r Regal's
,r. .1-. -i,--i .-- I, Fll .1 rl, FI,.,.. in.1 gas, and
In i.,Irr1 ,. ..nd r r I.. 1 .d rli. presence of a
hil-,,- ,., -hl, ,.r ;,- i I-,.. .] ,-, In -.. com ach.
TliL, .i,ciIM...i rl,. ir .pri.-n, ith
i,,hris.in h. ., .. rl,. UF .r.,nary team
rhe .-_' -1h id r., pi.,.,, ..d .rli nesthesia
r., p .an iind.,.. . .., n l, R Il's trachea
*ind it p.-. l I-hl h r.I r. .nI -'i ell.
"\'l[h rhI. nd,.J -,. p. . able to
visuali-i, .ini. ri, -.. -. i n .- .ject in his
trachla.' .AllKr' n d j ls I, R.; l was doing
reasoinabhl '!! ',II ., ndL I rl. -i 1. we were
also ablk rI n il'..'. -.cLI 1 -,r I n bodies
from his s I iirc lii


The foreign bodies were pieces of a
sponge-like material, but when veterinarians
asked Johnson about their findings, she was
stumped.
"I asked Mrs. Johnson to just look around
the house while Regal was with us, just to
make sure he didn't have anything hidden
anywhere," Allen said.
Johnson did, and her findings surprised
everyone: Regal had been eating the stuffing
inside of his dog bed.
"He was putting his head under the cover
of the bed and eating the
sponge," Johnson said.
"There is a huge hole in the Withou
sponge. He must have been
eating it for weeks." equ
She added that the
bedding Regal had eaten was Ho!
not visible unless the cover
was completely removed.
After veterinarians
removed the sponge material
from Regal's stomach, he remained in the
hospital's Intensive Care Unit over the
weekend.
Subsequent rechecks have gone well, and
Johnson and UF veterinarians say he is
doing very well.
"He is back to being a happy, playful
puppy," Allen said. "Mrs. Johnson has
disposed of his previous bed and monitors
him closely at home."
Allen added that Regal's case illustrates
that with prompt medical attention,
patients with critical needs can have a good
* outcome.
"Treating these patients successfully
* often requires a team effort between the
multiple clinicians, including the emergency
doctor, the radiologist, the internist and the
anesthesiologist," she said. "I think Regal's
rory also serves as a reminder for owners to
provide puppies with toys and bedding that
rley cannot easily chew up."


It's always good to monitor closely any pet
playing with a stuffed toy, and to dispose of
the toy if the pet starts tearing it up.
"Crate training puppies is also a good
idea, so that they don't get into things while
unsupervised," Allen said. "Puppies are
much like toddlers who are just learning to
walk. They like to be naughty and get into
anything within their reach."
In Regal's case, Johnson didn't even know
he had been chewing on the bedding, Allen
added.



t the doctors and the excellent

ipment at the UF Small Animal

spital, Regal would have died,"

FayeJohnson



"She is a wonderful owner who loves
Regal with all her heart," Allen said. "Now
that she knows he has a habit of eating
things, I think she will be making some
environmental changes at home to try to
prevent this from happening again."
As for Johnson, she is thankful she was
able to get her puppy the help he needed to
save his life.
"Without the doctors and the excellent
equipment at the UF Small Animal
Hospital, Regal would have died," Johnson
said. "I barely got him there in time. Every
person I have come in contact with at
the UF Small Animal Hospital has been
extremely pleasant and the quality of care
cannot be surpassed."
For more information about the UF
Veterinary Hospitals, visit www.vethospitals.
ufl.edu.
By Sarah Carey


FLORIDA VETERINARIAN 11






Clinial Udate


Small animal expertise boosts treatment of baby horse

at UF Large Animal Hospital


WT hen a quarter horse colt born with
a severely deformed right hind
limb arrived at the University of Florida's
Large Animal Hospital last May, equine
veterinarians recognized that traditional
methods used for straightening abnormal
legs in foals would not work. But several
months, procedures and one small animal
surgeon later, the foal is living the good
life at home in Palmetto, Fla., running and
training on four good legs.

"Traditionally, when you perform an acute correction, you break
the leg and then plate it, all at once," said Ali Morton, D.V.M.,
assistant professor of large animal surgery at UF "In this case, the
amount of correction needed would have probably compromised
the blood supply and the lower part of the limb likely would have
died. There also is a significant risk of infection, which is why
these types of procedures often fail in horses, even in the best
circumstances."
Morton then consulted one of her colleagues who treats small
animals at the UF Veterinary Hospitals Dan Lewis, D.V.M., a
professor of small animal orthopedic surgery and an internationally
respected expert on the correction of limb deformities. For more
than a decade, Lewis has used a technique in which the deformed
bone is cut surgically, and an device called a circular external
skeletal fixator secures and gradually straightens the bone a
process called distraction osteogenesis. The gap that forms between
the bone segments fills in quickly with new bone.
"Dr. Lewis has contributed significantly to the literature on
distraction osteogenesis, so we called him, and he looked at
the foal's leg," Morton said. "Our biggest concern was its size, since
at 5 weeks old, this foal weighed 220 pounds and was much bigger
than your average dog."
Traditionally in horses, the fixator is pinned to the bone
segments. But it quickly became evident that pins were not the
answer.
"Within 24 hours, the foal bent some of the pins," Morton said.
"Within 48 hours, he broke one pin. By then, we were at the point
of either trying something different, or euthanasia."
UF's veterinary team was literally down to the wire an "olive"
wire.
As a last resort, Lewis contacted John Madden from Smith and
Nephew, a company that manufactures circular fixators for human
patients. The foal's fixator was made from components used in dogs


and cats. Madden provided olive wires, which contain a bead, or
"olive," secured along the wire's length. These wires, when applied
under tension, provided the stability to resist the incredible forces
imposed by the 220-pound foal.
Lewis was familiar with the product because he had used this
human system to successfully stabilize a fracture in a tiger.
"We didn't know what would happen, but we were willing to
try," Morton said. She spoke to Anne Prince, owner of the foal, and
explained the options.
The Princes own a quarter horse farm in Palmetto, and are
longtime clients of the UF Veterinary Hospitals.
"Mrs. Prince said, 'Let's try it,"' Morton said. "She said we
shouldn't give up unless things got to the point that the foal was
suffering. So we took out the broken pins and put in four olive
wires, and over the course of the following three weeks, it seemed
to be working."
Five weeks later, additional surgery was performed, during which
additional wires were placed for reinforcement. Serial radiographs
and measurements confirmed that the deformity had been
corrected and the fracture gap just needed to fill in with new bone.
In time the leg had healed to the point that veterinarians began
to stage removals of rings and wires. A CT scan was
performed on the foal's leg, and he remained at the UF Large
Animal Hospital until his discharge.
"To my knowledge, this is the first time sequential correction,
which employs a circular fixator and distraction osteogenesis, has
been used to correct a limb deformity in a horse," Lewis said.
Morton credited Lewis and the foal's owners, the Princes, along
with the foal himself for the case's ultimately successful outcome.
"The only reason this worked was first, Dr. Lewis, but also the
Princes, who treat all of their animals very well and allowed us to
do everything we did," Morton said. "The foal was also an excellent
patient the entire time."
By Sarah Carey


On the day of the foal's discharge, Dr. Ali Morton and the UF
Large Animal Hospital patient care team presented the foal's
owners, Chester and Anne Prince, with a framed photo of their
foal, signed by all members of the care team, along with vital
"Gator Gear."


12 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN












THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE





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I I I D-1 --1 -1.1 1 1 L .1 -11 -1






dlnia Update


Gainesville resident says family dog's survival

a holiday 'miracle'


A although the holidays were tough
this year for the Palmer family of
Gainesville, they are grateful for what they
call their "little survival miracle" a toy
rat terrier, Bindi, whose presence gives them
much to be thankful for.

"At the beginning of October, I lost my 22-year-old son in
a horrible event that will take me a long time to get over," said
Elizabeth Palmer, a network administrator at the University of
Florida.
"About three weeks after his passing, another family member and
I forgot to check on Bindi's location when I left for work. It turns
out that she had been left with our larger dogs instead of with her
half-sister, Sarah. When my 14- and 16-year-old daughters came
home from school, they found Bindi in a bloody mess and barely
alive.
Palmer took the dog to her local veterinarian, who advised her to
take Bindi to the UF Small Animal Hospital due to the severity of
her injuries.
When the family arrived at UF, Bindi was immediately taken
back to the emergency area and assessed.
"The doctors came out and described what they had done and all
the care and surgeries that would be needed in hopes of keeping her
alive," Palmer said. "They estimated the cost, which was a burden
on our family, but we immediately agreed. We were willing to
spend whatever we could to keep her alive."
The family visited Bindi
every day. At first, it seemed
doubtful that she would
survive.
"Bindi sustained a
substantial amount of
muscle and vascular
damage to her left hind leg,
and also to her neck and
right hind leg," said Marije
Risselada, D.V.M., Ph.D.,
a clinical assistant professor
of small animal surgery at
UE "We performed two
reconstructive procedures
on her left hind leg in order
to close the entire wound."


Elizabeth Palmer with her dog,
Bindi, during the day of Bindi's
discharge.


UF veterinary surgeon Marije Risselada is shown with Bindi
during a recheck at UF's Small Animal Hospital in November.

For the first six days, UF veterinary surgeons treated Bindi with
a specialized wound care system, called vacuum assisted closure,
which is a treatment method frequently used by UF veterinary
surgeons.
Slowly, Bindi's condition improved.
"It seemed like every other day she had another surgery, but in
just a couple of weeks, she was ready to go home, with only one
wound still left to close," Palmer said. "She is our little survival
miracle."
After she was discharged from UF Bindi accompanied Palmer to
work every day. Palmer wanted to keep a close eye on her pet, and
it was convenient to drive across campus with Bindi for additional
treatments of the remaining open wound.
"Once that wound healed, I continued to take Bindi to work
with me," Palmer said. "She began to love the car rides and the
trips down the hall when I would visit my coworkers to help them
with their software issues."
"Charlie's death has forever changed my life," Palmer said. "It
would have been unbearable to have lost Bindi, too. We very much
needed this happy ending right now."
By Sarah Carey


FLORIDA VETERINARIAN 17














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UF veterinarians help cat survive


'bobcat fever' parasite


A 5-year-old domestic shorthair cat
named Franky is at home in Micanopy
with his owners after successful treatment
at the University of Florida Small Animal
Hospital for an infection with a deadly
blood parasite most people have never
heard of- cytauxzoon. It's the first time
UF veterinarians say they remember seeing,
much less successfully treating, such a case.

UF veterinarians used a new treatment protocol they hope will
help them save more animals diagnosed with cytauxzoon, pro-
nounced Sie-Tow-Zoh-aN), also known as bobcat fever, in the
future.
"This parasite is not that rare, but almost all animals afflicted
with it die quickly, so we usually don't see them here," said Gareth
Buckley, VetM.B., a clinical assistant professor and emergency and
critical care specialist at UE Owned by John Prosser and Ann
Murray of Micanopy, Franky first began showing signs of illness in
mid-September.
"We were walking around our yard one morning and noticed
Franky was behaving a little strangely," Murray said. "He drinking
out of the pool, crouched down. We thought we needed to get him
to the vet, that maybe he had a bladder infection."
Prosser and Murray took the animal to their veterinarian, Dr.
Molly Pearson, who kept him overnight for observation. The
following morning, Pearson called the couple and recommended
they take the cat to UF, as his condition had deteriorated.
"We brought him over and saw Dr. Ashley Allen from the
emergency service," Murray said.
"She helped us figure out how we needed to proceed."
Basic bloodwork was performed and Allen, an intern in small
animal medicine and surgery, noticed the presence of parasites in
red blood cells. Further diagnostics by UF veterinary pathologists
confirmed that the parasite was cytauxzoon.
"Dr. Allen actually drove to the pharmacy in the middle of the
night, since the new treatment protocol we used called for antipro-
tozoal drugs we do not keep in stock," Buckley said.
Franky remained very sick for several days. Veterinarians used
diuretics to rid the cat of fluid in his lungs -and administered


oxygen for two
days. Franky
became anemic
and experienced
severe gastrointes-
tinal bleeding that
resulted in two
blood transfu-
sions during his
weeklong hospital -
kst o. John Prosser and his wife, Ann Murray, with Franky
stay. following the cat's successful treatment at UF for
"He also had infection with the cytauxzoon parasite.
a low white cell
count, probably
due to infection," Buckley said, adding that treatment with the
antiprotozoal drugs, antibiotics and nutrition administered through
a feeding tube continued until Franky's condition slowly improved.
Franky's owners had looked up cytauxzoon infection online and
realized their cat's illness could be fatal.
Yet, they never lost hope.
"He was struggling hard, but we felt optimistic that Franky was
fighting and staying alive," Murray said. "It was touch and go for
a few days, and Dr. Allen was wonderfully conscientious about
keeping us informed and helping us understand the process,
Murray said. "We knew that she and the other veterinarians were
truly pulling for Franky's recovery and that meant so much to us."
Although she and Prosser have two other cats, Ann said Franky
was the most "people friendly" of the three, and had never been
sick before.
"That's partly why we wanted to give him this chance," she said.
"We always hoped for the best and tried to do whatever we could
for him."
Soon after Franky went home, he began to improve dramatically,
although it took a few days for his appetite to return to normal.
"Rechecks indicate that Franky is a happy, health cat with no
long-term side effects," Buckley said.
"The important thing is that although infection with this parasite
happens when it happens, we want veterinarians as well as members
of the public to know that we have now shown that we can success-
fully treat these cases."
The protocol UF veterinarians used to treat Franky was reported
at the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicines annual
meeting, during a presentation Allen attended.
"Luckily, Dr. Allen was in that talk," Buckley said.
By Sarah Carey


FLORIDA VETERINARIAN 19







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Large animal faculty member


drives multiple agendas


A anda House, D.\:V ., is on the road
again. Put another way, if she's not, she
will be soon.

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Shelter program

gets $25K boost


T he Humane Sociery Veterinary Medical
Association recently joined with the

Florida-based Kislak Family Fund to present

a $25,000 grant to the University of Florida

College of Veterinary Medicine for a surgical

training program that benefits injured and ill

shelter animals.


Dr Amanda Hiouse is sh-own in the UF Large
Animal Hospital in this file photo



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shown with a dog that
received assistance
through the HAARTS


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Dr Susan Krebsbach and Dr Natalie
Isaza show off a mock check indicating
the amount of the recent donation to UF's
HAARTS program


FLCORIDA, ETERINARIAN 23






Honors, Awards, Appont'ments& Announcements


Gibbs named associate dean

Paul Gibbs, B.V.Sc., Ph.D., a
veterinarian and virologist in the
University of Florida College of
Veterinary Medicine's department of
infectious diseases and p arl .1... ,, has
been named associate dean for students
and instruction at the college.
Gibbs has served as a member of UF's
veterinary faculty since 1979, when he
became a founding member. He has
been a full professor in the college since P A
1981 and also holds joints appointment Dr. Paul Gibbs
with the College of Medicine's department of molecular genetics
and microbiology as well as with the College of Public Health and
Health Professions' department of environmental and global health.
He was instrumental in the establishment of a joint Doctor of
Veterinary Medicine/Masters of Public Health degree program
offered by the colleges of veterinary medicine and PHHP in 2007.
Between five and 10 freshmen enroll in this program every year.
Gibbs is previous past chairman of the college's curriculum
committee and works with state and other governmental agencies
to aid in the identification of foreign animal diseases, a subject for
which he has developed an online continuing education course for
Florida veterinarians.
Gibbs also has developed a course in International Animal
Health aimed at veterinarians practicing in the developing world.
In addition, he has helped Florida middle and high school students
learn more about emerging diseases by partnering with science
teachers throughout the state to provide them with training tools
on emerging diseases.
From 1994-1999, Gibbs directed UF's International Center,
serving as the university's chief international officer. As a virologist,
his career focus continues on the international control and
eradication of emerging viral diseases having epidemic potential.
Gibbs said it was a "great privilege" to accept his new position at
such an exciting and pivotal time.
"In the 31 years since I was appointed as one of the founding
faculty of the college, I have seen the college mature and the
university grow in stature and size," Gibbs said. "Now, with the
new state-of-the-art UF Small Animal Hospital opening soon
and an increased student enrollment to 100 students per year, the
college is entering a new phase of its history."
He said the changing world we live in and particularly the past
10 years have been particularly challenging.
"The events of 9/11, the spate of emerging diseases, increasing
concern over the environment, the exponential increase in
computerized information and the recent economic crisis have
changed the role of the veterinary profession here in the United
States and indeed worldwide," Gibbs said. "Veterinarians are now
involved in protecting and promoting animal and human health in
so many more ways than just a decade ago."
He added that the sophistication of modern surgery and
medicine continues to grow, along with the number of veterinary


graduates who choose to specialize further after receiving their
D.V.M. degrees.
"While many of our graduates continue to enter practice in the
U.S., a surprisingly large number are serving in the military, the
pharmaceutical industry, state and federal government and other
less traditional roles," he said. "Our graduates span the globe. The
nation expects much of our veterinary students, but they have
much to offer."
Gibbs added, "I hope that in some small way, I can help them be
better prepared to meet the myriad challenges of the 21st century
and to become 'citizens of the world."'


Brooks presents Milne Lecture at
AAEP


Dennis Brooks, D.V.M., Ph.D.,
a professor of ophthalmology at
the University of Florida College of
Veterinary Medicine, presented the
prestigious Frank J. Milne State-of-the-
Art Lecture at the annual meeting of
the American Association of Equine
Practitioners in Baltimore in December
2010.


.aN -


Brooks' lecture, titled "Catastrophic
Ocular Surface Failure in the Horse," Dr Dennis Brooks
addressed the latest approaches to
handling severe corneal conditions in horses, which he says most
practitioners will encounter during their careers.
An internationally recognized expert in canine and equine
glaucoma, Brooks also specializes in infectious keratitis and corneal
transplantation of horses. He has performed close to 300 successful
corneal transplants in horses, more than anyone in the world.
He received his board certification from the American College
of Veterinary Ophthalmologists in 1984 and has served as a full
professor at UF's veterinary college since 1998.
Among the numerous awards Brooks has received for his
teaching and research are the Pfizer Award for Research Excellence
and the British Equine Veterinary Association's Sir Frederick
Smith Memorial Lecture and Medal. He was named the Western
Veterinary Conference Continuing Educator of the Year in the
equine category in 2007. In addition, Brooks served as president of
the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists from 1997
to 1998. He authored the book "Equine Ophthalmology," which
was published in 2002 and 2007.
Two former UF faculty members have also presented the Milne
lecture, including Joe Mayhew, B.V.Sc., in 1999, and Alfred
Merritt, D.V.M., in 2003.
The Milne lecture was created in 1997 to bring a meaningful
learning experience to AAEP members and to recognize an
individual with a distinguished career in research and discovery
who has presented and published their findings in a specific area of
equine health.


24 FLORIDA VETERINARIAN









CVM fundraiser honored by peers
Karen Legato, senior director of development and alumni affairs
for the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, has
become the first recipient of the University of Florida Foundation's
Debbie Klapp Memorial Award.
Legato was selected by a committee consisting of five Foundation
administrators. Criteria for the award include unique overall
achievement, strong collaboration, mentorship, and creativity in
approaching job, career and life. Recipients must be employed for
at least five years as a UF fundraiser.
Licensed pharmacist, -
Klapp, who died of a
cancer in 2007, served *
for many years as the j .
development officer
for UF's College of
Pharmacy and the 1
Warrington College of
Business Administration.
"Debbie was
a consummate
professional," said
Carter Boydstun, senior
associate vice president
for development at the
Foundation. "She was
a strong advocate for
her donors and for her
unit. She was creative, Karen Legato and her horse, Gator
aggressive and delightful
and an extremely well-rounded person."
In addition to her professional role, Klapp was an accomplished
golfer and painter who "was a great team player," Boydstun said.
"Debbie embodied everything that a successful development officer
should be."
At the time of Klapp's untimely death at the age of 56, she had
not only gained the largest gift in the history of the College of
Pharmacy, but also the largest gift in the history of the Warrington
College of Business and UE
"The recipient of the Debbie Klapp award most closely mirrors
those exceptional professional and personal characteristics that
made her loved and admired by her peers," Boydstun added.
Legato, a member of the UF veterinary college's development
staff since 1999, has 27 years of professional fundraising experience.
She has worked with donor events, corporate solicitations and
campus campaigns, and was promoted into her present position at
the college in 2008.
"Having known Debbie personally, I am deeply honored
and touched to be the first person to receive the Debbie Klapp
Memorial Award for doing the work I genuinely love," Legato said.
Since Legato has been at UF, the college has consistently ranked
in the top 10 of the 28 fundraising units across campus, both in
terms of money raised and percentage of goal achieved.
Mary Ann Kiely, associate vice president for development for the
UF Health Science Center and vice president for development of


Shands HealthCare, said Legato had done a great job of building a
well-rounded development program for the veterinary college, and
in doing so, had set the bar high for other development programs.
"Karen is a hard worker, and is well-liked and respected by her
peers here at UF as well as in the national veterinary organizations,"
Kiely said. "Karen did an excellent job raising the profile of the new
Small Animal Hospital among her constituency with her passion
for animals and her respect and admiration for the faculty at UF
veterinary college."


Professor emeritus of infectious
diseases honored by epidemiology
group

Paul Nicoletti, D.V.M., a professor
emeritus of infectious diseases at
the University of Florida College of
Veterinary Medicine, was presented
with the 2010 Karl E Meyer-James H.
Steele Gold Head Cane Award during
the American Veterinary Medical
Association's annual meeting in Atlanta
recently.
The award is the highest honor given to
a veterinarian by the American Veterinary
Epid, mi..1.._ Society. The group selects Dr. Paul Nicoletti
the awardee on the basis of achievements
in animal health that have significantly advanced human health
through the practice of veterinary epidemiology and public health.
A 1956 graduate of the University of Missouri's College of
Veterinary Medicine, Nicoletti retired from the UF veterinary
faculty in 2003. During his 25 years of service at UF, he taught
courses in infectious diseases, epidemiology, public health and food
safety.
Nicoletti's career began at the U.S. Department of Agriculture
in Missouri, with later duties in Wisconsin, New York, Mississippi
and Florida. He served as an epizootiologist in Tehran, Iran, from
1968 to 1972 with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the
United Nations prior to beginning his academic career at UF in
1978.
An internationally recognized expert in brucellosis, Nicoletti has
amassed many awards in his career, including Distinguished Service
awards from both the University of Missouri and UE As a tribute
to Nicoletti's professional contributions and service to the cattle
industry, a private $1.3 million contribution was recently made to
the UF College of Veterinary Medicine in his name.


FLORIDA VETERINARIAN 25






Honors, Awards, Appont'ments& Announcements


UF veterinary administrator honored
for contributions to animal clinical
biochemistry

John W. Harvey, D.V.M., Ph.D., ,,,
executive associate dean and a professor .
of hematology at the University of
Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, i
has received the 2010 Heiner Sommer
Prize from the International Society
for Animal Clinical Pathology. The
award is given in recognition of lifetime
contributions to the field of animal
clinical biochemistry.
As this year's winner, Harvey presented Dr. John Harvey
the keynote Heiner Sommer Lecture
during the society's 14th biannual Congress, held at Oregon State
University.
A board-certified veterinary clinical pathologist, Harvey has
been a member of UF's veterinary college faculty since 1974.
His scholastic accomplishments include the publication of 113
refereed papers many describing syndromes not previously
recognized in both veterinary and human medicine, three
books, 46 book chapters, 56 proceedings papers, 65 abstracts and
31 research grants. He is an accomplished lecturer both nationally
and internationally, having participated in more than 250 major
seminar engagements throughout the world.
Harvey is a past president and treasurer of the society, and has
held numerous leadership roles in other organizations, including
the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology, of which
he is a past president and board member. He has served on the
examination committee of the American College of Veterinary
Pathologists and has been a member of several other national and
state veterinary associations.


Earlier this year, Harvey received the 2010 Mark L. Morris Sr.
Lifetime Achievement Award for his lifetime contributions to the
field of comparative hematology. Among Harvey's other awards are
the Norden Distinguished Teaching Award, the American Association
of Feline Practitioners Research Award, the Alumni Recognition
Award from Kansas State University and the American Society for
Veterinary Clinical P url.. .._', Lifetime Achievement Award.


UF veterinary researcher to chair
international scientific group

Daniel Brown, Ph.D., a scientist at
the University of Florida College of
Veterinary Medicine, has been voted
chairman-elect of the International
Organization for Mycoplasmology, a
nonprofit scientific group dedicated to
the study of a type of bacteria that infect
a wide variety of animals and plants. His
term will be from 2012 to 2014.
An associate professor in the college's
department of infectious diseases and
p arl.. .l..,, Brown also chaired the Dr. Dan Brown
scientific program committee for the 18th International Congress of
the IOM, which was held in Chianciano Terme, Italy, in July 2010.
Brown's work focuses on genetic and taxonomic analyses of
pathogenic mycoplasmas and the diseases they may cause in
animals and humans.
His research has been supported by the National Institutes of
Health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Morris Animal
Foundation, the UF University Scholars Program and the Merck-
Merial Veterinary Scholars Program.



























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UF |UNIVERSITY of
UFFLORIDA
College of Veterinary Medicine
P.O. Box 100125
Gainesville, FL 32610-0125


Calendar


UF's annual Spring Weekend, featuring the
traditional Orange and Blue Game. The
Class of 1986 will hold its 25th anniversary
reunion and there will be a Silver Society
reception that evening at Emerson Alumni
Hall.


Open House is back! Following a two-year
hiatus due to construction, the public is in-
vited to attend the UF CVM and SCAVMA
Open House. Tours of the UF Veterinary
Hospitals will be provided. The free event
will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The Florida Veterinary Medical Association
will hold its annual conference in Orlando,
with a UF CVM alumni reception planned
for April 30. Contact Jo Ann Winn at
winnj@ufl.edu for more information.


The traditional sophomore professional
coating ceremony will be held at 2 p.m. at
the UF Phillip's Center for the Performing
Arts.


Commencement exercises for the UF CVM
Class of 2011 will be held at the Phillips
Center for the Performing Arts at 2 p.m.


April 9







April 16







April 28

- May 1





May 13





May 28


Non-Profit
Organization
U.S. Postage
PAID
Gainesville, FL
Permit No.94


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