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Guyana chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00228
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Portion of title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown, Guyana
Publication Date: 12/24/2006
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
sobekcm - UF00088915_00180
Classification: lcc - Newspaper N & CPR
System ID: UF00088915:00228
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text


S UNIA Y


The Chronick' at http://www.guyanachronicle.com


SREA L juries after being hit by a bus several days ago. but doctors were
able to save the heart, lungs, kidneys. liver, skin. bones and cor-
CIHRIS TMAS STORY eas of the healthy and athletic teen-ager.
S SY "There were at least seven recipients of the organs," said a
HONG KONG (Reuters) A Hong Kong schoolboy spokeswoman with Hong Kong's Hospiial Authority.
who died in a traffic accident has brought festive hope Miu's 41 year-old mother, a single parent on social welfare,
to at least seven other patients through the rare mass ignored the protests of superstitious relatives in insisting on the
donation of a large number of his vital organs. donations to "bring hope to other families" Hong Kong's Apple
Fourteen-year-old Miu Chi-ho died from brain in- Daily newspaper reported Frida%


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society," the paper quoted her as saying.
WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF
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THE Customs (Amendment) Bill has been ap-
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to correction of errors in printing, will be-
come effective from January 1 next year.
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SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24, 2006 3


Close





watch c


flood


continues


By Chamanlall Naipaul
THERE has been no report of
flooding with the onset of
heavy rainfall, but there is
need for continuous monitor-
ing and vigilance, Minister of
Agriculture, Mr. Robert
Persaud cautioned yesterday.
He stressed the point to re-
porters at the drainage sluice at
Hope. East Coast Demerara
where desilting was under way
'to clear a blocked outfall.
On Friday night. the silted
,channel prevented the outflow
'of water from heavy rain, result-
ing in rising water levels in the
j-village, with the yards of some
. -residents flooded.
However, officials of the
N, National Drainage and Irriga-
:-tion Authority (NDIA)
promptly mobilised a pri-
Svately-owned excavator and
work to clear the outfall began
the same night.
By yesterday morning the
water level in the village had
dropped significantly and the
situation was back to normal.
There was also some rise
in water levels in Cane Grove,
also on the East Coast, caused
by a sluice door being left
open beyond the scheduled
period as a result of the koker
attendant not reporting for
duty on time.
NDIA Senior Engineer, Mr.
Lionel Wordsworth, told this
newspaper the door was left
open from 00:01 h to 00:06 h
Thursday, resulting in an influx
of water to the community.
However, he said, the NDIA
responded promptly and was
able to get the door closed and
bring the situation under control.
Persaud said the attendant
falls under the administration of
Region Four (Demerara/
Mahaica) and Chairman, Mr.
Clement Corlett has assured
him that the incident will be in-
vestigated and disciplinary ac-
tion will be taken if the atten-
dant is found to have been neg-
ligent.
Persaud indicated that moni-
toring of all drainage systems
throughout the country is ongo-


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CLEARING SILT: an excavator at work yesterday at Hope, East Coast Demerara. (Photo,
courtesy the Government Information Agency) ,


ing as a pre-emptive approach
to the situation is being adopted
and similar work to that under
way at Hope is also being car-
ried out in other areas where
this is necessary.
The minister said a drainage
pump at Canals Polder. West
Bank Demerara, is down due to
mechanical problems but all ef-
forts are being made to have it
expeditiously fixed.
Also on the West Coast
Demerara, at Crane, Persaud
said the sea defence has a
breach and while the area is



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unpopulated it would have to
be repaired quickly so that
the situation does not esca-
late: .
Asked about how well the
community drainage mainte-
nance programme is functioning
with respect to clearing second-
ary and tertiary drainage sys-
tems, the minister said it is
working effectively, but in some
areas work needs to be acceler-
ated.
He said there is also a need
to address the issue of people
dumping refuse and garbage in


drains and canals.
Chairman of the NDIA
Board, Mr'-Walter Willis, said
the water t iW in the East
Demerat "jConservancy
(EDWC) is well below its
threshold and every'cffort is
made to keep it that way to al-
low fort least one foot of
"free board."/
He said the latest report
indicates that the level of
the conservancy is at 55.6
GD (Georgetown Data).
while the threshold level is
58.6 GD.


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4 SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24, 2006


U.N. imposes nuclear



trade sanctions on Iran


By Evelyn Leopold and Irwin
Arieff
UNITED NATIONS,
(Reuters) The U.N. Security
Council voted unanimously
yesterday to impose sanctions
on Iran's trade in sensitive
nuclear materials and tech-
nology, an effort to stop en-
richment work that could be
used in bombs.
"Today we are placing Iran
in the small category of states
under Security Council sanc-
tions," acting U.S. Ambassador
Alejandro Wolff told the coun-
cil before the 15-0 vote, which
followed two months of tough
negotiations.
Iran, which refused to end
its uranium enrichment work in
exchange for economic incentives
earlier this year, immediately
condemned the resolution as il-
legal and said it would not af-
fect its "peaceful" nuclear activi-
ties.
The resolution demands
Iran end all research on uranium
enrichment, which can produce
fuel for nuclear power plants as
well as for bombs, and halt all
research and development on
methods of producing or deliv-


ring atomic weapons.
The thrust of the sanctions
is a ban on imports and exports
of dangerous materials and tech-
nology relating to uranium en-
richment, reprocessing and
heavy-water reactors, as well as
ballistic missile delivery sys-
tems.
The measure is less restric-
tive than the original draft,
drawn up by Britain. France
and Germany, due to Russian
objections. A ban on Iran's oil
exports was not considered.
In Tehran, Foreign Ministry
spokesman Mohammad Ali
Hosseini told state-run televi-
sion the resolution "cannot af-
fect or limit Iran's peaceful
nuclear activities but will dis-
credit the decisions of the Se-
curity Council."
He said Iran would con-
tinue to install 3,000 centrifuge
units at Natanz. the site of a
uranium enrichment plant.
Tehran's U.N. Ambassador,
Javard Zarif, accused the Secu-
rity Council and the United
States of a double standard by
punishing Iran while ignoring
Israel's nuclear arsenal.
"Iran has simply thumbed
its nose at the council and de-


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fied international law," Britain's
U.N. Ambassador Emyr Jones
Parry told the council, adding
that he remained committed to
resolve the dispute through ne-
gotiations.
While Britain. France and
Germany, sponsors of the reso-
lution, urged Iran to return to
negotiations, the United States
sought tougher measures, such
as an end to credits for Iran and
a halt to arms sales. It urged the
Europeans, Russia and China to
do the same.
"We don't think this reso-
lution is enough in itself." Un-
der Secretary of State Nicholas
Burns said in a teleconference
with reporters. "We'd like to
see countries stop doing busi-
ness as usual with Iran."
The resolution is under
Chapter 7. Article 41 of the
U.N. Charter, which makes en-
forcement mandatory but re-
stricts action to non-military
measures, and Russia's U.N.


Ambassador Vitaly Churkin
emphasised this point.
Russian President Vladimir
Putin, whose government had
hesitated over supporting the
resolution and succeeded in wa-
tering down parts of it, called
U.S. President George W. Bush
yesterday after reviewing the
measure until the last minute.
Russia, which is building an
$800 million light-water reactor
for Tehran that is exempted in
the resolution, has tried to main-
tain close ties with Iran but is
also concerned about any bomb-
building intentions Iran may
have.
"Russia views this resolu-
tion as a serious message be-
ing sent to Iran regarding the
need to more openly and ac-
curately cooperate with the
IAEA to lift or resolve the re-
maining concerns and ques-
tions relating to the nuclear
programme," Churkin told
the Council.


U.S. says top

Taliban leader killed
Taliban denies claim
KABUL (Reuters) U.S. forces said yesterday they had
killed the Taliban's military chief in southern Afghani-
stan, who had close links to Osama bin Laden and was heir
to the rebel leadership.
Akhtar Mohammad Osmani was the most senior leader
killed yet and was targeted in a region where the insurgency is
at its bloodiest, a military spokesman said. The Taliban denied
he was dead.
Osmani and two other guerrillas were killed in an air strike
on their car on an isolated desert road on Tuesday, spokesman
for the U.S.-led coalition force, Colonel Tom Collins, said in
Kabul.
"Mullah Osmani is the highest ranking Taliban leader that
we've ever killed," he said. "His death is very significant and
will hit the Taliban's operations."
The Taliban said Osmani, anointed by the group's leader,
Mullah Mohammad Omar, as his heir in 2001, was alive.
"We strongly deny this. He is not present in the area where
American forces are claiming to have killed him," commander
Mullah Hayat Khan told Reuters by telephone.
"The American and NATO forces from time to time
make such false claims. It's just propaganda against the
Taliban."


Nigeria president
replacing deputy
spokesman
ABUJA, (Reuters) Nigerian Vice President Atiku
Abubakar has "technically resigned" by attending an op-
position party convention and President Olusegun
Obasanjo is seeking a replacement, a spokesman for
Obasanjo said yesterday.
Abubakar accused Obasanjo of staging a coup and vowed
to resist his removal in the courts, setting the stage for a con-
stitutional showdown in Africa's top oil producer in the run-
up to elections in April.
"By the actions of the vice president he has shown that he
has technically resigned his position by ... attendance of the
convention of Action Congress." Obasanjo's spokesman Uba
Sani told reporters at the presidential palace.
Action Congress chose Abubakar as its presidential candidate ear-
lier this month after the ruling party suspended him over a report
accusing him of corruption, which has since been nullified by a court.
"The president has embarked on a wide consultation with
relevant bodies in an effort to select a new vice president in
line with the provision of the 1999 constitution." Sani said.
Obasanjo has accused his deputy of disloyalty and
waged a campaign to stop Abubakar standing in next year's
poll, which should mark the first fully democratic handover
in Nigeria's coup-prone 46-year history as an independent
nation.


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Olmert and Abbas hold

first formal talks
.ERUSALEM. (Reuters) Israeli Prime Minister Ehud
Olmert told Palestinian President Mahinoud Abbas vester-
daN he would unfreeze $100 million in withheld tax funds
and remove some checkpoints in the occupied West Bank,
officials said.
Olmert and Abbas holding their first formal talks at the
start of what officials said would be a series of meetings
also agreed to try to restart peace talks but reached no break-
through on freeing Palestinian prisoners.
Peace negotiations collapsed in 2000. and a Palestinian up-
rising erupted soon after. Hopes of reviving talks appeared all
but dead when the Hamas Islamist movement took power in
Gaza and the West Bank in March.
But Israel has been under pressure from the United
States and the European Union to take steps to support
the moderate Abbas since he called for early Palestinian
elections, a move that Hamas has rejected as a "coup" and
unconstitutional.


AT GNNL LAMA AVENUE

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AND NEWSPRINT


CUT TO SIZE

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Sorry we are closed on:

25th and 26th December 2006


We will re-open on:

27th December 2006


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24, 2006 5


II


_ _ _ __ _ _ i.LI L.-' "
11 7-.-
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Kidnappers'



getaway



car found


TRINIDAD EXPRESS -
One of the cars police said
was used by the men who
kidnapped businesswoman
Vindra Naipaul was found in
Laventille Friday.
The silver coloured Nissan
Almera had bogus number
plates.
The plates were traced to a
truck. Police believe they were
stolen to be used in the abduc-
tion. Crime scene forensic offic-
ers examined the car for blood
and fingerprint evidence. Inves-
tigators declined to say what
they found.
Several men were ques-
tioned by police in connection
with the abduction Friday. Five


U.S.


officials


meet on


Cuba

WASHINGTON,
(Reuters) Top Bush
administration officials
met last week to dis-
cuss Cuba's political
future.
President George W.
Bush's national security ad-
viser Stephen Hadley
chaired the 90-minute meet-
ing Thursday that included
Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice and other
officials, National Security
Council press secretary
Gordon Johndroe said yes-
terday.
"We're engaged in an in-
teragency process that is fo-
cused on a successful tran-
sition to democracy for the
people of Cuba," Johndroe
said.
He declined to provide
further details about the
meeting at the White
House.
The United States on
Wednesday rebuffed a re-
cent offer by Cuba for
talks and said Hav ana had
become even riore hard-
line since Raul Castro
stepped in for his older
brother.
U.S. diplomats in
Havana, how'.evci, have
raised the possibility of
some easing of sanc-
tions if Raul Castro
were .ti, frpep1,piitical
'*;' 'prnison r. **'*' '. *


homes in Central Trinidad were
also searched.
The car police found is said
to be the vehicle that took
Naipaul away from her Lange
Park, Chaguanas home on Tues-
day night.
The men took her away
in a gold coloured Nissan
Almera. That car was found
abandoned in Lange Park the
following day. Investigators
believe the kidnappers
switched cars and put
Naipaul into another Almera
- the one that was found in
Laventille.
Friday night, her friends,
relatives and neighbours held a
prayer vigil at her home.
Several organizations are
helping the police in the search
for Naipaul.
The Lange Park Residents
Association has posted emer-
gency numbers for anyone with
information.
Naipaul's workers at the
Xtra Foods supermarket at
Grand Bazaar and
Chaguanas intend to spend
Christmas Day out on the
street outside her home, ac-
cording to the supermarket's
public relations manager,
Daniel Austin.


Raul Castro tackles



Cuba's shortcomings


By Anthony Boadle

HAVANA (Reuters) Cuba's
interim leader Raul Castro
urged greater honesty in deal-
ing with chronic shortages of
housing and public transport,
the biggest complaints in the
country, Cuban state media
reported yesterday.
"Tell it as it is," he told the
first session of the National As-
sembly since brother Fidel
Castro ceded power to him in
July after undergoing emergency


TRINIDAD EXPRESS -
The hunt is on for two men
who entered the compound of
the Port of Spain General
Hospital Thursday night in
an apparent bid to "finish
off" the job of killing PNM
Councillor Peter John.
According to police reports.
at around 20:30h, two men were
spotted heading towards Ward
22, where John is warded. The
men, whom police say were
acting suspiciously, appeared to
have weapons concealed in their
clothing. However. before they
could approach the ward. an
alarm was raised and the men
ran off.


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surgery.
"Tell the truth, without jus-
tifications, because we are tired
of justifications in this revolu-
tion," the newspaper Juventud
Rebelde reported Defence Min-
ister Raul Castro as saying on
Friday.
Raul Castro, who is consid-
ered more of a practical admin-
istrator than his more ideologi-
cal brother, said he encouraged
a series of recent newspaper ar-
ticles criticising bureaucracy and
corruption in the food supply


The police were called in
and officers from the nearby
Belmont Police Station as well
as officers of the Inter-Agency
Task Force responded and
searched the area, but the men
were not found.
Investigators said they have
ruled out last week Saturday's
shooting of John as being rob-
bery related and are linking the
shooting to a robbery gone sour


system.
The one-day session dis-
cussed high food prices and de-
ficiencies in housing and public
transport, the three main com-
plaints among Cubans.
Cubans stand for hours
waiting for packed buses,
some of them wagons pulled
by trucks, and many live in di-
lapidated houses, often
crowded with more than one
family.
Raul Castro said it was "in-
explicable" how bureaucratic


in July, when a lone bandit at-
tempted to rob John.
Investigators said in that
incident, John managed to
wrestle the armed gunman,
who subsequently ran off.
Last week Saturday, John was
shot seven times by two
armed men while at his su-
permarket, which is at the
corner of Desperlie Crescent
and Laventille Road.


The Best
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hurdles had held up payments
to peasant cooperatives that
produce 65 per cent of Cuba's
food.
The younger Castro has
criticised state inefficiencies in
the past, but now he is effec-
tively running the country. He
is said to favour reforms easing
state controls over the
economy.
Raul Castro said his brother
was continuing to recover from
an undisclosed illness.
Fidel Castro, in power since
a 1959 revolution, has not been
seen in public since July 26.
The low-key Raul Castro,
who has spent most of his life
in the shadow of his larger-than-
life brother, said he will govern
in a more collegiate way.
In a recent address to uni-
versity student leaders, he
stressed the need for debate and
disagreement to improve deci-
sion-making.
Raul Castro also called
for more debate and self-
criticism to deal with the
many problems facing the
country and said the state-
run press had an important
role to play, the ruling Com-
munist Party newspaper
Granma reported.


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Men try to 'finish off'


'1


II






6 SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24, 2006


Editorial)

AT THIS season of goodwill and merry-making, a common
feature across the member states of our Caribbean Com-
munity is the quite visible presence of the police, some
armed and mobile, others on foot patrols, giving a sense of
security to shoppers and other citizens of protection against
criminals.
Crime has emerged as a major problem in most CARICOM
states and, consequently, the law enforcement agencies have been
compelled to be better equipped and prepared to go on the of-
fensive against the criminals.
The Guyana Police Force, like its counterparts in other
CARICOM states, is also faced with the challenge to recover
numbing quantities of illegal guns, including sophisticated AK-
47 rifles such as those stolen from the Guyana Defence Force
- in the possession of criminal networks that seem to be ex-
panding their bases of operations across the country.
In our situation, it is right and proper that both the head of
the GPF and GDF in reflecting on the operations of their re-
spective force, avoid minimising failures, some quite
outrageous while, at the same time, offering deserved praise and
encouragement for work well done.
SThey would know that a safe and secure environment is
absolutely essential for the peace and orderly development of
Guyana which should in no way be compromised by ANY con-


Musing on crime and security


sideration inconsistent with their mission statements and, ulti-
mately, what's good for our nation.
In extending our own best wishes to the security forces,
knowing that their members are now in a better position to cel-
ebrate Christmas with the one-month tax free bonus they de-
serve, we also express the hope that:
GDF Chief of Staff Brigadier General Edward Collins will
succeed in generating more confidence within the army and among
the public with the recovery of the 30 stolen AK-47 rifles. Fur-
ther, that the army will continue to show a high profile in work-
ing with the police to rid this nation of the criminal networks
that continue to kill, steal, destroy and spread fear.
Secondly, that the powers that be, including the relevant
politicians, and the Police Service Commission, would act
without delay in confirming the appointment of Mr. Henry
Greene as the Police Commissioner.
He has done well, in cooperation with his colleagues, to merit
such a confirmation in his relatively short period of acting in
that post since the retirement of Mr. Winston Felix.
Our Disciplined Services, like the workers of our public ser-
vice and other state institutions, have had to overcome, over
the years, the legacy, the damning consequences of the undemo-
cratic doctrine of "party paramountcy".
The indications are that they have done quite well in deal-


ing with that social and political burden. They, therefore, need
and deserve the respect and cooperation of ALL segments of
the Guyanese society.
SThe more the GPF and GDF inspire confidence in public
safety and national security, the more they could.expect the
solidarity of the Guyanese people across ethnicity and po-
litical affinity.
Let the battle intensify against crime. Let us enjoy
Christmas and spread some joy and goodwill.

7r: 1


CHRONICLE
Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Editorial: 227-5216; 227-5204; 22-63243-9
Sports: 225-7174
After hours 226-3243-9
Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is at www.guyanachronicle.com
e-mail address sundayeditor@guyanachronicle.com
Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown, Guyana.


Me and you at Christmas



- Hailing peace envoys and humanitarian aid workers


THE debates continue, with recurring focus at Christmas,
whether Jesus Christ was born on December 25 which we in
the Caribbean and others of the global community celebrate
as His birthday.
A related debate is whether this momentous birth that holds
such tremendous spiritual significance for a vast segment of
humanity, is what we celebrate. Or is that, in reality Christians too
have become saturated in what is often characterized as a "pagan
holiday"?
Whatever a reader's perspective, either as a "true
believer", sceptic, cynic, or simply one who just want to join others
in soaking up a "holiday season", it is also sad to note that the
very place associated with Christ's birth, the famous town of
Bethlehem in Jerusalem, has fallen victim to contagious political and
religious hatred.
Consequently, instead of the once very popular attraction
for tourists as a place of learning in history and culture, of
tranquillity, peace and harmony, it is currently a symbol of so much


that's wrong about human civilisation the intolerance, bigotry,
hate, destruction, the walls of separation and imprisonment of the
human spirit.
So, on this Christmas Eve, when galloping consumerism, fed
by entrenched capitalism, continues to make it increasingly
challenging to appreciate from the believers' perspective the
real reason for the season, I extend my humble best wishes to all
those working for peace in the world's trouble spots, and who boldly
and lovingly reach out, against the odds, to the millions of victims
of manmade and natural disasters..


I








:'5


I am greeting those White and Black men and women, often
simply described as "aid workers" who, sometimes at risk to their
own lives, are the 'foot soldiers' in the provision of emergency and
humanitarian relief to victims of natural disasters such as
tsunamis, earthquakes, hurricanes, floods.
Or are engaged in passionately assisting the victims of
manmade disasters who have been reduced to being among
the wretched of the earth by those driven by the thirst for
power and misuse the name of God and mock democracy to
achieve their goals.
Such people who commit their dastardly crimes against
humanity with weapons of race and religion, resulting in the
grotesque images that are routinely brought into our homes by the
powerful medium of television images from various channels
amid all the commercial jingles that urge bigger spending for a "merry
Christmas".
To the honest peace-makers as distinct from those in leading
Western or Middle East capitals who only see the "devil" on the
other side" and the brave, committed humanitarian aid
workers, the foot soldiers, I add my own quota of good wishes for
Christmas.
I do so as we keep hope alive for the peace we so
desperately need today, and which is desired by the Prince
of Peace whose birth is the reason for this season of joyful
and spiritual celebration.
It is, however, a peace that remains elusive by the sinful
corruption of power and the greed of the wealthy and powerful,
and which contributes to sustaining the notion that we are
destined to always have in our nation and global community,
the poor, dispossessed and powerless.
In an ugly world of killing fields, gross violence, greed.
racism and religious bigotry, thousands of men. women and
children continue to die daily from hunger and preventable
diseases; lack of access to potable water and basic medicine,
while corrupt tyrants and deceptive messengers of
"democracy" build their political systems and "kingdoms of
the damned".
Rather than being overwhelmed by the daily horrors around
us. we could respond in our own communities in simple ways of
caring by spending less on our own merry-making and giving some
tangible support, modest or generous, to organizations and agencies
known, in every member state of our CARICOM for their help to
the poor in and out of the Christmas season. If too late for 2006,
there is Christmas to come.
I also take this opportunity Ito extend warm greetings to the
health workers of our region who are helping in the struggle
to combat the dreaded killer disease. HIV/AIDS: and the social
workers involved in programmes to curb delinquency, and crime
among the youth and check the inclination towards immoral
behaviour that seems an ever present danger.
May the peace and blessings of 'Christimas be with all readers
Thank you f'or journeying with lme from their last
i .ristnus to that of tIopnliowrwp whether or not our religious.
,t' l~~ll~ll !i~ti'a lt~sli l, dife: ...,.,, ... .






SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24, 2006 7





ib dC


WHILE visiting one of my sisters in the United States dur-
ing Christmastime a few years ago, she kept hauling me
all around the place while I would have much preferred to
stay and snuggle in the warmth at home than be shiver-
ing out in the freezing cold.
Global warming may be somewhat heating up some places
that are normally bitter cold at this time of the year, but the
cold is still freezing for those of us born and bred in the warm
tropical sun. (To us, even an overcast sky is enough to get us
shivering and find some excuse to seek warmth in bed!)
It was dark and raining hard in and around Georgetown
Friday and someone commented to me that it was "rough, rough
outside".
Well, duh! I told him he ain't seen anything yet. People in
cold countries have to go to work in winter through driving snow
so thick you can't see a few inches before you, and you had
better not be late!
And most people here look at a little drizzle, and thinking
they are made of either salt or sugar and would melt if they get
wet, waltz into work a couple of hours late with the excuse,
"It's raining."
Some sugar babies and salt daddies don't even turn up to
work, using a little rain as an excuse to stay away to preserve
their sugar and salt levels.
Sugar babies and salt daddies like them would be sucking a
lot of salt in cold countries, living off little else than welfare
cheques because they wouldn't be able to hold a job for long.
So, a little bit of a sugar man like me, found it a bit hard to
agree with my sister when she wanted to go out into the cold.
And when I asked her why she and her husband did not
like staying home much, her prompt reply was, "we've got
itchy feet!"
So, the little bit of a sugar man that I am, I had to quickly
find the itch in my feet to keep up with them and their itchy
feet.
It didn't take me long (probably as long as to suck a snow
cone on a hot day in Georgetown) for this little bit of a sugar
man to find his itchy feet, and soon my itchy feet were all over
the place, in step with their itchy feet, every inch of the way.
Those were sugar sweet itchy feet days in the cold and


this sugar man revelled in the outings. I've been there, done
that.
And the itch is still with me. Like my love for music, for
laughter, like my weakness for sweetness, I believe I was also
born with itchy feet.
There are times when I wish I could really get down and
get it on with my itchy feet addiction, but 1 can't because my
job most of the time keeps me in the office.
Like this season. This is Christmastime and it's prime time
itchy season and this sugar itchy man is, most of the time, itch-
ing to get out of the office, but can't.
Crowds are swarming the streets and the stores, itching to
spend, itching to buy, some itching to try to inch closer to other
shoppers and watchers and hoping to inch any likeable contact
further along.
Some people in authority, probably with a bad sad case of
itching in the brain, tried some time ago to kill this serious Christ-
mas itch that infects Guyanese, but it didn't work.
You know those sweet body itches you get sometimes and
can't resist scratching to enjoy the itch?
Well, those people in authority very quickly found out that
the Christmas itch was too sweet and it had infected too many
Guyanese too deeply, so they dropped the plan to ban Christ-
mas and let the itch grow and spread.
In the itchy feet excursions I have had in and around
Georgetown so far for this season, I felt the itch deep and sweet
and saw many, many other itchy feet people itching away.
This is an itch that does not discriminate it cuts right
across religions, culture, race, class and whatever and there's
no known antidote to this seasonal epidemic.
It's so infectious that even normally rude or curt or impo-
lite telephone receptionists and clerks and others can't help
greeting you with "Season's greetings!"
In the cold countries, they have flu season and phar-
macies come up with all kinds of stuff to help victims deal
with the flu.


Here, this is prime itch season and neither rain nor sun can
stop people from feeling the itch. There's no known cure.
Did you see the shoppers out in the rain in Georgetown
last week and yesterday? The sugar babies and salt daddies,
who stay away from work or turn up late at the first drizzle,
couldn't resist the itch and were out in force with all the other
itchy Christmas people.
Those who weren't itching were itching to itch that's
how bad this seasonal itch is. People can't help it they were
either painting, repainting, decorating, rearranging, cleaning,
washing, cooking, shopping, or doing whatever else the itch
forces them into.
You want to see the force of the itch?
Get your freak on and let your itchy feet take you around
Georgetown, the towns and villages around the country today
and tonight, and you'll see the power of the itch.
And tomorrow and the day after, you will smell the power
of the itch. Those smells will be all over the place.
You will see people itching so bad that it's worse than any
bad case of stinging nettles.
And if you see this little bit of a sugar man itching along
with all the others, know that I finally and joyously managed
to itch my out of the office for a good bout of itching.
And a very Merry itchy Christmas to one and all!


The Caribbean at the end of


2006 and beyond


(The writer is a business executive and former Caribbean
diplomat)

AS DUSK descends on the Year 2006, the countries of the Car-
ibbean Community (CARICOM) continued to face daunting
challenges in the global community in relation to trade, in-
vestment and development as-
sistance. .
Banana exports were al-
ready badly hurt from the loss
of their preferential access to the
European Union (EU) market
causing pain flo .;lT banana
growers in rural communities in
several Caribbean countries. But, -
as the year was drawing to a
close, Ecuador, which already
'" ner cent of the world
controls ou L-,--
market, launched a new t ... .
to EU banana regn- e
It is a challenge Ecuar. i
likely to win in the long run sim-
ply ,, because World, Trade
Organisation (WTO) rules say .
the days of preferences are done,
er.! CAP'O. M slates have not


managed to get themselves into a category of countries which qualify
for special and differential treatment.
Therefore, Caribbean banana growers are headed for more dif-
ficult times, as are those Caribbean economies to which banana ex-
ports still make a sizeable contribution.
The prospects for sugar exports seemed no better. Having lost
the preferential price they earned in the EU, Caribbean sugar pro-
ducers were struggling with ways to transform the industry; but at
least some of them are coming to terms with the need for innova-
tion such as ethanol production.
Financial services, particularly off shore banking and in-
surance, once held out hope for the adjustment of some
CARICOM economies; this hope is fading fast. While it is
true that there has been growth in the provision of financial
services wit;." CARICOM particularly from financial insti-
tutions in Trinidad, Barbados and Janiaica, participation in
the global economy is shrinking.
Except for the Bahamas and to a certain extent Barbados (which
has a special treaty arrangement with Canada), the Organisation for
Economic Cooperation and Development and the Financial Action
Task Force (both creatures of the richest countries of the world).
using the International Monetary Fund as a surrogate to inipk ient
suffocating rules that suit their own powerful states, have eltec-
tively constrained the scope of much of the Caribbean's financial
'. services sector as a global layer.
, fqC i %7 !A ,


over Economic Partnership Agreements are sadly lacking in a de-
velopment orientation. The EU is insistent on the Caribbean open-
ing its markets to European goods, services and investment with
little compensatory mechanisms for the dislocation which such open-
ing will cause to local businesses and the losses to governments of
tariff revenues.
This situation calls into question policy positions adopted
by the region in its negotiating strategies and demands a more
radical approach, including a re-examination of the negotiat-
ing structures themselves. The negotiations require the ex-
pertise of good technical officials, but they also noi' C(y out
for political positions to be adopted based on the realities of
economic conditions on the ground.
Tourism was the one bright spot in an otherwise bleak hori-
zon in 2006. But, the industry boomed in the last three years on
the back of a weak US dollar to which many Caribbean currencies
are tied. European and other tourism to the region improved sim-
ply because the drop in the exchange rate between the US dollar
and other major currencies created a de facto devaluation of Carib-
bean currencies.

DESPERATELY REQUIRED
Structural changes that are desperately required for tourism,
including the promotion of local ownership, enforceable linkages to
l"arners and local manufacturers, grater pan-Caribbean cooperation
in promotion. flight scheduling and hospitality-sharing. me yet to
happen.
Global competition not in im s Irs liar expert Bmr-
ket.- but tlso within their own demesic mart stayed


fI ByShaief Kan






...... l.SUNDAY CHROCNIHClU DedHIO 4.a006


2006 Year-Ender


IT'S BEEN one of the slower
years, in hard news terms: no
great events, few surprises,
and no real shocks.
But as the little events
accumulated during 2006, the
shape of the future gradually
became clearer in three
important dimensions.
It is now clear that
America's moment in the
Middle East is coming to an end.
It has been a rather long moment
- the United States has called
most of the shots in the region
since the 1960s but recently
it has turned into a classic case
of imperial over-stretch. So we
will soon find out if a strong
American presence really was
vital for all of those years to
keep the oil flowing, keep the
crazies from seizing power, and


assault on Lebanon in July add
to the impression that U.S.
foreign policy in recent years has
been little more than crude
militarism.
Counter-productive
militarism, at that, and American
voters do not like the taste of
failure. So how far will the
U.S. withdrawal go?
All the speculation early
this year about American
military action against Iran to
destroy its alleged nuclear
weapons programme now
sounds preposterous; Iran will
be the new great power in the
Gulf, and there is nothing that
the U.S. can do about it.
Syria will do what it wants
in Lebanon, confident that
neither the United States nor
Israel will intervene to stop it.


p -





.t




r 4* 4r
-- ,~a ---.-', -


keep Israel safe.
The catastrophic Iraq
adventure is the main reason
that the U.S. public is turning
decisively against further
American military involvement
in the Middle East, but the
growing debacle in Afghanistan
and even the botched Israeli


The U.S. navy will still hang
around the eastern
Mediterranean and the Gulf, and
Israel will still get lots of
American money and weapons,
but six months after President
Bush leaves office in early 2009
there will probably be no
American "boots on the ground"


between Morocco and Oman.
Will disaster ensue?
Probably not, except in Iraq
(where it has already arrived) and
perhaps in Lebanon. Except for
those two countries, the Middle
East is a massively stable area
where no regime has been
overthrown since Iran in 1979.
Many of the region's other
countries also contain aggrieved
religious and ethnic minorities,
but the awful price that Iraqis
and Lebanese paid when the
status quo was destroyed makes
people elsewhere very reluctant
to consider radical change. The
legions are going home, but the
barbarians are not at the gates.
The second big change that
became indisputably clear in
2006 was the shift of the
world's economic centre of
gravity. For centuries it has
been in the European-North
American part of the world,.but
the emerging economies
elsewhere are now big enough to
have a decisive impact on the
global economy.
Oil surged to almost $80 a
barrel in mid-year as demand for
imported oil in China and India
dramatically exceeded supply,
and the prices of minerals,
timber and even grain soared for
the same reason. But the new
pattern goes well beyond this.
The familiar business
cycle of boom and bust has
been more or less
synchronised internationally
for over a century, but it was
always driven by what was
happening in the big
Western economies plus
Japan. It's almost seven
years since the last recession,
so we are due or even
overdue for another by now


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94 REGENT STREET and
STALL 1 3 BOURDA MARKET ,,


- but there's no sign of it.
The big developed
economies are forecast to grow
at only 1.5-2.5 per cent next
year, but Eastern Europe,
Russia and South Africa are
growing at 5 per cent or better,
and the major Asian economies
(apart from Japan) at 7 per cent
or better, so overall growth in
the global economy will be


healthy enough to avoid a
recession. This is not to say
that the business cycle has been
abolished forever, but rather
that the timing of the next
downturn probably depends as
much on decisions made in
Beijing, Moscow and New
Delhi as it does on the
traditional decision-making
centres in the U.S., Western
Europe and Japan.

TIPPING POINT
And the third change...
This is harder to pin down,
because the thing about real-life
turning points is that you can
only be certain that you have
passed one some time after the
fact. but 2006 felt like the year
when we reached the global
tipping point on the issue of
climate change.
There is still a great deal of


denial, especially in North
Anierica, sond there C ertc n
dir;in i;li 'e\v global agireemeints.
\, ieless. the avalanch ,,I'

anl speed of cli : .
''ei ie distinctly chastened
ltone (i lihe climate-change
deniers. holh suggcstedi llil ithe
debate is sliiorllyv going o ito\e
hion (l i li hypolh licilc ie:lii1i to
thCe wX'o lI of real polities.,
This does not nlieaC that
new, global agreements x'will he
forthcoming in the next year or
so. In the United States, the


headquarters of denial on
climate change is co-located with
the head office of denial on Iraq,
and no basic change of policy at
federal level is likely on either
topic until Mr. Bush leaves the
White House.
But when Arnold
Schwarzenegger, the
Republican governor of
California, signed a bill last
August committing the most
populous state to get back
down to 1990 emission levels
by 2020, it was clear that the
resistance in the United
States is starting to crack.
And once the United States
starts taking the issue seriously,
dramatic things could happen
quite quickly.
In more local politics, the
year's most dramatic changes
were in Asia, where the civil war
in Sri Lanka resumed after a long
cease-fire, the Thai army
overthrew the elected
government, the king of Nepal
lost a confrontation with his
people and may yet lose his
throne and North Korea
tested a nuclear weapon.
It was a very small nuclear
weapon, and North Korea may
not have many more, but it was
a nasty reminder that north-east
Asia is potentially the scene for
a military confrontation between
the world's greatest military
powers. Nowhere else but
around the Korean peninsula do
the armed forces of China, the
United States, Russia and Japan
operate in such close proximity.
and Pyongyang's actions are
not exactly predictable. If you
were looking for a ninth nuclear
weapons power, North Korea is
just about the last place you
would have chosen.

PINK TIDE
In Latin America, existing
left-wing governments in Brazil,
Venezuela and Chile won re-
election, while the so-called
"pink tide" carried other leftist
leaders to power in Bolivia and
Ecuador. Some would argue
that the return to power of
Daniel Ortega in Nicaragua and
Alan Garcia in Peru were also
election victories for the left,
but it would be fairer to
T .-


describe those men as ex-lcftisls
S-nd the lel-wing challenger
for the Mexicain president
nll i '1 \ kIX osl. t ,i u I ,nteein II lI"
I.* r,., .Si [ ii~ji speal- k n'l
C. iuiii x another six \Clars lf
contNser\Vti\ c oX\ CNiuC-l'e
Moreover. the most lell-
willg altin leader of them all.
lidcl ( 'aslro'. tell era\'cly ill aind
iItI ne\cr i'etiLUrn lo power.
which class cot nsi'.'';i,- C oubt
over hllc poulical future o CuIb,.
In Africa. chllnicclte:, '
Darfurgot thel t Mll i
but l.i; gg tl hladlincs...
.., even worse war mayi ,
I 1 : ' lll''l'l 'I :


brewing in the Horn of Africa.
Ethiopian and Eritrean troops
are already in Somalia, backing
opposite sides in the
confrontation between the
Union of Islamic Courts, the
grassroots movement that has
finally restored order in
Mogadishu, the capital, and the
American-backed "interim
government" in Baidoa. On the
other hand, the Democratic
Republic of the Congo managed
to have its first democratic
election in forty years without
falling into renewed civil war as
predicted. Indeed, more of
Africa is now at peace than at
any time since the late 1960s
and the average economic
growth rate across the continent
this year was 5 per cent.
The big story in Europe
was "enlargement fatigue."
With the admission of Romania
and Bulgaria as full members at
the beginning of next month, the
European Union will have
grown from 15 to 27 members
in just three years, and there is
a strong reluctance in a number
of countries to go any further
for the moment. That was why
referendums in France and the
Netherlands rejected the EU's
new constitution last year, and
the same sentiment was at work
again this year in the (so far
unsuccessful) efforts of a
number of governments to
exclude Turkey from
membership negotiations.
Europe gained its 49th
independent country when
Montenegro voted for
independence from Serbia in
March, but the expected creation
of an independent Kosovo was
stalled by local conflicts and
Serbian opposition.
Swede and Poles voted to
move right, and Italians voted to
move left (though only
narrowly). The Ukrainians
voted almost exactly the same
way that they did in last year's
election, just after the "Orange
Revolution" but got a quite
different government due to the
interplay of ambitions and
antipathies among the party
leaders. And when Russia briefly
cut the gas off to Ukraine in a
dispute over prices last January,
everybody in Europe got a
sharp reminder that Moscow
still wields great power.
A Danish newspaper's
cartoons of Mohammed upset
the whole Muslim world in
February. and the Pope's
comments on Islam had much
the same effect in September.
The Palestinians voted for a
Hamas-led government in
January, and were punished all
year for choosing the wrong
party. Former Serbian dictator
Slobodan Milosevic died in
custody in The Hague as his
five-year trial on war crimes
charges was nearing an end:
former Iraqi dictator Saddam
Hussein was sentenced to death
in Baghdad by a kangaroo court.
Lots of minor dramas, but
not much that will stick in
people's ninds even in five or
ten years' time. For which *we
should be grateful, because in
thlii contex! "lllenli:.' 'le"
.;;,. lnicmeans horribl.l It
wouldd have been a really
ncii morab!i' ycar for example. if
the hirdi Ilu had finally become
tIraiisimissible between human
ieiungs.
..cl us fo th'''kful for
Ia;ge ;,,crcies.
(** Gwynne Dyer is a
London-based independent
,, jpulrn!li.t ,whqse ui tick~s,pre
p, polished/, i.4- countries.)
1 1." |! |..'- '.' -, *l' i J t !


ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER






SUNDAYCHhtROeNICkErWla206- the




Laughter the best medicine


LAUGHTER begins as nature
in man as it is a universal ex-
pression of satisfaction.
It is innate as it is evident
from infancy and continues into
adulthood. It is evident even
with children blind from birth
suggesting the instinctive nature.
There are different sources
of laughter. Some scholars view
jokes that are erotic or sexual in
nature. Cognitive jokes are de-


California at Los Angeles. His
lesson was "Mind over Mat-
ter".
The sounds of laughter are
produced by a deep inhalation
followed by short interrupted,
sporadic contradictions of the
chest, and especially the dia-
phragm. The mouth is open
more or less widely. The corners
are down backwards, a little up-
wards with the upper lip raised.


then is perceived as ludicrous or
hideous which may be classified
as humour; so is wit, satire, sar-
casm, cynicism, etc. While
humour may be an aspect of
human nature, satire comes from
one's moral and appropriate so-
cial conduct.
In humour, the audience is
sympathetic; in satire it is self-
satisfaction; in sarcasm there is
a victim. It is evident then that


~- .1


rived from incongruous or con-
tradictory attitudes or senti-
ments.
One time magazine pub-
lisher, Norman Cousins, wrote
his famous "Anatomy of an Ill-
ness" and described how laugh-
ter cured him of an unknown
illness by reading and watching
movies that sent him into beds
of laughter. He was given six
months to live but at the end of
six months, no one knew what
became of the dying cells.
He then began to teach
medicine at the University of


laughter arises from our own su-
periority or inferiority to oth-
ers.
For some psychologists,
that laughter is born of sudden
change of events and that logic
is not always applicable.
Sigmund Freud sees
humour as an aspect of the un-
conscious and all have some
form of conflict, e.g. perception
of ourselves and perception of
others. An intelligent adult do-
ing something silly will create a
chuckle.
Freud even suggests that


The Caribbean



at the end ...

From page seven
CARICOM countries in the face as 2006 faded away, underlying starkly the absolute necessity
to integrate or perish.
At least the year started with six CARICOM countries at last bringing the much promised Carib-
bean Single Market (CSM) into existence, and, despite the uncertainties that surrounded their decision,
the OECS countries joined in the middle of the year.
The Single Market is by no means complete and, unless a range of measures are established by
law, including common regulatory rules for services and the machinery for integrating production across
CARICOM countries, it will be a flawed process giving rise more to contention than to harmony.
A key issue the freedom of movement of labour remains off the discussion table, mired in fears
of a political backlash for the political party in each country that dares to acknowledge the reality that
there can be no genuine single market without free movement of all the factors of production.
Sharp divisions are still part of the relationship b'eiwi gJvc'l. "" d the private sector, on
the one hand, and governments and the trade union movement on the other, in.many counties of
CARICOM. Yet, until there is a symbiotic relationship between these three groups that is built around
an agreed strategy for taking forward the Single Market, CARICOM will be marking time in a world
where other regions are marching forward.
It is a glaring reality from which the Caribbean as a whole is yet to learn that the government
negotiators in trade negotiations, whether bilaterally, at the WTO, or through the OECD are repre-
-':-- i interests of big businesses in their countries who want access to the markets of others on
senuing, L ......---.. -~- ^ '" -o'trictin- entry to their own market through the
the most advantageous terms while at me saiiLc ,, ....
use of non-tariff barriers and other ruses.
The time is now urgently upon us when there must be substantial consultations between
Caribbean governments, the Caribbean private sector and the Caribbean Trade Union move-
ment; to determine agreed strategies for trade negotiations in goods and services.
(To be continued next'Sunday)
[Responses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com]


humour is a form of latent ag-
gression.
Mythology is a system of
axiom's and postulates ca-
pable of conferring a common
significance on unconscious
formulation of the mind and
of civilization. Here laugh-
ter takes on a new and
deeper meaning.
In mythology, laughter
serves several purposes to ex-
press joy, sacrificial laugh, tri-
umphant laugh, etc.
Among many South
American Indians, including
the Waraos and Arawaks of
Guyana, laughter is forbid-
den because it is perceived as
mockery and had to be re-
pressed. In fact, it could be
the cause of death The
Warao, "The origin of the
stars"; the Arawaks "Forbid-
den Laughter". "The Indian
Warrior despises laughter
and tickling, which are
barely suitable even for
women and children".
The Tereno myth explains
the origin of language as laugh-
ter when a wolf failed to make
them laugh a little red toad
amused them.
Among the Tucuna of South
America the origin of fire was
when the old lady amused and
laughed at the false explanation
of how she baked manioc bread.
In laughing the Indians saw the
fire and seized it.


DIFFUSING TENSION
Laughter serves numerous
functions. It serves as a way
of diffusing tension or even an-
ger. It shows the readiness to
cooperate and to continue what
is in progress. In contrast to en-
ergy, the group can relax in
safety.
It can serve to discharge nu-
merous energies. It is then a de-


nial of anxiety. Someone who
has been through a prolonged
period of anxiety is more likely
to laugh.
A surprise incongruity may
be the source of laughter in re-
sponse t to the sudden tension.
In the conflict situation, laugh-
ter becomes a psychological
compensation and helps to
ward off social damage, when
we experience something un-
pleasant or provoking in a pleas-
ant manner.


In the conflict principle it
is suggested that even pleasant
activities have elements of ten-
sion which produce a release of
pain so that at the conclusion
there is relief. This is why some
individuals laugh louder and
longer than others and this is
quite easy because the muscles
surrounding the mouth are small
and readily activated.
It can and has been used in
a form of seduction in numer-
ous relationships.
The social function is evi-
dent in racial jokes. These may
be accompanied by horse play
or obscenity evident in groups
of in-laws. It is noted that in
formal work settings, higher
level employers, with equal sta-
tus, are more likely to greet each
other with humour.
Lower level employers, es-
pecially in the company of su-
pervisors are less likely to be
humorous. Seniors are more
likely to use juniors for their
own wit. In hospitals, patients
with known lower status are
more likely to hear jokes from
their doctors or nurses.
Laughter in modern times
has become very popular. Mov-
ies. comedy clubs, cartoons, etc.
have replaced other forms of en-
tcrtainment. Comedians are re-
placing serious movie actors in
the mainstream.
Their wealth in money
and mind is untold.


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The muscles surrounding
the mouth are small and readily
activated because they are so
often used in the expressing of
emotion. This may be preceded
or followed by a smile and may
even be a sign of love.
The reparatory and other
parts of the skeletal muscles
are then called into play.
When the senses hear or see
a comical situation, it will be
sent to the thalamus and then
to the hypothalamus, parts of
the lower brain.
The beginning of laughter


i V/I

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u- -J-


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King Hei


try I of Haiti


By Watson R. Denis, Ph.D

IN THIS article, I am seek-
ing to make brief historical
remarks on the state of Haiti
some years after its indepen-
dence.
Special attention is placed
on the monarchy in the north of
the country and the Citadelle
Laferriere.
Haiti proclaimed its inde-
pendence on Ist January 1804.
Two years later, the country
was divided into two states: the
Western Republic, led by
Alexandre Pi6ton, who set up a
republic there, while in the
north, Henry Christophe con-
verted the first republic into a
monarchy in 1811.
King Henry I built a regime
characterized by order, disci-
pline and work which ensured
that his kingdom would be pros-
perous. Agriculture flourished,
education developed and indus-
try took root.
The King was particularly
interested in the conduct of busi-
ness in every political and mili-
tary jurisdiction. Each of his ad-
ministrators was required to
submit a detailed report on the
financial affairs of his respective
district and the status of agri-
cultural activity. Every centime
spent had to be justified; failure
to abide by established rules
was punished. Under such a
system, the monarchy in the


north grew each year.
If there is anything vis-
ibly demonstrative of that
prosperity and continued
growth, is the number of pal-
aces and castles which were
built during the kingdom at
that time. Two fundamental
reasons led the monarch and
his entourage to build these
edifices: the notion of an of-
fensive return by the Frenchi
to reclaim the territory which.
was declared independent
and a desire to build some-
thing long-lasting in the new,
independent state.
Henry I declared that he
wanted to build a civilisatiori in
the Caribbean which wold
have no cause to envy any an-
cient civilisation in Europe. In
so doing, he had churches built,
as well as some nine palaces, in-
cluding the Palais des 365
Portes and the Palais de Sans-
Souci, 15 castles and the
Citadelle Laferrimre.
These lavish and imposing
edifices earned Henri I the title
of the King "Builder".
Next to the Palais de Sans
Souci, destroyed in 1842 during
a deadly earthquake, there is an
architectural work of the
Christophe era which is
idealised over two centuries of
Haitian history the Citadelle
Laferriere. This citadel remains
the largest fort in the American
hemisphere.


- a notable builder


Situated at the summit of
Bonnet A l'Eveque, at an altitude
of 969 metres, it extends over
an area of 8,000 m2. Its walls are
between 5 to 7 m thick and its
longitudinal walls stand 940 m.
The Citadelle was built with
large tanks for water and stores
to hold a year's supply of food
for some 5,000 soldiers.
In fact, everything was
considered to make this for-
tress a strategic stronghold
and an area for social gath-
erings. Strategically, the
Citadelle was fitted with 300
cannons of varying sizes and
cannonballs. Large arsenals
of cannonballs, shot guns,
bombs, shells, gunpowder,
lead and pillboxes were hid-
den inside.
Important gold pieces,
carved bricks and precious
stones were stored in other lo-
cations. There were also royal
quarters, kitchens, a bakery, a
foundry, a theatre house and ar-
eas for recreation.
The plan for the Citadelle
was designed in 1805 by Henri
Barre, a Haitian, who began the
early works, but it was a Scot-
tish architect named Laferriere
who would complete the struc-
ture. Together with engineers
and craftsmen, more than


22,000 workers of all ages con-
tributed to its construction.
TheiCitadelle offers several
geograpliical forms, ranging from
round ,urves to rectangular
lines, based on the perspective
of the observer. It offers a pan-
,oramic View of the entire north-
ern region of the country and
overlooks the town of Cap-


Haitien.From the summit of the
Citadelle, one has an extensive
view of the Caribbean Sea and
the eastern side of Cuba can be
seen during clement weather.
In 1982, the Citadelle was
declared a World Heritage site
for humanity by UNESCO.
Many consider it to be the 8th
Wonder of the World.
During the prosperous
days of Haitian tourism (1950s
to early 1980s), it was consid-
ered, together with Bicentenaire
in Port-au-Prince, the ruins of
the Palais de Sans-Souci, the
small church at Milkt. a great
tourist attraction.


Even today, it remains a
place of interest for tourists. For
example, it is included in the
"package" offered by certain
tour operators in the Dominican
Republic who immediately cite
it in what is referred to as multi-
destination tourism.
This Citadelle
symbolised the power of
Henry I, who wanted to ex-
pand it further and to link it
to other royal palaces. When
the King committed suicide


in 1820, works halted and the
kingdom was destroyed for-
ever. The North then fell un-
der the Western Republic,
which did not experience the
same success in material
terms or in its political and
social structures.
Even worse, the wealth ac-
cumulated in the North disap-
peared and was squandered. The
country was to suffer, on the
one hand, the consequences of
these losses and, on the other,
the failure of the Western Re-
public to which the entire com-
munity would join ranks.
Since then, Haiti has been


unable to deal with tremendous
challenges. The spurts of a pe-
riod are far from meeting expec-
tations. It is not that the mon-
achy itself was superior to the
Republican system; the u:e
made of it by one or the other
is evident in the outcomes. In the
north, there was greater politi-
cal cohesion, a guiding principle
and clear objectives. In the
West, however, there was a prac-
tising republic which was ca-
sual; a society which was ex-
tremely stratified and political
freedom was not respected.
Surprisingly, in the north-
ern kingdom, where there was a
feudal system, which would call
to mind even the European do-
mains of the Ancient Regime,
daily social interaction was more
open than in the Western Re-
public.
As we approach a new an-
niversary of Haitian indepen-
dence, one hopes that the coun-
try will experience sustained
economic growth so as to be
able to construct new citadels;
this time, however, for social in-
tegration.
(** Dr. Watson Denis is
,the Political Advisor at the
Secretariat of the Association
of Caribbean States. The
opinions expressed do not
necessarily reflect the offi-
cial views of the ACS. You
may send your comments to
mail @ acs-aec.org.)


Guynee omanI Lcra teshisto rynt (n ada I


By Hubert Williams


AN OUTSTANDING Guyanese whom then South African
President Nelson Mandela described as an African princess
when he first met her in Cape Town in 1994 has created his-
tory in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan by becoming
the first minority woman to win the nomination for election
to its Legislative Assembly.
Dr. Judy Kobsar (formerly Judy Blackman) last week scored
a landslide victory over three white candidates in the selection pro-
cess by the ruling National Democratic Party (NDP) to 'run' in the
predominantly white Regina Rosemont constituency at the next pro-
vincial elections scheduled for either Spring or Fall of 2007.
The Premier of Saskatchewan, the Honourable Lore Calvert,
in a speech after the results were announced, said it was a day that
would be recorded in the history of Canada. He expressed copfi-
dence that Dr. Kobsar's overwhelming victory at the party level
will be repeated at the elections.
Dr. Kobsar has been selected to succeed retiring politician
Joanne Crofford, a 15-year veteran in the Legislative Assembly who
has held a number of Cabinet posts, tpe last being Minister of dul-
ture, Youth and Recreation, with responsibility also for the Public
Service Commission.
Land-locked Saskatchewan in Canada's southwest is almost 10
times the size of New York State (NYS) and has a population ekti-
mated at about one million, compared with 19 million in NYS.
The NDP controls 30 seats in the 58-member Assembly,
with the remaining 28 having been won by the Saskatchewan
Party (SaskParty), just a slim majority resulting from the pre-
vious elections in 2003.



[IT l']; il [l~i [i


PLEASE BE ADVISED THE RESULTSf
FOR THE CHRONICLE CHRISTMAS
CROSSWORD PROMOTION WILL BE
PUBLISHED ON THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 28, 2006,

WE RI.GET ANYV INCONValtNCFr. (AlSc.


___......MI *1 1 E


However, the NDP hierarchy has expressed confidence that
the party's excellent record in government during the past three
years has identifiably improved its standing with the electorate and
this is expected to translate into an increased majority at the polls.
Political analysts in the province are predicting that Dr. Kobsar,
who is hugely popular in Regina, will take the constituency by a
wide margin and also be elevated to a ministry.
She will be coming into elective politics from an impressive
background of university teaching, community service, international
relations and a stint as a technocrat junior Minister of Agriculture
and Food.
Asked to comment on the outcome of the party vote, Dr.
Kobsar expressed pride in being
the first woman from what Canada
calls a visible minority to have been
so nominated; and expressed the
hope that she will carry this per-
Sformance through to the elections.
"I think thaitit is important
that visible minorities have a
voice in the legislature," she re-
marked, adding that "I think it
also helps to boost the
multicultural and diverse com-
munity we have here.
"Regina is a melting pot of
various ethnic groups. Once they
see one of their own has been able DR. JUDY KOBSAR
to get that far, it will make them
do the same or even better."
A few days following the vote and ihe victory speeches and.
response, Dr. Kobsar attended the NDP Caucus at the Legislative
Assembly where she was formally introduced by Premier Calvert
to Cabinet Ministers. other rittinn NTI"D .--'aat o the i-o
....- ...r, ,-, c MUn i er s or meiHouse,
and to members of the opposition SaskPaity, all of whom raised a
cheer to her as the first Black woman to have reached thus far in
the politics of the province.
In a response, Dr. Kobsar expressed deep appreciation of all the very
' favourable statements made about her and she pledged to work assidu-
ously to retain the seat for the NDP with an even greater majority.
Dr. Kobsar is President of the Saskatchewan Caribbean Cana-
dian Association and current Chair of the Saskatchewan Emnlov-
mecn Equity and.M *-, ---
..- ...,.,. .~. ssocaon. Her previous service in-
dWict membenkmp of the Board of Dikeces of the Regina and
iarict Food Ba and he Cir of Regin Police Race Relations


Advisory Board.
A former student of the Tutorial High School in
-Georgetown, Guyana, she has, an excellent academic record
and is numbered among 'about 200 people worldwide with a
doctorate in Total Quality Management.
She has had the distinction of being part of a Canadian Gov-
ernment delegation to the White House, the first foreign group to
be received by: President George W. Bush following his assump-
tion of office in 2001.
In the mid-1990s she travelled extensively to Ottawa for meetings
with Federal Ministers Lloyd Axworthy and Paul Martin (former Prime
Minister of Canada) while working with representatives of women's groups
on Canada's Social Poliby Reform Green Paper, and during the period 1993-
1995 she served as Advisor to the Federal Minister of Justice on Crime
Prevention and Safety in Canada.
Her most prominent awards include the Commemorative Medal
of Canada (presented by the Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan)
for community and humanitarian work in Canada, the Saskatchewan
Centennial Award, the YWCA Woman of the Year Distinction Award,
the Woman of the Year Award of the Saskatchewan Government
and General Employees Union, the Eddy Award for humanitarian
work over and above) and numerous others through the years.
She has traveller extensively in North America, Europe, Af-
rica, Asia and the
Caribbean attending conferences, conventions and seminars on
race relations, humai rights, family violence, pay equity and re-
lated topics, and these include the World Conference on Crime Pre-
vention held in Cairp, Egypt and the 4th United Nations World
Conference for Women held in Beijing, China, both in 1995.
Dr. Kobsar'; current position is as Immigration Administrator,
Saskatchewan I migration Branch, Advanced Education and Em-
ployment.
Following her remarkable first-stage triumnh. Dr. Knhar
has received nSmerous congratulatory messages from rela-
tives, friends and admirers across Canada and around the
world, the following being one example in which Guyana was
specifically mentioned: "Congratulations!! I am so pleased for
you. You were long destined for greatness, and Guyana's deep
loss is Saskatchewan's and Canada's rich gain, for rather than
scaling the heights of wet Roraima you are soaring above the
snow-capped peaks of Canada's southw-* --L- -
,'ll ._ ..... l .ugmanas. History
-,m snark t is day, and Destiny says there's much more to
come, for crossing the Rubicon has become your hobby. Just
imagine, the world still deludes itself in the view that
"Destiny's Child" is a pop group. Right on. Judy."


, The Greater


Caribbean This Week
t.. m


lO,10: _llA)r_,C@------ ---------fy





.A.... B - -- ...----.v



President



joins Xmas



shopping ,



crowds


PRESIDENT Bharrat Jagdeo
yesterday had a walkabout in
Georgetown meeting some in
the throngs of last minute
shoppers trying to get every-
thing ready for Christmas
Day tomorrow.
His visit took in some of
the main shopping areas on Wa-
ter Street and Regent Street (in-
cluding the new City Mall) and
Bourda Market where he
mingled with shoppers and
wished them all the best for the
season.
At the City Mall, the Gov-
ernment Information Agency
(GINA) said Mr. Jagdeo had ex-
tensive discussions with owner.
Mr. Lennox John.
John escorted the President
around the mall and, said GINA,
the Head of State explained
about the government's plans
and work taking place in the
city for Cricket World Cup
2007. The ongoing work in-


eludes raising and beautifying
the city's avenues, and tree-
planting.
President Jagdeo also vis-
ited several other stores along
Regent Street as well as
Fogarty's and Guyana Stores
Limited.
After the walk around the
city, GINA said the President
noted that though there has been
some rain, which put a slight
damper on shopping, it did not
prevent people from coming to
the city to shop.
He added that storeowners
related that most people
shopped early in the month and
others are just purchasing
Christmas Day gifts.
"I think it's going to be a
good Christmas. There's a good
mood in the country and we
need to consolidate, build on
this," he said.
GINA said the President.
however, cautioned that per-


MALL STOP: President Bharrat Jagdeo in the recently opened City Mall at Regent and Camp Streets during a walkabout
in Georgetown yesterday. (Cullen Bess-Nelson photo)


sons still need to be careful on
the roads and should not drive
if they are drinking.
The agency said he is also
urging Guyanese not to con-
sume large amounts of alcohol
that could result in heavy intoxi-


cation and persons getting in-
volved in physical altercations.
He expressed the hope that
Guyanese would enjoy them-
selves during the season and es-
pecially welcomed those who
are visiting the country for the


holidays.
GINA said the President
disclosed that for the Christmas
season, he will be spending time
with children in Sophia and vis-
iting the children's ward at the
Georgetown Public Hospital


Corporation.
Minister of Tourism, In-
dustry and Commerce,
Manniram Prashad and other
government officials were
with the President on the
visit.


;IIa(yI the peace, jof


and good will of lre


Chiristmas seasoriA


fill your hearrtsand


homes lorevel:


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I -


I






S712



Major



overhaul



for Kuru



Kuru



Training



Centre


SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24, 2006
00S0 ,S -iedmoo-Q 31j1i4,H55 t5ACl Md


MAJ.OR infrastructure over-
haul and the introduction of
more skills programmes are
planned for the Kuru Kuru
Training Centre on the
Soesdyke/Lindt-a Highway,
the Government Information
Agency (GINA) said yesterday.
The agency said Minister of
Culture, Youth and Sport. Dr.
Frank Anthony, outlined the
plans for the centre next year
during a Chrisltmas luncheon
there lFrida).
For the annual event, the
.igenc l said. the students
orlganliscd a dorli decoration
competition, upgrading several
facilities in and aro; und the trailn-
ing centre.
According to GINA. An-
ihony said the institution stands
ii benefit 'from ne\\ vocational
courses which will come on
'1tream in partnership \\ ilh roller
institutions. TIhe plans include a
computer laboratorx- it said.
The centre pro\ ides training
lor sludelnts ft)rom aro1 und t. h
countrI and accorldillg to An-
lhonv, it is a gi'rat place lor so-
'ial and multi-cultural inlerac








I ~. .
In loving memory of
WOODROFFE wl
passed away or
December 23, 2001.
Age 14 yrs.
A light from our
household is gone
A voice wi, loved is
stilled
A place is vacant in our
home
Which can never be
filled
We have to mourn the los
of one
We did ourbestto save
Beloved on earth. regretti
SRemernbered in the grav
S It was hard to p. with or
We little thoughlr :(e time
".Farewell dear oine, your li
Curhx~ve toryou till the en
CWe mi wu Jou
Sadly-missed by parents
sisterTatiana, aunts, ur

v.. --*(....


tion and unit\.
In 200(5. the HIV/AIDS
peer counselling progixramme of
the Ministry of Health was in-
troduced at the institution to
help students become advocates
for HIV/AIDS prevention,
GINA said.
The programme, it said.
sought to help students increase
the knowledge and I)roIlUote
behav\iour change in their com-
munities.
It said Anthon urged slu-
delnts to remain committed to
the institution and the trailing
pri\ ided since it is a garantlced
camrer'-oriented incenti c.
He said the training is a
stepping stone lor furltllcring
their education anld can lead to
diploma or ldegrece programmuces
at ICteriars institutions.
His encouragement. GINA.
said. xwas prompted b\i discus-
sions \\ illh se\ .ral slulelills \ iho
wa ilI to furlher lhieir i studies

I he m11m1Ilir said Ihe Iraii




xl"ui ii
ing is provided lor IClle0i to ide
\, lop ieclhniciai skills to ciL e
(;tl\ Iana.



^.-<. ^


RIA
h'o











s


ed still



fe is past .,
waS near .

d will last.
Ria.
s, grandmother,
cles and cousins.'


KURU KURU CHAT: Minister of Culture, Youth and Sport, Dr. Frank Anthony with students at the Kuru Kuru Training
Centre Friday. (Photo, courtesy GINA)
The institution provides els. These include welding, lah- masonry, and other technical more than 30 females, many
training lor students between 16 rication. motor vehicle repairs, training, doing business studies, at-
and 25 years old at various Iev- electrical installation, carpentry, About 130 males and tend the centre, GINA said.










1' e 1etJ n .


THE (Customs (Am.endment)
Bill ihas Ibeln appro edt in thle
Natiui.al \ssei, bhl. iand slub.-
ject to correction of er rorsI in
printing, \;ill hecolie ciffec-
ix e Fromn ,laiinar I Inex t'ar.'
I milixice !Iniistel )r \Ashnl
Sinlxi. \ in' ix lo ed lthe egislc.i .
Ilon Tllir'sda\. s.Ad the iilln
lion oIf he bill is l1 io bhii inito


operation lharionisation of clas-
silication for purposes of lar-

lie told the 1House that thec
('aribbean C(ommunitly
iCA\RICOM)n (ounicil lor l'radc
ia d 1I'c nonll ic Dec)I opI entll
(COTIID) I pllproxed liCe slruc-
Ilne of the ('Commion li\terIal
u if ill I ( T') and in .IlIe C this


btin C/femootiamyi
: iI .


In memory of the life of
a LOKNARINE RAMDIN
a.k.a. GAROO of 188
Industry Housing
' Scheme who departed
on December 23, 1999.
ieven e/ors ar I/ wo' In st


Ouvu lI ycudf cdy v Wvt luta
you dad
Our hearts are heavy,
we're stillsad
The seasons have
changed, our ages too
Celebrations come and gone


How we've missed you
A precious one from us has gone ,
Your beautiful memory keeps us going
We wish you were here
Yourface to see. yourvoice t ar
' 1 ) In yourown special wy
So 'll always be neat
S Always remembered by his wife Joyce, 5
", t children Michael, Lita, Dovey Carl and Albert,.
i !sons-in-law Blair and Brodo. daughter-in-law
, F.,ia. grandchildren, brother, sisters. other
SrL! i',oes and friends. ,

S*;


year. CARICOM Secretary-
General Edwin Carrington com-
municated this to lnmember states
and urged them to strive for
implementing Ih e necessary leg-
islationl bv Janliux I Inext year.
This. tGu ana sought to do
and is now read\ lor its imiple-
inentation. Singh said.
Mr. \VinsIon Mlurra. of the
main opposition People's Na-
tional Congress Reform-One
Guyana (PNCR-IG) alliance,
commended the government for
bringing the legislation-beolre the
House to ensure the deadline for
implementation was met.
He recalled that historically
Guy'ana has always made efforts
to implement decisions of
CARICOM in a time\ manner
and inquired whether other
member states have also fol-
lowed suit.
-Howe er. Murray observed
that there \\ as deviation from the
original bill which was passed in
the House earlier this year, \\ ilh
respect to dutLy free concessions
permining to iimtlportation of mlo-
lor cars for racing purposes and
importation of certain items for
public places of worship.
Singh1 explained that tile de-
i iation does not reflect a change
in the regulations biu \\:ia due
Ito erxri;s inu printing.
SlrrfiI N contended lxha,
guidelines for dui\ li coiuces.'
sions ol A,'t illu ii !ll.; []llli\


should be gazetted and sought
to have an amendment to in-
clude this in the hill.
However. this was rejected
by the government side. with
the Finance Minister stating
that these guidelines are \\ idel
a\ ailahle.
Murray also sought to ha\ e
all amendicmnti with respect to
wording of a section dealing
with duly free concessions for
the Head of State and the Prime
Minister.
According to Murray, the
words "by the Head of State
or for his use" give the impres-
sion that the items imported
would be used for other pur-
poses than that of the Head of
State and made a similar con-
terition in the case of the Prini
Minister.
Instead, Murray suggested
that the word "or" as used in
both cases should be replaced by
"and."
However. his suggestion
and subsequent proposed
amendment were rejected by
the government. as Singh argued
that these words were in use for
the longest while.
In addition, he said, the
use of the word "or" is there
because the Head of State or
Prime Minister may not nec-
essarily import these items
Ilieniselhes hut instead this
iiiax he done hb agencies.


'I /~~ll~i' ~~/ I,, SC~I
Georgtown.ista iL et'sa

AmessagB om te Mayr and Cty Council





SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24. 2006


First tsunami, now war:Sri




Lanka survivors can't win


By Simon Gardner

VINAYAGAPURAM CAMP,
Sri Lanka, (Reuters) Squat-
ting under a makeshift shel-
ter in a refugee camp in vola-
tile east Sri Lanka, grating
coconut for a curry as mon-
soon rains thunder down, tsu-
nami survivor Kamalini
Kandasamy has seen it all
before.
The 26-year old and her
husband had expected to spend
the second anniversary of the
island's worst natural disaster in


their rebuilt home on the tsu-
nami-battered east coast. In-
stead they are on the run again
- this time from renewed civil
war.
Kandasamy and her family
are among thousands who have
fled Tamil Tiger rebel-controlled
territory in the eastern district
of Batticaloa to escape the
crossfire of fierce artillery
battles and air raids. She paid an
unimaginable price.
"When the bombs fell, I
started running and fell in the
shock," she told Reuters, tears


Bono receives

honorary British

knighthood

By Jodie Ginsberg

DUBLIN (Reuters) Irish rock star and rights campaigner
Bono has been awarded an honorary British knighthood,
the British Embassy in Dublin said yesterday.
"Her Majesty The Queen has appointed Bono to be an
honorary Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of
the British Empire in recognition of his services to the music
industry and for his humanitarian work," the embassy said in
a statement.
Fellow Irish rocker Bob Geldof, also a high-profile rights
campaigner, received the same award in 1986. Honorary
knighthoods are awarded to non-British nationals.


welling in her piercing blue eyes.
"I was 9 months pregnant. I
was immediately taken to hos-
pital. My child was stillborn."
"We do not know what the
future holds for us. Now I am
told my house was damaged by
shelling," she added. "If peace
really returns, I would prefer to
go back. That's my place."
More than 3,000 people
have been killed this year in a
series of air raids, ambushes,
land battles and suicide attacks
as the military and the Libera-
tion Tigers of Tamil Eelam
(LTTE) fight a new chapter in
a two-decade civil war.
The conflict has largely
been confined to the northeast,
where the Tigers run a de facto
state under the terms of a now
battered 2002 truce.

PEACE CHANCE
WASTED
A golden opportunity to
capitalise on the tsunami disas-
ter as a basis for cooperation
and peace, as in Indonesia's
Aceh, was squandered when
majority Sinhalese hardliners
went to court to derail a $3 bil-
lion aid-sharing pact between
the state and rebels, and suc-
ceeded.
"By blocking the joint
mechanism for tsunami work.
the Sri Lankan government ...
blocked international tsunami
aid reaching our affected


people," rebel political wing
leader S.P. Thamilselvan said.
"Sri Lankan governments have
always neglected the Tamil
homeland."
The Tigers, who say they
are resuming their fight for an
independent state for minority
Tamils after President Mahinda
Rajapakse rejected their de-
mands for a separate homeland,
have said the island is on the
brink of a full-scale war.
Both military and Tigers
have hampered access to con-
flict areas, and artillery duels
have made it too dangerous for
aid workers to operate, forcing
many organizations to shelve or
abandon tsunami projects alto-
gether.
"The conflict has majorly
disrupted tsunami rehabilitation
projects due to lack of access.
fear, risk," said Martin de Boer,
who heads International Com-
mittee of the Red Cross (ICRC)
staff in Batticaloa.
"It affects aid organizations
because they have to react to an
influx of internally displaced."
he added. "They have to choose
their activities." Three of the
Red Cross's seven planned tsu-
nami projects in the area have
been halted by the conflict.
ine vec. 2004 isunami hii
around two-thirds of Sri Lanka's
coastline. \\rapping around the
island as the waves travelled on
to India. All along the coast.


derelict houses, rubble and
razed foundations still stand
witness to a disaster that killed
35,000 people in Sri Lanka and
around 230,000 in total.

NORTH-SOUTH
DIVIDE
Along the palm-fringed
south coast, the government's
Reconstruction and Develop-
ment Agency says around 98
per cent of around 25,000
planned permanent homes have
been completed though the
lynchpin tourist industry there
is suffering from cancellations
due to the war.
In the Tiger-dominated
north, the number of completed
houses drops to 29 per cent.
Along the coast road in the
hardest-hit eastern province of
Ampara, many still live in rudi-
mentary shelters made from
metal sheeting and thatched
with palm fronds. Creepers and
undergrowth consume tsunami-
ravaged houses whose owners
either abandoned them or per-
ished.
But there are success sto-
ries.
In the eastern village of
Vaddavan, which lies around six


miles (10 km) from forward de-
fence lines which separate rebels
from government territory, fish-
erman Mylvaganan
Sathyamoorthy cannot believe
his luck.
Sri Lanka's biggest local
charity, Sarvodaya, and two
Austrian non-governmental
organizations, are putting the
finishing touches to 142 houses
they have built further inland
for survivors whose coastal
homes were obliterated.
"I am very happy that I am
going to settle down in a house
two years after the tsunami,"
he said, as builders plastered
over bricks and stacked boxes
containing his future bathroom
and kitchen. "This is a much
more solid house than I lived in
before."
"We are even being
provided with solar en-
ergy," he added, gesturing
to a set of solar panels to
be installed on his new
tiled roof. And he has plans
for his old temporary shel-
ter. "I might open a grocery
store, or perhaps a spice-
grinding mill in it." he
beamed, his wife laughing
behind him.


HONORARY KNIGHT U2 lead singer Bono
(REUTERS/Toby Melville)
A statement on the U2 Web site (www.u2.com) said Bono
was "very flattered to be honoured, particularly if the honour
... opens doors for his long standing campaigning work against
extreme poverty in Africa."
British Prime Minister Tony Blair said he was delighted
Bono had chosen to accept the award.
BONO FAN
"I'll leave it to others far more knowledgeable than me to
talk about U2's music. All I'll say is that, along with millions
of others right across the world, I am a huge fan," he said in
the letter, reprinted on the No. 10 Web site (www.pm.gov.uk).
The prime minister said he felt more qualified to talk about
Bono's personal commitment to tackling global poverty and,
in particular, to Africa. "I know from talking to you how much
these causes matter to you," Blair said.
The knighthood is the latest award for 46-year-old Bono.
In 2003, he was given the Legion D'Honneur by President
Jacques Chirac on behalf of the French government, for his
contribution to music and his campaigning work.
Last year Bono was awarded the Time Person of the Year
2005, along with Bill and Melinda Gates, for his work pro-
moting justice and equality.
The British Embassy said Bono would receive the award
from the British ambassador to Ireland in a ceremony in Dublin
shortly after New Year's Day.
Bestowal of an honorary award does not confer the
title "Sir" on the holder.


D -GU ,AR of 45.
Arapaima St, .
S ID r Io j.n mim2ry of

ELEANOR .i.rs-',."







Sincere thanks to -
WALTON neeney
d al GUIAR of 45
i Arapaima St., .<'
TGuyhoc Park, La
SPenitence. D.O.D.:
December 24,2005.
Sincere thanks to
Margaret Sweeney
and all the relatives of
Tortola, BVI, Gavin
Phillip and all relatives
of Perseverance.
Mahaicony. ECD. Mr. & lVrs.
Rafeek of
Raf's Variety Store, Kihg St., Mr. Standford
Solomon and family. Col. L. Paul of the GDF, Mr.
Winston Feiix, Cyril Belgrave, Aubrey Jones,
Joseph Harmon, Owen Ramsey and their families
and all my customers and friends of Guyhoc Park,
Joy & Christine Browne, to my mom, Mr. Andy
Jacobs ofWBD t: m;, brjhers nd .:i'1er
Jimmy Ray, Patricia Pinl, I ,-entore
Desmond Walton and heir 'I
families, all of the USA
S, - .


*-*''*' A ***
**">. !, /^ **' ,


Watch your business
GROW! Advertise in the Guyana
Chronicle.Tel: 226-3243-9
or 225-4475


RABINDRANAUTH
BUDHOO aka "
IVAN formery :t
22 Logwood et.
Enymore, ECD '-
who passed
away on
December 26, -AMP'
1999atthe age te
of 35 years. .
A daily thought,
a silent tear
A secret wish that V .-"
you were here .
Gone are the a :,
we used to share
But in our hearts you will always be there
We are neverfarapart
For you are foreverin our hearts f-
We love and missedyou more
than words can say
If tears could build a stairway and
memories a line
We would walk right up to heaven
and bring you home again
We will always love you daddy
Sadly missed by his wife Nanda, two loving
children Shivanie Budhoo and Hamraj
Budhoo, grand mother Bramdai, sister
Suroj, sister-in-law, brother-in-law, nieces,
nephew, other friends and relatives.


"M NM q4WR- "IW qlPRqW "M INW-RIGM 40M WMPW"WMM




14 SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24, 2006



isiIIi i


(Compiled by Clifford
Stanley)

THIS is a look back at some
of the happenings in British
Guiana between October and
December 1906 as Guyanese
were preparing to celebrate
Christmas 100 years ago.
The excerpts selected give
readers a light-hearted look on
these events and some other as-
pects of life as reported in the
pages of the Daily Chronicle
newspaper at that time.

ACCIDENT IN WATER
STREET (October 30, 1906)
- Yesterday a young man
named Edward Leung, Clerk to
Messrs Hing Cheong and Com-
pany, was knocked down by a
cab horse in Water Street,
Georgetown near the Stabroek
Market. The young fellow was
stunned for a while but it was
not thought that he had re-
ceived any worse harm than a
very severe shock.

CRIME:
DARING THEFT FROM
WHARF: Daily Chronicle Oc-
tober 25, 1906:
Percival Earle was yester-


DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE
CLOSURE TO ROAD TRAFFIC



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For Monda'. December 25, 2006 08:30h
For Tiues'dv, December 26. 2006 08.:311

For Ocean Going Vessels opening laaLs about 1-l'hrs


GUYANA SUGAR CORPORATION INC.




The Gu, ana Siugar C"orporaltiir tnc. inviletsisuitably qualified
.tan tfnact'mreit n ;a lt Suppliers for ICh follohins Iept'tra' tt enlders

1. One Diesel (Generator Se t withl .iil..rm, Seeds of notf
greater than t100ltt200( R lPM. 1tH) kW Cor tinumtt s
Rated in liccordant3e with IS0.) 8528 & BS551-4,50 /60tltz.

2. One lDic'eIl (eiera'tor Set w'ithi 1operatingl S'Itltd or nof
greater tha t100t)I1200f RiPM TM.75 kW Co'timlinms Ruated
in ;'acconttlmle ~ thi)r (l t( 852)1& f514, 50:6t0 11

itid chloies t'ii
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catilns atrld r i'umtirte enll is dtaiiletd in (tic il'clder I)tl iifttt.

lThe Tender t'avtigv (:i lInt P i u irchasedi l :mtl1i[)litt1 d t f'i urn






!t < k. M52).: 222.3322I r
lint I tr:t tli .. iltifirln' ,i n i. O t' ,S in ,

(HI"- i (i f M IL M m ,i l "s It< no.\fI i."1)t 14 t %I'


day charged by District Inspec-
tor King at the City Police
Court before Mr L E Hawtayne
with having stolen two barrels
of rolled beef valued at $30, the
property of J I Chapman be-
tween the 20th and 21st in Wa-
ter Street.
Robert Wight, Clerk with
Mr Chapman said that Saturday
the 15th he took stock and left
five barrels of rolled beef on the
wharf. They each had a dia-
mond mark with a C in the Cen-
tre. The beef was sold only in
the grocery and to shops in the
gold fields but not to those in
town. From information re-
ceived he went to the wharf and
checked the barrels on the
wharf. Two barrels were miss-
ing. On the 25th he accompa-
nied the Police to Albouystown
where he saw a barrel similar to
those in which the beef was
kept. The head was scraped.
Hubert Phillips, a cartman, said
that the defendant came to the
market and called him to take a
load from Holmes Stelling. The
defendant borrowed two boards
from Mr Birch's Store and rolled
the barrels onto the cart. One of
the barrels was marked with a
Diamond and a C in the centre.


Witness saw a man named Do-
ver Blackman there. He was
told to drive to the corner of
Murray and Thomas Street.
When he reached Main Street he
met a Portuguese man who ac-
companied the cart. When he
reached the destination the Por-
tuguese man told him to drive
to Lot 49 Brickdam and leave
the barrels there. Blackman and
two others followed the cart.
The Portuguese man and an-
other man knocked in the head
of one of the barrels at
Brickdam.
He did not see what was in the
barrel. The barrels were covered by
a board at Holmes Stelling.
Dover Blackman corrobo-
rated. His Worship convicted
accused and sentenced him to
two months imprisonment with
hard labour.

SHIPPING NEWS: The
Steamer Ganges which is due at
Georgetown with indentured
immigrants from CALCUTTA
towards the end of the month
is also bringing a number of Im-
migrants from Trinidad where
the steamer is due for the 25th
Instant. She left CALCUTTA
on the 8th Ult.

FASHION:
THE EXCELSIOR Is the
Establishment for High Class
Tailoring.
We offer the best lines in
Serges, Tweeds. Coatings,
Trouserings, Lambwool,
Cheniot. (the right thing for
Frock Coats), riding breeches. A
small shipme t to hand; Galatea
sailor suits. Boys' Navy and
dark and light blue sailor clothes:
Boots: a new style in crossover,
button sides. Planters and other
kinds; Fox's patent SPIRAL
PUTTEES.
The Excelsior Talioring. G
N Lord Cutter and Manager 44
Water Street 1906.

WOMANWH BASKET
OF STONE day or two
"'-''go in th ed-en-Hoop
Courtroom a g woman ap-
Speared carry basket on her
head to JayJ. fficultie tnd
trials before the Magistratei To
the surprise of everyone the


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EllS CRAFT OPITICAi
\A iffr f..t.. of in


basket contained a quantity of
stones and when questioned the
woman poured forth a most
pitiful tale informing the Mag-
istrate that it was her husband's
doing who had put her out bag
and baggage and implored His
Worship's sympathy. His Wor-
ship questioned why the hus-
band should have treated her in
the manner described. She
pleaded no reason whatsoever
and in fact she made herself to
be an immaculate person. She
pleaded that she might be sup-
plied with a Constable and let
her take her goods.
His Worship was not im-
pressed by the story and sug-
gested that she should summons
her husband. The applicant left
the Court with her sympathiz-
ers looking very dejected.

SWINDLING MILKMAN
HEAVILY FINED: At the City
Court yesterday (November 1
1906) before Mr W A Parker
Acting Assistant Stipendiary
Magistrate Balgradge was
charged by PC 1201 Curry with'
having sold a half pint of milk
valued at 3 cents which when
analyzed was found to contain
4.7 per cent of added water at
Georgetown. Accused had been
convicted on three previous oc-
casions on a similar charge and
was fined $50 or two months
imprisonment with hard labour
(Writer's Comment: Fifty
dollars! What a heavy fine for a
dairy farmer in 1906. Wonder
whatever happened to Mr
Balgradge? It's a safe bet to say
that he kept his fifty dollars in
his pocket and cut his two
months in jail. But it happened
a hundred years ago and Mr
Balgradge is undoubtedly above
all that agony about choice
making now.)

BENT STREET BUR-
GLARY: (Burglars on the
prowl) Ai.tie Cit\ Police ves-
terday before Mi J KD. Aldl.
:.,orge,C6ox and Perry 'Bo\6 en
'Were charged by-District lispec- .
tor, King.ikith Jii~ig broken and
'.itered the sbpp. of Joseph
Bozwelle at Lot 69 Bent Street
on the 24th inst and then sto-
len therefrom a quantity of


goods to the value of $4.25. No
evidence was led, the case be-
ing further postponed till the
5th instant.

ANOTHER BURGLARY
IN GEORGETOWN: On Fri-
day evening a small theft was
committed at a branch shop of
the Demerara Bread Factory
owned by Mr N Cannon at the
corner of Lime and D'Urban
Streets, Georgetown. It was
discovered yesterday morning
that the thief had carried off
seven shillings in cash and seven
and a half pence of bread. The
Police have been communicated
with. (The Daily Chronicle
added It is peculiar that the
robbery should have taken place
on the eve of the relinquishment
of the duties of the person in
charge of the shop.)

DISTRICT NEWS EAST
BANK DEMERARA: There
has been quite a harvest of sud-
den deaths and accidents here.
The finding of the body of a
man named Kemp in a farm at
Mocha and the sudden death of
a child at Bagotstown named
Irene Hamlet were followed by
Ellen Fortune being seized with
some kind of disorder on the
road at Meadow Bank and fif-
teen minutes after she was taken
home she died. Then followed
an elderly James Barry at
Bagotstown who after taking his
tea died suddenly. Sookurmoni,
an elderly East Indian woman of
Plantation Houston went to
bathe last week and had to be
taken from the trench into which
she had fallen. She too expired
and so did Rhoda Hodge a little
dumb and deaf girl of ten years
who fell into a trench. At the In-
quest which was held by Mr W
A Parker at Providence Court-
room the Jury returned the ver-
dict of accidental drowning in all
other cases except that of Irene
Hamlet. Post mortem examina-
lnons were inade
CYCLES CYCLES


CHANNEL 18 10:00 h Eid-UI adha
12:05 h Death
05:10 h Meditation Announcements
05:30 h Quran This Morning 12:30 h- India Bazaar
05:45 h Annandale Kali Devi 13:00 h -DVD Movie
Shakti Mandir 16:00 h- Gurukula Sandeshh
06:00 h R. Gossai General 16:30 h -Teaching of Islam
Store presents Krishna Bhajans 17:00 h -- Ramadhan Program
06:16 h Jettoo's Lumber Yard 17:30 h Kishore Local Talent
presents Krishna Bhajans 18:00 h- Mere Awaaz Suno
06:45 h Ma Ki Amrit Shakti ...Karaoke Live
07:00 h -- Ramroop Furniture 19:00 h Islam. The Naturiial
Store presents Religious Way
Teachings 19:00 h Birthday greetings/
07:30 h C. Dookhie & Sons Death Announcement & In
Presents Krishna Bhajans Memoriam
07:45 h -Kanhai Guvana 20:05 h -Greetings
Electrical Agency presents 21:00 h Teleview Old Years
Krishna Bhajans Night 2006
08:05 h Sa Re Ga ma 01:00 h Sign Off






2I 20:30 h ,-s 14:00/1t7:0l
'* SIN () RO.i 'A .F" ..:,I,: ., '

-l 2 >:.3) h
i- piuW', I -

I 'vitli Mlirii L;>vr\\rcn ccI
I I STORY"
S 'i ": ... \..^) .a.. '.; < x -

A . DHOOM
--... I . - 1% Ii' l I


CYCLES (The main mode of
transport at the time): An ad-
vertisement:
Chapman's Brick Store has
just received a shipment of the
following well known bicycles.
Rudge-Whitworth's Special
Standard and Crescent. Singers
Model DeLuxe and Challenge.
TO BE SOLD AT PRICES TO
SUIT THE TIMES.
SGD: JOS Chapman No-
vember 4th 1906.

EXEMPLARY CHAS-
TISEMENT FOR A SCAMP:
(The assailant fined 24 cents)
Daily Chronicle November
2006. A Court story.
At the Suddie Court before
Mr Burke one R Young charged
J Richardson who is a fisher-
man and resides at Johanna
Cecilia. He was absent from
home on the night of December
15th leaving his wife in charge
of the house.
Young visited the house
of the defendant and eventu-
ally strayed into the bedroom.
Defendant who had received
information about these noc-
turnal visits did not fish that
particular night but lay in
ambush and on returning
found Young cooling out
without boots, without trou-
sers and without jacket. Need-
less to say Richardson
promptly attacked his adver-
sary who could not give a sat-
isfactory account of himself
and one Webb gave his kindly
assistance by throwing light
on the scene by means of a
lamp holding it over Young's
face. The night prowler got a
good healthy castigation. In
vain did he beg and implore -
Richardson leathered him for
all he was worth and eventu-
ally when the door was burst
in by a Rural Constable the
scamp was badly battered.
The Magistrate thought a
shilling-to bean adequate
penalty for the ruffled hus-
band to pa>.





- - -DJ I I... .1, -


PRO-CHANCELLOR of the
University of Guyana, Dr.
Prem Misir, has another book
publication: Ethnic Cleavage
and Closure in the
Caribbean Diaspora: Essays
on Race, Ethnicity and Class.
It is published by The
Edwin Mellen Press of New
York.
A press release said this
collection of essays addresses
the allegations of racism as one


of the major themes in political
commentaries in the multiethnic
Caribbean and its Diaspora. In
this context, several ethnic
groups ply for scarce resources,
so the principles of fairness and
equality in resource distribution
become critical to societal
stability.
The book, the release said,
advocates an understanding of
inter and intra-ethnic class
structure as a useful conceptual


tool to address the issues of
ethnic cleavage, racism, and
discrimination, using a power-
conflict framework that
illustrates that inter and intra-
ethnic class structure
emphasises economic
stratification, caste, internal
colonialism, and a diversity of
class-based and Marxist
theories.
The Foreword to the
book by Professor Aubrey W.


Bonnett, The College at Old
Westbury, says: "It is not
often that one is presented
with a book that succinctly
and deftly dissects the social
and political dynamic in the
mini diasporic nation-states
in the Caribbean with such
clarity and force of arguments
... This book leaves the
reader with a well-informed
feeling about colonial and
postcolonial analysis, and is


required reading, I would
contend, for anyone
interested in truly
understanding how these
arrived at their current
dilemma."
Dr. Colin Brock, University
of Oxford, says: "Dr. Misir has
made a most welcome addition
to the literature of Caribbean
social science with his
compilation of this book. It
deals with enduring and tense
issues in Caribbean societies,
both in the region itself and
beyond, for the Diasporas are
both within and without. In
addition to his skilful
compilation of themes and


choice, of contributors, Dr.
Misir makes a major
contribution to the volume
himself with characteristic
scholarship and commentary of
a high order."
"Dr. Misir's personal
knowledge of the East Indian
Diaspora experience in Europe,
North America and the
Caribbean positions him to
speak with conviction, and even
passion, on the scope and
challenges of that social reality.
He offers a firm perspective
from within that invokes a
response from without as part
of an ongoing discourse on race
and ethnicity in the Caribbean",
says Dr. J.A. George Irish, City
University of New York.
Misir received his Ph.D.
from the University of Hull,
England and is the author of
several books.


CHRISTMAS OPENING HOURS

Saturday 23rd December- 8:00hours to 16:00hours (4:00pm) Main Street only.

Other Branches 8:00hours to 14:00hours (2:00pm)

Christmas Eve (Sunday 24th December) All Courts Stores will be open from

8:00hours to 14:00hours (2:00pm)


link REE
irma li ESENTS


ALONG WITH THE


Timeka


celesbe


R hONT OF


Ha Ihlmk ol ;iuyavii

TImIe: BPIU ... ., ,.


i %


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, 111 1 -r, v


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16 SUNDAY CHRONICLE
I II,


"
'auC


(ji


nJ


I, "


,* L4 o


bB I A ULA^ b ma^es nis way to ine ArrowpoJni tourist
resor Frid!^ay for he annualChristmas party hostedfor^^
children from te neary Demrara Rver cmmuiyb
iowne'r Cati GerryGovei o Roaia Arwys
|(Photo, courtesy Roraima Airways)


Parents advised

to limit kids' use

of noisy toys


NE\% \ORkh Reuters
Health Some Ios emit
noise at a high enough Ieel


Appoints CEO


CLICO Guyana is pleased to announce the appointment of


Mrs. Geeta Singh-Knight to the position
Executive Officer (CEO).


of Chief


Srs. Singh-Knight took up the
post in September 2006 and has been
capably assuming full responsibility for
provision of innovative, end-to-end solutions
that optimise wealth and create security for
CLICO's vast clientele.

Joining the CLICO family in 2001 as Finance
Comptroller, Mrs. 5inglh-niglh s progress
has been meteoric and consistently impressive:
In May 2003, she was appointed Chief
Operations Officer (COO) of CLICO Guyana
and in November she was made Director and
COO of CLICO Suriname. January 2006 saw
the position of Chairperson at CLICO Suriname
being added to her portfolio. Mrs. Singh-Knight
is also Secretary and Executive Director of
Caribbean Resources Limited.

As a global financial services leader, CLICO
is proud of Mrs. Singh-Knight's outstanding
accomplishments. We pledge our support
as she continues to pioneer the development
of asset.protection, savings and investment
solutions for thousands of CLICO Clients.


N


/


Cloco.xom


--


Geet fi Siagh-Kni eight
brings extensive
experience to tbe role


to cause permanent hearing
damage if they are held too
close 1t the ear. ne" research
,from the UK shows.
"With most toys, your
child will only damage their
hearing if they use them for too
long a duration, or if they stick
them in their ear," Dr. Brad
Backus, a research fellow at
University College London's Ear
Institute who performed the
study, said in a press release.
"Our advice is pretty simple:
don't let your child hold noisy
toys too close to their ear, and
don't let them play with them
for more than an hour a day."
In a study commissioned by
Deafness Research UK, Backus
tested the noise levels of 15
popular toys for children aged
3 months to 15 years. The rec-
ommended top noise limit for
toys is 85 decibels. Prolonged
exposure to noise above this
level can cause permanent hear-
ing damage.
Eight of the toys emitted an
average of 81 to 105 decibels
when held 25 centimetres from
the testing microphone, roughly
arm's length for a child. Pixar
Cars "Lightning McQueen"
emitted 82.5 decibels, while La-
ser Command's noise level was
88.6 decibels.
But when held at 2.5
centimetres from the micro-
phone, approximating the dis-
tance if the toy was held close
to the ear, 14-of the toys, in-
,cluding Fireman Sam's Action
Jupiter and Tomy's "Spin n'
!Sound" remote controlled car,
Ihad average noise levels between
84 and 115 decibels. The only
toy with noise levels below the
safety threshold was a VTECH
cell phone for babies.
Toy guns were the worst
offenders, emitting 120 to 140
decibels when held at arm's
length and 130 to 143 decibels
when held close to the ear.
Noise of 140 decibels or above
can cause immediate hearing
damage.
"If I had children, I'
wouldn't.give any of these
gun-toys to them," noted
Backus, who said his ears
were ringing after testing the
guns. "And I would recom-
mend.that people avoid them.
They have the very real po-
tential to cause permanent
hearing loss."

Watch you

busnes


~-'~


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December 24, 2006 17


I


i,
7 -
N(41


2


-AV)
\c 'c -,r. "--
.T^T.n ff'T7.f7^


Come in today and collect your card,
make a wish to win an all expenses paid
TRIP FOR 2 TO
ST. VINCENT &
THE GRENADINES
WITH US$500 ON YOUR CARD


l1f i


T CONSOLATION PRIZES
US 5100 EACH
ON YOUR CARD

GIFTS
FOR EVERY APPLICANT


EN"rTPIF4 CLOSE Q)'!T 'tiEMBER, 2o0063


,;


I


.I.-. .
c


G WTI





Snu Pnnt l ulI U t, e, I u -i u



FCC defends fine


for Janet Jackson


: breast flash


By Jeremy Pelofsky
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -
The Federal Communica-
tions Commission late Fri-
day defended its decision to


fine 20 CBS Corp. television
stations $550,000 for airing a
brief breast flash by pop
singer Janet Jackson.
The agency rejected CBS's
argument that her performance


Think and o

1HIfh l ILL I I, Inl MOE IOUR ELEffCIGVlU 1, BILL 11118 HIS SI l?
SNewa electrical/electronic appliances, equipment and toys, e.g. large screen
6ct (plasma) television/DVD sets, additional cellular phones with chargers, video 6[
computer games, remote controlled toys with chargers

Keeping the cell phone chargers plugged in after the phones are charged
0' Cooking extensively with the microwave oven and electric stove
4 Using extra water from the storage tank so you have to pump water more often

SUsingmore hot water from the water heater

Positioning the refrigerator near the stove or other heat source
Fairy lights and lighted Christmas trees ,

Going to bed later than usual 4

SllHaving house guests .
^ Children at home from school with new electronic toys
and cell phones



BIE

*Don't plug more than three (3) strings of fairy lightS into each other
Don't overload outlets power strip bar or adaptor at one time r
Avoid using all the outlets on a powed
* Unplug fairy lightS before going to bed
! If your appliance shows a red light after you switch off, UNPLUG IT!

SAvoid using drop cord switch, plu or cord ets we
Make sure that no outlet, swith, plug or cord gets wet.
* Dry it thoroughly before using
l Consult a qualified electrician before buying or plugging
in new appliances .


during the live 2004 Super Bowl
football halftime show did not
violate decency standards that
restrict nudity on broadcast tele-
vision.
"The FCC reasonably con-
cluded that, although brief, this
display of nudity violated
longstanding federal prohibi-
tions on the broadcast of inde-
cent material," it said in a brief
filed with the U.S. Court of Ap-
.peals for the Third Circuit.
Fellow pop singer Justin
Timberlake ripped off part of
Jackson's bustier exposing her
breast for less than a second
during the show. Despite the
brevity, lawmakers and regula-
tors were outraged and vowed
a crackdown on broadcast inde-
cency.
"The commission also rea-
sonably held that CBS's viola-
tion of its broadcast indecency
rules was 'wilful' and therefore
justified a forfeiture," the FCC
said.
U.S. television and radio
broadcasters are barred from
airing obscene material and are
limited from broadcasting inde-
cent material between the hours
of 6 a.m. and 10 p.m., when
children are likely to be watch-
ing. The restrictions do not ap-
.ply to cable or satellite services.
CBS apologised and paid
the fine, $27,500 for each of the
20 stations it owns, but said it
was not clued in ahead of time
about the stunt and in July ap-
pealed the decision to the court,
based in Philadelphia.
The network challenged the
FCC's ruling that the flash was
indecent, contending that it was
brief and that in the past the
FCC had not taken action-
'against flceiing instances offiiUf
.dity and profanity.
"If CBS doubted the appli-
cability of indecency regulation
to brief nudity, its doubts
should have been dispelled in
the days before the Super Bowl
when the commission found ap-
parently indecent ihe broadcast
of nudity lasting less than a sec-
ond," the FCC said.
The agency denied that its
contemporary community stan-
dards by which it measures such
incidents was subjective, an-
other argument by CBS.
A representative for CBS
was not immediately available
for comment.
The case is the second
major legal challenge to the
FCC's decency standards.
Earlier last week, an appeals
court in New York heard oral
arguments about the fleeting
use of profanity on broadcast
television.







..22 -447






SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24. 2006 ,,..---.-- - -- -r------'


7p


The following list
Department as at
Authority.


No. NAME OF COMPANY ADDRESS 1 ADDRESS 2
1 A.B.M.D. (GUYANA) INCORPORATED LOTS 35-38 ECCLES INDUSTRIAL ESTATE
2 A.H & LKISSOON LIMITED LOTS 3-6 INDUSTRIAL SITE RUIMVELDT
3 ABC ACADEMY 68 HIGH STREET KINGSTON
4 ABDOOL & ABDOOL INC. INS. BROKERS & FIN. CONS. 11 AVENUE OF THE REPUBLIC ROBBSTOWN
5 ADVANCE INTERNATIONAL SECURITY SYSTEMS LTD 9/12 INDUSTRIAL SITE RUIMVELDT
6 ADVANCED BUSINESS SYSTEMS (GUYANA) INC LOT 71 CROAL STREET STABROEK
7 ADVENTURE MANUFACTURING COMPANY LIMITED QUEENSTOWN ESSEQUIBO COAST
8 ADZER ENTERPRISE INCORPORATED 8 SHERIFF & SECOND AVENUE SUBRYANVILLE
9 AGV NATURAL RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT INC. 61 BLYZEIGHT GARDENS GEORGETOWN
10 AIR SERVICES LIMITED OGLE AERODROME OGLE
11 AIRCRAFT OWNERS ASSOCIATION OF GUYANA INC LOT 159 CHARLOTTE STREET GEORGETOWN
12 ALKI INVESTMENT & TRADING COMPANY INC LOT 10 CAMP STREET WERK-EN-RUST
13 AMACO INCORPORATED MUD LOTS 28-30 NEW AMSTERDAM BERBICE
14 AMATUK TRADING COMPANY LIMITED LOT 149 PIKE STREET KITTY
15 AMAZON CARIBBEAN MAINSTAY GUYANA INC LOT 46 FIRST AVENUE SUBRYANVILLE
16 AMCAR SERVICES INCORPORATED LOT46 FIRST AVENUE SUBRYANVILLE .
17 AMEERALLY SAWMILLS LOT 29 STRAND NEW AMSTERDAM I
18 ANDERSON CHEMICALS (GUYANA) LIMITED LOT 90 BRICKDAM & SANDEMAN PLACE STABROEK
19 ANRAL INVESTMENTS LIMITED LOT 30 BROAD & LYNG STREETS CHARLESTOWN
20 ANSA MCAL TRADING LIMITED LOT 1 PUBLIC ROAD LA PENITENCE
21 APEX CARIBBEAN GUYANA INC LOT 1 CROAL STREET GEORGETOWN
22 APEX INSURANCE BROKERS INCORPORATED LOT 125 C BARRACK STREET KINGSTON
23 ARCHIE'S ELECTRICAL COMPANY LIMITED LOT 122 LALUNI STREET QUEENSTOWN
24 ARROW INVESTMENTS LIMITED LOT 42 HIGH STREET WERK-EN-RUST
25 ASHMIN TRADING COMPANY LIMITED LOT 48 HIGH STREET GEORGETOWN
26 ASHMIN'S FUN PARK AND RESORT INCORPORATED LOT 48 HIGH STREET WERK-EN-RUST
27 ASSOCIATED INDUSTRIES LIMITED R5 RUIMVELDT
28 ATLANTIC NATURAL OILS INCORPORATED LOT 2 CAMP STREET WERK-EN-RUST
29 B.& B FARMS INCORPORATED LOT 53-55 MUDLOT ACCESS ROAD GEORGETOWN
30 B & B INDUSTRIAL LIMITED LOT 9 BURNHAM DRIVE WISMAR
31 B. BHAICHANDEEN LIMITED LOT 6 COMMERCE STREET GEORGETOWN
32 B.K. MARINE INCORPORATED LOT 4055 MANDELA AVENUE RUIMVELDT
33 B.M. ENTERPRISE INCORPORATED QFL WHARF, HOUSTON EAST BANK DEMERARA "
34 BAIJNAUTH & SONS LIMITED 2767 GRANT CRABWOOD CREEK CORENTYNE
35 BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA- GUYANA BRANCH LOT 104 CARMICHAEL STREET GEORGETOWN
36 BANKS D. I. H. LIMITED THIRST PARK GEORGETOWN
37 BARAKAT TIMBERS & TRADING COMPANY LTD JACKLOW POMEROON ESSEQUIBO COAST
38 BARAMA COMPANY LIMITED LAND OF CANAAN EAST BANK DEMERARA
39 BAUXITE COMPANY OF GUYANA INCORPORATED LOT 278 FORSHAW STREET QUEENSTOWN
40 BEEPATS LOT 100-101 REGENT STREET LACYTOWN
41 BEHARRY AUTOMOTIVE LIMITED 192 N 1/2 WELLINGTON STREET LACYTOWN
42 BENJAMIN BUSINESS MACHINE INCORPORATED LOT 9 CAMP STREET WERK-EN-RUST
43 BENJAMIN MARINE & SALVAGE SERV. INC LOT 90 GARNETT STREET NEWTOWN
44 BEV PROCESSORS INCORPORATED AREA'K' HOUSTON EAST BANK DEMERARA
45 BISH AND SONS TRADING COMPANY LIMITED LOT 159 BARR STREET KITTY __
46 BK INTERNATIONAL INCORPORATED 4055 MANDELA AVEN'L WEST RUIMVELDT
47 BLACK JEWEL COMPANY LIMITED LOT 1244 CANJE PHEASANT SOUTH RUIMVELDT PARK
48 BLACKMAN & SONS INCORPORATED LOT BB2-3 MANDELA AVENUE EAST LA PENITENCE
49 BRASIMEX INCORPORATED LOT 79 ECCLES INDUSTRIAL ESTATE
50 BRASS ALUMINIUM & CAST IRON FOUNDRY LIMITED LOTS 11-14 WEST RUIMVELDT
51 BRENCO SHIPPING & TRADING COMPANY LIMITED LOT28 'B,' NEW PROVIDENCE EAST BANK DEMERARA
52 BROADBAND INCORPORATED 86 FIRST STREET ALBERTTOWN
53 BRYDEN & FERNANDES INCORPORATED LOTS 53-55 WATER STREET
54 BUFFALO FOOD PRODUCTS LOT 139 WATERLOO & QUAMINA STREETS GEORGETOWN
55 BULKAN TIMBER WORKS INCORPORATED YARROWKABRA, SOESDYKE LINDEN HIGHWAY
56 BUYRITE TRADING COMPANY LIMITED LOT 95 REGENT STREET LACYTOWN
57 C & D FASHIONS & TAILORING COMPANY LIMITED Y1 137 TUCVILLE EAST LA PENITENCE
58 C & F MEAT CENTRE COMPANY LIMITED LOT 144 REGENT STREET LACYTOWN
59 C & V CARIBBEAN SHIPPING LIMITED LOT 110 LALUNI STREET CULEENSIOWN
60 CAMEX LIMITED 125 'C' BARRACK STREET k I\INGS iON
61 CAMEX RESTAURANTS INCORPORATED 231 CAMP & MIDDLE STREETS GEORGETOWN
62 CANJE RICE INCORPORATED LOT 87 JOHANNA SOUTH BLACK BUSH POLDER
63 CARIB FOOD DISTRIBUTORS INCORPORATED 178 CROAL STREET STABROEK
64 CARIBBEAN AVIATION MAINTENANCE SERVICES LTD OGLE AERODROME OGLE __
65 CARIBBEAN CHEMICALS (GUYANA) LIMITED 45 CROAL STREET STABROEK
66 CARIBBEAN CLOTHING COMPANY LIMITED 27 D LAMA AVENUE BEL AIR PARK
67 CARIBBEAN CONTAINER INCORPORATED PLANTATION FARM EAST BANK DEMERARA
68 CARIBBEAN ENGIN. & MANGT. CONSULTANTS INC LOT 304 CHURCH STREET QUEENSTOWN
69 CARIBBEAN RESOURCES LIMITED' PLANTATION HOUSTON EAST BANK DEMERARA


0 7 CARPETS AND APP D


R-.101 EGENT ROAD


RBO IRDA


__________ I Z_____________________________________________ I CU ___________________________________ 1UM -


iS. ---.- ---- 9,z -.. ^-^^ -^^*^*^ S^M^^W^W^-.-^-g. ----^ *~iiiB ^BI r'>^!BMRE
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uyana Revenue Authority

: comprises Companies that are registered with the Value Added Tax and Excise Tax
December 20, 2006 and are required to charge, collect and remit VAT to the Guyana Revenue


COMPANIES


-MK. 1*"* l**


. -W





20 SUNDAY CHRONICLE Decempr 24, 2006


:-.. .-. .- o -.'t




..-- ,, Con't
iter,-. tJit


. ~ ~ -~-


r




)18~9s~


3 41 FRANDEC & COMPANY D


I OT29


.II N I...... k -I- 11 ..... .- ... .-...- .. ..-..-


144 FRASER'S BATTERY SERVICES LIMITED
145 FRIENDSHIP HOTEL & RESTAURANT HOLDINGS LTD


38 ROBB STREET


LOT 1 PUBLIC ROAD


- 5 -,


- .. -"


MAIN & OLMES STREETS


LACYT( VN


RUIMVE DT


w- ;- -


--- -1 11- -


I 1 -


_ _ ____ __ __ ___ _______~__~__~~_~ ___ ~___


71 CASE TIMBERS LIMITED LOT 279 FORSHAW STREET QUEENSTOWN
72 CATHOLIC HOSPITAL INC. 130-132 PARADE STREET KINGSTON
73 CCS (GUYANA) UMITED R6 RUIMVELDT GEORGETOWN
74 CELINE ATLANTIC CITY INCORPORATED LOT 26 NORTON STREET WORTMANVILLE
75 CENTRAL GARAGE INCORPORATED LOT 7-9 AVENUE OF THE REPUBLIC GEORGETOWN
76 CEVONS WASTE MANAGEMENT INCORPORATED LOT 573 TOUCAN DRIVE SOUTH RUIMVELDT
77 CHEVRON WEST INDIES LIMITED. RAMSBURG PROVIDENCE
78 CIRKEL DISTRIBUTORS INCORPORATED LOT 1-2 LAMAHA STREET & VLISSENGEN ROAD GEORGETOWN
79 CITY VILLAS & OFFICE INCORPORATED LOT 310-312 CHURCH & IRVING STREETS QUEENSTOWN
80 CIVIL ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS 18 DELHI STREET PRASHAD NAGAR
81 CLAIRANS ENTERPRISES LIMITED LOT 134 CHURCH STREET GEORGETOWN
82 CLASSIC RESOURCES INCORPORATED LOT 83 GARNETT STREET NEWTOWN
83 COALPOT RESTAURANT 130 CARMICHEAL STREET GEORGETOWN
84 COMPUSTRUCT ENGINEERING INCORPORATED LOT 9 1/2 PERE STREET KITTY
85 COMPUTER WORLD LIMITED LOT64 MIDDLE STREET GEORGETOWN
86 CONTINENTAL AGENCIES LIMITED LOT 9/12 INDUSTRIAL SITE RUIMVELDT
87 CONTINENTAL ENTERPRISES LIMITED LOT 9/12 INDUSTRIAL SITE RUIMVELDT
88 CONTINENTAL FOODS INCORPORATED LOT 9/12 INDUSTRIAL SITE RUIMVELDT
89 CONTINENTAL INDUSTRIES LIMITED 9/12 INDUSTRIAL SITE RUIMVELDT
90 CORENTYNE RICE INCORPORATED VILVOORDEN ESSEQUIBO COAST
91 CORREIA & CORREIA LIMITED LOT 10 & 15 ECCLES INDUSTRIAL ESTATE
92 CORREIA MINING COMPANY LIMITED LOT 159 CHARLOTTE STREET LACYTOWN
93 CORRIVERTON ICE INCORPORATED BLOCK "6" PLANTATION # 81 SKELDON CORRIVERTON
94 COUNTRY PRIDE ENTERPRISES LIMITED LOT 36-37 AGRICOLA PUBLIC ROAD EAST BANK DEMERARA
95 COURTS (GUYANA) INCORPORATED LOT 25-26 MAIN STREET GEORGETOWN
96 CREATIONS LIMITED LOT 7 'A' WATER STREET SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
97 CUMMINGS ELECTRICAL COMPANY LIMITED LOT 83 GARNET STREET CAMPBELLVILLE
98 DALIP TRADING LIMITED LOT 11-14 BROAD STREET CHARLESTOWN
99 DARTMOUTH SKIPS RENTAL INCORPORATED LOT 573 TOUCAN DRIVE SOUTH RUIMVELDT GARDENS
100 DAVIS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL LOT 121 DURBAN BACKLANDS LODGE
101 DELMUR COMPANY INCORPORATED LOT 364 OMAI STREET PRASHAD NAGAR
102 DELOITTE & TOUCHE LOT 77 BRICKDAM STABROEK
103 DEM. MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY LTD LOTS 61-62 AVENUE OF REPUBLIC ROBB STREET
104 DEMERARA ICE COMPANY LIMITED LOT 29-32 CACTUS ROAD WEST RUIMVELDT, HOUSING SCHEME
105 DEMERARA MILLERS & TRADERS LIMITED PLANTATION SPOONER MAHAICONY BRANCH ROAD
106 DEMERARA CONTRACTORS AND ENGINEERS LIMITED PLANTATION DIAMOND EAST BANK DEMERARA
107 DEMERARA DISTILLERS LIMITED PLANTATION DIAMOND EAST BANK DEMERARA
108 DEMERARA INVESTMENT COMPANY LIMITED LOT 106 REGENT ROAD BOURDA
109 DEMERARA OXYGEN COMPANY LIMITED OLD ROAD ECCLES
110 DEMERARA SHIPPING COMPANY LIMITED LOT 8-12 WATER & SCHUMAKER STREETS GEORGETOWN
111 DEMERARA TIMBERS LIMITED LOT 1 WATER ST & BATTERY ROAD KINGSTON
112 DEMERARA TOBACCO COMPANY LIMITED LOT 14 BARIMA AVENUE BEL AIR PARK
113 DEO. S. PAUL LIMITED 148 REGENT AND ALEXANDER STREETS. LACYTOWN.
114 DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SERVICES LIMITED LOT 77 ANIRA & IRVING STREETS QUEENSTOWN
115 DESINCO LIMITED LOT 48 JOHN & SHERIFF STREETS CAMPBELLVILLE
116 DIDCO TRADING COMPANY LOT 1 PUBLIC ROAD RUIMVELDT
117 DISTRIBUTION SERVICES LIMITED 38 INDUSTRIAL SITE RUIMVELDT
118 DR BALWANTSINGH HOSPITAL INCORPORATED 314 EAST STREET SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
119 DREAMWORKS DEVELOPMENT INCORPORATED LOT 83 GARNETT STREET NEWTOWN
120 DYNAMIC ENGINEERING LIMITED ECCLES EAST BANK DEMERARA
121 E & A CONSULTANTS LIMITED 274 PETER ROSE & FORSHAW STREETS QUEENSTOWN
122 E. C. VIEIRA INVESTMENTS LIMITED HOUSTON EAST BANK DEMERARA
123 EAGLE TRANSPORTATION & GEN. CONSTRUCTION INC. 1 OLD ROAD CRANE
124 EBORABO ENTERPRISES INCORPORATED LOT 99 LALUNI STREET QUEENSTOWN
125 EDWARD B. BEHARRY & COMPANY LIMITED LOT 191 CHARLOTTE STREET LACYTOWN
126 EL DORADO RESTAURANTS INCORPORATED FARM EAST BANK DEMERARA
127 ELECTRICAL POWER SERVICES LIMITED LOT 34 A COOP CRESCENT MC KENZIE
128 NETWORKS INCORPORATED LOT 213 B CAMP STREET NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
129 ENGINEERING & CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LIMITED LOTS 39-40 FRIENDSHIP EAST BANK DEMERARA
130 ESSO STANDARD OIL SOUTH AMERICA LIMITED LOT 126 QUAMINA & CARMICHAEL STREETS
131 EVERGREEN ADVENTURES INCORPORATED LOT 159 CHARLOTTE STREET GEORGETOWN
132 EXPLORER TRADE AND COMMERCE LIMITED LOT 106 NEW GARDEN STREET QUEENSTOWN
133 F & D LIMITED LOT 65 DAVID STREET KITTY
134 FAIR FIELD RICE INCORPORATED FAIRFIELD ESTATE MAHAICONY
135 FAIRFIELD INVESTMENT LIMITED FAIRFIELD ESTATE MAHAICONY
136 FARFAN & MENDES LIMITED LOT45 URQUHART STREET NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
137 FARM SUPPLIES LIMITED ROME ACCESS ROAD MC DOOM VILLAGE
138 FASTENING & BUILDING SYSTEMS LIMITED LOT 25 PRINCESS STREET CHARLE >TOWN
139 FIDELITY INVESTMENT INCORPORATED LOT 121 REGENT & ORONOQUE STREETS
140 FINE WOODS MARKETING, INCORPORATED LOT 10 13 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
141 FISHERMAN'S PARADISE LIMITED 64'C MIDDLE STREET GEORGETOWN
142 FIX IT HARDWARE BLACK & DECKER INCORPORATED LOT 33 BARRACK STREET KINGSTON


~5~~4~:~ ~~) ~AL ;~


I





SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24, 2006 21

...---- --.-.-5-c-- ----..--.. -- -.-; g -

I --- -i


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11 1





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-A


I1 GOOD HOPE


214 INDUSTRIAL FABRICATORS INCORPORATED


215 INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS AND SERVICES INC
216 INDUSTRIAL SAFETY SUPPLIES INC.


I OT 1 GOOD HOPE


LOT 226 CAMP STREET
LOT 26 PROVIDENCE


LOT 63 ROBB STREET F
LOT 19 'B' CORALITA AVEN IF


... .......... B . .. NA L I ,1 CAH..


EAST COAST.DEMERARA
EAST COAST DEMERARA i


NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
EAST BANK DEMERARA


LACYTOWN


BEL AIR PARK
SOUl IH CUMMIN\ iSBU RG,


146 FRIENDSHIP OXYGEN COMPANY LIMITED LOT30 FRIENDSHIP EAST BANK DEMERARA
147 FRIENDSHIP SLIPWAY AND COMPANY LIMITED LOT 7 FRIENDSHIP EAST BANK DEMERARA
148 G & I SAWMILLS & LOGGING INC. LOT 27 POUDEROYEN WEST BANK DEMERARA
149 G.E.B SECURITY SERVICES INCORPORATED LOT 10 PROVIDENCE EAST BANK DEMERARA
150 GAFSONS INDUSTRIES LIMITED 1 & 2 AREA'X' PLANTATION HOUSTON
151 GANDHI SALES & INVESTMENT COMPANY LIMITED 28 WATER STREET STABROEK
152 GAYADIN CONSTRUCTION CO LTD LOT I VRYHEID'S LUST EAST COAST DEMERARA
153 GENERAL EARTH MOVERS- UEM INCORPORATION LTD 122 LALUNI STREET QUEENSTOWN
154 GENERAL ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES LIMITED 64 ROBB AND KING STREETS GEORGETOWN
155 GENERAL EQUIPMENT GUYANA LIMITED ROME ACCESS ROAD MC DOOM VILLAGE
156 GENERAL MARINE COMPANY LIMITED 231 MIDDLE STREET NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
157 GEORGETOWN MEDICAL CENTRE INC. LOT 258-259 THOMAS & MIDDLE STREETS GEORGETOWN
158 GLOBAL INVESTMENTS LOT 1 AUSTIN STREET & DUREY LANE CAMPBELLVILLE
159 GLOBE MANUFACTURING & DRUG COMPANY LIMITED LOTS 40-41 INDUSTRIAL AREA BETERVERWAGTING
160 GMP MINING INCORPORATED 332 EAST STREET SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
161 GOBIN'S LIMITED LOT 139 WATERLOO STREET GEORGETOWN
162 GOLDEN STAR CONTRACTING SERVICES LIMITED LOT 1 GAP ROAD LA JALOUSIE
163 GRACE KENNEDY REMITTANCE SERVICES (GUYANA) LTD LOT 19'C' WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
164 GRAND COASTAL INN INCORPORATED LOT 2 LE RESSOUVENIR EAST COAST DEMERARA *
165 GUYANA BANK FOR TRADE & INDUSTRY LOTS 47-48 WATER STREET
166 GUYANA BEVERAGES INC. 1988-1989 BLUE MOUNTAIN ROAD FESTIVAL CITY, NORTH RUIMVELDT
167 GUYANA BRAKES & CLUTCH COMPANY INC. 27 COLDINGEN INDUSTRIAL ESTATE
168 GUYANA CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY LOT 82 PREMNIRANJAN PLACE PRASHAD NAGAR .
169 GUYANA DEFENCE FORCE CO-OP CREDIT UNION CAMP AYANGANNA THOMAS LANDS
170 GUYANA FIRE, LIFE & GENERAL INSURANCE CO. INC. 'A' OCEAN VIEW DRIVE RUIMZEIGHT
171 GUYANA FORESTRY COMMISSION LOT 1 WATER STREET KINGSTON
172 GUYANA LANDS & SURVEYS COMMISSION LOT 22 UPPER HADFIELD STREET DURBAN BACKLANDS
173 GUYANA LOTTERY COMPANY LIMITED LOT 357 LAMAHA STREET NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
174 GUYANA METAL INCORPORATED LOT 57 BRICKDAM GEORGETOWN
175 GUYANA NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL COMPANY INC. 1-9 LOMBARD STREET CHARLESTOWN
176 GUYANA NATIONAL NEWSPAPERS LIMITED LOT 10-12 LAMA AVENUE BEL AIR PARK
177 GUYANA NATIONAL PRINTERS LTD. LOT 1 PUBLIC ROAD LA PENITENCE
178 GUYANA NATIONAL SHIPPING CORPORATION LIMITED LOTS 5-9 LOMBARD STREET LA PENITENCE
179 GUYANA OIL COMPANY LIMITED LOT 166 WATERLOO STREET SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
180 GUYANA PAWNBROKING & TRADING COMPANY LTD. 306 PETER ROSE STREET QUEENSTOWN
181 GUYANA POLICE CONSUMER'S CO-OP SOCIETY LTD. LOT45-46 ROBB STREET LACYTOWN
182 GUYANA POST OFFICE CORPORATION ROBB STREET LACYTOWN
183 GUYANA POWER AND LIGHT INCORPORATED 40 MAIN STREET GEORGETOWN
184 GUYANA PUBLICATIONS INCORPORATED E 1/2 4647 ROBB STREET LACYTOWN
185 GUYANA QUALITY SEAFOOD INCORPORATED LOT'P' NEW HOPE EAST BANK DEMERARA
186 GUYANA REALITY INVESTMENTS LIMITED 1 & 2 AREA 'X' PLANTATION HOUSTON
187 GUYANA SAWMILLS LIMITED LOT 4 WATER & BUGLE STREETS GEORGETOWN
188 GUYANA STOCKFEEDS INCORPORATED FARM EAST BANK DEMERARA
189 GUYANA STORES LIMITED 19'A' WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
190 GUYANA SUGAR CORPORATION INC. AIR STRIP ROAD OGLE
191 GUYANA TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY LTD. 79 BRICKDAM STABROEK
192 GUYANA THERMO PLASTICS LIMITED LOT Q & Q1 PROVIDENCE
193 GUYANA WATER INCORPORATED LOT 10 FORT STREET KINGSTON
194 GUYANA-GOLD COMPANY LIMITED LOT 27 NORTH ROAD BOURDA
195 GUYANANET INCORPORATED LOT 234 ALMOND & IRVING STREETS QUEENSTOWN
196 GUYSONS ENGINEERING LIMITED 15 ORCHID STREETT WEST RUIMVELDT
197 H. PERSAUD & COMPANY LIMITED LOT 17-18 DAVID STREET KITTY
198 H.A SNACKS & COMPANY LIMITED 25 JOHN STREET WERK-EN-RUST
199 HABITAT FOR HUMANITY GUYANA INC LOT 45 HADFIELD STREET WERK-EN-RUST
200 HACKS CYCLE STORE LIMITED LOT 5 COMMERCE STREET GEORGETOWN :
201 HAND-IN-HAND MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE LOT 14 AVENUE OF THE REPUBLIC LACYTOWN
202 HAND-IN-HAND TRUST CORPORATION INC. LOT 62-63 MIDDLE STREET NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
203 HARRICHARAN ENTERPRISES INCORPORATED- NOVAR MAHAICONY
204 HARRIS PAINTS (GUYANA) LIMITED LOT 10-13 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
205 HARVEST COMPANY LIMITED LOT 176 MIDDLE STREET GEORGETOWN
206 HFS CORPORATE SERVICE INCORPORATED LOT 61-62 HADFIELD & CROSS STREETS WERK-EN-RUST__
207 HINTERLANDER TOURS LIMITED LOT 76 FIRST AVENUE SUBRYANVILLE
208 HOTEL TOWER LIMITED LOT 74-75 MAIN STREET GEORGETOWN
209 HUMPHREY & COMPANY LIMITED I05 ROBB STREET & AVENUE OF THE REPUBLIC LACYTOWN
210 HUMPHREY'S BAKERY & FARM PRODUCTS LIMITED LOT 38 KETLEY & SUSSEX STREETS CHARLESTOWN __
211 I.S.A. ISLAMIC SCHOOL INCORPORATED LOT 307 EAST STREET CUMMINGSBURG
212 IMAM BACCHUS & SONS LIMITED AFFIANCE ESSEQUIBO COAST
213 IMPERIAL MANUFACTURERS (GUYANA)LTD LOT 249 PURSHOTTAM STREET PRASHAD NAGAR


217 INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY OF GUYANA INCORPORATED
218 I-NET COMMUNICATIONS INCORPORATED
191 INGI FFIELDFOGILVY & MATHER LIMITED


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220 INSURANCE BROKERS GUYANA LIMITED


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21 NEWBURG FUNERAL HOME
292 NHL (ALPROGUY) INCORPORATED
293 NHL ENTERPRISES LIMITED
294 NIDERA (GUYANA) LIMITED
951NM SECIt 'iTY. SOLUTIONS INCORPORATED
.... .-- T-... __ ...-,


18 NORTON & JOHN STREETS


PROVIDENCE


____ _____ I -f_____


INDUSTRIAL SITE
LOT 24 WATER STREET


NEWBURG


EAST BANK DEMERARA


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GEORGETOWN


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221 INTERIOR FOREST INDUSTRIES LIMITED LOT 10-12 LOMBARD & SUSSEX STREETS GEORGETOWN
222 INTERNATIONAL TECHNICAL SUPPLIES (GUYANA) LTD. LOT 36 HIGH & LEOPOLD STREETS WERK-EN-RUST
223 INTERNETWORKS INCORPORATED LOT 233-234 CAMP STREET GEORGETOWN
224 INTL PHARMACEUTICAL AGENCY GUY. LTD LOT 266 'B' CAMP STREET SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
225 INTOUCH CELLULAR INCORPORATED MAIN STREET PAPRIKA
226 INTRASERV INCORPORATED LOT 224 NEW MARKET STREET NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
227 J. T. MEKDECI & COMPANY LIMITED LOT 19 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
228 J. W. POTTER & COMPANY (GUYANA) LIMITED LOT 139 REGENT AND LIGHT STREETS BOURDA
229 JAGS SALES & INVESTMENT COMPANY LIMITED LOT 43 WELLINGTON STREET
230 JARDIM HOLDINGS LIMITED 232 MIDDLE & CAMP STREETS SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
231 JIM BACCHUS TRAVEL SERVICE LIMITED LOTS 34-37 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
232 JOHN FERNANDES INSURANCE SERVICES LTD LOT 126 'F' CARMICHAEL STREET SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
233 JOHN FERNANDES LIMITED LOT 24 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
234 JP SANTOS & COMPANY LIMITED LOTS 53-55 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
235 JPS TRADING INCORPORATED LOT 53-55 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
236 KALABULE CHEMICAL COMPANY LIMITED LOT 73 B SANDY BABB STREET KITTY
237 KARES ENGINEERING INCORPORATED LOT'K' LA UNION
238 KARLAM SOUTH AMERICA TIMBERS (GUYANA) INC LOT 160 HAPPY ACRES EAST COAST DEMERARA
239 KAYMAN SANKAR & COMPANY LIMITED LOTS 216-217 LAMAHA STREET CUMMINGSBURG
240 KENNAV H.D.L LIMITED LOT 309 EAST & QUAMINA STREETS SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
241 KING ADVERTISING LIMITED LOT 150 CHURCH STREET
242 KIRKPATRICKS ENTERPRISES LIMITED LOT 24 JAMOON DRIVE MEADOWBROOK GARDENS
243 KISHAN BACCHUS GENERAL CONTRACTORS INC LOT 19 PUBLIC ROAD DIAMOND EAST BANK DEMERARA
244 KURUNDUNI LOGGING & DEVELOPMENT CO INC LOT4 COVERDEN EAST BANK DEMERARA
245 LAPARKAN AIRWAYS (GUYANA) LIMITED LOTS 34/37 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
246 LAPARKAN FINANCIAL SERVICES LTD LOTS 34-37 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
247 LAPARKAN HOLDINGS LIMITED LOTS 34-37 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
248 LAPARKAN TRADING (GUYANA) COMPANY LTD LOTS 34-37 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN ,
249 LAXSHMI NARAYAN TRADING COMPANY LTD LOT 185 CHARLOTTE & KING STREETS GEORGETOWN
250 LINDEN QUARRIES INCORPORATED TEPERU MAZARUNI
251 LOCHABER LIMITED OGLE ESTATE EAST COAST DEMERARA
252 LUCID ENTERPRISES LIMITED 60 SOESDYKE- PUBLIC ROAD
253 LYSONS DYE KNIT LIMITED LOTS 1-2 INDUSTRIAL SITE RUIMVELDT
254 M BEEPAT & SONS LIMITED LOTS 100-101 REGENT STREET LACYTOWN
255 M. C. DA SILVA & COMPANY LOT 26 LAMAHA & IRVING STREETS QUEENSTOWN
256 M.M.C. SECURITY FORCE INCORPORATED LOTS 95-99 COMMERCIAL BOULEVARD HAPPY ACRES
257 M.P. INSURANCE BROKERS AND CONSULTANTS LTD. 46 "F" BRICKDAM & BOYLE PLACE STABROEK
258 MACHINERY CORPORATION OF GUYANA LTD. 26 PROVIDENCE EAST BANK DEMERARA
259 MAHAICONY RICE LIMITED LOT 1 LOUISA ROW & NORTON STREET WORTMANVILLE
260 MAHARAJA OIL MILLS LIMITED LOT 18 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
261 MAKUBA MINING INCORPORATED LOT 149 CHURCH & LIGHT STREETS ALBERTTOWN
262 MARICS AND COMPANY LIMITED LOTS 167-168 CHARLOTTE STREET GEORGETOWN
263 MARLIN INCORPORATED LOT 73 ALAMANDER AVENUE BEL AIR PARK
264 MATO GROSSO PURE GOLD & DIAMOND INC. LOT 36 ROBB STREET BOURDA
265 MAZARUNI MINING & DIAMOND TRADERS INC. LOT 57 ROBB & ORONOQUE STREETS BOURDA
266 MEKDECI INVESTMENTS INCORPORATED 95-99 COMMERCIAL BOULEVARD HAPPY ACRES
267 MEKDECI MACHINERY & CONSTRUCTION INCORPORATED 95-99 COMMERCIAL BOULEVARD HAPPY ACRES
268 MICRO DESIGN TECHNOLOGY LOT 233-234 CAMP STREET GEORGETOWN
269 MILCO GARMENT INDUSTRIES 170 CHARLOTTE STREET LACYTOWN
270 MINELLI ENGINEERING LIMITED 112 NEW MARKET STREET NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
271 MINES SERVICES LIMITED W2 PROVIDENCE EAST BANK DEMERARA
272 MINGS PRODUCTS & SERVICES LIMITED 6 URQUHART STREET GEORGETOWN
273 MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS 254 SOUTH ROAD GEORGETOWN
274 MODERN INDUSTRIES LIMITED 3-6 INDUSTRIAL SITE RUIMVELDT
275 MUNESHWERS JMITED 4547 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
276 NAGASAR SAWH LIMITED 6 WATER STREET WERK-EN-RUST
277 NAND PERSAUD & COMPANY LIMITED # 36 VILLAGE CORENTYNE
278 NASIR & NASIR COMPANY LIMITED 18 NORTH ROAD BOURDA
279 NAT. INDUSTRIAL & COMMERCIAL INVESTMENTS LTD. LOT 126 BARRACK STREET KINGSTON
280 NATIONAL COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK INC. HOMESTRETCH AVENUE DURBAN BACKLANDS
281 NATIONAL FASTENERS LIMITED .LOT Q & Q1 PROVIDENCE
282 NATIONAL HARDWARE (GUYANA) LIMITED LOT 17-19'A' WATER STREET SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
283 NATIONAL MEDIA & PUBLISHING COMPANY 24 SAFFON STREET CHARLESTOWN
284 NATIONAL MILLING COMPANY OF GUYANA INCORPORATED AGRICOLA EAST BANK DEMERARA
285 NEAL & MASSY (GUYANA) LIMITED 5 RUIMVELDT GREATER GEORGETOWN '
286 NEW GPC INCORPORATED "Al" FARM VILLAGE EAST BANK DEMERARA
287 NEW HORIZON INCORPORATED LOT135 SHERIFF & FOURTH STREETS CAMPBELLVILLE
288 NEW LINE AQUA FARM INCORPORATED 17 NORTH SECTION CANAL NO.2 POLDER
289 NEW LINE CONS. ENG. & TRUCKING SERV. INC. LOT 17 NORTH SECTION CANAL NO. 2 POLDER
290 NEW TIMEHRI HANDLING SERVICES INC. TRACK 9 HYDE PARK CHEDDI JAGAN INT'L. AIRPORT


. .. .....


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295 NM SECURITY SOLUTIONS INCORPORATED 'O' RUIMVELDT GEORGETOWN
296 NM SERVICES LIMITED R5 RUIMVELDT GEORGETOWN
297 NOBLE HOUSE SEAFOODS LIMITED BLOCK'X' ECCLES' EAST BANK DEMERARA
298 NORTH AMERICAN RESOURCES INCORPORATED 88 C & D BARRACK STREET KINGSTON
299 NORTH MINING INCORPORATED LOT 385 GANGES STREET PRASHAD NAGAR
300 NORTH WEST INVESTMENTS INCORPORATED PORT KAITUIMA NORTH WEST DISTRICT
301 NPG PACKAGING AND PLASTICS INC. WELLINGTON PARK VILLAGE CORENTYNE
302 O AND A PROPERTY HOLDINGS LIMITED 1 & 2 AREA X' PLANTATION' HOUSTON
303 OGLE AIRPORT\INCORPORATED OGLE AERODROME OGLE
304 OMAI SERVICES INCORPORATED 176'D' MIDDLE STREET GEORGETOWN
305 ORIENTAL GENERAL STORE (GUYANA) LIMITED LOTS 15-16 WATER & HOLMES STREETS
306 P & L ENGINEERING & CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD. LOT 61 DAVID STREET KITTY
307 P & P INS. BRORS & CONS. LTD LOT 35 NORTH & KING STREETS GEORGETOWN
308 P.B.S. INVESTMENTS LIMITED MEADOW BANK EAST BANK DEMERARA
309 PAN GLOBALjCOMMODITY LIMITED LOT 158 BARR STREET KITTY
310 PARIKASAWMILLS LIMITED LOT 154 PARIKA
311 PATREWTA SAWMILLING & TIMBER COMPANY LTD TIMEHRI PUBLIC ROAD EAST BANK DEMERARA
312 PEARL'S BAKERY & SNACKETTE COMPANY INC. JJ DURBAN STREET WORTMANVILLE
313 PEGASUS HOTELS OF GUYANA LIMITED SEAWALL ROAD KINGSTON
314 PETE'S REALESTATE COMPANY LTD LOT 2 GEORGE STREET GEORGETOWN
315 PLANTATION HOUSTON SUGAR ESTATES COMPANY LIMITED HOUSTON ESTATE EAST BANK DEMERARA
316 PLASTIC PRODUCTS LIMITED LOTS 1- 2 AREA'X' PLANTATION HOUSTON
317 PLUS MARKETING AGENCIES LIMITED LOT 29 LYNG STREET CHARLESTOWN
318 POMEROON OIL MILL INCORPORATED LOT 86 CHARITY POMEROON ESSEQUIBO COAST
319 PRECISION PACKAGING (GUYANA) INCORPORATED LOT 235 SOUTH ROAD LACYTOWN
320 PRECISION WOODWORKING LIMITED LOT 35 INDUSTRIAL ESTATE RUIMVELDT
321 PRIME NEWS INCORPORATED LOT 302 CHURCH STREET QUEENSTOWN
322 PRITIPAUL SINGH INVESTMENTS INCORPORATED MC DOOM WHARF DEMERARA RIVER
323 PRITIPAUL SINGH SAWMILLS LIMITED LOT43'A' FRIENDSHIP EAST BANK DEMERARA
324 PROFESSIONAL GUARDS SERVICES LIMITED LOT 81 FOURTH AVENUE SUBRYANVILLE
325 PROPERTY PROTECTION SERVICES LIMITED S 1/2 23 HADFIELD STREET STABROEK
326 PROTEIN RECOVERY INCORPORATED 29 TIMEHRI PUBLIC ROAD EAST BANK DEMERARA
327 PROVIDENCE INDUSTRIES LIMITED LOT Q & Q1 PROVIDENCE
328 R & R INTERNATIONAL LIMITED LOT 7-9 LOMBARD STREET GEORGETOWN
329 R. BASSOO & SONS LIMITED. LOT 135 REGENT ROAD BOURDA
330 R. D. KHAN LIMITED LOT 8 WATER & NEW MARKET STREETS NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
331 R. G HUMPHREY MACHINERY SALES & SERVICE LTD. LOT 29 MAIN & HOLMES STREETS GEORGETOWN
332 R.SINGH AND SONS LIMITED LOT 1 'X' 78 NO 78 VILLAGE CORRIVERTON
333 RAMBARAN BROADCASTING SYSTEMS LTD LOT 139 REGENT & LIGHT STREETS BOURDA
334 RAMBARAN IMPORTS & EXPORTS LIMITED LOT 32 BROAD STREET CHARLESTOWN
335 RAMESH PERSAaJD & SONS LIMITED LOT 71 'A' KERSAINT PARK LA BONNE INTENTION
336 RAMJOHN KATUN & SONS LIMITED .GOOD SUCCESS WAKENAAM
337 RAMROOP & COMPANY LIMITED LOT 15 LOMBARD STREET CHARLESTOWN
338 RAYMAN BROS. INCORPORATED LOT 34 NEW ROAD VREED-EN-HOOP
339 RAYON HOUSE OF FASHION INCORPORATED LOT 73 ROBB STREET LACYTOWN
340 READYMIX CONCRETE LIMITED 69-72 ECCLES INDUSTRIAL ESTATE
341 RENTOKIL INITIALi (GUYANA) LIMITED LOT 8 CHARLES & DRYSDALE STREETS: CHARLESTOWN
342 REPUBLIC BANK (GUYANA) ULMITED LOT 155-156 NEW MARKET STREET NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
343 RESAUL MARAJ &COMPANY LIMITED LOT 18 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
344 RICHWOOD FOREST PRODUCT LIMITED 279 FORSHAW STREET QUEENSTOWN
345 RICKS & SARI AG O. INDUSTRIES LTD BLOCK'A' KURU KURURU SOESDYKE LINDEN HIGHWAY
346 RIVERVIEW \ELJING LIMITED 23 SAFFON & HOWES STREETS CHARLESTOWN
347 ROBERT NARAIN AND SONS LIMITED LOT 92 MIDDLE STREET : NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
348 ROCKVIEW ECO TOURISM LODGE ANNAI RUPUNUNI
349 RODRIGUES ARCHITECTS LIMITED. LOTA 126 ROBIN'S PLACE WEST BEL AIR PARK
350 ROMA MANUFACTURING COMPANY LIMITED LOT 33 BETERVERWAGTtNG INDUSTRIAL SITE
351 RORAIMA AIF WAYS LIMITED LOT R8 EPING AVENUE :BEL AIR PARK
352 RORAIMA TR JST & INVESTMENT INCORPORATED LOT 2 PLN. VERSAILLES WEST BANK DEMERARA
353 ROYAL CARI BEAN INCORPORATED LOT 128 B PARADE STREET KINGSTON
354 ROYAL CASTLE GUYANA INCORPORATED LOT 52 SHERIFF & GARNETT STREETS CAMPBELLVILLE
355 RSJ MINING INCORPORATED LOT 73 ANIRA STREET I QUEENSTOWN
356 S.W.WILLSUN & COMPANY (GUYANA) LIMITED LOT 30 INDUSTRIAL SITE r RUIMVELDT
357 SALT & PEPPER LIMITED LOT 38 ROBB STREET LACYTOWN
358 SANMIK CIVIL WORKS LIMITED 5 & 6 FELICITY HAPPY ACRES
359 SASITA ENTERPRISES INCORPORATED LOT 155 PLN VERSAILLESI WEST BANK DEMERARA
360 SEAFREIGHT TRANSPORT GUYANA LIMITED LOT 165 CHARLOTTE & C MMINGS STREETS BOURDA
361 SECURITY SE VICES LIMITED LOT 70 QUAMINA STREET SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
362 SHIVA WOODWORKING ESTABLISHMENT LIMITED BLOCK 5A PUBLIC ROAD ENMORE
363 SHOEWORLD GUYANA) LIMITED LOT 64 BETERVERWAGTING EAST COASTDFMmDA"
364 SINGER GUYA A INCORPORATED LOT 5 A + -... ---
365 SOL ANTILLES WAD GUIANAS UNITED .1 .- WATER TREET
366 SOL GUYANA INOORPCWRATci-, Io rUMi AGRICOLA
..... BB ROME AGRICOLA __GREATER GEORGETOWN
367 SOLUTIONS 200 INCORPORATED 167'A' WATERLOO STREET' NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
368 SPADS INCORPORATED LOT 268 THOMAS STREET IGEORGETOWN
369 SPECAUSED EQUIPMENT & BEARING COMPANY LTD LOT 164 CHARLOTTE & CUMMINGS STREETS


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369 SPECIALISED EQUIPMENT & BEARING COMPANY LTD LOT 164 CHARLOTTE & CUMVMINGS STREETS .2'
370 STABROEK TV INCORPORATED 46-47 ROBB STREET LACYTOWN
371 STAIN MASTERS (GUYANA) LIMITED LOT 1059 AUBREY BARKER ROAD SOUTH RUIMVELDT PARK
372 STAR DIAMONDS INCORPORATED LOT 86 CARMICHAEL STREET SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
373 STARR COMPUTER INCORPORATED LOT 59 BRICKDAM
374 START METAL TRADING INCORPORATED LOT 87 A ITUNI & ISSANO PLACE BEL AIR PARK
375 STRANGREON ENTERPRISE LIMITED DE HOOP MAHAICA
376 STRATEGIC ACTION SECURITY SERVICES LOT 194 CHARLOTTE STREET LACYTOWN
377 SUCCESS FARMS UNITED SUCCESS EAST COAST DEMERARA
378 SUPERIOR SHINGLES AND WOOD PRODUCTS INC YARROWKABRA SOESDYKE U NDEN HIGHWAY
379 SUPRA INTERNATIONAL COMPANY LIMITED LOTS 30-31 COLDINGEN INDUSTRIAL SITE
380 SWANSEA INDUSTRIAL ASSOCIATES INCORPORATED LOT 166 WATERLOO STREET NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
381 SWISS MACHINERY ESTABUSHMENT LIMITED LOT 1 'C PUBLIC ROAD ECCLES
382 SYNERGY SEAFOODS INCORPORATED LOT 31 BACK STREET BELAIR VILLAGE
383 TAGMAN INCORPORATED SEAWALL ROAD KINGSTON
384 TATABU TRADING COMPANY U MITED LOT 23 LOMBARD STREET WERK EN RUST
385 TCL GUYANA INCORPORATED LOTS 1-9 LOVBARD STREET GEORGETOWN
386 TECHNICAL SERVICES INCORPORATED LOTS 18-23 ECCLES INDUSTRIAL ESTATE
387 TELECOM SOLUTIONS GUYANA INCORPORATED 50 'DD' ECCLES INDUSTRIAL SITE
388 TELS NET INCORPORATED LOT 95 HADFIELD STREET STABROEK
389 THE BEACON FOUNDATION LIMITED LOT 127 QUAMINA & CARMICHAEL STREETS GEORGETOWN
390 THE GEORGETOWN CLUB INCORPORATED LOT 208-0209 CAMP STREET NORTH CUMMINGSBURG
391 THE MEDICINE CHEST INCORPORATED LOT 315 MIDDLE STREET
392 TOOLSIE FERSAUD LIMITED LOT 10-12 LOMBARD & SUSSEX STREETS GEORGETOWN
393 TOOLSIE PERSAUD QUARRIES INC. PROVIDENCE EAST BANK DEMERARA .
394 TORGINOL PAINTS INCORPORATED LOT 9/12 INDUSTRIAL SITE RUIMVELDT
395 TOTAL AIR CARGO SALES & HANDLING AGENTS INC. CHEDDI JAGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TIMEHRI
396 TOTAL PROTECTION SYSTEMS INCORPORATED LOT 274 PETER ROSE & FORSHAW STREETS QUEENSTOWN
397 TOUCAN INDUSTRIES LOT 10 WATER STREET KINGSTON
398 TRADING & DISTRIBUTION INC. R6 RUIMVELDT GEORGETOWN
399 TRANS GUYANA AIRWAYS U MITED OGLE AERODROME OGLE
400 TROPICAL PRODUCT GUYANA U MITED LOT 8 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
401 TRUST COMPANY (GUYANA) UNITED LOT 230 CAMP & SOUTH STREETS GEORGETOWN
402 U-MOBILE (CELLULAR) INCORPORATED LOT 56 HIGH STREET KINGSTON
403 UNISOON CONSTRUCTION LIMITED 3-6 INDUSTRIAL SITE RUIMVELDT
404 UNITED INVESTMENT TRADING CO. LTD. LOT 200 CAMP STREET LACYTOWN
405 UNIVERSAL AMALGAMATED COMM INDUSTRIES LTD LOT 279 FORSHAW STREET QUEENSTCWN
406 USA GLOBAL EXPORT (GUYANA) UNITED LOT 50'E' FIFTH STREET ALBERTTOWN
407 VARIETY WOODS & GRENHENART LTD. LOT 99 LALUNI STREET QUEENSTOWN
408 VENANCOS DIAMOND INC LALUNI STREET QUEENSTOWN V
409 VERDUN SODA FACTORY UNITED LOT 17 BROAD STREET CHARLESTOWN
410 VIDEO IEGA PRODUCTIONS LIMITED LOT 176 MIDDLE STREET GEORGETOWN
411 VIEIRA COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED 239 QUAMINA STREET SOUTH CUM/lilNGSBURG
412 VIGIL SECURITY SERVICES LIMITED LOT 185 CHARLOTTE &KING STREETS
413 VIKAB (GUYANA) LIMITED LOT 20 COURIDA PARK WEST PLANTATION OGLE
414 VISH TRADING COMPANY LIMITED TRACT "E' AREA "I' LE RESSOUVENIR
415 WATERCHRIS UMITED LOT 184 WATERLOO STREET SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
416 WIETING & RICH-TER UMTED 10-13 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
417 WILUAM FOGARTY UNITED LOTS 34-37 WATER STREET GEORGETOWN
418 WOODLANDS LIMITED LOT 110-111 CARMICHAEL STREET NORTH CUMVIINGSBURG
419 WORLDWIDE TRAVEL SERVICE LIMITED LOT W 1/2 85 QUAMINA STREET SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG
420 YOMI FOODS INC 198 DUNCAN STREET LAMAHA GARDENS


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25


AFS Ai C RO6NCLE December 24,2006


CLAIFIED w SUNDAY i*""' ,"

COUNSELLING .2 1.1.
WANTED L.FI ,lf ,,
LAND FOR SALE FOR HIRE C.:uiiI \hc.IF E,
LEGALS BEAUTY SALON PROPERTY FOR SALE EDUCATIONAL I(I \. I'.u,
TO LET LEARN TO DRIVE HERBAL MEDICINE AUTO SALES (.,- i L-,. llm.
cO t-ECCilRAIKikr. UCAITU RJMACCAIGE


BUIDLING Contractor -
mason, carpentry, painting,
plumbing, tiling and guttering.
Prompt, reasonable and reliable
services. Free estimates. Call
622-0267, 629-2239.



WORK from home for US$$$$
weekly. Information? Send stamped
envelope to Nicola Archer, P.O. Box
12154 Georgetown, Guyana.
BE your own boss. Use your
spare time filling 100 envelopes for
US$500 or more weekly. For
information send stamped self-
addressed envelope to Randolph
Williams, P.O. Box 12154
Georgt own, Guyana.
CONTROL your income
working from home filling 100
envelopes for US$500 or more
weekly. For information, send
stamped self-addressed envelope
to Nathaniel Williams, PO Box
12154 Georgetown, Guyana.



INDRA'S Beauty Salon, 122
Oronoque Street, for cold wave,
straightening, facial, manicure,
scalp treatment and design on
nails. Also Beauty Culture
available. Tel. 227-1601.
DOLLY'S Hairdressing
Salon, 175 Middle Street C/burg,
Georgetown for cold waving.
straightening, styling, colour
streak, cut, blow dry, manicure.
pedicure, facial, etc. Phone
227-2428.
NAYELLI SCHOOL OF
COSMETOLOGY is now offering
special 3-month Cosmetology
package beginning January 8,
2007. Evening classes beginning
January 16, 2007. Courses in Air
brushing Acryc nails, Barbering. Basic
& Advance Hair Cutting classes. Tel.
226-2124 or visit at 211 New Market
Street, North Cummingsburg.



ARE you cursed,
depressed, demon possessed
OR need finance? Call
Apostle Randolph Williams -
# 261-6050 (20:00 h 23:00
h.)



DOLLY'S Auto Rental -
272 Bissessar Avenue,
Prashad Nagar, Georgetown.
We accept Master. Visa and
American Express Cards. Phone
- 225-7126, 226-3693. Email:
dollysautorenatal@yahoo.com



FOR PROFESSIONAL
COMPUTER Repairs, Sales & Services
-Call Kersting's Computer Repairs
& Sales Centre @ 227-8361, 618-
8283. Home & Office Services
available. 24 hrs.
www.kerstings.org.
BRAND new laptops starting
fro $170 000, Desktops $11
000, Repairs. upgrades, all
brands. Kris 220-6262, 624-
5659.

DRESSMAVJ3G
FOR all types .of
dressmaking un:rorm and
altering at affordable price in
Kitty and around G/town. Lot
45 Garnette Street, C/ville ( 2
houses away fror Sheriff St.)
Call Sharon- 223-1120/649-
2358



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
COLLEGE. Now registering
students for our (1) full ti-- -
darv 6'"-' ,,, con-
., luOl (2) Pre Form
...Students with SSEE marks 300
390 (3) (4) ABE Certificate and
Dioo-nas Courses (5) Computers
Courses Call today for more
information. Tel. 225-2397, 225-
5474 and 223-7219 or visit us at
262 Thomas Street N/C/B. IBC
School commence for the new
term 3"' January 2007 Student
success is our greatest concern.


C O M P L E T E
COSMETOLOGY COURSE.
REGISTER KNOW FOR MORE
INFO., CALL 226-9448.
EVERGREEN Nature
Study Club (Regionsl-10)
www.sdnp.org.gy/evergreen.
TEL. 226-4634, 627-92" 85,
664-5947.
ENROLL your kids now at
"Kids Day Out" Play School.
Affordable fees. Contact 226-
2299 or 227-0331, Karen or
Mandy.
EARN a Certificate, Diploma
or Degree, in any part of the world
from home THROUGH
CORRESPOND' ENCE. For
information, call CFI Global
Education Link #261-5079
NOW REGISTERING FOR
JANUARY, 2007. GUYANA
Training College for International
skills. Get prepared for the local and
international job market. Training
on the Canadian Curriculum for the
certified personal support worker
programme. Canadian certification
as recognisd by private colleges and
universities. Ocean View Hotel
Campus. Day and evening classes.
Call 222-5430, ext 271. 222-3997,
663-9296.



HAVING a party? Need
chairs, tables, etc for rent.
Contact Affordable Rentals at
226-2299 or 227-0331 at
affordable prices. Ask for Karen
or Mandy.....
ENTIRE northern tiger island
situated in the Essequibo River,
Hamburg fertile land, good for
farming $5000 Guyana dollars
per acre per year. Please call
774-5034, 624-6855.
TRAVELLER sound of
lighting system. Having parties,
function, cocktail, press
meetings, churches, crusades,
yaag, weddings, concerts and
international shows also we have
all effect like fogging bubbles,
foaming, confetti pennonn) disco
lighting effects, stage lighting all
sizes of generators, tents, band
equipment. Tel 226-6527, 623-
7242 based at The Tennessee
Night Club.


SCARPOTIC Itch ulcer
pain, cholesterol pressure,
gall stone, impotentcy,
colds. 220-7342, 609-1308.




BOOKS for all ages, X-
change, rental, for sale. Juliette's
Book Library, 143 West
Ruimveldt. Tel: 223-8237.




ENROL now at Soman &
Sons Driving School, First
Federation Pui,.,,n:,. Manget
Place & Croal Street. Manual
& automatic. Phone # 225-
4858, 622-2872. 646-7806.
ENROL now at Shalom
D ;' i..; School, Lot 2 Croal
Si.- 3tabroek. You could also
obtain an International Driver's
Permit. For more information
call 227-3869. 622-8162, 611-
9038.
R.K' .- -i'.' Masters in
Driving ... I Studenits
need security andi comfort to
learn. Students must know who
they deal with. Driving is serious
business, inot i i,, by i;: i!i
business. FR.Ks Institutc ol
Motoring, 125 Regent P- -'
Bourda.



ESCAPE to 'est Massage
Therapy. Certific
Therapist Ulelli .
8747.
Indera Singh Massage. If you
need a balance massage try my
therapeutic massage combined
with reflexology, Cell 615-6665.


OPEN CHRISTMAS EVE.
Immediate link. The Junior/
Senior/Singles Dating Service
18-80 yrs. Tel: 223-8237 Mon -
Sat 8:30am 5pmn.
GET A FRIEND! Get educated!
Get Married! Migrate!...through the
CFI Telephone Friendship Link.
Call 592-261-5079, everyday -
07:00 h to 21:00 h.
OPEN ON CHRISTMAS EVE
DAY The Junior/Senior Singles
Dating Service 18 80 yrs. Link
for Christmas. Call Tel. 223-
8237, 648-6098 Monday -
Saturdays 8:30 am 5 pm.
A MIDDLE aged, divorce
intellectual or Indian decent
would like to correspond with an
intelligent, sincere female of
both local and overseas, for a
serious relationship which may
lead to marriage. Have that
special man or your dreams.
Don't miss this golden
opportunity! Write to: Raju, P.O.
Box 12351, Bourda,
Georgetown, Guyana.



PLAZATAXI SERVICE. Now
re-open under new
management. 24 hour service for
courtesy and dependability see
us first. Tel: 225-1710.



HAVING problems with your
refrigerators, washing machine,
gas stove, air-conditioner? Then
call Linden on 641-1086.
TECHNICIANS available for
appliance repairs washers,
dryers, microwaves, stoves, deep
fr ers, etc. Call 622-4521/218-
0 5 : ... ..... ... . .... .... ......... ........ .......... ... ..............
REPAIRS to hydraulic
accumulators. Contact
Friendship 6Oxyen Limited.
Phone #266-217.
FOR all your construction
repairs, renovations, as well as
masonry, varnishing, plumbing
and painting. Contact Mohamed
on 223-9710. 614-6634
HAVE your gas stoves and
oven service for the Christmas
Holidays. Both domestic and
industrial. Call Lawrence 226-
6411, 627-0720, 646-7400.
UPHOLSTERY done.
Excellent workmanship
guaranteed. We upholster chairs,
car seats all household furniture,
etc. We do house to house
service. Contact 650-0469.
FOR efficient service and
repairs washing machines, gas
stoves, microwaves, refrigerators,
etc. Telephone 227-0060, 641-
2026. Freezezone Enterprises, 6 'A'
Shell Road. K tty.



VACANCY exist for Washbay
Attendants (males & females).
Call. 625-4380.
CASHIERS. Apply to
Cambo Restaurant, 76 Sheriff St.
C/ville. Tel: 641-1998, 646-
5808.
LORRY Driver for Leyland
Truck. Telles Steel and
Hardw:, e. 7-4 Hadfield St. Call
226-6771.
ONFI experienc:ui
seamstress. greia wiges and
benefits. RoxiC' F 122
Merrimn n'F Mall. 13oCiurda
i, CI-l-INIST. Mechanics,
!pri ;ftr Electricians Welder.
,loib i,. d T'rainc. C
., ischnircal Qus lificatic .
One, Accoiuntant. MVust be
computer literate. Attractive
.lar yiBernefi's Apply in peson
!8 2:, EriF- s Industrial Site,
E-B!:
\ACA'CVY eyis: fur three (3)
O"lice ',SI t otl, 1o rec'=- ii'o Ists
cx, r, i j) Li t I ,.' ^ ri Q DiF ,ii
i'jnini q provided. M.1st h vi
pleasant persona.iitv. br'
computer literate, ambiious amnd
.,,.i to learn. Contact Zilfa
I- Security Services, 125
Regent Road, Bourda


BAKER male, Table Hand
- male, Pastry Maker Female.
Call: 227-6270, 225-1949,
Hurry's Pastry Palace, 2 Bel Air
Village, G/town.
SALESPERSON. Must have
a valid drivers licence. Apply in
person at ARK Enterprise The
Container House. 17 Lombard
St., Werk-en-Rust.
PORTERS to work at Garment
Factory & Stores. Apply at Lot D
Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park. Contact
Reshma on Tel. 225-4492 or 225-
9404
E & N BECK Welding
Establishment, 3 Princess and
Ketley Sts, Charlestown, 1 night
security guard, 40 years up. Must
have valid police clearance with
2 references.
SAWMILL MANAGER, 5 yrs
experience, machinery.
maintenance and production.
SAWMILL WORKERS skilled
and unskilled for all areas of the
mill. CHAINSAW OPERATORS
felling and ripping, TRUCK
DRIVERS, experience with
logging trucks in hilly conditions.
LOADER OPERATOR -
experience necessary. Premier
Lumber, 27 Lombard St.
Opposite Chochin. Tel: 225-
2471, 623-9889 between 8am -
4pm.





Vacancies exist at

Hope Christian

Academy


TWO PRIMARY

SCHOOL TEACHERS


ONE HEAD TEACHER


Contact: Samantha
220-4981
leave a message

VACANCIES for Sawmill and
forest operations in Kwakwani -
experienced Band Saw
Operators, Pony Saw Operators,
Crosscut Operators, Saw Doctor,
Forest Operation Manager, Logging
Supervisor, Forklift Operators.
General Woikers, Tree Spotteis,
Line Cutters.'Jompassrnan, Dozer
Operators, Skidder Operators.
Chainsaw Operators, Skidder and
Chainsaw Helpers, Heavy Duty
Mechanics. Auto Electrician.
Industrial Electrician. Tyre Repair
Man. Welder, Mercedez Logging
Truck Drivers, Accounts/Inventory
Clerk (Georgetown)Security Guards
(Georgetown). Please send in
application or apply personally to
Unamco Industries Limited, 279
Forshaw Street, Queenstown.
Georgetown, Guyana. Tel: 225-
7335, 227-4703, Fax: 225-7351.
APPLICATIONS are being
invited frorn suitably qualified
peisons ti; fill the vacancy of
MANAGER with a dynamic and
fast groving sports '" ., -i
T h , -, w ill ,, .. . :
S' all adm iniisutilv
matters of the Orgi anisatiol's
dcliii activities inclusive of
fi aincn l human resource .ansd tnh
coorlin. tion of its vari,., -
proor: ., itercsted caiididate
ca'-i uplift a detailed List i,[
Di:u.c- hy sending a request to
the following e-mail address:
. .... i II" jl'f Ii u I 1 o r c a ll

ior further infornla<-io
Candidates should posses aii
minlimuLi a diplorna i
ACcountin t! Finl nce/Ecornoni 3
iromo a recogni.'.ed Ulniveisity o
-gqu /ivalent The pi efei rre
calndidltu MUST be cohmipui[or

Aiiplic.'aiun', should be received
no latoi than December 30.
2001"


53 H EARL'S COURT,
LBI, ECD. CALL 227-1711.
LAND with 2 houses at 41
Agriculture Rd., Triumph
Sideline Dam. Call 263-5338.
EARLE'S COURTS. Single
lot (113x69) or double lot. Call
owner. Tel: 624-8894.
LAND for Sale in Parika, not
far from the market. Price -
$6.5M. House for sale Prashad
Nagar 225-6556.--
LAND FOR SALE. LAND
FOR SALE OLEANDER Gardens
- 89 ft by 152 ft. Price $25M.
Call: 612-0349.
TRANSPORTED land Lot
155 Canal Road, Stanleytown.
WBD. Land 48,177 sq. ft. $3M
negotiable. Phone 220-8472 or
618-5384.__
TRANSPORTED land N V
Lot 158 Canal Road,
Stanleytown, WBD. Land:
20,060 sq. ft. $1M negotiable.
Phone 220-8472 or 618-5384.
TRANSPORTED Land N '/
Lot 156 Canal Road,
Stanleytown, WBD. Land:
20,060sq. ft. $1M negotiable.
Phone 220-8472 or 618-5384.
RIVERSIDE land East Bank
Demerara. house lots from $700
000; East Bank Demerara; business
centre lots and house lots at Parika
- $3M up. 619-6648, 266-2111.
PLOT of prime Agriculture
land 6.5 acres including house
lot located on the southern side
of public road Canal No. 1, WBD.
Water, telephone, electricity
accessible, fur information. Call
233-2738, 640-0661, 622-5794
DEMERARA RIVER.
Transported prime river front
land. blocks, 200 acres 440
acres 66- acres. Suitable for
any development. Serious
enquire only. Call: 592-226-
2803, mobile: 592-627-8891.
E m a i I :
TABIRU2000@yahoo.co.uk
Diamond house lot $1.2M,
Kuru Kuru Creek, Linden
Highway, 120 acres, prime
transported land, Timehri Road
to river two acres, Friendship
East Bank Demerara 80 acres of
prime transported, Essequibo
house lots 160 x 50 $600,000
each lot, Soesdyke 10 acres 4M.
And much more. Call 592-226-
2803. Call: 592-627-8891.
E m a i I :
TABIRU2000@yahoo.co.uk
FUTURE HOMES REALTY-
227-4040, 628-0796, 611-3866.
Land for sale. Queenstown -
$35M. Sheriff St $45M -
US$1M, North R/veldt S4M.
Diamond H/Scheme S.2M.
Grove #1 Scheme $1.2M
Lamaha Gdns $17M. Land of
Canaan EBD 40 acres $3.5M
each per acre and 3 per acre 62
x 184 High St. Kinston $75M.
Canal No 1 84 x 100 Sii7M.
Main & Middle Sts. $150M Camp
St 150 x 90 $75M. David St.
Kitty $25M. Sheet Anchore
Village 28 Lots $28M Stone
Ave 2 lots $24M, Peter s hall
EBD 47 x 290 $45M, Dowding
St & Vlissennen Road $35M.
CONTINENTAL Parkl $6.5M.
Republic Park $7M, Courida
$25M. Bel Air Park $15M. L.e
Ressouvenir F! acre) S60M,
Subrvanville $15M. Robb St
$90M. S15. Public Road,
Eccles $22Mi, S15M. Bel Air
-dii'ens 1 ;'))U, 000 US. Sheriff
Street S40M. S N30M BRe Air
Spri ngs $18mvt Q1 ,::ii,';:'-:t'
100' .7Ml. NewV,'toiM I tl\t
SU x 115 $8 :M. Middieton
Street 68 x 100 $91M Sou\
Rnad $40M, V: hiinu'" ,iIeet
S65M. New G.imroei t 1SlM.
1 urkeyen 18 acres, MiliG;i Stieet
$30M, Carmichael Street ?90M
(-- v 300. Guvhloc $1.5!lM. La
,iinge 7 cire' s $1 3M. East Banl,.
F', x'ro h,1 ; ', 7iM LOx, F00
S-ilundsmiip S':13lM ,vx i side, 150
,i.:ces L n:d of Carnia. Soesdyke
100x800 ( .I ;sui ;'m
KilngS-toi ; 500l .. ' -I'l; .
L. C, Garde(,i ; 13M Main
troel t100 x 100 .120M,
...uienst}own $22'M, Regont
$30M $60M Call tus at
Goodwill Realty :'.,3-5204. ?25-
2540 828 7605


ROOM for single
working female. Tele-
phone: 227-0928.
FOR overseas visitors
apt. to rent in Kitty. Call
226-1640.
ROOM to rent in residential
area. Contact 231-8661, 629-
5064.
FURNISHED house -
79 Atlantic Gdns. Call
220-6060, 626-2066.
..... .. ........ ............ ... ..... .. .... .... .
FURNISHED flats for
overseas visitors. Phone 227-
2995, Kitty.
^" .^ ':.--- --- .- -_-
BUSINESS space in
Georgetown. Call 225-7131,
611-0800.
- -------- ------------------- - - --- -- -- -- -
1 3-BEDROOM flat
Lamaha Street, Queenstown -
$45 000. Tel. # 225-3370.
FURNISHED rooms for
single working male $4 500
weekly. Tel. #613-2647.
KITTY. Campbellville -
furnished and unfurnished 1,
3-bedroom apts. 233-6160.
SHORT TERM RENTALS
FOR OVERSEAS VISITORS.
PHONE 225-9944.
3-BEDROOM top flat
with verandah & parking -
$48 000. Tel.225-5512, 647-
0856.
ONE two bedroom
apartment to rent in Kitty.
Please contact 227-1689 or
225-6184 or 231-1585.
2 BEDROOM $35,000, 2
bedroom, fully furnished
$75,000. Unique Realty 227-
3551. 647-10856.
REPUBLIC Park 4-
bedroom upper flat on
storage bond. One business
place. 233-6160.
BOTTOM flat 3-bedroom
- $80 000 neg. Civille, hot
and cold, self contained,
etc. Tel. 628-6855.
ROOMS and apartments
to let on a daily/nightly basis
from $4 000 daily. Call 227-
3336/227-0902.
FURNISHED ROOMS.
Single person only at
Bachelor's Adventure, ECD.
Tel: 229-6149 Gloria.
ONE bond space upper flat
at Sharon's Building available
in the 1"' January. Tel. 662-
5567, 225-4413.
ONE BUSINESS PLACE
LOCATED BELOW THE
ODYSSEY RESTAURANT,
BARR STREET, KITTY. TEL.
623-4700.
ONE 3 bedroom, lower
flat building. Address: 76
Sheriff St. Campbellville.
Phone 227-6953.
1 FULLY furnished apt in
Kitty for overseas and out of
town guest. Tel: 227-2466!
644-7743.
UNFURNISHED one
oedroom self contained
apartment price $20 000, 130
Garnett St., New Town Kitty.
1 unfurnished apt. in Kitty.
Fully grilled, tiled, AC. water 2-
hours. etc. Price ($45 000'
neg. Cal! 609- I315.
SELF-CONTAINED :.:-
... ul; .i.. .u apartmentss in" G.
Iown for overseas visitors. C ai
. 5-7!3 1. 6 i-'0800.
HOUSE furnished andc
uiifurnished' ap arl llme r
ilrnished an unfurntiishelJ
)O fice oi, business f*',;
C 22! 22'352
PROPERI V by It&eii rfo
rent from USS60(C up. Note
"r.. -. r -,.1 holiday
S i __-':-2626
ONE semi furnished
edr(oom house in Rornim5;
Comrh' Short or long te~ni'
rant C l o645-5343 o, 2?25-
o.,O.
ONE TWOI'(' storey bulild'i
situated at .) Nortllh Road
Bourda foil liuiling purposes
only Tel. 269-0217


---~-"---


'








26 SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24,2006


BUSINESS Place, car park
area, ground floor. K. S.
Raghubir Agency Office 225-
0545. 642-0636.
CHARLOTTE St. Office
space, secured ground floor
$50,000.00. K. S. Raghubir
Agency 225-0545, 642-0636.
REGENT ST, large
secured business place, prime
location. K. S. Raghubir
Agency Office 225-0545, 642-
0636.
EXECUTIVE RENTALS -
Bel Air Park $1,500 & $1.800
US per month. Nandy Park
$1,600 US. 227-3843-4/661-
3361
SHORT term rental for
overseas clients. Fully
furnished apts., phone well
secured, AC, etc. Vanies Realty
- 270-4695, 643-1695.
SHORT STAY semi-
furnished 3-bedroom house for
rent in Eccles Housing
Scheme. 3 months only. $30
000 per month. 629-3208.
BEL AIR GARDENS -
EXECUTIVE HOUSE
UNFURNISHED US$1 200
MONTH Norbert DeFreitas -
231-1506/642-5874.
TWO-FLAT building in
New Market St., opposite
Promenade, for residential or
business. $85 000 mth. Call
227-2331, 624-1055.
ATLANTIC GARDENS -
LARGE FURNISHED
BUILDING, 3 BEDROOMS, 2
TOILETS AND BATH. 227-
0972.
UNFURNISHED two
storeyed building with
telephone, parking and
, overhead tank. K. S. Ra hubir
Agency. Tel: 225-0545. 642-
0636.
FULLY furnished two
storeyed executive concrete
building with air condition, hot
& cold, self contained
bedroom, telephone. 642-
0636.
POPULAR Video Club in vey
busy area in NewAmsteidam Terms
of Sale & Occupancy can be
negotiated Cal 333-2990 rafter
hours- 333-3686._ _
FULLY furnished 3-bedroom
bungaow wnd solar, ht wer in
gated community. Weekly or
monthly rental. Contact Ganesh -
618-5070, 641-2946.
SNACKETTE $80,000.
Beauty Salon $60.000,
Internet Cafe $50,000, Office
space $30,000. K. S.
Raghubir Agency. Tel: .225-
0545, 642-036. _
BOTTOM FLAT to rent, 154
Shell Rd Kitty. Georgetown with
modem convenience, situated
near to market and more others
easy to have. Apply with in.
4 BEDROOM house for
rental, fully furnished
Caneview Avenue, South
Ruimveldt Gardens, overhead
tank, grill work, parking space.
Tel: 623-9012.
EXECUTIVE houses by
themselves area Ogle. Atlantic
Gardens. Price $100 000 to
$250 000 neg. Enquiries pls. Call
220-7021. Cell 624-6527.
FURNISHED and unfurnished
apartments one, to. thee & four
bedrooms. Queenstown
residential, from US$25 per day, lng
term also available. Tel. 6244225.
AVAILABLE from January
1, 2007 One 2-bedroom
apartment in Campbellville.
For further details Tel. 650-
9753 during working hrs., 223-
9099 after 7 pm.
QUEENSTOWN, fully fur-
nished 1 & 3-bedroom apartment
with parking space to rent Suitable
for overseasvisitorson short termba-
sis. Tel. # 226-5137/227-1843.
TOP flat $40000; (1) bedroom
s.0 000, irnms- $17 00 -$19
000, Section F F usoSGO
USS700. house by itself US$500
Call 225-2709. Business oFiiCz b-d.
3 BEDROOM, fully
furnished executive, top flat.
Master room. hot & cold.
standby generator, A/C.
pressure pump, etc. Contact
623-1433/624-4587/225-
7736.
APARTMENTS (1.2.3,4-
bedroomed) $21 000. $22
000, $25 000, $35 000. $45
000, $50 000, Furnished $26
000 $80 000, Rooms $12
000 S16 000. Call 231-6236.
ONE executive type house
fully furnished master bedroom
and two bedroom, maids quarter,
self container; apartment indoor
garage, over head tank and
generator hot and cold water.
Contact 662-5567, 225-4413.


FULLY equipped store in
central Georgetown, glass cases,
hts, phone, office, cashier boat,
design for electronics cellular
phones alarm; system (GB) steel
doors and rill move in today. Call
in Singh 647-3000, 225-2503, 225-
4631.
A BEAUTIFUL large 4-
bedroom concrete house at
Ruimzeight Garden, WCD with
24 hours armed security, built-in
wardrobe, 2 bathrooms, hot and
cold water, kitchen diner, and
many extra. Please call 268-
3214 for quick sale.
CUMMINGS LODGE:
furnished 2-bedroom bottom fat -
$45 000. Unit Place (Croal St.)
office ceintemet etc $40 000.
BEL AIR GARDENS 4-bedroom
house US$1200 neg. N.P.
FINANCIAL SERVICES 223-
4928.
AA Eccles US$1200 &
US$1500, Bel Air Park US$1700,
Bel Air Springs US$2000.
Queenstown -US$1200, Happy
Acres $60 000, Lamaha Gardens
- US$850 & US$2000, Kitty $75
000 (business) and many more Tel.
226-1192, 623-7742.





WANTED



1 HOUSE



TO RENT
either on East Coast.
West Coast or
East Bank of
Demerara
Rent should not
exceed $10,000
per month

Call: 619-5117,
615-6250. 223-6135

CUMMINGS Lodge 2-
bedroom top fat $40 000, Bel Air
Gardens, 4-bedroom executive
house US$1 500, Nandy Park, 3-
bedroom house (furnished) -
US$650, Bel Air Park, 4-bedroom
house US$800. N. P. FINANCIAL
SERVICES 223-4928, 648-4799.
ALBERTTOWN one
bedroom, b/flat $30,000, South
$40,000, Nandy Park $600 US.
Bel Air Park $1,000 US, Bel Air
Gardens $3,000 US,
Subryanville $650 US & $1,500
US and office spaces $60 000
upwards. Call us at Goodwill
Realty on Nos. 223-5204 or 225-
2540 or 628-7605.
YOUR new home for the New
Year. One (1)three (3) bedroom
Top Flat at 273 E. La Penitence
(Lamaha Park, near Lamaha
Springs) Georgetown. Good
Roads. Vehicle space, breezy
verandah $55,000 per month.
Negotiations unnecessary.
Contact A. A. Fenty. Tel: 218-
1808, 622-6843, 226-4764.
SEASONS Greetings to all
Thomas Street,
Cummingsburg semi furnished
2 bedroom, phone and parking
$60,000, Turkeyene house by
itself, 3 bedrooms $55,000,
Queenstown 3 bedrooms
unfurnished, top flat $45,000,
Queenstown 2 bedrooms, semi
furnished, utilities included
$60,000. Kitty 1 & 2 bedrooms
$30,000, $35,000. 227-3843-
4 66 1-33 6 1................................... ..........
FUTURE HOMES REALTY-
TO LET AA Eccles US$3000 -
US$4000, Middle St. $60 000
US$400. Camp St. $60 000
US$4000, Charlotte St. -
US$600, Regent St. US$2000 -
I'J5IC nnn ( Avenue of Republic
US$4000, Sec. 'K' C/ville
US$1300, Bel Air Park- US$800
-US$b^3G. PNanar- US$1500,
Lamaha Gdns. Ub,, .,
North Road US$1600 per flat,
high St Kingston US$4000 and
many more flats to rent Call for
details 227-4040, 611-3866.
FULLY FURNISHED
EXECUTIVE TWO (2)-FLAT
BUILDING WITH ALL MODERN
CONVENIENCES, LOCATED IN
POSH UPPER CLASS
RESIDENTIAL AREA: FOUR (4)
BEDROOMS, (ALL WITH AC
UNITS), TELEPHONE FLAT
SCREEN TV, TREATED WATER
SYSTEM STAND BY
GENERATOR (AUTOMATIC
SWITCH OVER), LAUNDRY
ROOM WITH LARGE WASHER.
CONTACT CHARLES, SINGH
REALTY. TEL. 225-5512, 621-
2239.


SEASONS Greetings to all
from Regent View Guest
Pousada Regentview. Roomsl
Rooms! Rooms! 24 hour, weekly,
monthly rates available with
discounts on weekly & monthly
rates. Contact John at 120
Regent Street, opposite Alleyne
High School or on 227-3843-4/
661-3361.
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
"Have Faith in Christ, today".
227-1988, 623-6431, 270-4470.
E m a i I
jewanarealty@yahoo.com
GEORGETOWN: High Street
(office/residence)- LTS$2 500,
Kitty $60,000, $45,000,
US$500 (F/F) Caricom/GuySuCo
Gardens US$1 500. EAST
BANK: School $120 000,
Providence $50 000, Eccles
'AA' (F/F) US$2 000, Diamond
- US$1 500. EAST COAST:
Courida Park US$3 000 (F/F),
Atlantic Gardens US$5 000,
US$2 000/US$1 000/US$500,
Happy Acres US$2 000/US$1
200/US$500, Non Pariel $35
000, Le Ressouvenir- US$2 500,
Ogle US$700/US$1 000,
OFFICES: Central Georgetown
- US$4 000, Georgetown -
$100,000/ $60,000,
Queenstown US$2 000, Sheriff
- US$1 500, North Road US$1
200, Brickdam US$800, bond,
restaurants, etc. Versailles -
executive US$3 000, 3
storeyed residential/office/bond
- US$1 500, Nandy Park -
US$650, ,Kitty $45 000, $30
000.



PROPERTY IN KURU
KURURU. Tel: 643-0332.
PROPERTIES from 7
million up. All 35% deduction.
Phone 225-2626, 231-2064.
399 BARAMITA STREET
South Ruimveldt Gardens.
Contact OWEN KING WITHIN.
FOR sale by owner -
property at Public Road De
Hoop, Mahaica, ECD. Call 623-
2717._
ONE two storey building for
sale at Lot 3 De'Aguiar St.
Meadow Bank. Contact 220-
75.03...... 22.0-.3.2..64....... ........................
EAST Bank Demerara -
House and vehicle in good
condition. Asking $15M. Call:
225-3006, 618-3635.
EXECUTIVE two storey
building on /2 acre of land
locate on Diamond Public
Road. Call owner. Tel: 624-
8894.
OGLE building 75ft by
35ft. land 260ft by 6Oft. No
repairs needed. Tel; 642-0636,
225-0545.
CUMMINGS Lodge, large
two storeyed building with land
space for a next building. Price
642-0636.
QUEENSTOWN building
30ft by 24ft, land 120 ft x 60ft
Price negotiable. Tel: 225-
0545, 642-0636.
UG. Industry area, large
business complex, no repairs,
immediate vacant possession.
Price negotiable. Tel; 642-
0636.
ATLANTIC Gardens large
two storeyed, no repairs needed.
Price $15M. Immediate vacant
possession. Tel: 642-0636.
EAST Coast Demerara -
Non Pariel $12M. Paradise
$6.8M, East Bank Demerara,
Land of Canaan $3M. Call: 225-
3006, 618-3635.
ONE going business remises;
one secured beautifully tiled office;
one three-bedroom house fully
grilled in New Amsterdam. Tel:
333-2500
GARNETT St. Business
place, large two storeyed
concrete building. No repairs,
immediate vacant possession.
Price negotiable. Tel: 642-
0636.
NEW house fully
furnished, 2.5 bath. central AC.
25 miles from Disney World,
Florida. Price US$294 000 or
,a Phone No. 954-294-7373.
."'" ............ to M
BEL AIR PAIr\ ......
Prashad Nagar $17M.
Campbellville 1 5M, Kitty
S10M, Enmore $2M. K. S.
Raghubir Agency. Tel: 225-
0545, 642-0636.
4-BEDROOM concrete &
wooden house. Ketley St.,
Charlestown, formerly Rudy's
Liquor Restaurant (corner lot) -
$18M neg. Contact 227-6204.
PARIKA -- Reserve Road just
off Main road Pet Shop.
Building 3-storey building and
land. Asking $39M. Norbert
deFreitas 231-1506/642-
5874.


TRANSPORTED concrete
front building with six bedroom,
yard space for a next building,
vacant possession. 226-3866.
SOUTH $8.5M (4
bedroom), C/ville $15M Bel
Air Park $24M & $32M,
Brickdam $25M, Prashad Nagar
- $20M and many more. Tel.
226-1192, 623-7742.
TRANSPORTED pro erty
Lot 154 Canal Road,
Stanleytown, WBD. House
814.00 sq. ft. Land 48,177 sq.
ft. $8M negotiable. Phone 220-
8472 or 618-5384.
CAMPBELLVILLE 6
bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 2
kitchens. Suit 2 families,
property investor. Land 48x141,
worth viewing. 110-220V. Mrs.
Wilson 226-2650, 229-2566.
'CC' ECCLES $15M,
GROVE $6.5M & $12M, W.
Ruimveldt $8M P/Nagar -
$25M. N. P. FINANCIAL
SERVICES 223-4928, 648-
4 7 9 9
Nepent2002@ya
ANANDALE NORTH THREE
BEDROOM TWO STOREY
HOUSE AND LAND 50X100 FT
NEWLY REMODEL. ASKINd
$4.9M. CALL: 225-5591 OR
619-5505.
THREE STOREY BUILDING
ON MIDDLE STREET GOOD
CONDITION. EXCELLENT FOR
ANY BUSINESS. ASKING
65M. CALL 225-5591 OR 225-
631.
3 STOREY wooden and
concrete house at Good Hope
Mahaica ECD (land space 5100
sq ft house 2000 sq ft. huge
parking space, etc. Recently
built. Price $12M. Tel. 228-
2342, 649-2670.
BE your own boss and own
your home and business. One
two storey house 6 bedrooms
with an existing licenced shop
with all stocks and equipment
in Newtown. Price $12M. Call
645-3791. Only serious
inquiries..___._ ._ -_
PRINCESS Street $7.5M,
South Park $8.M, 12.5M,
18.5M, Garnett & Stone Avenue
$18M, De Abreu Street $13.5M.
Brickdam, Regent Street and
others. Roberts Realty First
Federation Life Bldg. Tel: 227-
7627 Office, 227-3768 home.
644-2099 cell.
SECTION K C/ville 1
executive property in
immaculate condition, 2 flat
concrete. Upper flat 2 master.
1 regular; lower flat 3 rooms.
Hot and cold, pressure system.
meshed, fully secured
immediate possession. $33M
neg. Call Naresh Persaud 225-
9882, 650-2724.
PROPERTY in Ogle with
double lot. 4 bedrooms. $2.6M.
Blygezith Festival City $4.3M.
Gordon Street Kitty $6M,
Guyhoc Park $6M, Brickdam
$35M, Thomas Street $16M,
$50M. Shawn 218-1014, 618-
7483.
ONE three-storey building 33
000 sq. ft. at Parika. Ideal for Hotel
Store, Hospital or any other type of
businesses, etc. Any reasonable price
would be considered. Contact Lens
at Sheriff St. for further
information. Tel. 227-1511. N.B.:
Extra land to extend building or
new one.
3 BEDROOM house Pin,
Versailles, West Bank Demerara
in gated community with 24
hours security. Modern finish
throughout. Fully furnished.
fenced and landscaped. Solar
hot water. Phone and all
utilities. Move in condition.
Immediate possession. Ph:
264-2946, 618-5070.
KITTY $8.5M and $16M, La
Penitence $7.5M neg, Neimes.
West Bank $5.5M, West
Ruimveldt $3.2M. Church
Street $43M, South Road
$35M, Best Road $4M, Shell
Road, Grove $4M, $5M, Flat 2
BR $2M. Many more. Call 5G2-
226-2803. Call: 592-627-8891,
E i a i I
TABIRU2000@(yahoo.co.uk
FOR SALE BY OWNER 2-
storey fully concreted house 5
bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms,
American fixture faucet. sink, toilet.
cabinet, hot water tank. eating
.1..-" hi ilt-in wardrobe, central
KIL n., -.... --- front
air-conditioner, car gam,....
view to Public Road. Lot 6 Nandv
Park, EBD. Interested person only
to call. Day 226-7806; evening -
225-8410.
ONE Newly built two storey
concrete builcfinq and general
store at Enterprise Gardens.
ECD, top flat tour bedrooms.
bathroom and sitting area.
Bottorri flat kitchen, dining
and sitting area with a thriving
General Store. Completely
grilled, water, phone and car
port for four vehicles. Must be
sold $8.5M, Call owner on 619-
3105 or 648-3728


TWO (2)-FLAT 3-BEDROOM
WOODEN AND CONCRETE
PROPERTYAT BEST, WCD WITH
VERANDAH PLU S TIdLET
AND BATH UPSTAIRS, LIGHT,
WATER AND TELEPHONE
MASSIVE LAND SPACE. COST
- $8.5M, CHARLES SINGH
REALTY. TEL. 225-5512, 621-
2239.









HAYE FAITH IN CHRIST TODAY"
IRemember: Jesus' birth
brought the infinite God
within reach of finite man.
To put meaning into your
Christmas give Christ first place.

Merry Christms ao our
valued customers &riels.
KEEP CHRIST IN CHRISTMAS
Call anytime
Jewanram's Realty
227-19'270.4170.623-6431/641-15186
Emoil: iewanarealty@yahoo.om

RESIDENTIAL: LAND OF
CANAAN one beautiful
concrete ranch type house with
all the social services in calm
and peaceful neighbourhood,
no pollution, one acre of land or
43,560 s' ft). $15M.NEG.
D'AUIAR'S PARK: Two flat
concrete and wooden, gated
community, suitable for small
family. $15M. Contact:
SUGRIM'S REAL ESTATE
AGENCY CALL ANYTIME ON
226-4362 or email:
sugrimrealestate@hotmail.com
FUTURE HOMES REALTY -
227-4040, 611-3866, 628-0796
Property for sale
QUEENSTOWN $16M $78M,
Bel Air Park $24M $55M,
Durban $18M, Kitty $17 $34M,
Vreed-en-Hoop $65M, Meadow
Brook $17M, Lamaha Gdns
$60M. King Edward St. $10M,
Blygezight Gdns $19M, Saffon
St. $50M, Diamond H/Scheme
$11M, Agricola $10M, Ogle -
$20 US$550 000, Parafaith
Harmony $5.2M, Regent St. -
$45M US$1.6M, Plaisance -
$23M, Sheriff St $60M -
US$1.3M. Alexander Village -
$28M, Atlantic Gardens $23M -
$100M, Subryanville $70M -
$125M, Bel Air Springs $67M -
$165M, Linden $5.5M, Sec. 'K'
C/vill. $22M, New Haven -
$33M. CC Eccles $20M, BB
Eccles $25M, Oleander Gdns. -
$47M, Good Hope WBD $50M,
Broad St. Charlestown $40M,
Bel Air Gdns. $87M $95M,
Kingston $20M US$525 000.
BRICKDAM three flats,
suitable for executive office.
school, doctor's office, having all
the amenities with parking a lot
$125M, CAMP ST. large
commercial three flats, suitable
for store, whole sale distributor,
and retail outlet $60M, CAMP
ST. large three flats, suitable for
residence, school, executive
office has parking for many
vehicles $80M, DIAMOND
PUBLIC ROAD two flats
suitable for retail outlet,
restaurant. guest house $30M,
PALMYRA, BERBICE -
residential and business place,
with a workshop and bond $60M,
ALEXANDER VILLAGE large
three flat residence, business.
workshop (bond), just off the
Public Road, suitable for office,
wholesale and retail $28M,
NORTON ST. beautiful residence
three bedrooms, parking $14M,
SECTION 'K' large two flats
concrete (new) three bedrooms
parking $35M. ECCLES two flats,
concrete and wood residential in
good condition, three bedroom
also two apartments, parking
tIAM CRIkMniflID twun flats
concrete and wood with business
S13.5M. Also Regent Street.
-, t Meadow Brook
Kitty, bLis~^ -:....nh.
Gardens, Lusignan. Inu,,..
Enmore. Plaisance. Samantha
Point Grove. Diamond.
Blankenburg, Houselots. housing
schemes, rice and aquaculture
fairning, large acreage in
Demerara and Berbice GIVE
US A CALL ON 226-4362 OR E-
M A I L
aRo.!,Es2005@aYahoo.com OR
VISIT US AT SUGRIM'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY &RELATED
SERVICES AT 1 HADFIELD &
GEORGE STS., W/RUST.


PRASHAD Nagar one 2
storey concrete building in
immaculate condition, upper
flat 2 master, 1 regular.
Lower flat 1 master, guest
room, kitchen, dining, etc. Hot
and cold, pressure system,
fully secured, meshed parking,
etc. Shop for the Holiday.
Price $26M. One business
property in Freeman Street La
Penitence S10M neg. lall
Naresh Persaud 225-9382,
650-2724.
TONY Reid have all price
reduced by 33% for Christmas
South Ruimveldt $6M, $8M
Republic Park $18M, Meadow
Brook Garden $16M, Sec 'K'
$14M, Kitty $10M
Queenstown $14M, Prashad
Nagar $19M mansion on 3
house lots reduced from $85M
to US$275 000, Jackaranda
Ave. reduced for $55M
double lot for swimming pool
US$198 000, Eccles $14M
land from $1M upward and
Earl Court $4.2M. Phone Tony
Reid's Realty the World #1
Realtors. 2252626, 231-2064.
E m a i I
tonyreids@hotmail.com.
FROM XMAS into World
Cup 2007 South R/veldt
$5.5, $18M, North R/veldt
8M, $75M, Werk-en-Rust
$10M, Charlestown $6.5M,
Camp Street $12M 8M, Robb
Street $15M. $85M, Charlotte
$20M, $12M, Lamaha Street
$30M, Middle Street $30M,
King Street $80M,
Queenstown $55M, Lamaha
Gardens $30M Bel Air
Gardens $90M, Sheriff Street
$58M, Bel Air Park $25M,
40M, Section "K"
ampbellville $30M (new)
$13M, 1 apartment complex
centrally located, Re ent
Street $85M, 35M, Ave of the
Republic $11M. Call us at
Goodwill Realty 223-5204,
225-2540 or 628-7605.



ONE FRIDGE.
EXCELLENT CONDITION.
CALL 265-5876.
GLASS WARES. FILM
FARE MAGAZINE. CALL:
663-1516.
PARTS for washing
machines. Telephone -
227-0060, 641-2026.
1 BED 1 vanity $8,000
each. Wardrobe $8,000. Call:
226-4692.
POMPEK PUPS 6
WEEKS OLD, FULLY
VACCINATED. 231-4702.
PARTS for twin tub
washing machines (new).
Telephone 641-2026, 227-
0060.
2 PUREBRED German
Shepherd, Young. Adult
English Bloodline. 625-6006.
NEW 18" Celestion
frontline 11 speakers, 2800
watts. Call 226-2913, 615-
1203.
6 WEEKS old pitbull pups
fully vaccinated and
dewormed. Call 646-9456,
231-1074.
SHOCK treatment for
swimming pools. Phone 227-
4857 (8 am 4 pm), Mon. to
Fri.
EARTH. sand, reef sand.
Excavating. grading &
leveling of land also done.
Contact: 628-3840.
ONE 4-CYLINDER
Mitsubishi diesel engine for
dredging with one 4 3-pump.
Call 643-4530.
ROTTWEILER &
Doberman pups, 4 months
old, vaccinated and
dewormed. Tel. # 222-5013.
IMPORTED from the USA
heavy embroidered curtains.
Balance parcel available.
Phone 227-6202.
2 RED Snapper fishing
boat. Contact Ganesh
Cheddie. 29 Pouderoyen
WBD. Tel. 264-2524.
STALLS located at
Stabroek market corner spot
Stood location 225-4413.
62-5567. 619-9972.
UNt uaisun .i'y. 3...
gear box 120Y. good
condition. Price S40 000.
Call 617-8242- cell
r'HLORINE tablets 3" for
.. '- -niv. Phone
swimming poo lb .. -
227-4857 (8am- 4 pm). Mon.
to Fri.
EARTH. sand, reef sand.
Excavating, grading &
leveling of land also done.
Contact: 628-3840.
LISTER engine &
generator 110 240 voits.
Portable Lister Diesel Welder,
Contact 624-3!87


- - ~ I-r ~-----








SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24, 2006


PITBULL puppies for sale.
Price $45,000, vaccinated
and dewormed. Bred for
excellence. 29 Pouderoyen.
2 HONDA pressure
washers, 2 chain saws, 2
machines, 2 microwaves, 1
pump, 2 saws. Call 265-5876.
HONDA 6500 ES
generator from Canada, one
eezer (whirl pool), chest
freezer. Call 225-7978, 57900.
PURE BRED PITBULL
PUPS. Excellent for Breeding
& Security. Contact Ray 264-
2911 or 618-5557.
ONE beautiful 8 weeks
old male pompek mixed with
dachshund (fawn and white).
Tel. 231-7590, 627-3330.
ELECTRIC oven, (1 000
W auto transformer), new
pressure sprayer, single bed,
7-iece dinette set. el. 611-
31T53.
PARTS for Dryers/
Washers. Thermostats, pumps,
motors, belts, valves knobs
etc. Technician available. Call
622-5776.
TOYOTA Cressida Mark 11
car perfect condition. Property
at 75E Garnett Street, Kitty.
Phone 225-1911 office hours.
STUDY desks, lamps,
stool, 36" fan, bed, kitchen
ware, projection screen, coffee
set and more. Dial 227-
1234.
1 USED RZ engine, 1
Mitsubishi canter 4D 32
engine, 1 canter breaks Survo.
CalI 226-2996. 614-1150.
SOFA BED $25,000.
Chest of drawers $15.000.
Cabinet with doors $15,000.
Small items. Telephone 227-
3542..
ORIGINAL BRAND NAME
CLOTHES FROM THE USA.
JEANS $3 000 SHIRTS/
TOPS $1 500. 220-4791.
FRIDGE, washer TV,
home theater system, A/Cd units,
Fax machine, cell phone
(Karza. Phone 227-3717/
623-534.
1 34 FEET Cabin
Cruiser Fishing Boat with 350
lbs Ban a Mary seine, Ice
Box, 1.40 Yamaha engine.
Contact S. Singh. Tel: 629-
5700.
FREON gas: 11, 12, 22,
502, 134A & 404A, also
Helium gas for balloons an
Argon gas. Phone 227-4857
(8 am 4 pm). Mon. to Fri.
NEW COMPAQ
LAPTOPS. 1.46 Ghz
Processor, 512 MB RAM, DVD
Writer, 80 Gig hard drive. Call:
643-7039, 628-9810.
ONE Honda, 80 Scooter,
good condition. No
reasonable offer refused.
Contact 223-4204 or 618-
7383 or 629-3390 Kenny/
Gloria..
1 BRAND new Whirlpool
dryer, super capacity. 1 X-
Box with lots of games &
controls. Call. 21 -4384 or
618-5805 or 611-8824.
BEAUTIFUL and
adorable dashund mix with
pompex pups one year old.
ery loving pets, a lovely gift
for Christmas. Call 227-6202.
S BILLBOARD top hits 1950
- 2006. Get your music
selection on CD/MP3. Contact
626-8019. 231-2440. Web:
wwwfyahtunes.bravahost.com
IN.STOCK 4 MM and 9MM
Plyboard. Wholesale
quantities. Waheed's General
Store. 113 Pike Street, Kitty.
Tel: 226-7585. Fax: 226-
7586.
COOKS, waiter, waitress,
cleaners, puri maker. Must
know to make roti and purl.
Contact C & S Night Club 28
Sheriff and First Street,
Cambellville.
1 ROTTWEILLER male,
also 1 blue Pit Pup (female),
Love birds various colors. 1
tyre machine and compressor.
Contcat 265-3206 or 265-
2057 or 645-0589.
1 BILLARD table, 1 3-
speed De Walt buffing
machine (110v), 1 sanding
machine. Assorted mechanical
and welding tools. Contact M.
Singh 645-1976, 612-8337.
OXYGEN and Acetylene
gases fast and efficient
service. 10 -- 11 Mc Doom
Public Road. EBD. Phone
223-6533 (8 am -- 4 om Mnn
to Fri. (Sat. 8 am i ...-.
HURRY to Sky Universal.
authorized dealer of Phillips
Sky Digital Satellite Dish. For
the best offer. 156 Channels
, ,,in, i pay per view and
',: il 227-1151, 231-601 .


ONE 1000 gallon fuel tank,
Model M Bedford truck spares,
Nissan windscreen. engine parts,
bearings and Massey Ferguson
spares, injectors, etc. Tel: 625-
9188/622-2242
GIVE AWAY Food
warmers, extractor fan, Chinese
cahary, Pizza plates, garden
chairs, rechargeable lamps,
stoves, wedding dresses, etc.
Contact Suriyyah 223-9316/643-
5431.
2 STEREO SET complete
or in parts, e.g. amp, deck, CD
Player, equalizer, crossover, vice
horn. At a reasonable cost. Nice
music for the holidays.
Household items. Call: 220-
7252.
AMPLIFIER CD player, tape
deck speaker boxes, brand new
article Hi watts and one
motorcycle 125 G. Excellent
condition. All prices negotiable.
622-0267, 629-2239.
ALL types of feed and rice
bran, broke, paddy, boosie, pet
rice, copra meal, white rice,
brown rice & baby chicks. Call us
we have the best price around -
261-5533, 336-3996, 614-1150.
ONE 14" remote colour
television, Sony Play Station 1,
Game Boy Advance, One- single
bed ($10,000.00), one 7 piece
dinette set ($20,000.00),
Panasonic stereo power
amplifier. Tel: 611-3153.
CAUSTIC Soda 55-lb $4
000; Alum 55-lb $5 000, Soda
Ash 50-lb $7 500. Sulphuric
Acid 45-gal $45 000, Granular
Chlorine Chlorine gas. Phone
- 227-4857 (8 am 4pm) -
Mon. to Fri
SAMSUNG P850
CELLPHONE WITH
BLUETOOTH 3.2 MP CAMERA,
MP3 PLAYER 73 MB,
INTERNAL, 128 MB EXTERNAL,
ETC. PRICE $70,000
NEGOTIABLE. TEL: 647-1110,
225-5167.
HOUSE & LAND located on
Eccles Public Road. 1 Isuzu
enclosed canter. Parts and body
for Toyota Hilux double cab, ick
up, 1 6640 Ford tractor. 1 TW10
Ford tractor, 1 132 Lavarda
combine. 1 1 ton dumper, 1
AE 110 Corolla car, PJJ series, 2
- 20 ft German trailers, various
sizes 3 phase electrical motor.
CONTACT 233-2423/641-7073.
DELL COMPUTERS Brand
new Pentium 4 (3.06 GHz) and
Celeron (2.5GHz) computers.
With modem, network card,
128MB video. 256/512 MB
memory, CD burner/DVD player
USB keyboard and mouse and
17 inch flat screen or monitor.
Custom orders and wholesale
offered. For details call Raval @
223-5308 or 626-8784 or come
in at 63 Fifth Street Alberttown.
9 11 am and 12 -5 pm.
NIGEL'S WOOD WORKING
COLIDGEN INDUSTRIAL SITE
ECD. SPECIALISE IN KITCHEN
CUPBOARD FURNITURE,
PANEL DOORS & SPINDLES,
ETC. PURPLE HEART DOORS,
SQUARE DOORS $17 000,
SQUARE INNER ARCH DOORS
- $20 000, SINGLE FRAME -
$35 000, SINGLE ARCH DOOR
WITH DOUBLE FRAME $50
000 DOUBLE ARCH DOOR
WITH DOUBLE FRAME $80
000. DELIVERY AVAILABLE.
TEL. 270-4532 OR 624-7023.
1 200 hp Yamaha
Outboard Engine working) .
Price $680,00-0. 1 18 000
watts, 110/220 diesel enerator,
working. Price $380,000.00. 1
- Kenmore 25 Cubic Fridge
(working). Price$125,000. 1 -
17 cubic Whirlpool Freezer
(working) Price $60.000.00, 1
24 volts 110 volts heavy duty
battery charger (working). Price
$60,000.00. Parts for 200 HP
Yamaha Outboard. Call: 662-
6790 or 661-0122.
ONE complete music set
with 8 bottorns 18" Fane
speakers, 6 upright'tops with 15"
double speakers, 4 44T Drive
horns, 6- QSC amnplfiers,
equalisers, crossovers (Numark),
1 32 amps Turn-up transformer,
6 100 watts bullets. Also 8
metal hail spot lamps 18" x 15"
complete with wires, disco lights,
fogging machine. One Nissan 4x
4 complete with bed liner, search
lamps and winch. Call 263-7305
or 618-8996.
"GAMESTATION" VIDEO
GAME BIG XMAS SALE. Play
Station 2 & X-box $44,000 (new
or $30,000 (used), Nintendo 64
with free gaine $15,000.
Supernintendo & Sega Genesis
with 3 games $10,000
Controllers, connections,
accessories & dozens of game
discs & cartridges at low reduced
prices Visit "GAMESTATION".
Pouderoyen Main Road. WBD,
Mon -- Sat 11am 7pm Tel
264-2498. 609-8132. 311-9001.
raA 4 .; ..", C_.


BUSINESS FOR SALE.
COMPLETE BUSINESS (STORE)
with all equipment, showcases,
good will and positive income,
at a prime main road location,
WBD giveaway price ready for
immediate takeover. Call "MAX"
on 264-2498, 609-8132 now for
more details and viewing.
75 4-Feet Defuser parabolic,
Fluorescent lamps 4 tubes 240V
$8 000 each 100 new truck tyre
liners Good year size 20 $1
000 each, 1 Briggs and Stratton
Pressure Washer 2000 PSI, 2.1
pressure water pump stainless
steel pump barrel $30 000, 1
truck dump pump $25 000, 1
computer transformer input 110
or 120, 220 or 240, 380 or 415
out 110, 1220, 220, 240 $55
000, 1 Canon NP 6221
Photocopy machine needs
servicing $100,000, 1 Xerox
5028 photocopy machine, needs
servicing $100 000. All
machines on stand with wheels
and have a manual. Owner
migrating 621-4928.
1 LARGE MILWAKEE Delta
drill press 110, 240v on stand $105
000; 1 bench type drill press English
made, 110 v $60 000; 1 Black &
Decker cross cut saw, 11Ov $10 000;
1 2 000 watts transformer $10 000;
1 new 16-feet ladder aluminum in
2 8-ft. half English made $25
000; 1 4-feet platform ladder for
cleaning $10 000; 1 side and edge
sander. 110 240 v on stand $30
000; 1 industrial and commercial
Dayton vacuum cleaner with large
dust bag, 110v for floor or carpet
cleaning $35 000; 1 truck hydraulic
dump pump $35 000; 200 new
tyre liners for truck size 20 $1 000
each W/S; 1 large bench grinder
110v $30 000; 10 buckets of 5-
gallon carpet adhesive paste -
5 000 each; 4 wash basins with
hot and cold water fittings $8
000 each, British made; 50
parabolic diffusers, 4 ft. x 2 ft.
lamps with cubical reflectors and
4 4-ft. tubes 240 volts $12
500 each; 12 GE security lamps
with ballast 240v $6 000 each,
3 000 watts. Call 641-2284.



1 RZ minibus excellent
condition. Contact 227-8587.
1 MARINO CAR. PGG
Series. Call 73442 or 38530.
2 F150. 1 Dodge Ram,
2500 Diesel. Tel: 645-2250
ONE TOYOTA
TUNDRA, F 150. TEL.
623-5534, 227-3717.
ONE AT 212 in excellent
condition, fully powered. Tel:
265-3566.
2000 MODEL Toyota
Tacoma. Tel. 610-3880, 612-
7666.Price negotiable.
TOYOTA Chaser GX 100
Suzuki 750 katana M/bike. Tel.
231-4586, 622-6448.
TOYOTA TUNDRA V6, fully
loaded, 2001 model, GKK series.
Tel: 660-4292.
1 AE 81 Corolla, gear, A/C,
CD. mags. PGG series. Tel: 626-
1170, 642-7666 Charlie
ONE AT 170 Corona.
Reasonable condition $650
000. Call 645-5343 or 225-5363
1 SV 50 Toyota Vista, like
-new. Price to go. Must be sold.
Tel: 227-4474, 227-4473.
AT 192 CARINA. PHH
Series. $1.4 mln. Owner
leaving. Call 225-3221/8915
Office.
1 BLACK Toyota Long base
Extra cab pick up. Contact M.
Singh 645-1976 or 612-8337.
1 HONDA Civic motor
vehicle (car) in working
condition. Please call M. King
644-9318.
2 NISSAN pick up, D21, AA
Carina, AT 170, KT 147 Corona.
Call 220-5124. 645-7167.
1 NISSAN Caravan, working
condition. Reasonable offer
accepted. Tel. 220-7252
1 DAIHATSU CHARMANT for
sale. Crash sold as is. Tel;
222-4914, 615-7158, 622-1305.
TOYOTA Hilux, diesel,
double cab pick up. Excellent
condition. 623-1436, 231-8661,
629-5064
1 GJJ .eyland Daf, double
axle truck wvith hyhab, dump. 20-
cyd Tray. Price neg. Call 640-
2365.
ONE AE 100 Toyola
Corolla, in eycellenl workingl
condition. Prirce nerg Phone
227-7,458. 613. 6149.


1 AT 170 Carina PGG series
automatic, fully powered, mags.
Tel. # 627-3438 price $850 000
ne.99.._ __... ..._____
TOYOTA Mark II GX81.
Price $950,000 neg. Tel: 226-
0868/621-5944 or 226-1753/
623-5376.
ONE SV 40 Camry, 1 Ceres,
both in excellent condition.
Price neg. Contact 220-9058,
649-3976, 613-9077.
6 4 ... 7. 8... .... 6 ... ...... .0I ..- ......................
ONE Mitsubishi Lancer in
excellent working condition.
Price $1,350 000 negotiable.
Contact 618-2063.
ONE Toyota Carina AT 192
PHH 1186, manual, in good
condition. A/C megrims. Tel:
611-3145, 264-1446.
SUNNY 815 2003 Model.
Finished only 6 000 miles.
Vehicle never registered -
$2.3M. Call 225-2611.
ONE Coaster bus in good
working condition. Contact
616-3736 or 660-1564. No
reasonable offer refused.
AT 170 CORONA EFI,
excellent condition; 2 AT 192
Carina EFI, fully powered.
Tel. 222-2905, 641-3821.
NISSAN Presea mags, fully
power, air conditioned, good
condition. Asking $550 000.
Call Elson 622-5465.
ONE AA 60 Carina, in
excellent working condition, needs
body work tape deck AC etc.
Tel. 617-4063/225-6236
2005 TOYOTA Tacoma,
access doors, Extended Cab.
2003 Toyota Tundra fully
loaded. 619-0063, 643-4891.
ONE RZ BHH, EFI, Long
base, two doors mini bus with
mags, music. Excellent
condition. Call 625-3683.
AE 100 COROLLA,
automatic, fully powered, mas.
Price $1.200,000. Tel: 227-
0613. 225-2172.
1 Toyota Dyna 1.5 ton truck.
5 FWD manual 2700cc, diesel,
double wheel at rear, PS, AC.
Call: 231-5680.
ONE AT 170 Carina & one
AE 100 Corolla both
automatic, fully powered,
excellent condition. Tel. 626-
7452.
ONE TOYOTA CORONA
Wagon ET 176, White, mags. 5A
engine, automatic, PHH series.
Te 627-3438.
SUV Mazda 7 seater,
automatic, V6 4WD vehicle.
Asking 1M neg. Excellent
condition. 613-6005, 226-1457.
1 NISSAN Stanza, magrims,
stereo system, good condition.
$700,000. Cal:: 612-1450 or
218-4295 Robert.
ONE white Toyota Car,
automatic. Right hand drive.
Good condition. Call: 222-3406
& 612-3941 for Raj.
TOYOTA CARINA AT 212,
AT 192 Toyota Corolla, etc.
Contact Daward Auto Sale 226-
0041. 621-5407.
2 RZ MINI BUS EFI
Excellent condition. Music.
magqs Good to go. Crystal light.
612-8963. 612-9041 649-8530.
1 AT 150 CORONA.
automatic, good working
condition. (Call: 629-6261 or
265-3027 .,iytime. Price
$425.000 neg.
1 AT 170 TOYOTA Corona
- excellent condition, mag
rims. fog lamps, original
spoiler. Price neg. Telephone
622-0322
GX 71 Tovota Mark II. Good
working coridition and fully
powered. Price $750,000
negotiable. Contact 220-4310.
ONE long base Toyota Pick
up with front and back spring leaf
and with off road tyres. Contact
Manjoor at 623-6560.
AT 212 192 Carina, AE110
Sprinter. EP82 Starlet 4 door,
Mitsubishi Pajro JR, Tovota
Pickup. Call: 227-2834. 621-
6037.
FORD 150 Pick Up, 3 doors.
good condition, CD!Tape player,
bubble tray dual air hag, imaq
rims. etc. $5.5M neg. Tel. 220"-
7416
MIGRATING BMW 528 E
S850,000. Mercedes 190 E
1,200,000. Excellent
Condition. Neg. Tel: 225-1060.
641-0607.
MITSUBISHI Canter, wide
body, 14 feet, open tri lr'1'
base 2 on4032 1..
C. Contact 226-91
Sheriff St., C/ville.
DOCTOR drlnvIn iiliornmatc
Hilux 4m 4 Surf olour rnminei
Inllna Cilatetr on. i ition L. olt
.miiil. powv er d l.l. Id'ed. V-'
Tel. nI 221' 7085r : 8' ,


ISUZU Truck, 4BE1 engine,
14 feet open tray, 2 /2 ton, A/C.
New from Japan. Excellent
condition. Contact 226-9109 at
74 Sheriff St., C/ville.
1 DUMP truck, 1 water
tender and 330 Timber Jack
Skidder all are in good working
condition. For more information
Contact: 264-2946.
580 C HYMAC with swamp
tract, 10 tons (3) wheel roller, 3
tons vibrating roller. All in good
working conditions. Call 623-
3404, 222-6708.
ONE SV 42 Camry, fully
loaded, keyless entry, four wheel
steering, megrims. Never
registered. Price $2.6M. Tel:
225-3255 or 648-6318.
LONG Base RZ, BGG series
in immaculate condition with
solid engine ear box and Def.
Call 276-0313 626-1141 $950
000 _n. Shahab.__1
PJJ Toyota Hilux Surf 4x4,
fully powered, AC, automatic,
CD, mags in immaculate
condition $2.4M neg. Call 276-
0313, 626-1141, Shahab.
ONE Four wheel drive long
base English made Land Rover
in good working condition.
Suitable for farm, transporting
goods. Tel 625-9188, 622-2242
1 AE 100 COROLLA, 1 AT
192 Carina, 1 SV 40 Camry, AE
91 Corolla Wagon. Owner
leaving country. Call # 645-
6288, 231-0555. All prices neg.
ARRIVING January 15 AT
192 at wharf. Price $500,000
up and more or $1.650 000
cash. Pay down $500,000. Book
now. Carib Auto Sales 627-
1331.
1 AT 170 Toyota motor car.
EFI, mags, automatic. Excellent
condition. Price $700,000. 1
Nissan FB 13 Stick Gear
$500,000. Call: 629-4236.
TOYOTA Townace small
bus 12-seater, good condition.
Priced to go 600 000. Contact
35 Seaforth St., C/ville. Phone
231-1271, Cell 610-2037.
Hyneter.
GR SALOON MARK II,
automatic, $1.1M, Camry SV 30
and 40, Toyota Land Cruiser
$2.1M, RZ Bus $1.1M. AT 192.
Shawn 218-1014, 618-7483.
GKK series Toyota Tacoma
Extra Cab, 4x4 1995 model.
automatic, air bag. 3RZ engine.
AC. etc. in immaculate
condition $2.4 million. Call
276-0313, 626-1141, Shahab.
TOYOTA Dyna truck, new
model, 15B engine, 16" wheel.
3 ton, long base, 17 feet open
tray, A/C, powered, excellent
condition. Contact 226-9109 at
74 Sheriff St., C/ville.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter
enclosed excellent condition
GHH series. Price $1.7 million.
1 Hiace Super Custom minibus.
working condition, PFF series.
Price $600 000. Telephone
259-3158
GKK series, 1999 model
Toyota Tacoma Extra Cab, 4x4
automatic, V6 engine, fully
powered, air bag, etc in immaculate
condition -$2.9 million. Call 276-
0313, 626-1141, Shahab.
TOYOTA Hilux Surf PHH
series, 4x4, fully powered, AC,
automatic, 5 door. crash bar. fog
lamp. mags. flair, roof rack. in
immaculate condition $2.3M
neg. Call 276-0313, 626-1141,
Shahab.
PHH TOYOTA HILUX SURF,
FULLY POWERED,
AUTOMATIC, IN IMMACULATE
CONDITION. $2.1 MILLION
NEGOTIABLE. CALL: 618-
3093.
TOYOTA RAV 4 in mint
condition, PHH series. fully
powered. mag rims, side bars,
fog larns and crystal h/lights.
Sony CD;MP3/tape player. $3M
negotiable. Contact 648-9485.
624-1102. 226-7228.
HONDA Civic 2001 model,
CD changer, mag rims. spoiler.
fully flared leather interior.
44000kin. Fronr ,. ,...
$1 5M negotiable .... ii . i,,,
Contact Fazela Auto Sales Tel
276.0245. 628-4179.
1 AT 192 Carina PJJ series.
A/C. mrag. music, owner priced
to go. 1 AE 100 Sprinter, PJJ
series, AC, nags, music, alarm
start, 1 owner Priced to go.
Contact Safraz, 220-2047. 614-
1939
ONE Tovota Land Cruiser -
2006 model, leather seats, auto
i. i powered, left hand
.,, -. i i million One 1998
model Land Criseil (irmanual)
ilnlmh culite *uldlliun S12?
,liil!iiT lTel 227 4040. 225-
0995, 1G1-3866.
.t-' >'


1 SV 40 Toyota Camr'
PHH series, music, DVD, nev,
tyres, mags, spoiler, showroom
condition. 1 Mitsubishi Pajero
V6 en. 3,000 cc, new tyres,
mags,' ull bars, Sun roof, bi
music, leather interior, PHH
series, owner migrating. For
quick sale contact Ail 220-
2047, 614-1939.
GJJ series Extra cab Pick
up 1999 model, automatic,
4x4, CD, air bag, crash bar,
winch, 6 year warranty battery,
life time warranty air, filter
brand new tyres, mags, bed
liner etc, in immaculate
condition, never run off road.
Owner leaving country $2 950
000 neg. Call 276-0313 or
626-1141.
1 MORRIS Marina motor
car, 4-door imported from
England. Never re gistered
excellent condition $850 000
neg. registered 1 Chevy
Silverado 4x4 enclosed 4-door,
power steering, mag rims,
automatic for interior run -
750 000 neq, 1 Land Cruiser
Toyota P J series fully
automatic, hardly used, fully
powered $8.2M neg. Mint
condition. Leather seats. Owner
migrating. 621-4928.
USED vehicles. SV 40
Camry/212 Carina, 210
Corona AT 192 Carina AE 100
Corolla/Sprinter, AT 176 Carina/
Corona, AE 91 Sprinter. AE 81
Corolla, Nissan Sunny, 4 x 4
Nissan. 4-Runner, Nissan
Vanette, Toyota Townace, RZ
buses. Vehicles from $300 000.
Contact Dave Auto Sales, Lot
10 Croal Street, Stabroek. Tel.
223-6218/after 4 pm 231-
3690, Cell 612-4477. Also
Wagon cars. ?
AT 212 CARINA- $1.7M
1998 Model Honda Civic 17
mags, (immediate) $1.9M, AT
19Carina, PJJ series- $16M
AE 110 Sprinter 1.5M, A
100 Marino (PHH series)
manual, in top shape $1.3M,
AE 100 Sprinter $1 250 000;
AT 170 Carina (Real Classy) -
$950 000, AT 170 Corona
automatic $875 000, AT 156
Corona, (manual) $450 000,
Kindly call for other model cars
if ou wish. Tel 225-0995, 611-
3866.
RORAIMA Trust& Investment
Inc. requires skilled workers and
general labourers for immediate
employment. Sub-contractors are
also required for Formwork,
columns & beams, steelwork,
concrete casting, block
laying, plastering, electrical,
plumbing, timber stairs
roofing. Sub-contractors and
skilled workers must have own
tools. Apply at Roraima Trust
& Investment Inc. Plantation
Versailles, West Bank
Demerara. Phone 264-2946.
Fax: 264-2949.
210 CORONA, 212 Carina,
AT 192 Carina, AE 100 Corolla
and Sprinter, Lancer. Camry SV
40, GX L-Touring Wagon, AT 170
Corona and Carina, AE91 Sprinter
and Corolla. BUSES: RZ Long
and Short Base (EFI & C/tor).
PICKUP: 4-Runner, enclosed and
open back, CRV & RAVA 4. At all
times you can call for other
models and prices. Credit for
vehicles is available. Pete's Auto
Sale. Lot 02 George Street, Werk-
en-Rust, Georgetown (behind
Brickdam Cathedral Church.
South into George Street). Tel.
226-9951. 226-5546. 231-7432.
2003 TOYOTA Xtra Cab
Tacoma $4.4M, 2003 Tundra
(Bubble Lite tray) $6.2M,
oyota Land Cr : I
(excellent) $6.8M. 1
Trundra (never r.i:.' c-.~ .
$4.7M, immaculate J.,jL,. .t
oyota Pick up 3.7M Toyota
Tacoma Xtra Cab $2.8M.
Toyota Lexus Land Cruiser.
leather seats, etc in
Toyota RAV-4 (neati- $3 -r
Toyota diesel van (new model
- $1.7M, Toyota Xtra Cab SRS
- $ i Toyota Surf. PJJ series
r 1, Toyota Four Runner -
$1.7M, 320L-Xcavator. never
registered in Guyana $17 5m
Kiiidly call for more
information 225-0995, 611-
3866, 227-4040.
ONE Toyota Land Cruiser
FJ 'i F; i,.i i',.. hlansrnssion
3F cc enqrUin.
EFI ',I. .. . -- I winr iws.
dooi h -, I l
cM ctrr., and [, i
,~--i 1,. Def lock for 4our
wheel drive inside leathei
seats. :igqh and low range .irive
4 new Good Year tyres ana 'nni
rims size (16) crash bar. foi'
lam ps, adjustat bl, I.-I .i i
whee, roof rack r- r i ,i
grilled, back toe '-, '.
sunL vsor. power steering, new
12v battery, bact .ir', l r hnt
air
,,.-! ,,' pow er .,
security system from theft. 2
years I0 months old. PJJ I ;cries.
.cond ition
1 i interior anl' lir-I
conliumpltion, well kept n vii r
wuInt illthe iilO i or ,
I lh : lin o S l8 (I M l i e ! w -' i -
,? 'i


_ 1~---14____1.-1---__-~-__~_ ~--^---^~---~---IX-~s~~sl~L-Y~-IUI








28 SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24, 2006


Recent Shipment from
Japan/Singapore, Tovota
Carina AT 192 $700,000,
Mitsubishi Lancer $850,000,
Toyota NZE 121 $1.8M, 2003
Mazda 1.5A- $2.1M, Mitsubishi
Mini Van $1.2M, 2003
Mitsubishi Mini Van $1.2M,
Suzuki Mini van $1.2M, 2003
Mitsubishi Colt $1.7M. ALL
prices are negotiable and
quoted on the wharf! Contact
azela Auto Sales 276-0245,
628-4179.
ONE Mitsubishi Canter
truck enclosed, 3-ton, GFF
series $950 000; 1 Toyota
Hiace Super Custom 3 000 cc,
Turbo charge, diesel engine,
BJJ series, hardly used. $2.4
million. One Toyota Hilux
Double Cab. PHH Series. 3 Y
engine $2.7 million. One 29-
seater bus Mitsubishi Rosa, JJ
series $3.5million. One 29-
seater Toyota Coaster bus, BHH
series $2.9 million. 225-1429;
624-1147
NOW IN STOCK. Toyota
Corolla NZE 121, AE 110, EE
103. Honda Civic EK3 & ES1,
Toyota Hilux Extra Cab LN 172,
LN 170, RZN 174, Toyota Hilux
Double Cab- YN 107, LN 107, LN
165, 4 x 4, RZN 167, RZN 169,
Toyota Hilux Single Cab LN
106, Toyota Hilux Surf- RZN 185
YN 130, KZN 185, Mitsubishi
Canter FE 638E, FE6387EV,
Toyota Carina AT 192, AT
212, Toyota Marino AE 100,
Toyota Vista AZV 50, Honda
CRV RO1, Toyota RAV 4. ZCA
26, ACA 21, SXA 11. Toyota
Mark IPSUM SXM 15, Toyota Mark
2 GX 100, Lancer CK 2A. Toyota
Corona Premio AT 210, Toyota
Hiace Diese; KZH110, Mitsubishi
Cadia Lancer SC2A, Toyota
Corolla G-Touring Wagon AE
100 Contact Rose Ramdehol
Auto Sales, 226 South Rd.,
Bourda, Georgetown. Tel.
226-8953, 226-1973, 227-
3185, Fax. 227-3185. We
give you the best cause
you deserve the best.



ONE FILL MAN. CALL
256-3216, 621-3875.
WAITRESS. CONTACT
BABY, 1B SHELL ROAD, KITTY.
1 LIVE-IN DOMESTIC,
40-50 YEARS.
TELEPHONE 642-8781.
ONE LIVE IN MAID. 20-30
YRS. CALL: 226-7189.
ONE HANDYBOY TO
WORK IN THE INTERIOR. TEL.
223-1609, 777-4126.
ONE BAR ATTENDANT
TO WORK IN G/TOWN.
CALL: 227-3674/622-2442.
ONE GARDENER TO
WORK TWO DAYS PER WEEK.
APPLY AT 53 DAVID STREET,
KIITY.
CONTRACT CARS &
DRIVERS NEEDED ON E.B.D.
TEL. 231-2584, 609-9528.
A HIRE CAR DRIVER TO
WORK CAR AROUND
GEORGETOWN AT TAXI
SERVICE 641-2284.
ONE MAID FOR 2 DAYS IN
SUBRYANVILLE. AGE 35 49.
CALL 613-6005 OR 226-1457.
BOYS TO PLUCK
CHICKEN A1 ORANGE WALK.
BOURDA. TEL: 225-9720.
URGENTLY WAITRESS
AT VEE BEE S BAR. 37 SANDY
BABB ST KITTY.
ATTRACTIVE SALARY.
ONE enclosed minivan
or igqht truck, diesel, with
automatic transmission. Call
Lawrence 322-0309.
1 EXPERIENCED COOK.
CALL 663-8829, ANYTIME.
REFERENCES REQUIRED.
ASSISTANT Cook/
Creole. preferably male and
House Cleaner to work in
Georgetow Tel. 625-1906.
2 WAITRESS. 1 live-in
mnaid. A oiy t!o Bibi Jameel's.
'1 'rvho;: Lu.st Public Road.
-Ta. 220e-52i -. .
S Oc 'C'



S .- -.!~" .*;E., Ca.- ,2'


:'i79 T CHRoNicuEL E





Iverson suffers defeat




on Denver debut


By Keith Coffman

DENVER, (Reuters) Allen
Iverson had 22 points and 10



EXPERIENCED curry cooks,
counter servers. Apply in person
Hack's Halaal Restaurant. 5
commerce St., G/town. 9-11
am.
COUNTER CLERKS. Apply
in person with written
application to Bish & Sons
Discount Store, 38 Cummings
Street, Alberttown
MECHANIC to work in the
interior. Must have experience
in CAT Excavators. Perkins
engine and ARC Wellding. Tel:
626-6909. 629-0037, 642-
7963.
VACANCIES exist for
honest and reliable security
guards also one handyman.
Apply in person at National
Security Services. 80 Seaforth
St., C/ville. Tel. 227-3540.
House Keeper to work in
Trinidad for Indian Family. Call
0011-868-685-1115 or write to
Garnett Moller, 11 Hillside
Terrace North, Eldorado Road,
Tuna Puna, Trinidad W.I.
SALES GIRL, CASHIERS,
PUMP ATTENDANTS, HANDY
BOYS, FEMALE COUNTER
CLERK, OFFICE ASSISTANT &
2 WASH BAY MEN. Apply in
person with written application
at Texaco, Vlissengen Road
ONE (10 General Help/
Gardener to work at 280-282
Atlantic Gardens, ECD.
Contact: Mr. Roshan Khan,
RK's Security Services, 125
Regent Road, Bourda or 280-
282 Atlantic Gardens after
04:30pnm.
1 LIVE in domestic.
People from country and
interior can also apply 1 full
day domestic to work in Atlantic
Gardens, 1 part time and full
time experience cook for Indian
dishes to work in Atlantic
Gardens. Contact: Mrs. Khan,
RK's Security Services, Regent
Road, Bourda after 4:30, 281
Atlantic Gardens. East Coast
Demerara.


assists on his Denver debut
but the Sacramento Kings
snapped a three-game losing
streak with a 101-96 win over
the Nuggets on Friday.
Iverson travelled all day to
make it to Denver in time to
pass a physical and wound up
playing 39 minutes, shooting 9-
for-15 from the field.
It was the first game in two
weeks for 'The Answer' who
had been sitting at home await-
ing a trade from the Philadel-


ALLEN IVERSON


phia 76ers, the team that drafted
him No.l overall in 1996 and
where he had spent his entire
career.
The Nuggets used just
eight players due to numer-
ous injuries and the suspen-
sion of Carmelo Anthony,
with the Kings finally wear-
ing them down in the fourth
quarter despite arriving just
90 minutes before the game
due to bad weather in the
area.
John Salmons had a triple
double for the Kings with 21
points, 11 rebounds and 10 as-
sists, while Brad Miller added
21 points and 14 rebounds. Earl
Boykins led Denver with 25
points.
"They embraced me. It was
a great feeling," Iverson told re-
porters about his new team
mates and Denver fans after the
game.
"Not having played for a


while, the altitude was tough
on me at the beginning. I had
jet lag and car sickness and I
only had five minutes to
shoot."
Despite his late arrival
Iverson turned in a solid effort,
and said he looked forward to
playing with Anthony,
"I know we're going to be
good," Iverson said. "We'll be
hard to stop."
Denver coach George Karl
was impressed.
"For a guy who hadn't
played in a couple of weeks, I
think he looked pretty damn
good," Karl said. "I'm just sorry
we couldn't win the game for
A.I."
In Charlotte, Emeka
Okafor scored 21 points and
had 10 rebounds as the Bob-
cats upset the Utah Jazz 101-
89.
Jama! Crawford scored 30
points as the Knicks beat the


Chicago Bulls 103-92. Channing
Frye scored 15 points and had
12 rebounds and David Lee
scored 12 points and 14 re-
bounds for the Knicks as the
team won three in a row for the
first time since April.
Kobe Bryant scored 21
points and had 11 rebounds as
the Los Angeles Lakers beat the
New Jersey Nets 99-95. Vince
Carter scored 33 points for the
Nets, who lost Nenad Krstic
with an injured left knee in the
third quarter.
Andre Igauodala scored 31
points as the Philadelphia 76ers
ended their 12-game losing streak
by beating the Celtics 98-83.
In San Antonio, Yao Ming
scored 22 points as the Hous-
ton Rockets beat the Spurs 97-
78.
Washington ended the
Phoenix Suns' 15-game win-
ning streak with a 144-139
overtime win.


JoeiP ulic] [* uSan tos advance


From back page

goals against the mining town
team as the Trinidadians shot
to goal about one a minute.
He thwarted six shots from
close quarters to keep the
Linden fans shouting with
expectation.
But the defence let him
down in the 28th minute dur-
ing a mix-up in the box and
he was beaten by a close
range shot from Mitchell to
the southern goal.
That seemed to open the
gates and six minutes later,
Wolfe sent a banana from the


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Mr. Clifford Stonley on 618-6538/328-2304


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reduced drastically. Call
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right edge of the box to splat
the net in the far corner, col-
lecting the ball from a corner,
the fourth of five in the half,
against none for their oppo-
nents. A minute before half-
time, Mitchell completed his
double and the Trinidadian
led 3-0 at halftime.
The second half offered
nothing to shout about as
both teams forced two corners
each, Blue Berry Hill finding
their first 15 minutes into the
half. But they could not find
the net.
Then ten minutes from
time, Davis added his name to
the score sheet. He raced with
the ball close to the goal line.
shot from five out. Whittaker
got a touch on the ball but it re-
bounded on the inside of the
upright to end in the net.


Joe Public's next appear-
ance will be at Blairmont
Community Centre ground
on Christmas Day to face
Pele in the second match un-
der floodlights from 19:00 h,
a change from the original
15:00 h start.
Later, nothing significant
occurred between Santos and
Pouderoyen. The West
Demerara boys forced one cor-
ner but no one could find the
net.
Santos used all their
changes, significantly Oie run-
ning on for captain Dwayne Ali
in strike. The match see-sawed
with both sides forcing two cor-
ners each.
Then in the 79th minute,
Santos got a free kick from
the edge of box. The ball
stuck in the mud in front the


goal and the keeper flew past
it as he went for the save. Oie
simply ran in and kicked he
ball into an empty goal,
which turned out to be the
sealer.
Santos will also travel to
Blairmont, tomorrow, to meet
Alpha United in the first match
at 17:00 h. a change from the
13:00 h.
The other two foreign
teams will be on show tonight
at the Wales Community Cen-
tre ground on the West Bank
Demerara.
In the first match
from 18:00 h, Team
Guyana of New York will
meet Den Amstel and in
the feature game,
Mabouya Valley of St
Lucia clash with Western
Tigers from 20:00 h.


McGrath to retire...


From back page

home ground and my
favourite ground in the
world."
McGrath, 36, said he was
bowling as well as ever and
could have kept on playing but
\\as retiring to spend more time
\\ ilh his family.
McGrath took eight months
off this year to look after his
children while his wife Jane was
undergoing treat ment for cancer.
"It's a lough decision be-
cause I still love playing. The
body Ieels greal ;and I coildn'l
be happier with the way I'in
bowling so everylhin's exactly
where 1 want iti Ito ." he said.
"But on the olher side. it's
an easy decision because of ev-
ervthing else lhat goes wilh it
... the training. the tra\ el. the
lilme awav froll home.
"It is ellt in iLugher to
leave Ilome. especially w il .lane
and the kidl. 'Tlie'k'ids aNV grow-
ing up all the lime and it's loulgh


missing the things they go 2004 and another in September
through, this year after taking time off to
"But I would say that with care for his wife, immediately
respect to Jane, her health has helping Australia win the Cham-
nothing to do with the decision pions Trophy for the first time,
I've made here today. We're a then regain the Ashes they lost
family and that's what it's all to England last year.
about." Speculation about his fu-
ture began to intensify when
HUMBLE BEGINNINGS Damien Martyn retired after
McGrath rose from humble the Adelaide Test and Warne
beginnings to become the announced he was quitting
world's most successful fait after Sydney.
bowler, capturing 555 Test McGrath initially tried to
wickets in 122 matches, and 342 dampen the speculation by say-
one-day international wickets in ing he was still weighing up his
20 panmes, options before calling a news
The lanky paccmlni tor- conference yesterday to confirm
niented the world's best bats- the news.
men for over a decade with "It's only in the last couple
his unerring accuracy but of games I made the decision to
ruimours \iore ri-fe that he hlang ip ly boots." he said.
v;was on the verge of quitting. "The plan I had come up
The wsear and tear of bowl- \\ith w as Slhane would go be-
ing had started to take effect fore Melbourne and I before
and hle had sirmgeled wilh nig- Sydney, but with all the hear-
gling injuries 1 cer tIi" past three,( [Slia.ad. sCrutiny,.we. wanted
,seasons... .. .. ..-- to get ilt-o t d'\a.Y..T'fryjug t
lie inadc a comeback in deny retiring is a bit tough."


-------







SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24, 2006 :


w U 'l "IL


McGrath's success a victory for hard work


By Julian Linden

SYDNEY, Australia (Reuters)
- Australia's Glenn McGrath
made fast bowling look so
simple it was easy to forget
how hard he worked to get to
the top.
McGrath, who is retiring af-
ter the 2007 World Cup, was
not the quickest pace bowler
the world has ever seen, but he
was the most successful with
555 Test wickets.
His recipe for success was
simple: unerring accuracy,
subtle movement off the seam
and sharply rising bouncers
only a man of 1.95m (6ft 5in)
could generate.
His stock delivery was the
ball that pitched on a length and
was aimed just outside the off
bail, in the so-called 'corridor of
uncertainty'.
While other fast bowlers
tried to intimidate their op-
ponents with blistering
speed, McGrath played with
their minds, moving the ball
away from batsmen who
dared to hit him and cutting
the ball back at those who
dared not.
He often made batsmen
look like fools as they shoul-
dered arms to a ball that sud-


denly darted back and crashed
into their stumps or nicked a ball
that moved away off the seamn
and could have been left alone.
McGrath's simple ap-
proach to the game belied the
fact that he was one of the hard-
est working fast bowlers Aus-
tralia ever produced and few
people gave him any hope of
ever making a career out of it.
He grew up in Narromine,
a dusty outback town in
western New South Wales,
and was a slow starter. He
never played junior
representative matches and
by the time he was 16, his
own team mates were telling
him he would never make it
as a bowler.
When he finished school, a
career as a professional cricketer
was the last thing on McGrath's
mind, so he spent the next few
years in a variety of jobs, in-
cluding working as carpenter, in
a bank and at local farms har-
vesting cotton.
But by 19, the ambitious
McGrath was dreaming of
greater things so he packed his
bags and headed to Sydney. He
spent the next 13 months living
in a caravan while playing club
cricket, before he caught the eye
of former Test players Jeff Th-


*l~~


~Az i
:


/ .





GLENN McGrath makes his first appearance at
1997 and records stunning figures of 8-38 as
suffer. (BBC Sport)


ompson and Rod Marsh.

WAFER-THIN PACEMAN
Both saw something in the
wafer-thin paceman that others
had missed and pushed for his
promotion. He made his first-
class debut for New South


to antagonise the world's best
batsmen by publicly naming
S his favourite targets. He dis-
missed England opener
Michael Atherton 19 times
and West Indies world record
holder Brian Lara on 15 oc-
casions.
McGrath's greatness was
there for all to see when he took
the astonishing figures of eight
for 38 in the second Test at
Lord's on his first Ashes tour in
England in 1999 and was named
Wisden Cricketer-of-the-Year in
. ." 1998.
He won his first World
Cup in 1999, was awarded
the Allan Border Medal as
Australia's best player for
2000 and took a Test hat-
trick against West Indies in
Perth later that year.
McGrath won a second
World Cup in 2003, taking ca-
Lord's in reer-best one-day figures seven
England for 15 in a pool match against
Namibia, but injured his ankle
the following year.


Wales in 1992 and a year later.
aged 23, he made his Test de-
but, as a replacement for Merv
Hughes.
It was not long before
McGrath began to stamp
himself as one of Test
cricket's great seamers and


ADVANCING YEARS
Despite his advancing years
and claims his best days were
behind him, McGrath returned
in 2004 better than ever. He
scored his first and only Test
half-century with the bat when


he made 61 against New Zealand
and took eight for 24, the sec-
ond-best figures by an Austra-
lian in Test cricket, against Pa-
kistan.
He became only the
fourth bowler to capture 500
Test wickets when he dis-
missed Marcus Trescothick
in the first Ashes Test at
Lord's in 2005 and was
named man-of-the-match af-
ter steering Australia to vic-
tory.
However, he stepped on a
ball on the morning of the sec-
ond Test and missed the match
as Australia went on to lose the
series 2-1 and the Ashes for the
first time in 16 years.
McGrath took an eight-
month break from international
cricket in 20@6 to care for his
wife Jane after she was diag-
nosed with cancer for the third
time but made another come-
back in September.
He helped Australia win
the Champions Trophy for
the first time and regain the
Ashes from England to com-
plete all his unfinished busi-
ness before announcing he
would retire after the 2007
World Cup, bringing a close
to one of the finest careers in
the history of the game.


Motie bowls


Albion A to


commanding win
LEFT-arm spinner Gudanesh Motie snared five wickets for
a mere five runs to steer his team Albion Community Cen-
tre 'A' to a commanding 68-run win over Whim National
in a preliminary round match in the Republic Bank Un-
der-15 50-over cricket competition recently at the Albion
ground.
Motie spun his way to the outstanding figures to bowl out
Whim National for 40 after they were replying to Albion CC's
modest 108. Supporting Motie was Mahendra Bhim with two
for eight.
Earlier, Albion CC 'A' made 108 all out in 25 overs with
Harrinarine Chattergoon hitting 41 as Deraj Venkiah took four
for 28 and Yudesh Sooknanan claimed four for 49. bowling for
the losers.
In the other encounter at Area 'H' ground, Rose Hall Town
Farfan and Mendes defeated Albion CC 'B' by a massive 201
runs. Scores in the match: RHT Farfan and Mendes 239 all out
off 48.2 overs: Stephen Lewis 45, Nelroy Hicks 42, Travis
Frank 35, Moses Sookram 28, Nadeem Khan 2-27, Makin
Chinapen 2-1, Churaman Chinapen 2-36, Joshua Ramsammy
2-60.
Albion 'B' in reply 38 all out off 16 overs (Loyydel Lewis
5-5, Isaiah Brijadar 5-3).


World


championships


moved from Fiji


to New Zealand
SYDNEY, Australia (Reuters) New Zealand will host the
2007 world netball championships after they were moved
from Fiji in the wake of the recent military-led coup.
The event has been postponed until November 2007 to give
New Zealand an extra four months to prepare. tle International
Federation of Netball Associations (IFNA) said in a slatemenil.
New Zealand are the current world champions and last
hosted the world championships in 1999.


By Martin Herman

LONDON, England (Reuters)
- Leaders Manchester United
began their holiday fixtures
with a resounding 3-0 victory
at Aston Villa as the goals
flowed in the Premier
League soccer yesterday.
A double from an inspired
Cristiano Ronaldo and a thump-
ing Paul Scholes volley, all in
the second half. briefly gave
United a five-point lead before
champions Chelsea responded
with a last-gasp 3-2 win at
Wigan Athletic to slice it to two
again.
At the halfway point of the
season United have 47 points
from 19 games while Chelsea
have 45.
Liverpool remained a dis-
tant third at the halfway stage.
13 points behind United after
Craig Bellamy and Xabi Alonso
sealed a 2-0 home win over bol-
tom club Watford.
Arsenal stayed in the hlstl
Champions League qualify-
ing spot with a 6-2 thrashing
of free-falling Blackburn
Rovers.
Arsenal were shocked into
action after three minutes when
Shabani Nonda scored a pen-
ally, but the rampant Gunners
replied three times before half-
time with Gilberto Silva.
Alexander Illeb and immianiuel
Adebayor's penlally.
Nonda scored again aller the
break as Rovers hllreatenied a;
comeback only for Robin van
Persic to score a late double be-
fore Matllhiieu lamini com-
pllted Ihe rout in addedtt linllc.
Waiyne Rooncy wUaIs til olln
tlec bench for United's Irip to


Villa Park having missed train-
ing due to a family bereavement.
but his sidekick Cristiano
Ronaldo took centre stage.
The Portuguese cut through
the Villa defence to break the
deadlock after 59 minutes and
then grabbed the killer third goal
either side of Scholes' thumping
volley that went in off the un-
derside of the crossbar.
"After 11 games in a row
it was a good time to give
(Rooney) a rest." United man-
ager Alex Ferguson told Sky
Sports.
"But Ronaldo was fantastic.
he's having a great season lor
us." added Ferguson who cel-
ebrated the 2 000th United goal
under his command when
Ronaldo scored the opener.
"'Maybe I'll give him a
bottle of wine." he joked.
Chelsea's victory took tlie
day's goal tally to 32. but they
looked to have blown victory
when FliLile Heskey's brace can-
celled out goals from Ftrank
l.ampard and Salomon Kalou.
Ilowever, in the third
minute ofl stoppage tille
RobbenI cut in Ifrolm the right to
fire the winner that keeps
Chelsea rcatiinig do.n
United's neck.
SEarlier at St.lames' Park.
Newcastle United won 3-1
against a Tottenham Hotspur
side looking for a sixth
straight victory in all colmpe-
titions.
Keiron D\cr aind ill-'orll
striker Obal'fei Mlarlins gcul\
the hosts a two-goal lead.
)ainny Murphy pulled onei
. hackk for Spurs before Scottll
Parkt'er stru 'k ;Igau all hIcl't!'c
half line.


Nicolas Anelka scored both
goals for Bolton Wanderers as
they consolidated fifth place
with a 2-0 victory at Manches-
ter City. who had Joey Barton
sent off late on.
Portsmouth, who are also
flying high, came from be-
hind to beat Sheffield United
3-1 and stay sixth. Everton
striker Andy Johnson, ac-
cused of diving by Chelsea
manager Jose Mourinho last
week, responded with a goal
in Everton's 2-0 win at Read-
ing.
Charlton Athletic completed
a miserable week to increase the
pressure on manager Les Reed.


Thrashed by Liverpool last
Saturday and beaten by fourth
division Wycombe Wanderers ii
the League Cup on Tuesday.
second-bottom Charlton lost 2-
0 at Middlesbrough in a relea-
tion battle.
Charlton have now gone 24
away matches without a vic-
tory.
Middlesbrough's win left
West Ham United in the hot-
tom three despite a battling
0-0 draw at Fulham. The
struggling east London side.
without an away goal since
August, had Paul Konchesky
sent off five minutes from
time.


ASTON Villa 0-3 Man Utd: Cristiano Ronaldo breaks the
deadlock for manchester United in the 58th minute of the
clash. (BBC Sport)


* ied to ,C ele ls a
=,ilt rrr


-.' ,.


riE~ ~a..






SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 24, 2006


,RJSP RT CHRONIC



Cooley confident Aussies



could face life after McGrath


BOWLING coach Troy
Cooley is confident Australia
have the young bowlers to fill
the gap left when Glenn
McGrath retires after the
World Cup in April.
"We've got a few bowlers
that have been in and out. It's a
huge chance for one or two of
them to step up," he said.


SHAUNTAIT
"We'll miss the experience
but we're looking forward to
the next bowler to try and fill
those huge shoes."
Mitchell Johnson,
Nathan Bracken, Shaun Tait


and Shane Watson were on
the sidelines as Australia
won the Ashes.
"The headache comes more
from a selectors' point of view.
I'm pretty happy that we've
got some good talent there,"
Cooley told BBC Radio Five
Live.
Johnson. described as a
"once in a generation" player by
Dennis Lillee eight years ago.
has yet to play a Test but has
impressed as part of the one-day
squad.
Fellow left-armer
Bracken struggled during his
first spell in the Test side
while McGrath was injured
three years ago but has re-
turned with better control and
variation.
Watson would have played
as an all-rounder in this Ashes
series but suffered a hamstring
injury playing for Queensland
before the opening Test.
Tait is still to build on a jolt-
ing Test debut during the 2005
Ashes in England, when he was
fast but a little too wild.
McGrath is the most suc-
cessful seam bowler in Test
history, with 555 wickets from
122 Tests and he also has 342
scalps from 230 one-day


Flintoff to battle


through the pain


in last two Tests

SYDNEY, Australia (Reuters) England captain Andrew
Flintoff will battle through painful ankle problems to play
in the last two Ashes Tests.
He did not bowl in the nets on Friday but said he was con-
fident about the next match
starting in Melbourne on Tues-
day.


"The ankle feels good.
Obviously, we netted yester-
day and I didn't bowl, I will
probably bowl tomorrow,"
Flintoff told reporters in
Melbourne yesterday.
"There's no secret, I'-.e
had some discomfort in it over
the past week. I'm not envis-
aging any long-term problems
or worried about these next
two Test matches."
Flintoff said his team


, ."


_-
.




ANDREW FLINTOFF


were very keen to put on a
gool performance in Melbourne after the disappointment
iof losing the first three Tests and the Ashes.
S "We want to show we can win out here. we want to show
Sv e can \win two Test nlaltichs. it's ai big occasiion lor us," lie
"There's been a few things happening in the world of
t icket over the past week. but it can't affect our ptrep;arations".
he added. referring t Australians Shan: Wmrnc and (GIlenn
McGralh's announcing their retirements.
Flintoff said his team were looking forward to playing
at the Melbourne Cricket ground in front of around 90
000 spectators.
"There's a lot of character and a lot of pride in the dressing

:Icrs and what a good tea mi we are.' he said.
"I've only been here once before and you walk into
the ground the other day, you see the size of it and
hands, it's something that's exciting," he


internationals.
Cooley believes he has
provided a wonderful tem-
plate for aspiring fast
bowlers to follow.


-L JOHNSON


"With his strength of char-
acter, the way he goes about his
work, the way he prepares
himself, he's an absolute role
model for any young bowler
that wants to get into the game
and enjoy a successful career."
he said.
Aussie opener Matthew
Hayden said both McGrath
and Shane Warne, who an-
nounced his retirement ear-


lier this week, would be
sorely missed.
"Both have had amazing te-
nacity and longevity; they're
both courageous and incredibly
positive in the face of adver-
sity," he said.
"The secret to Glenn's per-
formance is just in his consis-
tency. He is totally ruthless in
his delivery of line and length.
It's so difficult to get on top of
him.
"His under-rated skill
was his ability to adjust no
matter where a batsman
stood, to place the ball exactly
where he wanted it."
Captain Ricky Ponting said
the two announcements marked
the end of an era in Australian
cricket.
"We're going to be losing
two of the all-time greats in a.
pretty short period of time." he
said.
"We'v\e now got to push on
in the next few weeks. We've
known for a long time that these
two weren't going to go on for-
ever.
"So as much as it's a sad
time, it's an exciting time too
because a lot of younger play-
ers will get their opportuni-
ties." (BBC Sport).


South Africa


reshuffle batting


for second Test


By Telford Vice

DURBAN, South Africa
(Reuters) Opener
Herschelle Gibbs is expected
to be moved down South
Africa's batting order for the
second Test against India af-
ter recording a pair of ducks
in first match, captain
Graeme Smith said yester-
day.
AB de Villiers is likely to
open with Smith as South Af-
rica reshuffle its batting line-up
after a 123-run defeat in the
first Test in Johannesburg.
"There will be one or two
line-up changes in the top six."
Smith told a news conference in
Durban, where the second Test
will start on Tuesday.
"AB going up front will
probably be one change, with
Hlerschelle going to number
six."
'The match marked
India's first Test win in
South Africa, and another
victory in l)urlban would





-- "


clinch the three-Test series.
Smith, who scored five and
10 in Johannesburg, said he had
worked on his game since the
first Test ended on Monday.
"1 really needed some time
for myself and my own game."
Smith said.
Smith remained confident
* that South Africa could redeem
themselves in Durban.
"We said we didn't play
well enough, and that pressure
on yourself is enough to turn
around a performance like the
one in Johannesburg." Smith
said.
"There's no doubt that we can
turn it around. We laow we played
badly and we know we have the abil-
ity to tmunit around."


'II IIIIIIII I I


AUSTRALIAN players are
currently breaking a lot of
records and Adam Gilchrist is
on the verge of adding to his
impressive collection. Fresh
from a 57-ball century against
England in Perth, Gilchrist is
only three sixes away from
becoming the first to hit 100
in Tests.
Brian Lara is his nearest rival
with 88 from 131 games while
Gilchrist's 97. which include four
in his second innings at the WACA,
have come in 88 matches.
Gilchrist told The Austra-
lian his most memorable strike
came off Muttiah
Muralitharan when he was bat-

















Adam Gilchrist moved to
97 Test sixes with his four
during his hundred in the
third Ashes Test at Perth.

ting at No.3 due to a Ricky
Pointing back injury in Kandy
in 2004. Muralitharan was
"on song" and Gilchrist didn 't
have the confidence to charge
down the wicket.
"I didn't leave my crease
because I thought he was going
to spin one past me," he told
the paper. "Then finally I saw
him throw up a big doosra.
For the first time I was
absolutely, 100% sure it was
a doosra so I ran down, took
a great, big swing, and
donged it straight back over
his head. That's the most
hard-fought. keenly con-
tested battle I've had with
anyone."
During a training camp iat
the Academy when lie iwas in an
Under-17 squad Gilchrist was
singled out because he hit too


many boundaries. "One of the
coaches dissected an innings
that each of us played during a
match and the feedback I got
was that they were disappointed
because I hit 24 with six fours,"
he told The Australian. "The
impression I got was that they
were disappointed I didn't rotate
the strike and pick up ones and
build an innings. I've never for-
gotten that.
"I didn't do it to spite
them but I just thought 'I
want to keep my aggressive
side rather than restricting
it'. It's worked many times,
and many times it has
brought my downfall."
While Gilchrist has a per-
sonal record to aim for, he will
also become an even more im-
portant figure for Australia with
the upcoming retirements of
Glenn McGrath and Shane
Warne. Gilchrist said Australia
can remain the world's best
team without the two bowlers.
"It's going to be extremely
difficult to maintain that playing
style or types of standards we've
hit under the guidance of Warne
and McGrath, he told AAP.
"But we've been without
them before and at the same
time and we've still been
able to win, but maybe it's
not been quite as comprehen-
sive, it's been more of a fight.
They'll be very tough shoes
to fill but I do think we can
maintain our standards as be-
ing one of the most competi-
tive teams in the world if not
retain that No.1 position."
Gilchrist, 35, does not feel
like the end of his career is near.
"It's fair to say there's probably
a group of us considering where
we're at and what further part
cricket's got to play in our lives.
but not to the point where it's
a real sit-down decision-making
time," he said. "The time comes
to you and it will really reveal
itself when it is the right time.
and I certainly don't feel that's
the case at the moment.
"Physically I feel exactly
the same as I've felt for five
or six years, so that's pretty
much most of my Test career.
Probably starting late has al-
lowed me to remain pretty
fresh." (Cricinfo)


Vettori to captain New

Zealand in two one-dayers


SYDNEY. Australia (Reuters)
- Spinner l Daniel \ettori will
captain New Zealand in two
one-day internationals
against Sri Lanka as norm41al
skipper StFphen ileming is
rested. the New Zealand
Press Association reported
yesterday.
Fleming who also has a
slight elhow strain and fast
5\,1 "


Zealand in eight one-day
inlcrnaiionals.
Batsman Hamish Miarshall
returns to the squad after being
dlopp)e'd lor the Test seines
.u:ii Sri In., L nkai. I 'a ppcd
sc'a.iiii Mtark (Gil'e pi' \ \a.s ilso
callId up.
The first match iof the se-
ries is in Napier on December


Patel. Ross Iavlor.


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PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad,
(CMC) The kick-off times
for next month's Digicel
Caribbean Cup football final
round games will be 17:00 h
and 19:00 h with the excep-
tion of the opening day on
January 12 when multiple
champions and hosts
Trinidad and Tobago tackle
Barbados.
The opening day kick-off at
the Hasely Crawford Stadium
between Trinidad and Tobago
and Barbados will be at 18:00
h.
"This move is to accommo-
date an opening ceremony in the
World Cup/Olympic standard
mould to open the Digicel Car-
ibbean Cup Finals," Digicel Cup
organizers announced in a press
release.
Former champions
Martinique will face the winners
of the final qualifying Group J
(Haiti/Bermuda/Dominican Re-
public) in a 20:00 h match on
that opening evening on January
12 in the Hasely Crawford
group.
Other match days in the
Hasejy Crawford Group will
be January 15 and 17.
The other final round
group, the Bobby Sookram
Group with Cuba,
Guadeloupe, Guyana and St
Vincent and the Grenadines
(SVG) will be played at the
Mannie Ramjohn Stadium, with
matches scheduled for January
14, 16 and 18.
The top two teams in each
group will contest semifinals on
January 20 at the Hasely
Crawford Stadium, venue for
the final and third place play-
off three days later on January
23.
Eight-time Caribbean
Cup champions Trinidad and
Tobago will be trying to re-
bound from their moderate
showing in last year's finals
in Barbados where they
placed third behind champi-
ons Jamaica, and Cuba a
rare finish for the Soca War-
riors outside of the top two in
the tournament's history.
The only other year that
the T&T Soca Warriors had
failed to finish among the
top two was 1993 when Ja-
maica and champions
Martinique contested the fi-
nal in Kingston, Jamaica.
Haiti, Bermuda and the
Dominican Republic, third-
place- finishers in second-
round qualifying during No-
vember, will contest the final
qualifying stage (Group J) at
the Hasely Crawford Stadium
.onJanuary 5,7, and 9 to de-


4.W,


cide the eighth team for the
final round.

SCHEDULE:

SEDLEY JOSEPH GROUP
(Hasely Crawford Stadium)
January 12
17:00 Opening Ceremony to
the Digicel Caribbean Cup
18:00 T&T v Barbados
20:00 Winner Group J v
Martinique

January 15
17:00 Barbados v Winner
Group J
19:00 T&T v Martinique

January 17
17:00 Barbados v Martinique
19:00 T&T v Winner Group
J

BOBBY SOOKRAM GROUP
January 14 (Mannie Ramjohn
Stadium)
17:00 Cuba v Guadeloupe
19:00 Guyana v SVG

January 16
17:00 Guadeloupe v Guyana
19:00 Cuba v SVG

January 18
17:00 Cuba v Guyana
19:00 Guadeloupe v SVG

January 20 Semi Finals (Hasely
Crawford Stadium)
17:00 Winner Sedley Joseph
v Runner up Bobby Sookram -
Match 13
19:00 Winner Bobby Sookram
v Runner up Sedley Joseph -
Match 14

.January 23 Hasely Crawford
Stadium
Third-placed Play-off:
17:00 Loser Match 13 v Loser
Match 14
Final:
19:00 Winner Match 13 v
Winner Match


Fernandes shines at



World Squash Awards


LONDON, England (CMC) -
Guyana's Caribbean squash
champion Nicolette
Fernandes captured the prize
for the Most Improved Player
at the World Squash Awards
at the RAC Club on Friday
night.
The only professional
squash player ever produced by
Guyana, the 23-year-old
Fernandes was rewarded for
several outstanding perfor-
mances during the last year.
She was runner-up in her
first Pan-American Champion-
ship in September before sur-
prising many to reach the sec-
ond round of the World Open
Championships last month.
"When I first took up
squash back in my home coun-


FIFTY-ONE horses will gal-
lop on Tuesday, Boxing Day,
at the Kennard Memorial
Turf Club track in Bushlot,
Corentyne, Berbice in the El
Dorado-sponsored one-day
meet.
Over $1.5M will be up for
grabs in the eight races carded
for the day, four of which are
feature races with the winner
collecting over $100 000. The
horse owners are not the only
winners of the day, since the
champion jockey, will also re-
ceive his due a champion tro-
phy, compliments of Trophy
Stall in Bourda Market.
The main race of the day
is the C3 and Lower over a
distance of one mile for a first
place prize of $130 000.
Donna, the winner of her last
two races will have strong
competition from Stop on the
Line, Ice Folly, Isle Be True,
Sarifiena and the new import
from Trinidad and Tobago,
The Cat is Back from the
Romel Jagroop Staples.
There will also be the
three years old, one mile race
with the winner receiving
$110 000 and the Eric Lewis
Memorial trophy. Competi-
tion will come from Miss
Davinci, Miami Vice, Star-
light, Shue Suemi, Va-Va-
Voom and Peace of Mind.
The F class will run over


try Guyana, I never dreamed
that one day I would be stand-
ing in front of such a distin-


I I
NICOLETTE FERNANDES
guished audience receiving an
award like this," Fernandes said.
Fernandes, who is now
based in London, beat out


six furlongs for a first place
prize of $110 000 and the
relatively established horses
such as Fire Power and Just
in Time will have to compete
with Fresh Wings a horse
recently acquired from T&T
by Nasrudeen Mohamed
(Jumbo Jet).
The other feature race
will be the two-year-old open
also over a distance of six
furlongs and a first prize of
$110 000. In this race, Little
Panie with five consecutive
wins will get competition
from Sir Balajie, Prospectors
Pride, Grand Force and


challenges from Australia's
Kasey Brown, Manuela
Manetta of Spain and
Mexico's Samantha Teran, to
take the award.
Malaysia's Nicol David was
voted Female Player-of-the-Year
while Tenille Swartz of South
Africa was voted Young Female
Player-of-the-Year.
In the men's category,
Egypt's Amr Shabana captured
the Male Player-of-the-Year
award while his compatriot
Ramy Ashour took the Young
Male Player-of-the-Year award.
The award proved the
perfect finish to a successful
year for Fernandes. Earlier
this month, she surged a no-
table six places up the
Women's International


Matterazi among others.
The G and Lower six fur-
longs race ($90 000 first
prize) will be between Rude
Boy, Simply Royal, Brave
Heart and Just in Time. The
I and Lower (six furlongs) for
an $80 000 first prize will
see Shue Suemi, Miami Vice,
No Contest, So Fire, Pace
Maker, Mission Dancer and
Graphic battling. Another six
furlongs race will be the L
class, with Rock Star, Windy
Classic, First Lady and
Shaggy galloping for a first
prize of $70 000.
The other race carded for


Squash Players Association
world rankings to an all-time
high 29th, her first time in
the top-30 of the rankings.
This move was boosted by
her upset win over highly
ranked Briton Jenny Duncalf at
the Women's World Open in
Belfast.
Also this year, Femandes won
gold in the Central American and
Caribbean Games in Cartagena,
Colombia, back in July.
Fernandes, a six-time
Caribbean junior age-group
champion, broke into the
world Top-50 rankings late
last year after a series of good
international results and was
subsequently chosen
Guyana's 2005 Sportswoman-
of-the-Year.


the day is the J and Lower
seven furlongs race for a $75
000 first prize.
This race will have the full
complement of 12 horses in-
cluding Sadam, El Gato, Asian
Dancer, Dust Dancer, Mission
Dancer and Graphic to name a
few. Along with the cash
prizes, El Dorado Rum will con-
tribute seven of the eight cham-
pion trophies.
According to a release
from the Turf Club presi-
dent Cecil Kennard, de-
spite a few showers the
track is in perfect condi-
tion for racing.


"SECOND FLOOR
America Street. (formerly JAGS Building) Tel: 223-5178, 226-830f .


-


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JOE PUBLIC AND SANTOS




ADVANCE TO QUARTERFINALS


By Isaiah Chappelle
PERHAPS for the first time
a double-header unfolded at
the GFC ground, Bourda, af-


ter persistent rains and a wa-
terlogged outfield, as foreign
team Joe Public of Trinidad
& Tobago and Santos ad-
vanced to the quarterfinals of


the 17th Kashif & Shanghai
Christmas football extrava-
ganza, Friday night.
Joe Public adapted well to
the mud and water to whip


newcomers Blue Berry Hill 4-0
while the mud set up Santos'
lone and winning goal over
Pouderoyen.
Devon Mitchell hit a double


for the visitors and one each
came from Wolry Wolfe and
Kendall Davis, while former
youth national Michael Oie fin-
ished for Santos.


A magnificent perfor-
mance by goalkeeper Leron
Whittaker prevented more
Please see page 28


MAKE A DINNER

A WINNER !


Macaroni
Vei; micelli


The Real Thing


." +r' ;,.





Edward B. Beharry & Company Ltd.
Tel: 227-1349, 227-2526


lr1 .lulia;n Lindten
N1 l)N I \ul.lr i.i I i ut r, i ti.i lu'i .li'a i bowler Glenn
Nlc0 r.tth .lid t'vLrd.I hit muld ret-lire' ironi all forms of
CrJICk lA .ill-r IIt\l .l i '% \\1iirld Cup.
L 1 1 1111 LI IL ,I.1 k1.1 i .. .I L.aI.Iu Ill.J 0 .n l-.i 11 I I.it ure w hen he
Si ll P.,. I I 11. -. I ll.11 I-II..In \\.i i I- h..-lin, I1.. Test career in

n111l n .d I.111 h11 .1 10 I i .1 1 I' -1 ll n l h I'..:'1 ,1 t I .1a_ ltoSether at-
Ic' Il \\,1lid CIl' Il hr I l .I tI I \llII IlI .i aIll M arch and
\.-I L L \ ....I l ... ..1 J h1. \\..lild U l_ L ., 'n \- .. tr I'll be fin-
l.il, l ni I' -Ir I .* i ,I.LI \1 .'1: .l1 IIhl' I I'c1L .' conferencee in
\1I. i .- u ,,.
( hniout'.i IIIt.1 iltan, Sthdtnv% %ill hv ni .%lai match, but
ii'* Ira"h.0aI j .1 I r'fi:cli r I killing eniingi for nit.-elf being my
Plea ;ue \e page 28
GLENN McGrath announces that he will retire from international cricket at
the end of the World Cup in 2007, Melbourne, yesterday. (BBC Sport)


clico.com


---


ADNUS Y, DECEMBER 24, 2006


Oriented and Published by Guyana National Newspapers Limited, Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown. Telephone 226-3243-9 (General); Editorial: 227-5204, 227-5216.Fax:227-5208




























M/M/,206:. : 41 PM


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II __SUNDAY CHRONICLE, December 24, 2006


,t


Love can't cross



the class divide

Men who fornicate above their station have far less sense


DOES social status in relationships
really matter? Is the power of a
good relationship swayed by a
good job, healthy bank account or
increased social status?


Sherry Dixon has her say.

A few months ago, a shapely,
attractive redhead and a mar-
ried mother of two, resigned
from her job as a doctor at
Winchester prison in England
after falling in love with an
inmate an armed robber.
She treated him as a pa-
tient and wrote him passionate
letters. She wore provocative
short skirts and low-cut tops,
which was madness for a sup-
posedly responsible woman
dealing with volatile, sexually
frustrated young men.
She behaved in a crass, un-
seemly way and she's lucky she
wasn't reported to the GMC.
"You have no idea what went
through my mind and body",
she wrote to the armed robber
inmate.
I'm sure he knew precisely
what was going through her
mind and she wasn't the first


middle-class woman to lust af-
ter him. This middle class doc-
tor reacted like a pathetic,
lovesick schoolgirl and I have
absolutely no sympathy for her.
She could easily have ruined
her life and her marriage. If the re-
lationship had continued and she'd
left her comfortable lifestyle for
a criminal lover, the outcome
would have been disastrous.
Class differences don't mat-
ter in the first flush of overpow-
ering physical attraction, but
they matter in the end. They
matter even more when a
woman is the socially superior
of the two. Women are much
more adaptable and shrewder
than men. If they fall in love
with a posher bloke, they're
quite willing to fit in with his
lifestyle. They see it as a learn-
ing curve, not demeaning.
Men who fornicate above
their station have far less sense.
They're outraged by any sug-


est.iion thai Ihcir .ibl miiinner,
are uncoulh. Here relallons are
common or their speech non-
grammatical. They are furious if
it's tactfully suggested that the
occasional visit to a dentist is a
good idea and in some cases it's
obvious that treatment seems
'long overdue..
Men want to be in charge so
they can't cope with being told
what to do. If they're criticised
about the way they hold their
knife or the slurping noise they
make when they drink their tea,
there liable to turn nasty.
Men like-the inmate are flat-
tered when middle-class girls
make it clear they fancy them.
Initially they are attracted by
their speech, gentility and pro-
fessional standing. Then they
begin to feel inadequate so they
turn into controllers. They have
to show they're not impressed
and they're unfaithful just to
prove that they're macho and
dominant.
Women like the foolish doc-
tor fall in love with rough, mus-
cular guys because he's highly
sexed and virile. Sexually they
want him to be masterful. Later
they expect him to be acquies-
cent when they try to change
him into a social equal.
Sex with a rough lover may
well be exciting in the early


,1i"e h', onl\ k hen pa-.ion
i, ,aled ihali real n intrude:.
And it nearly always comes
with disillusionment.
It ain't what you got, it's
the way that you've got it...
Far from conducting our rela-
tionships with egalitarian goodwill,
research has revealed that we feel
most comfortable in the company
of people whom we believe to be
equal or whisper it even slightly
below us, in social terns. Not only
that, but wealth, status and power
impacts directly on our health: in
relative terms it doesn't matter
whether you own a humble coun-
cil flat or an eight-bedroom mansion
on Millionaires' Row, simply be-
lieving that you live better than
your friends and neighbours puts
you in line for a happier, healthier
and even longer life.

Close-up and personal
And what about the numer-
ous friendships that have sim-
ply worn out? It has long been
acknowledged that, much as
women like to pretend other-
wise, most of us are swayed by
a good job, healthy bank account
or increased social status when
it comes to choosing a partner.
Why do we honestly believe it
to be that different when it
comes to our friends? In both
relationships we want someone


who will support and be there
for us. But, while we might not
like to admit it, we also choose
our companions as a subtle re-
inforcement of our own worth.
Well how would we be able to
snare such a good friend/lover if
we weren't the same ourselves?
Crucially, however, Friend-
ship Status Syndrome (FSS)
isn't just about the outward
trappings of who's doing better
than whom. Most friendships
hinge, to some degree or other,
on a balance of power that's as
much about emotional (in) equal-
ity as superficial success and
sometimes even the most ap-
parently minor shift can knock
things seismically off course.
One woman I know has re-
cently lost over two stubborn
stone in weight. Since then she's
been accused some by some of
her closest friends of being ev-
erything from over-confident to
too thin (she clocks in at a
pleasingly curvaceous size 12).
What's happened, of course, is
that she's overstepped the
boundaries of their friendship's
emotional hierarchy, even if she
didn't know it existed until now.
And as her Friendship Status
stock has gone up, so have


some of those around her been
forced to reassess theirs.

The bottom line
If all this simply seems sim-
ply too depressing for words,
cheer up there are some rela-
tionships that seem, genuinely,
to be beyond such superficial
sway.
Longstanding friendships in
which each party has had more
than enough experience of the
best and worst of each other are
generally able to withstand the
vagaries of FSS.
Why do you think it is
that famous people always
cite their oldest friends as the
only ones they can really
trust through their journey to
the top of society's tree? (Or
is hanging out with old mates
the ultimate way to ensure
your top-dog status within
your social group?) Anyway,
so what if even your close re-
lationships still seem littered
with the messy fallout of
FSS? If friends truly are the
new family then perhaps re-
peat occurrences might, well
be the highest accolade. After
all, what greater competition
is there than sibling rivalry?


VACANCY FOR ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT
Applications are invited from suitably qualified
persons for the position of Assistant Accountant,
Bureau of Statistics.

Applicants must hold a Diploma in Accountancy or its equivalent at an
accounting examination, plus eight years experience using the government
accounting system, and must be holding a position at the level of a Clerk III
with a minimum of five years service at that level.

The incumbent must be able to supervise an Examination and Preparation.
Section and/or Receipts and Payment Section.


Applications should be addressed to:-

The Head: Human Resources,
Finance & Administration (ag)
Bureau of Statistics


Applications should reach the Bureau of Statistics no later than
Wednesday 27' 'December, 2006


MICROBIOLOGIST
Demerara Distillers Limited invites applications to fill the vacancy for
MICROBIOLOGIST.

Applicants should possess at least a Degree in food and Water
Microbiology or equivalent and two (2) years experience in a food
Industry.

We offer an atiractive salary & benefits package

Interested persons should apply before December 29, 2006 to:
The Recruitment Officer
Demerara Distillers Limited

Tel: 265-6000 Plantation Diamond, E.B.D
Fax: 265-2015
.e-mail: recruitment@demrum.com... .


I I I I I I II I II I I I I ll lI


i


--I-:-'. .5
kt AV






SUNDAY CHRONICLE, December 24, 2006 "'


icei
",B :- .. ;


"Guh 'round, come 'round gyal, peesay massala"


TUNES like "Guh 'round,
come 'round gyal, peesay
massala" and "Boujie gyal,
ah wah yo cook fo dinna" are
Chutney classics that refuse
to die away.
When Joyce Ormela Harris
wrote "Pack up yo grip and leh
we go" she might not have re-
alized that this is exactly what
she would do. Today, she lives
in New York, and continues to
sing publicly, embracing an en-
during musical career. She has
entertained crowds at Madison
Square Garden, and travels
regularly in the US and to
Canada, and to Europe, carry-
ing her voice to thousands.
you
The singer, who many a


housewife woke up to in the
early mornings in the 1970's and
1980's, has not given up what
she says is her "gift" of singing.
She is back in Guyana for the
holidays and you can hear her
latest songs including Christmas
ballads and a string of love
songs written in tribute to her
husband on local radio. She has
also recorded "Miscry" which
playts on the lighter side os a
woman in an abusive relation-
ship.
Joyce, 60. began singing
since she was nine-years-old,
and could be considered the
original "Canal gyal". She hails
from Good Hope, Canal No.1
Polder, West Bank Demerara
and made her mark in the early


days when radio acted as an av-
enue for the development of tal-
ent.
She performed on such
shows as Teen's Will. Local Tal-
ent and Teenager's Choice.
On one of her shows, she
received a call from LFS
Burnham, the president at the
time. She was invited to per-
form at one of his birthday par-
ties and praised her as being the
chutney queen of Guyana.
Her voice was used readily
in commercials and some of the
more memorable ones are those
associated with Sujata and Indi
curry powder.
While she loves Guyanese
creole style Chutney music, she
sings soca as well. She doesn't


like to sing Hindi film songs.
Joyce's career has taken her
to the United States, Canada,
England, Holland, Trinidad and
Suriname.


She doesn't plan to stop
singing anytime soon.
Today, when Joyce is not
singing at shows in the US or
elsewhere, she performs at New


York's Club Tobago and Soca
Paradise.
You can hear Joyce's
newest songs on NCN ra-
dio.


(BBC) A CAFE on the island
of Sao Tome off Africa's west
coast relies on its famed aph-
rodisiac cocktail to pull in
punters during the festive
season.
A large glass bottle contain-
ing a mysterious brown liquid
labelled "Pilolo Atomico" -
which means Atomic Penis oc-
cupies a prime position on the
bar.
"It's so popular, even the
president talks about it," says
Maria-Joao Pombo, the owner
of Cafe and Companhia (Cafe
and Company).
"Pilolo Atomico is made up
of a mixture of a local brandy and


,e\eral tree bark' >he \\e al'o Il.\1our II % lib
hine like ciinn.imon beca',us' II
i, 'er\ bitter Here in S.u,
Tome. Ihe ,\ II'_ ,in .phro-.
di'i.C "

Herbal remedy
NlI Ponbo. \ ho mnlOed ii,
the island live years ago. has
been selling the cocktail for
about a year and a half.
She decided to go commer-
cial after hearing about the lo-
cal erotic concoction.
"I knew people here eat the
bark of plants like Pao three;
washing it down with what they
call a 'hot (alcoholic) drink'.


SSo I decided ti' c.imibine
the in redieni, and tioll IIe
she a\ ,
fradiiimaIn ll ho ,ecrl li t
drink %% not onl\ u'ed i en.
h.ice c.'\uIl potic
Peoplriial ame i the this' k Iw.
rPe o' rien.ich pnhile sitting at
l"I knl e Ihe namhe sioren-'id,
v..Ilk I'0 r uIihC llou lio d ',r
drink

Sceptics
And Pilolo Atomico is not
its original name either, this was
cooked up by some of Ms
Pombo's friends while sitting at
the bar.
"I knew the name sounded
very suggestive but I didn't
know exactly what "pilolo"


meant he e.pklalin
"Once the dnnk sit.ijed be-
cinunng miire pnIpular. I decided
i. rc-i,-ter the name and ihe prod-
Ili
But lihe \\ '.uldn'i le nme
1lh11.1 i lihen I lound >oui ih.l
pioloII" IIiL.111n peli -
Scepicl, ..i\ he cockinl ,
rNp ularin, i, I u \l duo n li1 I 11%
n11.111 but omine c;il. rL''e ul.-i,
, 1 ,' Ar b I II
"When 1 drink just one glass
of pilolo, I feel strong for 12
hours. Believe me, it really does
work." says Miguel.
"You just have to make sure
you have a beautiful woman
with you." he adds.
Women also seemed to ap-
preciate its aphrodisiacal ef-


=5a~


I knew the name sounded very suggestive but I didn't
know exactly what it meant Maria-Joao Pombo


fects.
"It's fantastic, much better
than the blue pill," says Alexia.
referring to the impotency drug
Viagm.
Others say the cocktail is


an acquired taste. "It tastes
foul," says Bibi.
But effective or not, safe
sex is the message every
Pilolo Atomico comes with a
free condom.


"COURTESY TIPS FOR

CHILDREN & YOUNG PERSONS"
A booklet produced by Joyce Sinclair
written for children themselves,
their parents as well as teachers.
Foreword by Savitri Balbahadur
former Head of Cyril Potter
College of Education

Available at all leading bookstores
@$1,000 per copy
^ aW ...-...... A..-.*


G.N.C.B

NOTICE TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS

Shareholders of GNCB are hereby
requested to contact GNCB on/or before
Friday, 5 January, 2007, Monday to
Friday between 09:00 16:30 hours at
the address or telephone number stated
below as a matter of urgency.


Lot 77 Croal Street & Winter Place
Stabroek
Georgetown
Tel: 225-9486


J. Chapman
Co -rporate Secretary (ag.)


MAYOR AND COUNCILLORS

OF THE CITY OF GEORGETOWN










The Mayor and City Council

has extended its Amnesty to

Sunday, December 31, 2006.

Defaulting Rate-payers must

take this opportunity to settle

their accounts with the City
,o nciil 'I n "


- 'Viaara cocktail' takes off in Africa


I


_ r U1 rsrl~ JuJ.- u in ur rll - - -- --Y----


I I






IV SUNDAY CHRONICLE, December 24, 2006


Deep In


The Heurt...


I went on a trip to Texas this
summer with my three chil-
dren and a girlfriend. Look-
ing back now, I should not
have taken my friend. She is
a drama queen to the max.
We were staying with my dad,
and the reason for the trip
was to meet my sister I didn't
know about until two years


Mom and dad split when I
was two, and he was never part
of my life. We have a fairly
tense relationship as he doesn't
know how to be a dad. As a
child my mother told me hor-
rible things about him. My girl-
friend added to the stress by
sitting my dad down and giving


him advice.
One night my dad made
margarita. My friend had three
and was toast. He olTered to
show her his collection of prize
classic vehicles he's restored.
These cars are his pride and joy,
and he shows them off every
chance he gets. An hour or so
later he headed to bed, and my
girlfriend gave him a hard time
about it.
She said. "What if I run out
of margaritas?'" He said. "Well
then, come wake me up. and I'll
make you nm1re." She took this
as a come-on and decided he was
trying to hook up with her.
Neither my sister nor 1 saw this
as a come-on, but my girlfriend
wouldn't let it rest. She brought
it up continually for the rest of
the week.
As the week came to a close
1 was soaking in every last mo-
ment with my sister. Six days
just wasn't enough to make up
for 23 years. My friend barged
into our conversation, talking
nonstop about a relative's mari-
tal problems. Next morning she
asked if we could swing by
someone's house for a quick


goodbye before our 16-hour
drive home.
Her quick goodbye turned
into 45 minutes. My 3-year-
old was screaming bloody mur-
der, and I was exhausted. Four
hours into the trip I let loose.
1 told her she was rude. I said
she was mighty full of herself
to think every guy wants her.
1 also told her I was never go-
ing to wear the pair of short
shorts she bought ime for my
birthday.
I know words are like
toothpaste, and once you
squeeze it out it doesn't go back
in. So I wrote her an apology.
I said in some ways you arc
still that chubby little girl who
has low self-esteem. Despite
what you feel inside you are a
beautiful woman with the heart
the size of all those Texas egos.
I said you are Mother
Teresa in some ways. I say in
some ways because I'm sure
Mother Teresa would never
break out a permanent marker
in a bar bathroom and write on
someone's naked fat butt like
you did, but the truth is I miss
you.

Boinie, if this woman and a
stranger were on the bank of
a river and you fell in, we'd
bet on the stranger to jump
in and save you. Your friend
might say, "I can't imagine
Bonnie wants me to jump in
and get this outfit wet."
People have a hard time ac-


cepung they have frindeb, hu
are not friends, just as people
have a hard time admitting they
married the wrong person. But
both can be true. You offered
to make up with her. That is
enough.
Somehow you have lost
the definition of the word
"friend." A friend is someone
you can count on, someone
you can tell your deepest se-


crets to and they will never
tell. Cicero said we may as
well take the sun out of the
sky as take the friendship out
of life. A friend, he said, is a
second self. But his words ap-
ply to true friends, not drama
queens.


Wayne & Tamara


QUESTION:
I was advised by a friend who is an NIS clerk like me, that there are I
some employees who should not be registered. .
I am however, not sure of this. Could you advise me?

ANSWER:
There is a list of persons who should not be registered as employed o
persons: ;

1. Anyone who is earning less than five dollars
($5.00) per week.

2. A married Woman who work for her husband. (She can be
registered ps self-employed)

.3. A non-citizen who is exempt from social security legislation
because of diplomatic status. l

4. Anyone employed by an International or Regional Organization
of which Guyana is a member (~tg. Caricom)." .""

NIS extends Christnra greetings to all Contributors,
Peisioners and4 ie Guyanese Cotnmunity.
We look forward to improved relationships ov. the coming year .
Do you have a question on N.I.S ? Then write/call.


NIS MAIL BAG
C(/O Dianne Lewis Baxter
Publicity and Public Relations (Officer (ag)
National Insurance Scheme
IBrickdaln and( \ inter Place '
SP.O. Box. 101135
E-mail : pr_nis(ia solution, 20(00.net
Tel: 227-3461.
1 ,,,,,,,- I


Pupil gives


birth at school

(BBC) A 15-year-old girl has given birth at a school in
Bradford, England.
The baby was born in a medical room at St Joseph's Catholic
College in Cunliffe Road on Friday, a school spokesman said.
An ambulance was called but the girl had given birth by the
time it arrived. The Year 11 pupil is not thought to have known
she was pregnant.
Spokesman for the Catholic Diocese of Leeds, John Grady,
said the girl and her baby were "fine".
"It is something that will be talked about for some time but
we are just happy that the girl is OK, the baby is OK, and
hopefully they will be home this weekend and spend Christ-
mas at home," he said.
"It is not going to help to go moralising on the whole situa-
tion. That is not important, what is important is that the child
and the baby are fine and everything is being done for them and
their parents."
Mr Grady said the head teacher had met the girl's
mother and preparations had been made for her to return
to school and continue with her education.


I
I
I1
I
I
I
I

I


CARIBBEAN COMMUNITY SECRETARIAT


STAFF VACANCIES

Applications are invited from interested and suitably qualified nationals of
Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Member States andAssociate Members
of the Caribbean Community to fill the following positions with assigned
duty station in Guyana:
CARIFORUM
(i) Executive Director
(ii) Deputy Programme Manager, Operations
(iii) Senior Project Officer
(iv) Administrative Officer, Bilingual
(v) Administrative Assistant, Bilingual
(vi) Administrative Assistant
AUDIT
(i) Programme Manager
(ii) Deputy Programme Manager
MONITORINGAND EVALUATION
(i) Programme Manager
(ii) Senior ProjectOfficer
PROGRAMME SUPPORT
(i) Deputy Programme Manager, Finance ,;-..
(ii) Project Officer, Procurement -
Full details of these positions may be( by accessing the
Secretariat's web page at '
Applications with full curriculum details, including nationality, date of
birth, work experience, educational qualifications, summary of
professional skills andlor expertise, language proficiency, list of
professional publications, three referees (at least two of whom must be
familiar with the applicant's work), and other relevant information, should
be sent to the Adviser, Human Resource Management, Caribbean
Community Secretariat, Turkeyen, Greater Georgetown, Guyana or by
email to applinhrmiimlcaricom.org.
The Secretariat will commence considering applications from 15 January
2007.


Au#. thors1nd ounst an ad.mraMthllcnb

reced a ww.an~daaacm.3






SUNDAY CHRONICLE, December 24, 2006 v





Have a sweet tooth


- Watch out for a Christmas toothache! Tle Denlst AdvisS
I 1 11 rUm II NI-J'il


IT may not be by coincidence that during a ses-
sion of light banter with a few dental colleagues
that two of them disclosed that their first (and
worst) toothache was experienced on a Christmas
day.
Many vmay be able to teslif\ to similar experiences.
But \hat is the point here? lThe point is thai there is a
distinct relationship between the ingestion of sw\seel and
tooth decay.
During this Iesti\e season ofl Christmas there will be at least a
tell percent increase ill the incidence ofl dental caries along
Guyanese. The simple reason is because of the higher sucrose (sugar)
ingestion combined with the transient neglect in maintaining oral
hygiene concomitant with the disruption in routine personal activi-
ties.
Cakes, s\\eets, jellies. chocolates and dried lruits ar ie the most
cariogenic (caries producing) foods in existence and they are eaten
indiscriminately at this time of the year.
Although sugar by itself cannot affect the teeth in any way.
the bacteria of dental plaquIe ferment these substrates (sugars and
starches) most readily to produce the acid that erodes the enamel
causing tooth decay. It only lakes bacteria a matter of seconds to
conerlt sweel to acid.
People have always liked a sweet taste. The "sw eet loolth
of primitive man was satisfied by fruits and other sweel part'
of plants which were supplied by nature. All over the world
people ha\e used honey. a natural sugar concentrate as the
source of additional sweetness. In Australia. Cuba. LEngland
and the United States of America, each citizen consumes more
than 100 pounds of sugar a year. however, in China, the most
popular country in the world, less than five pounds of sugar
a year is consumed by each citizen. As a result, the Chinese


have fewer caries than Iiost.
The modern approach which is designed to circum-
vent the deleterious potential o u of s ar on d mental \ell-


being is to substitute the carbohydrate with arti'ii.c l
sweeteners. However. universal use of these \Nwould re
still in disarray for countries \\hose economies depend


<'tn sigar cane e ltli\ dtion
Presentt. n:!'hIv diabetics use artificial swxeetenes. It is
acad mllic to in,!'" ihai: the scientific coinm nitlvi is conllempltl-
in lwhetlhe it i s i i .:r e i!dlent to de cIvlp a \x.iine agatillt
the Strep 1mulalns. the cihll culpiIl responsiblCe jl ii oIhi tie
So caries do not result frotm nutritional deficieclli in-
volving the formation of a dentition \which is predisposed to
deca). Rather. it is the net result of a \ariel\ ol local influ-
ences in the environment of the teeth in\ol\ ink the bioLchlc '
cal e\cnts in dental plaque which follow the intake tI cat
ltem of the diet.
Tile high sugar contenl I and the stick\ i nsi stell ne' I
predominant factors for cariogenicit.l. Itooth dea cc als
depends ont the amnountt iand type ol caibholl di~ate e.ttIen.
the food aciditi\ the length ol timec bie een intakes, ,an
'sw alll\\ ing. eniaml el tougIhne I'ron I IllMCIde' s ,id ho\.
Ireelc tle ,sali\a Ilow\s.
\\ halt then can be done ol in eI ) i' I. i i ,' -,
tootlhachte should stii ke suiidedln!\ 'hil .1 ti, h.t che in.
sil ike suddenly but cerlainl l\ n t i \\w i i ....' '1 l "'i .111n1112 I ,'i
.asli out tile moutith thortoihl\i
Then iixit a strong solution of bilaking ida i andil ,.II c I. Ihd'
the affected tooth with the solution as long as poIsibhle. chang
ing it as it becomes diluted with sali\a. It' that does not w\iok.
pulverize a clove in drop of edible oil and place il iln 'hI
cleaned out. drN cavity. See your dentist ;at til' earliest o>ppl
tunitp.

Have a happy Christmas!


GUYANA ELECTIONS


COMMISSION



The Guyana Elections Commission invites expressions of interest
from building Consultants with recognized architectural capabilities
to undertake and complete consultancy services for construction of
its lead Office at 41 High Street. Kingston. Georgetown.

The successful firm will be required to prepare designs. construction
drawings. tender documents. budget estimates and related sen\ ices.

The estimated area is approximately 82(() square feet. Ihe interested
Consultants must submit information to substantiate, that the firm
possesses the technical competemcec. financial resources. eCquipLment.
managerial capacity. reliability, experience. reputation and the
personnel to perform the services.

Three (3) client references. on prc\ in'u.1 d -e i ',s ', 'i''' cil 1n',i L !'


i rI


R.."'spon-es must he :i' lr. -es-e.! ri,

Th-l ( Inel Flecliont( ll(t cr

~2 1Hiuh Street
; i +
1 ;!i ; ^ l .. ..I( i i ;.' f!


G fe GUYANA REVENUE AUTHORITY





IMPORTANT NOTICE
The following persons are hereby requested to make. IMMEDIATE c;acmi
with the Legal Division of the Guyana Revenue Authority. 357 Lamarn ,, .,as
Streets, Georgetown.


NAMES


LAST KNOWN ADDRESS


Rarnchand Nadr;;
Shaliza Shaw


Raymond Jor";-
Su Bao Lu
Devanand Ram:,
Michael Sims
Mahendra SuIkh
Ameer Khain
Latcha Kwok
Emea, iVloilam;c
Sheldon Graves'ic.:

Raibar


-niform. ,eguan. : L .' ...
Shaw's Poultry .',' 84. .
Lacytown. Tow,
86 C ..l" "', S 'e o'' '.'
33 Gar:et! Stree: 'Ca .e.
5 Bagotston.r :.. LE -t B .
8S Lusigna; : C
S S f "!r il ...

. C l'orai'.t "-xv uII I "i, :-
Puovidence Eit Bar:, ":.
*. u Brookdaie .- enL. : .,;,. :
' Tn nt'Vi
.",eW ..,A nnait .. *' :: .' *" "*.


'ilaS'' fe (


a Winii1iL'Mtkf'r thVIU^-* I I ^


ii





VI SUNDAY CHRONICLE, December 24, 2006



Magistrate who usurped function



of Rice Assessment Committee


THE Full Court in 1971
found that a magistrate over-
stepped his bounds when he
proceeded to hear and deter-
mine a Rice tenancy matter,
which was the exclusive right
of the, Rice Assessment Com-
mittete.
The Magistrate had
awarded damages and costs to
John ?Nagreadiei who alleged that
hle was a tenant of appellant
Noori.Abjal. and had claimed
damages for trespass Ahjal ap-
pealed the ruling.
The Full Courl. which
hear-d the appeal, was consti-
Iuted bv Chief Justice Mr.
H.B.S. Boilers and High Court


J judges
M. -\lkbar Klhan and Mr. Frank
k iL'ild.
That Full 'Court held that ii
a., s .l mater for the AssesCs-
.:!o ( lunitee'' to decide the
I elA i nc of I'cc

I he ai s 1i 1 1 Ithe case dis-t
. l,'d thai the lIRespondent
\:ai-,id',h la-iinid to he 'a ten-
.. t n; acres t' l'ii.e land
rni'd fromii the .ippellainl. liHe
.lleccd acts of tIrepass- againmsi
:hie appellant in preventing him
*:!ou reaping the rice crop and
..ud he \\as entitled to the pro-
tion ofl the Rice F-armters (Sc
t its of Tenure > Ordinance.
)The appellant denied the ie
.tI!uship of l:ipl'lord .and ten-
; ltf!ind iverred ihUti fte imgis-
atiL had no jurisdiction to en-


tertain the claim, as that was a Tenure)'Ordinance, No. 31 of the appellant, his Counsel rcit- yearly tenancy had been created
question, which fell within the 1956. rated that there was no proof, in respect thereto.
exclusive jurisdiction of the As- He averred that since No- in the absence of documentary After perusing the argu-
sessment Committee. vmeber 14, 1969, the appellant evidence such as a receipt, that ments on both sides and the
T'he appellant made the without any lawful authority, any relationship of landlord and cases cited, the Chief Justice ex-
same submissions in the Full committed several acts of tres- tenant existed between the par- plained. "Having regard to the
Court to that made before the pass by barring and barricading ties and he requested the Court provisions of the Ordinance and
magistrate. his rice lands thus effectively to decline juisdiction i view of the relevant authorities quoted,
The Full Court held: preventing'him from reaping the the unsatisfat ory ~dvience of it is clear, we feel, that a Mag-
(i) it was for the Assess- 1970 Spring crop which was es- the respondent.
nient Committee to decide the linmalId to yield 150 bags of In reply, c'ounsll ,for the
question of tenancy of rice padi at $6.50 per bag = $975.00. respondent submitttqd'that all
lands; In addition, he claimed the sum tenancies in relationI to rice f
(ii) the magistrate had no pI- of $1'0; 000.00 as prospective lands are re-statute tenan- '1 :
risdiction to proceed to hear and gener;alddamages. cies and that trespiss had
determine the matter; In his defence, dated Janu- been established byithe ap-
(iii) the magistrate should ary 27. 1970, the appellant ex- pellant and his witiiesses.
have put the matter down sine pressly denied that he was at On July 10, 1970, the
die pending an investigation b\ any time the landlord of the re- Magistrate gave decision in
spondent and he averred that favour of the respondent and
the Magistrate had no jurisdic- awarded him damages, costs
f s tion to entertain and counsel's fee in the total ,
By George Barclay the claim. sum of $1. 218.50.
By George Barclay Before the Chief Justice Boilers who
the Assessment Committee into learned Magistrate. Counsel for had delivered the judgment on .
the question whether there \\ as the appellant submitted in behalf of the Full Court had -
a valid tenancy existing hbevt i limtine (1) that the plaint was said In the appeal before us, '
parties. had injlaw and could not be en- Mr. Doodnauth Sing submit-
At the hearing of the appeal. tertained because this would ted that the Respondent's CHIEF JUSTICE H.B.S. BOLLERS
the appellant was represented mean Ihat the Court would be claim was based chiefly upon
h\ Mr. J.O.F. Haynes. S.C. nd ex\ercisjng a jurisdiction under trespass and upon.that basis the istrate does have jurisdiction and
Mr. Doodnauth Singh. S.( Sectioi 51 ( I) of the Ordinance learned Magistrate had no juris- is. in fact, the proper forum to
now Attorney General. Mr I which. under section 11 thereof diction since it was necessary. award damages for trespass in
L. Bro(herson appeare'l for Illh was within the exclusive juris- apriori. for the respondent to elation to rice lands even
respotndcntt. diction of the Assessment Coin- establish satisfactorily the fac- Jlough the amount claimed is in
Thtl: facts of the case dis- mitlee s'il up under the said Or- turn ofl'enancy which under the excess of the statutory limit of
closed that on January 9. 1970. dinanceand (2) the Court had Ordinanke. can only be done by $250.00 videe section 51 (4) on
the respondent filed a plaint in *:n jurisdiction to hear and de- an Assessment Committee and this aspect).
the Magitirate's Court of the en'rmine the matter, this. clearly, has not been done "But it is equally clear that
Essequib, Judicial District in Couisel cited S tall v. Saul in this matter, he can only do so where the fac-
which he'alleged that he was ; .1andI Sault 1965) 8 W..R. 351 in Mr. Brotherson, in reply, turm of tenancy has first been
tenant of the appellant in re- support tft his arguments. The submitted that the lands were satisfactorily established before
aspect of ten acres of rice lands learned Magistrate overruled the indisputably rice lands and the',competent forum, viz: the
situate at Fredericksburi. submiissiuns and proceeded to when the evidence is considered Assessment Committee for the
W'%enaamt. RioEssequibo and taketevidence from the parties \hen ihe only pgiible inferences iarea in uhich ihe rice l.indin yae
ttits entitledd to ihe protectil and hieir epective witnesses. \that the leatdil Magistratf' situated.
of the Rice Farmers (Security of At tlhe close of the case for would have come to was that a "Clearly. this has not been


I Wrongly found landlord liable for damages for trespass j


l'Foreign Exchlanlg Market Actiitics
Sunimmiart Indicators


Itrid~a\,4)etsenlh)r 15, 2006 -Tlhirsdai, Dciilhte 21 2t0 I. EXCIIANGE RA.ITES


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I t) ) (II)


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21 11()I ,11

(5 Ili)
-,(I I no


206 00
204.25
203 00
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;"f ~s~wa~aaanm,


.4 4t2 ~ r


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done in this matter. Mr.
Brotherson's: submission that
having regard to the undisputed
fact that the lands are rice lands
and that from the evidence itself
the learned Magistrate was en-
titled to draw the inferfence
that a yearly tenancy had been
created in respect thereto, is
surely, an untenable proposi-
tion", the President of the Court
had said.
He added, "As we see it, it
is for the As.essment Commit-
tee to decide the question of
tenancy of rice lands and, ac-
cordingly, ii this matter, the
learned Magistrate was clearly
acting outside the scope of his
authority when he found as
stated by him in his Memoran-
dum of reasons for decision.
:"I found as a fact from the
evidence that the defendant who
denied beingzthe plaintiff's land-
lord at the trial, was in fact his
landlord and did have a transac-
tion with the. plaintiff as alleged
by the letter which pointed to
and were related to his tenancy
of the rice lands in question".
Before allowing the appeal
and setting aside the
Magistrate's order, the C.J. de-
clared, "What has really hap-
pened here is that the respon-
dent has baked his claim on an
action for damages for trespass
based upod a contract of ten-
ancy and the learned Magistrate.
in such circumstances, had no
jurisdiction to proceed to hear
and determine the matter.
'"What he should have
done was to have put the mat-
ter down qine die pending an
investigation by the Assess-
ment Committee into the
question whether there was a
a|id tenancy existing be-
tw the; parties". the j~dg-
ment disclosed.


S U
fR,


..


__ __ __ ~ ___


( l'.tum 1irlin I
i____ ~ _
--- ~-- ----i


lR
i ,, I!n'r t


___ ~_______


!',. ( .in.dia.n t Illl;n


; 1 I .


':.-. .fll,il;'^t';


i





SUNDAY CHRONICLE, December 24, 2006 VII


LITERATE


New Guyanese


Publications in 2006


by Petamber Persaud
IN an article captioned "Of
Books and Citizens", pub-
lished forty years ago in the
"Booker News", Martin
Carter illustrated the value
of books. He declared that
books allow citizens into the
debate, helped to deepen un-
derstanding and sharpen
criticism.
The end result of these pro-
cesses is the enrichment of the
individual personality and ulti-
mately, the enrichment of the
community.
The year 2006 was another
very good year for Guyanese
literature. Many excellent pub-
lications were launched in
Guyana and numerous books
published here and abroad. (A
depressing note, however, is
that many Guyanese books
published abroad do not reach
this country.)
Here are a few titles to en-
rich our day.
A proper place to begin this
odyssey is with the publication
of "Guyana" the coffee-table
book that bears it all about this
country. This massive 240-
page book coloured in with 400
imposing photographs give an
overall picture of the complex
history and vibrant culture of


this country, portraying Guyana
- the country in all its gracious
simplicities and glorious com-
plexities.
"Guyana" is edited by Arif
Ali and published by Hansib
Publications Ltd. UK.
Following in the wake of
yet another local surge towards
the restoration of the Theatre
Guild, Kingston, is the first ma-
jor publication on local theatre.
This book, A History of The-
atre Guyana 1800 2000, com-
piled by Frank Thomasson was
published by Peepal Tree Press.
Thomasson was closely in-
volved with the Guild during the
1950s and 1960s while he was
here working for Bookers.
The next on our list are two
books on Martin Carter that
were released to coincide with
the ninth death anniversary of
that great poet.
Martin Carter: University
of Hunger, Collected Poems &
Selected Prose, edited by
Gemma Robinson, published by
Bloodaxe Books. It is an exten-
sive work containing a 36-page
introduction by Robinson and
over 70 pages of notes that pro-
vide bibliographic details and
commentaries relating to the
specific phrases in the poetry
and prose..
Collations of lexical differ-


ences are given when there are
multiply versions of a poem'.
Poems by Martin Carter,
edited by Ian McDonald and
Stewart Brown, published by
Macmillan, is an insightful re-
working of the prize-winning
book, Selected Poems by Mar-
tin Carter. Still on poetry we
have four locally produced
books.
Twenty Four Poems by
Merlin October Persaud,
Moongazer by Lorri Alexander,
Plain Taak and Lest We Forget
by Petamber Persaud.
From Peepal Tree Press we
have The Gift Of Screws by
Brian Chan, and A Leaf In His
Ear: Selected Poems by Mahadai
Das.
In the fiction category we
have such novels as Drums of
My Flesh by Cyril Dabydeen.
Tsar, The Brown Curtains by
Clive Sankardayal. published by
Jako Books, USA. and Illustri-
ous Exile, by Andrew O. Lind-
say, Peepal Tree Press.
The Brown Curtains is one
of the few West Indian novels
to explore intra Caribbean mi-
gration and cultural differences
among the Caribbean Commu-
nity countries and has impor-
tant implications for CSME and
Caribbean integration.
As a norm, the least addi-


The Social Statistics and Policy Analysis Project: ID No. SSPAP1516F-GY/E01-
0503001 (A Government of Guyana/IDB Funded Project) invites expression of
interests from suitably qualified persons for the position of:

DATA ENTRY CLERKS

Operating in a supportive role, the data entry clerks will work out of the Ministry of
Home Affairs to help in the collection and transporting of raw data from the Prisons
Department, Fire Department and the General Register Office into statistical database.

The successful candidate will work under the general direction ol the Permnlannt
Secretary of the Ministry of Home Affair with responsibility to oversee the
implementation and monitoring of the social statistics unit.

REQUIREMENTS

Education/Qualification:
The successful candidates mu-t be the holder of an intermediate certificate in
inii formation technology and a sound secondary education.

Experience and knowledge:
Experience in the use of Microsoft Excel and M icrosoft wVod \ ill ser\ e as an asset.

The duration ofemploymenlt ~ ill he lforsix (6) months.

Interested applicants can obtain the Terms of Reference and fiitrl heli mu' ormuliow1n il 11
the address below Monday thru Friday during ol'ice hour,1 of OS(I:t0 h and 1 7:(0011.

Expressions of interest nmuist be delivered in scaled envelope to thie addresss hbelo\ no
later than Friday, January 05,2007.

N i. C'olin vyrLus
ProcutreCment Olficer
Office o Ithe President
PC'PMUL
New (iGarden St.. Hourd
(;corgetown. (iGuyana

^*^^ ^^^ ?^ **.a^*:a^"^*'''^ ^^* 'w~\~IJ


tion is in the category of chil-
dren literature Fables and Tales
of Guyana by Norma Jean, and
Layers of the Rainforest by
Shirley Najhram. Of course, if
we are to augment this group-
ing, we must add the two cat-
egories of children literature in
The Guyana Annual 2006-2007
namely The Henry Josiah Writ-
ing Short Story for Children
Competition and The Rajkumari
Singh Writing Poetry for Chil-
dren Competition.
Other notable titles of 2006
include: Cultural Identiy and
Creolisation in National
Unity:The Multi-Ethnic Carib-
bean by Prem Misir, University
Press of America; Georgetown:
Anthology of Georgetown and
a Piece of the World, by
Hamilton Green; National De-
fence: A Brief history of the
GDF, 1965 to 2005. by David
Granger, Free Press, Guyana;
and Immigrant #99840 and
Canecutter #7074: The Story of
an East Indian Family in
Guyana by Lal Balkaran,


AuthorHouse: Bloomington,
Canada.
In the category of food for
thought and thought for food,
we could turn the pages of An
Adventure in Caribbean Cui-
sine, reminding us that cooking
is also a science and that the
practice of good home econom-
ics is the foundation of a pro-
gressive society.
And we must include our
journals and magazines that fill
the gap between books and
newspapers namely GEM, The
Arts Journal, Explore Guyana,
Guyana Review and The
Guyana Annual.
These few titles in a long and
impressive list of new Guyanese
publications (see bookshelf section
of THE GUYANA ANNUAL
2006-2007) comprise a reasonable
representation of the development
and direction of Guyanese litera-
ture.
However, while Guyanese
writing abroad is on sound
grounding, the local writing
industry needs more support.


Responses to this author tele-
phone (592) 226-0065 or email:
oraltradition2002@yahoo.com
LITERATURE UPDATE
Look out for THE
GUYANA ANNUAL 2006-
2007, a tradition started in
December 1915 courtesy of
the then Chronicle newspa-
per. This issue continues the
tradition of excellence in
Guyanese literary and cul-
tural heritage with the re-
sults of six competitions in
poetry and fiction with spe-
cial sections on literature
written for children. This
family-oriented general
magazine offers scintillating
recipes, Balgobin stories in
the tradition of Guyanese
folklore, Guyanese proverbs,
articles on Guyanese cricket,
festivals of Guyana, attitudes
of young people in Guyana to
HIV/AIDS, avant-garde art,
Carifesta, and pen-portraits
of Helen Taitt, Philip Moore
and Paul O'Hara. Two-page
listing of new Guyanese pub-
lications. And much more...


CANAWAIMA MANAGEMENT CO. ,V.
Canawaima Ferry Service Inc.
Moleson Creek, Corentyne

The Guyana/Suriname Ferry Service will

not be operating on Monday, December

25, Tuesday, December 26, 2006 and

Monday, January 1, 2007. Management

regrets any inconvenience caused by this

interruption of the service.





CONSULTANT '

The Hydrometeorological Service is desirous of employing a
short-term consultant with working knowledge of the Montreal
Protocol.

Minimum qualification: Bachelor's Degree and two (2) years
related experience.

Terms of reference can be uplifted from this office at 18
Brickdam, Stabroek or visit www.hydromet.gov.gy

Applications, along with Curriculum Vitae, must be submitted
by January 11, 2007 at 14:00h to:

Chief Hydrometeorological Officer
Hydrometeorological Service
Ministry of Agriculture
18 Brickdam, Stabroek,
Georgetown
e-mail: noau.gLiyan.?j@gmn-iil.com,

Permanent Secretary





VIII ,..SUNII CIONICLE, December 24,206

I ElI


NATIONAL FREQUENCY MANAGEMENT UNIT

VACANCIES
Vacancies for exciting and rewarding careers exist at the National
Frequency Management Unit for persons who are:
* quick self starters,
results oriented,
able to work with minimum supervision,
able to communicate effectively,
team players,
comfortable working on challenging projects,
willing to work beyond the normal call of duty,
able to multitask;

in the following positions:

ACCOUNTS CLERK

The successful applicant shall be computer literate ( MS Excel, MS
Word and QuickBooks) and have the following:

Qualifications
5 Subjects CXC (Including Mathematics & English Language)
ABE Intermediate level or
LCCI Intermediate level or
CAT Level 11.

Experience
at least 2 years working in an Accounts Department
experience as a Cashier would be an asset.

Being the holder of a valid driver's licence would also be an asset.

RADIO INSPECTOR

The successful applicant shall be the holder of a valid driver's licence,
computer literate and have the following:

Qualifications
5 Subjects CXC( including Mathematics & English Language);
Telecommunications certificate from GTI or its equivalent;
working knowledge of radio equipment would be an asset.

DRIVER/DISPATCHER

The successful candidate shall be the holder of a valid driver's licence
and have the following:

Qualification:
SA sound secondary education.

Experience:
at least 5 years driving experience;
experience in driving in the interior would be an asset.


The successful applicants for the above positions shall be:
quick self starters;
results oriented;
able to work with minimum supervision:
able to communicate effectively;
team players;
comfortable working on challenging projects:
willing to work beyond the normal call of duty:
able to multitask.



Suitably qualified persons for the above positions are invited to submit
their applications, including curriculum vitae, not later than January 5,
2007. to the below address:

Managing Director
National Frequency Management Unit
68 Hadfield Street
D'Urban Park
Georgetown.


Unsitaible applications will not he acknowledged.


An artist's rendering of Turiasaurus riodevensis, which appears to have been the largest
dinosaur ever to roam European lands. (Image: AAAS/Science/Carin L Cain)



Europe's 'biggest



dinosaur' found


(BBC) FOSSILS found in
Spain belong to what was
probably Europe's biggest
ever dinosaur, according to
scientists.
Turiasaurus would have
been 30 to 37 metres long, and
would have weighed between 40.
and 48 tonnes.
Writing in the journal Sci-
ence, researchers say the beast
is probably the only member so
far discovered of a European
group of Jurassic reptiles.
The world's biggest recorded
dinosaur is Argentinosaurus, a
South American reptile twice as
heavy.
Like the rest .of the giant
long-necked sauropods,


Turiasaurus riodevensis was a
herbivore, despite the fierce ap-
pearance of its teeth.

Big-boned
Fossils came to light in 2004
at Teruel in eastern Spain, and
the scientists responsible, from
the Fundacion Conjunto
Paleontologico de Teruel-
Dinopolis, have just published
a formal analysis.
Although languishing some
way behind Argentinosaurus,
Turiasaurus was a substantial
specimen.
At 1.79m long, its humerus
(upper arm bone) is one of the
largest ever recorded, while one
of its claws is comparable with


a rugby ball or American foot-
ball.
The discovery site also
contains teeth from theropod
dinosaurs, Stegosaurus rem-
nants, and fragments from fish
and turtles.
By comparing its features
with other European dinosaurs,
the scientists deduce that it be-
longs to a previously unknown
clade, or grouping, which
evolved in the Jurassic period
(200 to 145 million years ago).
Teeth excavated in
France, Portugal and the UK
are similar, indicating that
Turiasaurus, or more likely
its close relatives, ranged
across the continent.


there.

Packing up and
leaving
In all, last year, two thou-
sand people a week packed up
and left the UK.
Figures from a separate
poll show that the number of
British people wishing to emi-
grate (perhaps dreaming of
that Caribbean paradise), has
doubled over the last few
years.
Nearly ten percent of the
Britain's population live
outside of the country, giv-
ing them one of the biggest
expatriate communities on
the globe. (BBC Caribbean)


BARBADOS and Jamaica
art the two most popular
Caribbean countries for
Britons living abroad but
for different reasons.
The two Caribbean coun-
tries are part of a trend show-
ing a pattern of emigration by
British people.
Figures obtained by the
BBC show nearly ten percent
of Britain's population live
outside the country. giving
thein one of the biggest expa-
triate communities on the
globe.
Studies by the British-
based Institute for Public
Police\ Research indicatee that
the figure goes up to six mil-
lion if those who live or work
in lulledd
ThIe miajoinly ofl these ate
)llder Ipeople 5\\lho ha\ c elhosen
to lit\e o tllhe tln11 t11u ol l their
Il\ e iI \s arinner climes such ;as
thie ('anribein. ,A\lstlralia and
Spain.
Ainong (Caribbean coun-
tries B3arbados I,s tlihe -iost
British residents 27 thou-
hSnLld.
I'Thalt s \\ o-liotsanld


more than second placed Ja-
maica. The vast majority in Ja-
maica 23 of the 25 thousand -
are pensioners.
Jamaica might be many
Brits' idea of a retirement para-
dise. but Barbados has more all-
round appeal with less than a
fifth being pensioners.
Trinidad and Tobago. the
Bahamas and Antigua and
Barbuda all have significant
numbers of Brits making a home


Brits abroad in


the Caribbean


MANY Brits retire in the Caribbean


J~BIBPPr;llllll]~





SUNDAY CHRONICLE, December 24, 2006 Ix


ndian vil ager





try 'e-policing'

BBC) INDIA'S IT revolution and above all been part of regu- with the technology. Nagpur. very few of them."
s sometimes thought to ben- lar video conferencing between "It saves me time and Those 30 to 40 villagers
efit only the better off, but the village and the district po- money. 1 don't have to go to the 'WIDENING ACCESS' were the lucky ones.
developments in Bhanegaon lice headquarters in Nagpur city. city to meet the police chief. I Mr Yadav, who himself has It's not easy for a villager in
village in Maharashtra state, Ravinder Chikle of can lodge complaints sitting an IT background, sits in his of- India to be able to have an au-
nd 10,000 other Indian vil- Bhanegaon took part in a con- here at the kiosk," said a de- fice everyday between 4 and dicnce with the district police
apes, suggest that it is slowly ference call with the police chief, lighted Mr Chikle. 6pm and talks to the villagers chief.


--0-v-' --BOgg -- 1- j -
taking deeper roots.
Until a few weeks ago the
village was on the have-not side
of the digital divide.
Now some of its 8,000 in-
habitants have used computers,
e-mailed scanned documents


S Yadav and complained about
big lorries creating traffic chaos
near the village's two schools
and endangering children's lives.
Mr Chikle still cannot pro-
nounce "video conferencing".
but surprisingly he was at ease


*1

; i-
-,'
~



Aciit s

Activists say some women will still be scared to complain


Just a few weeks ago. he
would have had to cover a dis-
tance of 80km (50 miles), spend
his hard-earned money and
travel more than half a day to
meet the district police chief in


on the video line.
Kiosks have been installed
in the district's 22 villages.
Says Mr Yadav: "Earlier 1
used to meet 30 to 40 complain-
ants everyday. Now I receive


And to complain aboul a
policeman to his boss was even
more difficult.
But IT has changed all that.
Now, Mr Chikle and villag-
ers like him can not only take
part in video conferencing with
the police chief, they can also
get hard copies of their conm-


A generous
heart
will quickly
become a
precious
heart


District police chief S Yadav gets new sources of
information


plaints scanned- and-enailed, to-
the police headquarters with the
click of a mouse.
The project, the first of its
kind in India, was launched as a
test case and it is well appreci-
ated by the villagers.
FIGHTING CRIME
Encouraged by the po.iive
response, the state government
has formed a committee to lo:;
into whether it can be replicated
all across rural Maharashtra.
The IT facilities; are proving
useful in combating crime a'
well.
Mr Yadav recalled ia' n
former g ing him precise in'-
mation about a gang of d r
pushers during one of the vider
conferencing sessions.
The tip-off led to th. ,ei-
zure of marijuana orlh .:ire
than $2m.
Mr Yadl:i fondly call, 'h:
ni'w system:: --policing".
lie sa s a large number
'of women from these 22 vil-
lages are coming forward to
Please turn to page Xli1


)ur 00ad7/

Knowledge must be
balanced by Love.
I Corinthians 8.


I Till i[ r


FIT


4.


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x SUNDAY Chroni


Olympia Small-Sonaram gets


OLYMPIA Small-Sonaram is synonymous with red and what is bold, and if you know her
well, you would know that's a combination destined to sizzle.
So when she says she is also getting jazzy, it's double trouble! Her invitation to "come
and be mesmerized" is one worth falling to the temptation.
S Noted for her sexy getups, Olympia promises to deliver on her reputation, but she is
. being a tad bit conservative.
Olympia's December 27 phow at the Embassy Courtyard, Pere Street, Kitty is ex-
Spected to be the best fashion event in Guyana this year, given its swing to a gala red
carpet affair and the special body art attraction. Not even a storm would dare mess with
Ints collection!
Expect to see pants, skirts, gents shirts, evening dresses and swimsuits. And to give
the right touch to the event the sounds of the Sidewalk Cafe Jazz band will give rhythm
f to a truly innovative event on the local fashion ground.
4' 1 Tickets to the show, which cost $2000, have been selling even before the announce-
S -. -. ment of the date for the show. Such is the respect the.sexy d~ua has earned.
S- .; Red, Bold and Jazzy will featte.rolpi. (.i rplo G a, apd-[pi ,c
,m4






le December 24, 2006 XI


SPrincess from the emerald sea


-t7


By Hubert Williams

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados -
Neither the Grimm Brothers
of Germany (famous for en-
chanting the world with their
folk tales and fairy stories)
nor a dashing prince fetching
a pair of golden slippers could
have matched the web of
magic which singing super-
star Rihanna has woven for
herself to move from virtual
obscurity on the 166 square-
mile eastern Caribbean island
of Barbados to global promi-
nence in less than two years.
Her rise represents the
region's biggest fairy-type tale
for many years; but it defies
mythology, for it is all so very
real. She is probably now the
youngest millionaire ever in Bar-
bados, bequests to youthful
heirs in prominent families not-
withstanding; and, still only 18,
there are many worlds yet for
her to conquer.
Earlier this month, Rihanna
was sparkling from the peak of
another mountain as she joined
some of the world's best known
entertainers, including the ever-
green Lionel Ritchie, at a presti-
gious concert during the glitter-
ing 2006 Nobel Prize Awards
Presentation Ceremony.
Only two other places may
for her carry greater gloss i.e.,
command performances for the
Queen at Buckingham Palace in
London and for the President at
the White House in Washington.
Just a few days prior to her
Oslo appearance, Rihanna had
trumped the best on the world's
stage in three categories Female
Hot Artist, Pop 100 Artist and
Female Artist of the Year at
Billboard's 2006 Music Awards
extravaganza in Las Vegas, Ne-
vada.
Her sold-out appearance
have taken the young Barbadian
to such 'far away' places as Ja-


Spg







--
pan in the Far East and Australia
Down Under, with other trips to
London, England, and several
major American cities becoming
like just a walk in the park.
In her hometown, there have
been calls from not insignificant
voices for her to be accorded a
national honour. Also, increas-
ingly her lovely image is appear-
ing in newspapers and on the lo-
cal television in endorsement of
some advertiser's products. In
short, Rihanna is beginning to
appear just about everywhere.
Recently, dining out in Bos-
ton with family and friends, our
preferred place was the Cheese-
cake Factory Restaurant which
jealously defends its reputation
for the most delectable cuisine. Its
artistically presented 36-page


menu is a delight to behold, and
right up front (page 3 to be exact)
Rihanna blossoms forth in a beach
scene on a large advertisement in-
viting the world to visit her home-
land, with the message saying:
"There's still a real Carib-
bean out there. Where you'll find
chart-stopping recording artist
and Bajan native Rihanna. End-
Sless perfect beaches, open to all.
Incredible dining. Spectacular
golf. And people as warm and
unspoiled as the island itself."
Early this year, Rihanna
took seven major trophies at the
inaugural Barbados Music
Awards; and she is being nomi-
nated for an armful of other s
when the second glittering event
takes place at Bridgetown on
January 5, 2007.-
Rihanna also is not far away
from one's inquisitive general
reading,. though she would hardly
have been impressed by the non-
sense written in one of the en.
tertainment world's 'under
press' which goes by the name
of Star.
Focusing on one Nick
Lachey whom it called America's
SHottest Bachelor and said to


have more hot women than one
man can handle, the Star won-
dered whether Rihanna would be
"Nick's next babe" and contin-
ued: "Is this the next stop on
Nick's love train? They were on
the same bill twice over the
weekend of June 23. That Fri-
day they participated in a con-
cert in Sacramento. Then the next
night, they did another gig in Se-
attle. For how long can Rihanna
resist Nick's charms?"
What rot! Rihanna hasn't
just emerged from idiotville or
simpletown and is thus fair prey
for brainless wolves. She is a
product of an environment where
stability, good sense and judg-


ment are the norm. Where small
size is not an impediment, and
scientific and technological ad-
vancement is not the barometer.
Barbados ranks considerably
ahead of many countries, includ-
ing some of the so-called devel-
oped ones, in the conduct, free
from evident graft and corrup-
tion, of its political, social, judi-
cial and other institutions.
As beautifully as she sings
and dances, Rihanna was also
firmly on course to academic ex-
cellence as a student in the Fifth
Form of the Combermere
("Cawmere" to old scholars) Sec-
ondary School, just a mile north
of the capital Bridgetown.


Indeed, on one of her visits
to Barbados in 2006, she did a
radio interview and fielded
phoned-in questions. Most in-
quirers wanted to hear of the vis-
tas and the excitement of the far-
away places she had recently
toured. I wanted to know what
was she doing to continue her
education while enjoying the glit-
ter and splendour of the United
States and the international ex-
tension of her singing career. Her
reply was that she was seri-
ously continuing her education
through private tutoring.
Let the Star know that
Rihanna is a beauty with brains.
Being a product of Barbados, she


is most unlikely to be the run-
of-the-mill entertainment success
who hits high and then drops
low, gets slogged. 'stoned'.
duped, or whatever, and disap-
pears from the scene. One day
they may even see her as a highly
qualified former entertainer and
Barbados' Permanent Represen-
tative at the United Nations.
The Rihanna high-speed
entertainment train will con-
tinue unchecked because she
has the talent and the classi-
cal beauty, and, very impor-
tantly, the triple-L 'look' that
America so likes: she's Leggy,
Light-skinned and Long-
haired.


..,00,P
S . .-

Ro2l ui


Consumption tax on electrical items and hand tools is 30%

V.A.T at 16% will reduce prices for these items as of 1st January, 2007

B-u-t you can save by buying now and getting 20% discount on these

A-N-D '

get this Coffee Cup for $100.00 on any purchase you make.

You can buy as many as you wish..





S. The Name You Canr


items


items


Trust


I


-1-2 --7 1:

- -


zi





( SUNDAY CHRONICLE, December 24, 2006


Giant squid caught on video by Japanese scientists
1I -.illl.AIII' A dl I . J s ..r | TOKYO (Reuters) Its, mass the ultimate prize for zoologists


of reddish tentacles flailing,
a giant squid fought a losing
battle to evade capture in a
video unveiled by Japanese
scientists on Friday.
Images of the squid a
relatively small female about
3.5 meters (11 ft 6 in) long and
weighing 50 kg (110 Ib) were


at the National Science Mu-
seum, who have been pursuing
one of the ocean's most myste-
rious creatures for years.
"Nobody has ever seen a
live giant squid except fisher-
men," team leader Tsunemi
(Please turn to page XIII)


In tl s handout photograph, Tsunemi Kubodera, chief of Division of Invertebrate Zoology at the National Science Museum
ofJ pan, sits behind a Giant Squid on a boat off Ogasawara Islands, Japan, on December 4, 2006. The squid, was
aoo -i 3.5 metres (11.5 feet) long and about 50 kg (110 Ibs), was caught at a depth of 650 metres (2132.5 feet) off the
I'sa s REUTERSNational Scier.ce Museum of Japan/Handout



SHoliday WISHES AND A HEARTFELT THANK YOU

TO ALL BLOOD DONORS
.- 4. :-.- Donors,

Christmas:is the time when loved ones present each other with gifts, but over the
years.you have given many people that you may never know, the best gift of all -
-The Gift of Life.
S Through your donations, which can be made every two months, you have given
Accident victims, cancer patients, pregnant mothers and many others a chance
to live.,
Your thoughtfulness and love to all mankind has been demonstrated by your
commitment to saving lives.
Even now as we celebrate with our friends and loved ones, there are people who
need that gift of blood. It may seem like an odd present, although it's anything
but.

k '.any person 3 have their loved ones today, because of your selfless donations.
''e \ ish to especially mention the following organizations and companies that
supported us during the year by either hosting blood drives or participating in
monthly blood drives held at the Guyana Red Cross (The AMERICAN
EMBASSY,COVE & JOHN ASHRAM, DIDCO, DOCOL, GEDDES GRANT,
GTM, GUYANA DEFENCE FORCE, GUYANA SCHOOL of AGRICULTURE,
LEOS & LIONS CLUB ZONE 3, NEW GPC, SARASWATI VIDYA NIKETAN
SCHOOL, SATYA SAI BABA (Essequibo, Berbice and Georgetown
Branches), SCOTIA BANK, STERLING PRODUCTS LIMITED, TIMEHRI
S SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH, U-MOBILE and UG 3'" Yr
Communications Class)
lerry Christmas and Happy New Year wishes are coming from NBTS and more
3 cular;y from the recipients of blood and blood products and their families.

.z aiso wishes to remind members of the public that it's especially important
: :rne of year to donate. Supplies are low because people are so busy but
"ed is nigh around this time with the expectation of more traumas through
-- e-.ts.

5 to meet the expectation of the growing need for blood, we are
S g-: in_ 9;g members of the public to give the best gift this Christmas and for
S3 : donated before. ,>e !ook -or'.a- :. our :, -tinued support.


i1


, . -



. "^


TWELTH wedding anniversary greetings are extended
to Mr and Mrs Nigel Duguid of Pike street, Kitty. You
get greetings from your loving son Joshua, parents
and their relatives and friends.






VACANCY

Confidential Secretary
For the Georgetown Office
Requirements:
-4 subjects CXC with a Grade 1
or 2 in English, and Mathematics
-Must be computer literate (MS
Word and Excel)
-A valid drivers licence and
previous experience would be
an asset.
Send written application and Resume to tre
address Below

Gardener
Requirements:
-Previous experience in gardening
Send application to the address below

Industrial Products, andl Servic.- c.
1 ot I (iood [ lope. Blcer\ \ e \ :illg .L .
Phone 220 2314


.10 'A






ounAYl tpnAnunitII'L Llt:flpUll'- r -1 2-lO Y fL"


Giant squid caught on ...
(From page XII)
Kubodera of the museum's zoology department said in an in-
terview on Friday. "We believe these are the first ever moving
pictures of a giant squid."
Little was known until recently about the creature thought to
have inspired the myth of the "kraken", a tentacled monster that
was blamed by sailors for sinking ships off Norway in the 18th DC
century. LO
Unconfirmed reports say giant squid can grow up to 20 meters In'
long, but according to scientists they are unlikely to pose a threat
to ships because they spend their lives hundreds of meters under 1
the sea.
The Japanese research team tracked giant squid by fol-
lowing their biggest predators sperm whales as they
gathered to feed near the Ogasawara islands, 1,000 km (620
miles) south of Tokyo between September and December.
They succeeded in taking the first still photographs of a living
giant squid in 2005, observing that it moved around in the water 2.
more actively than previously thought, and captured food by en-
tangling prey in its powerful tentacles.
The latest specimen, whose formalin-preserved carcass
was displayed at a news conference at the museum in Tokyo,
was caught on a baited hook laid 650 meters (2,150 ft) under
the sea off the Ogasawara islands, on December 4, the scien-
tists said.
A squid about 55 cm (21.65 inches) in length had been at-
tracted by the bait and the giant squid was hooked when it
tried to eat the smaller squid, the scientists said.




From page IX
report domestic violence. 3.
"The men are under pressure to behave themselves," says In-
spector Sanjay Purandare.
Mr Yadav was candid enough to say the project is also helping
him keep an eye on police atrocities.
"I get to know of policemen who indulge in corruption or tor-
ture inmates in police lockups."
'LIMITS' TO
EMPOWERMENT
But some women's rights activists, such as Kalpana Upadhayay
from Nagpur, are sceptical about how far-reaching the impact of
this technology will be in villages.
She says: "Women in villages are suppressed and they are
scared of complaining against their men."
Ms Upadhayay also thinks the villagers, for whom this
project has been launched, are largely unaware of its exist-
ence.
She doesn't doubt the project's good intentions, but she be-
lieves it may not have a proper impact unless the rank and file of
the police force accepts the technology too.


INVITATION FOR BIDS
Urban Development Programme
Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development

Office Equipment and Furniture
ate: December 18, 2006
an: 1021/SF-GY
citation for Bids: 14/2006

The Government of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana has received financing from The
Inter-American Development Bank towards the cost of the Urban Development
Programme. It is intended that part of the proceeds of this financing will be applied to
eligible payments under the contract for the Supply of Office Equipment and Furniture for
which this Invitation for Bids is issued.

The Government of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana, acting through the Ministry of
Local Government and Regional Development, Fort Street, Kingston, Georgetown, Guyana
(after herein called the "Employer") now invites sealed Bids from eligible bidders of the IDB
member countries for the Supply of Office Equipment and Furniture. The Office Equipment
and Furniture have been separated into Lots, and Bidders may bid for all or any selected Lot
(s) as follows:


Lot I (a) Dot Matrix Printer 9
(b) Laser Printer 9
(c) Photocopier 2
(d) Digital Camera 4


Lot 2


(a) Executive Desk 6
(b) Executive Chair 12
(c) Steel Filing Cabinet
4 Drawers 8
(d) Secretary's Desk
L-Shaped -2
(e) Office Desk 24 x 42-32


Interested eligible bidders may obtain further information from and inspect the Bidding
Documents at the address below, and may purchase a set of bidding documents as of
December 21, 2006 by a written application or applying in person between 08:30h and
16:00 h, Monday to Thursday, and 08:30 h and 15:00 h on Friday, except on public
holidays, and upon the payment of a non-refundable fee of five thousand Guyana
dollars (GS5000.00). The method of payment will be by cash or manager's cheque,
payable to the "Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Local Government and Regional
Development." It will not be necessary to make request in person to receive a
complete set of bidding documents, since these may be sent by mail.

Application should be addressed to:
The Project Coordinator
Urban Development Programme
7 Broad & Charles Streets, Charlestown
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel # 592-225-2062 Fax # 592-225-0506
Email: udp@networksgy.com


4. Bid must be accompanied by a Bid Security, in an acceptable form, of not less than one
percent of the bid price, must be CIF Georgetown, Guyana, and must be valid for 90 days.

5.. Bids must be placed in a sealed envelope and marked on the outside top right hand
corner, "Supply of Office Equipment and Furniture." The envelope should be addressed to:

The Chairman
National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown, Guyana

Bids must be placed in the Tender Box of the National Board of Procuremen!t uonTa Tenoer
Administration at the address above before 09:00h on January 2007 It wiai no oe
necessary to submit Bids in person since these may be sent by ma;. However tie
Employer wil nol be responsible for bids not received thereof !-elote !. tinm- c ite
specified for the receipt of bids. Late bids will be rejected o.C cl'rned CLc "' .'rer
unopened.


Mr Yadav accepts criticism of the lack ofi awareness about the 6.
facilities, but he says his department plans to launch a publicity
drive to draiw the villagers' attention to the Iacilities.
On the whole, the police believe the system hi;: helped bridge
the digital divide.
The state governnenlts senior minister. RR Palil. praised
the project iand1 promised to spread it across riurl llMahrashira. 7.
Mr Yadav. who is recei\inl queries ail'oul te ipc roijecl Ihrom1
other district and stale police departmenlll in India. belie\'es
very soon the video conlerencing will he implemented all o\er
rural India.
According to estimates, over 10.0(00-villages in India Pe
have already joined the IT revolution lender different M
schemes.
E-policing may prove a further step towards.bridging the
digital divide.


Bids will be opened l o puth.ic c omonI i;n ne'1o ,' p K'* '
iepresentotivw vrs who choose to attend immediately afler 09:00h o T e .
2007 in the Boardroom, Ministry of Finance. Main and Urquhcrtt Strieets. C
Guyonca.


Bidders regisleied in Guyacrnna miust submit valid corlifictile
Natcional Insurar r ce S> her '1 I id Gu, ana Re enue o Aulthot! .
rejeclion of t Iose bi, Is.

e manenl Secretary
ministry of Local Govesnmn l i Iand Reional Developient


'1,j


of )mplixn ;O I !
Ali11e io d i* 1 > .! .'^


= --------- ---- ------"%~~~"Plu-raepwar~Pz~;arsrrQ' 'rr~llll'


Y ADNUS CHRONICLE Dece 6


i


'Xffv...





SUNDAY CHRONICLE, December 24, 2006


MINISTRY OF II ALTII NOTICE

Admission to the Professional and the Nursing Assistant Training Programmes

The following candidates whose names are listed below have been identified to be trained as Professional Nurses and Nursing Assistants at the
Georgetown, New Amsterdam and the Charles Roza Schools of Nursing:

These candidates are invited to attend an Orientation Seminar on Thursday, January 11 and Friday, January 12, 2007 at 8:00 hrs at the Ocean View
International Hotel.

Kindly contact the following officers for further information:

Departments Telephone Numbers
Permanent Secretary 225-6785
Director, Health Sciences Education 222-4414
Principal Personnel Officer 227-0215
Regional Health Services 225-2420

Regional Executive Officers and Regional Health Officers are asked to make the necessary arrangements for the release of the selected candidates.


Hinterland Professional Programme Region # 1
No Names Address
1 Goodman Natalie Mabaruma Settlement
2 Gibson Kim. M Mabaruma Settlement
3 Jarvis Amanda. F Cabucalli Island, Moruca
4 Hercules Shaunell. B Hosororo Hill
5 La Rose Kendra. A Huradiah, Moruca
6 Peters Elizabeth. P Hosororo Hill
7 La Rose Rondine. V Huradiah, Moruca
8 Linton Kafi. O( c/o Mabaruma Hospital

Region # 2 Professional Programme

No Names Address
I Sital Renita Lot 1 Drvshore. Esseq. Coast
2 Osborne Alicia. K 274 Devonshire Castle. lEscq
3 Ramnauth Rosanna 24 Hiust "T Diercn. Esseq
4 Shafck ibi S y (6 Riverstowni. Esseq
5 Fraser Trichelle 56 Barker St. Danielsto\\n. sseq
6 Bhowan Kaishwarie 19 Affiance, Esseq
7 Persaud Mada\ i 100 Zore Back St. Esseq
S Campbell Ro\ina. A St DeIny's Mission. T1apaIkum
9 Ragoobeer Andrea. MN 80 Cotton Field. Esseq Coast
10 Pcrsaud Naiomi 297 Devonshire Castle.Esseq
I1 Bhagan N\LcI..C Ilic 'A' Cullen. Esseq Coast
12 Nankoo Shareshmic 3 Sea Road Reliance, Esseq
[ 13 Persaud Devistri 13 Columbia Esseq Coast

Region # 3 Nursing Assistant
SNo Names Address
I Bumburv Nikitqa Alesia 634 Parika, EBE
S2 Gittens Leisa 21 De Kinderen,Pasture WCD
: Doobav Nicola Blankenburg Public Road
4 Carroll Nuirelie Amanda 28 Sera Lodge If Scheme SA'Ville
5 Taitt Anceia Anika 44 L'oratoire Village ('anal I1
6 Gibson Staccv 3 IHylde Park. Parika
Wlhinfield Keesanna Anoopa 4 Goed fortuin. WIBD
S A.lphonso S\ntryce Omeia 290 (God Intent. WBD


a Roopnauth .iasodra


97 Tuschen Jai IDam. IBE


Hinterland Nursing Assistants Region # 1
No Names Address
1 Rebeiro Peggy Huradiah, Moruca
Region # 2 Nursing Assistants
No Names Address
1 Itwan Savitri 29 Columbia, Esseq. Coast
2 Phillips Saantha 58 Lina Public Road, Esseq
3 John Shonette. A -20 ZorgVillage, Esseq.
4 Rannarine Jenelle St. Deny's Mission Tapakurm
5 Harricharran Jaiwantie 29 New Road, Esseq
6 Roopnarine Durga. A 17 Columbia, Esseq
7 Richmond Devicka. S 711 Goed Hope, Esseq
8 Walcott Zerolene. V 140 H / Scheme, Charity

Region # 3 Professional Programme
No Names Address
1 Singh Dasuntie. R 2 Harlem West Coast Demerera
2 Patrick Quanza. T 119 Middle Road, Stewartville
3 Charman Anjanie 9 Alliance # 2 Canal Polder
4 Zephyr Vedda. Z 12 electra H/ Scheme, Nismes
5 Becte Onica. A 5 Ged Intent Village, WCD
6 Smith Nikois.A 23 Langevine St Den Amstel WCD
7 Sceraim Anorhada Vive La Force. WBD
S Jacobs Mariam. R 177 Block'8' Plantation Tuschen
9 Ivy-Grant Stuart Ivy 116 Unity St, La Grange. WBD
10 George Alicia 913 Sister's Village, Wales WCD
I 1 Bhagwandin Tenashna 97 Best Village. WCD
12 Bowman Shanice. A 33 Crane FH Scheme, WCD
13 Coleman Geneva Atoya Lot 1 fann Village. EBE
14 Sookram Sharda. D 14 Block'20 Tuschen EBE
15 Massiah Veneita. A 27 Church St. Stanlevtown, WBD
16 Budhan Natasha. N Monashi EBE
17 Griffith Michelle. N 158 Crane H/ Scheme WC[D
1 S Calrington Danel. E 101 Nismes WBD
19 Trim Giwendolyn. 0) 120 Main Road, Parika
20 Sinh Vastie Tcwkcsburv, Leguian


Region # 4 Nursing Assistants
No Names Address
I Tieschmaker SoneAnn 3Noton St. \\erk-n-Rust. Cieorto\\ n
2 Mars Reniska .D Police Officers' Mess, tIve Learv. (ieoregto\\ n _


Grant Niamby. MN
Carmichael [)Dvon. M
Jerome Vanessa. A
eTlford Zola. N


+--I


7 Thomas Maureen .1:


349 Timchri [ill Top. !ast Bank Demerara
2() I aknd-en-Veldt Mlahaica East. East Coast Demcerara
5 Princess St. Charlesto\ n. Georgetolw n


50 Old Road Bu\ton Front. East 'Coast Demerara


23 Rox anne B1urnham Garden. Ruimi\ eldl. G(ieorcto _


.1 U- m m--I--- -I -~-18 ~IIBCCI I-LIC~ P


3
4
5
6


--


m


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE, December 24, 2006


MINISTRY OF IHEALTII NOTICE (CON'T)


Region # 4 Nursing Assistants con't
8 Wilson Kelita. K 742 West 5th St. Paradise. East Coast Deneram r
9 Reynolds Petrinella. O W /121 Lanimal St. Newtown Kitty, Georgetow
10 Pellew Aneca. F 52 Clonbrook Housing Schelne, East Coast Demn q 'a
11 Behan-vLall Chaitnmttie Helena No. 1 Mahaica, East Coast Det l iira
12 FiaserTracy. F 3 Cpverden East Bank Denrrara
13 Ritchie Abiola J 46 Norton St. BagotstoMn, East Bank Xlen-lara
14 Belle Tanica. A B Louisa St. Wortrniville, kGeogetownl
15 LykenPetra. A 1'60 Fricndship Village, East Coast Denl1itur
16 Janes Debbie. M 110 friendship Village, East Coast Deniara
17 Lancaster RBnmona. A Grant Sand Road Soesdyke, East Bank ntnrran
18 Jainam Vanita. D 98 GCunette St. Newtown Kitty, Geoigetlwn ;
19 Chan Farah. R 2()9 Block 8 Tusclhen New Scheme, -ist Bank
Essequibo
20 Daniels Wanda. P 20 South Vryheid's Lust. East Coast Denrmm i
21 Sears Slhenrne. S 4 Niblic Road Bagtstown, East Bank D.emarAu |
22 Halley iackalia. L 4:ivepool Cotul, Hibiscus Drive, West Ruimveldt
23 Lewis Duan. K 64 Duncan St. Newto\M Kitty, Georgetown
24 KryenhoffJavita .G 27 D'urbam xSti et, xloge, Georgetowni
25 Fieeman Jacl .A 77 Roxanne BtunliamGrden. Ruimveldt, Georgeto\\n
26 Bradfrd OCQcssa .P I Section A Victoria, East Coast Dmnermu
27 Austin June. A 2 Victoria Public Road East Coast Demenueim
28 Hetsberger Monica. V 41 Prince William Street, Plaisuance, East Ctst
Danennu
29 Hawker Seia .S 989 Pattensen Turkeyen South, IEst Cxist XDen-ranm
30 Mrison Jennifer. A 235 South Sophia. D Field Seven. Geotrgetown
31 Glasgow Janelle. C 2 1,4 DR Sil\a Street, Newt-own Kitty. (ieogetown\
32 Griffith Jhonelle.A 10 Public Road, Me Doom Village, East Baik
14nemran
33 Gilbert Shaon .A 59J3ent ~ad Lint Street, Wedk-en-Rtist. (lGegetot\n
34 Duncan Sadie. A 2510 North Ruimvneldt. (Gorgetown \
35 (qoriah-Roslani Sheny. A 13' KingEdwauid Stieet, Albouystomn.(iei getoixn
36 Bowen Carl 24( DIaSilva Soeet, NewImt n Kitty. (eorgetomn
37 lbolford Donelle Ann 12l Shell Road Kitty Georgetown
38 Johnson Fraciella. A 61 Success Housing Scheme, East Coast [Da1urara
.39 Noble Anthony il09lCnmidcael St.eiNoth 'utinings BuiM.'.
Geooaetown
40 Canpbell Kisha .A 24 4New Stiet, Slpuenmdaawn'last Coast D[krnua
41 Daly Duaille. S 3537 Stevedomr Housing Scheme, Ruimweldt.
(________ orgtown\
42 Patterson Avanell U Santw Mission, Kluuni Creek, amnenua Ri\ler

Region # 5 Proiessional Programme
No Names Address
1 Fraser Tilicia. R 101 Main'St. Hometown WCB
2 Vaugln Alena.iO 90 Section'A'#22 Belair. WCB'
3 Burke Alexia. M 22 Farm Maichony
4 McPherson Telicka. A 22 Belair, WCB
5 Baksh Alicia j 71 Plantatio'Ross WCB
6 Carmichael Elvret. T 160 Tempi Village WCB
7 Goodluck Kwaine. 0 127 Edward'St. Rosignol Village
8 Gaffar Rafeena 9 Cotton tree Village WCB


Kamaloodeen Zaneeslta
Sealey Keon. R





I

i


r


11 Cotton Tree Village WCB
9 Railway Avenue Farm Maichony


9
10


No Names


1 Bunette Shance
2 Logan Nakasia. N


Muir Alexis. A
Selby Elicia. L.
John La Shawna. K


Region # 4 Professional Nursing
IAddress


20 Chateau Margot Railway Line, CI)


334 East Streetl South C'ummingsburg. Gcoraetown


26 B3 Grat Scheme. Craig Village, E13D
4 A Sheriff Street. Campbellville, Georgeto\wn
6(00 West Ruimveldt Housing Scheme. G.eorgetow\n


6 Anderson Latoya Shecneza 28 Queen Street. Kilty. Georgetown


7 Glasgow Shawana .S
8 Gidding Natoya
9 Sutton Diana .M
10 Damon Akesha. M
11 P.umanand Sonrati
12 Bryan Alana .R


13 Heeralall Vidya.wati


14 Peters Fiona
15 Austin Michelc. A


Kennedy O'Delc\ana. L
Beekhum Paranand. R
King Roschell. T
Thomas Olive. N


20 Goodridge Shonettc.S


21 Burihamn Kamana
22 Cyrus Monique. (


23 Kewcy Candace
24 Josiah Tiniesha
25 Ed\airds Angela. N
26 )Osborne llalimahi. I.
27 Datterdeen Naaslia. .
28 Singh lMecna
29 (inndison Shemele
30 BLnyan R.a\un
Singi UlnaD )evi
32 Con Renata. C'
133 cnfield Yolanda. N
4 Bmmiell Rlawlan. NM


74 Grant Sand'Road, Soesdyke. EBD
34 Fort Street, Kingston. Georgetown
6 Supply, East Bank Demermra
135 Mitchell S3. Section B, Field 2 Pattensen. !( t
4 Public Road. (o\e and John. ECD
42 Norton St-dcet. Woltmanville. iGeogcetovxn


109 Section C' Entepprise West. ECD


35 Garden of [ilen, last Bank Dmenarra
2 Friendship Front. East Coast Dememarm


R-

i


40 Nabacalis Public Road. tEs! Coast Dei.o.'
118 Parade Street. Kingston. Georgelown
48 West Ruimveildt I-lousing Scheme. (GeorLctV,
656 South Sophia. Section B 7. Georkgeto\ n .
46 Middle Walk. Paradise. East Coast Dcmcrari


SVvbmrn Farm. Stabrock Backlands. Chinese [mbil.m,..-
S296 Lamiaha Park. Last La Penetience. (Gker,, .-
24 1 ughghanic Park. Cummings Lodge. -( I)
265 South Vr"heid's Lust. EIast Coast ')ic;n
3064 North Ruimkn cldt. .,eo.rgblo', n
181 Jackson Stred. Republic Paik. ElI)


t I lecn No. 2. Mlahaica. ta.st (oast D)clr.,:
172 Marsholj Street. Annandale North. I (
S12'elltnr Lane South. Melanie Danlisha,;m.
8 I Jo1sph II Poll dore Sti-ccl. I1 lge. (,:,-:
268 S.ction [3L Non Pna1iclI.-Fast ( Coast )cn..
4) Luniaha Street. Nc\vto\ n Kit\. ( corne.'
- 21 Grahaim Strle. Plaisanlc. l sl Coast .
25 AR.ichmlund I lill. lackni.ie. Linden


35 Baljor Hemrlal (,86 (Aid IH-ope South. Iasl ( oast [X'li::: :
36 WillignWa ista.M .87 %u rbatli Road. McadmOk\bn~cok .i.i..
37 Tulsiei 1 ittie 32 l eat No. I. Mahaica. East Coas;t i v.
3 Oliver Staccv. M 24 Nu-ton Strivt. Woilinmanille. (ieo le,-,.
3) Cordis Anika. C' 52 lion 11. Nabacalis. Ii>,i. ast IXlD
-4) Blmine Donna 9i b) Bago\ illc. \\est Baniik Llki'.Ierar
41 .Iclie\ (icralda. | 2 I 2 Cu inning. I odge I !ui in Si.-
I in' nua! '

Region # 5 Nursing Assistants

No Names Address
1 Lewis Ustacia Louania 30 ViNllaie \\C('
2 Hookumchand lPaticai 1-92 Sect ion'D' BuS!: i
3 Scott Christel Corettit 1 "C' Belladrum \ U:,
4 Walters Tricia Leteslhi .Amorita S801 Rail\ay line = 2\
S Archibald Kingsel Stk.c 28 41 Vill


6 Mootoo Vimarsha ['
7 Ross Marcia Sandtintce
8 Percival Ruth Hannual
9 Wade Deonne Petula


Region # 6 Nursing Assistants
- - .. ... -. -- _ _-------------------L ___


A JA .--,,


N*:o .Na rmes Add Address
I Dudhnath Menawattic Vanessa 98 Susannah \'illacr. (L d


2 Lambert Kendra OlCntian


3 ..,l illuu Aleisha
4 Stoute Juel Alicia
5 Simon Abasenia
6 Paul Patrina Alexis


entvno11~


! MivO- & io\\ n ('Coticil N A


= 6 'C' Kildonan V illnage (orntvne
22 'A' Mattai St. Rose Ilali rfown
18 Symthlield NA -
452 Queen St Co('urland .Village


7 Harris Vadam4ttie :3 King St. N Amsterdam


S Hermon Nicola Veronica
9 Hughes Renaiia. R


I0 Mount Sinai West Can ie
S S\ mthl-iei \ A:.-nt.'t,',m


~1


3
I... .\C13
.t~.


18C -2 V\illace W(
Lovely Lass \'V ge. \h:1hio, \
.J7 Penh Village. \. .
5 Pianitatin Br.h.


rm


-1 -


i


__


i


N: V'-. --,





XVI SUNDAY CHRONICLE, December 24, 2006



MINISTRY OF HEAIfiT NOTICE (ON)
Region # 6 Professional Programme Region # 7 Hinterland Professional Programme


NoI Names Address
S! Coates Melveon. A I 3 1 Skiamp Section Rose Hall Town
-- I Sakur Fareezah 5A Kildonan Village. Corentyne
i Mangar Nandanee 108 3 St. 'Tain Settlement Port Mlourant
4 Pottayya Dropatie. .1 4 Brighton Village Corentvne
P5 ersaud Rehana 33 West Reliance Settlement East Canj ic
S Nero La Donna. A 339 5 St. Swamp section. Rose H-all lTomw
7 Benjamin Marcian. L 324 Swamp section Rose Hall Town
8S Caesar Julian 17 Glasgow Village New Amsterdam
S Ramdhany Indira. D 10-18 Church St. N'Anmsterdam
10 Din Nazir 1803 C'rabwood Creek Corentyne
1 I l ranis Rachelle. (
Mohamed Nazir Lot I Grant 1803 Crabw\ood Creek Corentvne
S-1 Agard Tammy 5155 Bermine H/ Scheme Vryman's Erven N A
4 Vannooten Carleen. C' 203 .Angoy,s Avenue NA
Si 'ersaud Rohini # Settlement Blainnont WBB


No Names Address
1 Atkinson Shamee7a j i 72 4 miles 11 / Scheme
2 Thomas Lconell a Karrau Creek Lower Mazaruni
3 Benjam in S uzetle. T 76 2 W: Miles Bartica
4 Bumelte Sonia Lot 5 First Bartica

Region # 8 Hinterland Nursing Assistant
No Names Address
I Bell Saliezeburgh I 1 Miles Mahdia

Region # 9 Hinterland Professional Programe
1 Atkinson Natasha St. Ignatius Village
2 Singh Micaila. A 68 culvert City
3 Andries Hannah. A Toka Village, North Rupununi
4 Ambrose Nicolc. T Lethem, Rupununi
5 Bernard Diane St Ignatius Village


Region# 9 Hinterland Nursing Assistants


Conrad Osana
Cornelius Rhonda


Aishalton Village South Rupununi
5 Culvert City


3 Jacobus Chyre _Aranaputa Village
4 Nash Natoya Annai Village
5 'Williams Urmia Annai Village


Region # 10) Professional Programme


Address


Fl-om Shenmiza. T1 212 Greenheart St Linden
HIutson Tomika. N 281 Wisroc H / Scheme
Major Walletta. J 84 Alstrom Alley. C' Burg
Glasgow Cenise. M 130 Wisroc H/ Scheme
Nicholson Teshanna. L 1469 Central Amelia's Ward
Ralph Sonya. O 53 Amelia's Ward
Fraser Stacia. A 1564 Central Amelia's Ward
I li nds Leon Anthony 173 Wi smar Hi Schemen
Htiggins Shinelle. 0 41 Half Mile, Wismar
liount Tiana. ( 56 Half Mile. Wismar
(ilasgow Ceanna. .\ 117 Wisroc Park
T1hImas Yulandee. 1 184 Block'22', Wislmar
(Grant Lisa.A Kwakwani Water Front Road


Sau;ers Asante. N
'CSemple Rene Brittan,


ir-aecsandc (Xiacia. \
S'dltkou I ./a. R
i i .i- ,, ,' i !
\bi')I' Nh\i ` '.


:I-
'ii. tk l ,ik_< t';:! ,'K id, i -


Kwakwani Park


649 Industrial Area. Linden


-_I


S26 Wisroc H Schenme
Lower i aira Kara. SpiCeh!lauind
.. ..... . Park
N 12 Block _22_ \v\iL
S32i \Visroc HI Sclheme
,85<- Iduistrial AVrea. Lindc


,' 'TFilc!
--~--Si Sil -lo\


Region # 10 Nursing Assistants

No Names Address
1 Allicock Ron 24 Rainbow City
2 Bouvea Aletha. V Cinderella City Amelia's Ward
3 Samuels Stacey. () 415 Block '22' 1- Mile
Wismar
4 Elliot Brian. O 182 Carter St. Kara Kara
5 Barrow Vanette. A 81 North Blue Berry Hill
6 Clementson Kenetta. C 1200 Central Amelia's Ward
7 Nggondo Tchaiko 909 South Amelia's Ward
8 Kingston Myel. L 22 Amelia's ward Self Help H/
Scheme
9 Hutson Ronetta. A 1 Cinderella City Linden
10 Gillis Shantel. N 167 1 Mile Block'22'
11 Chapman Weslyn 565 Ariula Oval Retrieve.
Linden


12 Jeffiey Ann. S
13 Croal Henk. M
14 Grant Duanne. A
15 Gordon Jonelle. A
10 Grandison Tessa. \
I' King lThesia. A
I --
I?, L.eitch Keen an ( :
i; Minro Bari ra


L i Thomas Lelnno\.'.
i i [ ctcr.ei, .\i'i ci '


114 Victory Valley, Wismar
146 Fraser Road Kara Kara
736 HWisroc H / Scheme
177 Wisroc Valley. Wismar
2507 Central ameli's Ward
30 John Alley, Linden
0122 Central Amelia's Waurd
KwI\akwlani 2nd Phase H
SI'h!,,'me
250 South \nmclia's Ward
'523 (ina\s Cit\
IS8 Dkamaa ('i'cle l.iiilden


By Order of the Permanent Secretary, Ministry oo Healt.h
.- 4 . . .. . . ,' t .. . . . . . . . . .. .


No Names


i


-- i ---I


WS. MVWI fM fBM r^^Moli-c!.


--





,a u,




Health & Safety




tipsfor Christmas

HRISTMAS is almost here and I know many of you look forward
to it with the same wonder, enjoyment and anticipation as when we
were still in our childhood. Last week we looked at how you can
minimize your environmental impact while you celebrate during this fes- Coopr tive Ropublic of Muy=a
tive season. We want Guyana to be clean and productive in the New Year.
Most people spend a great deal of time and money preparing for the holidays but the older and Mnistry of Health/GPHCo, Materials Management Unit
wiser we get, the more we realize that the season can have its downside alongside all the festivities,
parties and presents. The Ministry of Health/GPHCo has secured funding for the purchase of
the items below and now invites sealed bids from eligible and qualified
WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW DURING THIS HOLIDAY SEASON bidders for the supply and delivery of same:
One of the secrets of having a memorable Christmas is to be able to enjoy the fun, know- MoH 22/2006 Breast Milk Substitute (Over 6 months) (CDC
ing that the risks have been assessed and appropriate safety measures put in place. We .need Funded)
to consider some of the issues associated with Christmas such as; Christmas decorations. MoH 23/2006 2 xAmbulances
electrical safety and of course the perennial issue of drinking. We want everyone to enjoy Thedelivery period is2 monthsafter avardingofcontrct.
this most widely celebrated holiday season without having to face the aftermath of some tragic
event. 2. Bidding wNill be conducted through the National Competititive Bidding
By their very nature, many of our.arrangements for Christmas tend to be temporary; often make- B ed thr ou e N A .i
shift in nature and that fact alone greatly increase the risk of accidents occurring. Consequently, it's (NCB) procedures. specified in the ProcurementAc 2(03.and is open to
worth having a simple checklist on hand of what we need to keep in mind to minimize any additional all bidders. subject to provisions of Section IV (Eligible Countries) as
risks that might arise, defined in the Bidding Documents.
DECORATIONS Interested eligible bidders may obtain further information,
I am sure that you are in the process of decorating. People will be unpacking decorations that were clarification, and may examine and uplift bid documents (upon and
hastily put away last year so take care when unwinding the electrical pieces. Be careful when hanging I presentation of receipt from Ministry of Health/GPHCo- see#5
decorations because this often means stretching to an extent that would not be permitted as part of below) at the address in #8 belo\.from NMonday to Friday 9 am to 3 pil:
normal work activities. This all adds up to a recipe for falls that could easily result in bruises. frac-
tures or worse. 4. Qualifications requirements include: Valid certificates of Complince
from NIS and GRA which should be submitted for companies \\ith
CHRISTMAS TREES offices registered in Guvana. Additional requirements/ details are
Whether real or artificial it must be stable. Ensure that your Christmas tree is placed in a suitable pro\ idcd in the Bidding Documents.
location where it will not be a hindrance to people.
/ ELECTRIC L IS5. A complete set of Bidding Documents in English may be purchased by
ELECTRICA IS S interested bidders upon payment of a non refundable cash fee of:
Each year we see more and more ingenious variations in Christmas lights. Low voltage sets are MoH 22/2006 Breast Milk Substitute (Over 6 months) $ 10.000
obviously preferable so far as they pose less risk of electric shock, assuming they are properly in- MoH 23/200 2 Bret i Subes -$15 000
stalled. However, even low voltage equipment is capable of starting a fire if it is faulty. In order to o Ambulances -
plug in your lights (or other electrically operated decorations), there's a good chance you will be using
extension cables or at least have trailing wires. Ensure that you take extra precaution when connecting 6. Bids must be delivered to the address below (#9) at or before 9 am
your lights. January 2, 2007. electronicc hiddin will not he permlllcd. Late bids \\ ill
be rejected. Bids will be opened in the presence of the bidders'
DRINKING representatives who choose to attend in person at the address below at 9
For most people, Christmas wouldn't be Christmas without sharing a drink or two (or more), but am January 2, 2007. All bids must be accompanied by a Bid Security as
we have to be aware of the hazards that brings. Be responsible when drinking; ensure that you are listedbelow:
nothing putting yourself or anyone else at risk. MoH 22/2006 Breast Milk Substitute (Over 6 months) A hid
security of$ 120.000
FIRE MoH 23/2006 2 xAmbulances A bidsecurity of $250.00(0
Fire is an ever present danger. We've already mentioned some of the hazards, but we left the topic
till last because most everything else we have considered so far can contribute to the risk of irp sarl- .7. Purchasing of Bid Documents (see #5 also):
ing or of hindering a prompt response should fire break out. As a reminder these are some of the i sues For Project 22/06: Cashier -Accounts Department (Ground l'/or)i
that need urgent attention: !i"
that eed urgent attention: MinistrofHealth. Bikdam. Georgetown
-Don't allow waste combustible materials to accumulate, but keep the premises as ean For Project 23/06: (C shier -Accounts DLeprtmn'nt (Blue l' d itlute
and tidy as at any other time of the year. ing)
Ensure decorations, Christmas .ees, greeting cards, etc. are positioned to avoi4'tem ;Georgetown .Public Hospital Corpoporatio,n. New Atr rkel Srliet
catching fire or contributing to the spqpd of fire shouldit occur. i G'e ,'it i on J'
Ensure al electrical items are d for safety and there are no trailing cablesdaisy
chained extension cables, etc. In other s, good cable management is important even when 8. Furtheation, clarification, examination and upliftingbid
the installation is o .. e... .
the installation is on temporary docume~ (tpon presentation of receipt from Ministry of Healthi
If you must electric lightly r leave them switched on when.tte premise1 are#3a
empty. In fact, it is ed to unpluge a" e y .e
lp *"K B^ i *:s9r' 'l .. i,., r. ,' a d / A, ,,lk run .ie ( "ti # al
Jj,* "'. l '' '...". ; ...... .. ''* "'-' .\ ,, ,,, M/i,, ,', Un, t ,,,, ..o, ,, Hlc,,hh a'-'u '
Merry tmas! -ol ..,1i/. "u '.='""" ," .
C h. .' 51 i 22 .) i,7 7 , ', n ,,.. h hu i .. ,:

9. JFor Bid Suhlttissiona (111 d lidolleninig (xcee#6 also)

yIourilettersto:["Ou rEni me "Co I Divisilon ".En-, l i ,,/il ci d1,'.,,-
vr' [IIt~'/I ri I 'l",B ItIldi g/t(/
O CampusGREA TERGEORGETOWh/N.Or/emai./d/h.us,,


XVII


Y ADNUS CHRONICLE 6






XVIII SUNDAYCHRONICLE, December 24, 2006


Sponsored by the Guyana-UNEP-GEF

National Biosafety Framework Project


Brief Introduction to Guyana's


Draft Biotechnology, Biosafety &


Biosecurity policy Part 3


Current Regulatory situation Pertaining to GMOs [Continued
from last week]

Guyana has a plethora of laws and regulations but none pres-
ently fulfills the entire spectrum of requirements of the
Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety. Though the EPA Act of 1996
articulates an EIA requirement for GMO projects the details
for such a complex process have never been defined or tested.
Contextually, the EPA Act is premised on five principles of en-
vironmental management for the determination of environ-
mental impact and risk, namely:

> The "Polluter pays" principle
> The "Precautionary" principle
> The "Strict liability" principle
> The "Avoidance" principle
> The "State of technology" principle

'The New Biosafety Regulatory Regime and Need.

Institutional Framework

The competent body shall be the National Biotechnology and
Biosafety Council of Guyana (NBBC) (or National Biosafety Au-
thority (NBA)), a semi-autonomous body that shall be set up ini-
lially as a semi-autonomous body within the EPA. All appoint-
ments to the sub-Committee shall be for a five-year term. The Presi-
dential Adviser on Science and Technology (or designated Minister
responsible for Science and Technology) shall appoint members.
The composition of the NBBC (or NBA) shall reflect the present
reprcsentation-on the National Coordinating Committee of this NBF
Project. However, efforts must be made to include persons from
the private sector. Members of the NBBC (or NBA) shall include
expertise in human and veterinary medicine, agriculture, plant breed-
ing. microbiology, molecular biology, environmental protection, food
production and processing, social science, economics and military
science. The NBBC will provide oversight to the Guyana Biotech-
nology Corporation (GBC), which shall be legitimised by an act of
Parliament. The GBC shall be established at either lAST (Institute
of Applied Science and Technology) or NARI after an assessment
of institutional mandate and ease of alignment.


Suggested Composition of the NBBC (or NBA)
The NBBC (or NBA) shall be an independent regulatory
agency by law constituted as a multisectoral body comprising
the following:
1. Chairman
2. Vice-Chairman
3. Two Representatives of the EPA drawn from:
a. The division of Environmental Management of the EPA
b. The division of Natural Resource Management of the EPA
4. Director of Food and Dru-s department of the Ministry of
Ilcalth
5. Director of NARI
6. Chairman of the Pesticides and Toxic Chemicals Control
Hoard
7. Chairman of the National Commission of Codex Alimentaruis
8. Representative of the Private Sector Commission
9. Representative of the Amerindian Conimunity


Promote accumulation of knowledge, dissemination of infor-
mation, create active dialogue between researchers and other spe-
cialists, politicians and other citizens;
Draw up, implement and monitor appropriate occupational
safety protocols at work places where biotechnology procedures'
are used or products handled;
Advise on appropriate labelling of GMOs in'feedstuffs and
feeds sold in or imported to or through Guyana;
Defend the image of the country in the field of biotechnol-
ogy. biosafety and biosecurity;
Create and maintain a bio-informatics database as well as an
information and promotion website;
Representing the biotechnology industry overseas
Regulation and administration by the GBC, and assisted by
NBBIU shall include, but not limited to the following:
Agricultural law enforcement, crops and livestock disease con-
trol, registration of livestock importation and agricultural products;
Environmental impact assessment and food safety review
functions;
Industrial practices review and import/export management
functions;
Occupational food safety standards review functions;
Customs and excise functions with respect to GMOs;
Border control and forensic science with respect to GMOs;
Policy integration and institutional coordination functions;
Marine research management, stock assessment and impact
assessment processes:

The GBC will develop a regulatory framework for GMOs. One
of the key elements to consider when developing the regulatory
framework is public involvement in the decision-making processes.
Once a regulatory framework for GMOs is in place, requests for
commercial approval of individual GMOs can be processed. The
decision making process needed to provide an entry point for con-
sultation with the public, and provisions for taking into account
feedback from groups of the public. That entry point could take a
number of forms: such as a committee containing representatives
of the public, feedback through a focal point, or a formal process
of submission of a decision to the public. In addition, there had to
be a recourse procedure for appeal of a decision, as well as access
to justice.
The decision-making process includes a risk assessment, which
according to Codex Alimentarius, is defined as "a scientifically based
process consisting of the following steps:
(i) hazard identification,
(ii) hazard characterisation,
(iii) exposure assessment, and
(iv) risk characterisation.
After individual GM products have been approved, the regula-
tory framework may include provisions for post-release monitor-
ing of the impacts of GMOs, where feedback from.the public, es-
pecially those in rural areas where they are produced, would be of
particular importance.
All GMOs must be identified and labelled such that they can
be traced. Products thereof must also be labelled stating the fact
that there is evidence of the presence of GMOs in the product.
Labelling is also required to indicate that the presence of GMOs in
a product cannot be excluded, if this were the case. Further, the
label must forewarn of any allergies, reactions or other side effects
that the GMOs or products thereof may cause. The GNBS in col-


10. Representative of the Farmers' Association
II. Representative of the Guyana Consumers Association
12. Representative of the National Science and Technology Re-
se.irch Council
13. Representative of the Guyana Biotechnology Corporation Nat l
National Biotechnolc
14. Representative of the Religious community Authority
15. Representative of the Minister of Industry. Commerce and
Tourism
16. Representative of the Minister of Foreign Trade and Inter- Guyana Biotechnology
national Coo peration (GBC)
17. Re-resentative of the Attorney-General and Minister ol Le- AST or NARI
UG, Private Sector 6
SAffar National Science E
18. Representative of the Lands and Surveys Commission Technology Council

The mission of the Council (or Authority) must be based on
i!hi principles otillined in a earlier installment in this series. The func- Public
l .r the NBBC shall be as follows: Participation
SCoordii'tile research and development;
'Receive and process applications;
Ensure publicc education and awareness on relevant issues per-
.iining to biotechnology. biosafety and biosecurity in a timely man-
*> ,-,, ', ;,t -,r t" ..'.. *'. ,- '.... :*'- .*.r
1,71 ~ 40
"Mi


I Environmental Protection Agency


laboration with the GA/FDD can convene a select committee to
draft and have ratified, labelling standards for GMOs in Guyana.
This policy proposes that the Organisation for Economic Co-
operation and Development (OECD) system of unique identifiers
for transgenic plants be used when referring to GE crops. A unique
nine-digit letter and number code is given to each new transgenic
plant that is approved for commercial use and becomes its name
worldwide. So, for instance, any unique variety of maize developed
to be resistant to insect pests has a unique identifier of MON-
00810-6 (Monsanto) or cotton denoted by DD-01951A
(DuPont). OECD countries are already using the system. The EU
recently adopted it as its system for generating unique identifiers
and it has been recognized as a mechanism for unique identification
to be used within the context of the Cartagena Protocol. The OECD
is now considering how the identifier tool can be extended beyond
crops to micro-organisms and animals
Separation of Biotechnology development and biosafety regu-
lation functions

A regulatory agency cannot and must not be the same to pro-
mote technology development and entrepreneurship in biotechnol-
ogy. To ensure the separation of regulatory functions from biotech-
nology enterprise development functions, the following alternate


Fig. 1: Suggested organizational relationships for the Biosafety
regulatory framework in Guyana


Yet another unauthorized experiment in gter.etically-modified food

Close o Home By John McPherson


Email address:
caesarbiosafety
@yahoo.com
The National
Biosafety
Framework
Project is ex-
ecuted under
the auspices of
the Environmen-
tal Protection
'Ager)iey







SUNDAY CHRONICLE, December 24, 2006 .




I'm truly enjoying myself: HrithikRoshan


HRITHIK Roshan's popular-
ity has scaled new heights
with the success of "Dhoom
2" and the superhero says in
a matter of fact tone that he
deserves it.
"I'd like to believe no one
gets what they don't deserve.
I've to keep growing," Hrithik
told IANS in an interview.

"Looking at where I'm
coming from 'Koi Mil Gaya',
'Lakshya', 'Krrish' going to
'Dhoom 2' and 'Jodha-Akbar',
it's like the whole spectrum. As
an actor I'm getting to explore
different areas. I'm truly enjoy-
ing myself.

"Dhoom 2" has benefited


other actress. We've.one more
film together and we better look
good."

Hrithik is truly excited about
"Jodha-Akbar".

"It takes me to a place
where I've never travelled, not
even in my imagination. The
journey has already become very
fascinating for me. I've been
reading up books on the Mughal
rulers. Rest of the research is be-
ing done by Ashutosh
Gowariker."


Q: You've suddenly shot
into the biggest league.


my leg got caught in the stirrup.
I got dragged on the ground a
bit. I suppose these things will
keep happening.

Q: But accidents keep
happening to you quite fre-
quently.

A: Yeah, I know. I think I've
'people's. good wishes with me.
In spite of these accidents noth-
ing serious happens to me. The
only way to perfection is to fall
and rise. Ifyou don't fall, you
never know the pleasure of ris-
ing, A child needs to stumble be-
fore he learns to run.

Q: But now you're a fa-
ther too, hence the added re-


With Aishwarya Rai in Dhoom 2 in a scene before their controversial kiss in the movie.


Hrithik in one more way his
pairing with Aishwarya was
widely appreciated and they
will be seen again in Ashutosh
Gowariker's "Jodha-Akbar".

"We were considered a
mismatch. With our light eyes
and fair skin, we were almost
seen as siblings. I don't think
I've looked better with any


A: I'd like to believe no one
gets what they don't deserve.
I've to keep growing.

Q: What preparations are
on for "Jodha-Akbar"?

A: Swords are breaking.
Horses are throwing me off
(laughs). Thankfully, it wasn't a
serious fall. The only thing was


sponsibility.

A: Right. That's why I
stretch myself a little more so I
set a good example for him. It's
more important to learn to rise
after the fall than to not'fall.

Q: No what I meant was,
the risks you take could af-
fect your son if, god forbid,


something were to happen to
you.

A: Sure, I've to exercise
that little bit of caution for
Hrehaan's sake. I guess I fell off
the horse during the rehearsals


for "Jodha-Akbar" so it doesn't
happen with the camera on....

Looking at where I'm com-
ing from "Koi Mil Gaya",
"Lakshya", "Krrish" going to
"Dhoom 2" and "Jodha-
Akbar", it's like the whole spec-
trum. As an actor I'm getting to
explore different areas. I'm truly
enjoying myself.

"Jodha-Akbar" takes me to
a place where I've never trav-
elled even in my imagination.
The journey has already be-
come very fascinating for me.
I've been reading up books on
the Mughal rulers. Rest of the
research is being done by
Ashutosh Gowariker. He's ab-
solutely amazing.

Q: A nice contrast for you
and Aishwarya Rai after
"Dhoom 2"?

A: Yes, people are already
talking about how good we're
looking together in "Dhoom 2".
That feels good, considering at
one time we were considered a
mismatch. With our light eyes
and fair skin we were almost
seen as siblings. I don't think
I've looked better with any
other actress. We've one more
film together and we better look


good.

Q: You've entered a new
phase in your life.

A: I've never felt more
alive. I'm evolving with each
step. People don't grow old.
When they stop growing they
become old. I never want to get
there. You just have to keep
evolving.

Q: Earlier there was a
criticism that you put too
much intensity into every
part...

A: Well, you evolve as an.
actor. You get better with every
shot. I've given my best to ev-
ery shot I've done. So, what-
ever I did at that time was right
for back then. And I'll never
look back with regret at any-
thing I did. But yes, of course,
I've become more casual before
the camera. There's no better
teacher than experience.

It's only after seven-eight
films that every, actor begins to
realise his potential. I think I've
got there now. You know I grew
up watching movies that gave
me a supposedly ideal view of;
how a hero behaves. Somewhere
that got stuck in my mind. Most
of the initial work that an actor
does is played out of reference.
You've seen an actor hold a gun
in a particular way. And you get
unconsciously, influenced into
doing the same. Once those in-
fluences melt, you begin to dis-
cover your own individuality.

Q: People used to say you
clicked only with your dad.

A: People would find
some way to give their own
egos a boost, even if it means
making such irresponsible
statements. Please ask them
to look at the collections of
"Krrish". It's the biggest hit
of my career. And, if I've a
director (father Rakesh
Roshan) at home, who can
conceive ideal projects for
me, why shouldn't I make
use of it?

Q: Your dad's next super-
hero film?


A: He's going through
\arious story ideas. "KrriA"
will live on even if Ii isn'l
my next film with mi dad
Yes we've thought of iurnitli
"Krrish" into a comic-book
character, or an animation
character. Dad is exploring
various possibilities:'

Q: Your future plans,

A: "Jodha-Akbar" right
away. Then Zoya Akhtar's Im.
'Dates are in place.

SQ: Final question, are
you obsessed with y ur
looks?

A: The true freedom '#nd
flight of an actor can only I4ap.
'pei when he can break through
1


that cage of physicali\.- At
some point all of s have to stop
trying to look good all the time
This vanity keeps every actor
chained down. I'm trying tb go
.beyond that. It isn't easy t4 go
.beyond your physicalitN. Fi-
nally, when you face the cam-
era it's your connectivity with
the character that counts.

Q: You've been experi-
menting a lot with your
looks.

A: All the' compliments
that have come to me for m)
looks in "Dhoom-2" must go
to my stylist Anaida. Not that
I ever had a style. But ,.s,
I've been changing' my Id.ks
for all my films. You've to
.keep challenging yourself.
I'll be changing my looks,
clothes and entire staince'for
all my roles. It's part of-my
evolution as an actor.
(Bollywood World)


CHAMPION


Cookery Corner

Welcome to the 431"t edition of
"Champion Cookery Corner", a
weekly feature giving recipes and
tips on cooking in Guyana.


IChristmas is over, you're staring at the turkey and ham leftovers and don't have tih
energy or inclination to make another full meal. What do you do? Here are "somI
suggestions!


1/4 cup green pepper, diced
1/4 cup onion, diced
2 tbsp. butter or margarine
1 can.cream of celery soup
3/4 cup milk
2 cups ham, diced
3 cups cooked rice
4 oz. Smoked or Cheddar cheese,
shredded
' mA tspirsal't '
.Add milk if too dtsy


Heat butter over medium heat: brown green
pepper and onion.

Add soup and milk; blend well.

Add ham, rice, cheese, and salt.

Pour into casserole dish. Top with bread or
cracker crumbs (or crushed potato chips).

Bake at 350 degrees tbr 30 minutes.


3 cups cooked turkey or chicken, chopped
3/4 cup butter, divided
1/ cup flour
1 teaspoon salt, divided
1/8 teaspoon Chico Black Pepper
2 1/4 cups chicken broth
Ie 1 Cup whole milk or 2%" low-lfat milk
e' 2tcups loasted-bread cubes
I cup chopped yellow onions
I teaspoon (roasted) minced garlic
3/4 cup.chopped celery
1 (4 ounce) carn mushrooms. chopped
3/4 teaspoon ground sage
.1/4 Clip grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

SPO'.WORE)D BH

Baking Powder
Custaid Powder P< f
Black Pepper


In a saucepan over medium heat, melt 'U, cup butter, then.
stir in the flour. '. tsp salt. and Chico Black Pepper and
lower the temperature and cook o\er low until bubbly
and golden. Gradually whisk in the broth and milk and
simmer for 4 minutes while continuing to \whisk, then
taste and add more salt and Chico Black Pepper, if you
like: set the sauce aside.
In a large bowl. toss together the bread cubes. onion.
garlic, celery. mushrooms. remaining ' tweaspooro salt.
sage, and remaining 1.4 cup melted buter: toss well to
coat. Add the chopped turkey meat and sauce and-n.ix
well. Pan spray a 2-quart casserole dish and! pjuui
dressing-chicken-sauce mixture into the dish: tip \w iih
the grated Parmesan. cover, and bake at 350 degrees F
for 45 minutes, then uncover and bake 10 to II o l'ce
minutes until Parmesan isgolden.

'THE .IA.VLU CTtRERS OF,

Icing Sugar
TA Curry Powder
Garam -iasa!a


Scalloped Turkey Casserole


I I -1 I -I I III U


ill


i


*t
























































Mumbai, Bollwood actor
Sanjay Dutt looked tense and
paced up and down as a spe-
cial court Thursday extended
his bail till Jan 18 along with
those of seven others con-
victed in the 1993 Mumbai
bombings.
The TADA court will take
up that day the quantum of sen-
tence on the eight, all of who are
seeking relief under the Probation
of Offenders Act for good con-
duct while being on bail.
A battery of lawyers, in-
cluding V.R. Manohar, Santosh
Mansingde, Karan Singh and
Farana Shah, represented Dutt.
The other seven accused
are Russi Molla and Kersi
Adjania, former additional cus-
tom collector Somanth Kakai.m
Thapa, Yusuf Nalwala,
Zabanussa Qazi, Imtiaz Gowte
and Mubinabhaya
Bhiwandiwalai.
Judge Pramod Kode said he
was giving time to both sides so
that they could place their sub-
missions under the Probation of
Offenders Act and tih argu-
ments on the quantum of ,en-
tence.
When Dutt appeared for
bail Nov 28, it was extended un-
til Dec 19. That day, it was fur-
ther extended until Thursday.
Judge Kode is presently
hearing arguments on quantum
of sentence to 92 others con-
victed in the 1993 bombings
that killed 257 people in
Mumbai on a single day in
March. It was the world's worst
urban terror attack until then.
Objecting to the defence
plea for extension of bail, spe-
cial public prosecutor Ujjwai
Nikam said: "We are objecting
on the ground that the provision
for the Probation of Offenders
Act cannot he moved at this


ai, LANS) NOW that her problems with the customs department
ended, there are joyful tidings for Bollywood's beauty queen
warya Rai. She is back in Jaipur shooting for Ashutosh
wariker's "Jodha-Akbar" with Hrithik Roshan.
"It's going greal!'" Aishwarya exulted from Jaipur as she prepared for
he day's shoot.
So, has she done any horse riding and sword-fightng as yet'"
"None of the above. But I rode an elephant for a scene. And his name
was Lakhi. After 'Dhoom 2' and its hi-tech ambience and accessories, enter-
ing a world of elephants and Mughal grandeur is a true culture shock. And a
real challenge for both Hrithik and me after 'Dhoom 2'," Aishwarya told
IANS,
"But what's the life of an actor without challenges? I'm at a stage in my
career where I need to constantly re-invent myself."
About the elephant ride, Aishwarya explained with a giggle, "It wasn't
exactly a unique experience. I've ridden an elephant before for Gurinder
Chaddha's 'Bride & Prejudice', though very briefly.
"In 'Jodha-Akbar' everything is far more elaborate. I guess I must
be the only actress of my generation to have taken two elephant rides."


Twin baby girls arrived on Thursday for Sean
"Diddy" Combs and his girlfriend Kim Porter.
One of the tins, D'Lila Star, was named after
Porter's grandmother Lila Star. OK. that's a nice
name, and a good reason.
And her little sister? She was named Jesse
James, after Diddy's grandmother, Jessie.
You read that correctly. Somehow, Diddy's
grandma's name morphed from the feminine 'Jessie'
into the name of the West's notorious outlaw, Jesse
James, without a blip.
There's no indication that Grandma Combs
was a six gun-toting outlaw who waylaid stage-
coaches and robbed banks throughout the Old
West. It must be a Hollywood thing.


Trump and O'Donnell wars


of words over beauty queen


NEW YORK (Reuters) Two
of America's biggest mouths
were at war, trading insults
and threats over a fallen
beauty queen.
Comedienne Rosie
O'Donnell on Wednesday's
"The View" talk show took is-
sue with Donald Trump, who in
a news conference on Tuesday
said he would let troubled beauty
queen Tara Conner continue her
reign as Miss USA 2006 if she
agreed to attend rehab.
"Trump "left his first wife
- had an affair. Left the second
wife had an affair. Had kids
both times. But he's the moral
compass for 20-year-olds in
America." O'Donnell said, flip-
ping her hair over to mock his
famous comb-over hairstyle.
Trump, who co-owns the
company that produces the
Miss USA and Miss Teen USA
pageants, fired back, telling
"Entertainment Tonight." "I'll
probably sue Rosie because she
doesn't tell the facts."
In an interview with the Fox
News Channel, Trunmp ridiculed
O'Donnell's looks and said,
"I'm going to surprise Rosie,
but I guarantee I'll have a lot of
Rosie's money, you know, right
out of her big, fat pocket.


She continued: "Here's
ifradJ 1 ileae Kelli m comment to him
je someone %ii h a (Trunpi." then made a
name o\er and ln'Ie smirk.


Miss USA Tara Conner listens to Donald Trump (L) during a news conference in New
York, December 19, 2006. Comedienne Rosie O'Donnell on Wednesday's "The View"
talk show took issue with Trump, who in the news conference on Tuesday said he
would let troubled beauty queen Conner continue her reign as Miss USA 2006 if she
agreed to attend rehab. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson


Ii