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Guyana chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00227
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Portion of title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown, Guyana
Publication Date: 12/17/2006
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
sobekcm - UF00088915_00180
Classification: lcc - Newspaper N & CPR
System ID: UF00088915:00227
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text




S UN DA '


The Chronicle is at http://www.guyanachronicle.com


A TICKET TO YOUR

DREAMS!
RESULTS HOTUNE 225-8902

*IJ]ei:M tlo


CAUGHT IN MESH
OF MISTAKES
r TORONTO (Reuters) -' Just about everything that
could go wrong did go wrong for a would-be robber
last week and led to his quick arrest.
While trying to rob a convenience store in


Edmonton, Alberta, on Wednesday the man slammed the till with
an aluminium baseball bat, jamming it before the clerk could open
it, police said. went a litte south after that," said Lisa Lammi
"I think things went a little south after that," said Lisa Lammi
of the Edmonton police.
As the robber tried to open the broken till, the clerk escaped,
and with the help of others, barred the robber from leaving through
the front door.


project Page eight


The back exit was locked and barred.


WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF


THE taxi driver shot by a hijacker Friday was last
night still under intensive care after emergency sur-
gery at the Georgetown Public ... Page eight







2 SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006 3


resident


down


for agri

diversification


'We don't need

complicated monitoring

& evaluation schemes'


PRESIDENT Bharrat Jagdeo
yesterday told Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank (IDB)
Representative Geoffrey
Cannock that Guyana will not
be using the bank's Agricul-
ture Exports Diversification
Framework model since its
systems would make the local
initiative slower.
The Government Informa-
tion Agency (GINA) quoted the
President as saying that Guyana
needs to implement several
strategies and programmes si-
multaneously to move the pro-
cess faster.
"I can't see clear output. At
the end of spending this money,
what are we going to achieve?
The model that we're going to
use is the model similar to the
GTIS (Guyana Trade and Invest-
ment Support) model," he stated.
"We don't need compli-
cated monitoring and evaluation
schemes. They (GTIS) monitor
and evaluate every week be-
cause of the way they've
organised the work", he added.
Mr. Jagdeo was speaking
during yesterday's agricultural
diversification summit at the
Guyana International Conven-
tion Centre, Turkeyen.
According to GINA, the
President said the government
had been negotiating with the
IDB for some time on an agri-
diversification loan, and a few
weeks ago the loan document
was prepared and he perused it.
"I must commend the good
work that was done in the docu-
ment but yet, I thought some-
thing was missing. I thought it
was a bit mechanical, and I
thought that it did not (maybe)
answer all the questions that we


need to ask..."
"...we need to ask those
questions and have them an-
swered in a collective way be-
fore we start building a loan
programme which supports the
strategy," the President said.
"We have to agree first of
all on what that strategy will be
and what its primary focus will
be and that is why we're here
today," he added.
GINA said that following
the IDB Representative's pre-
sentation, President Jagdeo
pointed out that every week the
GTIS team meets representa-
tives in the agriculture sector
where feedback is given.
Unlike the model outlined
by the IDB, Mr. Jagdeo said,
Guyana needs a monitoring and
evaluation programme that runs
concurrently with the imple-
mentation of the programme for
it to be fully useful with feed-
back daily.
"In spite of all the difficul-
ties, there are sectors that we
can work with now. We don't
have to wait on capacity-build-
ing in the public or private
institutions.., .as we go along we
will address the constraints", he
stated.
GINA said Mr. Carl Larkins
of GTIS and the United States
Agency for International Devel-
opment (USAID) also made a
presentation on the work being
done by his body to assist in
marketing Guyana's agricul-
tural, aquaculture and forestry
products.
The agency said there was
loud applause from pariulicipants at
the summit at the GTIS successes
so far. as Larkins noted that
through regullu meetings and the


I


B


turns





model


PRACTICAL APPROACH: President Bharrat Jagdeo at the opening of the summit yesterday. (Delano Williams photo)


collaborative efforts of the New
Guyana Marketing Corporation
(NGMC), the National Aquacul-
ture Association of Guyana, For-
est Products Marketing Council,
the private sector and others, mar-
kets have been sourced in the U.S.
for tilapia exports.
Larkins, it said, noted too
that an international company
has also expressed interest in
organic aquaculture in Guyana.
He reported also that the
North American market has


4
~ ~~bgt4'~ 3


A III


been targeted for the export of
fresh produce, including peppers
and pumpkins.
Larkins said Guyana can
grow other crops for exports on
a large scale and these are being
considered as the group meets
every week.
During the summit, other
small farmers expressed in-
terest in joining the initia-
tive, GINA said.


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4 'SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17 2006


MARAJ BUILDING

Offices To Rent

185 Charlotte & King Sts.

central Georgetown


Bush urges Iraq


reconciliation,


weighs options

By Caren Bohan

WASHINGTON, (Reuters) The Bush administration yes-
terday urged Iraq's Shi'ites, Sunnis and Kurds to move
forward on reconciliation, as President George W. Bush
weighed options for overhauling his Iraq strategy.
The White House praised a speech by Iraqi Prime Minis-
ter Nuri al-Maliki in which the Shi'ite prime minister made an
overture toward Sunnis by calling for the return of officers of
Saddam Hussein's disbanded army.
Bush, who plans early next year to announce an overhaul
of U.S. Iraq strategy amid growing public frustration with the
war, has said he will consider both the military and political
approaches.
But administration officials have declined to comment on
reports last week in the Wall Street Journal and the New York
Times suggesting Bush is giving strong consideration to a near-
term surge in U.S. troop levels.
The Journal said Friday that Bush was leaning toward tem-
porarily sending up to 20,000 more U.S. troops to Iraq but
that some U.S. military commanders had reservations and
Maliki disliked the idea.
And yesterday, The New York Times said military plan-
ners and White House budget analysts had been asked to pro-
vide options to Bush for increasing U.S. forces in Iraq by 20,000
or more. The article, which cited unnamed U.S. officials, said a
final decision had not been made but that the troop surge idea
was gaining favour.
Gordon Johndroe, spokesman for the White House National
Security Council, declined to comment specifically on the re-
ports of increasing troop levels.
Democrats, who are set to take control of Congress in Janu-
ary, are stepping up pressure on Bush to begin to draw down
to troops.
A main recommendation of the bipartisan Iraq Study Group
was to shift the role U.S. troops from a combat mission to one
of training Iraqi troops and said the United States could aim to
pull out most U.S. combat forces by early 2008.
Delivering yesterday's Democratic radio address, former De-
fence Secretary William Perry, a member of the Iraq Study
Group, said the United States risked being stuck in a "quag-
mire" in Iraq unless Bush changes course.
Bush has held meetings with a number of Iraqi officials,
including Iraqi Vice President Tariq al-Hashemi, a Sunni, and
Abdul Aziz al-Hakim, leader of the powerful Shi'ite Supreme
Council for Islamic Revolution in Iraq.
On the eve of a Baghdad conference on Iraq reconciliation,
Bush on Friday spoke with Maliki via a secure video link.
The conference brought together Kurdish, Shi'ite
Muslim and Sunni Arab politicians from Baghdad's rul-
ing coalition, and figures from Saddam Hussein's former
Baath party, many of whom have lived abroad since the
U.S.-led invasion in 2003.


By Wafa Amr
RAMALLAH, West Bank
(Reuters) President
Mahmoud Abbas called yes-
terday for Palestinian elec-
tions, throwing down the
gauntlet to his Hamas rivals
after days of factional vio-
lence that have sparked fears
of civil war.
Abbas said parliamentary
and presidential polls should be
held at the earliest opportunity.
but appeared to leave the door
open to the ruling Hamas by
saying renewed efforts should
be made to form a government
that could lift Western sanctions.
British Prime Minister
Tony Blair urged foreign govern-
ments to support Abbas while
the United Slates said it hoped
elections would enable peace
talks with Israel to resume. Is-
rael did not comment on the
election call, but lauded Abbas
as a moderate.
Gunmen from Hamas and
Abbas's Fatah faction clashed
hours later in Gaza and at least
six people were wounded, wit-
nesses said. They said the rivals
exchanged fire with automatic
weapons and rocket-propelled


to strengthen mutual coopera-
tion," China's top energy policy
maker Ma Kai said.
"(We will) promote conser-
vation of oil, improvement of
energy efficiency, strong devel-
opment of oil alternatives, and
reduce reliance on oil," he added
in prepared remarks to the fo-
rum.
The call to action may re-
flect a growing desire by China
to engage with other key energy
users, some of whom have
criticised its secretive approach,
price controls and a strategy
favouring Chinese ownership of
resources over spot buying of
oil.
It also echoed a shared con-
cern over increasingly national-
istic policies in major oil and gas
producers that threaten to sty-


mie investment and limit new
supplies.
In addition, producer cartel
OPEC will see its power expand
when new member Angola joins
next year.
"This is the first time an
energy conference is organised to
look at the interest of consum-
ers," Indian oil minister Murli
Deora told Reuters after the
meeting.
"Otherwise it is all OPEC
and the oil producers interests."
Ma emphasised that the
five countries had common
problems and could benefit from
a joint approach to them, al-
though delegates were already
pleased China was taking a more
prominent role.
"South Korea is hopeful
that the meeting hosted


by China which has been
rather inactive in energy co-
operation up until now -
will increase China's role as
an important partner in glo-
bal energy security," one of-
ficial in Seoul said.
The five consumer na-
tions will focus on diversify-
ing energy sources and in-
creasing efficiency to reduce
oil dependency, cooperating
on strategic oil reserves, and
encouraging more investment
in the industry to boost mar-
ket stability, according to a
ministerial statement issued
at the end.
They hope the dialogue
will become a regular event,
and Japan has already of-
fered to host the next round,
India's Deora said.


MEMBERS of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas's special forces stand guard around
the Palestinian authority headquarters in the West Bank city of Ramallah yesterday.
(REUTERS/Ammar Awad)


grenades.
Internal Palestinian tensions
are at their highest in a decade
after the collapse of months of
talks between the Hamas Islam-
ist movement and Fatah on


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forging a unity cabinet.
"I have decided to call for
presidential and parliamentary
elections ... The crisis is getting
worse," Abbas said in a speech
in the West Bank city of
Ramallah.
Hamas accused Abbas of
launching a coup and said the
president had no authority to
call early elections. Some Hanias
officials directed unprecedented
vitriolic attacks at Abbas.
The movement's leaders
said they would never allow\
early elections to be held but did
not say how.
"His speech of defeat was
a source of satire, laughter and
disgust. He has taken out his
sword against the Palestinian
people." senior Hamas law-


maker Mushir al-Masri told
thousands of Hamas supporters
at a protest rally in Gaza.
"The government is staying.
Whoever does not like that can
leave."
One Hamas official who
declined to be named said the
speech by the normally cau-
tious Abbas had "shocked" the
faction.
A senior Abbas aide, Saeb
Erekat, said elections could
not be held before the middle
of next year for legal and
technical reasons. He said
Abbas had to issue a presi-
dential decree to provide a
framework for the early
polls. After that, voter rolls
would need some 90 days to
be updated.


'- I/


RESULTS


ICIESLTSI DRAWDATE


E TICKET 2006-12-16 DRAW DATE 2006-12-16
BETTER BONUS ALL


B 222306 5 29 828 351


02


MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY


RESULTS


2006-12-11 17
2006-12-12 03
2006-12-13 08
2006-12-14 11


02 26 23 05
21 19 07 12
25 01 23 22
15 02 09 19


2006-12-15 14 20 09 24 14
2006-12-16 14 22 10 23 12


By Emma Graham-Harrison
BEIJING (Reuters) China,
hosting its first major energy
summit yesterday, urged top
oil consumers to join to-
gether in the face of resur-
gent producer power and
sought to paper over differ-
ences on how best to achieve
energy security.
Ministers from the United
States, India, Japan and South
Korea nations that consume
nearly half the world's oil -
gathered in Beijing for the meet-
ing, which marked a rare move
by China to take a leadership
role on global energy issues.
"We want to send out an
important, positive message,
which is: the world's key en-
ergy consuming countries plan


FRE
L


----ALJMNLM


-Ibbas calls for early Palstiian elections


m


I


i


a


----- __--


China, at energy summit,


urges oil consumers to unite






SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006 5


Lethal injection


halted in


Calif., Florida
SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) Botched executions in
California and Florida that required more than 30 min-
utes to kill condemned prisoners prompted a moratorium
of the lethal injection procedure in both states Friday.
Federal Judge Jeremy Fogel found California's method of
execution unconstitutional, concluding its "implementation of
lethal injection is broken, but it can be fixed."
The decision follows the state's 2005 execution in which
guards failed to connect a back-up intravenous line to Stanley
"Tookie" Williams, the former Crips gang leader who garnered
global publicity after writing anti-gang books.
Then on Wednesday Florida executioners botched the in-
sertion of needles into condemned killer Angel Diaz, which meant
lethal chemicals did not go directly into his veins, according to
the state's medical examiner.
Florida's incoming governor, Charlie Crist, responded Fri-
day by saying he would halt executions until a commission in-
vestigated the state's procedures.
Death penalty opponents have for years argued that lethal
injection is cruel and unusual punishment barred by the U.S.
Constitution, but only such recent instances have given legal
and political traction to their arguments.
"When properly administered, lethal injection results in a
death that is far kinder than that suffered by the victims of capi-
tal crimes," said Fogel, who earlier this year visited the death
chamber at San Quentin State Prison north of San Francisco.
"At the present time, however, defendants', implementation
of California's lethal-injection protocol lacks both reliability and
transparency," he wrote.
"In light of the substantial questions raised by the records of
previous executions, defendants' actions and failures to act have
resulted in an undue and unnecessary risk of an Eighth Amend-
ment violation. This is intolerable under the Constitution."
Lethal injection is used in 37 U.S. states, but legal challenges
have delayed such executions this year in not only California
and Florida, the first and fourth most populous states, but sev-
eral others including New Jersey and Ohio.
The United States has executed 53 people in 2006, a
10-year low, according to the Death Penalty Information
Center.



Four missing in

Mexican airforce

crash off Acapulco
MEXICO CITY, (Reuters) A Mexican airforce cargo plane
with four crew members on board crashed into the sea close
to the Pacific resort city of Acapulco yesterday, the govern-
ment said.
A team of divers backed by navy launches and helicopters
was searching for the four men missing after the accident.
In a statement, the defence ministry said the Antonov AN-
32B transport plane crashed while taking part in parachute ex-
ercises. The cause of the crash was unknown.
Over the past year, Acapulco, a once elegant resort
made famous by Hollywood stars like Errol Flynn. has be-
come a major battleground for rival drugs gangs and armed
attacks on police are frequent.


Riot force leaves troubled

ex st cty
ml' x"Lf- totstCly


OAXACA, Mexico. (Reuters)
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touci':' .'it; O)a'-;;;-;. .* .** -:'tL d; y.


trucks and miolled oul olf thlic city
'Tol-,dawn, (Iv/ h.;lln ill; -,M.'.';- s .'ctl-
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11 1.. [ i i I i n l i l r ii il !'i i Ix '! '' l i '


Fidel phones Cuban officials


HAVANA (Reuters) Ailing
Cuban President Fidel
Castro has spoken by tele-
phone to a meeting of Cuban
officials, the ruling Commu-
nist Party newspaper Granma
said yesterday in the first of-
ficial word on the 80-year-old
leader in 11 days.
Castro has not been seen in
public since an undisclosed ill-
ness forced him to relinquish
power to his brother in July.
The last glimpse Cubans had of


- Granma reports


him was a video clip released
on October 28 that showed a
frail and shuffling old man.
"The Commander in Chief
Fidel Castro spoke by tele-
phone to a work session of the
Provincial Assemblies of the
People's Power." the newspa-
per said in its online edition.
Castro listened to a sum-
mary of discussions at the meet-


ing held on Friday and got a
warm round of applause, the
newspaper said, giving no fur-
ther details.
Castro's illness has been a
tightly guarded secret since he
underwent emergency surgery
for intestinal bleeding that
forced him to turn over the reins
of power to his brother Raul
Castro on July 31.


FIDEL CASTRO


MANTA, Ecuador, (Reuters) -
In a move popular with many
Ecuadoreans, left-wing Presi-
dent-elect Rafael Correa has
pledged to get rid of a key
U.S. counter-narcotics opera-
tion based in the booming Pa-
cific port city of Manta.
But his refusal to extend the
U.S. base's lease and his friend-
ship with U.S. antagonist Presi-
dent Hugo Chavez of Venezu-
ela could put him at odds with
the country's largest trade part-
ner and its drive to stem the il-
legal drug trade.
Correa, a charismatic U.S.-
trained economist, has pledged
to challenge the country's po-
litical elites. During November's
election he used anti-American
rhetoric that played well with
many Ecuadoreans who see the
United States as a bully.
Correa, set to take office
next month, promised to cut his
arm off before prolonging the
base's lease that expires in 2009
and called U.S. President George
W. Bush a "dimwit."
"A symbol of sovereignty
for us is not having foreign
troops in our country. And for


that reason, we will not renew
the Manta military base," he
said while campaigning last
month.
Chavez also has refused to
allow U.S. drug surveillance
flights because, he said, that
would compromise his
country's sovereignty.
The contingent of U.S. air-
men living in dormitories at
Manta is responsible for more
than half of all South American
drug seizures. The mission of
the 250 airmen is seen by ex-
perts as playing a vital role in
curbing the trafficking of co-
caine from Peru, Bolivia and the
world's top producer, Colom-
bia.
Ecuador signed a 10-year
agreement in 1999 to allow the
U.S. Air Force to use the air
strip in which Washington has


FOR ALL CHRISTMAS
ACTIVITIES,
BIRTHDAY
PARTIES, ETC.
INN "P-WwMm~'yg


invested $71 million and em-
ploys around 150 local workers.
But Correa plans to use the
base's improved air strip to
build an international airport and
create a trade route linking
Ecuador's coast and Brazil's
Amazon rainforest that he says
would bring thousands of jobs
to Manta.
"If the Americans are out of
here, it's not like we are going
to go bankrupt," said Manta
Mayor Jorge Zambrano. "We
don't depend on the American
presence."
Manta, a coastal city
known for its tuna exports
and exotic beaches, has
granted a port concession to
Hong Kong-based Hutchison
Port Holdings, which plans to
invest more than $460 mil-
lion.


His absence from public
appearances, including his de-
layed birthday celebrations and
a military parade two weeks ago,
has fuelled speculation that he
is dying of cancer or is even
dead.
U.S. Intelligence chief
John Negroponte said in an
interview with The Washing-
ton Post published on Friday
that Castro was near death and
had "months, not years" to
live.
Castro's closest ally, Ven-
ezuelan President Hugo, said
Friday at a rally in Caracas that
he does not have cancer, but is
fighting a "great battle" against
a "very serious" illness.
Chavez said he was opti-
mistic about his recovery after
speaking to the Cuban leader by
telephone.
"Some comments have
come out, that Fidel has a ter-
minal cancer Fidel does
not have cancer," Chavez told
supporters in the celebration
of his December 3 re-election.


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6 .. ........ .. SUNDAY-CHRONICLEDecember 17,.2006


Editorial)

POLITICIANS who count on people's short
memories to expediently remain in the business of com-
petitive politics can create much embarrassment for them-
selves in the process.
This seems to be the case for a few politicians in the
Eastern Caribbean sub-region in the wake of the unexpected re-
sults of last Monday's general election in St Lucia at which Sir
John Compton's United Workers Party (UWP) defeated the in-
cumbent St Lucia Labour Party (SLP) of Dr. Kenny Anthony.
No sooner had it become clear that the UWP would form
the new government in Castries -the cabinet of which is ex-
pected to be officially announced Tuesday than the former
Prime Minister of Dominica and current leader of the also named
opposition United Workers Party, Mr. Eddison James, was echo-
ing the earlier criticisms of Sir John Compton about "interfer-
ence" in St Lucia's election campaign by a few CARICOM lead-
ers.
Sir John was particularly sharp in his attack, prior to the
December 11 poll, of Vincentian Prime Minister Ralph
Gonsalves, speaking on the SLP platform in his support of that
party's election campaign for a third term in government.
With the election over, Mr. James and Sir John's newcomer
to competitive electoral politics, Richard Frederick, a contro-
versial lawyer-politician, went on the attack against Prime Min-
isters who had actively given support to the SLP as platform
speakers during the election campaign. They avoided calling the
names of the two who had done so -Dominica's Roosevelt
Skerritt and St Vincent's Gonsalves.
There is an old saying with which Sir John and Mr.


Strange 'interference' complaints


James, as well as the UWP's Frederick should be familiar: those
who live in glass houses should not throw stones.
It so happens that both Sir John and Mr. James were
among Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States leaders in gov-
ernment who had participated in the pre-convention elections
of fraternal parties and in turn had such favours reciprocated
and more.
It is now being recalled that such interferencee" if
that is what they could be properly called had often taken
place even outside of the fold of a once strident Caribbean Demo-
cratic Union.
Therefore, to now urge, as the apparently ill-in-
formed UWP's Frederick of St Lucia did last week, for
CARICOM to consider instituting a policy to restrict Com-
munity Heads of Government from identifying themselves
on the election platforms of fraternal parties, is simply a
non-starter.
We predict that no support for any such move will be
forthcoming from among CARICOM Heads of Government,
even if the new governing UWP in Castries should wish
to initiate such discussion within the councils of the community.
Here in Guyana, the governing People's Progressive Party/
Civic (PPP/C) is quite aware of what perceived regional politi-
cal interferencee" meant when, during the long dispensation
of governance by the People's National
Congress, representatives of then ruling parties in CARICOM
had maintained public silence on ongoing electoral rigging in this
country while openly hobnobbing with the PNC at conventions
and otherwise.


That was recognized as the right of such parties and the
PPP continued its struggle, against the odds, for a return to elec-
toral democracy without taking issue with any ruling or oppo-
sition parliamentary party in CARICOM.
A lot of changes in attitudes and otherwise have since
occurred and the PPP/C administration in Guyana for one,
known to have very good relations with ALL member states
and governments of the community, would hardly be expected
to now become involved in any CARICOM initiative designed
to restrict leaders of fraternal parties from giving public sup-
port on platforms or otherwise to each other during a
general election campaign.
We shall follow developments on this matter -
unless the strange complaints of expediency, as raised by
the two UWPs in St Lucia and Dominica, simply prove to
be ill-considered reactions and lack sustainability.



CHRONICLE
Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Editorial: 227-5216: 227-5204; 22-63243-9
Sports: 225-7174
After hours 226-3243-9
Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is at www.guyanachronicle.com
e-mail address sunday editor@guyanachronicle.com
Lama Avenue. Bel Air Park, Georgetown, Guyana.


After St Lucia,




where next?


- The'crime stupid' factor and


Anthony's reply to Compton


IN ST LUCIA last week, the post-election message of the sur-
prising victorious United Workers Party (UWP) was an encour-
aging "forward to crime control and economic recovery", while
that of the losing St Lucia Labour Party (SLP) was a robust
"defeated, not humiliated".
"Crime control" may be on the agenda of political strategists
helping to shape plans for scheduled elections next year in Jamaica
and at least three other CARICOM states.
But it is a promise that could come to haunt the UWP of 82-
year-old Prime Minister Sir John Compton with the early warning
given by the SLP's 55-year-old leader and former Prime Minister,
Kenny Anthony, to go on the offensive against "distortions of our
achievements and the falsehood of corruption allegations and not
dealing with the crime problem..."
It would be difficult to ignore the achievements of Anthony's
administration, particularly in its second term, to attract local and
foreign investment some EC$1 billon real economic growth
at three to five per cent and a projected six per cent this year, plus
a significant dent on traditionally high unemployment. Some argue
that benefits from economic growth have not been trickling down
to those more in need.
However, to adapt a popular slogan associated with President
Bill Clinton's second term victory to that of last Monday's elec-
tion results in St Lucia, it was "the crime stupid" (not the economy).
This is a dilemma that could also be faced, in varying degrees, by
four CARICOM states where national elections are expected in
2007 Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, The Bahamas and Barba-
dos all of which are confronted with worrying levels of murder
and other serious crime.
Jamaica, where the incumbent People's National Party (PNP)
would be seeking an unprecedented fifth term, has already passed
the dread 1,000 murder toll, with Trinidad and Tobago floating
in the wealth of its oil and natural gas resources is in an unenvi-
able second place with 351 by last week and counting. Once tran-
quil Barbados has already recorded 35 compared to 27 this time
last year.
Guyana, which held its general eelction in August this year and
returned the PPP/Civic to power for a fourth term, continues to be
deeply affected also by the crime nightmare of murders 147 by
last Friday (31 more than in 2005) -- and daring, vicious armed


robberies that had totalled 894 for the year compared to 712 for
the same period in 2005.
Editorial writers and social commentators across the region, in-
cluding Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago, have been drawing gov-
erning parties' attention to the relevance of St Lucia's election shock
results message that sharply contrasts with the predictions of poll-
sters, and, also, the impact that the incidences of serious crime situ-


ation could have on their hopes for return to power in 2007.
In his bold bid for another stint of state power, Compton
emerged last year from his self-imposed "sunset politics" with tren-
chant criticisms against Anthony's SLP, including failure to
control the "crime horrors", as well as claimed poor economic man-
agement.
He was also on the offensive against sources of campaign fi-
nancing, such as reported assistance provided his UWP from Tai-
wan via its embassy in St Kitts a claim strongly denied
There was also Compton's bitter complaints against "interfer-
ence" in St Lucia's election by heads of government of the
Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), such as Prime
Ministers Ralph Gonsalves of St Vincent and the Grenadines and
Roosevelt Skerritt of Dominica, both having been SLP platform
speakers during the campaign.
Truth is, elections campaign financing remains an old issue in
regional politics involving a number of governing and opposition
parties. It is now becoming an increasing challenge to be faced, as
Jamaica, for one, is preparing to do ahead of campaign 2007.

'INTERFERENCE'?
If it were amusing to find the UWP on the defensive on cam-


paign financing sources an issue that should provide much po-
litical sparks at Jamaica's coming poll, then on the matter of "in-
terference" in the St Lucia election campaign, Compton should have
been advised against going down that route.
He can hardly forget the history of recurring interference in
the domestic politics of fellow OECS states by the now defunct
United States-influenced Caribbean Democratic Union (CDU), a
grouping of like-minded conservative parties that had routinely
involved themselves in election politics in that sub-region.
The CDU was an off-shoot of the 1983 U.S.-led military inva-
sion of Grenada and included Compton's UWP, the Edward Seaga-
led Jamaica Labour Party; Dominica Freedom Party of the now late
Dame Eugenia Charles; and the New Democratic Party under Sir
James Mitchell's leadership.
Objectively, therefore, while the UWP leader, has good reason
to joyfully give the proverbial kick-in-the-groin to pollsters' fore-
casts of a third-term victory to Anthony's SLP; the arithmetic
of Monday's election results would also give some credence to the
incumbent's claim of defeated yes, but not humiliated.
After all, with an increased 16,000 voters on the electoral reg-
ister of 135,000, the overall voter response on Monday was just
some three per cent more than that of the 2001 general election and
with no more than a 2,000 plurality of valid votes separating vic-
tor (UWP) and loser (SLP), or by just over two per cent.
At least three of the UWP's 11 seats were secured by less than
a combined 200 votes, primarily in known middle-class constitu-
encies. For instance, tourists-attracted Gros Islet, where reactions
against armed robberies and gun-related murders were particularly
pronounced against the SLP.
So, did the SLP administration really fold its arms in the face of
a growing rampage by criminals as Compton's UWP seems to
have successfully claimed in mobilising his base support, while, in
contrast, a significant percentage of SLP traditional supporters ap-
parently bought into pollsters' forecasts and did not turn out to vote?
An independent inquiry into the SLP government's response to
the crime situation that, as of last week included 34 murders (last
year it was 40), has revealed its quite various pro-active initiatives.
Recruitment earlier this year of seven British cops to bolster
the anti-crime battle by the local police force seems a bit too late.
But it had followed expansion of the force with a 450 increase in
manpower as well as increased mobility.
There was also the construction of new police stations; a new
modem prison; recovery of approximately 420 illegal guns and the
enactment of a series of new legislative measures: these included a
new criminal code; new evidence and firearms acts as well as a new
forensic laboratory.
From a regional perspective, with last week's very surprising
change of government in St Lucia, has come the inevitable
question: where next for a change in government Jamaica,
Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados or The Bahamas?
The quality of governance, fiscal and economic management and
responses to the crime situation are expected to feature, with vary-
ing emphases, in all four of those coining elections.
Since the 2000 general election in Dominica, only two gov-
ernments of independent CARICOM countries have been re-
placed the long-serving Antigua Labour Party in 2004 by
Baldwin Spencer's United Progressive Party and, as of last
week, Anthony's SLP.


-.-.i






UNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006


YO RASTA why are you
wearing a cowboy hat and
what are you doing on a
horse and why are you carry-
ing a lasso?
You're a sheriff?
All right, blood; stop the
joking and fooling around.
People are dressing up in
Santa Claus suits at this time of
year, not fooling around pre-
tending they are cowboys.
Look at all the Santas
around Santas like ants.
Me, I don't have time for
them tired-looking men sitting in
stores and waiting to hand out
gifts to children for a fee, of
course. This is the season of
giving, but it's also for taking.
I'll have all the time in the
world for those dazzling female
Santas, wearing Santa caps and
little red suits (if you can call
them that) and spreading joy as
they move around. Jiggle, wiggle
and jingle bells!
Those Santas do not need to
give gifts, my blood; just seeing
them is a precious gift in itself!
Praise to the Most High!
What a Christmas morning
it would be if you found a
sweet-looking Santa like that
waiting near your stocking,
dread! I know you, you rascal
Rasta. With a Christmas gift
like that, you would be going
Ho! Ho! Ho! for the rest of the
year.
But, on that horse, with a
cowboy hat and carrying a
lasso, you look like you are into
a different kind of Ho! Ho!
Hoing.
So, what's with the cowboy
stuff?
I have never heard about a
Rasta cowboy, never mind a
Sheriff Rasta.
There was a movie the other
day about some funny kind of
cowboys called 'Brokeback
Mountain' that created some
kind of fuss, but it didn't bother
me much.
I don't mind funny people's
business, once they don't mind
mine; but I know you're not
funny in that kind of way, so
what are doing on that horse and
making believe you are a cow-
boy?
You what? You are taking
Dr. Roger Luncheon seriously?
You mean, Dr. Luncheon -
the Head of the Presidential
Secretariat and Cabinet Secre-
tary?
So, how come he get you to
get on a horse and make a jack-
ass of yourself?
Dr. Luncheon is a medical
doctor, not a vet who can work
animal miracles, blood.
You are looking to get rich
and Dr. Luncheon has shown
you the way?
All right, dread. I know it's
Christmas, but neither Lun-
cheon nor anyone in the gov-
ernment that I know is sharing
out money this season.
A lot of us hoping we'll get
a little Christmas bonus after
working hard all year, but I
haven't heard anything from
Luncheon about any huge hand-


Sherti







Rasta


outs. And I am in the business
where I should be among the
first to know of such glad tid-
ings so that I can help spread
such glad tidings.
So what has you getting
rich got in common with the Dr.
Luncheon I know?
It's the stray animals thing'?
Tell me more, blood.
You heard Dr. Luncheon
announce last week that an in-
ter-ministerial team has recom-
mended higher pound fees and
building and rehabilitating
pounds across Guyana?
So what has that got to do
with you on a horse and calling
yourself Sheriff Rasta and get-
ting rich?
You are going to Luncheon
to get a badge designating you a
Marshal Stray Catcher'?
You heard Luncheon saying
the recommendations by the in-


ter-ministerial team have been
submitted to the Attorney
General's Chambers for consid-
eration and you want to be the
early catcher that will catch the
strays?
But what makes you think
you can get rich by being Sher-
iff Rasta or Marshal Stray
Catcher'?
Oh, I see. You planning to
lead a gang to round up the
thousands and thousands of
stray cows. bulls. donkeys.
sheep, pigs, goats, dogs, cats,
horses and other animals and
pound them for a fee?
Are you serious. Rasta?
You heard Luncheon saying
that the ongoing focus on traf-
fic hazards associated with the
nuisance of stray animals on
roadways. as well as their de-
struction of agricultural pro-
duce, has led to the recommen-


dations by the inter-ministerial
team'?
And that, for you, is a clear
indication that the government
is finally serious about getting
strays off the streets and out of
people's crops?
And higher pound fees
would mean higher pay for stray
catchers?
What? You don't have
much time to stick around on
your horse and talk to me?
Where are you going in such
a hurry, Rasta?
You are trying to outrace
the Mayor of Georgetown?
But why. blood?
Because you fear he may
also get the same idea you got
and finally realise there's a lot
of money to be made by round-
ing up and getting all them
cows, bulls, sheep, goats.
horses, jackasses and others


spinning wheel.
Why then the pretence of
a symposium when everyone
knew that nothing they said
would change Mr. Manning's
rigid position?
The ruling party also
seemed to have condoned one
of its vile parliamentarians,
Larry Achong, who was neither
rebuked nor slapped on the
wrist when he mouthed an ob-
scenity to a young female uni-
versity student who had an
anti-smelter position at a cot-
tage meeting.
Achong, well known for his
cavalier attitude and foul mouth,
was shown time and again on a
television gleefully mouthing the
obscene four-letter word, which
even a cave man would have been
able to 'read'.
But it's not just these is-
sues of the rapid rail and the
smelters projects and the tow-
ering towers it is the display
of arrogance by the Prime Min-
ister and a few others in his
government for the people be-
neath them and behaving as
though the money in the na-
tional coffers belonged to them.

NOT A CHICKEN EATER
Recently, when the
Trinidadians. big chicken caters
that they are, complained about
the high price of the bird. Mr.
Manning retorted that he
doesn't cat chicken and added.


"Look how good I look!"
I thought he might have next
sprung a Marie Antoinette on
the population by telling them to
eat cake instead.
That also brings me to my
next concern about inflation.
Despite the central bank's
warning about the government's
excessive spending contributing
to rising inflation, government
ministers are parroting that the
inflation is temporary and that
the government's expenditure in
building sky-scrapers had noth-
ing to do with it.
So, with the government
turning a blind eye to their own
contribution to inflation, I do
fear that the high price of food.
particularly for fruits and veg-
etables, will remain with us for
a while longer and the Central
Bank and the rest of the coun-
try must brace themselves for
a smaller food basket.
Also nagging me over recent
months is the dismissal of sev-
eral murder cases in which key
witnesses have refused to testify
against the accused.
Magistrates and lawyers
have complained about the
breakdown of the system of
justice where persons guilty otf
crimes are supposed to be given
due punishmient. So hatl when'
due justice does not take place


Cricket World Cup 2007?
You better hurry, dread.
And I wish you luck,
Sheriff Rasta. Ho! Ho! Ho!


i.1


Nagging




concerns as


2007

PORT OF SPAIN I admit
to feelings of Irepidation as
2007 looms closer and it does
not have anything to do with
the uncertainty of what the
new year will bring or not
bring.
The uneasiness really has
to do with a number of issues
facing Trinidad and Tobago at
the current time and how they
are likely to affect the popula-
tion.
I also fear that because the
country is gearing up for another
general elections and the pen-
chant of those in power to try
to impress the electorate, things
could get progressively worse.
Top of the list is the almost
maniacal behaviour of Prime
Minister Patrick Manning these
days as he pushes ahead ruth-
lessly with several projects, de-
spite opposition to them from
various sections of the society.
In this instance, I refer to
the Rapid Rail project and the
two aluminium smelter projects.
Regarding the Rapid Rail
project, virtually everybody
who has been commenting on it
has said that the administration
needs to step back and perhaps
look at alternatives instead of
committing the large sum of
US$2.5 billion of the taxpayers
money to this massive invest-
ment.
Industry experts last week
called on the government to put


the procurement process on
hold untiltresearch and feasibil-
ity studies are carried out.
In response, Mr. Manning
retorted that the project must be
built. End of story.
The project, which includes
a 54 km east-west route and a
50 km north-south line which
the government said will be the
country's answer to the chronic
traffic problems, will be largest
and most expensive infrastruc-
ture undertaken in the country.
The Association of Profes-
sional Engineers of Trinidad and
Tobago complained that no pre-
feasibility study on the pro-
posed rapid rail system has
been done.
For a project of great mag-
nitude and significance, a pre-
feasibility study ought to have
been done long before the devel-
opers were asked to tender.
The second issue has to do
with the opposition against the
building of two smelter plants
in the country.
On the eve of a public con-
sultation. which was literally
extracted like a bad tooth from
the government, the Prime Min-
ister had the temerity to say
that nothing that has been said
so far will change the
government's mind about pursu-
ing the construction of the
smelters.
That immediately threw
th- -r'-verbial spanner in the


and the system is manipulated
in such a way, it reflects a
breakdown of law and order
throughout the judicial system
and by extension, the society.
It also mirrors the lack of
confidence that people have in
the police to protect them or
their families from being gunned
down because they appeared as
a key witness for the prosecu-
tion.
So far, we have not seen
any action from the DPP's of-
fice or the AG's office on how
they would deal with this
emerging and troubling situa-
tion.
And, finally, crime contin-
ues to trouble the entire popu-
lation of Trinidad and Tobago.
As Father Gerry Pantin
said in a letter to the newspa-
pers last week, "We citizens are
not impressed by massive
projects like multi-storied sky-
scrapers or waterfront proper-
ties. Our main priority is that
we should feel safe in our coun-
try, and I would venture to sug-
gest that not a single citizen
feels reasonably safe in present
day Trinidad and Tobago."
And on this point, Prime
Minister Manning should be
advised to learn a lesson or two
from the results of St Lucia's
general elections, where an oc-
togenarian, Sir John Compton,
came out of retirement to beat
the pants off the much younger
Dr. Kenny Anthony.
Despite the rosy economic
picture of St Lucia, Anthony
lost the elections because St
Lucians wanted to feel safe once
again in their homes which Sir
John's United Workers Party
campaigned on.
But I truly doubt that
even that will stop Mr.
Manning's maniacal drive to
spend, spend and spend un-
der the guise of development
and really deal with issues
that are affecting the body
and soul of the population.


from off the citr ,iris.
And time running oul be-
cause the government want all
the strays off the streets before


beckons







8 SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006





Praise for U.S.-funded


farmers


By Neil Marks

HAILING a U.S.-government
funded project which is work-
ing with farmers to export
80,000 pounds of pepper and
23 containers of squash and
pumpkins monthly, President
Bharrat Jagdeo yesterday
said his government wants an
agriculture diversification
strategy that meets the needs
of farmers.
Such a strategy, he said,
must also create opportunities
for the people in the vast hin-
terland who still grapple with
poverty.
Speaking to farmers, agro-
processors, exporters and bank-
ers called together to help the
government fashion an approach
to the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank (IDB) for a loan to
execute an agriculture diversifi-
cation strategy, the President
said he wanted a practical
"checklist approach" to identify
areas that would be profitable in
the long run.
He applauded the U.S.-
funded Guyana Trade and In-
vestment Support (GTIS)
project, which he said is doing
"a wonderful job" of support-
ing farmers "where it matters".
He said too often he criticised
the United States for funding
projects that "strengthen" um-
brella bodies and failed "the
people who need strengthening
at level of the factory or the
farm".
GTIS is focusing on facili-
tating marketing and produc-
tion of peppers and numerous
varieties of pumpkins and
squash which will increase the
level of export earnings by
US$1.8M annually. This would
represent an 80 per cent in-
crease over fresh produce ex-
ports for 2005.


According to GTIS, ship-
ment sizes will begin small, with
about one to four containers per
month, but sustained increases
in production are expected to
meet the demand of five differ-
ent U.S. buyers who have sealed
export contracts with local
farmers.
President Jagdeo, who has
taken a leadership role in push-
ing for agricultural diversifica-
tion, made it clear to participants
at the summit, held at the
Guyana International Conven-
tion Centre, Turkeyen, not to fo-
cus on academic presentations.
He said he wanted them to
emerge with "a very practical
approach and a broad concept"
that will guide the diversifica-
tion strategy for the agricultural
sector which is referred to as the
"backbone" of the Guyanese
economy, employing directly
and indirectly more than 70 per
cent of the population.
Citing areas that needed at-
tention, the President said
Guyana's vast hinterland, inhab-
ited by poor Amerindians, could
be fertile ground for develpp-
ment.
He said economic opportu-
nities need to be created for the
people of indigenous communi-
ties, who have seen "very little
change" in terms of poverty, de-
spite the tremendous improve-
ments in health, education and
water.
"We have to find some crop
that is sustainable, that is not
perishable because of the long
distances, and that is not bulky
because of the difficulty of
transportation," Mr. Jagdeo
said.
Agriculture Minister, MW.
Robert Persaud said the agricul-
ture sector in Guyana and the
Caribbean continues to face
challenges that dematid in
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All Applicants must apply in person to

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creased focus geared towards
ensuring expansion of the non-
traditional agriculture sector to
one that is sustainable and com-
petitive.
He said the diversification
plan must be complemented by
appropriate research, technical
training, improved production,
post-harvest and processing ex-
pertise. efficient marketing
structures and investment.
He said the President's vi-
sion and leadership will acceler-
ate the finalisation of the diver-
sification strategy.

HISTORY OF ATTEMPTS
Dr. 0. Homenauth, Director
of the National Agricultural Re-
search Institute (NARI), in a
paper presented to the summit.
said Guyana has had a history
of attempts at diversification.
starting with the Accelerated
Production Drive (APD) in
1970 which focused on the pro-
duction of stockleeds and pro-
cessing cassava flour.
There was a string of other
attempts in the 1970s. 1980s
and 1990s. but these were all
failures, he noted, because they
tended to be top-down govern-
ment initiatives, among other
reasons.
Persaud said the summit
was aimed at being a bottoms-
up approach. with the govern-
ment seeking ideas from stake-
holders in the sector.
Homenauth said the cultiva-
tion of fruits and vegetables.
rearing livestock, fisheries, in-
cluding aquaculture develop-
ment. honey production and
production of value-added prod-
ucts from these commodities are
being vigorously promoted.
In statistics he presented,
Homenauth noted that the ex-
ports of plantain, pumpkin and
melon have shown progressive
increases while there have been
decreases in pineapple exports
over the years. Exports of bora
and pepper have remained con-


stant.
Regarding fruits, he said,
Guyana has several comparative
advantages and environmental
conditions enabling it to become
a prominent tropical fruit pro-
ducer and a member of the se-
lect group of the South Ameri-
can countries where fruit crops
are an important component of
the national economy.
Homenauth noted that pine-
apple, banana, citrus, cherry,
avocado, carambola, passion
fruit and mango are the main


THE taxi driver shot by a hi-
jacker Friday was last night
still under intensive care af-
ter emergency surgery at the
Georgetown Public Hospital
Corporation (GPHC).
Nazir Samad. 51, of Lot 23
Hague Front. West Coast
Demerara. was shot in the back
after failing to comply with the
bandit's demand to stop and
transport him to Vreed-en-
Hoop. also on the West Coast.
The bandit had earlier
robbed Ganga Persaud Tagedat
of jewellery valued $400,000, a
cell phone and $24,000 cash af-
ter hijacking his mini-bus.
The hijacker was later shot
dead by Police when he tried to
flee after a botched hijacking of
another taxi.
Samad, a father of three,
was last night in the High De-
pendency Unit (HDU) at the
hospital.


species cultivated.
On the coastland, as in the
other regions of the country,
farmers frequently diversify:
their agricultural production
by intercropping the orchard
with several fruits and other
crops with the purpose of re-
ducing risks and obtaining in-
comes each month o-f the
year.
He said, too, that the veg-
etable industry, though small, is:
dynamic, generating income and;
creating employment for many.


His son, Amir Samad, said
his father's condition is improv-
ing.
He said the bullet which
damaged his father's small intes-
tines, was removed during sur-
gery Friday.
The hijacker, who Police
said was unidentified up to yes-
terday. was shot dead by cops
in a hair-raising and dramatic es-
cape chase Friday morning.
Police said the drama began
at about 10:30 h when the man
boarded a mini-bus owned and
driven by Ganga Persaud
Tagedat, 39, at the Vreed-en-
Hoop park.
When the bus was at
Ruimzeigt, about five miles
west of Vreed-en-Hoop, the
man, who was the only passen-
ger, pulled out a handgun and
stuck up the driver, Police said.
Police said after robbing
Tagedal, he left the bus to in-
tercept a motor canter driven
by Samuel Rambijtle, 43, head-
ing back to Vreed-en-Hoop.
Police said the hijacker or-
dered Rambajue to drive him to
Vreed-en-Hoop and he com-
plied.
But Tagedat turned around
his bus and gave' chase and at


urban and rural residents. He
also made note of developments
in the livestock sector, which
include cattle, poultry, swine,
sheep and goat.
He said initiatives that are
being targeted to achieve agricul-
tural diversification include set-
ting up a modern abattoir to
promote the export of beef and
boost the cattle industry. Initia-
tives are under way for such a
facility to be constructed, he
said.
Homenauth said the new
strategy aims to address
shortfalls noted in previous
efforts, namely lack of mar-
ket demand driven interven-
tions, inadequate supporting
services and the lack of pri-
vate sector investment and
involvement.


Harlem, about four miles west
of Vreed-en-Hoop, used his ve-
hicle to force the canter to stop,
Police said.
At this stage the bandit fled
from the canter, firing shots at
the two drivers, but missing,
Police said.
According to Police, he
then attempted to stop a taxi
that was approaching.
But the driver Samad re-
fused to stop and was shot in
the back.
Police said he, however,
managed to drive away.
The gunman blocked an-
other taxi and forced the driver
to take him to Vreed-en-Hoop.
However, the taxi-man drove
to the Police Station at Vreed-en-
Hoop, stopped the vehicle and
jumped out, Police said.
The hijacker ran towards
the Vreed-en-Hoop Squatting
area hotly pursued by cops.
Police said there was an ex-
change of fire and the man was
shot dead.
An unlicensed .38 Taurus
revolver with two live rounds
and three spent shells along
with the $24,000 and cell
phone were recovered by the
police.


a I I


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Applications are being invited from suitably qualified
persons to fill the following vacancy within the hospital




Applications, along with two references and a recent
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Human Resource Director
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For further information and job specification, please
contact the'Human Resource Department on Telephone:
223-5450.
Deadline for submission of application is
2006-12-27.


Decomposed body


found in canal
A DECOMPOSED body was yesterday found in a canal near
Agriculture Road, Mon Repos, East Coast Demerara.
Residents said the body of a male was found around 10:30
h by workers contracted to clean the canal.
According' to one resident, the body was badly decayed
when it was pulled from the canal.
Another resident said that about five or six weeks ago, per-
sons in the area were complaining about a terrible smell and
they now believe it wag from the body in the canal. ,
An officer at the'Sparendaam Police Station sld dthe
body was beyond recognition and is at ie mortuary on
Princes Street, Georgetown.







SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006 9



Foreign policy implications for




CARICOM of John Compton's return


(The writer is a business
executive and former
Caribbean diplomat)

THE majority of the
electorate of St Lucia has
brought back as their head of
government Sir John
Compton, an 81-year old who
led the small Caribbean
island to independence from
Britain in 1979.
Sir John had retired from
office in 1996, but came out of
retirement in March last year to
be elected leader once again of
the United Workers Party
(UWP) that he founded in 1964.
Over the last year, despite his
age, he mounted a robust
campaign against the
government of the St Lucia
Labour Party (SLP), led by 56-
year old Dr. Kenny Anthony.
Without a shred of doubt,
Sir John's leadership of St Lucia
will have implications for the
foreign policy positions of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARICOM)
both politically and
economically.
Sir John is no wilting
flower. When he disagrees, he
digs his heels in hard and can be
immovable if he feels that
decisions are not in the interest
of St Lucia or indeed of the
principles he believes in
personally.
In 1979, when the New
Jewel Movement (NJM) of
Maurice Bishop overthrew the
government of Eric Gairy and
seized power in Grenada, Sir
John ardently and vociferously
opposed its recognition.
He personally
canvassed the British
government of Margaret
Thatcher not to recognize
the regime and encouraged
intervention to overturn
the revolution, and he was
sorely disappointed when
the British government
decided that it recognized
"states not governments".
At the time, Sir John was
keeping a close eye on leftist
political parties and left-wing
activists in the Windward and
Leeward Islands some of
whom had openly suggested
unconstitutional overthrows of
governments as a means of
accomplishing regime change.
For him, the seizure of
power by the NJM in Grenada
marked the erosion of the rule
of law and constitutionality in
the Eastern Caribbean. It was


a thought he could not abide.
Not surprisingly, when the
Grenada revolution
spectacularly imploded in 1983


with the killing of Maurice
Bishop and the establishment of
a military government, Sir John
was in the forefront of those
leaders who saw intervention as
essential to demonstrate clearly
that revolutions would not be
tolerated in the region.
He was among those who
strongly encouraged and
supported the October 1983
U.S.-led intervention in
Grenada, not because he
wanted U.S. troops on
Caribbean soil, but because
he wanted Grenada and the
Caribbean returned to
normality.
Sir John's return to office,
therefore, will witness a shift to
the right in St Lucia's foreign
policy. It is a shift that will
affect CARICOM consensus on
issues dealing with the United
States.
It will also have an impact


on how the countries of the
smaller sub-group, the
Organisation of Eastern
Caribbean States (OECS), treat
with matters such as the socialist
vision of Venezuela's President
Hugo Chavez.
Sir John is likely to take a
close look at Chavez's
PetroCaribe arrangements for
members of the OECS to ensure
that its terms bring tangible
benefits to St Lucia and not just
long term debt. He will be
extremely cautious, if not
opposed, to any embrace of
President Chavez's wider
socialist policies.
With regard to the
Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) that is now
being negotiated between
Caribbean countries and the
European Union (EU), St Lucia
will take a hard line in relation
to bananas.
Already, there is
discontent being expressed by
some Caribbean countries
about the region's
negotiating strategy and even
the structure under which
the Caribbean is conducting
its negotiations with the EU.
Having campaigned on
getting a better deal for banana
growers in St Lucia, Sir John's
government will undoubtedly
join those who feel that political
representatives should replace
technical officers in the
forefront of negotiations. He
will want to show the banana
farmers, who believed that he
would do better for them, that
he can at least try harder to
deliver the goods.
And, on the Caribbean
Single Market and Economy
(CSME), while the idea and


the process will enjoy Sir
John's support, it will not be
unconditional. He will be in
the forefront of arguments
for compensatory
arrangements for the OECS
countries, and he will hold
out for terms that he regards
as not disadvantageous to St
Lucia.
That was his position
when CARIFTA was formed in
1968 and it was his position
when CARICOM replaced it in


1972.
He goes into his first
CARICOM Heads of
Government conference early
next year with a bone to pick
with some of his colleague
Prime Ministers. Three of them
turned up in St Lucia to
campaign for Dr Kenny
Anthony.
Sir John saw this as
interference in the local politics
of St Lucia, and he has said that
he will raise the issue at the


forthcoming meeting.
It is, of course, an
important foreign policy issue
for each CARICOM
government: should a
government leader in one
country actively seek to
influence the election of a
leader in another? The
people of St Lucia obviously
thought not.

(Responses to:
ronaksanders29@hotmal.com)


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Getting radical about climate change:




The shape of things to come


HERE'S the plan. Everybody
in the country will get the
same allowance for how much
carbon dioxide they can emit
each year, and every time they
buy some product that
involves carbon dioxide
emissions filling their car,
paying their utility bills,
buying an airline ticket -
carbon points are deducted
from their credit or debit
cards. Like Air Miles, only in
reverse.
So if you ride a bike
everywhere, insulate your
home, and don't travel much,
you can sell your unused points
back to the system. And if you
use up your allowance before
the end of the year, then you
will have to buy extra points
from the system.
This is no lunatic proposal
from the eco-radical fringe. It
is on the verge of becoming
British government policy, and
environment secretary David
Miliband is behind it one
hundred per cent. In fact, he is
hoping to launch a pilot scheme
quite soon, with the goal of
moving to a comprehensive
national scheme of carbon
rationing within five years.
Ever since a delegation of
scientists persuaded Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher, a
scientist herself, to start taking
climate change seriously back in
the late 1980s. British
governments of both parties
have been in the forefront on


UTI


the issue, but Miliband's
initiative breaks new ground. It
has, says Miliband, "a
simplicity and beauty that
would reward carbon thrift."
Previous emissions-trading
systems the sulphur dioxide
system mandated by the 1990
Clean Air Act in the United
States, the 25-country European
Union scheme for trading C02
emission permits launched in
2005, the system for trading
emission allowances at national
level among developed countries
that have ratified the Kyoto
Protocol all envisage large
industrial organizations or even
entire countries making the
deals.
Miliband is bringing it
down to the personal level.
A huge share of total
emissions is driven by the
decisions of individual
consumers. Miliband thinks
that the least intrusive, most
efficient way of shaping those
decisions is to set up a system
that tracks everybody's use of
goods and services that
produce a lot of greenhouse
gases, and rewards the thrifty
while imposing higher costs
on the profligate.
And there is no time to
lose: the world's carbon
emissions have to stop growing
within ten to fifteen years., lie
says. and Britain must cut its
total carbon emissions by (60
per cent in the next thirty or
forlt years.


"We are in a dangerous
place now," he told the
Guardian newspaper on
December II11, "and it is going to
be very difficult to get into a


less dangerous place. The
science is getting worse faster
than the politics is getting better.
People know the technology
exists to get a lot of this
done...but there is a huge chasm
of mistrust between countries
about how to do this...The
developing countries won't take
on any carbon reduction targets
until they believe the countries
that have caused the problem do
so."
The science certainly is
"getting worse." in the sense
that every forecast is worse than
the one before. The most recent
assessment of the state of the
Arctic by the International
Panel on Clitiiatc Chamge. \\ hose


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full fourth report is due next
year, was published early in the
journal "Geophysical Research
Letters" earlier this week
because its forecast was so
alarming.
If current trends persist,
the scientists reported, the
Arctic Ocean will be entirely
ice-free in the summertime
not in 2080, as previous
forecasts suggested, but by
2040, just thirty-three years
from now. Then the dark
ocean surface absorbs much
more heat than the reflective
ice did, and another element
of feedback kicks in, and the
speed of warming increases
again....
Those in the know are very
frightened, but there is still that
"huge chasm of mistrust." The
developing countries that are
only now beginning to emit large


By Ruben Sili6

SUFFRAGE is not an end in
itself it is a civic right
which, when exercised,
makes it possible for the
public to participate in the
selection of a government.
In that respect. the results
tend to reflect the aspiration,': of
the others Thus, it is
interesting to examine the
restilts o1 the elections held this
year, taking into account the
social and economic context of
the region.
Since the beginning of the
nineties, international
organizations have managed to
keep the issue of poverty and
social exclusion a high priority.
Perhaps the highest expression
of thatl interest has been the
programme on the Millennium
Development Goals, which has
led to an overall examination of
the causes of poverty and the
means by which progress could
be made in overcoming this
dilemma.
Governments adopted a
formal commitment to ensure
the fulfilment of those
important goals. However,
although it can be said that
the world economy, as well as
the economics of many of the
countries of our region, has
gl'o\ iU, such ain impetus has
Ocien achieNved by
maintaining a high
concentration of income,
along gw ith high levels of
social inequality.
1,\ n thougll there have
becitl ot\ itlx t stigis of

I' ,11 lhimo\ c lhc l,'M r tillh,.


amounts of greenhouse gases
look at the mountain of past
emissions produced by the
developed countries, the source
of most current climate change,
and they want the rich countries
to cut back very deeply -
deeply enough to leave the
developing countries some room
to raise their consumption
without dooming us all to
runaway climate change.
That's where the long-
range target of 60 per cent
emission cuts for Britain
comes from. Britain only
produces 2 per cent of global
greenhouse gas emissions, so
a 60 per cent cut in Britain
alone is still only a drop in
the bucket, but the aim is to
set an example: see, we can
do this without
impoverishing ourselves, so
other developed countries


In the case of several
Greater Caribbean countries, a
limited reduction in poverty has
been observed. But this result is
not due solely to the measures
adopted within the Millennium
Goals. For many countries that
have confirmed that reduction in
poverty, it is more the result of
remittances sent bv emigrants
and the expansion of the
informal sector of the economy.n
In other words, the
slight improvement
experienced by the poor of
the region has stemmed
from their own actions, by


can, too. And if they do, then
a deal to control the growth
of emissions in the
developing countries is
within reach.
So individual carbon credit
accounts for all, and if you want
to do things that produce more
carbon dioxide than your annual
allowance, you pay for it.
The frugal and the poor can
sell their unused credits back into
the system and every year
or so, as the average carbon
efficiency of transport or food
production or power generation
improves a little bit, the size of
the free personal carbon
allowance is reduced a little bit.
It is, I suspect, the shape
of things to come.
(** Gwynne Dyer is a
London-based independent
journalist whose articles are
published in 45 countries.)


objective of consolidating social
movements more than formal
organizations of political
participation.
If we look at the electoral
results over the last few
months, throughout the
continent, we will observe how
the popular vote has been
focused. cither by giving
victory to the alternative leaders
or consolidating them in second
place.
The fact remains that in
any case, they are being
portrayed as true political
forces, without which the


The Greater

Caribbean This Week


developing those
initiatives that have been
forced on them by social
exclusion, as is the case of
emigration.
Those obvious setbacks in
the fight against poverty
manifest themselves in the
outcome of elections. This has
affected the traditional political
parties that have always had
electoral control, and which
have been rejected to some
exteni by ai population llln lino
longer waus ito beliesc int
perpetual promises.
The weariness of \.is
sectors of the population hl.is
contributed to the emergence ol
a new leadership, \\lhos,

eoit tlitha i iet ''i,"\ it ,ilk


governance of their respective
countries cannot be guaranteed.

This contfirls that the vote
has been radicalised among the
socially excluded, with them
leaning toward those positions
which they believe identify
more \with their aspirations for
change and with the urgency to
achieve the de e\Clopmient goals
that have been so often
posltponed.
lPerhaps the time has
coliie to listen to the voices
fi'lmn lblow.
( ::: Dr. Ruben Silie
S;lad z is the Sec'retairy
('eni.'ral of the associationn of
( ':i ibbea'n States. T'he N ien s
xt'\i'u's' 'd art' ollt tieec'tss.t 'il
iit' o ti'lt'iill vitm S t of tin' V 'S.
"* 1 1 i' lll i ll i t'i l'


" .' V 4,, ?-; ':@ s g the right to i','s e1 t, I, e.,i' or ,'y it!


- ---~-- ---"---~D-~ ------~


10


Somal ea asmo


SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006





SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006 1 '


Of course, only the
strongest can fight to gain or
maintain that space.
Someone in a waiting line
does not like his space to be


mounts. In their anxiety to
move on, some individuals will
shuffle forward even when the
line is not moving thus reducing
the space.


"Be not afraid, ye waiting hearts that weep,
For God still griveth His beloved sleep..."
H. Heathhorn


invaded. If someone touches us
or we get upset and may react
negatively. This is more evident
in North America where
touching bv strangers is not
tolerated.
In Guyana and the
Caribbean and in some Arabic
countries this is not a problem:
touching, to a degree, is
tolerated.
When individuals do not
like to be touched, it becomes a
serious problem because tension


The intruder may get a
dirty look or a disapproving
grunt. The more anxious we are
the longer the wait seems to be.
"A watched pot never
boils".
Behaviour in waiting lines,


-~ iij


WA

WAITING in line is a
necessary waste of our time
because businesses do not
always anticipate the rush
hours and/or they are less
willing to make special
arrangements for an
anticipated crowd.
The problem with waiting
in lines is that it is boring unless
you are a people-watcher or
inveterate reader.
There is also the problem
that going to the bank or post
office is a by-the-way event. It
comes between work, shopping
or other more important events
of the day.
As such, we are always in
a hurry. There is always tension
and anxiety, peeping to the
front of the line to see "what is
the delay".
The tension is intensified if
someone takes a little too long
than is unexpected. This
becomes evident in the
grumbling and suck-teeth of
disgust or any number of anxiety
symptoms evident in non-
verbal behaviour or body
language.
The mere fact thai we walk
into a bank or cashier with long
lines and are forced to wait, we
begin with a poor attitude. The
stress begins. Some of us avoid
it by walking away at the sight
of the long line or if the wait is
too long.
The waiting in line is
like a miniature society with
people froni many alks of
life. albeit temporary. It has
its own rules, written and
un 'rit!"i .
O)1 n'ik is tihal \; \ (i id ) 'l
Cl i ; i C in' I tilli| ofl a i li
l ii' i h s in spl i iil iih

In Ci],[ ii and ii ', hiild
\\ ll~ d n tlalin n, hii til,' i. i i l
;lt\'.;',s (0 ,cr-vc l. 111c eatingng


waiting

lines at the selling in New Some places use a ti(
Amsterdam and Rosignol are and numbers are call
good examples. Unlike the animi
In North America and human societies are
Europe you could be punished follow this rule. In
with a scream to get back, a kingdom, might is rin
dirty look, etc. In this waiting Where the ri
line society there is a hierarchy written, one is expect
with those in front with a sense one's turn and others
to see that it is car
.chastising the cul
rule is followed n
waiting lines bu
places, such as rest
This rule often
early arrival the bett
we are envious
treatment to anyone,


of greater comfort than those to
the rear. As we move up the
line we feel better about
ourselves and the possibility of
service.
In this society we may
feel we have a role to play.
While some of us are
passively waiting, others may
feel the need to comment on
the conditions; still others
may feel the need to
comment about anyone who
may break the line
philosophising or'
psychologising.
Some may come in with
friend'; and l ormn 1a clique land
conlinlte their discussion ort -hC i
to iiakc llie momllllents pass.
(1li irs1 ni.'\ ild 1 acqLjiiainlraniLC
l"or Ii I ii','ld.
it '2> \ to Ifind l hiing |c

.'. L ,')Cii {1 ;lt5if ie ,i i !
\ ilh in i l :M k' I ii l 1 ; )l) 'il iar
l'c C I t'I Lt2L iC l+'l 'q's i 1. \ c.L


OCCUPYING YOUR
SPACE
Another characteristic
feature of the waiting line is the
physical and psychological
space occupied by the person at
a particular moment known as
territonality. This is a deeply
ingrained behaviour as it is
evident in animals and little
children.
In fact the buck (male
deer) without his space will
not be able to garner the
females and spread his seed
for the next generation. It is
for this reason that some
animals defecate, urinate,
break branches and leave
distinct smell of marks to
give notice to intruders. They
will then fight, even to death,
to protect that space.
'I hIe pn]ili VCy el l l is (uilCiL
evident ais '\\c enter liisl in a bus
or ttllC Iiir C i ] \\c CIe \\ i Cii C
all \\ed Ilov s|,pilcc. \\,- i\
,si i ln .I ii r ,li ; i i '' iii.iii k i.
i, 'L [)} i t in ,i 'in" n \hL ,i


as indicated, has a cultural
dimension. Where people are
resigned to such conditions, it is
to their advantage or it could be
bad for their health stress
leading to heart attack or ulcer.
Where this is not the case,
it has led to tension and anxiety,
already intensified by the hustle
and bustle of the day.
Westerners are more likely to
feel such anxieties and often
without the open outbursts.
A visiting Guyanese-
American at the selling in
Rosignol or New Amsterdam,
seeing the lines broken,
especially if the person moves
ahead, will be very upset.
Situational factors play a
role when we are in a hurry.
Generally we may be worried
about waiting in line but on
certain days or events, there is
much to do and very little will
calm us down. This may lead to
negative feelings or aggressive
behaviour, only multiplying the
tension.
Personality factors also
play a role in how we behave.
Those of us who are more verbal
and aggressive are likely to
make adverse comments about
the long wait. This may create
more tension for the group.
Others may even agree with him
and join in the criticism.
"Misery loves company".
Waiting lines will be with
us for some time. Technology
has helped in clearing people
faster. Computerised service
has made it easy to locate and
process information. You can
book an airline ticket from
home. In some instances
airlines and airport lines,
because of terrorist threats, have
become longer.
Urbanisation, centralised
housing and businesses have
made lines even longer. As
such. we need to learn to
adapt walk with a
newspaper: become a people-
watcher, or learn to meditate.


Wath9yurbusnes GOW


aderie in the


NOTICE


The Public is hereby r.'fried that ELIZABETH JABAR a.k.a. PETTY of Lot
21 Lilly Street Sprinqg ids. Corentyne. Berbice and CYNTHlA EMMANUEL





Cfc".cii b /aii ; , ,


in lines





in lines


~PsP


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,12 ,j ,UND YP, Cg- :Dq2Foe r, 906


Oxfamr ends emergency



Guyana operations


AFTER some 14 months of that the emergency project has
operation, Oxfam has an- ended.
nounced the closure of its Eu- It said its support to food
ropean Commission funded security, livelihoods recovery
emergency operations in and disaster preparedness in
Guyana but assured that it flood-affected communities ben-
will continue working with its efited directly an estimated
long-term partners here. 60,000 people affected by the
Oxfam Great Britain a de- 2005 floods in Guyana.
velopment, advocacy and relief "But the end of this project
agency working to put an end doesn't mean Oxfam will leave
to poverty worldwide has been the country, the agency will
operating in Guyana for more continue working, as it has been
than 10 years now, but the lo- over 10 years, working with lo-
cal office last week announced cal partners in development


In Region Two...

Farmers see signs

of another bumper

rice harvest
THE 2007 Spring rice crop cultivation is blooming in Re-
gion Two (Pomeroon/Supenaam) and farmers said it is
showing promising signs of another bumper harvest.
Reports said the fields in the south of Essequibo Coast
(Spring Garden to Anna Regina) are thriving very well and in a
more advanced state of growth than those in the north.
The difference has been attributed to the time of sowing
but all have derived benefit from moderate rainfall and good
irrigation.
Some farmers told the Sunday Chronicle they have been
given cheques that can only be cashed in February next year
for paddy sold since they reaped the previous crop.
But they have planted again and because they are
looking to the Rice Producers Association (RPA) to secure
. the resuscitation of the Rice Marketing Board, to which
they can sell their paddy in future.


projects", it said.
The emergency project, car-
ried out with funding from the
European Commission Humani-
tarian Aid Department, ECHO,
started in October 2005 imme-
diately following Oxfam's initial
emergency flood response (also
funded by ECHO) that began
soon after the flooding in Janu-
ary 2005.
Oxfam worked with flood-
affected communities in 21 vil-
lages on the East Coast
Demerara in Region Four and
the Mahaica, Mahaicony and
Abary riverine areas in Region
Five..
The work centred on disas-
ter preparedness equipping
community members with the
skills to take action in the run-
up to disasters, such as alert and
evacuation, as well as the after-
math where activities included
damage, needs and capacity as-
sessment, and the provision of
shelter, water, food and medical
care.
This was achieved through
public information campaigns
and a series of training activities
in the communities.
Oxfam said a total of 630
community representatives and
more than 1.000 teachers at-
tended the sessions on disaster
prevention and preparedness.
health and sanitation, and psy-
chosocial support training.
More than 2,000 children
attended psychosocial support
and training sessions in recogni-
tion of the fact that the floods
traumatised many people. espe-


r


PUBLIC NOTICE


The public is hereby notified that the following chemicals
is prohibited and shall not be brought into, offered for sale
or used in Guyana by Order (No. 21 of 2006) made by the
Minister of Agriculture, Honourable Robert M. Persaud on
the 3' day of November 2006.
(1) 2,4,5-T and its salt and esters;
(2) Aldrin; C
(3) Captafol;
(4) Chlordane;
(5) Chlordimeform;
(6) Chlorobenzilate;
(7) Dieldrin;
(8) Dinoseb;
(9) 1-2-Dibromoethane;
(10) Fluoroacetamide;
I (11) Heptachlor;
(12) Hexachlorobenzene;


Lindane;
Mercuric chloride;
Methyl Parathion;
Mirex;


(17) Parathion;
(18) Pentachlorophenol;
(19) Phosphamidon;
(20) Toxaphene;
(21) Mixed Isomers of
Hexachlorocyclohexane; and
(22) Endrin.
(22mmemmunagemel


L


(13)
(14)
(15)
(16)


cially children, it added.
Oxfam also noted that
teachers, mothers and fathers
were trained to support
traumatised children and family
members.
This was combined with a
livelihoods recovery
programme, in which Oxfam
helped farmers provide basic
healthcare for their herds and re-
establish commercial and subsis-
tence crops.
Oxfam worked through lo-
cal entities including the
Guyana Red Cross and the lo-
cal branch of UNICEF, and
long-term Oxfam partner
organizations such as Women
Across Differences and the Rice
Producers Association, as well
as with the local government and
national ministries.
Mr. Dan Stothart,
Oxfam's project manager in
Guyana said: "This was the
first time that disaster pre-
paredness was tried on such
a big scale in Guyana, reach-
ing 60,000 people. We are
pleased with the response
and eagerness of the commu-
nities and hopeful for their
future capacity to cope with
flooding. We are proud that
we had such an impact in sup-
porting the recovery of the
livelihoods of nearly 2,000
small farmers."


Anna Regina

Town Council

begins garbage

removal

campaign
TOWN Clerk of Anna Regina, Mr. Ganga Persaud said the
municipality has started to remove tons of garbage from the
shoulders of the road leading to Lake Mainstay Resort on
Essequibo Coast.
He told the Sunday Chronicle that pits have beer dug for the
refuse and make the township look tidy.
But Persaud lamented that some residents are continuing to
dump in areas already cleared and making the job more difficult.
He anticipates that many tourists would be visiting the Lake
Mainstay hotel during Cricket World Cup (CWC) in March/April
next year and said the route to the location must not be dirty.
Persaud said, as the cleaning campaign intensifies this
week, persons found dumping will be prosecuted under the up-
dated by-laws that took effect on December 1.


Bush Lot Market

project nearing

completion
THE Regional Administration in Region Two (Pomeroon/
Supenaam) has announced that the rehabilitation and ex-
tension of Bush Lot Market is nearing completion.
A release said the $112M project includes construction of
enclosed concrete stalls, walkways and repairs to the main build-
ing.
The release said, when the works are completed, the
place will be occupied also by all the vendors from the old
Anna Regina Market and become the main vending loca-
tion in the town.


W g



sh n


RESIDENTS of Aliki,
Lannaballi, Makouria and
Saxacalli have expressed con-
cerns about the prevalence of
acoushi ants and the high
freight charges by the Trans-
port and Harbours Depart-
ment in these areas and gov-
ernment and regional offi-
cials have promised to look
into these concerns.
Residents also raised con-
cerns about the lack of electric-
ity in these areas, duty free con-
cessions for outboard engines.
speed boats operating at nights
and a lack of communication.
The concerns were raised
last week when a team of gov-
ernment and regional officials
visited the communities of
Aliki, Lannaballi, Makouria and
Saxa and held community meet-
ings, according to Region Three
(West Demerara/Essequibo Is-
lands) Information Officer Mr.


Jaidev Dudnauth.
Region Three Vice Chairman
Manpersaud, Coordinator of
Hinterland Development.Mr.
Harripersaud Nokta, Member
of Parliament Ms. Bibi Shadick
and Regional Agriculture Of-
ficer, Mr. Conrad Wilburgh,
were among the officials that
visited the communities and met
the residents.
Noting that the acoushi ants
have been plaguing several com-
munities across Guyana.
Wilburgh stated that it is virtu-
ally impossible to eradicate the
pest.
He opined, however, that
the pest can be controlled by
applying insecticide using a
swing-fog machine.
Wilburg said the swing-fog
machine will be put into opera-
tion in January 2007.
As regards dIut free conces-
sions for outboard engines.


Georgetown is-,


beautitW.'- Le, "S


keep it that way*,
A message from the Mayor and City Council
I


Manpersaud stated that the
matter would have to be treated
in a holistic manner and prom-
ised to raise it with the Minis-
try of Agriculture.
On the issue of speed boats
operating at nights between
Parika and Bartica, Shadick ob-
served that the operators are
contravening the laws govern-
ing speed boat operations.
She noted that there are
specific times during which the
speed boat is allowed to use the
rivers.
Noting that it may be a le-
gitimate speed boat (for pas-
sengers). Shaddick stated that
the operation during the night
makes it questionable and
highly suspicious.
In this regard. she urged resi-
dents to exercise a greater de-
gree of security consciousness.
As regards freight charges
for their produce, residents
claimed that vehicles on board
the Transport and Harbours
Department ferry boat pay less
even though they occupyU itNoieC
space.
Responding to the claims.
Noklta assured residents that the
mil.t1er \ill be discussed \\ith
the irelevant authorities.
He also stated that the
government will engage the
telephone company (GT&'T)
with a view to providing wire-
less telephone to these com-
munities.


-- _ _ _ I


~LCI ~ I-I~ I IL~LC~--~d~ I






-' -t-CL


.-SoeIAY- HRONCE emb-7;:2t0- --r r-------------- --------------



Governments and their responsibilities


By Rev. Kwame Gilbert
THE issue of government is
ultimately the issue of au-
thority.
In a fallen world, authorities
are given to maintain order and
not anarchy. Order makes life
more secure. Anarchy makes life
most uncertain.
And today, the spirit of
lawlessness is let loose in many
lands. The criminalisation of
culture is pushing society to-
wards the brink of anarchy. Vio-
lence replaces reason in resolv-
ing conflicts.


achieved by withholding from
the struggle. The fact to be
recognized is this: there is no
moral hiding place."
God has ordained several
positive roles for human govern-
ments. Primarily, these are to
encourage good behaviour and
restrain evil. The benefits of
government to human society
are recognized.
Against the backdrop of
separation of religion and state,
one has to recognize the need for
a widening of democratic partici-
pation and accountability of in-
stitutions; and interdependent


F ..'.


What should we expect then
from our governments?
1. Social Righteousness.
While it may be unrealistic to
expect all government officials
to become Christianised, they
are however expected to con-
duct their private and public life
in keeping with the basic stan-
dards of social righteousness. 1
wish to state rather emphati-
cally at this point that social
righteousness or morality is not
possible outside of religious
groundings.
America's first Presidenl.
George Washington. greatly



-,:: V.


is rife, throughout the globe, as
far as governments are con-
cerned. Instead of intentional in-
tegrity, what we see very often
is, in some cases is conditional
integrity and in other, no integ-


rity at all.
Peter Drucker said
"People might know too
little, perform poorly, lack
judgment and ability, and yet
not do too much damage. But


if they lack in character and
integrity...no matter how
knowledgeable, how brilliant,
how successful...they will de-
stroy." (TO BE CONTIN-
UED)


By Antony Bruno
SAN FRANCISCO (Bill-
board) This past year
marked the beginning of a
revolutionary experiment to
sell and distribute digital
music to and from mobile
phones.


The stage is only just being
set. with the business models,
pricing and marketing issues still
evolving.
Sprint and Verizon
Wireless jumped in early
with a la carte music ser-
vices that let users down-
load full tracks right to


i*I i'i ~


t.

Vt ~


These are not just issues of
subjection to authorities or honour
for rulers or payment of taxes.
What is at stake is evangelical par-
ticipation in the shaping of civil so-
ciety to recover the vocation of
public deacons and encourage the
new Josephs and Daniels of this
generation to serve God in palaces
and parliaments to secure peace
.and justice.
According to Gordon
Harland, Christian Faith and So-
ciety (Alberta: The University
of Calgary.Press, 1988), p. 86
"The very struggle to secure
.justice itself involves the use of
the instrument of power, and
the instruments of power are al-
ways ambiguous. Nor can inno-
cence be maintained or purity


prosperity that counteracts
predatory prejudices among in-
dividuals and groups and en-
ables everyone to participate in
the good of society.
To espouse religious liberty
is to affirm religious pluralism.
In a broader context, since most
cultures are religious driven, we
talk of cultural pluralism as
well. In a constitutional democ-
racy such as ours, pluralism is
a given, although racism im-
plodes society with its -violent
and segregationist tendencies.
The responsibility therefore
of every citizen is to hold up a
plumb line of social righteous-
ness, to which every govern-
.ment, democratically elected,
should measure up.


feared that America would be-
come a godless, secular state. In
his farewell address on Septem-
berl 7. 1796. this is what he
said:
"Of all the dispositions and
habits, which lead to political
prosperity, religion and moral-
ity are indispensable supports.
It is substantially true, that vir-
tue or morality is a necessary
spring of popular government".
Hence I find it difficult to ac-
cept that leaders, who hold no
regard for, or affinity to religion,
can actually demonstrate social
righteousness.
2. Intentional Integrity. In-
tegrity seems to be a word no
longer applicable to public of-
ficers. The charge of corruption


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ILLEGAL CONNECTIONS-

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makSPARKS.


SPARKS START FIRES 11


4'3
.13


Music on the move as

mobile applications multiply


. , .,
, .^


their phones, with a copy
sent to their PCs. Sprint
charges $2.50 per track,
while Verizon charges $2.
As of December 4, more
than 9 million songs had
been downloaded via the
(Please turn to page 17)


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14 'SUNDAY CHRONICLE I




Orealla residents get promised boat


THE government has pro-
vided a motor vessel to serve
more than 1,600 residents of
Orealla/Siparuta on the
Corentyne in Berbice.
It was handed over Friday
to the Captain, Councillors and
residents of the community by
Amerindian Affairs Minister
Carolyn Rodrigues who
pledged the government's con-
tinued support for their devel-
opment.
The Government Informa-
tion Agency (GINA) said resi-
dents had asked President
Bharrat Jagdeo for the boat
when he was there in June on a
Cabinet outreach.
The agency said the vessel
'MV Epira' will be used to
transport goods and services to
the market on the Corentyne
Coast and help in other eco-
nomic activities to develop the
community.
Ms. Rodrigues told resi-
dents of the government's con-
cern about the development of
Amerindian communities and
said it is working with every
organisation and stakeholder to
improve their lives.
"Today I can stand as an
Amerindian and say that we
have come a far way, and I know


that all of you are proud too, but
we must always want better and
we in the government are com-
mitted to this," she said.
The construction of the
vessel, GINA said, was a part-
nership project between the
government and residents since
they decided what materials
would be used and who would
build it.
Rodrigues urged residents
to take good care of the vessel,
urging that it be used to provide
maximum benefits for all resi-
dents.
Captain McLean Devair
said the occasion was memo-
rable for the community and ex-
pressed heartfelt gratitude to the
government.
"We the people of Orealla/
Siparuta are very pleased and
thankful to the government for
fulfilling its promise to us. This
boat will significantly assist us
in the transportation of our
goods to the coast; it will also
take our people when they need
to go," McLean said.
The vessel can carry 200
persons.
The vessel is named after
Epira, the first Amerindian
reservation in the Orealla/
Siparuta area.


PROMISE KEPT: Amerindian Affairs Minister Carolyn Rodrigues presents the key to the vessel MB Enira to Orealla
Toshao, McLean Devair. (Photo,courtesy GINA)


THE first shipment of bulk
cement for the TCL Guyana
Incorporated (TGI) cement
packaging terminal arrived
in Georgetown Friday from
CEMEX in Venmezela, the
company ....cd
The vessel, MV Caribe
Star, carrying 5,500 metric
tonnes of cement moored
alongside the TGI facility at
about 11:45 h to begin dis-
charging the bulk cement into
the silos, the company said in
a statement.
The three silos at the pack-
aging enminal eac have acapac-
ity of 2000 metric tonnes.


Commissioning of the plant
began on October 25, and in-
cludes the testing of all installed
equipment. TGI said all original
equipment manufacturers
(OEMs) were in Guyana to en-
sure that the installed equip-
ment function properly and
handle the local conditions as
required.
The processing of this first
batch of bulk cement takes the
terminal into the final stages of
commissioning where cement
will be stored in the silos and
later it will be bagged in jumbo
bags and the more familiar 42.5
kg bags.


The cement bagged during
this phase will be available on
the local market. The first bag
of cement came off the line Fri-
day night.
When fully commis-
sioned, the terminal will be
receiving bulk cement
shipped directly from the
TCL Group's plants in
Trinidad and Barbados.
TGI Plant Manager, Mr.
Mark Bender, was on hand for
the arrival of the MV Caribe
Star and said the arrival of the
first bulk shipment "is a signifi-
cant milestone on the way to
improved supply of cement to


support Guyana's building ac-
tivities."
Noting that the terminal
will cater exclusively to
Guyana, Bender added that
"...this terminal will
strengthen TCL's competitive
position in the marketplace,
through improvement of qual-
ity of service and reliability of
supply to its Guyanese cus-
tomers."
The bagging plant was con-
structed at a cost of about
US$10M.
The plant will be oper-
ated by TGI and staffed by
Guyanese nationals.


Another


Muslim


group against


casinos here

THE Guyana Islamic Trust (GIT) has registered its disap-
proval of any form of gambling here and said the intended
introduction of casino gambling will have a catastrophicc
impact" on all Guyana.
The GIT, in a statement, said its contention on the matter
was reiterated at a consultation with religious groups regarding
the issue of introducing casino gambling in Guyana in time for
the Cricket World Cup (CWC) tournament here next year
During that consultation with the government, the GIT said
it "elucidated that such an introduction spells a catastrophic
impact on all Guyana".
Besides its theological and legal positions, the GIT is of
the view that the social impact of any form of gambling is far
greater than its economic benefits to a community or society.
As such, the religious body said it will not support any legisla-
tion that will have a negative impact.
Moreover, the GIT is suggesting that before the matter of
gambling goes to Parliament, some research should be done to
ascertain the impact this will have in Guyana socially.
"We believe that the government should revisit the issue
of gambling in a total way and make the necessary arrangements
to safeguard the society from negative social impact," the GIT
posited.
Additionally, it said a public discourse should be encour-
aged on this issue. The Muslim religious group also committed
to working with all for the development of Guyana in positive
ways.
The GIT also called on the government, all political par-
ties, civil society, the business community and the religious
groups to work in partnership in coming up with a way for-
ward for the development of Guyana in a multi-faceted way in
order to reduce or eradicate all negative social impact of casino
gambling.
The Central Islamic Organisation of Guyana has also come
iout against introducing casinos here.
The government has taken a decision to introduce the
casino bill in parliament which, according to Head of the,
President Secretariat Dr. Roger Luncheon, is the ultimate
forum where the merits and demerits of introducing and
legalizing casino gambling in Guyana can" be thoroughly
discussed and debated before any final decision is takes.


PACKING: cement being packed at the pl. it (Photo, courtesy TGI)




ember 17, 2006 15


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-f---- .-------------------- ------ -- ---- -------------------------------------- ----- ----- --- SUNDAY -IU.EYebOr-'', ..


Climate change catching



voter attention around world


By Erik Kirschbaum

BE tLIN, (Reuters) "It's the
environment, stupid!"
Just as Bill Clinton used the
batt le cry "It's the economy,
stu, id!" to keep his 1992 presi-
den .al campaign focused, politi-
cal ridersr s worldwide are chant-
ing ,i new mantra based on
gro ring alarm about global
w,. ning.
mainstream parties in Ger-
m. ,. Britain, France, Canada.
the united States and Austria
be' c tackling climate change is
a N s winner while established
Gr n parties in Germany and
Au ta are experiencing a renais-
sar i


'\mold Schwarzenegger won
re action as California governor
in ,i landslide last month after
disi.ncing himself from Presi-
den: George W. Bush, a fellow
Republican, and championing
,me iures to cut the state's
gr'o house gas emissions.
In Britain, Tony Blair and
hi, ,robable successor Gordon
BE, '.n have made the fight
ag nst climate change a priority
Sai the leader of the pro-busi-
n( Conservative Party, David
C: ieron, has won over voters
by Ilking up environmental is-
su
Climate change, if pre-
se ed the right way, is a topic


Files
'anitary Ware
Sluminium products
" electrical Fittings
- hain Link Fencing
'B.RC Fabric
Ironmongery
*Camping Tents
"Carpets & Rugs
*Gym Equipment
*Stainless Steel Sinks
*lighting Fixtures
Christmas Items
Fishing Accessories

L-" ... -" L "




:. .. ... .


that voters are definitely open-
ing up to," Manfred Guellner,
managing director of Germany's
Forsa polling institute, told
Reuters. "We're seeing you can
score points with it.
"Blair has done a good job
of showing how leadership on
climate change can make a dif-
ference. Climate change clearly
has 'hot button' potential."
In France, the need for sus-
tainable policies has been em-
braced by all parties ahead of a
2007 presidential election. So-
cialist candidate Scgolene Royal
and her likely rival Nicolas
Sarkozy pepper speeches with
references to the environment.
In early December, Sarkozy
met former U.S. Vice President
Al Gore, whose documentary
on global warming, "An Incon-
venient Truth". has been a sur-
prise box-office winner.
Sarkozv said concern about
the environment was not the
preserve of traditional green
part ies.
"Sustainable development
and the defence of the environ-
ment is a question so funda-
mental that it can't be the prop-
erty of one political party, even
if it's green in colour." the
front-runner For ruling conser-
vative UMP party told parlia-
ment.

(;GREE\NH)L .SI (,\S
EFFECT
This month, Canada's
opposition Liberals elected
former environment minister-
Stephane Dion as their
leader. Dion campaigned on
green issues and said he
would focus on the need to
cut emissions from the
booming Alberta oil area.
It was the first time a ma-
jor Canadian party had picked
a leader who campaigned pri-


marily on the environment.
Greenhouse gases like car-
bon dioxide (C02), produced
by burning fossil fuels, trap heat
in the atmosphere. Scientists
say rising temperatures could
raise sea levels and cause more
droughts. floods and heatwaves.
The United Nations' Inter-
governmental Panel on Climate
Change predicts the average glo-
bal temperature will increase
between 1.4 to 5.8 degrees Cel-
sius by 2100. which would lead
to rising sea levels as ice caps
melt.


President George W. Bush
The publication of a hard-
hitting report in October by
Nicholas Stern, a former World
Bank chief economist, concen-
trated minds on climate change
which he said could lead to an
economic upheaval on the scale
of the 1930s Depression.

GOING MAINSTREAM
Blair made global warming
one of the key themes of
Britain's Group of Eight presi-
dency last year and.German
Chancellor Angela Merkel has
pledged to continue the cam-
paign when her government
takes over the presidencies of
the European Union and the G8
in 2007.


"Showing a commitment for
the environment has once again
become fashionable and deemed
worthy of public recognition,"
said Udo Kuckartz, a University
of Marburg researcher in a re-
cent study of the public's view
for the German government.
"We haven't seen that in a
long time."
Climate change was re-
garded as important by 93 per
cent and viewed as the number
two issue behind unemploy-
mient, up from fourth place in
2000.
Germany is home to the
Greens party, one of the world's
most successful ecology parties
which has had seven years in
government. Their support has
climbed from 8.1 per cent in the
2005 election to around 11 per
cent in opinion polls.
"The climate issue is vital to
voters of all shades and to busi-
ness as well," said Ralf Fuecks.
head of the Greens' Heinrich
Boell Foundation think-thank in
Berlin.
In Austria, the Greens got
their best result in an election in
October, winning 21 seats in
parliament. Austria derives 20
per cent of its energy from re-
newable sources.
Emmerich Talos. professor
for political science at Vienna
University, said ecology was a
key issue in the Alpine repub-
lic and no party could afford to
ignore it.
"There's no way a party
could run an election nowa-
days without having green is-
sues in their programme," he
said. (Additional reporting by
James Mackenzie in Paris,
Alister Doyle in Oslo, Simon
Johnson in Stockholm, David
Ljunggren in Ottawa, Karin
Strohecker in Vienna and
Madeline Chambers)


Over 5.000.000 pieces in stock variety of designs and sizes
Toilet sets basins bathtubs vanity units
Windows doors, shopfronts show cases
S -Switches panels cables lights and accessories
Sizes 4ft. to 12ft. heights. Special lengths can be ordered.
-Sizes #65- #66 #610
Locks hinges tower bolts bolts and nuts etc.
--Sleeping bags hammocks etc.
In several sizes and designs.
Treadmills -weights
In single bowl single and double drainers.
Chandeliers wall lamps exterior lights
Decorations Christmas trees fairy lights
Polyethylene nets. nylon nets, lead
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Penguins


offer


evidence


of global

warming


By Deborah Zabarenko, Environment Correspondent

MCMURDO STATION, Antarctica (Reuters) The first
Adelie penguin chicks of the season black fluffballs
small enough to hold in the hand started hatching this
month, and the simple fact that there are more of them in
the south and fewer of them further north is a sign of glo-
bal warming, scientists say.
Smaller than the more majestic Emperor penguins, the
Adelies have some 193 colonies that have a total population of
2.5 million breeding pairs, said researcher David Ainley in a tele-
phone interview from his camp at the penguin rookery at Cape
Royds in Antarctica.
"We're looking for dramatic right-hand turns (in the pen-
guin population), which are happening now," Ainley said. "The
rate of Adelie penguin colony disappearance is accelerating as
the sea ice disappears."
As the northern sea ice vanishes and penguin populations
decrease, southern penguin colonies flourish as the sea ice loos-
ens, making it easier for them to dive and fish, he said.
Adelies and Emperors are the two species of penguin that
live on sea ice: all other penguins dwell in open water.
"Adelies and Emperors have the ability to cope with sea
ice," Ainley said. "They have an incredible ability to lay on
layers of fat when the sea ice is heavy."
For example, he said, Adelies can hold their breath for six
minutes at a time and Emperors can go without a breath for 20
minutes at a time, allowing both species to forage for food un-
derneath the ice.


PENGUIN EVIDENCE: Adelie penguins make their way
to the water in the Cape Evans region of Artarctica in
this file picture. (REUTERS/Mark Baker)
They eat fish, squid and tiny creatures called krill.
Adelie penguins have moved around depending on the tem-
perature at least since the so-called Little Ice Age that occurred
around the year 1200, Ainley said.
"As the Earth cooled slightly, Adelie colonies began to ap-
pear further north during the Little Ice Age," he said. "But since
then, Adelies have been retreating, and in the past 30 years this
process has been accelerating."
When asked whether there is any doubt that this is a con-
sequence of human-fuelled global warming, Ainley offered a flat
"No" in reply.
ROCK THIEVES
To keep track of the Adelie colonies at three sites in the
vicinity of McMurdo Station, Ainley and his team band hun-
dreds of the new chicks and insert bar code identifying chips
under the skin near the shoulders of the adults.
"You'd never be able to collect any meaningful data
without these techniques," he explained, noting that you
might be able to weigh a certain penguin once, but it would
be virtually impossible to identify that penguin again for
a repeat weighing.
As it is, scientists have constructed a weigh bridge that acts
as a scale when penguins waddle across it.
Because nothing grows on the sea ice where Adelies live,
there are no twigs or branches to build nests, so these penguins
collect rocks and fashion a nest-like pile of them to brood over
their eggs usually two eggs at a time.
Even rocks are in short supply, so some Adelies have a habit
of swiping rocks from other penguins' nests, Ainley said.
"Some birds are pretty industrious," he said. "Others
have a strategy of stealing."


I


Every customer is guaranteed to get a discount.


Fet .5% t 15!/ Disounton th folowingi:'t;mfs






Z_,._ND..YQ.......O E g erJ7.006 ..L




U.S. CHURCHES DIVIDED




ON HOW TO HELP POOR


By Ed Stoddard

DALLAS, (Reuters) If it
wasn't for churches and reli-
gious charities, a lot of folks
would go hungry in the
United States this winter.
But while most churches
believe in helping the poor, they
take different views on how to
go about it.
Some of the more conserva-
tive evangelical churches believe
any kind of state intervention
reeks of socialism and favour in-
dividual or faith-oriented ef-
forts.
Others see a more active role
for the state and strongly favour


plans by the incoming, Demo-
cratically controlled Congress to
raise the minimum wage.
In the United States -
where the welfare state is less
robust than in other developed
countries but church attendance
rates are much higher reli-
gious groups often step in to fill
social service roles that the state
would carry out elsewhere.
"We could not operate with-
out faith-based organizations," said
Bill Prickett, spokesman for the
Dallas-based North Texas Food
Bank, which is the biggest in Texas
and fed about 262,000 people last
year.
Almost 75 per cent of the


DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE
CLOSURE TO ROAD TRAFFIC


For Sunday, December 17, 2006 14:30h
For Monday, December 18, 2006 14:30h
For Tuesday, December 19, 2006 14:30h

For Ocean Going Vessels opening lasts about 1-1"2hrs








weather
e aItch e



TODAY'S FORECAST: Some cloudy spells with light to
moderate showers are expected to interrupt mostly fair
weather conditions.
WAVES: Moderately high reaching about 2.1m in open
waters.
WINDS: North-easterly to South-easterly at 1 to 7mps,
gusting at times over some areas.
HIGH TIDE: 01:41 h at (2.40m) and 14:05h at (2.65m)
LOW TIDE: 07:53h at (1.21 m) and 20:17h at (0.80m)
G/TOWN
SUNRISE: 05:56h
SUNSET: 17:41h
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE: 30.0 -33.0C over inland and
interior locations & 28.0-31.0C over coastal areas.
MINIMUM TEMPERATURE: 20.0 23.0C over near inland
and interior locations & 21.5-24.0C over coastal areas.
RAINFALL G\Town: 0.3mm
RAINFALL ACCUMULATED: 106.3mm
MARINE ADVISORY: Fishermen and other marine
users are advised not to damage or interfere with the
ocean platforms, whose data are vital to the provision
of the weather information and warnings for the
safety of the marine community.
HIGH TIDE ADVISORY:
SPRING TIDE ADVISORY: Nil

FOR WEATHER RELATED QUERIES PLEASE CALL -
-- 261-2216, FAX 261-2284


distribution sites that receive
goods from the Food Bank are
run by religious organizations.
"I was in the Baptist min-
istry myself for almost 20
years, this is my faith and my
passion," said Prickett, as fork-
lifts whirled around with boxes
of foods in the cavernous ware-
house.

BLESSED ARE THE POOR
For some Christians, raising
the minimum wage carries al-
most Biblical weight.
"I don't know how being
against an increase in the mini-
mum wage could be supported
by faith. We are talking about
justice here, not economics."
said Jan G. Linn, a pastor with
the Christian Church (Disciples
of Christ) and author of the
book "Big Christianity: What's
Right With The Religious Left."
"Most of what Jesus said
was about the poor," Linn told
Reuters by telephone from his
Minnesota base.
Some other mainstream
Protestant denominations such
as the Presbyterian Church and
many Catholics endorse a higher
minimum wage.
This is the case even with
some conservative Christians
who praise the virtue of work
over welfare because a mini-
mum wage earner is obviously
employed.
But for many evangelicals
the issue is a hard one to
grapple with given their inher-
ent suspicion of Big Govern-
ment and ties to the business
wing of the Republican Party.
"Evangelicals and other con-
servative Christians are less op-
posed (to the minimum wage)
than ambivalent," said John
Green, a political scientist at the
University of Akron and an ex-
pert on religion and politics.
"Since the minimum wage


CHANNEL 2
06:00 h Music Break
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operates at the level of individu-
als, it is the type of social jus-
tice approach evangelicals like.
But on the other hand,
evangelicals are sceptical of
government intervention in the
economy," he said.
The result was that while
many evangelicals would not be
strong opponents of the mini-
mum wage they would not rush
out to support it either, Green
said.
Many religiously-motivated
social conservatives believe that
issues of social justice are best


addressed through churches and
individuals and not by raising
taxes on others.
"Religious conservatives are
very giving people but helping
comes from the person and not
the IRS (Internal Revenue Ser-
vice)," said Tom McClusky,
vice president of government af-
fairs at the Family Research
Council, a conservative lobby
group with strong evangelical
ties.
He said evangelicals
favoured approaches such as the
White House Office of Faith-


based and Community Initia-
tives, which makes federal fund-
ing available for religious
organizations with social service
programmes.
At the North Texas Food
Bank, the efforts of the faithful
are appreciated but a govern-
ment-mandated increase in the
minimum wage would also be
welcomed.
"You cannot feed your
family in Dallas on the cur-
rent minimum wage," said
Food Bank Chief Executive
Jan Pruitt.


Music on the move as ...


(From page 13)
Sprint service. Verizon
has not yet disclosed sales.
In October, Cingular Wire-
less introduced a subscription
model, providing mobile access
to existing services like eMusic,
Napster and Yahoo Music. Cus-
tomers can't wirelessly down-
load music yet, but they can
transfer subscription tracks
from their PC to their phones.
Once Cingular adds over-
the-air downloading, expected
early next year. the true test of
whether a subscription or a la
carte model works best on wire-
less will commence.
Cingular VP of consumer
data services Jim Ryan believes
wireless will rejuvenate the
struggling music-subscription
model. "We can double their
base in the next 12 months," he
says.
Sprint executives, mean-
while, seem content with the a
la carte model, but haven't ruled
out a subscription element in
the future.
The more immediate goal
for 2007 is to raise awareness


Magazine
03:00 h Movie
05:00 h The Mystery of the
Body
05:30 h Newtown Gospel V2
Hour
06:00 h NCN News
Magazine
07:00 h- Voice of Victory
08:00 h Lifting Guyana to
Greatness
09:00 h Anmol Geet
10:00 h National Geographic
1 1:00 h Homestretch
Magazine
11:30) h- Weekly Digest
12:00 h Press Conference
ilih Cabinet Sccretarv
13:00 h Gelltting Ready For


Shopping Tiime'
SIn Slylce
Cat lolic Maga/inc
- Grow with IPlDI)
- Feal tlrle
Family Forumn


VA1'

13:30 h-
I -1: ()0) h
15:00( h
10:003 h
16:30 h1


17 00 h Lutheran Men's
I 'llowship
17:30 h hiiysuco Round tip
I 8:00 h NCN 6 O'clock
News Magazine Live
19:00 h One on One
19:301)h Close Up
20:00 h I' eHlire


of both models. Only 3 per cent
of mobile users say they've lis-
tened to music on mobile
phones, so the wireless indus-
try hopes that offering a broad
portfolio of mobile-music ser-
vices will spark consumer inter-
est in 2007. A pending mobile-
music service from mobile-
phone manufacturer Nokia could
aid in that effort as well.

BEYOND THE RINGTONE
Aiming to raise the volume
of the mobile-music message,
wireless operators are creating a
broad range of music-related
services in an attempt to recast
the mobile phone as an enter-
tainment hub.
Here are just a few of the
music-related services and ap-
plications that gained promi-
nence during 2006:
Streaming radio: Sirius
and XM Satellite Radio sta-
tions now stream multiple
channels over such wireless
networks as Sprint. Cingular
and Alltel for a monthly fee.
Others like MobiRadio and
MSpot offer programming as
well.


Streaming concerts:
Wireless operators have
sponsored and hosted live
performances by such acts as
the Fugees, Josh Turner and
the Pussycat Dolls and made
them available for download
or, in some cases, streaming
live exclusively to subscrib-
ers.
Concert tickets: Wire-
less leaders like Nokia and
Verizon Wireless have begun
experimenting with using mo-
bile phones as a means to en-
ter live events. Trials are un-
der way that let fans buy
their tickets via the mobile
phone and receive a unique
bar code sent to the phone's
screen that can be scanned
like a paper ticket.
Lifestyle portals: Not
content with letting wireless
operators dictate how
ringtones and other music
content is offered to wireless
users, lifestyle icons like
Kevin Lyman and Tony Hawk
are creating their own mo-
bile-content portals focused
solely on content of interest
to their core audience.


Energy Watch

Ford's Model T car was initially designed to
j run on ethanol (ethyl alcohol).


G$/Litre
Gasolene Diesel Kero
ESSO 166,05 143.75 129.50
GUYOIL 161.00 138.50 128.00
SOL 167.40 146.73 131.25
CHEVRON 166.20 147.73 135.00
Average price displayed at the pump December 16, 2006.
L t =AST I G ) 11 S= T= R D= ELUXE

'* *_!__ _II_
N *


16:15;I2(0:30 rs |
S GRDIth the Ro 14:00 17:00/20:30 h
* hR I I
S I plut -RAIN1ONW RAANI'.
I "THE i()NGESTI RI" I &
I whh (hris Ro I
* I M.\.V.K,.JACK"
* I
* I


S ,v' COMING SOON 1' 1
kh. Inrn1,. DHOOM 2 A ,


M 6aMU-- 5 FEZ







18 SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17,2006




CaHsLE SUNDAY V --:;21 -9

COUNSELLING CLA SSIFIEDS .L'.-f);lb

LAND FOR SALE FOR HIRE 1,111 \I.Wt ,W-
LEGALS BEAUTY SALON PROPERTY FOR SALE EDUCATIONAL I1 .l J\n I'.,k
TO LET LEARN TO DRIVE HERBAL MEDICINE AUTO SALES (.,. -;.' <*,"'.


SERVICES


DRESSMAKING


HEALI


BUIDLING Contractor -
mason, carpentry, painting,
plumbing, tiling and guttering.
Prompt, reasonable and
reliable services. Free
estimates. Call 622-0267. 629-
2239.


ONE 38 FT Basha Boat
complete with engine & seine.
1 Mitsubishi Caanter. 2AT 170
Carina cars. Call Preka 275-
0344/275-0305.
ONE cruiser fishing boat 55
ft x 9 x 6 with seine, one 48
Yamaha engine (in good
working) condition) and ice box
(boat complete) sea worthy price
$2.5 million negotiable. Tel.
223-5549.


WORK from home for US$$$$
weekly. Information? Send stamped
envelope to Nicola Archer, PRO. Box
12154 Georgetown, Guyana.
BE your own boss. Use your
spare time filling 100 enveopes for
US$500 or more weekly. For
information send stamped self-
addressed envelope to Randolph
Williams. P.O. Box 12154
Georgetown, Guyana.
CONTROL your income
working from home filling 100
envelopes for US$500 or more
weekly. For information, send
stamped self-addressed envelope
to Nathaniel Williams, PO Box
12154 Georgetown, Guyana.


INDRA'S Beauty Salon, 122
Oronoque Street, nails &for cold wave,
straightening, facial, manicure,
scalp treatment and design on
nails. Also Beauty Culture
available. Tel. 227-1601.
HOLIDAY special free air brush
on all acrylic nails & chemical
services 10% on pedicures & facials
Monday Thursday now to
December 21. 2006. Special
opening hours 8:30 am 7pm
Sunday 10am 3pm visit Nayelli
Hair Fashion at 211 New Market
St. between Camp & Water St. for
appointment. 226-2124.
NAYELLI SCHOOL OF
COSMETOLOGY is now offering
special 3-month Cosmetology
package beginning January 8.
2007. Evening classes beginning
January 16, 2007. Courses in Air
brushing Acrylic nails Barbering, Basic
& Advance Hair Cutting classes. Tel.
226-2124 or visit at 211 New Market
Street, North Cummingsburg.


ARE you cursed,
depressed, denAn p-^-T^e.
OR need fnr-, -'- ,_ ,!1
Apostle Randolph Williams -
# 261-6050 (20:00 h 23:00



DOLLY'S Auto Rental -
272 Bissessar Avenue.
Prashad Nag ar, Georgetown.
We accept Master. Visa and
American Express Cards. Phone
- 225-7126 226-3693. Email:
dollysautorenatal@yaho(c.comi


FOR PROFESSIONAL
COMPUTER Repairs, Sales &
Services--Call Kersting's Computer
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8361. 618-8283. Home & Office
Services cvaIlable. 24 hrs

BRAND new laptops i ,I ,
from $170 000, Des-ktop,' : i


C O M P L E T E
COSMETOLOGY COURSE.
REGISTER KNOW FOR MORE
INFO., CALL 226-9448._
ENROLL your kids now at
"Kids Day Out" Play School.
Affordable fees. Contact 226-
2299 or 227-0331, Karen or
Mandy. .. .
EVERGREEN Nature
Study Club (Regionsi-10)
www.s dnp.org.gy/evergreen.
TEL. 226-4634.627-92' 85,
664-594-7........--
EARN a Certificate Diploma
or Degree, in any part of the world
from home THROUGH
CORRESPOND" ENCE. For
information, call CFI Global
Education Link #261-5079.
NOW REGISTERING FOR
JANUARY, 2007. GUYANA
Training College for International
skills. Get prepared for the local and
international job market. Training
on the Canadian Curriculum for the
certified personal support worker
programme. Canadian certification
as recognisd by private colleges and
universities. Ocean View Hotel
Campus. Day and evening classes.
Call 222-5430, ext 271, 222-3997,
663-9296.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
COLLEGE. Now registering students
for our (1) full time secon-dary
school (2) Pre Form 1...Students with
SSEE marks 300 390 (3) (4) ABE
Certificate and Diplomas Courses
J5) Computers Courses Call today
or more information. Tel. 225-2397,
225-5474 and 223-7219 or visit
us at 262 Thomas Street N/C/B.
IBC. School commence for the new
term 3rd January 2007. Student
success is our greatest concern.


HAVING a party? Need
chairs, tables, etc for rent.
Contact Affordable Rentals at
226-2299 or 227-0331 at
affordable prices. Ask for Karen
or Mandy.
ENTIRE northern tiger island
situated in the Essequibo River,
Hamburg fertile land. good for
farming S5000 Guyana dollars
per acre per year. Please call
74-5034, 624-6855.
TRAVELLER sound of
lighting system. Having parties.
function, cocktail, press
meetings. churches, crusades.
yaag, ,weddings. concerts and
international shows also we have
all effect like fogging bubbles.
foaming, confetti pennonn) disco
lighting effects, stage lighting all
sizes of generators, tents, band
equipment. Tel 226-6527, 623-
7242 based at The Tennessee
Night Club.



SCARPOTIC Itch ulcer
pain, cholesterol pressure.
gall stone, impotentcy,
colds 220-7342. 609-1308.
WORRIED about your
health" Why not try Iridology
(study of science of using the eyes
to detect the strength and
weaknesses of the organs and
systems of the body. For more info
226-4889, 622-6064.


PRUDENTIAL SCHOOL OF
MOTORING "You train to pass".
227-1063. 226-7874. 644-
7211. I
ENROL now at Shalom
Driving School, Lot 2 Croal
Street, Stabroek You could also
obtain an International Driver's
Permld For more information
cal: 227-3869. 622..8162, 611-
9038.
R K's .,,, Masters in
Driving sinfr. StLdents
need se''urity ard comfort to
: ",i l; ^ .,io(nfs musI i In O W; i

Ii-L 'i.' K hL li n if


ESCAPE to rest. Massage
Therapy. Certified Massage
Therapist Ulelli Verbeke. 6f5-
8747.
FEEL the benefits of
massage. Come in and have a
lymph drainage massage and
feel re-energised. Tel: 223-8993.
Indera Singh Massage. If you
need a balance massage try my
therapeutic massage combined
with reflexology. Cell 615-6665.



MAGAZINE of Worldwide
Pen Friend. Information?
Send stamped envelope -
CFI. PO Box 12154
Georgetown, Guyana
GET A FRIEND! Get educated!
Get Married! Migrate!...through the
CFI Telephone Friendship Link.
Call 592-261-5079. everyday -
07:00 h to 21:00 h.
REOPENED The Junior/
Senior Singles Dating Service
18 80 yrs. Link for Christmas.
Call Tel. 223-8237, 648-6098
Monday Saturdays 8:30 am -
5 pm.
US Based Guyanese, East
Indian female, seeks decent
educated male between the
ages of 39 and 47 yrs. Reply with
pnotograph to: Salema, P.O. Box
180031 Richmond Hill
Jamaica, Queens, NY 11418,
USA.
SINGLE, decent.
independent feamle 60 yrs.
would like to chat with single.
decent independt males 60 yrs
plus. Please Call The Junior/
enior/SinglesDating Service,
18 80 yrs. 223-8237. Mon. -
Sat. 8 am 5 pm. Ask for Ann.
A MIDDLE aged, divorce
intellectual or Indian decent
would like to correspond with an
intelligent, sincere female of
both local and overseas, for a
serious relationship which may
lead to marriage. Have that
special man or your dreams.
Don't miss this golden
opportunity! Write to: Ra PO.
Box 12351, Bourda.
Georgetown, Guyana.



REPAIRS to hydraulic
accumulators. Contact
Friendship Oxygen Limited.
Phone #266-2171.
HELLO the doctor is back!
Have your gas stove repaired and
serviced also your kero range
change to gas. 220-4073.
HAVING problems with your
refrigerators, washing machine.
gas stove. air-conditioner? Then
call Linden on 641-1086.
TECHNICIANS available for
appliance repairs washers.
dryers, microwaves, stoves, deep
fryers, etc. Call 622-4521/218-
O650.
FOR all your construction
repairs, renovations, as well as
Iiaso'r ', v rinishinrg, pi uPatbi!'
anr painting'. Contact fMcha-,med
on 223-9710, 614-6634
HAVE your gas stoves and
oven service for the Christmas
Holidays. Both domestic and
industrial. Call Lawrence 226-
6411, 627-0720, 646-7400.
UPHOLSTERY done.
Excellent w o k n i a n s i
Y i-. We upholster chairs.
.1 .. 1. .1I household furniture,
etc. We do house to house
service. Contact 650-0469
FOR low cost an conditioner.
refrigerator. n icrowa'e. free er.
dimnk cooler ei pairs and servicing
electrical and solar ranel
installation Call 225-4822. 624-
0004., 321-3547.
FOR olfln ont -rerv ,-;r (!
I1r'p 'i"' wr s ii r n' aCt' lino, cI' !,
ph: iq~q~lt :,'2 l27 "dt: b ]


S Immigration
We can assist you
to migrate to Canada.
Skinled Workers a Business
Class Students Refugees o
Work Permits *
Sponsorship ps Appea ls
for Refused Cases *
visitor 's Visa,
Con!act
Balwant Persaud &
Associates Certified
Immigration Consultants
57, Upper Robb and
Oronoque Sts., Boun'ta,
Tel 225-1540, 622-8308
Canada: 416-431-8845
wwwcanadaimmigrafionbpa.com
Approved by the Canadian Govt.
to represent clients.



ONE experienced
seamstress great wages and
benefits. koxie's 122
Merriman's Mall. Bourda.
ONE TRUCK DRIVER.
Contact P. Ramroop & Son. 1
'C' Orange Walk, Bourda. Tel:
227-1451.
SALESPERSON. Must have
a valid drivers licence. Apply in
person at ARK Enterprise The
Container House. 17Lombard
St., Werk-en-Rust.
PORTERS to work at Garment
Factory & Stores. Apply at Lot D
Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park. Contact
Reshma on Tel. 225-4492 or 225-
9404
EXPEREINCED Hairdressers -
must do Manicure and Pedicure.
To wages and incentives. Call.
227-8538. 622-4386. Apply
Roxie's, 122 Merriman's Mal
Bourda.
E & N BECK Welding
Establishment. 3 Princess and
Ketley Sts. Charlestown, 1 night
security guard, 40 years up
Must have valid police
clearance with 2 references.





Vao ndes exist at

Hope Christian

Academy


TWO PRIMARY

SC(0 L'. TEAC RS


ONE HEAD TEACHER


Contact: Samantha
220-4981
I leave a message

URGENT 100 SECURITY
Guard for Baton, Armed and
Canine (dog) Divisions, 2 lorryv
and viani drives to work as ci ier s
on contract (like iri, b)us. ( i
Visiting Inspector with
n otorcvLc le n.oitors tI'i ('.":'1 -i
,-r hitv L1 n,; f .!L,,1 G,- Ink ,;IK L,,;,
znnns, Corl' ct -I, Rc u.'! !
Rid 1 se iiV ii s


1 DISPATCHER for Taxi
Service. Tel: 223-5400, 225-
6969.
CAR & VAN Drivers. Contact
Ganesh Cheddie, 29
Pouderoyen WBD. Tel: 264-
2524.
SALES girls, boys, Porters
and security guards. Apply
Avinash Complex, Water Street.
Athina's by the East Coast Bus
Park and Anand's Regent St. Call
226-3361. 227-7829, 226-6594.
VACANCIES for Sawmill and
forest operations in Kwakwani -
experienced Band Saw
Operators Pony Saw Operators,
Crosscut Operators, Saw Doctor,
Forest Operation Manager.
Logging Supervisor, Forklift
Operators, General Workers, Tree
Spotters, Line Cutters/
Compassman, Dozer Operators,
Skidder Operators, Chainsaw
Operators, Skidder and Chainsaw
Helpers, Heavy Duty Mechanics,
Auto Electrician Industriai
Electrician, Tyre Repair Man,
Welder, Mercedez Logging Truck
Drivers, Accounts/Inventory Clerk
(Georgetown) Security Guards
(Georgetown). Please send in
application or apply personally
to Unamco Industries Limited,
279 Forshaw Street,
Queenstown, Georgetown,
Guyana. Tel: 225-7335, 227-
4703, Fax: 225-7351.



LE RESSOUVENIR, several
lands and properties with pool
and without pool. REPUBLIC
PARK beautiful property with
pool on 3 lots of land. TEL. 226-
8148, 625-1624.
RIVERSIDE land East Bank
Demerara house lots from $700
000; East Bank Demerara; business
centre lots and house lots at Parika
- $3M up. 619-6648, 266-2111.
DOUBLE LOT SOUTH
RUIMVELDT PARK $6.9< or
$3.4M. each. VERSAILLES 125'
x 67' in gated compound $5.9M,
6 lots $3M each and 5 lots,
property & rice mill CraneiLa
union S45M. 15 acres Canal No.
1 $11.75M, HIGHWAY LANDS
farming, resort, sand pit,
residence. LBI $2.4M, Atlantic
Gardens $6.9M, Campbellville
$10.75M, Lamrnaha Gardens
$14.75M. Cummings St $12M,
FRIENDSHIP water front, Bee
Hive double lot $6.75M. Melanie
$4.75M. Non Pariel $1.75M.
Property $4.75. Tel: 226-8148,
625-1624.
FUTURE HOMES REALTY-
227-4040, 628-0796. 611-3866.
Land for sale. Queenstown -
S35M. Sheriff St $45M -
US$1M. North R/veldt $4M.
Diamond H/Scheme $.2M.
Grove #1 Scheme $1.2M
Lamaha Gdns $17M. Land of
Canaan EBD 40 acres $3.5M,
each per acre and 3 per acre 62
x 184 High St. Kinston $75M,
Canal No 1 84 x 100 $17M,
Main & Middle Sts. $150M Canmp
St 150 x 90 $75M. David St..
Kitty S25M Sheet Anchoe
Village 28 Lots $28M. Stone
Ave 2 lots $24M. Peter s hall
EBD 47 x 290 $45M. Dovwding
St & Vlissengen Road $35M
CONTINENTAL Park S6.5M.
Republic Park S7M, Courida
S25M. Bel Air Park $15M Le
Ressouvenir (1 acrel S60M.
Subiranvile S15M. Roob St
S90M. $15M Public Road.
Eccles $22M. S15M. Bel Air
Gardens $500,000 US, Sheriff
Street $40M, $.30M Ber Air
Springs S18M, Qu'iuns:own
100'x120' S27M. Neo.'tcwn 50 x 115 $8 5M, Middltron Srieoet
68 x 100 $OM. South Road iS-4iM
We'hngton Stroet S65M. New

i"cres 'i S'' $3 ','
e r q !


53 H EARL'S COURT,
LBI, ECD. CALL 227-1711.
LAND with 2 houses at 41
Agriculture Rd., Triumrph
Sideline Dam. Call 263-5338.
EARLE'S COURTS. Single
lot (113x69) or double lot. Call
owner. Tel: 624-8894.
LAND FOR SALE. LAND
FOR SALE OLEANDER Gardens
- 89 ft by 152 ft. Price $25M.
Call: 612-0349.
EARLE'S Court 2 house
lots 9800 sq ft. Build luxurious
mansion area for pool/tennis.
$4M. Edersons' 226-5496
ALBERT & Robb St.
Corner spot with steel frame.
Ideal 4 storey general store,
200 mini malls. Edersons'
226-5496
NEW HOPE EBD Road -
river, wharf, large ships, ware
house, active general store.
$12M. Edersons' 226-5496
SWAN Soesdyke Linden
Highway 10 acres farm land,
Yarrowkabra over 200 acres of
farm land with creek at the
back. Call: 261-5500.
FOULIS ECD $8M.
Bachelor's Adv ECD $5M,
Sandpit Red loom $6M. Call
Seeker's Choice 223-6346
(Office) 263-7110 (Home).
PLOT of prime Agriculture
land 6.5 acres including house
lot located on the southern side
of public road Canal No. 1,
WBD. Water, telephone,
electricity accessible, fur
information. Call 233-2738,
640-0661, 622-5794.



1 2-BEDROOM apt.
Railway Line, Kitty. Call 227-
4157.
ROOM for single
working female. Tele-
phone: 227-0928.
FOR overseas visitors
apt. to rent in Kitty. Call
226-1640.
FURNISHED house -
79 Atlantic Gdns. Call
220-6060, 626-2066.
FURNISHED flats for
overseas visitors. Phone 227-
2995, Kitty.
BUSINESS space in
Georgetown. Call 225-7131.
611-0800.
FURNISHED 2 bedroom
apartment, short or long term
rental. Phone 227-5980.
1 3-BEDROOM flat -
Lamaha Street. Queenstown -
$45 000. Tel # 225-3370
FURNISHED rooms for
single working male $4 500
weekly. Tel. # 613-2647.
KITTY, Campbellville -
furnished and unfurnished 1.
3-bedroom apts 233-6160.
SHORT TERM RENTALS
FOR OVERSEAS VISITORS.
PHONE 225-9944.
3-BEDROOM top flat
with verandah & parking -
$48 000. Tel 225-5512, 647-
0856.
REPUBLIC Park -
bedroom'' upper fI!at o
storage bond. One business
place 233-6160
ONE tvo-bed room
apartment to rent in !\ittv
Please Contact 231-1585 or
642-9441.
ONE 3 bedroom,. lower
- i I .,.; Address 76
Q. Cam pbeir ;i. l
Phone 227-6953
BOTTOM flat 3-bedroom
s, 0 0OO0 ;3 C !h i
Tel. 628-6855.


' 0.-h / -i


0


_


MASSAGE


'








SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17,2006 19


ROOM to rent in residential
area. Contact 231-8661, 629-
5064.
UNFURNISHED one
bedroom self contained
apartment price $20 000, 130
Garnett St., New Town Kitty.
1 unfurnished apt. in Kitty.
Fully grilled, tiled, AC, water 24
hours. etc. Price ($45 000)
neg. Call 609-8315.
ONE bond space upper flat
at Sharon's Building available
in the 11 January. Tel. 662-
5567, 225-4413..
TOP flat 3 bedrooms, top
flat 2 bedrooms, prime business
place bottoms flat. Call 624-
210, 223-1017.
2 BEDROOM APT, self
contained, 237 Independence
Boulevard $25,000. Call: 626-
8822, 231-6731.'
ONE BUSINESS PLACE
LOCATED BELOW THE
ODYSSEY RESTAURANT,
BARR STREET, KITTY. TEL.
623-4700.
FULLY furnished apt,
overseas guest A/C, security,
parking. Tel: 231-8748, 222-
6494, 615-1525.
ONE 3 Bedroonm bottom
flat at Durban St, Werk-en-Rust.
$42,000. Tel: 223-9773, 231-
1540.
SELF-CONTAINED rooms
and furnished apartments in G/
town for overseas visitors. Call
225-7131, 611-0800.
ONE semi furnished 5
bedroom house in Roraima
Complex Short or long term
rent. Call 645-5343 or 225-
5363.
SUBRYANVILLE 2
bedroom apt. fully furnished,
parking space, AC. Short-term
nor overseas vistors.Call 226-
5369.
KITTY Residential new
concrete bottom flat.
Hollywood designed $40,000
monthly. Edersons' 226-5496
ECCLES residential new 3
luxurious Hollywood designed
bedrooms, top floor, parking
$80.000 monthly. Edersons
226-5496
FUTURE HOMES REALTY
- 227-4040, 611-3866 -
Business spot on Public Road.
Kitty for restaurant $37 million
neg.
SHORT term rental for
overseas clients. Fully
furnished apts., phone, we il
secured, AC. etc. Vanies Realty
270-4695. 643-1695
3 BEDROOM house. 2
oedroonm house. 1 bedroom
apartment. Fully furnished for
overseas quest. Contact 227-
3128. 645-0787.
BRAND new Elite inline
skates size 7 $12 000, i
Nintendo 64 controller $6 500,
1 children pools table $3 500.
231-4702.
ONE three bedroom, back
building, lower flat. Price
$45.000. Address: 179 Pike
Street, Kitty. Tel. No. 225-
2067. No agents.
1 VACANCT 3 bedroom,
top flat, back house. Lot 8 First
Street Alberttown, G/Town.
Price $60.000. Call 226-
1004. 8am 4pm (Sundays.
SHORT STAY semi-
furnished 3-bedroom house for
rent in Eccler H- mouinq Scheme.
'3 months -,,: :. i 000 per
month. 629-3208.
BEL AIR GARDENS -
EXECUTIVE HOUSE
JNFURNISHED US$1 200
VIONTH Norbert DeFreitas -
731-1506/642-5874.
TWO-FLAT building in New
Market St., opposite
promenade, for residential or
-usiness. $85 000 mth. Call
227-2331. 624-1055.
FULLY furnished 3-
aedroom upper flat for short/
medium term rental (local &
overseass clients). Call 226-
3210 (9 am 5 pnm).
2-BEDROOM upper flat
South Ruimveldt Park toilet
and bath. well fenced yard -
535 000 neg. Call 663-5111,
310-4698. 21B-0117 after 7 prm
EXECUTIVE houses by
themselves area Ogle. Atlantic
gardens. Price $100 000 to $250
00 neg. Enquiries pls. Call 220-
7021. Cell 624-6527.
CONCRETE bond two section
22' x 31) (36' x 24') suitable for
n.orage. factory, processing plant,
-! Public Road Mc Doom Village
-'lione 226-1903.
POPULAR Video COub in very
:,y area in New Amsterdam Terms
Sale & Occupancy can be
.:itiated. Call 333-2990 or after
r-, 3:('- :S8


FULLY furnished 3-bedroom
bungalow wind solar, hot water, in
gated community. Weekly or monthly
rental. Contact Ganesh 618-5070
641-2946.
ONE two bedroom
apartment with toilet and
bathroom inside at Industry, East
Coast Dem. Ask for Indra Singh.
Tel: 222-4201. Preferable
working_ couple.
BUSY four corner business
spot: Entrance on Camp Street.
Large building, very busy area,
suitable for any business. Mr.
Singh 225-4631, 647-3000.
4 BEDROOM house for
rental, fully furnished Caneview
Avenue, South Ruimveldt
Gardens, overhead tank, grill
work, parking space. Tel: 623-
9012.
........ ....- i......... ......... .... .............
FURNISHED and unfurnished
apartments one, two, three & four
bedrooms. Queenstown residential,
from US$25 per day, long term also
available. Tel. 624-4225.
2 small office space,
located at 106 B Regent Road
Bourda (back of Giddings
Pawnshop). $20,000 monthly
For more information call 226-
7656 or 614-3522.
LONG & SHORT TERM FOR
OVERSEAS GUEST. FULLY
FURNISHED 1 & 2-BEDROOM
APARTMENTS A/C HOT AND
COLD, PARKING SPACE. CALL
218-0392, 648-7504, 218-
0287.
TOP flat $40 000: (1) bedroom
-$30 000. rooms- $17 000-$19 000,
Section F F US$600 & US$700,
house by itself US$500. Call 225-
2709. Business office bond.
QUEENSTOWN, fully fumished
1 & 3-bedroom apartment with park-
ing space to rent. Suitable for over-
seas visitors on short term basis. Tel.
# 226-5137/227-1843.
APARTMENTS (1.2,3,4-
bedroomed) $21 000. $22 000,
$25 000. $35 000, $45 000. $50
000, Furnished $26 000 $80
000. Rooms $12 000 $16 000.
Call 231-6236.
IMMEDIATELY available of
professional working couple
three bedroom top flat fully
grilled (AC. phone overhead
tank) No pets) Public Road Mc
Doom village Phone 226-1903.
OFFICE space at Orealla
Business Center on Church St.,
G/town (building before Go
Invest) in prime business area -
$55,000 per month Call Sandra
for appt 226-3284 or 616-8280.
ONE BEDROOM $20.000
2 Bedrooms house by itself with
verandah, parking. telephone -
S40.000. 3 bedrooms top fiat -
$55,000 Unique Realty. Tel-
227-3551, 647-0856,
ROOMS for decent single
--I- females $15 000 each.
C/vll top flat 60 000.
bottom flat $50 000. BaotsM '.vn
3 broom top fat $35 00)h
Norton St 50 000 Call 225-
8088, 650-6050
ONE executive type house
fully furnished master bedroom and
two bedroom, maids quarter, self
contained apartment indoor
garage, over head tank and
generator hot and cold water
Contact 662-5567, 225-4413.
FULLY equipped store in
central Georgetown. glass cases,
lights, phone, office. cashier
boat, design for electronics,
cellular phones alarm system
(GB) steel doors and grill move
in today. Call in Singh 647-
3000, 225-2503, 225-4631.
CUMMINGS LODGE:
furnished 2-bedroom bottom flat
- $45 000. Unity Place (Croal
St. office space, internet. etc -
$40 000 BEL AIR GARDENS -
4-bedroom house USS1200
neg. N.P. FINANCIAL
SERVICES -- 223-4928_ _
AA Eccles US$1200 &
US$1500, Bel Air Park -
US 1700, Bel Air Springs
US$2000, Queenstown
US$1200. Happy Acres $60
000, Lamaha Gardens -
US$850 & US$2000. Kitty $75
000 (business) and many rnore
Tel. 226-1192, 623-7742.
CUMMINGS Lodae 2-
bedroom rop flat $40 000, Bel
Air Gardens. 4-bedmiom
executive house US$1 500.
Nandy Park. 3-bedroom house
(furnished) US$650, Bel Air
Park. 4-bedroom house -
US$800. N. P. FINANCIAL
SERVICES 223-4928. 648.
4799.
ALBERTTOWN one
bedroom, b/flat $30,000. South
S40,000, Nandy Park $600 US
BSe Air Park $1.000 US B.! Air
Gardens S3,00 IJ.
Subryanville $650 US & '.I '
US and office spaces ':'.0 0 iI
-nwards Call us at Goodwill
Realty on Nos. 223-5204 ..'.i ,
w_5' O -, -7(if


OFFICE: Downtown, new,
fully air conditioned, ground
floor, parking for 2 vehicles
US$1,200. BEL AIR GARDENS:
Large, beautiful, 5 bedroom
mansion, unfurnished US$3,000.
BEL AIR PARK: 2 buildings, 3
bedrooms US$1,500 and
US$1,700, LA PENITENCE, large
office with bonds attached,
available at US$0.25 cents per
sq. ft. and lots more all over.
Call: 226-7128, 615-6124.
Absolute Realty for "Homes with
Style".__
FOR large company or
diplomatic mission. One two flat
modern house in residential
area, fully furnished to
international standards. Consists
of 4 bedrooms, self contained.
large dining television room
living room, hot & cold filtered
water, fully secured & large yard
space. Contact 616-5693. Asking
US$2.500 neg.
FULLY Furnished, Bel Air
Park US$1500, Lamrnaha Gardens
US$2.000, Eccles "AA' US$1300,
Caricom Gardens US$1800,
Prasahd Nagar US$1,000,
Courida Park US$2,500, Lamaha
Gardens US$750, Happy Acres
US$2000 Atlantic Gardens
US$2500. UNFURNISHED -
Eccles US$3500, Eccles 'AA'
US$1,000. Queenstown
US$2,000, Lamaha Gardens
US$850 US$750. Happy Acres
US$1,700. Contact Prime Realty
222-1319, 616-5693.
FUTURE HOMES REALTY-
TO LET AA Eccles USS3000 -
US$4000, Middle St. $60 000
US$400, Camp St. $60 000 -
US$4000. Charlotte St. -
US$600. Regent St. US$2000 -
US$15 000, Avenue of Republic
US$4000, Sec. 'K' C/ville
US$1300. Bel Air Park US$800
US$5000, PNagar US$1500.
Lamaha Gdns. US$2500,. North
Road US$1600 per flat, high
St Kingston US$4000 and many
more flats to rent Call for details
227-4040, 611-3866.
ONE two bedroom
unfurnished top flat. Lamaha
Gardens $75 000 (tel. own
parking, hot and cold water), two
bedroom cottllage new
\Vortmanville. parking. phone -
$50 000., office space 30 x 60.
upper Hadfield St., Stabroek -
S80 000, one large building
suitable for school or other major
enterprise One four bedroom top
flat fully furnished US$650. one
three bedroom bottom flat fully
furnished with master room and
2 AC's US$750. Eccles. Wills
Realty 227-2612. 627-8314
FULLY FURNISHED
EXECUTIVE TWO (2)-FLAT
BUILDING WITH ALL MODERN
CONVENIENCES. LOCATED IN
POSH UPPER CLASS
RESIDENTIAL AREA: FOUR (4)
BEDROOMS. (ALL WITH AC
UNITS), TELEPHONE, FLAT
SCREEN TV. TREATED WATER
SYSTEM, STAND BY
GENERATOR (AUTOMATIC
SWITCH OVER), LAUNDRY
ROOM WiTH LARGE WASHER.
CONTACT CHARLES, SINGH
REALTY. TEL. 225-5512, 621-
2239.
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
"Have Faith in Christ, today".
227-1988, 623-6431, 270-4470.
E Im a i
jewa nareally yahoo c orn
GEORGETOWN :. High Street
(office/residence USS2 500.
Kitt $60.000. $45.000.
US$500 (FiF) CancomrGuySuCo
Gardens --'US$1 500. EAST
BANK: School $120 000.
Providence $50 000. Eccles
-AA' (F/F) US$2 000, Diamond
- US$1 500. EAST COAST:
Counda Park US$3 000 (F/F).
Atlantic Gardens US$5 000
USS2 000/US$1 000/US$500,
Happy Acres USS2 000'USS i
200/USS500. Non Panel S35
000, Le Ressouvenir -- US$2 500.
Ocle USS700/US$1 000.
OFFICES: Cenial Georqetown -
US$4 000. Georgetown -
$100,000/ $60.0n0. QOueenstown
- US$2 000. SheiiIf US$1 500,
North Road US$1 200. Bnrckda
-US$800, bond restaurants, etc.
Versailles executive US$3
000. 3 storeyodI rIesidcntial/office/
hond USS1 500, Nandy Park -
US$650, Kitty $45 000, $30
000.



PROPERTY IN KURU
KURURU. Tel: 643-0332.
S U BRYANVILLE
EXECUTIVE 3 BEDROOM
PROPERTY. TEL. 231-4228.
399 BARAMITA STREET
South Rumnvldt Gardens,
Cnntact OWEN KING WITHIN.
F OR 1 .icb own, r prouporly
.I1 a Llh I Di Hoop.
lMa na L(,) Cill 623 271 .
PROPERTY FOR SALE -
I.AND CANAAN, EBD, CRANE
OLD ROAD. WCD. CONTACT
TEL. 226-1004.


EXECUTIVE two storey
building on '/ acre of land.
located on Diamond Public
Road. Call owner. Tel: 624-
8894.
COGLAM vacant 2-flat
concrete building, front 3-
bedrooms, back 2-bedrooms.
$5.8M. Edersons' 226-5496.
OVERSEAS owners, your
buildings need general repairs?
Our management services pay
rates, taxes. Edersons' 226-
5496
KINGSTON 3-storey
colonial mansion on 3 house
lots. Ideal foreign embassy
$85M, ($425,000 US) neg.
Edersons' 226-5496.
MON REPOS ECD, new 2
storey concrete building. Size
32'x22'. Land size 90'x50' $8M
($40.000 US). Edersons' 226-

DURBAN/LODGE, new s
storey, 4-2 bedrooms apartment.
monthly rents/pays your
mortgages $14M. Edersons'
226-5496
ATLANTIC Garden, 2 storey
mansion on two house lots, area
20 vehicles, bond 20,000 bags.
$30M. Edersons' 226-5496
HAVE you buildings for sale
- Granville Park. Subryanville,
South Ruimveldi. Kitty. Bel Air.
Call now Edersons' 226-5496
ROBB ST BOURDA Market.
new 2 storey concrete building.
Road, alley. Ideal 4 storey mini
malls S50M. Edersons 226-
5496
BRICKDAM vacant 2
storey, 4 bedrooms colonial
mansion, 3 house lots, ideal
hotel, insurance. $50M.
Edersons' 226-5496
ROBB & Camp St -- 3 2
storey wooden buildings. Ideal
for 100 mini malls Land -road
to alley. $28M. Edersons' 226-
5496
FRIENDSHIP, E. B. D.
Public Rd. new concrete 2-
stroey. 4 bedrooms luxurious
mansion $12M, US$60 000.
Edersons' 226-5496.
CROALiSTABROEK, new
3-storeved concrete 6-luxurious
bedrooms mansion on 3
houselots. $S65M. neg.
Edersons' 226-5496
SOESDYKE Public Rd.
Vacant 2 storey, 3 bedrooms
mansion. Area for tennis.
....im i pool. $13.5M
S. S), Edersons' 226-
5496
FUTURE HOMES REALTY
227-4040, 628-0796. 611-3866
- Beautiful Queenstown properly
on double lot t7S million neg
OLEANDER Gardens built
iu: 1and 130 ft 90 ft with house.
ne -. .

ONE I o Mni business
.* n .* sp red beautlrfi\l
i one thiee-bdrodoom
house fill' .. I',. in Nev,
Aimisterldarm 2500
PRIME business spot.
--f.--t f-r -, ess, located
S .... i, .- $65M.
S... - Mr. Singh
,, 0 .
NEW house fully
S, . : :- tr l

neg Phone No. i- 'I
4-BEDROOM concrete &
wooden house Ketlev St..
Charlestown, formerly Rudy' s
Restauranit (corner lotf -
i neg. Contact 227-
6204
PARIKA Reserve Road
lust off Main road Pet Shop,
-.. ',,,i 3-stor. -.:1-,,, ,-. ,
land. Asking 11 Noruertf
deFreitas'-- 231-1506/642-
5874.
ECCLES Old Rd $9M,
Crane Old Rd, WCD $3M,
Station St.. Kitty S15M
Chaetau Margot $5M.
Seeker's Choice 223-6346
10) 263-7110 (H).
CAMPBELLVILLE 6
bedrooms, 4 I 11. ..
k itc l ie n s C ,,, 1 1
property investor iLanid4lSx14 1.


SOUTH T 1 i4t
C vile i Bel
I, tI: & $32M,
Brickdamn 1 Prashad
.1 20M and many more.
i' .'. .1192. 623-7742.
FUTURE HOMES REALTY
227-4040, 628-0796, 611-3866
- Lanmiha Gdns prop. 3 B/K
iprusrinlly with Incomno of
US 8300 pei monlh price .I.
1/lho111i nlqg.
FUTURE HOMES REA; -
227-4040, 611-3866 C.

I rh lI-i",(/i: (tl)il l: r i


FUTURE HOMES REALTY -
apt building with 8 3 B/K apts
swimming pool and has an
income of'US$16000 per month
price US$1.9 million. Call 227-
4040, 611-3866.
'CC' ECCLES $15M
GROVE $6.5M & $12M, W.
Ruimveldt- 18M P/Na2ar -
$25M. N. 1. FINANCIAL
SERVICES 223-4928, 648-4799.
N e p e n t 2 0 0 2 a
QUEENSTOWN MANSION
on massive corner lot (Land -
144 x80= 11,520 sq. ft.) gracious
home with expanse o0 lawn.
Asking G$68M. Norbert
deFreitas 231-1506/642-5874.
3 STOREY wooden and
concrete house at Good Hope
Mahaica ECD (land space 5100
sq ft house 2000 sq ft huRe
parking space etc. Recently
Built. Price $122M. Tel. 228-
2342, 649-2670.
RUIMZEIGHT GARDENS-
beautiful concrete property on
double Lot $31M, Vreed-en-
Hoop Public Rd. $19M,
Diamond New Scheme $5M to
$15M, Covent Garden $7.9M.
TEL 226-8148, 625-1624.
A BEAUTIFUL large 4-
bedroom concrete house at
Ruimzeight Garden, WCD with
24 hours armed security, built-in
wardrobe, 2 bathrooms, hot and
cold water, kitchen diner, and
many extra. Please call 268-.
3214 for quick sale.
BARGAINS Albertown $7M.
Kitty $8M. Good Hope -$28M,
(fuly furnished) Land on
Highway 30 acres, HOUSE LOTS
SFriendship 50 x 70 complete
equipment for workshop and
more Call 225-9134 Monday -
Friday. y
SECTION K C/ville 1
executive property in
immaculate condition, 2 flat
concrete. Upper flat 2 master,
1 regular; lower flat 3 rooms. Hot
and cold, pressure system,
meshed, fully secured
immediate possession. $33M
neg. Call Naresh Persaud 225-
9882. 650-2724.
ONE three-storey building 33
000 sq. ft. at Parika. Ideal for Hotel
Store. Hospital or any other type of
businesses, etc. Any reasonable price
would be considered. Contact Lens
at Sheriff St. for further information.
Tel. 227-1511. N.B.: Extra land to
extend building or new one.
TWO (2)-FLAT 3-BEDROOM
WOODEN AND CONCRETE
PROPERTYAT BEST WCD WITH
VERANDAH PLU S TOILET
AND BATH UPSTAIRS LIGHT,
WATER AND TELEPHONE.
MASSIVE LAND SPACE. COST
- $8.5M, CHARLES SINGH
REALTY. TEL. 225-5812, 621-
2239.
ONE M ",<''" i,,, two store s
concrete t ,1 rid O n- i ,
storer at ,'
ECD top flit iur bedrooms,
bathroom ,,,,,, ,,,. ,
Bottom ltlat ,.. . .
r( , 1! 1d,, I I -
qlil.d \\ tei. phono and ai1 E.oti
for four vehicles Must be sold
SS 5i C.'ll owner o'n 619-3105
or 64.-372'.
FOR SALE BY OWNER 2-
storoy fully concreted house 5
bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms,
American fixture faucet, sink, toilet,
cabinet, hot water tank, eating
kitchen, built-in wardrobe, central
,- ;r "r i,.-- fr -- t
F/ I, I R. I i, 1

225-3-4 10
SOUTH Ruimveldt Gds. -
brand new breezy coiner house
,, ,,1 ,' ', ,-- ,,,. $8M .
I .il n t. 3
S, ,I : [- i. ,, ... corner
,' hhone , $15M.
h' ,! S t. .. -. i 2-flat, 2-
o'," house close to Guinness
:-I $t 5.8M North East La
P e n i te n c e v .'t , ,, i -.
i,,, ',phone & ,., & "i
N D ianoi,
i, i -'ulniveldi $3M.
I .... .i ,'I S4M Call:. 231 -
6236.
NEW HOPE E B. Demerara.
3 vacant house lots, -i1h 40ft
by 108 9 ft : q.ft, '. il sell
eac I for S" ' of somebody
-iit ll 3. we'll dive them for
Remnmnei'r vou are
ib i Iout Iloi thahl 13 000
Sir BELAIR PARR -4
M 3 bedroom
$32M .:E, TI,_'. : <, 2 betdioonm
G O I 1 l(Core all
. : t'h A"'l, 2?v--:' i ., L,15. 1 6124
ABUsOLLITE REALTY IThe Honmo
I i- , Bargain
TONY Reid ,-.e all price
reduced hb\, 53-, o Clhristmas,
South Ruiimveldli. S6M, $8M
Republic Park S 8M, Meadow
Brook Gard.in :, !:'I, Sec 'K'
S14M, Kitty l )tieenstown
$14M. P h.! ,:,,a $ $1l9M.
riansion i 3 n o reduced
fionil .; 5 000.
,r i . , ,', ( n fi i: ,
l, ri t, n :. -' 1 f
r I; i F. a
,1 I. 'r .


PRINCESS Street, Werk-
en-Rust $5.5M, $7.5M,
South Park $8.5M, $12.5M,
$18.5M, Eccles BB $26M,
Garnett Street corner $18M
neg, Newtown $13.5M,
Roberts Realty, First
Federation Life Bldg. 227-
7627 office, 227-3768 home,
644-2099.
BEAUTIFUL CONCRETE
PROPERTY REPUBLIC PARK
$33M, DIAMOND, ENMORE
massive concrete property
reduced to $16.5M, Blygezight
$13.5M, Subryanvile (on
double lot) Vlissengen Road
Sheriff St., Republic Park and
Le Ressouvenir with pool,
GuySuCo Gardens, Kitty -
$6M to $14.5M. Cummings
St. $12M Friendship -
$12.9M, Mc Doom $4.5M,
Vreed-en-Hoop Public Rd. -
$19.5M, Leonora Public Road
$10.75M. Crane Pub. Rd. -
land $3M, & 5 properties with
rice mill $45M. Anna
Catherina $2.75M, 15 acres
Canal #1 $11.75M, Non
Pariel $4.5M, David St., Kitty
$26.5M. TEL. 226-8148/
625-1624.
JEWANRAM'S Realty
"HAVE FAITH IN CHRIST
TODAY" 227-1988 270-
4470, 623-6431. Non Pariel -
$6M/$8M/$10M/$12M, Imax
gardens $14M/$10M/$7M.
Annandale $10M/$4M.
Courbane Park $7M/$12M.
Lusignan $12M/$4M Good
Hope $26M/$14M/$3M.
Triumph $14M/$9M.' Success
$6M, Happy Acres $25M/
$45M, At antic Gardens -
14M/$20M/$25M/$34M
gle $35M/$28M/$16MW
;iOM, Lamaha Gardens -
16M, Prashad Nagar $18M/
25M, Bel Air Park $22M/
X30M. Kitty $24M/$9M.
lbertown 15M, East Street
$24M. uijrrce--, Street
(business)- ,1.1 i- friendship
EBD- $16M, P,,- ,business)
$130M, University'Gardens/
Turkeyen $80M/$35M,
Subryanville $27M. Nandy
Park $18M, Eccles $30M/,
$20M/$15M.$9M. Alexander
Villa e $12M, Prospect -
$121 Herstelling S7.5M.
FUTURE HOMES REALTY
- 227-4040, 611-3866, 628-
0796 Property for sale
QUEENSTOWN $16M $78M.
Bel Air Park $24M $55M.
Durban $18M, Kitty $17 -
$34M, Vreed-en-Hoop $65M.
Meadow Brook $17M.
Lamaha Gdns $60M. King
Edward St. 51M, Blygezight
Gdns'- $19M', Saffon St."-
$50M, Diamond H/Scheme-
$11M, ,' ,. S10M, Ogle-
$20 000, Parafaith
Harmony S5.2M, -. I-' ?
- $451 US,1.6M. -, :, .,-
- $23M. Sheriff S S60M -
US$1.3M, Alexander Village -
$28M, Atlantic Gardens $23M
1- S00M, Subrvanvill S70M'
- $125M, Bel Air Springs -
$67M $165M, Linden -
S55 M, Sec. XK" C'ivil S22M,
Now Haven $33M. CC Eccles
- S20M. BB Eccles $25M.
Oleander Gdns $47M. Good
Hope WBD $50M. Broad St.
Charlestown $40M,. Bel Air
Gdns $87M $95M. Kingston
- $20M US$525 000.
BRICKDAM -- three l.i
suitable r:, ,- : i,
school, ,.,_.. : :. having
all the amenities i parking
a lot $125M. CAMP ST. -
large commercial three flats,
suitable for store, whole sale
distributor, and retail outlet
$60M, CAMP ST. large three
flats, suitable for Iden C
school, executive -
, for many vehicles
-0iOM DIAMOND PUBLIC
ROAD two flats suitable for
retail outlet, restaurant, -uest
house $30M, PALMVRA,
BERBIC residential and
business place, vith a
workshop and bond $60M.
ALEXANDER VILLAGE -
large three flat residence

I I i wholesale and retai
$28M, NORTON ST. beautiful
residence three bedrooms.
tarkinq $14M, SECTION 'K'
irge two flats concrete (new)
th i bedrooms L ,i 3M
ECCLES two i ,
mind ariod residential in --
etnd uon. three bed. oom
two apartments.
$14M. FRIENDSHIP
concrete and wood ',v'in
lhu.! 'ss $13.5M. Also Regent
S'! : Kitty, Sussex St .
f\, ,'ow Brook Gardens,
L ., Triumph, Enmor,.
S , ., Sarmantiha Point
Grove, Damnopd


Ir..SE I' ALLC;'
2' '; ,2 OR E-M 'I *.,

S, ..E NC ', r,, L ;:
AT 1 HA D li.
SSTS., W'VRUST








SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17,2006


P P=SF S


FROM XMAS into Wor
Cup 2007 South R/vel
$5.5, $18M, North R/veldt $81
$7.5M, Werk-en-Rust $101
Charlestown $6.5M, Can
Street $12M, 8M, Robb Stre
$15M, $85M, Charlotte $201
-$+2M, Lamaha Street $301
Middle Street $30M, Kiu
Street $80M, Queenstov
$55M. Lamaha Gardei
$30M. Bel Air Gardens $901
Sheriff Street $58M, Bel A
Park $25M, $40M, Section "
Campbellville $30M (nev
$13M, 1 apartment comply
centrally located, Rege
Street $85M, $35M, Ave of t
Republic $11M. Call us
Goodwill Realty 223-520
225-2540 or 628-7605.








JEWANRAM'S REALTY
AND PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT SERVICE
NINVEFAIT NHRIST TODAY
Fordyor Real Eate needs. Buyin
Selling, Leasing of residence,
commercial and industrial
land/properly alIso
mortgage/Financing approval,
valuation, property

KEEP CHRIST IN CHRISTMA
Call anytime
Jewanram's Realt
227-1912704470623-6431/641-1S
I Ek jtwanafrealty@y(ahe..o



ONE FRIDG
EXCELLENT CONDITION
CALL 265-5876.
PARTS for washing
machines. Teleph2o6ne
227-0060, 641-2026.
HANGING baskets,
Yamaha generator, 2600 watt
Tel. 618-2526.
GLASS WARES. FIL
FARE MAGAZINE. CALL: 66
1516.
POMPEK PUPS -
WEEKS OLD, FULL
VACCINATED. 231-4702.
PARTS for twin tu
washing machines (new
Telephone 641-2026, 22
0060.
NEW Briggs press
washer 2200 psi $98 000. C
225-2611, 225-5645.
A flock.of goat. Conta
20 Sheriff Street (op
Tennessee). Tel: 227-269C
DASCHUND puppies. T
No. 270-4231, Non-Parlie
E.C.D
NEW 18" Celestic
frontline 11 speakers, 281
watts. Call 226-2913, 61
1203.
6 WEEKS old pitbull pu
fully vaccinated ai
dewormed. Call 646-945
231-1074.
SHOCK treatment f
swimming pools. Phone 22
4857 (8 am 4 pm), Mon.
Fri.
1 BRAND New 3
Frigidaire Electric store
$80,000. Call: 220-3324
648-0744.
HONDA EB300(
Generator, 120/240. Goc
condition. Call Lee. Tel: 22
5396, 617-8001.
ONE 4-CYLINDE
M;tsubishi diesel engine f
dredging with one 4 3-pum
Call 643-4530.
WASHING Machine. Pri
$39.000. Twin Tub (new). 1
volts. Telephone 227-09;
(Roy).
ROTTWEILER
Doberman pups, 4 months o
vaccinated and deworme
iel # 222-5013.
IMPORTED from the US
heavy embroidered curtain
Balance parcel available
Phone 227-6202
2 RED Snapper fish
boat. Contact Gane
Checdie, 29 Pouderoy
WAIBD. Tel: 264-2524.
STALLS located
Stabroek market corner sp
good location 225-441
6[2-5567', 6T9f99gT2-


rId ONE Datsun engine and GLAZED Ceramic tiles, frost
dt gear box 120Y good condition, acid, stain resistant, size 1' x 1"
M, Price $40 006. Call 617-8242- set on a 12" x 12" mat, olive
M: cell blue, 1 500 sq. ft. Contact
np CHLORINE tablets 3" for Hunter 627-6357.
et swimming pools only. Phone SONY XR8 Steady-shot
M, 227-4857 (8 am 4 pm), Mon. video camera $65,000. Yamaha
M, to Fri. PSR75 Musical Keyboard
ng CHEST of Drawers, Cabinet, 19,000. Call 264-2498 or 609-
Nn double bed base & spring CD 8132 anytime.
ns case (new). Telephone 227- BILLBOARD top hits 1950 -
M, 3542. 2006. Get your music selection
ir -- -APTP--HFIi on CD/MP3. Contact 626-8019,
iK" 2 LAPTOPS HP & Elite 231-2440. Web-
K" Group. All with wireless adaptor. 231-2440. Web:
) contact 226-6835 home, 644- www.fyahtunes.bravahost.com
ex 7469. 1 34 FEET Cabin Cruiser
nt taAP Fishing Boat with 350 Ibs Banga
he 3 POOL tables. CHEAP.ino Ic ox, 1 0
at Must be sold. Owner leaving All Mary seine, Ice Box, 1.
4 9 Railway Line Better ope, Y anha Tene 95 intact S.
ECD. 220-3683. Singh. Tel: 629-5700.
NEW Pioneer DVD/CD 33 X 125 R 15 wheels,
Duplicator burns 5 discs at a future tyres on love aluminum
time $169 000. Call 225-2611, rims $200 000 OBO. 44 gear
225-5645.5-11, box in perfect condition Toyota
225-5645. 22 RE $65 000. 220-4791.
2 HONDA pressurewaers IN STOCK 4 MM and 9MM
2 chain saws 2 machines, 2 I SoC 4 andt
microwaves 1 pump, 2 saws. Pyboard. Wholesale quantities.
Call265-586. Waheed's General Store, 113
Call 265-58Pike Street, Kitty. Tel: 226-7585.
HONDA 6500 ES generator Fax: 226-7586.
from Canada, one freezer (whirl 1 BILLARD table, 1 3-speed
l eht freezer. Call 225- D a nf Dc I )
), chest freezer. Call 225- De Walt buffing machine (110v)
7978. 57900.- 1 sanding machine. Assorted
E 1 USED RZ engine, 1 mechanical and welding tools.
Mitsubishi canter 4D 32 engine, Contact M. Singh 645-1976,
1 canter breaks Survo. Call 612-8337.
226-2996, 614-1150. 5,138 sq ft property with two
PURE BRED PITBULL storey concrete building and
PUPS. Excellent for Breeding large yard space at Lot 1 Princes
& Security. Contact Ray 264- Street. Charlestown (near
2911 or 618-5557. Texaco). US$400 000 neg. Call
SATELLITE Dish one 231-1996.
complete working 22-ft C-band 15 INCHES Super pro
Satellite Dish and 20-ft. tower, speakers 1600 watts $35 000
S Tel. 226-4795/618-5278. per pair. DBX bass booster $60
000 step up transformer 15,000
ONE beautiful 8 weeks old wats locally made 000
male pompek mixed with 220479160 6
dachshund (fawn and white). -
6 Tel. 231-759, 627-3330. DELL Dimension Computer
GERMAN SHEPHERD system- (Black) 2 Ghz Processor,
9 m E 1 monitor internet ready,
Purebred). 9 months. Quality Windows XP 1 yr. warranty $98
breeding bitch. Contact Max on 000. Call 225-2611, 225-5645.
264-2498 or 609-8132.
OXYGEN and Acetylene
Floor and table model four ases- fast and efficient service.
E. burner gas and electrical stoves, 10 11 Mc Doom Public Road,
N. refrigerators and otheritems. EBD. Phone 223-6533 (8 am -
S Call: 225-9332 or 626-0709. 4pm), Mon. to Fri. (Sat. 8 am -
1 LAND Dredge, 6" complete 12noon).
ng with, 2 Perkins 2 2000 series,
ipes, camps, etc $5.5M neg. ONE Jia in onitioncy Onl
Call 625-8421, 231-0838. 150cc in mint condition n
1 POOL tables and coverage insurance. $250000
ts. accessories such as coin shoot, negotiable. Call: Ravi 613-
rubber, balls, cloth, pockets and 5003, 625-7956.
M chalk. Contact Naka 220-4298, HURRY to Sky Universal,
i3- 609-3311. authorised dealer of Phillips Sky
ELECTRIC oven, (1 000 W Digital Satellite Dish. For the
6 auto transformer), new pressure best offer, 156 Channels
LY sprayer, single bed, 7-piece including pay per view and audio.
dinette set. el. 611-3153. Call 227-1151,231-609.
ub PARTS for Dryers/ AMPLIFIER CD player, tape
). Washers. Thermostats, pumps, deck, speaker boxes, brand new
7- motors, belts, valves, knobs, etc. article Hi watts, and one
Technician available. Call 622- motorcycle 125 G. Excellent
5776. condition. All prices negotiable.
re 622-0267, 629-2239.
all TOYOTA Cressida Mark 11 622-0267. 62.-2239.
car, perfect condition. Property 2 STEREO SET complete or
at 75E Garnett Street, Kitty. in parts, e.g. amp, deck. CD
ict Phone 225-1911 office hours. Player, equalizer, crossover, vice
P. -- sand andreefsand, horn. At a reasonable cost. Nice
S EARTH, sand and reef sand, music for the holidays.
excavating, grading. leveling of Household items. Call: 220-
el. sand, clearing & laying of pipe 7252.
el, also done. Call 628-3B40.i -7-.
TU- 19" TV $24,000. Sony Music
.. STUDY desks, lamps, stool System $37,000 400 watts;
on 36" fan, bed, kitchen ware, $52s000 500 watts, Shocks
00 projection screen, coffee set and boots $4,000, Panasonic
5- more. Dial 227-1234. Microwave (big) $22.000, B
................................................................. M ic ro w a v e (b ig ) $ 2 2 .0 0 0 B ig
ONE Heavy duty. front Sunstar Players $11,000. Call
ps loading washing machine 617-7634.
nd (BOSCH), 240 volts, in good CAUSTIC Soda 55-lb $4
6, w,.rking condition. Call: 222- 000; Alum 55-lb $5 000, Soda
2214. __ ___. Ash 50-lb $7 500, Sulphuric
or GERMAN SHEPHERD Acid 45-gal $45 000, Granular
?7- (Purebred), 9 months. Quality Chlorine Chlorine gas. Phone
to breeding bitch. Contact Max on 227-4857 (8 am 4pm) -
264-2498 or 609-8132. Mon.. to Fri
0" ONE Honda 80 Scooter STAND UP Cooler, Rattan
re. good condition. No reasonable bar stools, photocopier, scanner
or offer refused. Contact 223-4204 (HP), Laminating machine,
or 618-7383 or 629-3390 guillotine, computer systems,
0X Kenny/Gloria. ta boxes binding machine,
X ..stationeries, wireless antennas,
od ORIGINAL BRAND NAME UPS Backup, filing cabinet. Tel:
26- CLOTHES FROM THE USA. 222-6494, 15-1 25.
JEANS $3 000 SHIRTS/TOPS
R $1 500. 220-491. FOR ALL your Xmas parties
ER" --$50 22-47. and social functions available in
or COMPLETE Computer wholesale and retail quantities,
ip. System internet ready, 15 all sizes of plastic bags, pastry
monitor, 1 yr. warranty $63 000. bags, black bags, coloured bags,
ce FREE Printer. Call 225-2611, paper bags, food boxes, cups,
10 225-5645. spoons, Styrofoam cups bowls,
28 BEAUTIFUL and adorable plates, etc. Tel: 226-1660, 623-
dashund mix with pompex pups 5302.
S one year old. Ver loving pets, a NON FROST Refri ratr
v& yiftfort rimaCa 1NON FROST Refrigerator
d, 2love27-202gift for C ristmas. Call (Frigidaire). 110 volts. 1 General
d . Electric refrigerator. 110 volts, 1
SONY XR8 Steady.-shot Artic Refrigerator. 240 volts, 1
SA video camera $65,000. Yamaha carpet, cream 21'x8', 1 carpet,
SA PSR75 Musical Keyboard green 9'x12; 1 carpet, brown
s. $19,000. Call 264-2498 or 609- 9'x12'; 1-16" bicycle, 1 12"
le 8132 anytime, bicycle. All in good condition
"NEW COMPAO LAPTOPS. CanI: 222-2214.
ng 1.46 Ghz Processor, 512 MB SEWING services (any style)
sh RAM, DVD Writer. 80 Gig hard modern dance shoes, sandals,
en drive. Call: 647-7039' 628- lights, leotards, unitards, swim
9810. suits, gym wear. athletics qear
FREON as 11 12. 22. 502 All style and size (made to order)
at 34A & 404A, also Helium as dance certificate, evening gown,
ot for balloons' an Aiqon gas school clothing. raw rmateenal,
3. Phone 227-4857( am 4 pm) etc 122 Merriam's Mall, Bourda.
'-,' -' .. M '" 622-4386. 22r7-'ff538
AV LI~D -r .,.. -, "! , = ,
t ,_ : : _. q ., ., / ; _< ', . 'a :


I FOR SALE I


FOR SALE^^^^


ALL types of feed and rice
bran, broke, paddy, boosie, pet
rice, copra meal, white rice,
brown rice & baby chicks. Call us
we have the best price around -
261-5533, 336-3996, 614-1150.
BUSINESS FOR SALE.
COMPLETE BUSINESS (STORE)
with all equipment, showcases,
good will and positive income,
at a prime main road location,
WBD giveaway price ready for
immediate takeover. Call "MAX"
on 264-2498, 609-8132 now for
more details and viewing.
ONE CHAR Broil portable
gas barbeque grill, $40,000, one
0 gallons (4ft x 2ft) aquarium
with pump, fishes, stand, lights
$10000m0. Barbie doll doll's
house 4ft x 4ft (pink) $60,000,
two sofa beds (grey and brown)
$80,000 $100,000. Large wall
divider, can accommodate 64"
TV, stereo equipment (must see)
$180,000. Phone 225-2503,
225-4631, 647-3000.
ONE complete music set with
8 bottoms 18 Fane speakers, 6
upright tops with 15" double
speakers, 4 44T Drive horns, 6 -
QSC amplifiers, equalisers,
crossovers (Numark), 1 32 amps
Turn-up transformer, 6 100 watts
bullets. Also 8 metal hail spot
lamps 18" x 15" complete with
wires, disco lights, fogging
machine. One Nissan 4x 4
complete with bed liner, search
lamps and winch. Call 263-7305
or 618-8996.
"GAMESTATION" VIDEO
GAME BIG XMAS SALE. Play
Station 2 & X-box $44,000 (new
or $30,000 (used), Nintendo 64
with free game $15,000,
Supernintendo & Sega Genesis
with 3 games $10,000.
Controllers, connections,
accessories & dozens of game
discs & cartridges at low reduced
prices. Visit "GAMESTATION",
Pouderoyen Main Road, WBD,
Mon Sat 11am 7pm. Tel:
264-2498, 609-8132, 611-9001.
75 4-Feet Defuser parabolic,
Fluorescent lamps 4 tubes 240V
- $8 000 each 100 new truck tyre
liners Goodyear size 20 $1
000 each. 1 Briggs and Stratton
Pressure Washer 2000 PSI, 2.1
pressure water pump stainless
steel pump barrel $30 000, 1
truck dump pump $25 000, 1
computer transformer input 110
or 120. 220 or 240, 380 or 415
out 110, 1220, 220 240 $55
000, 1 Canon NP 6221
Photocopy machine needs
servicing $100 000. 1 Xerox
5028 photocopy machine, needs
servicing $100 000. All
machines on stand with wheels
and have a manual. Owner
migrating 621-4928.


FOR SALE

Two 763 Skid Steer
Year 2000
1600
Hours Bobcat
MITSUBISHI LANCER CEDIA
YEAR 2001 LOW MILAGE
PIONEER CDIMP3 PLAYER
KENWOOD SURROUND
DECORSA Alloy Wheels
FULLY LOADED







Contact David
Tele:623-5844/227-0190

1 LARGE MILWAKEE Delta
drill press 110, 240v on stand -$105
000; 1 bench type drill press English
made, 110 v $60000; 1 Black&
Decker cross cut saw, 110v $100000;
1 2 000 watts transformer $10 000;
1 new 16-feet ladder aluminium in
2 8-ft. half English made $25
000; 1 4-feet platform ladder for
cleaning $10 000; 1 side and edge
sander, 110 240 v on stand $30
000: 1 industrial and commercial
Dayton vacuum cleaner with large
dust baq, 110v for floor or carpet
cleaning $35 000: 1 truck hydraulic
dump pump $35 000; 200 new
tyle liners for truck size 20 $1 000
each WiS. 1 large bench grinder
110v $30 000: 10 buckets of 5-
pll'n "irpet adhesive paste $5
. 4 wash basins with hot
and cold water til.'nr C. 000 each.
British made. s 4, diffusers,
4 ft. x 2 ft lamps w'tlh cubical
ieflectors andl 4- 4 ft tubes 240
volts $12 500 each; 12 GE security
lamps with ballast 2l0Ov $6 000
each, 3 000 watts C.all 64 1-2284


t. ---.-


I


- -r--l -- --- --- --~--


__


DELL COMPUTERS Brand
new Pentium 4(3.06 GHz) and
Celeron (2.5GHz) computers.
With modem, network card
128MB video, 256/512 MB
memory, CD burner/DVD player,
USB keyboard and mouse arld
17 inch flat s screen or monitQor
Custom orders and wholesale
offered. For details call Raval @
223-5308 or 626-8784 or come
in at 63 Fifth Street Alberttown.
9 -.11 am and 12 5 pm.



1 RZ minibus excellent
condition. Contact 227-8587.
1 MARINE CAR. PGG
Series. Call 73442 or 38530.
ONE TOYOTA
TUNDRA, F 150. TEL.
623-5534, 227-3717.
1 AT 192 excellent condition
full powered. Tel. No. 265-
3694. .
ONE AT 212 in excellent
condition, fully powered. Tel:
265-3566.
FORD tow truck. Need minor
work $600,000. Phone 624-
8402.
ONE NISSAN Caravan,
GGG series, working condition.
Call: 629-7146.
2000 MODEL Toyota
Tacoma. Tel. 610-3880, 612-
7666.Price negotiable.
TOYOTA Double cab pick
up. Bedford truck. Call: 225-
6722 or 661-5015.
TOYOTA Chaser GX 100
Suzuki 750 katana M/bike. Tel.
231-4586, 622-6448.
2 LONG base RZ minibus
EFI in excellent condition.
Contact 229-6533 or 613-2798.
AE 91 Sprinter $500 000
neg. Contact Rigby No. # 621-
5007, Home 256-3889.
ONE AT 170 Corona.
Reasonable condition $650
000. Call 645-5343 or 225-5363.
TOYOTA TUNDRA V6, fully
loaded, 2001 model, GKK
series. Tel: 660-4292.
G-TOURING WAGON $1.3.
212 Carina, megrims $1.650.
Tel: 227-3551, 647-0856.
AT 192 CARINA, PHH
Series. $1.4 mln. Owner
leaving. Call 225-3221/8915
- Office.
1 BLACK Toyota Long base
Extra cab pick up. Contact M.
Singh 645-1976 or 612-8337.
1 NISSAN Caravan, working
condition. Reasonable offer
accepted. Tel: 220-7252.
1 GJJ Leyland Daf. double
axle truck with hyhab, dump, 20-
cyd. Tray. Price neg. Call 640-
2365.
ONE AE 100 Toyota
Corolla, in excellent working
condition. Price neg. Phone
227-7458. 613-6149.
1 AT 170 Carina PGG series
automatic, fully powered, mags.
Tel. # 627-3438 price $850 000
neg.
1 SPRANKIN new 212
Carina mag rims, music system
50 000 KI and clock PKK series.
Tel. 618-1809.
EXCAVATOR Daewoo
Solar 200 111 (Factory
refurbished). Contact Sam 625-
7741, 222-3807.
SUNNY B15 2003 Model.
Finished only 6 000 miles.
Vehicle never registered -
$2.3M. Call 225-2611.
ONE Coaster bus in good
working condition. Contact
616-3736 or 660-1564. No
reasonable offer refused.
AT 170 CORONA EFI,
excellent condition; 2 AT 192
Carina EFI. fully powered.
Tel. 222-2905, 641-3821.
2 RZ minibus, BHH series, 1
HB 12 Sunny EFI stick gear, fully
powered PHH series. Phone 268-
3953. 612-5419.
NISSAN Presea mags, fully
power, air conditioned, good
condition. Asking $550 000.
Call Elson 622-5465.
ONE AA 60 Carina, in
excellent working condition noods
body work tape deck, AC etc.
Tel 617-4063/225-0236
2005 TOYOTA Tacoma,
access doors. F- i-0''trl Cab
2003 Toyota I.... fully
loaded. 619-0063, 643-9891.
ONE RZ BHH, EFI, I ,,
base, two doors minl buis ..,l
nusc Excellent
SI111 I ,(Call 625-35 3. ,


TOYOTA Tacoma Extra
Cab 4WD, manual trans, mags,
crash bar, etc. $1.8M neg. Tel:
622-6635 Mike.
AE 100 COROLLA,
automatic, fully powered,
--mags. Price $1,200,000. Tel:
227-0613, 225-2172.
AT 192 Carina, PJJ series,
one owner, excellent condition.
Price $1.3M neg. Contact Paul
259-3237 or 619-9451.
BMW 325i convertible,
automatic, DVD sound system,
mag wheels, full skirt kit, alarm
& more. Tel: 624-8402.
1 Toyota Dyna 1.5 ton truck.
5 FWD manual, 2700cc, diesel,
double wheel at rear, PS, AC.
Call: 231-5680.
ONE AT 170 Carina &
one AE 100 Corolla both
automatic, fully powered,
excellent condition. Tel.
626-7452.
TOYOTA Glanza fully
automatic, AC/PS/PW ABS,
mag rims, never registered -
$1.8M. Call 225-2611, 225-
5645.
1 AT 170 TOYOTA
Corona excellent
condition; mag rims, fog
lamps, original spoiler. Price
neg. Telephone 622-0322.
GX 71 Toyota Mark II.
Good working condition and
fully powered. Price $750,000
negotiable. Contact 220-4310.
TOYOTA Town Ace, 12
seat mini bus. Price $600,000
neg. Yamaha 80cc motor cycle
$6D;000. Call Wille on 623-
8682. __
AT 212 192 Carina, AE110
Sprinter, EP82 Starlet 4 door,
Mitsubishi Pajro JR, Toyota
Pickup. Call: 227-2834, 621-
6037.
ONE AE 100 Corolla car,
fully powered, EFI, mag, A/c,
low mileage. Must be sold.
Owner leaving. Ph 227-6567,
226-5609.
1 RZ Long base new model
with 1KZ engine, manual gear
box, fully powered, AC, crystal
lights. New from Japan. Call
226-9109.
FORD 150 Pick Up 3 doors.
good condition, CD/Tape
player, bubble tray, dual air
bag, mag rims etc. $5.5M neg.
Ter 220-7416.
ARRIVING January 15 AT
192 Carina wharf price $500
000 up and more book now.
Contact Carib Auto Sales -
627-1331.
NISSAN Pathfinder, SE V6,
fully powered, slightly
damaged, sold as is with
documents. $675,000. Phone
225-4631. 624-8402.
2 RZ MINI BUS EFI.
Excellent condition. Music
mags. Good to go. Crystal
light. 612-8963. 612-9041.
649-8530.
1 7 TON LEYLAND
Dump. Good working
condition. $475,000 neg.
Immediate transfer. Tel: -227-
8890, 664-6592.
1 MF 399 110 90 Fiat,
115 90 Fiat, 1 580c Hymac,
1 Defender 90 land Rover. 1 -
3700 Fiat combine. Call 616-
9402, 649-1339.. .
1 DUMP truck, 1 water
tender and 330 Timber Jack
Skidder all are in good working
condition. For more
information Contact: 264-
2946.
580 C HYMAC with swamp
tract, 10 tons (3) wheel roller, 3
tons vibrating roller. All in good
working conditions. Call 623-
3404, 222-6708.
NISSAN Sunny 2003
model only done 6 000 miles,
AC/PS/PW/ABS. fully loaded,
never registered $2.2M. Call
225-2611, 225-5645.
LONG Base RZ, BGG series
in immaculate condition with
solid engine, gear box and Def.
Call 276-0313, 626-1141 $950
000 neg. Shahab.
PJJ Toyota Hilux Surf 4x4,
fully powered. AC, automatic,
CD, mags in immaculate
condition S2 4M neg. Call
276-0313, 626-1141, Shahab.
HONDA CRV. Fully
Powered. automatic, A/C, mags,
PHH series Came brand new
$3M neg. Call: 276-0313/626-:
1141. Shahab.
ONE SV 42 Camrv. fully
loaded. keyless entry, four:
wheel steering. meqgrimis. NNever'
registered. Price $2 6M Tel:
S,, 20 -. or 648- ".1 .,

__ t L,"'i :~i':>.r"


I








SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006 21


YAMAHA 750 Road Bike,
never registered, minor work.
Will register at no cost to buyer.
$175,000 cash. Tel: 227-7677,
647-3000.
FORD Lincoln Limousine
(black) 7 seater, first to arrive in
Guyana. Sold 'as is' with
documents. $2.5 million.
Phone: 225-4631, 647-3000.
1 AE 100 COROLLA. 1 AT
192 Carina, 1 SV 40 Camry,
AE 91 Corolla Wagon. Owner
leaving country. Call # 645-
6288, 231-0555. All prices neg.
MAZDA convertible MX 5
Miata sports car. Hard & soft
top. Low mileage. Price
negotiable. $1.3M. Terms
available. Phone 227-7677,
647-3000..............
TOYOTA Townace small
bus 12-seater, good condition.
Priced to go $600 000.
Contact 35 Seaforth St.. C/ville.
Phone 231-1271, Cell 610-
2037, Hyneter.
GKK series Toyota Tacoma
Extra Cab, 4x4 1995 model,
automatic, air bag., 3RZ
engine. AC, etc. in immaculate
condition $2.4 million. Call
276-0313, 626-1141, Shahab.
TOYOTA Dyna truck, new
model. 15B engine, 16" wheel,
3 ton, long base, 17 feet open
tray, A/C, powered. excellent
condition. Contact 226-9109
at 74 Sheriff St., C/ville.
GKK series, 1999 model
Toyota Tacoma Extra Cab, 4x4
automatic, V6 engine. fully
powered, air bag, etc in
immaculate condition $2.9
million. Call 276-0313, 626-1141,
Shahab.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter
enclosed excellent condition
GHH series Price $1.7 million.
1 Hiace Super Custom minibus,
working condition, PFF series.
Price S600 000. Telephone
259-3158
TOYOTA Hilux Surf PHH
series. 4x4, fully powered. AC,
automatic, 5 door. crash bar, fog
lamp. mags. flair, roof rack, in
immaculate condition $2.3M
neg. Call 276-0313, 626-1141,
Shahab .......
TOYOTA RAV 4 in mint
condition, PHH series, f6lly
powered, mag rims, side bars,
fog lamps and crystal h/lights.
Sony CD/MP3/tape player. -$3M
negotiable. Contact 648-9485,
62 -1102, 226-7228.
190E MERCEDES Benz,
special edition, automatic,
fully powered, 2.6 cylinder, full
flair package and lots of extra.
Must see. Have minor work.
Sold as is. $1.1Mcash. Phone
647-3000. 225-4631.
ONE Toyota Land Cruiser
2006 model, leather seats,
auto and fully powered, left
hand drive$14 million. One
1998 model Land Cruiser
(manual) immaculate
condition $12 million. Tel
227-4040, 225-0995. 611-
3866.
LINCOLN town car (Ford),
four door luxury Sedan,
automatic, power windows,
locks, digital dish, TV & DVD
players, air conditioning. Only
47,000 miles. Like new S3.5M:
Terms available. Phone: 647-
3000. 225-4631.
ONE Toyota Land Cruiser -
fully powered, PJJ Series, mint
condition, new tyres, mags, etc.
Must see. Owner migrating -
$7.5M neg. One Toyota AE 91,
fully powered, automatic mag
wheels. Excellent con tion -
$650 000 neg. 641-228.
GJJ series Extra cau Pick
up 1999 model, automatic,
4x4, CD, air bag. crash bar,
winch, 6 year warranty battery,
life time warranty air, filter,
brand new tyres, mags. bed
liner etc, in immaculate
condition, never run offlroad.
Owner leaving country $2 950
000 neg. Call 276-0313 or
626-1141.
........... .. ........ ............ ... ............... .
KHAN'S BUYING &
SELLING AUTO SALES 3 AT
192 all private never w rked
hire before, PHH & PJJ s ries.
2 AT 170, 3 Toyota 4-Ruinner
top notch, 1 AE 81 Corol a, 1
Marino, one ST 190 Corona,
very nice car. 1 Pajero JR. z RZ
buses. 225-9700, 623-9?72,
233-2336. Just behind
Brickdam Police Station.
ONE Mitsubishi Ca iter
truck enclosed. 3-ton, pFF
series $950 000; 1 Tolota
Hiace Super Custom 3 000 cc,
Turbo charge, diesel engine
BJJ series, -hardly used. $2.4
million. One Toyota Hilux
Double Cab, PHH Series, 3 Y
engine $2.7 million. One
29-seater bus Mitsubishi Rosa,
JJ series $3.5million. One
29-seater Toyota Coaster bus,
BHH series S2.9 million.. 225-
1429; 624-1147.


MITSUBISHI Canter, wide
body, 14 feet, open tray, long
base, 2 / ton, 4D 32 engine, A/
C. Contact 226-9109 at 74
Sheriff St., C/ville.
ISUZU Truck, 4BE1 engine,
14 feet open tray, 2 '/ ton, A/C.
New from Japan. Excellent
condition. Contact 226-9109 at
74 Sheriff St., C/ville.
1 MORRIS Marina motor
car, 4-door imported from
England. Never registered
excellent condition $850 000
neg. registered I Chevy
Silverado 4x4 enclosed 4-door,
power steering, mag rims,
automatic for interior run $750
000 neg, 1 Land Cruiser Toyota
PJJ series, fully automatic,
hardly used, fully powered -
$8.2M neg. Mint condition.
Leather seats. Owner migrating.
621-4928.
USED vehicles. SV 40
Camry/212 Carina 210 Corona,
AT 192 Carina, AE 100 Corolla/
Sprinter, AT 170 Carina/
Corona, AE 91 Sprinter, AE 81
Corolla. Nissan Sunny, 4 x 4
Nissan, 4-Runner, Nissan
Vanette, Toyota Townace, RZ
buses. Vehicles from $300 000.
Contact Dave Auto Sales, Lot
10 Croal Street, Stabroek. Tel.
223-6218/after 4 pm 231-
3690, Cell 612-4477. Also
Wagon cars.
AT 212 CARINA $1.7M.
1998 Model Honda Civic 17'
mags, (immediate) $1.9M. AT
19 Carina, PJJ series $1.6M,
AE 110 Sprinter $1.5M, AE 100
Marino (PHH series), manual.
in top shape $1.3M, AE 100
Sprinter $1 250 000; AT 170
Carina (Real Classy) $950 000.
AT 170 Corona, automatic -
$875 0000, AT 150 Corona.
rmanuial) $450 000. Kindly call
or other model cars if you wish
Tel 225-0995, 611-3866.
2003 T YOTA Xtra Cab
Tacoma $4 41N 2003 Tundra
(Bubble Lite tray) $6 2M,
Toyota Land Cruiser, excellent)
S68M, 2001 Trundra (never
registered) $-i 7M. immaculate
double ca Tj yota Pick up -
$3.7M Toyota Tacoma Xtra
Cab $2.8M, Toyota Lexus
Land Cruiser, leather seats, etc
S10M, Toyota RAV-4 (neat)-
S2.9M, Toyota diesel van (new
model $1.7M, Toyota Xtra Cab
SRS $2.1 M, Toyota Surf, PJJ
series $2.8M, Toyota Four
Runner $1.7M, 320E-Xcavator.
never re istered in Guyana -
S17.5m. Kindlv call for more
information 225-0995, 611-
3866.
210 CORONA, 212 Carina,
AT 192 Carina. AE 100 Corolla
and Sprinter, Lancer, Camry SV
40, GX L-Touring Wagon. AT 170
Corona and Carina, AE91 Sprintei
and Corolla. BUSES: RZ Long
and Short Base (EFI & C/tor)
PICKUP: 4-Runner, enclosed and
open back. CRV & RAVA 4. At all
times you can call for other models
and prices. Credit for vehicles is
available. Pete's Auto Sale. Lot
02 George Street. Werk-en-Rust,
Georgetown (behind Brickdam
Cathedral Church. South into
George Street). Tel 226-9951.
226-5546, 231-7432.
ONE Toyota Land Cruiser
FJ 80. Automatic transmission
3F engine, 4 500 cc engine.
EFI, fully powered, windows
door locks, self start alarm AM/
FM, stereo and CD player.
automatic Def lock for four-
wheel drive inside, leather
seats, high and low range drive.
4 new Good Year tyres and mag
rims size (16) crash bar, fog
lamps, adjustable steering
wheel roof rack back lights
grilled: back toe bar, 5 doors,
sun visor, power steering, new
12v battery, ba6k and front
wiper, air conditioner, excellent.
power mirrors, fully security
system from theft. 2 years 10
months old. PJJ series.
immaculate condition.
excellent interior and fuel
consumption, well kept, never
went in the Interior. Owner
migrating $8.6M, neg. 641-
2284.
NOW IN STOCK. Toyota
Corolla NZE 121,AE 110. EE
103, Honda Civic EK3 & ES1.
Toyota Hilux Extra Cab LN 172.
LN 170 RZN 174. Toyota Hilux
Double Cab- YN 107, LN 107. LN
165. 4x4, RZN 167, RZN 169,
Toyota HilLux Single Cab LN
106. Toyota Hilux Surf RZN 185
YN 130, KZN 185. Mitsubishi
Canter FE 638E, FE6387EV.
Toyota Carina AT 192. AT
212, Toyota Marine AE 100,
Toyota Vista AZV 50, Honda
CRV RO1, Toyota RAV 4, ZCA
26, ACA 21, SXA 11, Toyota
Mark IPSUM SXM 15, Toyota Mark
2 GX 100 Lancer CK 2A, Toyota
Corona Prenlio AT 210, Toyota
Hiace Diesel 'KZH110, Mitsubishi
Cadia Lancer SC2A, Toyota
Corolla G-Touring Wagon AE
100. Contact Rose Ramdehol
Auto Sales. 226 South Rd.,
Bourda. Geo'rgetown. Tel.
226-8953. 226-1973 227-
3185. Fax. 227-3185. We
give you the best cause
you deserve the best.


NOW AVAILABLE TOP
QUALITY RECONDITIONED
VEHICLES. CARS: TOYOTA
COROLLA NZE 121, TOYOTA
WILL VS (2004) MODEL TOYOTA
CARINA AT 192- TOYOTA CYNOS
SPORTS COUPE TOYOTA VISTA
ZZV 50 TOYOTA'STARLET EP 91
(4 DOORS); MITSUBISHI LANCER
CK 2; HONDA CIVIC EK 3; TOYOTA
COROLLA WAGON AE 100.
PICKUPS: TOYOTA HILUX LN 170
EXTRA CAB NISSAN FLAT BED BD
22 DIESEL; NISSAN SINGLE CAB
QD 22 MITSUBISHI CANTER
TRUCK 3-TON OPEN TRAY.
ORDER EARLY AND GET THE
BEST PRICES ON DUTY FREE
VEHICLES. FULL AFTER SALES
SERVICE AND FINANCING
AVAILABLE. DEO MARAJ AUTO
SALES. 207 SHERIFF AND SIXTH
STREETS, CAMPBELLVILLE -
226-4939. A NAME AND A
SERVICE YOU CAN TRUST.











MITSUBISHI
PAJERO JR
A/I, 4\VD, A/C,
P/S, P!\V, P/MI
AIR BAGS, ABS,
CD/CASSETTE

CON NAI IA(ULAT


TELE O621N6-6015




ONE FILL MAN. CALL
256-3216, 621-3875.
ONE DRIVER. TEL: 227-
2800. ANN.
WAEITRESS. CONTACT
BABY. 1B SHELL ROAD. KITTY
1 LIVE-IN DOMESTIC.
40-50 YEARS.
TELEPHONE 642-8781.
COOK, WAITRESS,
WAITERS, HANDYMAN.
CONTACT 223-1682.
ONE LIVE IN MAID. 20-30
YRS. CALL: 226-7189.
ONE Handyboy to work in
the interior Tel. 223-1609, 777-
4126.
ONE BAR ATTENDANT
TO WORK IN G/TOWN. CALL:
227-3674/622-2442.
ONE MAID. Apply 172 East
Field Drive, Nandy Park, EBD.
RESPONSIBLE HIRE CAR
DRIVERS. CALL: 226-8973.
1 LIVE in domestic from
Country area good wages. Call
223-0742.
1 HONEST & reliable MAID
to work at Lamaha Gardens.
Contact 225-3638.
A HIRE car Driver to work
car around Georgetown at
Taxi Service 641-2284.
ONE Maid for 2 days in
Subryanville. Age 35 49. Call
613-6005 or 226-1457.
SECURITY PERSONNEL.
Apply to Clairans On Church St,
Friday & Saturday.
,BOYS TO PLUCK CHICKEN.
A1 Orange Walk, Bourda Tel-
225-9720
WELDERS and Fabricators
at 331 Cummings Street Tel-
231-1404 or 621-5310.
URGENTLY Waitress at
Vee,Bee's Bar, 37 Sandy Babb
St., (itty. Attractive Salary.
RELIABLE, caring NURSE
for evening or night duty. Tel:
226-1503 between 11am 4pm
1 EXPERIENCED COOK.
CALL 663-8829, ANYTIME.
REFERENCES REQUIRED.
NE CHEF, Two Room
Attendants. Apply Glow Hotel,
23 Queen St, Kitty. Tel: 227-
0863.
EXPERIENCED sewing
machine operators. Must know
to put pieces together. Call: 225-
057 1.
1 Waitress, Handy Boy.
Apply in person. Odyssey
Restaurant. 207 Barr St. Kitty
after 11:30 am.


RESIDENTIAL AND
COMMERCIAL properties/lands/
business places/offices/bonds and
vehicles. Ready buyers/tenants.
TEL.z226-8148, 625-1624
WELDERS, Mechanics,
Machinists, Electricians &Trainees.
Apply 18-25 Eccles Industrial Site,
EBD.
ONE enclosed minivan or
light truck, diesel, with
automatic transmission. Call
Lawrence 322-0309.
WAITRESSES wanted
urgently attractive salary. Apply
within 19 UG Road or call 222-
6510, 222-6708.
ASSISTANT Cook/Creole,
preferably male and House
Cleaner to work in Georgetown.
Tel. 625-1906.
2 WAITRESS, 1 live-in maid.
Apply to Bibi Jameel's, 14
Vryheid's Lust Public Road. Tel:
220-5244.
BOYS to work in Factory also
one snackette Assistant. Apply 353
East St., opposite Public Hospital
G/town.
URGENTLY needed.
Waitresses, live-in waitress
(accommodation provided).
Reasonable salary offered.
Contact 259-0574.
EXPERIENCED curry cooks,
counter servers. Apply in person
Hack's Halaal Restaurant. 5
commerce St., G/town. 9-11 am
EXPERIENCE Hire Car Drivers
with reference from last employer
and a valid police clearance Call
Jeffrey 622-8350 or 227-7746
COUNTER CLERKS Apply in
person with written application to
Bish & Sons Discount Store. 38
Cummings Street. Alberttown
EXPERIENCED Driver. Apply
to Permeshwars General Store.
King Street Sharon's Building Tel
# 225-6608, between 9 am 4
pm
URGENTLY Bar Girls.
Waitress and one experienced
cook Apply at Doc's Pool Bar, 315
Middle Street or call 616-9900.
Attractive Salary.
VACANCIES exist for honest
and reliable security guards also
one handyman. Appfy in person at
National Security Services 80
Seaforth St.. C/ville. Tel 227-
3540
ONE SECRETARY to workI
from 2pm 11pm at Sheriff Taxi
Service. Must be computer literate
and have a sound secondary
education. Call: 227-3336. 2.31-
4110.
EXPEREINCED Hairdressers -
must do Manicure and Pedicure.
Top wages and incentives Call:
227-8538. 622-4386. Apply
Roxies, 122 Mernman's Mal
Bourda.
House Keeper to work in
Trinidad for Indian Family. Call
0011-868-685-1115 or write to
Garnett Moller, 11 Hillside Terrace
North, Eldorado Road. Tuna Puna,
Trinidad W.I.
BICYCLE Assembler/Bicycle
Salesman/Handyman. Should
have past experience in same
field. Excellent salary. Apply in
person. Guyana Variety Store. 68
Robb St.
SALES PERSON to sell CD
Players/ DVD Players/Radios, etc.
Must have experience in electrical
items and some technical skills in
same field. Salary & commission,
Apply in person: Guyana Variety
Store (Nut Centre) 68 Robb St.
SALES GIRL CASHIERS,
PUMP ATTENDANTS, HANDY
BOYS, FEMALE COUNTER
CLERK, OFFICE ASSISTANT & 2
WASH BAY MEN. Apply in person
with written application at Texaco,
Vlissengen Road.
Trinidad- wanted domestic
for Hindu family; possibility of
migrating to Canada with family
exists. Must not be older than 22
years, must send recent photo,
and must be able to cook roti.
Applications without recent
photo will not be considered.
Must have a valid travel
document, be honest, tidy and
have no kids. Accommodation
provided. Write to SHEILA
AMCHARAN P0.O BOX 5866
TRINIDAD, WEST INDIES.. .
RORAIMA Trust & Investment Inc.
requires -- skilled workers and general
labourers for immeddiate
employment. Sub-contractors are also
required for Formwork, columns &
beams, steelwork., concrete casting,
block laying, plastering.
electrical, plumbing, timber stairs.
roofing. Sub-contractors and skilled
workers must have own tools. Apply
at Roraima Trust & Investment Inc.
Plantation Versailles. West Bank
Demerara. Phone 264-2946. Fax
264-2949.


British



police



issue TV



image of



dead



prostitute

LONDON (Reuters) British police released surveil-
lance television footage of one of five murdered pros-
titutes yesterday as they stepped up their hunt for a
possible serial killer.
The image of Anneli Alderton, 24, who was three
months pregnant when she was murdered, shows her trav-
elling on a train between the towns of Harwich and
Colchester in eastern England on December 3, a week be-
fore her body was found.
All five prostitutes were naked when their bodies were
discovered and police said the images were important for
forensic evidence purposes, as well as trying to determine
Alderton's movements in the final hours before her death.
"I would ask people to look carefully at the images,"
Chief Superintendent Stewart Gull told a news conference
yesterday. "If anyone saw Anneli after the evening of Sun-
day 3 December, we want to hear from them."
Alderton was pictured wearing a black jacket with a fur-
lined hood. a gray top and blue jeans.
The case has echoes of those involving the 19th cen-
tury prostitute killer Jack the Ripper, who was never found,
and Peter Sutcliffe, the Yorkshire Ripper, who killed 13
women, mainly prostitutes, in northern England between
1975 and 1980.
The murderer has been dubbed the Suffolk Strangler,
although the precise way all the women died is yet to be
established.
Prostitutes in the region are being offered financial help
to stay off the streets but some have ignored police warn-
ings and carried on working, many to feed drug habits, de-
spite the discovery of the five bodies in less than two
weeks.
Prostitution in Britain is legal but there are laws
that make providing sex for money difficult. For ex-
ample, a woman can sell sex in an apartment, but ad-
vertising sexual services, streetwalking, brothels and
kerb crawling are all illegal.



ease contact: Mr. G. Wynter onl333-3154/333-6628 Or



SMr. Clifford Stanley on 618-6538/328-2304


GOING business place,
30ft x 35ft. 1-secured
beautifully tiled office 30ft x
25ft. 1-3 bedroom house fully
grilled inN/A.Call 333-2500.
UPPER flat of two-storeyed
building for business purposes
located in Coburg Street (next
to Police Headquarters). Call
Telephone # 618-6634


CIRCUITCitylntemetCafeand
Computer School Lot 2
D'Edward Village, W/C/B. All
Internet facilities
photocopying, Scanning and
Fax Services. Tel. # 327-5369
or 625-7189



1 NISSAN Pathfinder
(V6 EFI). automatic, fully
powered. 330 Bedforr
Dump Truck, just rebuilt.
Never used. Night Hawk
motorcycle. Tel. 338-2345.



CHURCH View Hotel.
Main and King Streets, IA
Tel 333-2880. Gift Ftfawe-r
and Souvenir Shop. Maim &
Vryheid Streets. it 1XZ-
3927


2-STOREY house with
large land space, corner lot at
Edinburgh, East Bank Berbice.
Tel. 265-3419, 622-3879 -
Andy.
1 3-STOREYED
building, newly built in the
heart of New
Amsterdam. Price
reduced drastically. Call
333-2457, 337-2348.




OXYGEN and acetylene
industrial gases, # 58 Village.
Corentyne, Berbice. Phone
338-2221. (David
Subnauth).(av
One Ransom 3-Disc
Plough, one pair MF 35-
cage wheel, one 35 MIVF back
blade, one steel rake Call Tel:
333-3460
1 LITTLE Giant dra-
gline with 371 engine: 1 48"
x 36" pitch propeller: (1)
3'/" dia. x 13 ft 6 ins. pro-
peller shaft. 1 Perkins
marine with transmission: 1
- Bedford engine block with
standard crank shaft and
head. all sizes of 3-phase
rotors, cutting torch: one
zc:mplete qas welding
se-: one 371 GM en-
g=ue. Tei: 333-
j226.


I






22 SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006


From back page
Oswald Benjamin from the
top of the 18 yards box, as the
ball went over the bar.
Three minutes later Shattas'
best chance came through a vol-
ley by Ray Fraser from the edge
of the 18 yards box on the left
side. The effort which was
heading for the V was brilliantly
plucked out in mid-air by
Camptown's custodian Norris
Prince.
The two-time K&S cham-
pions sealed their victory, cour-
tesy of Codrington, Guyana's
leading Digicel goalscorer, when
he left his marker just inside the
Shattas half and raced down the
left inside before hitting the ball
with poise over the advancing
Benjamin to score in the 90th
minute to give Camptown a
well deserved 2-0 win.
The second game saw
East Coast Demerara side
Victoria Kings take an early
lead when Dwayne Jacobs
scored, beating Israel
Ramsaroop in goal, after col-
lecting a through ball from
Pearce Joseph to shock
Eagles United and take a 1-0
lead.
Home-side fans were still
trying to overcome the early
deficit when Ramsaroop was
called upon to punch out an-
other shot headed goalwards.
United eventually cancelled
out the early lead, compliments
of a controversial shot by Gre-
gory Kercellius which appar-
ently pierced its way into the
goal from the right side. This
was although the Kings' goal-
keeper Andrew Williams had
taken his position to guard and
save since he was within touch-
ing distance of his near post.
A hold-up for about four
minutes followed as the Kings'


SPiPRT CHR0NICL


WINS FOR



FORMER...


Murray's seminar


on captaincy for


NCN tonight


North Essequibo

holds ACGM at

C. V. Nunes

School
THE North Essequibo Cricket Committee will be holding
its Annual General Meeting today at the C.V. Nunes Pri-
mary School (Anna Regina) from 10:00 h.
High on the agenda will be the election of office-bear-
ers for 2007, review of 2006 activities and plans for the
New Year.
All affiliated clubs are asked to send two representatives
and must submit their current constitution and pay affiliated
fees in order to be eligible for all voting rights.
It is expected that observers from the Essequibo
Cricket Board and Guyana Cricket Board will attend
the session.


Silence at Italian


DERYCK MURRAY
from 09:05 h.
The two night sessions will
be coordinated by Television
personality and former cricket
commentator Edwin Seeraj.


camp roundly protested the de-
cision to rule it as a goal, but
FIFA-accredited referee Roy
McArthur blew for goal after
consulting with assistant referee
Franklin Brisport.
Before the celebrations of
the equalising goal by Lin-
den fans could have died
down, Rashleigh Morrison
was there to send the former
K&S champion into the lead
again after being fed the ball
by the hard-working Joseph.
After play resumed in the
second half Kings' Sherwin
Griffith shot to goal was
blocked by Eagles' Timothy
Small at the near post with the
goalkeeper out of position in the
57th minute.
Soon after Williams was
there to hold a lobbed shot,
but when Travis VWaterton's
shot from the right went past
Williams, no player was
there to guide it into the goal
for Eagles who had now
shown aggressive intent.
In the 80th minute another
attempt to level the score again
was wasted by the Eagles attack
as the effort went high and wide
of the goal.
Adding insult to their effort
was a shot by Waterton which
found its way in front of the
aoal but Small was unable to slot
it home.
Two minutes from game
time, second half Victoria Kings'
substitute Lance Rolston, who
came on for Sherwin Cadogan,
was sent off for violent con-
duct, after striking an opponent.
Tonight the action
switches to the GFC ground
in the city where a Berbice
All-Star Selection play Cari-
Air Western Tigers at 18:00
h and at 20:00 h Alpha United
tackle Rusal from Upper
Demerara.


son because of a match-fixing scandal, are top of Serie B. | '*, y -
-1 a r- r | _y C< y--
Fletcher under fire for ( >lTIOIH !Ii

m miserable England (Died December 6.2006).
We wish to extend our heart
perform ances ( thanks to our relatives and frier
for their kind expressions
L NDNnr' M Trrlr'.l>and iReuters) it will r'obablv be too late" ivmnathv cn allv to the S1


- England coach Duncan
Fletcher, a hero last year
when his team regained the
Ashes, was blamed yesterday
for their miserable perfor-
mances on the current tour
of Australia.
England, 2-0 down after as
many games in the five-Test se-
ries, now face defeat in the third
Test in Perth after they were set
557 to win and keep the series
alive on the third day.
"Everything that could have
gone wrong has gone wrong for
Fletcher on this most momen-
tous of Ashes tours, to the
point where the same people
who wanted him knighted 15
months ago are calling for his
head," wrote Pat Gibson in The
Times.
Gibson said England were
wrong to burden all-rounder An-
drew Flintoff with the cap-
taincy when Andrew Strauss
could haIve done the job just as
well.
He criticised the decision
to leave left-arm spinner
Monty Panesar out of the first
two Tests in favour of Ashley
Giles and described as "ex-
traordinary" the decision to
reinstate Geraint Jones
ahead of Chris Read as En-
gland wicketkeeper.
"There is still time to rec-
lify the omission because there
are tIwo c Tess to go. bill by then


.. ..... ... ...... / . - 1
Gibson said.
"And what have England
got to look forward to after
that? The World Cup. Per-
haps it is better not to men-
tion England's record under
Fletcher in one-day cricket."
Writing in The Independent.
James Lawton said the selection
of Giles had been an "atrocious
decision" while Jones was a
"mediocre gloveman of cata-
strophically dwindling batting


DUNCAN FLETCHER
standards".
"Fletcher ... has been oul-
thoughtl, outplanned,
otnlmotivaled." La\ toln said.
Lawton said England needed
to emulate Australia's profcs-
sionalism arnd delennmnation.
"What will it take'?" he
said. "A new coach, surely.
and a firmer understanding
that true champions take
nothing for granted, least of
all their own publicity."


--/K')


fell
ids '- ,.
of
staff


of Mercy Hospital who cared for
him during tne long period of his .
Silliness .
i At oie e't in peice. l
Marjorie, Christine and Peter.







In loving memory of my father MR.


STANLEY NEWTOWN
YEARWOOD, A.A. J.P., late
proprietor of Amex House, former
Chairman of the Guyana Rice
Marketing Board, former Director of
the Guyana Pharmaceutical
Corporation. Died December 14.
2003, Age 93.
God saw you were getting tired
So He put His arms around you
And whispered Cometonme
Agoldenhleadstoopedbeating
Hard-woiking hands at rest
God broke our heais to prove to us
He only takes the best
So let us trust in the Lord with all our hearts
And lean not onto ourown understanding
Sadly missed by his loving son Walter
Yearwood and daughter-in-law Patricia.
-'/ly lic Il')CSt "il ,',cl


,~ ~5tN~~


matches for drowned / ....... .....

Juve youth players --
I = 1 W o 111 i M i j A "J
TURIN, (Reuters) A minute's silence will be observed on Ital- Sunrise: August 13, 1948. Sunset: December '
ian soccer pitches at the weekend and all players will wear 15,1998.
black armbands in memory of two teenagers from the Juventus Our family is broken and nothing seems the
youth team who drowned on Friday. same
Alessio Ferramosca and Riccardo Neri, both aged 17. 4 But as God calls us one by one. the chain will link
drowned in a small, fenced artificial lake inside the club's train- h' again Remembered by his loving )
ing centre. Inlovingmemoryof ourloved one daughter Darlene, sons,
The two appeared to have fallen in the ice-cold water of the 4- Eightyears have passed but it seems as g r a n d c h i I d r e n ,
metre deep lake as they were trying to retrieve a football. ifitwasyesterday sisters, brothers and other
S. o t ate ad m ised. relativ.es,......................
Juventus postponed their Serie B game at home to Cesena on ., m. rs.ti.*:va. -
Friday and all youth team matches scheduled for the weekend.
TI t iri idp 1 h hflI I C d .I tCIfro d iI f S A last s-


No. cancellation
From back page
-vvarm-up matches) have already met all their match and
pitch-testing obligations.
Two very special and historical local tournaments were
hosted at the respective stadia in September and October
this year and the reports on both pitch and outfield at
Kensington in particular, were outstanding and encourag-
ing.
As the Venue for the Final of the ICC CWC 2007,
Kensington Oval has the largest scating capacity for the lour-
nament (27 000).
Also as one of the premier cricket -rounds in the world,
the design of the redeveloped Kensington Oval ensures Iliat [he
facility will be a state-of-the-art world class event centre at-
tracting not only maJor sporting events post-CWC 2007, but
international entertainment and cultural activitres.
While the design is complex, all permanent works at
Ken.4ington Oval will be completed no later than the end of
January 2007, two months before any ICC CWC 2007 matches
-ire due to be played aT the faei.1ity. 1 .1
The new management c9mpany for the facility (Kensington
Management Inc.) will re-open the stadium with a Grand Cer-
emony for the public on February 17, two days before the fia-
cilfty is handed over to the !CC Cricket World Cup 2007.
According to the Ms Charles, "We wantthe inter*na-
tional cricketing Naternity and cricket fans to rest assured
that. there are no major delay's at Kensington' and there
are ho matches being cancelled.,The facilities team con-
't!ii66S o work day an# tfightto.meet'theirs.igi; .4 targets
C"40 Q7 1.1 t", mtNenae
s aciti b 'Ma#e.fl
VO 4, t2 r 'a ion. ynth t e pro ess eing


FORMER West Indies vice-
captain and wicketkeeper
Deryck Murray was recently
in Guyana to share his knowl-
edge of captaincy and leader-
ship to captains across
Guyana at a seminar, hosted
by veteran cricket commenta-
tor Joseph Reds' Perreira.
These sessions will be tele-
vised on National Communi-
cations Network (NCN) from
21:00 h tonight.
The programme has been
sponsored by Guyana Tele-
phone and Telegraph Company
Cellink Plus, Guyana Lottery
Company, Guyana Beverage
and Shell C-Power and will be
rebroadcast tomorrow night


II


I






SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006-


'P


Sreesanth



buoyed by



Donald's words


By Telford Vice

JOHANNESBURG, South Af-
rica (Reuters) -
Shantakumaran Sreesanth
said former opposition pace
great Allan Donald had
helped inspire him to a
maiden five-wicket haul in
the first Test between South
Africa and India yesterday.
Fast bowler Sreesanth took
five for 40 as India dismissed
South Africa for just 84 in their
first innings. India were 146 for
five in their second innings at
stumps on the second day, a
lead of 311 runs.
Sreesanth said he had spo-
ken to Donald, who took 330
Test wickets, before the match.
"He really helped me, and
he told me to stick to the ba-
sics and not to try too hard,"
Sreesanth told a news confer-
ence.
"Our chat boosted me, be-
cause he is my dream bowler.
Dennis Lillee is my idol, but I
saw Donald bowl and I wanted
to be like him."
Sreesanth was confident In-
dia had a big enough lead to
achieve what would be their
first Test win in South Africa,
but he would prefer the visitors
to score more runs today.
"I think we have a decent
target, but we need to score
more runs because you never
know what's going to happen in
cricket," he said.
Shaun Pollock, who be-
came the first South African
to take 400 Test wickets yes-
terday, did not attend the
news conference because he
was enjoying a well-earned
ice bath.
But he relayed a comment
via South African media liaison
officer Gordon Templeton.
"I'm chuffed to have got the
400, and I'm hoping to get more
wickets tomorrow to help South
Africa win the Test," Templeton
said Pollock had told him.
South African coach
Mickey Arthur offered no ex-
cuses for his team's dismal bat-
ting performance.
"Today was a really poor
day for us," Arthur told a
news conference. "We've had
a heart-to-heart about it in
the dressing room and the
guys have taken responsibil-
ity for their performance,
which was poor.
"India have outplayed us in
all departments, but there's no
way that we should have been
bowled out for less than a hun-
dred. India made our batsmen
play, which is something we


didn't do.
Arthur said South Africa's
steady diet of one-day cricket in
recent months was also taking
its toll.
"Our one-day side has a


RAMKISSOON
of 136 Dr. Miller St.,
Triumph, ECD and
late owner of LBI
Lumber Yard, who
died on December ,
17, 1988. .
Sad are the hearts
thatlove you
Silent are the tears
Sthatfall.
Living our lives
without you is the
hardest thing of all.
The special years
will not return
When we were all together
But with love within our
hearts
You will walk with us
forever.

Sadly missed by youi
three children Rabl
Data.


presence, they know the
roles they are required to
play and they are very com-
fortable with each other," he
said. "We're still trying to get
there in our Test side."


loving wife and
ie, Arnold and

p,


ago
Decemberhascomewith Sadly missed by his wife,
Amonthwewillneverforget children Frederick Jr.,
So swift and sudden was the call Ann, Lugard, Angel, Anya
It wasashockto us all and grand daughter
Nowin this life you are no Rolanda, sister Emily and
longerhere nieces, nephews and other
But treasured memories keep relatives.
Syou near .
To some you maybe forgotten
STo others a part of the past /
But to us who loved and lost you
Yourmemories will alwav lv3t 4


*, -: ,.m mm"um um. m.
mom a ,W 0.0 a 0 S a 0 .....
S11 1 "IN MEMORIAL
SL In' memory of a loving husband,
',, father, brother, grandfather
0. IGNATIUS MANN a.k.a. CHINEY of
'; ; Saachi Bazaar Street, Prasahd Nagar.
SSunrise: 27.09-31 Sunset: 14.12.2005

r\ ) | I'M FREE
j'.' Don't grieve for me for now I'm free
I'm following the path God laid for me
S,, 1 I took god's and when I heard the call
/ 1 turned my back and left it all
S' 1 could not'stay another day
To laugh, to love, to work or play
Tasks left undone must stay that way j
I found that place at the close of day
* If my parting has left a void
* Then fill it with remembered joy V
A friendship shared, a laugh, a kiss
Ah, yes these things I too will miss
Be not burdened with time of sorrow
* I wish you the sunshine of tomorrow
a My life's been full, I've served much
.. Good friends, good times, a loved one's touch
Perhaps my time seemed all too brief
Lift yourl'earts and share with me
.' : God~wanted me now, god set me free
vN Sad are the hearts that loved you
S Silent are the tears that feel
t Living our lives without your laughter
It's the hardest thing of all
1 The special years will not return
When we were all together
But with the love &joy within our hearts
: .' XYou will be with us forever
^A't May perpetual light shine on you
I ou i Rest in peace'
Inserted by his dearly wife, seven loving children
t grandchildren & great grandchildren.
L n nl / n ll1 vlK.


SIn memory of our dear and beloved brother and
uncle MR. MADHOO SINGH aka BASIL
SINGH of Lot 66 Sandy Babb Street, Kitty who
died on December 16, 2002.
Four years have passed since you have gone
A wonderful person has gone to rest
For all of us you have done yourbest
Memories of your gift of love and sacrifice will be
foreverin our hearts
There is no replacement when tears of love are
broken and loved ones have to part
It leaves a broken heart that no words, no flowers
or tears can heal
December 16 has come with deep regret
Your death was so sudden ... .........
You went to bed andnever woke up
You were the best, we would have done anything _-. [ ,
just to have you with us __. _
But again God has proven to us He only takes the
best.
The memories we have from day to day Sadly missed by his loviMg
No length of time could take away brothers Ramjit, Cecn,'
You were involved in eveiy activity, every Amar; sisters Norma,
celebration Serojine, nieces Amtita,
You were so much a part of our life Prlya, Vidya, Vanetta,
k Your death has not separated us Lorrain, nephews Vicky,
SBut has only served to bring us closer from that day Avinash, Anil and Alonzo,
Son sister-in-law Carmen,
You lived in our hearts Shirley and Data, brother-
And there you will remain in-law Vishnu, wife Myrtle,
Thanks for all we have shared together good and cousins Jeff, Baby, Shirley,
bad Veelene and Jadoo, aunt
Your light will shine forever Lucille other relatives and
We praise Lord Krishna for the gifttofyour life to us. friends
jOH tcW 1 yocxO t.IoaIl' te.tb n. p aes e.



AM AMr-- -- <---


:A1itaaasLS


'O


r
>i


O&eMO i^r


















in command in second Test


SYDNEY. Australia (Reuters)
- A half-century from
Chamara Silva helped Sri
Lanka to a formidable lead of
363 runs at the end of day two
in the second and final Test
against New Zealand in
Wellington yesterday.
His unbeaten 79, with
Prasanna Javy\ardenc on 22,
helped the Sri Lankans to 225
for five after the home side
were skittled out for just 130
in the morning session as the
tourists bid to square the se-
ries. Silva's second fifty of
the match in only his second
Test came off 84 balls and
included six fours.
After New Zealand
slumped from their overnight 66
for four to 130 all out, giving the
tourists a first-innings lead of
138, an opening stand of 44 be-
tween Sanath Jayasuriya and
Upul Tharanga looked set to put
them out of reach before
Tharanga was trapped in front
by Chris Martin for 20.
Kumar Sangakkara's bid
for a third successive century
was ended early when he was
caught for eight off Shane
Bond's bowling and
Jayasuriya edged to Kiwi
skipper Stephen Fleming off
Daniel Vettori to make it 62
for three.
Chamara Kapugedera was
then bowled by a straight one
from Vettori foi 27.
Skipper Mahela
Jayawardene was unhappy to
be given out for 31 when he



SRI LANKA 1st innings 268 (K.
Sangakkara 156 n.o., C. Silva 61)
NEW ZEALAND 1st innings (o/n 66-
4)
C. Cumming b Maharoof 13
J. How Ibw b Malinga 26
M. Sinclair b Malinga 7
S. Fleming c P. Jayawardene
b Malinga 0
N. Astle b Malinga 17
B. McCullum b Muralitharan 43
D. Vettori b Malinga 0
J. Oram Ibw b Muralitharan 1
J. Franklin lbw b Muralitharan 1
S. Bond Ibw b Muralitharan 8
C. Martin not out 0
Extras: (b-7, lb-5, nb-2) 1,
Total: (all out, 39.1 overs) 130
Fall of wickets: 1-30,2-40,3-40,4-66,
5-75, 6-85, 7-90, 8-98,9-116.
Bowling: C. Vaas 4-0-8-0, L. Malinga


edged behind to stand-in
wickelkeeper Mathew Sinclair,
deputising for the injured
Brendon McCullunm. to make it
168 for five before Silva and
Javawardene shared an unbro-
ken stand of 57.
Earlier, spinner Mulliah
Miiralitharan claimed four wick-
ets and ipaceman Lasilh MIthnga
completed a fivc-wickct haul as
New Zealand were dismissed in
just 39.1 overs at the Basin Re-
serve.
The Kiwis never hit their
stride and the lively Malinga
took his fourth wicket of the
innings when he bowled
Sinclair for six to make it 75
for five.
Malinga repeated the trick
to dismiss Vettori for a duck and
complete career-best match fig-
ures of five for 68, before
Muralitharan trapped Jacob
Oram, who was batting with a
runner, and James Franklin lbw,
both for one.
Muralitharan won another
leg-before-verdict against Bond
(eight) before the defiant
McCullum, who suffered a fin-
ger injury and did not take his
place to field, was last man out
for 43 from 61 balls when he
charged at the Sri Lankan off-
spinner and was bowled.
Muralitharan finished with four
for 31.
Sri Lanka were bowled
out for 268 in their first in-
nings on Friday. New
Zealand won the first Test in
Christchurch by five wickets.



18-4-69-5 (nb-1), F. Maharoof 5-2-10-
1 (nb-1), M. Muralitharan 12.1-3-31-4.
SRI LANKA 2nd innings
U. Tharanga lbw b Martin 20
S. Jayasuriya c Fleming
b Vettori 31
K. Sangakkara c Franklin
b Bond 8
M. Jayawardene c Sinclair
b Vettori 31
C. Kapugedera b Vettori 27
C. Silva not out 79
P. Jayawardene not out 22
Extras: (lb-4, nb-3) 7
Total: (for 5 wickets, 71 overs) 225
Fall of wickets: 1-44, 2-62, 3-62, 4-
100,5-168.
Bowling: S. Bond 14-2-49-1 (nb-
2), C. Martin 11-1-41-1 (nb-1), D.
Vettori 31-5-101-3, J. Franklin 15-
6-30-0.


^xx
,, .; -
: .: %


*/
/


LU fall I


By Trevor Huggins

LONDON, England (Reuters)
- A warning by Arsenal man-
ager Arsene Wenger that for-
eign investment could
jeopardise the future of En-
glish clubs is likely to fall on
deaf ears in the Premier
League.
The Frenchman's reserva-
tions about the loss of tradition
in clubs founded in the 19th
century. and the distortions in
the transfer market caused by
the arrival of foreign billionaires
arc easy to understand.
These new investors, the
Gunners boss feels. may not
have the long-term interests of
the clubs at heart but be more
motivated by the opportunity
to make a quick profit.
Wenger himself helped
changed traditional English
preconceptions about diet and
training routines when he
moved to England a decade
ago and has long been ac-
cepted as one overseas import
to have had a generally posi-
tive influence on the English
game.
But when even he says that
a club as established, rich and
successful as Arsenal could
struggle to win major honours in
the future if they could not
compete financially with clubs
benefiting from huge foreign in-
vestment, then the warning
signs should be heeded.
Football clubs were once a
vehicle for wealthy local busi-
nessmen to win friends and lose
money; exchanging status in the
town and the stadium for a
somewhat lighter wallet.
Like rattles, rosettes and
halftime results given on alpha-
bet billboards at the side of the
pitch such patronage now looks
consigned to a bygone era.

ROVERS RETURN
In recent times the late Jack
Walker was a notable exception.
A Blackburn Rovers fan.
since a boy he later spent much
of his personal fortune built up
from his involvement in the
steel industry to fund their
transformation from a long lost
sleeping giant in the lower
reaches of the league to become
English champions in 1995.
However, the football
business has changed dra-
matically in the decade or so
since then.
Chelsea were a good league
side at the turn of the millen-
nium., but \\ere never strong
enough ill depth or consistent
enough to challenge tihe
Manchester United-Arsenal
duopol\.
Tlh's \\'ire also SO million
pOniLs ( 15 7.3 million) in debt.
Ih'J 201k hliL \'e b Rus


( i J \\ iio Ih:\ oIO\\ vOn ill'
;\\ 1' tlt' i l.' O l. l :


24 SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006'


Sini S JSPr RT CHRONICLE


Malinga, Silva put Sri Lanka Wenger's
#n 4,% d~


warning likely

on deaf ears


But seen from the pork pie end
of the game, a foreign investor,
willing to spend money on the
ground, team and bank balance,
counts for a great deal more.

LIVERPOOL NEXT?
Liverpool are likely to
become the next club to fall
under foreign ownership af-
ter Dubai International Capi-
tal (DIC) expressed its inter-
est in an investment whict
British newspapers have put
at 450 million pounds.
Newcastle United, tht
symbolic heart ot
'Geordieland' in the Nortt
East could well follow soon.
But fans are unlikely to re-
volt.
Whether or not Sameer al-
Ansari, DIC's chief executive
knows the words to 'Ms
Liverpool Home' or 'Ferr;
'Cross the Mersey' will no
matter much to the Kopites i
there is the prospect of a nev
60 000-seater stadium and -
large fund for Rafael Benitez ti
spend in the transfer market.
Ansari, a Liverpool fai
who was educated in England
leads a state-owned agency,
which in theory has the finan
cial resources to make evei
Chelsea look like paupers.
"It's definitely not abou
becoming a rich man's play
thing," Liverpool chief execu
tive Rick Parry in a column
on the club's Website thi
week.
"It's about taking Liverpoc
FC to the next level and secure
ing the future of the club forth
next hundred years." Liverpool'
talismanic captain Stevei
Gerrard. a Merseysider born an,
bred, is already preparing th
ground with the Anfield faithfu
saying that fans "have got e
ery right to be excited".

HUGE DEBTS
Even hostility from a sec
tion of the fan base can be at
sorbed by a new investor.
A campaign again,,
Malcolm Glazer did not prevent
the American tycoon from bu)
ing Manchester United in 200
and the expanded Old Traffor
is still selling out with 76 00
seats available.
'Love United, Hat
Glazer' stickers are still vi
ible near their ground. B4
the substantial debts levere
onto the club by the 790-mi
lion pound buyout, is largely
forgotten at the moment bi
cause United are top of tt
table.
\\ whether fains aire happy (
r. the i er eo\cn tillc will not ii
[I ;c ill the issue b of club owl
,ii -lip.
Spoirts i nilstir Ri hat
'.- "; n.idc it ele!:1i i< ;i rccet
,:.; \ iof ll t. : it it

' I' i '* th









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out I I . !111


l'q- ,'ii.


Lasith Malinga completed career-best figures of five for
68.


Sixers' losing streak

hite 1 ft ra inht


Iii& lU illlU !llll

DALLAS, Texas (Reuters) The Philadelphia 76ers lost
93-79 to the Dallas Mavericks on Friday their 10th
straight defeat and fifth since sending Allen Iverson home.
Jason Terry led the Mavericks with 18 points, leading six
Dallas players in double-figures, as the Sixers' longest losing
streak in 10 years continued.
Philadelphia lost 13 in a row in 1996-97. Iverson's rookie
vear, and with Iverson at home awaiting his requested trade,
they may struggle to avoid equalling that mark in the next week.
Chris Webber was hurt in a game on Wednesday and
although he took part in shooting practice did not play,
leaving the 76ers without their top two players.
The Mavericks took advantage to build a 49-34 halftime
lead and answered any PIhiladelphia comeback hopes by shoot-
ing a perfect 100 percent 17 for 17 front the foul line.
Josh lhioward had 15 points Ilor the Mavericks. who also
olt 13-point efforts Iroui Dirk Nowilzki. De\in l larris and Creg
liuckner as lthe \ \\n their second straight ga;nii and improved
1o 10-7.
Andrei'c liunioia!L:i lc iih Si'-.es within 17 points. aind
Sauuel l)ahuI'llerl' t ai :i illi' (r'eCll chiipped inl ;;fit It:


each.
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SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006 25


b.


Windies-A denied as


last-over thriller ends in tie


CASTRIES, St Lucia (CMC)
- Sri Lanka captain Russel
Arnold was run-out off the
last ball of the innings as the
fourth one-day match against
West Indies-A finished in a
dramatic tie at the
Beausejour Cricket Ground


Travis Dowlin top-scored
with 75, in the West Indies
innings.

















frormi a e l serious


Iil~lness. IlI I l
I atathe fm iliyeste-

lfAurai a1r etrI101C I1






"Tet l 1211S flt l (le
i*f IJl J] [J

such a Ii iClt ] inIC,"



I _6* illl :h
F letcher haid I l















"It is typical of Ashley
maner an0ews
Stn a0ped0ecvr
"Ter s ochneSf
Asle ci nigbc oj
usa hssae* .
Gi les plydi Iis
tw Tss f teseis.u
wa relaedbyMot


late Friday night.
Requiring 18 from the last
over to overhaul West Indies-
A's 260 for six off 50 overs,
Arnold thumped two massive
sixes off left-arm spinner Ryan
Hinds to bring Sri Lanka within
sight of victory.
With two runs needed from
the last ball, however, Arnold
scrambled the first run quickly
but was run-out attempting the
second, as the pulsating day/
night affair finished on even
keel.
The left-handed Arnold, the
bedrock of Sri Lanka's innings,
finished on 79 at better than a
run-a-ball. He hit six fours to
accompany his last-over sixes.
Openers Avishka
Gunawardene and Mahela
Udawatte gave Sri Lanka, the
visitors, a perfect start, post-
ing 77 as the Windies-A
bowlers struggled under the
lights.
All-rounder Darren Sammy,
sending down his medium pace,
finally got the breakthrough
when he bowled Udawatte for
25..


WEST INDIES A
D. Smith c Perera b Amarasinghe
16
T. Dowlin c (sub.) Mubarak
b Bandara 75
W. Hinds c Lokuarachchi
b Amarasinghe 24
S. Joseph Ibw b Lokuarachchi 42
N. Deonarine b Bandara 3
P. Browne Ibw b Bandara 0
0. Banks not out 22
R. Hinds not 55
Extras: (b-1, lb-2, w-16, nb-4) 23
Total: (6 wkts, 50 overs) 260
Fall of wickets: 1-27, 2-70, 3-168, 4-
176,5-176,6-177.
Bowling: Perera 9-0-52-0 (nb-4, w-6),
Wijekoon 10-1-48-0, Amarasinghe
10-0-69-2, Lokuarachchi 10-0-37-1,
Bandara 10-0-42-3 (w-10), Mendis 1-
0-9-0.


West Indies-A did not have
to wait much longer for further
success as Sammy starred again,
pulling off a simple catch at
point to send back new batsman
Kaushal Lokuarachchi without
scoring, off Ryan Hinds' bowl-
ing.
Gunawardene, who stroked
66 from 72 balls with nine fours
and one six, added 51 for the
third wicket with Jeevan Mendis
(28) as Sri Lanka consolidated.
The stand ended when
Gunawardene played over a
full-length delivery from fast
bowler Gavin Tonge and was
bowled with the score on 130
for three.
Tonge, earlier switched to
the southern end for a second
spell, picked up two more wick-
ets in quick succession to leave
the visitors reeling.
First, he bowled Mendis
for 28 and then found Thilan
Samaraweera's outside edge
which Patrick Browne gobbled
up diving to his right.
Sanuaraweera went without scor-
ing and Sri Lanka slumped to
141 for five.


SRI LANKA A
A. Gunawardene b Tonge 66
M. Udawatte b Sammy 25
K. Lokurachchi c Sammy
bR. Hinds 0
J. Mendis b Tonge 28
R. Arnold run-out 79
T. Samaraweera c wkp. Browne .
b Tonge 0
G. Wijekoon c Sammy b Banks 15
K. Silva b W. Hinds 7
M. Bandara not out 13
Extras: (b-1, lb-4, w-10, nb-12) 27
Total: (8 wkts, 50 overs) 260
Fall of wickets: 1-77, 2-79, 3-130, 4-
141,5-141,6-176,7-213,8-260.
Bowling: Edwards 6-0-43-0,
Tonge 10-1-40-3, Sammy 10-1-
40-1, W. Hinds 6-1-31-1, R.
Hinds 8-0-49-1, Banks 10-0-52-
1.


CHENNAI, India (Reuters) Former president Jagmohan
Dalmiya was expelled from the Indian cricket board yester-
day for misappropriation of funds and bringing the board into
disrepute.
"The resolution was moved by
the president (Sharad Pawar) sug-
gesting to expel Mr Dalmiya and
barring him from holding any po-
o sitions in any body of cricket." se-
nior board official Rajiv Shukla told
television news channel NDTV al-f
ter the special general meeting in
Jaipur.
"The issue of irregularities
and refusal to provide relevant
accounts and documents relate
primarily to bank transactions
of the Pakistan-India-Lanka
Committee (PILCOM) formed
for the 1996 World Cup," trea-
surer N. Srinivasan told
JAGMOHAN DALMIYA Reuters.
The event was jointly staged
by the three countries. Dalmiya, a Iormer president of the Interna-
tional Cricket Council (ICC), was the convenor-secretary.
"There were other issues as well. like bringing the board into
disrepute," Srinivasanadded.
Only the Crickcit Association of '3Bcng:l and National (Cricket
(Club of Calc'ulta. bolth 'of %\thich D)alnii\a is preidcsint ofoppt sd
hC iIOVe C while11 ILcirimIIiiii C k' l l[1s;)1iO1iatI1s sitpi t( e I11 ,a d

"JThe oadrd h p c alcdhill] t I 11' 11:1, VC114 I 1 1'n a I .l ItoIlc-
approach ithe t olrd fter lhree Ctin ars.i Shu2I. d.
Dalmliya's group was ousted from pomter b3I'aPwar's cainip
in Iitterly-fought elections in 200.5.


Gayan Wijekoon set up a
partial recovery with Arnold,
adding 25 for the sixth wicket,
but when Sammy leapt high at
gully to snare a fine catch to re-
move Wijekoon for 15, Sri Lanka
were again under pressure.
Kaushal Silva was soon
bowled by Wavell Hinds for 11
and Sri Lanka struggled at 213
for seven.
Arnold then found a reso-
lute partner in Malinga Bandara,
who finished unbeaten on 13,
and together they took the
match down to the wire before
the drama unfolded in the last
over.
Tonge was the best West
Indies-A bowler with three for


40.
Earlier, Travis Dowlin
hammered 75 from 106 balls
with five fours as West
Indies-A posted a competitive
total after captain Sylvester
Joseph called right at the
toss.
The right-handed Dowlin
shared a 98-run, third-wicket
stand with Joseph who
scored 42, a partnership
which gave the innings mo-
mentum after the score had
slipped to 70 for two.
From a position of 168 for
two, however, West Indies-A
collapsed to 177 for six, losing
four quick wickets for the addi-
tion of only nine runs.


The damage was caused by
26-year-old leg-spinner Bandara
who accounted for Dowlin
caught at deep mid-wicket;
Narsingh Deonarine, bowled for
three, and Browne lbw for a
first-ball duck.
Ryan Hinds, batting at
number eight, then hit a breezy
55 not out and shared an unbro-
ken seventh wicket stand of 83
with Omari Banks who stroked
22 not out, to give West Indies-
A the advantage.
Bandara claimed three
for 42 and fast bowler Ishara
Amarasinghe, two for 69.
The series remains locked
at 1-1 with the final one-day at
the same venue today.


Liverpool go third as


Portsmouth hold Arsenal


By Trevor Huggins

LONDON, England (Reuters)
- Liverpool moved up to third
in the Premier League after
they won 3-0 at Charlton Ath-
letic and rivals Arsenal could
only draw 2-2 with Ports-
mouth after being two goals
down yesterday.
An early penalty from Xabi
Alonso and late goals by Craig
Bellamy and captain Steven
Gen'ard gave Liverpool an easy
victory over a Charlton side
rooted in the relegation zone.
Liverpool now have 31
points, just ahead of Arsenal
(30) and Bolton Wanderers (30).
who beat Aston Villa 1-0 away
with a Gary Speed penalty in
his 100th game for the club.
Nigeria striker Obafemi
Martins scored Newcastle
United's goals in a 2-1 home
win over bottom club
Watford, striker David
Bentley got a late winner as
Blackburn Rovers won 2-1 at
Reading and Sheffield United
beat Wigan Athletic 1-0 away.
Despite another big victory,
after 4-0 routs of Wigan and
Fulham, Liverpool are still adrift
of champions Chelsea (39) and
leaders Manchester United (44),
who both play today.


Charlton were in trouble af-
ter just two minutes when their
former Liverpool defender
Djimi Traore swung his boot
into the face of Jermnaine Pen-
nant as he tried to intercept
Mark Gonzalez's lofted cross
from the left wing.
Referee Howard Webb
pointed to the spot and Span-
ish midfielder Alonso converted
to put Liverpool in front.
Bellamy volleyed past
keeper Thomas Myhre after
running on to a neat through-ball
in the 82nd minute and Gerrard
added a third in the 88th when
he picked his spot after a
knockdown by substitute Peter
Crouch.
"We created a lot of
chances, we scored three
goals but we could have
scored two or three more,"
Liverpool manager Rafael
Benitez told Sky Sports.
Charlton's Les Reed said:
"We had a couple of chances:
we didn't take them and then
got punished for some bad de-
fending.
"That made it 2-0 and put
it out of our grasp ... we did
lack confidence today."
Portsmouth, fielding two
former Arsenal stalwarts in
striker Nwankwo Kanu and de-


AI


Steven Gerrard celebrates with Fabio Aurolio ai Peoior
C'ouch after his curald shol two Wr.sc. iO.: i;.n 'e
an easy win. (BBC Sport)


fender Sol Campbell, scored ei-
ther side of the break through
French defender Noe Pamarot
and Matthew Taylor.

ARSENAL TROUBLE
After four 3-0 wins and
four 1-1 draws. Arsenal looked
set for a first home league de-
feat at their new Emirates Sta-
dium. before everything changed
in five minutes.
Togo striker Emmanuel
Adebayor scored in the 58th
minute., just three minutes after
replacing Jeremy Aliadiere,
when he side-footed in a good
ball from teenager Theo
Walcott.
Arsenal levelled two min-
utes later when a deflected
Adebayor cross found its way
to Walcott and his ball into the
area was steered home by Bra-
zilian midfielder Gilberto.
Manager Arsene Wenger
pointed to Arsenal's schedule
with four games since Decem-
ber 6 and said: "After their sec-
ond goal we needed ... excep-
tional character.
"I give them a lot of
credit, even if we're disap-
pointed not to have won the
game, they showed excep-
tional quality."
Along with the dropped
points, though. Wenger said a
hamstring injury would rule
out Swedish midfielder
Fredrik Ljungherg for the fes-
tive period.
Pompey manager Harry
Redknqpp was in stoical mood,
saying: "'In the end, to come
here and pick up a point is a
fantastic result for us."
Newcastle shrugged off a
midweek defeat at Chelsea with
another win courtesy of Mar-
tins. who also scored twice in
their 3-1 win at Blackburn the
previous weekend.
The Nigerian struck
\\ ic eiI in te second half. ei-
Iher sd o il .111 'J tals'r from
\\, it ,J,' I eInl h lIik r

a!' *'\ I. ,x ,'r. I:," k' ilw n ri 'lillg
in a l.' ;I 1: rIunII. ;l .i d oh

,( , l , ..iII l'T .








26 SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006


ihk~a -i


!SP 'RT CH R NI CLE


Gilchrist, Hussey and Clarke




tons put Aussies on top


... Aussie wicketkeeper smashes second fastest century in Test history


By Julian Linden

PERTH, Australia (Reuters) -
Adam Gilchrist smashed the
second fastest century in Test
history to leave Australia
poised to regain the Ashes
from England in record time
after the third day of the
third Test yesterday.
Gilchrist slammed 12 fours
and four sixes to reach his hun-
dred off just 57 balls. He fin-
ished unbeaten on 102 as the
world champions amassed a
daunting total of 527 for five
declared.
Set 557 for victory to keep
the series alive, England's hopes
of a miracle plummeted when
opener Andrew Strauss de-
parted for a fourth-ball duck be-
fore they limped to the close on
19 for one.
"We've got nine wickets
to get in this game. We're in
a good position," Gilchrist
told a news conference.
"It's very exciting. We've
fought hard. We've endured
what England have thrown up
to us.
"We feel pretty good but


By Telford Vice

JOHANNESBURG, South Af-
rica (Reuters) A maiden five-
wicket haul by fast bowler
Shantakumaran Sreesanth
led to South Africa being dis-
missed for 84 and put India
firmly in control of the first
Test yesterday.
South Africa, replying to
India's first innings of 249, were
skittled for their lowest total
against India. Their previous
lowest score against India was
105 in Ahmedabad in 1996-97.
With 20 wickets tumbling on
the second day the visitors
reached the close on 146 for five
in their second innings. a lead of
311.
The display would have


winning the Ashes is certainly
something that hasn't been spo-
ken about yet.
Michael Clarke (135 not
out) and Mike Hussey (103)
also made hundreds after
Matthew Hayden (92) and
Ricky Pouting (75) narrowly
















MIKE HUSSEY

missed out as Australia's bats-
men went on the rampage
against a dispirited England
bowling attack.
England beat Australia 2-1
in an epic series at home last
year to win the Ashes for the


come as a huge relief to the Indi-
ans after they were whitewashed
4-0 by South Africa in the one-
day series.
The only silver lining for South
Africa came when Shaun Pollock
become the first South African to
claim 400 Test wickets.
The seamer went into the
match with 395 wickets and af-
ter picking up four wickets in
India's first innings, he
reached the landmark with
the prized scalp of Indian cap-
tain Rahul Dravid (1) in the
second innings.
Sourav Ganguly had earlier
justified his recall to the national
side following an I 1-month exile
with a gritty half-century in the
first innings.
Former captain Ganguly.
who was making
his Test comeback
aI lei beine
dropp'd lnliiow
till h Pgq n
series, ill Janttar\',
Iop-sc1'CLd for In-l
dia \\ h \\ 5 1 n01
out. hoss IC"

Makhaya Ntini
Stiruclk the first
blow wi\nt'l Pol-
lock pu led i'll :
," ,peclIIacular div-
ing catch to tlis-
miiss M le 11il ra
Singh Dhoni for
fi ve.


0 S fl rL unt 1 il hI
was joined biy nu-in
SHANTAKUMARAN Sreesanth is I 11t VikramSinah
ecstatic after dismissing another South after Indian had
Afrjcan batsman. The, young pacer slumped to 205 for
finished with five for 40. (Yahoo Sport) nine.


The last pair added 44 off
35 balls in a bright partnership
in which the free-hitting Singh
smashed six fours in his 29.
Sreesanth put India into
the driving seat by maintain-
ing a probing length and found
movement off the seam to take
five for 40 from 10 overs.
With four batsmen failing to
add any runs. Ashwell Prince
top-scored for South Africa with
24 as their innings lasted just
25.1 overs.
Prince and Andre Nel (21)
added 39 for the eighth \N icket.
the Imost lucrative partnership of'
the ninings.

PACE GENERATED
Captain Graeme Smith (5).




INDIA 1st innings (o/n 156-5)
W. Jaffet I'w b Ntini 9-
V. Sehwag c Boucher b Pollock 4
R. Dravid c Smith b Kallis 32
S. Tendulkar c AB de Villiers
b Kallis 44
V. Laxmrn c Boucher b Ntini 28
S. Ganguly not out 51
M. Dhoni c Pollock b Ntini 5
A. Kumble c Kallis b Nel 6
Z. Khan Ibw b Pollock 9
S. '- ,: thi rc Amla b Pollock 0
V. Singh c&h Pollock 29
Extras: (lb-15, nb-6, w-11) 32
Total: (all out, 79.5 overs) 249
Fall of wickets: 1-14, 2-14, 3-83, 4-
110, 5-156, 6-167, 7-188, 8-205, 9-205.
Bowling D. Steyn 10.1-3-26-0 (nb-2),
M. Ntini 18-1-57-3, S. Pollock 17.5-7-
,CQ.J A ' -l 1S l -' "- ',


l\uill ,u-U-U, -; rUo- Vi-Z).
SOUTH AFRICA 1st innings
G. Smith Ibw b Sreesanth
H. Gibbs c Sehwag b Khan
H. Amla c Laxman b Sreesanth
J. Kallis c Laxman b Sreesanth
A. Prince c Dhoni b Kumble
A. de Villiers c Sehwag b Khan


Hashim Amla (0), Jacqi
(12), Mark Boucher (5
(5) all failed to handle
generated by Sreesantt
South Africa s


first time in 16 years but face
the prospect of handing them
back after just 15 months the
shortest reign since the Ashes
were first contested in 1882.


BAD NEWS
"We've been through this
before and the guys have come
back," a defiant England coach
Duncan Fletcher said.
"Numerous occasions
they've bounced back and
they've just got to make sure
they bat tomorrow with a posi-
tive frame of mind and realise
there's still quite a lot of cricket
to be played."
There was more bad news
for the tourists when Fletcher
revealed spinner Ashley Giles,
who was dropped for the
match, had left the tour to re-
d turn home because his wife Stine
was potentially seriously ill.
"The thoughts of all the
S players and management are
with Ashley and Stine at such
a difficult time," Fletcher
arke on said.
cricket "There is no chance of
irke 135 Ashley coming back to join us
at this stage."
Gilchrist set a series of
records as he chalked up his
17th Test hundred in spectacu-
lar fashion despite arriving at
the crease after the tea break.
The Australian
wicketkeeper equalled Graham
les Kallis Thorpe's record for the fastest
), Pollock Ashes 50 when he reached the
the pace milestone off just 40 balls.
h. He also set a record for the
suffered most runs off a single six-ball


their first setback with the
12th ball. Smith was trapped
in front with a delivery from
Sreesanth that straightened
after pitching.
Four balls later Herschelle
Gibbs edged a drive off left-arm.
fast bowler Zaheer Khan and was
well caught by Virender Sehwag
in the gully for a duck.
South Africa crashed to five
for three in the fourth over
when Sreesanth found the edge
of Anila's bat and had him
caught by Vangipurappu
Laxman at second slip.




M. Boucher b Sreesanth 5
S. Pollock lbw b Sreesanth 5
A. Nel c Khan b V. Singh 21
M. Ntini b Kumble 0
D. Steyn not out 0
Extras: (b-2, nb-1, w-3) 6
Total: (all out. 25.1 overs) 84
Fall of wickets: 1-5, 2-5. 3-5, 4-21, 5-
33, 6-38,7-45, 8-84, 9-84.
Bowling: Z. Khan 10-3-32-2, S.
Sreesanth 10-3-40-5 (nb-1, w-2), V.
Singh 3.1-0-8-1 (w-1), A. Kumble 2-1
2-2.
INDIA 2nd innings
W. Jaffer c Smith b Nel 4
V. Sehwag c Gibbs b Nel 33
R. Dravid c Boucher b Pollock 1
S. Tendulkar b Pollock 14
V. Laxman not out 42
II. Ji .Ulll ll 1 OUlt
Extras: (b-2, lb-7, w-1) 10
Total: (for 5 wickets, 35 overs) 146
Fall of wickets: 1-20, 2-37, 3-41, 4-61,
5-119.
Bowling M. Ntini 9-0-56-1 (w-1). A. Nel
11-2-38-2, S. Pollock 9-2-24-2, J.
Kallis 6-2-19-0.


AUSTRALIA first innings 244
England first innings 215
AUSTRALIA second innings (o/n
119-1)
J.Langer b Hoggard 0
M.Hayden c Collingwood
b Panesar 92
R.Ponting c Jones b Harmison 75
M.Hussey c Jones b Panesar 103
M.Clarke not out 135
A.Symonds c Collngwood
b Panesar 2
A.Gilchrist not out 102
Extras: (lb-15, w-2, nb-1) 18
Total: (for five wickets declared, 112
overs)527


Ashes over when he plundered
24 off-spinner Monty Panesar
and brought up his hundred in
just one more ball than Viv
Richard's world record of 56,
set against England at St John's
in 1985-86.
Gilchrist's display over-
shadowed another fine perfor-
mance by Clarke and Hussey.
Clarke's 135 came off just
164 balls and featured 17
fours and a six and Hussey
became the first Australian to
score five successive half-cen-
turies in an Ashes series be-
fore completing his first ton
of the series.
England made a bright start
when they picked up the prized
wickets of Ponting and Hayden
before lunch but missed their
chance to restrict Australia to a
smaller total with poor fielding.
The left-handed Hussey
survived a chance on 48 when
he skied a hook off Steve
Harmison that fell between
three English fielders and he had
another let-off on 78 when he
was dropped in the slips by
Strauss.
England wicketkeeper
Geraint Jones also missed a
stumping off Clarke before the
Australian had reached double-
figures on a scorching hot day
that left both teams exhausted.
"What we kept thinking
was that if it's hot for us it's
got to be twice as hot for
them," Hussey said.
"So hopefully it'll take
its toll tomorrow and they'll
still be a little bit tired."




Fall of wickets: 1-0, 2-144, 3-206,4-
357,5-365.
Bowling: Hoggard 20-4-85-1,
Flintoff 19-2-76-0, Harmison 24-3-
116-1, Panesar 34-3-145-2,
Mahmood 10-0-59-0 (w-2 nb-1),
Pietersen 5-1-31-0
ENGLAND second innings
A.Strauss Ibw b Lee 0
A.Cook not out 7
I.Bell not out 9
Extras: (lb-1, nb-2) 3
Total: (for one wicket, six overs) 19
Fall of wickets: 1-0
Bowling: Lee 3-1-5-1 (nb-1),
McGrath 3-0-13-0.


OF-FASTEST,

T'CENTURIES
kajr !e*, I fastest-centa Aes-
t-(-Ti&et. dam Gilchrist made a lnmi,
d IT 57 balls in the third Ashes Test against England
at the WACA yesterday.
56 balls, VivRichards, West Indies v England at St John's. 1985-

I-Riii! ,us RIRYVEnglandatPerth,2006-07
ballsJackGre ryAusu.diaSoutliAfiicaatJoliannesbur,,
921-22
69 balls, Shivnarine Chanderpaul, West Indies v Australia at
Georgetown, 2002-03
71 balls, ericks, West Indies v Australia at Perth, 1975-
-0, olie

1774 balls, MJ"id Khan, Pakistan v New Zealand at Karachi, 1976-
74 balls, Kapil Dev, India v Sri Lanka at Kanpur. 1986-87
ad Azharuddin. India v South Africa at
C C,74 balls, Moharnni.
alcuttx 1996-97
76 balls, Gilbert Jjj6p, England v Australia.


2. .--.-l q


.4



..A


ADAM Gilchrist is congratulated by Michael Cl
reaching the second-fastest century in Test
history. Gilchrist ended up on 102 not out and Cla
not out. (Yahoo Sport photo)


Sre7ea7n7th 77i H ivemHif*e


hal ousS.Afia*or8







SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006


,,' .- *-2 -.a


---


Limp display from Windies



gives Pakistan ODI series win


... Chanderpaul hits 101


By Craig Cozier

KARACHI, Pakistan (CMC)
- West Indies produced a limp
performance in the decisive
fifth and final One-Day In-
ternational as Pakistan pow-
ered to a seven-wicket victory
and a 3-1 series success at
the National Stadium yester-
day.
Opener Shivnarine


by an opening stand of 87 be-
tween Mohammad Hafeez and
Kamran Akmal and the home
team was always in charge af-
ter that.
Wicketkeeper Akmal lashed
nine fours and one six in a bois-
terous 56 off 59 balls.
Hafeez, who stroked a cen-
tury in the Test on this ground
two weeks ago, just missed out
another this time as he fell for


scrappy fielding undermined the
tourists.
The Caribbean side again
failed to get a start from the
openers as Rana Naved broke
through early.
The energetic new-ball
swinger claimed Chris Gavle
for the fourth time in the se-
ries with an in-ducker that
breached a leaden-footed de-
fensive stroke and caught the
left-hander plumb in front.
Mohammad Sami cut
short a blossoming stand of 34
between Chanderpaul and
Lendl Simmons to further
dent the West Indies.
Simmons, who provided
some sweet off side strokes, hit
three fours in 21 off 35 balls be-
fore an off-cutter crashed into
leg stump off an inside edged
drive.
Marlon Samuels. hero in the
fourth match, again looked in
good touch and helped the com-
posed Chanderpaul add 51 for
the third wicket.
But Samuels fell at a crucial
time, undone by a beautifully
flighted delivery from Rehman
and neatly stumped at 104 for
three in the 27th over. Samuels
hit three fours in 22 off 37
balls.
Chanderpaul brought up his
half-century off 83 balls and he
and fellow left-hander Lara
forged an association that laid
the platform for a competitive
total.
Lara, without a meaningful
score in the ODI series, became
the fifth batsman to 10 000
runs when he reached 25 (fol-
lowing Sachin Tendulkar.
Inzamam, Sanath Jayasuriya
and Sourav Ganguly).
The West Indies seemed
well set at 181 for three off
40 overs but the dismissal of
Lara and Chanderpaul's flag-
ging health handicapped the
push in the final overs.
Lara was bowled off his
pads trying to heave Rana over
the leg-side moments after
Chanderpaul summoned a run-
ner because of a strained leg.


PRESIDENT of the Alamo
Auto Sports Club, Gavin
Gayadin, feels that All Ter-
rain Vehicle (ATV) racing has
the potential to be as big as
grasstrack bike racing, or to
rise "even bit'eir".
This declaration was niadei
recently, by Gavyadin who
pointed to tile increase in the
aMnount of events allotted to the
ATV for today's grasstrack
meeting at the Bath Settlement
ground on the West Coast of
Berbice.
Alamo firs introduced ATV
racing just ovcr a week ago
when the third stage of lthec
Banks Beer Grasstrack series
was held al the Ogle (Comu -
nily Centre ground.
"It was a big hit, _.. ..
ilichael Jackson's Thriller al-


The weakened Chanderpaul
could not supply the necessary
acceleration towards the end
even though he notched his
fourth ODI ton.
Denesh Ramdin, dropped
the previous ball, chipped a re-
turn catch to Rehman and none
of the other West Indian could
lift the tempo as the Pakistan
pacers tightened the grip.
Chanderpaul swung to deep
backward square leg and
Dwayne Smith was plumb leg-
before as Rana took his series
tally to 11 wickets.
Runako Morton carted a six
off Rana as the final over
realized 16 runs.
Lara, without Jerome
Taylor and Ian Bradshaw who
were both rested, surprisingly
chose Dwayne Smith ahead
of Corey Collymore with the
new ball and Hafeez and
Akmal were seldom troubled
as they laid the winning foun-
dation in a stand of 87 in 16.1
overs.
Akmal was the more au-
thoritative before he swung
Collymore to deep backward
square leg but Hafeez and Yasir
Hameed put on a further 89 for
the second wicket to virtually
seal the result.
Both right-handers played
with assurance as the West In-
dian effort flagged.
Yasir gifted his wicket to
Chris Gayle as he neared a half-
century, lifting a catch to long-
on.
Hafeez closed in on a cen-
tury but he. too. fell just before
the end as he missed a pull at
Mohanmmed and was leg-before.
The 30 000-strong crowd
cheered every run as the Paki-
stanis closed in on victory and
it was provided by Abdul
Razzaq, who ended on seven
not out.
A fireworks display after
Inzamam raised the Bank
Alfalah Cup also excited the
fans but the West Indies left
empty-handed as they now
head home today.


bum. The people loved it and
wanted more." Gayadin said.
The single ATV event at
Ogle was won by Stephen
Sugrim. Young Sugrim,
aboard his Yamaha Blaster
and sponsored by.Agri Parts,
came ont on top of a field of
three competitors.
At Bath Settlement. ATVs
will be given two events and ac-
cording to Gayadin, there will be
at least five starters.
Meanwhile. Stephen
Vieira will be the man to beat
in the Expert grasstrack cat-
egory. Vieira \wonl three races
atl the fourth Slagc ol the
Banks Beer Nationial
Grasslraack series held at the
Ogle Con1iniunilts CentIre
ground rcent |I\.
Today's mee will hi-be he


Chanderpaul hit 101 from 142
balls but the visitors, sent in,
were well short at 238 for seven
off 50 overs. Captain Brian Lara
stroked 44 off 55 deliveries.
Pacer Rana Naved-ul-Hasan
produced crucial scalps on his
way to a man-of-the-match haul
of four for 43 off 10 overs. Left-
arm spinner Abdur Rehman was
again impressive with two for
39 off 10.
Pakistan's pursuit was lifted


92 off 111 balls.
Yasir Hameed contributed
41 and Shoaib Malik hit an
unbeaten 34 off 36 balls.
Pakistan were strengthened
by the return of skipper
Inzamam-ul-Haq and the record-
breaking Mohammad Yousuf but
did not need to call on their big
guns.
Corey Collymore took one
for 44 to lead the West Indian
effort but a perfect pitch and


WEST INDIES (w-2), Abdul Razzaq 6-1-36-0 (nb-4),
C. Gayle Ilbw b Naved-ul-Hasan 7 Abdur Rehman 10-0-39-2,
S. Chanderpaul c Yasir Mohammad Hafeez 4-0-21-0.
b Naved-ul-Hasan 101 PAKISTAN
L. Simmons b Sami 21 M. Hafeez Ibw b Mohammed 92
M. Samuels stp. Akmal K. Akmal c sub. (Taylor)
b Rehman 22 b Collymore 56
B. Lara b Rana Naved 44 Y. Hameed c Morton b Gayle 41
D. Ramdin c and b Rehman 3 S. Malik not out 34
R. Morton not out 14 A. Razzaq not out 7
D. Smith lbw b Naved-ul-Hasan 1 Extras: (lb-2, w-4, nb-3) 9
D. Mohammed not out 0 Total: (3 wkts, 46.5 overs) 239
Extras: (b-1, lb-11, w-5, nb-8) 25 Fall of wickets: 1-87,2-176,3-224.
Total: (7 wkts, 50 overs) 238 Bowling: Powell 10-1-50-0 (nb-
Fall of wickets: 1-19, 2-53, 3-104, 4- 1), Smith 6-1-32-0 (nb-1, w-1),
200,5-205,6-217,7-222. Collymore 10-0-44-1,
'B1diib"g. Umar Guil0-u-48-0 tnb-2. Mohammed 9.5-0-53-1 (w-2),
lI-I).NAVied:ul-Has.ao'10q1-.3:44 (nb. Samuels 3-0-17-0 (w-1.), Gayle
2..w-2p.Mohammad Sarn 10-1-.I.91 8-O-41-t. -1.


Cecil Kennard (left) collects the champion race trophy,
from DDL's Dexter Seaton. (Winston Oudkerk photo)


THE Demerara Distillers Limited through their product El
Dorado Rum has once again thrown their support behind the
Kennard Memorial Turf Club.
This time they are sponsoring all the races for the one-day Box-
ing Day meet at the club's track in Bushlot, Corentyne, Berbice.
On Friday at the DDL head office in Kingston, Dexter Seaton,
brands manager for El Dorado, handed over a cheque of $1.2 mil-
lion to president of the club, Cecil Kennard, to cover the prize money
for the eight scheduled races. Added to this, El Dorado purchased
the trophies for the races and paid for banners and advertisements
amounting to over $300 000.
Seaton said that DDL which have supported the
horseracing club for almost 30 years will continue to do so in
the future.
Along with thanking the sponsor, Kennard said that the people
of Corentyne look forward to the Boxing Day event. He also pointed
out that a number of overseas-based Berbicians, expected to return
to Guyana during the Christmas holidays, are scheduled to attend.
Among the horses registered to compete at the meet are Trinidad
and Tobago-based Fresh Wings and Mistaken Identity, owned by
Nasudeen Mohamed and local horses Isle-be-True, Stop on the Line,
Donna, Sequin, Rea Pele, Spin and Squeeze Peace of Mind.
As is customary in Guyana, Trophy Stall of Bourda Mar-
ket has donated the champion jockey trophy.







(REUTERS) List of highest run-scorers in one-day cricket
after Brian Lara became the fifth batsman to cross the 10 000
run mark yesterday.


Sachin Tendulkar (India)
Inzamam-ul-Haq (Pakistan)
Sanath Jayasuriya (Sri Lanka)
Sourav Ganguly (India)
Brian Lara (West Indies)


club's penultimate for 2006
and the president declared
that there will be an increase
of events in that particular


Matches
374
369
370
279
287


Runs
14537
11591
11260
10123
10019


category at the final Banks
Beer meet, scheduled for De-
cember 23 at the Better Hope
ground.


., .


Stephen Sugrim proudly exhibits the chcqlered flag he
won in the lone ATV race at the Ogle Cornmuiiity Centre.


.
:..2 .


Aj


Shivnarine Chanderpaul raises his bat after reaching
three figures against Pakistan yesterday.


,Wl!RT l:WONI


-l. ~4Q'








.4 4


.-. .. -


THERE has been no cancellation of matches at Kensington
Oval leading up to the ICC Cricket World Cup 2007.
This release is from Chief Executive Officer of the Barba-
dos Local Organising Committee, Stephen Alleyne, in response
to reports in the foreign press that matches scheduled to play
at the Oval in the months prior to ICC CWC 2007 had to be
cancelled due to delays in construction.
According to Alleyne, "The ground authorities have never
anticipated hosting any first class cricket at Kensington'Oval
next year prior to ICC CWC 2007. Following the pitch-testing
in September of this year, in concert with the ICC CWC 2007
Inc., we agreed a programme for the regrowth of grass which
did not allow or anticipate any first class cricket until the be-
ginning of the ICC CWC 2007 event. The other fact mitigating
against first class games is that the first quarter of next year
has been reserved for the overlay completion in preparation for
the tournament. I am happy to report that all is proceeding
according to plan."
Chief Corporate Communications Officer at the Bar-
bados Local Organising Committee, Francine Charles, ex-
plained that reports in the foreign press were misleading.
She says, "In fact, both Kensington Oval and the 3Ws Oval
at the University of the West Indies (which is hosting the
Please see page 22


4.... S,.a-.i oo-a4cks off._


WINS FOR FORMER


CHAMPIONS


CAMPTOWN AND


VICTORIA KINGS


EAST COAST'S scorers (at left) Dwayne Jacobs and at
right Rashleigh Morrison


. D


84 DAYS TO GO.


TS live for Hundreds of Years


~~1..


CALL A CLICO AGENT (592) 226 2626


dCli


i ab a o a m eAP enI I 2


~V


L~e~7~i~pr Ig~~n~q~m~


ISU.= AY, DECaBr 17, 2006


m


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Printed and Published by Guyana National Newspapers Limited, Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown. Telephone 226-3243-9 (General); Editorial: 227-5204, 227-5216.Fax:227-5208

















ot to be sold separately


- MarionW
looks to
make his own |


B


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Stories on c ,"


W.'.',-
.-:."' ,. -


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Sunday Chronicle December 17, 2006


S-. "


LI


.- --


Bollers-Dixon


ON the 12th day of Christmas, my true love gave
to me... a sink full of dirty dishes? It's not all
partridges in pear trees. Christmas can be a
testing time for couples. So we give you the dos
and don't to get you and your partner through the
12 days of Christmas.
1. Don't snog a colleague at the Christmas party. Although
84 per cent of office workers say they'd be up for it, you have to
face your partner the next day and the office on Monday. Family
lawyer Shevelle Wright says that in young, childless marriages, the
complaint is often adultery at work drinks. 'This is partly because
office parties are becoming weekends away with nights in hotels',
she explains.
2. Do put thought into buying your partner a gift. Eddy, 34
says he is guilty of this typically male Christmas sin. 'Like most
blokes, I always leave it until the last minute. I felt terrible when
she opened her presents. By the time she got to the frying pan,
she looked crushed'.
3. Don't row over money. Up to 40 per cent of us will put
our festive spending on a credit cards and 17 per cent will spend
more cash than they can afford this year, according to Equifax
Survey. If you have shared finances, you need to discuss budgets
before they spiral out of control. Decide what kind of Christmas
you want and can afford then stick to it. Is it one present under
the tree or a stocking full?


'All things are lawful," BUT
will they help us win the
lost to Christ or turn
i them away.
forinthians 10:33.4


i Learning to
know
. and to accept .;
myself frees
me from
hatred of
i others.
-=, ,n,>*.' -, ,


&{unes









4. Boys, don't leave all the shopping to your girlfri
always row with Desmond about what to buy people
Samantha, 25. 'Whenever I ask him for suggestions, he says:
care.' Then he questions how much I spend on every gift.'
5. The same can be said for household chores. More t
per cent of arguments in the home at Christmas are caused b


L~e 5%to 5% iscun oe a


*Tiles
*Sanitdry Ware
*Aluminium products
*Electrical Fittings;
*Chaifn Link Fencing
*BRC Fabric
*Irontmongery
*Camping Tents
*Carpets & Rugs
*Gym Equipment
*Stainless Steel Sinks
*Lighting Fixtures
*Christmas Items
*Fishing Accessories


.4


1K


- Over 5,000,000 pieces in stock variety of designs and
- Toilet sets basins bathtubs vanity units
- Windows doors, shopfronts show cases
- Switches panels cables lights andaccessories
- Sizes 4ft. to l2ft. heights. Special lengths can be order
- Sizes #65- #66 #610
- Locks hinges tower bolts bolts and nuts etc.
- Sleeping bags hammocks etc.
- In several sizes and designs.
- Treadmills weights
- In single bowl single and double drainers.
- Chandeliers wall lamps exterior lights
- Decorations Christmas trees fairy lights
- Polyethylene nets, nylon nets lead


.1 I
I
I 1K'


iHousehold Department- Get up to 5


Every customer is guaranteed to get a discount


end. 'I not being done properly. Sixty per cent of women say it is more
e' says hassle to let their partners cook because they then have to tidy up
'I don't after them.
6. But equally ladies, don't nag. It's your partner's Christmas
han 65 too and apparently it's not sexy when we shout with our hands on
y them our hips.
7. It's common one, but try to avoid arguments over whose
family you'll spend Christmas with. Your partner may not want
to be an extra in your parents 'big affair'. But equally, you will have
to compromise.
sizes 30. If you are at the in-laws, be on your best behaviour. Megan,
30 was a little too nervous last year. 'I greeted my boyfriend's dad
with a kiss on the cheek but we missed and end up kissing on the
lips. Minutes later, I walked in on his grandmother on the toilet and,
for my final performance of the night, I smashed a crystal glass
that was part of a discontinued set which had been sent to the: family
ed. from England.' Remember, every family,has its own rituals and
traditions for Christmas. If they want to play games until the Baileys
runs out, so be it.
9. Don't hark back to old arguments. It's typical to look back
over the past year, particularly at the low times. It can make you
wonder what the next year will have in store for you.bdth. Couple
that with spending lots of time together, its no wonder many
couples end up needing relationship counseling in January.
10. This is the season to be jolly but don't get hammered. 'I
drank too much white wine at my ex-boyfriend's parents' house
last year' says Diane, 35. 'I have hazy memories of telling him his
mum was a "trol freak and that his dad looked down my top'.
11. Don't act too hastily if you are feeling stressed. Derek, 35,
has ended two relationships before Christmas. 'If things aren't going
well, the thought of spending money and effort on someone I'm
- not that keen on makes me want to bail. Then there's the prospect
of spending Christmas with two lots of families and friends.'
I0/ /12. Finally, make quality time for each other. The longer
you've been together, the smaller this issue becomes. But if
you haven't been together for long, you may feel as if you're
being cast aside for relatives and friends. Keep your partner
** at the centre of it all as much as you can.


, ~ .j


: .. _


EI


...' r







Sunday Chronicle December 17, 2006


Creole culture creates disunity


Pat Dial reviews Dr. Prem Misir's work
on cultural identity and creolization


AMONG the most important
books brought out in 2006 in
Guyana is "Cultural Identity
and Creolization in National
Unity" edited by Dr. Prem
Misir. The book, a tome of
216 pages, is published by the
University Press of America.
It consists of twelve sizable
papers by some of the most
eminent scholars in the field of
Caribbean society. These
include Brinsley Samaroo,
Walter Rodney, John La Guerre,
Verene Shepaherd, V. S. Naipaul
and Prem Misir. The papers
deal with a number of topics
such as creolization, race, class,
colour, religion, culture,
pluralism, unity and disunity in
the Caribbean territories.
The book is a treasure
house of ideas, new
perceptions, explanations of
terms such as "race" and
"creolization". It touches on
prevalent .prejudices and
outlines most, if not all, of the
major positions and intellectual
conflicts the study of Caribbean
societies engender.
One of the major themes of
the book is Caribbean unity,
both on an intra-Caribbean level
but much more so on the level
of unity within Caribbean
territories as individual
countries.
Thus, for example, the
socio-political disunity in
Trinidad and Guyana is
dissected. In such dissection, it
is found that creole culture and
creolization creates disunity and
alienation because it consciously
gives no space to other cultures
and social ideas.
In some cases, it attempts
to eliminate cultures or ways
of life which are not in
consonance with the "creole
culture" ethos. For example,


African religion and survivals
of religious practices were
suppressed by law. Or
concepts of African beauty
had to give way to European
concepts. Or the Hindu and
Muslim religions or Indian
culture and those who were
part of that culture found
themselves discriminated
against. Such clashes
between creole culture and
non-creole cultures led to
alienation, tensions and
disunity within societies.
What is the solution? The
solution could only be to allow
all the various cultures in the
society space to survive,
function and grow. Such a
formula is known as pluralism.
Pluralism eliminates the conflict
and tensions, gives all cultural
groups a stake in the society,
inculcates mutual respect and
appreciation, leads to cultural
enrichment by cultural
exchanges and brings about
societal unity. In parenthesis, I
may mention that the question
of the varied usages of the terms
"creole" and "creolization" is
addressed in the text.
In addition to the major
theme of societal unity in the
Caribbean, there are many
other perceptions in the text
which could be employed to
make societies in the
Caribbean stronger and
happier. For example, in one
of D. Misir's papers on page
192, the conclusion is stated:
"Clearly, significant cultural
loss reduces an ethnic group's
productivity and
psychological zeal to advance
a quality of life." If this
conclusion is tested
historically and in current
times, it would be found that
economic progress and desire


to advance the quality of life
do have a relationship with
cultural stability or cultural
loss.
This book satisfies many
needs. In the first place, it
gives students and teachers easy
access to important papers
most would never have seen.
Students and lecturers at the
University of the West Indies
and the University of Guyana
would find this book
particularly useful and
stimulating.
Non Go vernment
Organizations which are
involved in cultural
development, and government
agencies, in particular ministries
given the responsibility of
promoting cultural
development, would find that
this book could give them a
philosophical basis for their
policies and programs.
These would include
those organizations which are
hoping to promote African or
Indian or Amerindian
"renaissances". The book
could certainly help the
Ministry of Culture, since
they have no real policy
based on intellectual
underpinnings, concentrated
on programs, mostly in the
performing arts. It is
suggested that the Guyana
Ministry of Culture appoint
a Committee of interested
intellectuals to assist them to
formulate a cultural policy.
"Cultural Identity and
Creolization in National
Unity": is an important book
which fills an important need
in Guyana and the rest of the
Caribbean and Dr. Misir
must be congratulated for
bringing out such a text.
(PATRICK DIAL)


THE DELEGATION OF THE EUROPEAN

COMMISSION IN GUYANA


SALE BY SEALED TENDER

2 GENERATORS DEUTZ 50KV'Aand85KVA
manufactured in 1991. good working condition

The generators may be viewed at and bid form uplifted from the
Delegation of the European Commission, 11 Sendall Place,
Stabroek from Monday 18 December to Friday 22 December
between 13h00 and 16h00 each day.

Sealed bids will be accepted at the Delegation's office not later
than Thursday 28 December at 16h00.
*.'.' L,,, .1", .'*.*I* .'*. ,,. . *. . . ** ,


CULTURALI-DENTITY AND


CREOLIZATION IN NATIONAL UN-TY

Ae MltiehnicCaribea
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^1) 1 1 F D B Y^^^^


-^h^~ SSSSUVSSSS


ONE USED
TOYOTA WAGON
PGG 3866
Cll: SSB3-A5273/-









B1


EXCAVATOR CATERPILLAR AND
OPERATORS | DIESEL MECHANICS
FOR 320 B & 320 C"
AND 320 CL EXCAVATORs To work in interior
Call.: 223-5273/4


ANK OF GUYANA


The Bank of Guyana wishes to notify the public of the following changes to
its business hours on the dates specifRed below.

Friday, December 22. 2-'';. 8:00 hrs to 12:30 hrs



";,1 00 O h to .


Page III


""""~`~""""`"`~"~~`~'~~`~~`~~~


I






Sunday Chronicle December 17, 2006


All the wrong


reasons


MY HUSBAND and I are
both 35.
Four years ago he had a
vasectomy so I could get off
the pill, but recently I felt I
wanted to have a child.
Previously we thought
we would rather not have
one. We made that clear to
our families, but we both can


be a little wishy-washy, so
they weren't surprised when
I announced I suddenly
"know" I want a child.
I had my husband
convinced I was having a kid
with or without him until I
went to my annual
gynaecological appointment.
The doctor was great, but she


told me the facts.
Wanting kids at my age,
with diabetes in the family
history, obviously puts my
health at risk. I have to lose
30 pounds, the reversal is
expensive, and there's a 40
per cent chance it won't take.
The risk of miscarriage is
also increased.


HOW can I get my boyfriend whipped?
I mean how can I get him to be one of those boyfriends who is always attached to his girl-
friend and listens to what she tells him to do?
The reason I'm asking isn't solely to be one of those teenage girls that want to control their
boyfriend.
My boyfriend is not headed on the right path. He does drugs, drinks, and does not listen to
his parents.
We have had an off and on relationship, and I care about him very, very much.
I am a level-headed 17-year-old girl who wants to put him on the right track. I want him to
listen to me because he does not listen to anyone else.
If you have any guidelines or anything, I would appreciate it.
ALLISON
ALLISON, supertankers on the ocean can take 20 minutes or more to stop.
It takes that long because their momentum is so great.
People come with great momentum, too. They come with a history, character, and set of |
experiences which make it very difficult for them to change.
This isn't to say we shouldn't feel compassion for others or try to help them, but don't think
you can stop a supertanker in its tracks.
In choosing those who are to be closest to us, we are more likely to be fulfilled by
someone who is sailing our same course, or by someone sailing a course which pleases us.
WAYNE & TAMARA


~hi}~j
-,,'.. t


Needless to say, I was
both discouraged and actually
relieved because it seemed
like it wasn't worth it.
Even though my
husband feels he wouldn't be
a good dad, he doesn't want
to lose me. My mom insists
I will be a mom one day. I
think I even brainwashed
myself because I wanted to


make her a grandma.
I feel we are being selfish
- the "me" generation for
just wanting to have a fun,
simple, and easy life.
I'm a little worried I will
regret any decision I make.


successive generation, like
runners in a race, handing off
the torch of life.
But this is a race you are
not obliged to run, and there
are plenty of people willing
to carry the torch.
Some people feel it's a
mistake to bring a child into
a world of global warming,
overpopulation, and warring
factions. Others feel this is
the most exciting time ever to
be alive.
Whatever your feelings,
realise that women near the
end of their reproductive life
typically feel the urge to
have a child.
It's a natural
phenomenon. This is true
even of women who have
always known they should
not have children.
The world is different for
each of us having been here.
Each of us leaves a footprint,
whether we leave any
biological children behind or
not.


Unless you can think of
MICHELLE a positive reason to have a
child, perhaps this is a task
better left to others.


MICHELLE, the Roman
poet Lucretius wrote of each


WAYNE & TAMARA


PO Box 964,Springfield,.MO36581Tor e -Ami:3-B
- 1?ol :!tjfisw e1ithsTWndrriaoi.:IIm


Pano A. 17 nBR


Page IV


Invitation for Bids


University of Guyana invites sealed bids from eligible bidders for the
Supply of Security Services to UG locations in Georgetown and in Berbice.

Interested bidders may obtain further information from the Office of
the Bursar, Turkeyen Campus, Georgetown, Guyana, Phone No.:
592-222-4000, Fax: 592-222-3961.

The bidding document can be purchased by interested bidders at the
Bursary, Turkeyen Campus, Greater Geqrgetown, Guyana for a non-
refundable fee of $3,000.

Bidders must submit, as part of the bid, valid Compliance Certificates
from the Guyana Revenue Authority and the National Insurance Scheme.

The completed bid comprising of one (1) original and one (1) copy must be
submitted in a sealed envelope which does not in any way identify the
bidder and must be clearly marked on the top right-hand corner as
follows:

University of Guyana
Turkeyen Campus
Greater Georgetown
Bid for Supply of Security Services

All bids must be placed in the Tender Box: Bursar's Office, Turkeyen
Campus, Georgetown on or before the closing time of 16:00 hrs. January
5, 2007.

Bids will be opened in the presence of the bidders or their
representatives who choose to attend at 10:00 hrs. on January 8, 2007
in the Bursar's Office.


Ministry of Housing and Water

Central Housing & Planning Authority

The Central Housing and Planning Authority is inviting applications
from suitably qualified persons to fill the position of Director,
Community Development Services

The responsibilities for the post include developing and operating a
Community Development Services framework within approved
policies of Central Housing & Planning Authority and ensuring that
the Community Development Services status and performance are
appropriately tracked, forecasted and reported on in a timely
manner.

The requirements of this post are:-

* A post graduate Degree in Social Work, Sociology, Adult
Education or Project Management from a recognized
College or University.
Plus

. Community participation, management, organising,
mobilisation and environmental self help and home
ownerships methods with experience in multi-cultural, low
income situations along with a minimum of five (5) years
experience of training in community organizations, adult
education, socia! work, home improvement, healthy life
styles and group dynamics.

Interested persons should submit applications with Curriculum
Vitae to reach the Chief Executive Officer, 41 Brickdam & United
Nations Place, Georgetown not later than Friday, December 22,
2006






Sunday Chronicle December 17, 2006


PERHAPS at some time we
all suffer from a sore throat.
But while this seems normal,
the cause and evolution of
the disease may vary quiet a
lot. Included in respiratory
system disorders, the acute or
chronic condition arises from
causes such as infection,
allergies, tumors and drug
reactions.
Sore throat is usually a
prominent symptom of a
variety of diseases among which
are, rheumatic, scarlet and
relapsing fevers. (the latter is
spread by a tick). Other
includes polio, tetanus.
tonsillitis and vitamin B
deficiency.
What we commonly called
the throat is really the
oropharnyx which is visible at
the back of the mouth situated
below the nasopharnyx and
above the pharynx (voice box).
Tonsils are spongy tissues at
the back of the throat,
composed mainly of
lymphocytic cells. There are
three types. The palatine
tonsils usually referred to as
the "tonsils" are visible
between the arches that extend
from the uvula (bell-shaped
structure at the center of the
opening), to the floor of the
mouth.
The pharyngeal tonsils


often called adenoids lie at
the back of the throat. These
generally shrink as a child
grows, but may have to be
surgically removed if they
become enlarged and
inflamed. The lingual tonsils
are on the upper surface of
each side of the back of the
tongue.
The tonsils' function is to
protect the larynx (commonly
called entrance of gullet, nose
and windpipe) and the rest of
the body from infectious
organisms (bacteria, viruses and
fungi)
Infection of the tonsils
called tonsillitis., may serve as a
source of infection elsewhere in
the body. The tonsils from
lymphocytes which are white
blood cells that produce
antibiotics to combat harmful
organisms trapped in the
mucous membrane lining of the
throat. In fact, the lymphocytic
tissue circumscribing the throat
actually represents the first line
of defense against invading
pathogens (germs that cause
disease.)
Because viral illnesses
are the most common cause
of a sore throat, it is
important not to use
antibiotics to treat them.
Antibiotics do not alter the
course of viral infections.


Unnecessary use of
antibiotics exposes you to the
risks of an allergic reaction
and antibiotic side effects,
such as nausea, vomiting,
diarrhea, rashes, and yeast
infections. Antibiotics also
may kill beneficial bacteria
and encourage the
development of dangerous
antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
It is important that we
know the link between sore
throat and the lymphatic tissues
situated in this vicinity. Now. in
reality, the HIV is too frail to
kill anyone so most people who
die from AIDS succumb
generally as a result of either
pneumoncystic carini
pneumonia or cancer. These
situations develop because there
is the depletion of special white
blood cells known as the Tee
Four lymphocytes which have
the responsibility of providing
immunity against the aggressive
germs.
The AIDS virus also
invades and kills the Tee
Four Lymphocytes leaving
the body more vulnerable.
These protective cells are
manufactured in the
tonsils, bone marrow and
spleen.
A sore throat that is not
responding to conventional
treatment may be gonorrhea of


the oropharnyx contracted from
oral sex. Also occurring
sometimes is the diphtheria
which begins gradually with
fever, sore throat and swollen
lymph nodes (glands) in the
neck.
A thick white membrane
forms on the tonsils and may
obstruct breathing to necessitate
the surgical opening of the


The Dentist Advises
... ... ...... _ _ _ _ *


TREATING A




SORE THROAT


cream. If the infection
spreads downwards to the
larynx, a hoarseness and
temporary loss of the voice
may ensue. Treatment for
sore throat is usually done at
home and consists of gargling
with warm salt water ( 1
teaspoon of salt to 8 ounces
of warm water) every hour,
Tylenol, aspirin or Advil,
throat lozenges, cough drops
and rest usually resolve the
problem in 72 hours. Only if
the condition worsens that
medical treatment is
necessary


Attention

NGO's, Associations, Clubs, Schools and Civil Society

free web site design

and attractive rates for internet hosting

A web site can give a boost to your organisation, help you give better
service and reach more people

Contact us at DevNet Tel: 227-5723, 227-5989

Email: info@devnet.org.gy or visit our web sitewww.devnet.org.gy

DevNet is a non-profit NGO working in ICT for development formed after the
closure of SDNP (Guyana). DevNet is supported in part through USAID funding in
this effort.


D V V - T^ /.. .. : , ;,


7ANK OF GUYANA NOTICE




Government Treasury b,: Issue No. 5 (9 days)
1 Issue date: December 22, 2006

2 Maturity date: March 23, 2007

3 Deposit of Tenders commences at 8:00 a.m. on: December 18, 2006

4 Closing time for Tender is 10:00 a.m. December 20, 7006

5 Successful applicants wii be notified not ;i -r i .r' December 21, 2006

6 :_-!i ru : not later than 10:30 a.m. on: December 22, 2006
Receipts in respect : )ills purchased may be obtained at December 22, 2006
the Bank of Guyana by 10:30 a.m. on:

8 The estimated face value of this issue is. G$3,000,000l000

9 The average discount rate of the previous issue: 4A14%p.a.
'y v s ^ -- ^ ^^ ^^ v^i^ ^ w M M ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^r' ~ w ^^ ^-.- ~ ~ ---n~-c w w


. : 'r, compounded yield .i r. previous issue: 4.187%pa.
.- -. .-. - , ---. .--- ,


obtained from ,ak of Guyana, : '1 , .
r: rii nnQ '::,," r1d r :: ." ,? ,t'. ,' ,, '. !';" ; '*'. " .

tax. It should be noted be issued for a minimum amount.
172 0andin multiples

LT. i :. .
Governor


Guyana National Newspapers Limited


VACANCY

The Guyana National Newspapers Limited is inviting
applications for the vacant position of


GENERAL MANAGER, CHRONICLE NEWSPAPERS


The General Manager will report to the Chairman of the Board of
Directors and will be responsible for keeping in place an effective
organizational structure, support systems and mechanisms that
will ensure that the Company achieves its objectives as set out by
the Board.


The minimum academic requirements for this position are a
Degree in Management or Business Administration OR at least
seven (7) years experience at a senior managerial level.


The position is on the GY14 salary range. Salary is negotiable but
will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Further details of the position can be obtained from the Office of
the Company Secretary.

Applications, including a detailed curriculum vitae and the
names and addresses of two referees should be submitted to the
Chairman, Guyana National Newspapers Limited, Lama
Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown, on or before Monday,
December 18"', 2006


windpipe. Hear muscle anId
nerves may be affected causing
heart failure. paralysis and
sometimes death.
The throat communicates
with the middle ear, located
behind the ear drums, by means
of a passage called the
Eustachian tube. This is why
the pain of an ear infection is
occasionally experienced when
the victim has a cold.
With a sore throat, the
typical complaint is raw, dry,
burning sensation and pain
in the swallowing all but cool
substances, such as an ice


i FRM USARI
, *"I" FROM THE AMERICAN PEOPLE


10


i











Appellate Court sets



free convicted murderer


BecauSe of failure to reconsider voluntariness of

confession despite new evidence


IN 1978, the Guyana Court of Appeal, by
a majority judgment, freed Colin Joseph
de France from the gallows after
finding he did not have a fair trial before a
judge and jury.
De France, accused of murdering his stepfather Abdool Yussuf,
was found guilty by the jury on a controversial confession state-
ment, which the defence submitted that the trial judge should have
revisited because of contradictory evidence that surfaced under
cross-examination at the substantive trial.
But the trial judge rejected the defence submission by Senior
Counsel Mr. Rex Mc Kay for reconsideration of the voir dire (a
trial within a trial) resulting in the jury using the only evidence
against the appellant to convict him.
Two of the 3 judges Chancellor Haynes and Justice of Ap-
peal Mr. Dhan Jhappan, were critical of the judge's ruling. In a
majority judgment the appeal was allowed resulting in de France
who was in the death row awaiting execution by hanging, having
his conviction and sentence quashed and set aside.
On the other hand dissenting Justice of Appeal, Kenneth George
(who later became Chancellor) dismissed the appeal.
"Even if counsel is right in his contention and the learned trial
judge misconstrued this portion of the statement, this could in no
way have affected the remainder of the statement which by itself
showed direct complicity in the killing of Yussuf and active par-
\


[EOURJH


YAiA ~fies


ticipation.
Further the trend and sequence of events as given in the state-
ment indicate that the appellant knew of the plan to kill before its
actual execution. I would accordingly dismiss the appeal," the Judge
had said in his minority judgment.
The facts disclosed that the
appellant was convicted of mur-
dering his stepfather, Abdool ....
Yussuf, on November 8, 1974;.
The only material evidence ten- .
dered against him was a statement,
the admissibility of which was ob- --
jected to as an involuntary confes-
sion. '
At the voir dire, Detective .
Corporal Wilson related how
the accused came to make the
statement. He revealed that at
6 p.m. on January 8, 1975, the .
accused was cautioned after be- '
ing informed that information
was received that he and others CHANCELLOR
had beaten Abdool Yussuf to J.O.F. HAYNES


death with an axe.
Thereafter, he, Wilson ordered the accused to a cell after he did
not say anything. He also related that at
By George Barclay about 10.30 a.m. on January 9, 1975, he
took the accused into the station's recre-
ations room with two self-confessed confederates, Chandreka Nanu
and Rampersaud, and they made statements in the matter implicat-
ing the accused. It was only after those statements were read in the
presence of the accused and he was cautioned that he elected to
make a signed statement that was free from threats and inducements.
Wilson added that although he was not very keen tor get a state-
ment he felt one could have helped him in the investigations al-
though he varied this before the jury by saying he thought it was
necessary to obtain one from him.
At the trial within a trial the judge ruled the statement as free
and voluntary, and in the Guyana Court of Appeal that ruling was
not challenged.
Instead, it was submitted there that on account of (a) the
prosecution's case as to what happened in the station's recre-
ation room on January, 9 1975, (b) the appellant's prior con-
finement in a cell at the police station on January 9, (c) the
contradictory bits of evidence of the appellant that (I) the
cell was bare and without any sanitary facility, and (ii) that
he had neither food nor drink during the whole or a substan-
tial part of this period of restraint, the appellant had lost an

Please see page VII


I aa- a-------------





QUESTION
i


I often think that NIS is a waste of time. I would like to stop paying for.
myself and employees and pay a private insurance. Why can't I?

ANSWER


WI



= I


Unfortunately, there are persons who are still not fully aware of the role
of Social Security. As a result, there will be some degree of discontent"
resulting in such feelings. Social Security unlike other forms of insurance,
is always compulsory. It is a sign of civilization and a means of providing
for the citizens of a country. The Benefits that can bb derived outweigh the
contributions made by persons. This is because the;spread of risk is
much greater (the entire countr)\


4-W



I
I


The Social Security Act ensures that workers are protected by securing
income. While some employers, even some self-Employed persons, will
protect their workers and themselves so that they do not become a
liability on society when faced with certain conditions, many will opt not
to do so. Social Security contributes to protecting the social fabric of
society. It assists in poverty alleviation. This cannot be left to chance or
to the good nature of few individuals. What would happen to the vast
majority of persons who may not be fortunate enough to have good,
benevolent Employers?
Do youthave Jquestion on N.I.S ? Then write/Iall.
NIS.MAIL BAG '
C/O Dianne pwis Baxter
IPuliity anIAFuflic Relations Officer (ag)
National Ins.fan kie. Scheme
-Brik(kam anfl Winter Place
P.O. BoI. 101135
I E-mail: pr nis@solution2000.net
.el:W -34----- --- -------- ---- - -


VACANCY
THE GLOBAL FUND/ GUYANA TUBERCULOSIS
,PROJECT MINISTRY OF HEALTH
HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT UNIT
GRANT# GYA-304-G01-H
Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the
following vacancy:

PROJECT ACCOUNTANT

Summary of Duties and Responsibilities:
The Project Accountant is responsible for the maintenance of the records and
documents.of current revenues,: expenses, assets, liabilities, and funds of the Global
Fund Project among other Projects in accordance with established POM policieL,and
procedures. In addition he/she is responsible for the preparation of relevant financial
statements' nd other reports established in the PMU

Qualification's and Experience: '
* A university degree or ACCA Level II or any other equivalent accounting
certificate ;
* Have at least 3 years project experience working accounting systems and.
financial planning;
* Experience in working in a project managementenvironment. Must be'
computer literate (Microsoft Office, QuickBooks)
Details of duties for this position could be obtained from, and applications
addressed to: ,

Executive Director
Health SectorIDevelopment Unit
Project Management Unit
Georgetbwn Public Hospital Compound
East Street, Georgetown
Guyana:
Tel No.: 226-6122 / 226-2425
Email: i*ohgogn@networksgy.com

Closing date for the receipt of applications is Thursday, December 28, 2l t .'
4.30pm. Only short-listed-applicants will be acknowledged.


.- " 7 , f., ,


Page VI


Sunday Chronicle December 17, 2006


*






Sunday Chronicle December 17, 2006


APPELLATE


COURT


From page VI
opportunity of acquittal
otherwise open to him.
Firstly, there were
substantial breaches of the
judges' rules (2, 4 and 5)
requiring the trial judge to
investigate the question
whether he should exercise
his exclusionary jurisdiction
which according to
Chancellor Haynes, he ,
wrongly. never did. Secondly,
the circumstances leading up
to the making of the
confession including the said
breaches made it obligatory
to consider whether or not
it should be excluded as
obtained unfairly, although
voluntarily, and wrongly, this
was never done..
The Chancellor went on to
say: "A Court of Criminal
Appeal should exercise a
jurisdiction to set aside a
conviction for serious breaches
of the judges' rules although
they are not rules of law or for
a failure to exercise a discretion
in relation to breaches in fit
cases."
The Chancellor added:
"Not to do so would be to
exercise insufficient control
over the admission of
evidence resulting from
improper police questioning,
and to fetter unjustifiably
the exercise of the statutory
jurisdiction of the court to
set aside a conviction if it
finds that 'on any ground' a


miscarriage of justice has
resulted."
That judgment by
Chancellor Haynes with Justice
of Appeal Jhappan concurring
went on to state: "If the Court
finds itself able to say that, in
the particular circumstances of
a breach, if the trial judge had
excluded a confession he would
have exercised his discretion
unjudicially, then there would
have been no miscarriage of
justice.
"If the Court concludes that
a trial judge should have-
excluded the statement then
there would have been a
miscarriage of justice if he did
not exercise his discretion at
all."
It was ruled that "there
could be nothing unfair in
letting a man know that
his friends have
incriminated him and
giving him an opportunity
in their presence if he
wishes to do so, to deny it
all or to give his side of the
story, if there is no
pressure or importuning or
insistence on him to make
a statement," the judgment
further stated."
It was found that "the
Judges' rules 1964 differ from
those of 1912 importantly as
regards police questioning of a
suspect in custody. Under the
old rule he was not to be
questioned at all about the
offence in respect of which he
was detained."


I




Under the then rules, it
was found he can be
questioned about it, but a
proper caution must be given
beforehand. As a result, it
was permissible for the
Police, without reading the
statements, to have
questioned the appellant on
the information in them after
he was duly cautioned, and
so the appellant failed to
prove a miscarriage of justice.
"The evidence under-
cross-examination before
the jury that the witness
Detective Corporal Wilson
thought it was necessary to
get a statement from the
accused revealed a lack of


frankness about his state
of mind; but the crucial
question was whether the
disclosure before the jury
was of sufficient weight
and materiality to require
the trial judge to review
his ruling to determine
whether he was still
satisfied that the
confession was free and
voluntary", it was ruled.
Further. Chancellor
Haynes had ruled that "the
disclosure before the jury was
of sufficient weight and
materiality to require the trial
judge to review his decision
to admit it on the voir dire
and on this sole ground the
appeal would be allowed and
the conviction and sentence
set aside and a judgment of
acquittal entered".
In his dissenting judgment,
Justice of Appeal George had
among other things said, "the
evidence led before the jury
cannot be said to have been so
significantly different as to have


raised substantial suspicion of
a lack of frankness and so
require or oblige the learned trial
judge to address his mind to-the
question of reconsideration of
the admissibility of a statement
in the light of what was said on


the voir dire".
Difference there was, but
the degree was not such as to
warrant a re-examination of
his former decision", Justice
of Appeal George had
emphasised.


GUANA FRETR CMMSSO


PUBLIC NOTICE

Invitation to Attend Workshop on Marketing Opportunities for
Guyanese Wood Products in the Caribbean and North America

The Guyana Forestry Commission and the Forest Products Marketing Council of Guyana. Inc.
would like to invite exporters of wood products to attend a workshop on Marketing Opportunities
for Guyanese Wood Products in the Caribbean and North America. Persons / companies not
cunTently exporting but have the capacity to produce export quality products are also encouraged to
attend.


m


Date:
Venue:
Time:


Tuesday 19th December 2006
Guyana Forestry Commission Lower Conference Room
8:30 am


Persons desirous of attending are asked to contact Ms. Anna Mohase of the Forest Products
Marketing Council of Guyana, Inc. on telephone number 226 7272-4 to register.
Attends is compulsory for all exporters

James Singh
Commissioner of Forests


Ovk ii ra Hawkins th/ Ifrid tiia


h3rar.ey's Elcctrical .S GCr.ieral Slorc
133 Regent Road. Bourdja
A. Ally & Sons
15 Main, Street, N'Ariierdjarn
Berbice
Fogarly's Slore.
3 4 W a t e r S t r :.l R ': i t ti .'. 'n


W.'irob. Connect lions
Rege-t Street Bourda
inma Bacchus ,& So'is Lid
Arfiaince Essequibo
CABS General Slore
275 Greennear. St. Lincen


Cooking the iwa to o... cookL faster and easier


g4


0~


41 ^ .? ^ 44


Margarita Gift Shop
92 Middle Street, N/C/Burg
Evil Eyes
Main St N/Amsterdam
Singh's Electronic World
136 Regent St Lacytown
Household Plus
Regent Rd Bourda
Kennav HDL Ltd
309 East St., S'C'burg


aHawkinsH



ASC -k AUTO SUPPLIES CO. 306 Peter Rose Street, Queenstown, Georgetown.
rS BUro SUPPII5llES. CO Tel: 225-3860. Fax: 225-3869.
.... More t-han jus... ,uto supplies! Email:asco@guyana.net.gy
,' ....*.. ; . : , ' p.'= , ., D j . .


Page VII


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Sunday-Chronicle December 17, 2006


Caribbean Camera


Focusing on the wider picture

Community newspaper one of 250 ethnic publications in Toronto area


By Norman Faria
"TAKE a look at this", says Raynier Maharaj,
editor of the weekly Toronto newspaper,
Caribbean Camera, as he pulls up the front page
headline in a late August issue on the computer
screen.
The headline read "PPP gets 4TH term in Guyana polls".
"Yes, we do give a Guyana a fair bit of coverage. There are an
estimated 100,000 Guyanese in the greater Toronto area. But we
also cover other CARICOM (Caribbean Community) countries.
The same front page has for example a prominent photo of
the late Trinidad and Tobago President Justice Noor Hassanali who
had passed away a few days before, as well as a photo of the
Soca Warriors football team being presented with their trophy for
beating the Jamaican Reggae Boyz team ," he explains..
Leaning back in his chair in his remarkably well arranged ten
by eight "feet editorial office, the Trinidad-born veteran newsman
says this is where his sixteen year old publication differs from
most of the other weeklies orienting to the English speaking Carib-
bean immigrant community in the Canadian city.
"From the beginning we focused on a wide range of Caribbean
news rather than on any particular ethnic group or country. Given
the diversity of the West Indies, we felt it was better to deal with
our news from a commonality of culture and region rather than race.
We strive to present a digest of Caribbean news that
includes different political viewpoints. For example, we carried
Please see page IX


MANAGING Editor Raynier Maharaj and Associate
Caribbean Camera.


E~Frr1Trf~'


A vacancy exists within the Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation for the
position of:

Manager, Health Management Information Systems
Applicants should possessthe following:-
* A Degree in Business Management, Administration, Public
Management, Computer Science, Mathematics, Statistics or
Hospital Administration.

Or
* A Diploma in Business Management, Administration, Public Health
Management or Hospital Administration plus eight (8) years
experience in Health Management Information systems.

Applications, along with curriculum vitae, copies of certificates, two (2)
recent testimonials and police clearance can be submitted to:


Director, Administrative Services
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation
New Market Street
North Cummingsburg
Georgetown

To reach no later than Friday, Deeember 22, 2096-. - .


A ) GUYANA REVENUE AUTHORITY




IMPORTANT NOTICE
The following persons are hereby requested to make IMMEDIATE contact
with the Legal Division of the Guyana Revenue Authority, 357 Lamaha & East
Streets, Georgetown.


NAMES


Ramchand Narine
Shaliza Shaw

Raymond Jones
Su Bao Lu
Devanand Ramnarine
Michael Sims
Mahendra Sukhraj
Ameer Khan
Latcha Kwok
Emeal Mohamed
Sheldon Gravesande

Rajbar


LAST KNOWN ADDRESS


Uniform, Leguan, Essequibo Islands
Shaw's Poultry Supply, 84 Robb Street
Lacytown, G/Town
186 Callender Street, Albouystown, G/Town
33 Garnett Street, Campbellville, G/Town
5 Bagotstown, East Bank Demerara
68 Lusignan, East Coast Demerara
53 Seafield, Leonora, West Coast Demerara
2 'A' Cornelia Ida, West Coast Demerara
15 Coralita Avenue, Bel Air Park, G/Town
81 Providence, East Bank Demerara
280 Brookdale Avenue, Meadow Brook,
G/Town
New Annglet, Canal # 2 Polder, West Bank
Demerara


Commissioner-General
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in addition to news about the two main parties in Guyana, a
feature on the AFC (Alliance for Change). We have several
columnists with topical and sometimes controversial views.
This has built our credibility to the point where we are
considered a major authority on Caribbean affairs in Canada,"
Maharaj observes.
Maharaj has been a journalist all his working life, starting with
newspapers in Tirinidad's capital, Port-of-Spain, When he decided
he had "hit the ceiling" in terms of personal achievements back in
the twin island Republic, he migrated in 1989 to Canada.
He worked for a while for SHARE, another weekly newspaper
orienting to Caribbean immigrants. He also had a column from 1993
to 1997 with the Toronto Sun mainstream daily.
It wasn't easy going when he decided to put out his own pa-
per. He has a staff of twelve now, including Guyana-born Associ-
ate Editor Gerald Paul and Guyanese journalist Jasminee Sahoye.
But back then he and a handful of dedicated, faithful believers
worked long hours, sometimes not knowing when the next pay
would come in.
There wasn't much of an Internet back in 1990. It was a
lot of foot work. The main task was to get a foothold. Aside
from SHARE, there were several others (among the 250 eth-
nic newspapers in the greater Toronto area) vying for the Car-
ibbean readership. These included the now folded CONTRAST
for which I did movie reviews and other news stories during
the 1970s when I lived in Toronto.
he culture of community publishing in Canada is that you
have to give away the papers, mainly at subway stops and stores
selling Caribbean items. So you really need advertising. Because of
our wider coverage of issues we were able to get ads early on to
sustain us," he says.
Sixteen years on, the readership has grown to a printed run of
30,000, though the estimated readership following pass-ons (passed


to other people to read) is 150,000. Add another 130,00 from the
distribution in the Montreal area and one could conclude this was a
relatively high readership for a community newspaper. They moved
into the present Scarborough office in Toronto's north east area eight
years ago
From the beginning, some of the ads were from travel agents
and shipping firms doing business with the Caribbean. Another set
of regular advertisers are from companies and individuals offering
financial advice and real estate. Today, among the paper's major
clients are money transfer companies and airlines serving the Car-
ibbean basin area.
"Thanks in part to our coverage, the Caribbean community in
Canada is being seen today as a progressive, upwardly mobile group."
says Maharaj. "There is a lot of disposable income, because of per-
sonal success and this is attracting more and more advertisers."
Maharaj adds the majority of the immigrants won't reach
the status of Jamaican-born Toronto business tycoon Michael
Lee-Chin, the son of clerks who, after he migrated to Canada
in 1970 and investing in the banking sector, is now a billion-
aire. "But more and more new Canadians want advice on in-
vesting for example and how to get a good price for their homes
or buying a new one," Maharaj says.
Unlike some of the other newspapers, one hardly finds Carib-
bean Camera carrying ads from so called fortune tellers who prey
on the lonely by promising success in virtually every area includ-
ing how to succeed in marriage and deal with rivals..
Those from lawyers and "immigration consultants", offering a
wide range of services from "family sponsorship" to "refugee law".
are however accepted. All the newspapers carry them. "They pro-
vide a service. We frown on false advertising and keep a close check
on these", he says,
Being a weekly, the editorial staff has to juggle news at the last
minute about what finally gets in the paper. What was fresh on


Tuesday or Wednesday could be stale by Thursday or Friday, "To-
day, people are reading the daily newspapers back home on their
Internet every morning. Some are even listening to radio stations
run by Caribbean nationals in Toronto. So we have to be creative
and keep our ears to the ground about what people haveQ't read
about or need to see a fresh slant on it".
What was the team's most exciting story to work on in recent
times ?
Maharaj: "In recent weeks, we were at the forefront in
reporting opposition to changes to the Ontario Human Rights
Code. In fact, we were the first to report on the significance
of the proposed changes earlier this year, ahead of all the
mainstream press."
Did they have any exciting "scoops?" "We always have
scoops," Maharaj says with a grin. "One of them was a major story
years ago when a black man died in police custody. Not only did
we break the story ahead of the major media, but they -the dailies
and television stations-had to come to us to get photographs of the
man who died That was a real feather in our cap."
It is Wednesday midday and Raynier had said it was the only
day he could spare me a half hour or so. "Got to get back to work,"
he lets me know as he and Gerald lean over the computer monitor
to check over, as they say in the newspaper business, "fast break-
ing" story.
One consolation is that it is now a little bit less challenging
with the computer-not like the early days when all the stories had
to be typed up on an old Remington typewriter, then sent to be
pasted up and photos had to be run through a special camera. That's
all changed as improved technology has made work easier and
quicker.
"But there are still some things in the newspaper business that
will never change". says Raynier, as he gets back to you after speak-
ing on the phone with one of his "close sources" .
"It's a tip and worth checking out", he tells you..

(Norman Faria is Guyana 's Honorary Consul in
Barbados This is one of several articles
following his recent trip to Toronto.)


1. One long wheel base truck at Houston $ 550,00000


2. One canter truck


- at Houston $ 650,000.00


Please contact Mr. Farouk Kadir on tel: 225-0940

3, One Bedford TK 860 truck at Rose Hall $ 550,000.00

Please contact Mr. Bhagwandin on tel: 337-4649 or fax: 337-4650

Prices are subject to negotiations]




VACANCIES
OFFICE OF THE REGIONAL DEMOCRATIC COUNCIL
REGION No. 6

Applications are invited from suitably qualified
persons for the undennrmentioned positions within
Region No. 6, East Berbice/Corentyne:


(1) Senior Superintendent of Works
(2) Electrical Inspector


Interested persons must send their applications to
the Secretary, Public Service Commission, De
Winkle Building, Fort Street, Kingston,
Georgetown not later than December 29,2006.


Bhadase Poonai
Regional Executive Officer


I0




Sl PL



THERE ARE SIX GIFTS UNDER THE
CHRISTMAS TREE WITH A NUMBER
ATTHEBACK,JJUSTPUTANX (

ON THE NUMBER ON THE
TREE THAT YOU THINK IS ON
ONE OF THE GIFTS AND IF J

YOUR NAME IS DRAWN 5
YOU WILL BE A WINNER!


RULES:
Only children under 12 yrs
are eligible to enter.
Only one (1) X must be on
each coupon,
Coupons must have Name,
Address and telephone nurrb er
Employees of GNNL and their
relatives are not eligible to enter
You can send as many coupons as
you wish.


N am e: .................................................................... . .. .

A d d re ss: ................................................ .............. ...............

Telephone:................................... ...........
Cut out and send to: Guyana National Newspapers Limited
10 Lama Ave.,IBel Air Park, Georgetown. P.O.Box: 10120
DRAWING ON DECEMBER 21, 2006.
--- -


:, 15..I2C1' 5 12 PMR


NE OF 3 GREAT PRIZE
LUS 3 CONSOLATION PRIZE


I






































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Sunday Chronicle December 17, 2006


Page.IX


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x Guyana Chronick


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HER styles are hardly trendy, so whether you wear them today or years from now, they wouldn't go "out of style".
Andrea Brathwaite caters for the more mature ladies, applying fabric paint to signature designs, making room for different tastes.
On Wednesday, she decided to showcase "Christmas Jewels" at the Sidewalk Cof6's Designer Touch Teas. She says the collection was created with the
festive season in mind, noting that the designs are ideal for the cocktail parties that are common at this time.
She caters for women of all sizes. You can choose to walk in the to her 59 Canje street, Section C Campbelville store, and chose from her stock, or order
to your liking.


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EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST
PUBLIC MANAGEMENT MODERNISATION PROGRAMME
LOAN #1604/SF-GY
CONSULTANCY SERVICES Local Specialist in Institutional Strengthening
of Local Government Bodies
The Government of Guyana (GOG) has received financing from the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) for the Public Management Modernisation Program. It is
intended that part of the proceeds of this financing be applied to eligible payments for
the procurement of consultancy services.
The GOG now invites interested individuals to submit Expressions of Interest to the
Public ManagementModernisation Program for the captioned consultancy.
Objective of the Consultancy:
This consultancy will assist in a diagnostic survey of the Neighbourhood Democratic
Councils.
Duration of Consultancy:
Atotal of eight (8) consecutive months.
Qualification:
Graduate qualification in public management/business management, with at least five
(5) years experience in Institutional Reform.

Terms of Reference for this consultancy could be uplifted from the project office (see
address below).
Expressions of interest along with Curriculum Vitae must be sent no later than January
5,2007 to:
The Project Coordinator
Dependents' Pension Fund
230 Camp Street
Georgetown

Telephone Numbers: 592 2237046
5922237047
Facsimile: 592 226 8548
E-mail: pmmp.gov@broadbandguyana.com
V7


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jp tf (Hair 'uysnause)
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LiquidSop Kenko Watch __ Curling
Balance d) WatchIron-
Mao r Eom11


Transformr'.
jusfonierAmplifiers
1tr4w 300w)
^^ j~~laIvertor Z-.
A4 a1 .^.-, -*.*-," .-t--*.


Olive Oil Kit
(No Lye Rdmler)


- Gift Set ..e".S C
(Decortmive) Curt Phones Speakers



aIssel Toasmster
f wm TV 11 Cuti OlHI eder)


Door
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own Theatre
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EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST
PUBLIC MANAGEMENT MODERNISATION PROGRAMME
LOAN #1604/SF-GY
CONSULTANCY SERVICES International Specialist in Institutional
Strengthening of Local Government Bodies
The Government of Guyana (GOG) has received financing from the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) for the Public Management Modernisation Program. It is
intended that part of the proceeds of this financing be applied to eligible payments for
the procurement of consultancy services.
The GOG now invites interested individuals to submit Expressions of Interest for the ;.
captioned consultancy with the Public Management Modernisation Program
Objective of the Consultancy:
To carry out an Institutional and Governance Assessment with the aim of formulating
strategies and policies for local Government Reform in Guyana.
Duration of Consultancy:
Atotalof six months with seventy two (72) days spent in Guyana.
Qualification:
Graduate qualification in Public / Business Administration with at least 5 years
experience in Institutional Strengthening of Local Government Bodies.
Terms of Reference for this consultancy could be uplifted from the project office (see
address below).
Expressions of interest along with Curriculum Vitae must be sent no later than
January 5, 2007 to:
The Project Coordinator
Dependents' Pension Fund
230 Camp Street
Georgetown

Telephone Numbers: 592 223 7046
592 223 7047
Facsimile: 592 226 8548
E-mail: pmmp.gov@broadbandguyana.com


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~UNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006


NOTICE TO IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS


VALUE ADDED TAX TRANSITIONAL RELIEF
The Government has granted a dispensation for importers and manufacturers to claim a degree of transitional relief for goods remanung unsold at the end of 2006. which w would
othenm ise ha% e attracted both Valdue Added Tax (VAT) and Consumption Tax when the new sy stem of VAT is introduced on I" January 2007.

To qualify forrelief.,ou must have submitted your VAT registration application by December15. 2006.

The follow mng condinons apply:

Relief will be limited to goods imported or manufactured during the month of December 2006. on w luch Consumption Tax must ha\ e been due and/or paid.

Credit \ ill be limited to an amount calculated on the standard VAT rate of 16 percent. or the actual rate of Consumption Tax that has been paid. luchever is the low er.

No transitional credit w ill be allowed if the goods would not qualify for input uax credit under Secuon 24 of the VATAct

A registered person clauning transinonal relief w ill be required to submit w ith the first VAT Return of 20(X7 an m\ mentor, of all qualifying goods. supported by certified
documentary% evidence of the pa> ment of Consumption Tax

No transitional credit % ill be allow edon an item until ilt as been sold and only if it is sold dunng the penod l January 3 1" March. 2007

How to make a claim

The inm entonr of qualify ing goods must be submitted on the form shown here with your first VAT Return of 2007 These forms are available from the VAT and Excise Tax
Department of the Gu% ana Revenue Aulhonrv. or. our local GRA office. Vote In the ca'e of companies., tin statement vhoutld be certified by their external auditors. In
the case of self-employed persons. or partnerships.. a should be certified by an independent certified accountant who is a member of ithe Institute of Chartered
.Accountantis of'Guvana 1(IC G Gi

When you submit \ our VAT Returns for the months of January. Febman and March 2007. you may include in your input tax credit the amount of relief on qualhf ing
goods sold during those months.

The 'first-mn-first-out' (FIFO) method of accounting shall be applied to determine w luch goods are on hand at the end of3 I' December 2006 and the same FIFO method
shall beapplied to determine w luch goods are sold during the penod I" Januarn 311" March. 2007.


SAMPLE

STATEMENT OF CLOSING STOCK AS.AT 31" DECEMBER. 2006 FOR ITEMS ThIAT % ERE CII.ARGED CONSUMPTION TAX
DURING THE PERIOD UI-D C-2006 TO 31-DE(-2006.

Please atrach to fir t return field oIr the period Januar' March 2007

Ta\paer Idenlific3iitn NItmlber |

Comparn Name

Company Addre s
TarilT Descnplion ol' G od. Quanlit% Dalc of Quani it on I ind Rales otl V\alue oI'GooJL
Imported importation Consumption
STa Paid








Claimant

Name: M nature Dale

Cernfied b%
XName Sinialurix t ,ie

Designation

Please note.
In Ihe case of companies this sialem ent should be certified b%. their e-ternal auditors
In the case of self-employed persons or partner-h ipI. ihis satement should be certified by nn ndependenTccnified account h ho is a member of the tnsitulc of Cihartered Accounlants ot'Guana
You are required to attach asC72 forms io hcse returns
..________ ....______-..,-....,_______-__..____________fx.._V. * .,.:.. ... ^.., .


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Y ADNUS CHRONICLE Decemb 6


AVRI SE



WITHTH


*30" x 4' Bronze -48"x 16" 48" x 48"
CLEAR GLASS: -42"x 14"
2mm, 3mm, *WE CUT & POLISH TABLE TOPS
4mm & 5mm *CAR MIRRORS CUT TO SIZE
Sunday opening from 9:00am-1:00pm


Mon-Fri- 7:30am 4:30pm, Sat 7:30am 2:00pm
WE ACCEPT GBTI & DEMERARA BANK DEBIT CARDS.


i LINDENECONOMIC ADVANCEMENT PROGRAMME


Request for Supervision for
SRehabilitating Phase 2 of Moblissa Road Region 10

The Linden Economic Advancement programme (LEAP), a
programme of the Government of Guyana financed by the European
Union, to promote the economic development of Linden and Region
10 and the rehabilitation of economic infrastructure invites
Consultants with the relevant experience to submit applications for
Supervision of Phase 2 of Moblissa Road Rehabilitation.
CV's and two references are' required to be submitted with each
application at LEAP Office on or before December 21st 2006.
Applications. may also be submitted electronically to
mail@leapguyana,org:
Envelopes must be marked "Supervision of Moblissa Road Phase 2"
andaddressed to:
International Project Manager
LEAP
97-98 Republic Avenue
Mackenzie
Linden


---- - ,.


Gumiana Revenue Authoriti3
Notice to Importers, Exporters, Customs Brokers and Clerks

The Customs and Trade Administration (CTA) is in the process
of implementing a new.system to charge VAT and Excise Tax
effective January. 1, 2007.

As a. result the following provides the transition rules that will
govern which tax regime will be applied to customs entries that
are lodged with the CTA:


1.


Entries lodged at Customs on or before December 30,
2006 will be processed under the current tax regime
where Consumption Tax will be applied where
appropriate.


2. Entries lodged after December 30, 2006 will be
processed under the new system where VAT and Excise
Taxes will be charged where appropriate.


If you require further information regarding VAT or Excise
Taxes please call the VAT Hotline at: 227 7929 ext 200 or 201.


Expressions of interest are invited from ini qualifd building contractors
for pre qualification to tender for the construction of a new head .ff: building
in Central Georgetown.
The project consists of a four-storey office ,ulding of approximately ,,3100 o. sqft
with rnech'anical and ele.tral services and the >ruc1ture .. be a reinforce
concrete frame on reinforced concrete piles. Construction should coimme-nce
mid 2007,
Tbhe chliet s a well established indigenous financ~i instlion of over sixty years
standing and ." information .s available; on their wbsite w'w.nbgy corn
interested contractors are asked io subrnt i.e t i. nforma-ion:
- Company profile.ncluding financaci data. Shareholders and Board f Directors
- List of similar projects completed ard in-hand ti: photographs a.nd current
work load .
List f ey personnel and any other releant data
Contractors who responded, to: .. rleradvertisement need only send any
up-cated information [they may w'sh to e considered.
Submissions ar abe re ale ,by Wednesday. January 2007 lo:
The DirectoriSecretary
The New Buoiding Socivety Lid.
SAvenue of he.-. .
G" G .- :o ..'. Guyana.
E-.


MINISTRY OF HOUSING & WATER
CENTRAL HOUSING & PLANNING AUTHORITY

INVITATION TO TENDER
The Construction of Roads andAssociated Structures:-
a. Block D Bath (Phase II), West Coast Berbice
b. Block 11 Enterprise, East Coast Demerara
c. Hope Lowlands Housing Scheme, East Coast Demerara
d. Grove Housing Stheme, East Bank Demerara
e. Spikland, Linden
f. Canvas City, Green Valley, Buck Hill, Linden
1. The Central Housing &! Planning Authorityl elwby invites Bids for works in the stated
Housing Schemes.
..2. The Tender Dossier, can be purchased from the Cashier's cage located on the ground
floor of the Ministry, situated at 41 Brickdam & United Nations Place, Stabroek, for a
non-refundable fee of G$10,000.00 beginning December 18, 2006.
3. Bids mustbe accompanied bythefollowing:-
a. An IRD Compliance indicating that the Bidder has met his/her Income Tax
Obligations for the three (3) years immediately preceding the year oftender,
and NIS Compliance indicating that the Bidder has met his/her obligations
for the month immediately preceding the month of tender.
b. Certified experience on similar projects during the last three (3) years.
c. List of equipment to be mobilised for the execution of the works. (State if
equipment are in use presently).
d. List of Technical Personnel to be involved in the Project.
e. A comprehensive Work Programme for the execution of the Project.
f. A comprehensive Method Statement.
g. Bid Security of not less than 1% of Tendered Sum.
4. Bids must be addressed to: The Chairman, National Board of Procurement and
Tender Administration, Ministry of Finance, Main & Urquhart Streets,
Georgetown.
5. Bids must be deposited in the Tender Box located on the ground floor of the Tender
Administration Building. Ministry of Finance on or before 09:00 hrs on the 9" day of
January 2007 at which time they will be opened in the presence of bidders or their
representatives in attendance.
6. Bids which do riot comply with the stated instructions would be regarded as norn-.
responsive.


7. The CH&PAreserves the
8. Late Tenders will not be


Shop early & $ave for the .
Christmas Season nbs tie ew l society ItV .
LOUVRE GLASS: USAd MADExDSth2 new u d2 socit ltd.

*30" x 4' Frosted 60" x 72" 48" x 72"


I


'- -- - .


'right to reject any or all bids
accepted under any circumstances.
Chief Executive Officer
Central Housing & Planning Authoe
December 2006 i


wvnwngwwvffv 1 ----~~~-





SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006

VACANCY FOR ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT
Applications are invited from suitably qualified
persons for the position of Assistant Accountant,
Bureau of Statistics.
Applicants must hold a Diploma in Accountancy or its equivalent at an
accounting examination, plus eight years experience using the government
accounting system, and must be holding a position at the level ofa Clerk III
with a miniimum of five years service at that level.
The incumbent must be able to supervise an Examination and Preparation
Section and/or Receipts and Payment Section.

Applications should be addressed to:-
The Head: Human Resources,
Finance & Administration
Bureau of Statistics

Applications should reach the Bureau of Statistics no later than
Wednesday 27"' December, 2006


Multi Quip
BO KVA Generator
3-Phase,
240/460 volts,
144 amps
Isuzu Diesel
engine
Quiet-Whisper
Watt Technology


$3.5 Million




BIG BLOW SALE!!
Everything Must Go!

HOUSING SERVICE GUYANA
Public Road Lot #01 (Next to Ansa McAI Building)
La Penitence, Georgetown
Phone 227-8116/227-8117
Fax: 227-8118, Mobile: .611-7935
Open on Sudas 'ro900am1300pm


Toyota Hilux
Double Cab


50,000km
Imported new in 2001
rent, owner
I el (,00occ)


REPORT ALL ILLEGALZONNECTIONS TO GPL
Teh .22`6 -5,251


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006 B5




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SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006

Beodyv Line Beauty Worl

Avenue of Se Repubic giext to alamda Bank & Berblce Car Park) Tel:223-6016&

CUSTOMER 5-20% OFF

APPRECIATION STORE-WIDE


SALE
*Relaxer
*Hair Dye *Hair Foods

*Body Lotion
*Hot Oils *Body Oil
*Nail Products

*Creams ,ia
*Texarisers .
*Waxes .-
*Shampoos p
*Soaps
*Perfumes

*Gift Sets Etc."-


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VACANCY


A leading telecommunication company with branches
Throughout Guyana is seeking a suitably qualified
individual to fill the following senior position-

COUNTRY MANAGER
Responsibilities include:
Business Development of retail cellular stores
Manage all aspects of retail operations of cellular stores
*. Manage growth of operation

Qualifications:
--.. Degree in Management/Marketing or related field
would be an asset
A minimum of four (4) years experience in management
A combination of qualifications or experience would
also be considered

The successful candidate must have interpersonal and
communication skills and be able to lead and motivate
employees.

A competitive package based on qualifications will be
offered to the successful candidate.
Interested parties should send their applications and
resume to:
PO Box 10105


or email to: kingadv,-i networksgy.com


later than December 22. 2006


ICC Cricket World Cup 2007 Inc.
invites applications for the following position
Jo il:Csoe erieRpeettv


Employer:
Employment Period:
Location:


ICC Cricket World Cup W.I. 2007 Inc.
March 19th April 13th 2007
91 Middle Streets, South Cummingsburg,
Georgetown


General responsibilities:
* Excellent customer service and proficiency in data entry related to ticket
* sales
Specific job tasks include but are not limited to:
* Sale of match tickets and to assist with ticket purchase queries
* Record and account for collection of monies
* Balance cash intake with application data
* Prepare daily collection reports
Prepare monetary deposits for the bank
Ability to work late and on weekends

Qualifications and experience:
Business Administration Diploma or 5 CXCs including English and a
numerate subject
Computer literate with minimum i year customer service experience
Excellentdata entry and oral and written communication skills
Ability to work as part of a team and to relate to persons at all levels

Application instructions:
Email resumes in MS Word format to ticket.centre@cricketworldcup.com.
Applications to be submitted by December 29th 2006
We thank all applicants for their interest but advise that only short-listed
candidates will be contacted.


I- I


CEL NOL RT/


I _


'.


s


no






SUNDAY CHRONICLE December 17, 2006


TPL Staff Vacancies

Suitably qualified and experienced candidates are urgently required to fill the |
following positions at Toolsie Pesaud Limited Group of Companies.
1. Georgetown Head Office
Information Technology Manager
First Degree in Computer Science or equivalent from a recognized educational institution.
At least five (5) years experience in a similar capacity. Candidates must have a track
record in the implementation, maintenance and management of computer based systems.
2. Providence Stone Sales & Quarries Division.
(a) Building Superintendent
Higher Technical Diploma in Civil Engineering or equivalent
At least ten (10) years experience in all types of Civil Engineering projects including
roads, sea defences, wharves, drainage and irrigation works, preferably with a reputable
construction operation.
(b) Procurement Clerk
CXC or equivalent in at least four (4) subjects including English and Mathematics
At least three (3) years experience in the procurement of spares for heavy duty
equipment and machinery. Computer literacy will be an advantage.
A driver's licence is essential.
Security Guards
Persons with police or military experience to fill vacancies for armed and baton guards.
Must have Discharge Papers. A good educational background is necessary.
Attractive basic pay plus built-in overtime on 12 hour shifts. Double time on Sundays
and specified National Holidays.


B7


Cr2).


r, ,
^/4 9' x.wGU'


Applications together with Curriculum Vitae R
must be submitted to reach the Human Resource Consultant.
TOOLSIE PERSAUD LIMITED-' .
GROUP OF COMPANIES .'.
not later than Wednesday, 27th December. 2006, em i:m4h S n o m
,...... -.. -............. -... ... -.. .... ........................ ^. ..... .. -......... ........... .......... ... ^.... ...... ....... ..... ......- ..................... ...... ... ............... ... .. ......... ..


e In Yom
t Phone
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G.P.O., Robb Street, Georgetown. Tel: 227-7307/8
Stall 'A' Bourda Market & 130 West % Regent Road, Bourda. Tel: 227-3404, 223-5262.


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R8 Eping Avenue, Bel Air Park
Tel: (592) 225 9648
Fax: (592) 225 9646


PRICII iIpTER rrill"'ING
America Street. (formerly JAGS Building) Tel: 223-5178, 226-8309.
1ST AN IIERSARYY 20%o

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CHAIRS, DRYERS, ~a Produds, Deodorants,
CURLING IRONS, Aleo Vera Norurals, Vilamin E
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*4A< rW *S ^ W '^-^51^"- : *


a. K%-e '. . A


rim


-~""~~


-----





XI


WHEN Marion
Webster says
he dreams his
horsese, you might
hink he is joking, or
hat he means he
'eleases himself to an
maginary place and jots
lown his lines, or
somethingg like that.
But, the guy literally dreams
if dreams are literal at all) the
horsess for his songs, wakes
ip and scribbles on a piece of
aperr. The verses to complete
he song come after.
So, if he tells you it has been
iis dream to become star, you


might want to take him seriously
- he's not using that good old
line everyone uses.
"He has the talent, the skill
and the look. he just needs the
right avenue." says Jonathan
Beepat, his new manager. With
Beepat's push towards estab-
lishing his name on the local en-
tertainment scene, the 21-year-
old singer sees his inusical career
headed in the right direction.
A distracting "birth mark"
on his lips always gets a ques-
tion: What's that?
A Georgetown boy, he re-
members singing on the road-


-i

--A /, '~.. .. '., . .
,: W.,
, d.,. ,: '-" ',*: I,.q. ,1}


side, or the "'.,", for his
friends. They used to tell him
he can sing, but he never re-
ally bothered.
"I look it for granted." he
says. He is not quite sure where
his love for music came from.
He figures it probably has some-
thing to do with the fact that his
father, David Webster. was a
guitarist in a band. His
mother tells him h( u, ,
to go watch his fa-
ther perform, but













he doesn't remember.
However, at age 15, things
would change. He was working
as a stock clerk with Morris
Primo, the father of popular
Guyanese soca sensation Jomo,
known more recently for the
"Crazy" sound track with his X2
partner Adrian Dutchin.
Jomo's family had recog-
nized Marion's talent and urged
him to give the youngster "a
push". So, when Jomo told him
the band Pinnacle was looking
for a vocalist, he decided to give
it a shot. And so his career took
off.
In five-six months, he was
performing at various shows.
While performing at the
Palm Court, Georgetown's
favourite hangout, the band
was noticed by David Hooper,
the former manager for Bar-
badian international soca ar-
tiste Rupee. Hooper thought
the band had the potential to
pursue an international ca-
reer and the group left for
Barbados.


N.~1s


However, things did not
work out as planned. While some
members of the ban returned
home. Marion decided to stay in
Barbados. The decision paid off
for him. Through Hooper, he
was soon opening shows for
Krosfyah, Xtatic and others.
His first gig was with 4DPeople,
when he wowed the crows with
Michael Jackson's "You Rock
my World'.
He spent two years in Bar-
bados doing such performances.
but decided to come back home
to pursue a solo career. He
joined the popular Mingles
Sound Machine towards meeting
his goal.
He took part in the Carib
Soca monarch competition
twice, but to no avail. He
plans to go at it again this
February and hopes for better
results.
Marion says his songs are
meant for pure enjoyment since
that is what soca music is all
about.
His only disappointment is


that his move to Barbados
caused him not to complete high
school, but he said a career in
music is what he wanted and is
aiming for.
He says he would be
thrilled to be able to record
alongside the famous soca
and R&B artistes.
Currently. he has seven
singles out and three other songs


he did with others.
Soon, Beepat says he will re-
lease some of Marion's new
songs, including Jukie Jam.
which according to the singer, is
a "whining style, calls for the ro-
tation of the hips".
The other tracts to be re-
leased are Give me It, Rugged
and Tough, and Focus on D
Back.


Special on MDF Boards


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Discount On Quantites The Name You Can Trust.
Contact:-
(1) Miss. Kamla Houston Complex Tel: 226-3666
(2) Mr. Foster Land of Canaan Tel: 624-9343
(3) Mr. Miser Parika Tel: 260-4514j


,Y~UUII1UUI I~LVVV


t 'o'r,-mhr 17 9.n00i


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~yl5irr~





-unay Cyroniple peeQTr N7, 2Q06


Al EARN A DIPLOMA IN COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION
AT THE
'AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY

89 SANDY BABB AND MIDDLETON STREETS,
KITTY, GEORGETOWN

[HIS COURSE WAS DESIGNED TO EMPOWER INDIVIDUALS CONCERNED WITH COMMUNITY-BASED
HEALTH AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
Evening Classes
Affordable Tuition
Contact us

Tel: (592) 225-2242, (592) 225-2232
CLOSING DATE FOR APPLICATION WILL BE JANUARY 12, 2007
The University is also offering:
Certificate in Community Health Education
Certificate in Environmental Health


I Or()KAMA



,vokraina International Centre. an international organization dedicated to conservation and
sustainable use of the rain forests, has vacancy for the position of:
Monitoring Manager
Description:
ihe Moniioring Manager will have responsibility for monitoring all aspects, of iihe twokrama
Forest management, wildlife managcmeni, watershed management and environmental
management. She/he must be able anticipate present and respond to threats tothe integrity of the
Iwokrama Forest and must contribute to eftcltIe decision making by being timely and by
providing i fh i .i... 1 :..i., l level guidance lir the centre to make optimal decisions. She.
he must posses the ability to defend and represent a position to staff and management in order to
ir :..; i. .li i l change ifrequired.
.- .l.. ien., t r manger will develop and implement monitoring and reporting system.
Protocols' and site management plans using national and international regulations and regulations
developedd by the centre. Monitor the environmental, social and economic impacts of lwokrama
Businesses: Establish and monitor achievement of lwokrama Conservation Objectives: Review
data.11 i ilci,..iii r..'i...11. I I and devise a data management system for monitoring of activities
Svithin the Iwokrama Forest and assist in lwokrama Consulting Services are required.
Qualifications:
The position requires postgraduate in a field o1 Natural Resource Managemen along with at least
five years experience working in a natural resource management field. Computer literacy is
essential. along with excellent oral and written communication and interpersonal skills. The
ability to represent an organization and work within a multicultural setting would be a distinct
asset.
Suitably qualified individuals should mail, fax or e-mail their applications. Curriculum Vitae, the
name oftwo referees and an indication of their salary requirements by January 15.2007. A copy of
tie TORs can be uplifted from the front desk at Iwokrama International Centre (address below) or
v ebsite: www.iwokranma.org.

I! wokrama International Centre
\lonitoringManIagtxr Search
iwokrama International Centre
771ligh Street. Kingston.
P.O. Box 10630
(Georgelown
Fax :_225-91)9
Email: iwolirama(;iv.'okrama.org

Only those applicants who are short listed will be contacted.
;" '.'" ---------------- -I


ON meeting new mileposts, Mr and Mrs Jason Lashly of the USA, who recently celebrated
their birthdays and wedding anniversary, get greetings from all their friends and relatives
in Guyana.


CONGRATULATIONS and best wishes are extended to Mr and Mrs Surujpaul of Canal No.2
Polder who celebrate 30 years of marriage tomorrow. Wishes of good health and happi-
ness come from their children, grandchildren and other relatives and friends.





For Sale By Tender


ONE (1) USED CATERPILLAR V80E LIFT TRUCK
Tenders are invited for the purchase of one Caterpillar V80E Lift Truck
Will be sold "AS IS WHERE IS"
Available for inspection at MACORP, 26 Providence East Bank Demerara
(Work Shop Area) Monday to Friday 08:00 hrs to 16:30 hrs.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes, clearly marked on the top
right hand corner "Tender for one (1) Caterpillar V80E Lift Truck" and
placed in the Tender Box at Security Desk.
Closing date and opening of tenders will be held on Wednesday 20th
December, 2006 at 16:30 hrs
Successful bidder will be required to make full payments and removal at
his/her own expense immediately after sale.


MIA CORP


Macorp
26 Providence
East Bank Demerara.


.~Pai2e XII


7C~~r() -" = .I I I


r






iPage XMII


by Petamber Persaud


MARTIN Carter initiated a
number of issues and started
an ongoing dialogue by way
of his prose and poetry in the
manner and with a purpose of
a consummate artist, going
further than most writers of
merely acting as a mirror of
or a lamp to or a barometer
of the society.
In a letter introducing the
first issue of the 'New World
Quarterly'. he harped on the
need for "serious examination of
ideas" and objectivity, going on
to declare, "...1 do not know
why only so few revolt, either
by word or by deed against
...acute spiritual discomfort".
Many of those socio-politi-
cal issues relevant locally and
universally revolved around a
central theme "all are involved".
This "all are involved" theme is
married to the essential Martin
Carter his conjunctions. In an
interview with Professor Frank
Birbalsingh, Carter said, "the
word 'and' is very important to
my way of thinking, that is to
say, something and something,
not something and then some-
thing else", referring to his
poem, "Conjunction", with
opening line "very sudden is
the sought conjunction".
There are many other con-
junctions in the thought pro-


RTIN CA


cesses of Carter including "the
middle where we meet is not the
place to stop". This "all are in-
volved" theme has engaged the
attention of a number of think-
ers, scholars and writers who
have booked their thoughts in
useful publications on Martin
Carter.
Martin Carter: University
of Hunger, Collected Poems &
Selected Prose, edited by
Gemma Robinson, published by
Bloodaxe Books, 2006. is the
most recent adding to the grow-
ing scholarship on the leading
poet of Guyana and foremost
Caribbean writer of the second
half of 20th century.
This extensive work con-
tains a 36-page introduction
by Robinson and over 70
pages of notes that "provide
bibliographic details and
commentaries relating to the
specific phrases in the poetry
and prose. Collations of lexi-
cal differences are given
when there are multiply ver-
sions of a poem".
Gemma Robinson, a lecturer
in the Department of English
Studies at the University of
Stirling and whose research fo-
cuses on Guyanese writing, is a
leader authority on the work of
Carter.
Poems by Martin Carter,
edited by Ian McDonald and
Stewart Brown, published by


TER


MARTIN
CARTER


Macmillan, 2006, is another re-
cent addition to growing and
glowing tributes to Carter.
This book is an insightful
reworking of the prize-winning
book, Selected Poems.
This is not McDonald's
first public appreciation of
Carter. In 1989, McDonald as
chairman of Demerara Pub-
lishers Ltd., was instrumen-
tal in publishing "Selected
Poems by Carter" that won
the Guyana Prize for Litera-
ture in same year of publica-
tion.
McDonald was also in-
volved along with others includ-
ing Vanda Radzik in the publi-
cation of the revised edition of
that title by Red Thread Press,


NATIONAL LIBRARY



Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the following
vacancy:
DEPUTY CHIEFLIBRARIAN
Duties include:
> Discharging the duties of Chief Librarian whenever the substantive
holder is absent from Headquarters.
> Assisting in the planning and decision making process with the Chief
Librarian, i.e. budget preparation.
Assisting with the implementation of new Library and Information
Technologies.
Checking and passing for payment all vouchers and accounts pertaining
to the National Library.
Coordinating the work of the system and supervising Central Services.
Supervising the duties of the Personnel Officer.
Responsible for the organization, development and supervision of
Technical Services/Procedures.
Any other duties assigned.
Requirement:
Minimum requirements:
A Bachelor of Arts degree in Library Studios plus 2 years post qualification experience.
Experience in the use of the appropriate information technology would be an asset.
Applications stating date of birth, qualifications and including Iwo (2) recent
testimonials mustbesubmittedby2007-01-31 to:
The Chief Librarian
National Library
76/77 Main and Church Streets
P.O. Box 10240
Georgetown .... .... ... .. .


1997.
McDonald as editor of
Kyk-over-al, June 2002, de-
voted a combined 49/50 issue of
the journal to the life and work
of Carter. Titled 'Martin Carter


Tribute', this 400-page publica-
tion is exciting and informative.
All are involved: the Art
of Martin Carter, edited by
Stewart Brown, published by
Peepal Tree Press, 2000, is a
massive book of essays on
Carter by leading scholars,
colleagues and writers in-
cluding Edward Baugh, Ken
Ramchand, Gordon Rohlehr,
Kamau Brathwaite, Stewart
Brown, David Dabydeen, Fred
D'Aguiar, Kwame Dawes,
Michael Gilkes, Stanley
Greaves, Wilson Harris, Roy
Heath, Kendel Hippolyte,
Linton Kwesi Johnson, Eusi
Kwayana, George Lamming,
Ian McDonald, Mervyn Mor-
ris, Grace Nichols, Rupert
Roopnaraine, and Andew
Salkey.
This book sets out to cel-
ebrate Martin Carter's life and


work and to establish a context
for reading his poetry. It locates
the several facets of Carter's
work in the historical and cul-
tural circumstances of his time,
in Guyana, in the Caribbean.
Stewart Brown lectures at
the Centre for West African
Studies at the University of Bir-
mingham. He has edited several
anthologies of Caribbean writing
and published many books and
essays on aspects of West In-
dian culture.
Web of October: Re-reading
Martin Carter by Rupert
Roopnaraine, published by
Peepal Tree Press, 1988, copy-
righted to the author 1980, is
one the first published studies
on the work of Carter.
The blurb reads, "the
essay's functions are mul-
tiple: to draw attention to
Carter's poetic art, to rescue
his work from too narrowly
Please turn to page XIV


VACANCY

UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMME (UNDP)

UNDP invites applications from suitable candidates to fill the following post:

POSITION TITLE: DRIVER

UNDP Guyana is looking for a Driver to provide strong support to the World Bank
Guyana Coordinating Office.

Principal accountabilities/Duties of Driver:
The Driver coordinates work program closely with the Executive Assistant, but is
able to carry out the following tasks unsupervised:

1. Drives the office vehicle for the transport of Bank staff and visiting missions.
2. Delivers/collects mail, documents and other items for the local office.
3. Meets official personnel at the airport and facilitates immigration, customs
formalities and other protocol duties as required. Provides them with
transportation to meetings.
4. Entirely responsible for the day-to-day maintenance of the office vehicle;
performs minor repairs and arranges for other repairs. Ensures that the vehicle
is kept clean.
5. Contacts suppliers and obtains quotations; negotiates all office purchases;
supplies, equipment & consumables. Manages all of the office needs relating
to customs clearances, tax exemptions etc.
6. Conducts yearly asset management inventory and provides status for SAP
input.

Job Qualifications/Experience:
The candidate must have:

1. Five to ten years experience as a driver, good knowledge of roadways and safe
driving record.
2. Primary and vocational education, skilled in minor vehicle repairs.
3. Good English language skills, both written and oral.
4. Some computer skills; participation in defense driving course would be an
asset.

REMUNERATION:
Based on qualification and experience, and in line with UNDP salary scale

Deadline for applications is Friday 5 January 2007.

Only candidates with the abovementioned criteria are expected to apply and are invited
to submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae to the Country Representative, World Bank, 42
Brickdam & United Nations Place, Stabroek, Georgetown. The envelope should be
clearly marked "Driver World Bank".

Only short listed candidates will be contacted.


PRSRIGORLTRR EITG 11011-iV


"Suiday 'Chri6ic'l ecem b 'ler" 17I; 206








Page XIV Sunday Chronicle December 17, 2006


IVI


bans


)*A $60,000 Christmas "Must-Be-Won"

C"HRO LL Crossword Competition
2 4 5I3 4 5
IK3H4H U1I K 4 H 5U

u R OUNR
Ill U

KM I G K7KGM
A A
1 c 12 V E N9 0t o 11C '-Y E N l


N A M E :.............................................................................. N A M E:.................. ............... ..............................
A D D R E S S ............................................................................................ A DD R E SS: .................................................................................


20. Large(
21 Symbc
elemer
22. "Peace
war. it
Across: benev
justice
1. :,, ,,ny i, i ,,- ,,,, .el. 24. The k
3. Word used as expression of Carina
surprise and triumph. to the
4. Exclamation, being,
6. "... *** Father which art in Court
heaven, Hallowed be thy Sweep
name. Thy kingdom come. 25. Malec
Th, ,.* i ,-,ll ,n o.ri-or -arih ,3 i I 27. Country
is in heaven". Matthew 6:9- network
10. 28. Acroi
7. Smooth. Import
8. Fog or haze intensified by 29. Master
smoke or other atmospheric (Abbr.)
pollutants. 30. Vetera
9. Old Style. (Abbr.). 32. They c
12. An affirmative response, subs I
14. Variantofovi-. through
17 Certificate of Insurance. Down:
(Abbr.).
18. Creek on the Left Ban;, of the 2. Moun
Corentyne Riverin Guyana. of thE
19. A word used before words Guyan
beginning with a vowel sound. 3. Si

Hi! Fans,
A simple Christmas "Must-Be-Won" puzzle for
$60,000.00 has been prepared for you. If you were
not fortunate at the previous competitions, you
should capitalize on this 'Give-Away' offer. This is
our final competition for the Year 2006and it is
schedule to be drawn on Friday, December 22,
2006. The rules for this competition remain the
same, except, that the best entry wins the prize of
60Q_0OQ_00. And as usual, if there is more than one
winner the prize money will be shared among the
winners. So get in the action and win!
Play the Chronicle Crossword Competition and give
yourself the opportunity of experiencing the
excitement of winning a competition that is
informative, educating and puzzling.
The additional incentives of $1.000.00 and
$2,000.00 for the 40+ and 80+ entries groupings are
in effect.


(Abbr.)
ol for the chemical
ntargon.
e is not an absence of
is a virtue, a state of
, a disposition for
olence, confidence,
". Baruch Spinoza.
eys for a new Toyota
was handed over
University student for
the sole winner of the
z 2006 Christmas
stake.
all name.
N code for Ukraine in
ing.
nivm for "What's
aft Now".
rof Science in Nursing.
.,
n.
contain quinic acid, a
tance eliminated
h the urine.


ltain on the Right Bank
e Takutu River in
na.
mile "As mad as a


Ifyou playsmart, you can win this rand prize of
he pO.b0i. The more you play the greater is
the possibility of winning. The amount of
entries submitted must be covered by the
relevant sums of money (i.e., $20.00 for each
single entry or $40.00 for two as they appear in
the Chronicle) or they will not be judged. Then
place those entries in a Chronicle Crossword
box ata location nearest to you.
You will need coupons and clues so purchase a
copy of the Sunday or Wednesday Chronicle
newspaper. For extra coupons, purchases can
be made at our offices in Linden, New
Amsterdam and Georgetown. You can also
obtain extra coupons from Mr. Vincent
rivercurius of D'Edward Village, Rosignol,
Berbice. They cost $20.00 each or $40.00 for
two as they appear in the Sunday or
Wednesday Chronicle.
This apart, our general rule's pply." '


4. It is said that the realization of
...rights including the fight
against poverty is a duty, not
a mere aspiration.
5. Relating to urine or the
urinary organs.
6. Symbol for the chemical
element osmium.
10. The Christmas message
Where is he that is born King
of the Jews? For we have
seen his "'* in the east, and
are come to worship Him".
Matthew 2:2.
11. Of or pertaining to the
universe.
13. Taking into account the large
and increasing number of
in the world, the UN
General Assembly


p reclaimed 18"' December
international __ Day. On
that day, in 1990, theAssembly
adopted the International
Convention on the Protection
of the Rights of all Migrant
Workers and members of their
Families.
Seven.
Preposition.
Ho ho ho is the way that many
languages write out how Santa
. laughs.
Creek on the Left Bank of the
Essequibo River in Guyana.
Always "* more carefully near
schools, playgrounds and
parks because children may
suddenly dart into the street.
Aremarkable person or thing.
Trustee. (Abbr.).


We wish to take this opportunity to thank
Management for remaining committed to the
Chronicle Crossword Competition throughout the
years. Also, to our many valued fans who continue to
play the Crossword Competition, we sincerely
appreciate your commitment because you have
contributed to the benefits we have achieved running
these competitions.
A Blessed Christmas to you and yourfamilies.
Christmas has a bit of everything that makes life
worth living. So spend wisely and give generously.

On behalf of
Chronicle Crossword Committee
PLEASE NOTE:The presentation for the last puzzle
will done on December 19, 2006 and not December
29; 2006 0s was previouslypubllshed.'. ..' '.


THE government of the British Virgin Islands has refused per-
mission for a planned performance by Jamaican reggae singer
Tony Matterhorn.
Matterhorn is the originator of the popular and controversial
Duty Wine dance.
Some medical and fitness experts have expressed concerns about
the risk of serious possibly fatal spinal injury resulting from the
complex moves of the dance.
BVI Chief Minister Dr Orlando Smith, says paperwork for the
Matterhorn show was "incomplete".
Dr Smith, a surgeon, also cited health and safety concerns that
have been associated with the Dutty Wine.
"I have heard a chiropractor on the BBC Caribbean
Report warn about the dangers of this dance as there has
been a reported death resulting from (it)." (BBC Carib-
bean)



RE-READING


MARTIN ...

From page XIII
political readings and to explore the relationships between lan-
guage, art, politics and philosophy".
Two of the mentioned books were published by Peepal Tree
Press whose founder, Jeremy Poynting. is responsible for promot-
ing and enhancing Guyanese literature in recent times.
These publications offer varied and various insights into the
work and life of a national poet whose writings traced the struggles
and triumphs of Guyana from colonialism to independence and
post-independence. What is important however is that his work
has already included you into the ongoing dialogue of "all are in-
o\ oed".
Martin Carter was born on June 7. 1927, in Georgetown. Brit-
ish Guiana. His father. Victor Emmanuel. was an avid reader and
his mother. Violet Eugene Wylde, loved books and enjoyed reciting
verses.
In 1953, he married Phyllis Howard, a union lasting some four
decades even though many times during a night he would disturb
their sleep because he found a right word or phrase to insert in his
writing.
His "Poems of Resistance" (1954). some pieces which he wrote
while incarcerated by the British for his radical political affiliation.
established his Caribbean and international reputation.
Twice he was honoured by the government of the day: in 1970
he received the Cacique Crown of Honour and in 1994 the Order
of Roraima.
Martin Wylde Carinr died at his home in Lamaha Street on De-
cember 13, 1997. amidst political turmoil.

Responses to'this author telephone (592) 226-0065 or e-mail:
oralIradilion2002@yahoo.coin

LITERATURE U DATE
Look out for THI GUYANA ANNUAL 2006-2007, a tradi-
tion started in December 1915 courtesy of the then Chronicle news-
paper. This issue continues the tradition including the results of six
competitions in poetry and fiction with a special section on litera-
ture written for children. This family-oriented general magazine of-
fers scintillating reci" -, articles on Guyanese cricket, festivals of
Guyana, attitudes of Ning people in Guyana to HIV/AIDS, avant-
garde art. Guyanese p verbs. Christmas-time originals, Carifesta.
otheprQrae ro' tias' AUi pr, p nt;- Q fr And


An, Ar., blueberries, brisk, car, Cl, Claus, cosmic,
:cosmos, cranberries, drive, ha, hatter, ho, hornet,
huh, hum, human, in, Kaisi, Kako, Kamen, Kanau,
Kassi. Kauna. Ig., migrants, mind, MSN, on, oner,
Os, OS, our, ov., quick, Rod, Ron, Roy, sleek, slick, -
smog, star: tr., UA, uro-, vet, vii, WIN, yea, yes.


,...~....%I l ev. W


T


Sunday Chronicle December 17, 2006


Page XIV







Sunday Chronicle December 17, 2006 Page XV


DA G Y D YS B D L W L J G A L L
C T O T L N L E T I A N E RF Y
EE I V S O A R W L T H I T E G M E
C G 0 0 M D O T E S G;G C E N D
S R N W D N C L W D B N I H HR A
F G O O T L E H L E A E E N A G S
D N N S S D A A R M H L L H D I H
S! N R I O A R Y F I H T 1P G L I T
I' I A N K E M H O T S E O E N H M
F G K L H E T T E R H T :N T G I K
W E N K R N E B S S N T I I Y R J
Y I R I I E O R E I N I N A A O E
E A N Y K N D L H I R Y E E N T J
H E A T W L I N G T L H L C I E O
N W R O E H A H O E C C H N O M
A M T T W R T W H W Y W W A R O P

















CARIBBEAN COMM NIY SECREARIA











Applications are invited from interested ano suitably qualified nationals of
Project Officr, Conerence Services ,




G )Pubc Relations OfficerL






















(mll)Census Coordlnat&rm,
C I0













Full details of these positions may be obtained by accessing the
Secretaat's web page at http:lwww.caricom.org.
i. on E













Aplications with full curriculum details, including nationality, date of birth,




work experience, eduiationa qualifications, summary of professional skills
ani)ior expertise, language proficiency, list of~professional publications,
th(re referees (at leas two m must be familiar with the applicant's
work), and other relevant infoniayion, should be sent to the Adviser, Human
L source tanagemet, Car n Co u E nit Secretariat, Turke
Appic R eton w th fualD M das, inc l n F de o r










































after Georgetown, buyan 'orby e-mail to _applnhrmacaricor.
: M E


The Secretaatwill
2106.-:


,applications from December 22,


With AUNT MICKEY

Hello Boys & Girls
Do you know the word 'CAROL' means 'song and dance of praise', and was
first sung on 22nd of December, (the shortest day of the year) in Europe dur-
ina the early days of Christianity.


Since then due to the nativity plays, more songs
the Christmas Story.


AWAY IN THE MANGER

HARK THE HERALD/

O COME ALL YE/

WALKING IN THE
WINTER/

CHRISTMAS SONG

ANGEL SING

FAITHFUL

WONDERLAND

FIRST NOWEL


IT CAME UPON A/

OH HOLY NIGHT

WE THREE KINGS

FROSTY THE/

MIDNIGHT CLEAR

'0 LITTLE TOWN OF/

WHILE SHEPHERD
WATCH

SNOWMAN

JINGLE BELLS


were sung that related to



BETHLEHEM

WHITE CHRISTMAS

GOOD CHRISTIAN/

JOY TO THE WORLD

SILENT NIGHT

MEN REJOICE

LITTLE CHRISTMAS/

TREE

LITTLE DONKEY


GUYANA REVENUE AUTHORITY



W 1 ,




Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the following vacant
positions within the Value Added and Excise Taxes Department of the Guyana Revenue
Authority.

SUPERVISORS BERBICE & ESSEQUIBO

QUALIFICATION:

A Diploma in Accounting, Business Management, Public Administration or
Economics.

Leadership management, interpersonal. communications skills and knowledge of Tax
practices would be an asset.

SENIOR CLERK LINDEN & LETHEM

QUALIFICATION:

A Diploma in Accodnting, Business Management. Public Administration or
Economics.
\.
Organizational numeric, interpersonal, customer relation's and time management skills
along with computer literacy ahd knowledge ofTax practices would be an asset.

CLERK 111 NEWAMSTARDAM, SPRINGLANDS, ESSEQUIBO & LINDEN

A Diploma in Accou citing, Business Management. Public Administration or
Economics. t

Legal and regulatory knowled e, time management, organizational, interpersonal and
customer relations skills along vith computer literacy and knowledge of Tax practices
would be an asset.

A preference may be given to pe sons living within the location of the Rfgional Offices.

Applications shouldbe sent no lIer than Friday, December 22, 2006 to the:



Commissioner .General /
Guyana RevenueAuthority
357 Lamaha & East Streets .
Georgetown ; .
-------i-i --l--l---- -- in. ,


Sunday Chronicle December 17, 2006


Page XV



















DENTAL AUXILIARY TRAINING


PROGRAMME


LIST OF ACCEPTED, APPLICANTS FOR

DENTAL ASSISTANT TRAINING


NAME


ADDRESS


- 2006


LIST OF ACCEPTED APPLICANTS FOR
DENTEX CERTIFICATE TRAINING


ADDRESS


NAME


1. Taylor Melissa

2. Sparman Stay cc
3. Cho-Yee Diandra
4. Lindore Kellyan

5. Vandyke Tamnicka
6. Khan Sheneza
7. Ramnarine Deoranie
8. Peters Jamela

9. Francis Myrelyn
10. Davis J. W/LCPL
11. Mc Collin Denise


12. Ali Bibi R.M.


13. Cannaichael Tameika


42 Fourth St. Albertown. Geo.

126 Unity St. La Grange
21 Plantain Walk. W.B.Dem.
49 Sandy Babb St. Kitty. Gco.

203 W. R/vldt H/Sch.. G/Gt.
40 Brutus St. Agricola.EBDem.

51 Third St. Cummings Lodge. Gr. GT


455 W. R/veldt H/S. GT


182 Quamina St. S. C/burg. GT

c/o GDF. Camp Avangana.
13 Sera Lodge. Stewartville W.C.Dem.


19 Hague Front. WCD


27 Pearl Stewart H/S New Amsterdam


1. Abrams Maiy
2. Solomon Sheena
3. Boval Oslen V.
4. Laulvs Rhonda
5. Chintamani Rudolph D.
6. Daniels Quincy
7. Phillips Danelle
8. Thomas Nicola
9. Kelvin Hutson
10. Mathews Gavin
11. Hoppie Kevin R.
12. Jordan Keisha
13. Daniels Martina
14. Baharally Nadzeda
15. Morris Leslie
16. Mc Donald Dianne
17. Fernandez Vernica
18. Thomas Louie
19. Isaacs Annexsa
20. La Rose Judith
21. Kingston Mario
22. George Maylene
23. Daniels Atkinson
24. Torrington Candace
25. Allicock Rosalian


Paloma. Moruca. Reg. #1
Hosororo Hill. Barima Waini.
Waramani Mission. Monica
Jacklow. Pomeroon
La Bagatelle. Leguan
Santa Mission. Kamuni Creek
74 Middle Rd. La Penitence. G/town
35 John St. Lodge. G/town
284 Lamaha Springs. N.R/veldt. G/town
4125 Well Road. N. R/veldt. G/town
21 Hadfield St. Lodge. G/town
8043 n. R/veldt. G/town
St. Cuthbert's Mission
25 Sec. F D'Edward Village. WCB.
35 James St. Hopetown. WCB.
Brighton Village. Corent'yne.
Kaikan Village, Upper Mazaruni
Kamarang/ c/o 22 Crown Dam Industry ECD
Waramadong Village. Karamang. U/Maz.
33 Lethem.
St. Ignatius Village. C. Rupununi.
Aishalton Village. S. Rupununi
Annai Village, N. Rupununi
Kwakwani Park. Berbice River
17 Blue Berry Hill. Wismar. linden


LIST OF ACCEPTED APPLICANTS FOR

DENTEX DIPLOMA TRAINING


LIST OF ACCEPTED APPLICANTS FOR

COMMUNITY DENTAL THERAPIST TRAINING


ADDRESS


NAME


ADDRESS


Isardin Davindra
Ramnauth Rosanna
Moore Alphia
Persaud Sursattie
Charran Anjanie
Kumar Timothy
Blair Aiesha C.F.
Blackman Hatty
Shiwkaran Kamini
Rahim Abdool S.
Singh Severn
Corentyne.
Chamanlall Camille
Bennie Rafeek
Mohammed Nazir
Thomas Shelly
Walton Venecia
Thomas Yulande T.
Beaton Towana R.V.


54 Pomona, Essequibo Coast.
24 Huis T'Dieren, Essequibo Coast.
60 Lima New H/S, Essequibo Coast
13 Patentia H/S, WBDem.
9 Alliance Canal No.2, WBDem.
96 Goed Fortuin H/S, WBDem.
11 Railway St. Kitty, G/town
91 East Better Hope, ECDem.
12 Richard's Ville, Mon Repos, ECDem.
H Area A, Cummings Lodge, Gr. G/town
43 Miss Phoebe, Port Mourant,

125 East Canefield Settlement, E. Canje
12 Angoy's Ave. New Amsterdam, Ber.
Grant 1803, Crabwood Creek, Corentyne
Karasabai Village, S. Pakaraimas, Reg. 9
1299 Central Amelia's Ward, Linden.
184 Block 22 Wismar, Linden.
15 Second Alley, Wismar, Linden.


Bently Coleen


Brown Lisa


Harry Ceona


Halley Shelleza


Perriera Dianna


Joseph S.


1 George St. W/en/Rust,
Georgetown

1 Thorn's Drive, Durban
Backlands, G/town

Recess Village, Mahaicony,
E.C.Dem.


Manchester Village,
Corentyne, Berbice

Kato Village, North
Pakaraimas


Camp Ayangana, Georgetown.


NAME





I GUESS you are well into the festive season.
Last week we looked at what could be done to minimise the solid waste produced during this
festive season. This week we'll continue to look at how you can celebrate while you reduce the envi-
ronmental impact.
We will provide some tips for gift giving and holiday parties along with other useful information
which will make your festivities environmentally friendly.

TIPS FOR GIFT-GIVING
** Be prudent and practical as well as thoughtful and creative. Purchase gifts that are long-lasting
or that can be reused and later recycled. If an item has several layers of paper and plastic packaging,
choose a similar product that leaves less waste.
** Purchase items made of natural materials like wood rather than plastic. Better yet, choose items
made from recycled materials. Second-hand or antique shops are great places to do holiday shopping.
** Consider giving gift certificates or tickets for services or special events, rather than purchasing
an item that may not be used or needed.
** Save used wrapping paper and reuse.
TIPS FOR HOLIDAY PARTIES
** Use cloth napkins, silverware, glass drinking cups and ceramic coffee mugs, and reusable plates
rather than disposable plastic, styrofoam or paper at holiday parties.
** Rent party furnishings rather than buying things you will only use once a year.
** Buy products in recyclable, or better yet, refillable containers e.g. reusable plastic margarine
tubs or yogurt containers to store holiday leftovers.
** Use containers to store food in your refrigerator rather than saran wrap or aluminium foil.
** Buy sodas and beer in glass refillable bottles.
COMPOST
Compost your kitchen food scraps from holiday dinners and parties. Remember compost fruit
and vegetable wastes only, not meat or grease. You can also add coffee grounds and tea bags to your
compost heap.
REUSE HOLIDAY DECORATIONS
** Save your holiday decorations to reuse next year.
** Donate decorations to local schools, churches, town offices or non-profit organizations.
** Use natural ornaments such as pine cones, shells, dried flowers or berries.
REMEMBER: "The environment is Everybody's Business". Therefore, every Guyanese is a part-
ner with the EPA in the protection and management of our environment.

HA VE A MERRY CHRISTMAS!

(You can also share your ideas with other readers by sending your
letters to: "Our Environment", C/o EIT Division, Environmental
Protection Agency, IAST Building, Turkeyen, UG Campus, GREATER
GEORGETOWN. Or email us at eit.epaguyana@yahoo.com with
questions and comments.)


HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT UNIT
Government of Guyana/Ministry of Health
The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria
VACANCIES
(Re-advertised)
1. Programme Coordinator (TB Project)

> Minimum job requirements:
Bachelors Degree in Medicine and Surgery (MBBS) from the
University of Guyana or other reputable university along with

o A Masters or postgraduate Diploma in Public Health, community
medicine
or

o Three years experience (post MBBS) in the area of general
medicine at national/regional or district hospital.

Competence in the area of micro-computer and especially data
management will be an asset.

2. Tuberculosis DOTS Coordinator:

> Minimun job requirements:
Health visitors or Medex or Nurse Practitioners Certificate from the
University of Guyana or other reputable institution along with 2
years field experience in community-based program.
or

Registered Staff Nurse/Midwife or Staff Nurse with 5 years
experience in community nursing and supervision of other health
workers.

3. Statistical Clerk:

> Minimun job requirements:
Passes in at least 4 subjects at CXC/GCE one of which must be
English Language. Knowledge in the field of filing, micro-computer
and communication will be an asset.

4. TB Computer Technician

> Minimum job requirements
Network training and/or certificate with at least three years
experience working in a PC and network troubleshooting and
support environment.
or

CXC/CAPE (including English Language and Mathematics) or
equivalent plus a minimum of two years experience in a PC and
network troubleshooting and support environment.

Detailed Terms of Reference for these positions could be obtained from and
applications addressed to:

Executive Director
Health Sector Development Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Compound
East Street, Georgetown
Telephone:226-6222, 226-2425
Fax: 225-6559

Deadline for submission of applications is Wednesday, December 27,
2006. Only short-listed applicants will be acknowledged.


GUYANA DEFENCE FORCE
SALE BY PUBLIC AUCTION
Notice is hereby given that the Guyana Defence Force will expose
for sale by Public Auction at 10:00 hours on Wednesday,
December 20, 2006 three (3) unserviceable generators.

Terms of Sale

The price of the article plus 5% auction dues
The purchaser to give name and address and purchase
price and auction dues.
The article to be taken away within two (2) days after
the sale, upon full payment.
The UNSERVICABLE GENERATORS will be sold
at Base Camp Ayanganna, Thomas Lands and can be
inspected there between 1000 hours to 1200 hours and
1430 hours to 1630 hours from Wednesday, December
13, 2006 to Tuesday December 19, 2006.


Page XVII


Sunday Chronicle December 17, 2006


CHRISTMAS AND Pwao



THE ENVIRONMENT

HELLO READERS,








4yip SHway,9hroic)pegbr,)72QQ


Direct Bvosafety-relatcpd laws of Relevant Canagena Protocol Otner rclevanr regional and international
Guyana Article(s) Agreements. Conventions fl Treaties

Environmental Protection Act No. Article 11 "PROCEDURE FOR LIVING Convention on Biological Diversity.
11 of 1996 MODIFIED ORGANISMS INTENDED FOR
DIRECT USE AS FOOD OR FEED. OR [Tne Unied Naions Framevork Cronv.ni:o on Climate
FOR PROCESSING Change
The Vi rna Convention tor the Prolrclion of tile Ozone
Article 15 RISK ASSESSMENT Layer and tihe ian lria FPra l ion Sibsltaen s 'na
Cplaete the Ozone Layer.]
Article 18- HANDLING, TIRANS-PORT, The Basel Convention on the control of
PACKAGING AND IDENTIFCATION transboundary movements of hazardous
Article 18(2)(wastes and their disposal.
Each Party shall take measures to Convention for the protection and
require that documentatIon Development of the Marine Environment of
accompanying: the Wider Caribbean Region Cartegena.
(a) Living modified organisms
that are intended for direct use as Protocol Concerning Specially Protected Areas
food or feed, or for processing. and Wildlife (SPAW)
clearly identifcs that they "may
contain" living modified organisms and WTO Agreement on SaniLary and
are not in tended tfo intentional Phytosanitary Measures.
introduction into the envlinnlent, as
well as a contatr point for further The Convention to Combat Desertification.
inlomiation.
ANNEX III REGIONAL IMPLEMENTATION ANNEX
Article 19(1) FOR LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
COMPETENT NATIONAL AUTHORITIES Treaty for Amazonian Cooperation 1978
AND NATIONAL FOCAL POINTS Treaty of Chaguaramas
Caribbean Single Market and Economy
Biosafety Bill [to be drafted] All Articles of the Protocol Conventio n on Biological Divesity.
Codex Alimentarius
The Basel Convention on the control of
transboundary movements of hazardous
wastes and their disposal.
Convention for the protection and
Development of the Marine Environment of
the Wider Caribbean Region Cartegena.
Protocol Concerning Specially Protected Areas
and Wildlife (SPAW)
WTO Agreement on Sanitary and
Phytosaniltary Measures.
The Convention to Combat Desertification.
ANNEX III REGIONAL IMPLEMENTATION ANNEX
FOR LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
Treaty for Amazonian Cooperation 1978
Article VII -
Treaty of Chaguaramas
Caribbean Single Market and Economy

Biotechnology Research, Innovation All articles of the Protocol Convention on Biological Diversity.
and Enterprise Development Bill [to
be drafted] WTO Agreement on Sanitary and
Phytosanitary Measures.
Codex Alimentarius
The Basel Convention on the control of
transboundary movements of hazardous
wastes and their disposal.
Convention for the protection and
Development of the Marine Environment of
the Wider Caribbean Region Cartegena.
Protocol Concerning Specially Protected Areas
and Wildlife (SPAW)
The Convention to Combat Desertifcation.
Treaty for Amazonian Cooperation 1978
Article VII -
Treaty of Chaguaramas
Caribbean Single Market and Economy
National Agricultural research Article 3(g),(h).(i) WTO Agreement on Sanitary and
Institute Act CAP 68:02 of 1984 Definiuon or 1.MO Phytosanitary Measures.
Article I1 Procedure for use of LMO Convention on Biological Diversity.
as food, feed or for processing
Article 13 Simplitied Procedure The Basel Convention on the control of
Article 14 Regional Aygrileents and transboundary movements of hazardous
Arrangements. wastes and their disposal.
Article 15 Risk assessment
Article 16- Risk .nacansmt Caribbean Single Market and Economy
Article 19 information sharinn and
BCH
Article 21 Confidential information
Article 22 Capacity building
Article 23- Public awareness and
pari.iiopalion
A ticle 25 iieagji Transboundary
Movimerts
National Science Research Council Article 3(g),(h),(i) WTO Agreement on Sanitary and
Act CAP 42:01 of 1974 Dehnltit.n of LMO Phytosanitary Measures.
Article 11 Piccedure for use of LMO Convention on Biological Diversity.
as food. feed or for processing
Article 13 Simplified Procedure The Basel Convention on the control of
Article 14 Regional Agreements and transboundary movements of hazardous
Arranirmgemnts. wastes and their disposal.
Article 15 Risk assessment
Article 16- Risk management Caribbean Single Market and Economy
Article 19 information sarirg and
BCH
Article 22 Caoacrty-builoing
Article 23- Public awareness anid
participation
University of Guyana (Amendment) Article 11 Proced.ure for use of l.MO WTO Agreement on Sanitary and
Act 1995 as food, feed or for processing Phytosanltary Measures.
Article 13 Simplified Prox:ediure
Article 14 Regional Agnrriments and
Arrangements. Convention on Biological Diversity.
Article 15 Rsk assr.ssrnhfrt
Article 19 Information sharing and The Basel Convention on the control of
BCH transboundary movements of hazardous
Article 22 Capacity-building wastes and their disposal.
Article 23- Public awareness arid
participation Caribbean Single Market and Economy

SCaribbean Agricultural Research and Article 3(g),(h),() WTO Agreement on Sanitary and
Development No. 6 of 1988 Definit ion o[ LMO Phytosanitary Measures.
S" Article 11 Procedui for us.e (if iMO Convention on Biological Diversity.
as food, feed or for processing
Article 13 Sinmplilled Procedure The Basel Convention on the control of
Article 14'- Regional Agreements and transboundary movements of hazardous
Arralngementns. wastes and their disposal.
Article 15 Risk assessmjrent
Article 16- Risk management Caribbean Single Market and Economy
Article 19 Information sharing and
BCH
Article 21 Confidential information
Article 22 Capacity-building
Article 23- Pubhc awareness and
participation
Article 25 Illegal Transboundary
Movements


J4QRsc P C


/ ~
II
,


JI`


ARIES -- Tempo is key in every aspect of your life today -- you need to do
your best to match the rhythm of the people around you, because each of
the power players today is marching to the beat of his or her own drummer. If
you go too slow, you could be accused of underestimating the folks around
you. And if you go too fast, you could be accused of being inconsiderate.
Today may be challenging, but you have the skills necessary to make beauti-
ful music. Just be flexible

TAURUS -- You are gaining a higher profile than ever before, and this is a
great day for self-promotion. If you've been looking for a time to gain more
popular support or get a lot of good publicity for your cause, then today is
your day. People are ready to listen, and they are ready to use their power
and their money to help you. Momentum is building for something major to
happen, and you are finally ready to take a big plunge that you've been want-
ing to take for quite a while.

GEMINI -- Things may become hectic today, but remember that your feelings
matter! So don't swallow your emotions or refrain from sharing your thoughts
with someone. Today, it's important not only to have constant communica-
tion, but also to have honest communication -- and that means you need to
disclose how you truly feel, even if doing so might cause an uncomfortable
discussion.

CANCER -- Decisive action and unflappable confidence will energize you to-
day, while indecisive people and wishy-washy behavior are going to leave
you cold. The people you should listen to right now are the people who know
exactly what they're saying and exactly how to say it. Charm and charisma
are signs of a good leader. Hitch your wagon to a star that shines brightly,
not one that isn't quite sure whether it wants to twinkle.

LEO -- Two people in your life may seem to be getting along just fine, but
right beneath the surface is a great deal of pressure building between the two
of them. Don't be surprised today if you get separate emails from both of
them, asking for your advice and input. Getting involved in this disagreement
could be very risky. You will see that there are two very different sides to this
story, and it will be hard to know which one is accurate. (Perhaps neither is
the complete truth.)

VIRGO -- You will have an opportunity to inspire other people today. Those
in power right now are not very intellectually curious -- and if they get their
way, things are going to be somewhat boring for a while. If you're ready for
some safe predictability, then go ahead and let them do what they will. But if
you're ready for a new storyline, then step in and share your great ideas. It
will be easy to motivate leaders and find other people who want to make a
change.

LIBRA -- You've been skimming the surface with someone, keeping things
light and never quite coming out and saying what you mean. What gives?
Are you afraid that what you have to say won't be well received -- or are you
afraid that it will? Just because you don't know where to go from there doesn't
mean you shouldn't take the next step. Go deep, say what you want to say,
and see what happens. Regardless of the outcome, you will not regret mak-
ing yourself vulnerable.

SCORPIO -- Your closest relationships are going through a shift right now,
and new relationships are beginning. People are being drawn to you -- people
you might never have imagined being interested in you. This is going to feel
very flattering, and you should definitely explore it. Accept any invitations
extended to you today, without hesitation -- your enthusiasm will demonstrate
your self-confidence and your friendliness

SAGITTARIUS -- Even if you don't totally remember all of them, confusing
dreams you've had could leave you feeling moody and slow throughout the
day. Don't try to fight these feelings -- instead, you need to settle into this
abnormal energy as soon as you possibly can today. Don't even try to figure
out why you may be feeling the way you're feeling right now. Sometimes there's
no big mystery behind it all -- sometimes a mood is just a mood.

CAPRICORN -- Being your usual objective self will not be easy today, be-
cause a lot of issues will be swirling around some of the people and places
you care deeply about. Perhaps it's time that you stopped trying to be impar-
tial and took a risk by taking a side. By putting all your emotions behind some-
thing and even admitting that you have an agenda, you can make a bigger
impact and be a part of preserving something you really care about.

AQUARIUS -- A friend's conflicts will force you to consider your own deep
feelings about what's going on in your life. The good news is, you will get
confirmation that you are in the right place -- and on the right track to get
where you're going. The bad news is, the friend in trouble will not be able to
find the same solace. Make yourself available to your pal today, and resched-
ule a casual social plan if necessary. Only you can give this person the
strength he or she needs right now.

PISCES -- Delays will be caused by a wishy-washy personality today -- some-
one who wants to make everyone happy can never make a good leader, and
that will become dramatically clear today. Lead your group in the right direc-
tion, and don't bother to ask permission. There's a difference between lead-
ing a mutiny and taking initiative. You know what you're doing, and people
are ready to follow your lead. Show them the way to go, and help them avoid
wasting time. '. .












Sponsored by the Guyahaa-UNEP-GEF
National Biosafety Framework Project

Brief Introduction to Guyana's

Draft Biotechnology, Biosafety

& Biosecurity policy Part 2


Description of the National
Biosecurity Policy for
Guyana (continued from last
week)

The proposed Biosecurity
System is envisaged to cover
the following pathways of pest
transport and potential agro-
terrorism and bioterrorism
agents to Guyana can be cat-
egorized as follows:
Imported goods
Ships and aircraft
Ship ballast water
Vessel hull fouling
Shipping containers
Used vehicles and ma-
chinery
Passenger's effects
Mail and courier
packs


*
*
rents
*


Smuggling
Wind and ocean cur-

Air cargo


Under the proposed
Biosecurity system, pre-border
and border activities are ex-
pected to be covered as follows:
1. Pre-border activities:
Honour all international
commitments under multi-lateral
environmental agreements such
as the CBD, the UN Conven-
tion on the Law of the Sea and
the Convention on persistent
Organic Pollutants (POPs). Pre-
border activities shall include:
Testing
Inspection
Treatment or quaran-
tine

2. Border (marine and
terrestrial) and post-border ac-
tivities:


The objective of regulatory
control is to prevent entry and
establishment of new pests in a
country or area and to destroy
or prevent further spread of
those already present. Plant/ani-
mal quarantine is concerned
with prevention of spread of
pests from country to country.
It is the first line of defence
against pest introduction and
establishment. Such a system is
based upon a combination of
some or all of the following
measures:
Prohibition or com-
plete embargo
Restriction or partial
embargo
Inspection and treat-
ment at point of origin
Inspection and certifi-
cation at point of origin
Inspection at point of
entry
Utilisation of post-
entry quarantine facilities espe-
cially for plant propagative or
animal reproductive materials,
the greatest risk from a plant/
animal quarantine point of view.

In order to achieve the
aforementioned, a Biosecurity
Scientific Committee of the
NBBC [or National Biosafety
Authority = NBA] shall be es-
tablished. This Scientific Com-
mittee shall comprise specially
trained and equipped team from
the Plant and Animal Protection
Unit of the MFCL as well as
other relevant expertise from
other agencies and academia [in-
cluding any unit for national
emergency unit and related se-
curity personnel where rel-
evant] and shall be made respon-


sible for the biosecurity system.
This will require amendments to
the Plant Protection Act and
Animal Disease Act and any rel-
evant national security guide-
lines to treat with GMOs and
biosecurity issues identified in
this document. The importance
of bioterrorism and our national
preparedness and mitigation
measures comes under this pur-
view.

Biosafety
Regulatory
regime
Guyana has no specific
overarching legal regulatory re-
gime for biotechnology and
biosafety although the EPA Act
requires the execution of an En-
vironmental Impact Assessment
(EIA) for projects dealing with
GMOs. There are no specific
details of guidelines or proce-
dures to be followed nor have
specific GMO risk assessment
procedures been elaborated.
[This draft Framework corrects
this state of affairs.] Nonethe-
less, several of the laws and le-
gal instruments of Guyana im-
pinge directly or indirectly on
biosafety-related issues. The
details of these national legal in-
struments as well as relevant re-
gional and international instru-
ments to which Guyana is sig-
natory have been provided in
Table 1 below.

A set of national legal in-
struments which directly relate
to biosafety and GMOs
through possible harmonization
are:
Environmental Pro-


* tectionAct No. 11 of 1996
*. Biosafety Bill [in
* preliminary draft guidance pro-
cess]
Biotechnology Re-
search, Innovation and Enter-
prise Development Bill [to be
drafted]
Food Act [in draft]
Food and Drugs Act
CAP 34:01 of 1971
Pesticides and toxic
Chemicals Control Act No. 13
of 2000
Customs Act CAP
82:01 of 1952 Amendment No.
1 of 2005
Seed Regulation Bill
[in draft]
Crops and Livestock
Registration Act CAP 68:04 of
1917
Plant Protection Act
CAP 68:03 of 1942
Fisheries Act No. 12
of 2002
Forests Act CAP
67:01
Guyana National Bu-
reau of standards Act CAP
90:16 of 1984
Animal Movement
and Diseases Act No.14 of
2003
Animals (Control of
Experiments) Act CAP 71:03 of
1957
Occupational Health
and Safety Act No. 32 of 1997
National Agricultural
research Institute Act CAP
68:02 of 1984
National Science Re-
search Council Act CAP 42:01
of 1974
University of Guyana
Act (Amendment) CAP 39:02
of 1995
Institute of Applied
Science and Technology Act
Caribbean Agricul-
tural Research and Development
No. 6 of 1988

Other laws which may re-
late indirectly to biosafety but
may have a nexus with the bio-
technology enterprise are sum-
marized with relevant annota-
tions for relatedness to specific
article of the Cartagena Proto-
col on Biosafety and other in-


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Cartoon provided for humor only


Email address: caesarbiosafety@yahoo.com
The National Biosafety Framework Project is .
executed under the auspices of the Environmental
Protection Agency
Ird


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CHAMPION


Sookery Corner
Welcome to the 430rd edition of
"Champion Cookery Corner", a
weekly feature giving recipes and
tips on cooking in Guyana.


of family, community responsibility, commerce, and self improvement. Kwanzaa, which means
"first fruits of the harvest" in the African language Kiswahili, has gained tremendous
acceptance. Since its founding in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga, Kwanzaa has come to be


2 cups flour
2 tsp Champion Baking Powder
1V tsp baking soda
I tsp salt
I tsp sugar
12 tablespoons cold butter
1 cup mashed roasted sweet potatoes
/2 cup ground pecans

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.


Grease a 1/2 sheet pan. In a mixing bowl, combine the flour,
Champion Baking Powder baking soda, salt, and sugar
together. Add the butter, and with your hands, work the
butter into the flour mixture until the mixture resembles a
coarse cornmeal. Stir in the sweet potatoes and pecans.
Add thc cream, a little at a time until a soft dough is formnned.
Lightly flour a surface. Place the dough onto the surface and
dust the top with flour. Lightly press the dough out to 1/2
inch thickness. Using a 2 inch biscuit cutter, cut the biscuits
into rounds. Place the biscuits on a greased baking sheet and
bake for about 15 minutesor until the biscuits are golden


Yassa-Chicken Stew


1/4 cup peanut oil
I chicken, cut into serving
4 large onions, chopped
3/4 cup chicken stock
Salt & Chico Black Pepp
2 garlic cloves, lightly crt
I teaspoon chili pepper, m
1 teaspoon ground cumin
I large potato, diced
3 carrots, diced
VI cup unsalted peanuts



Baking Powder
Custard Powder
Black Pepper


In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat peanut
g pieces oil. Place chicken in pan and brown on all sides.
Remove chicken from pan and reduce heat to low.
Add onions and cook until
translucent. Add chicken stock,
)er to taste garlic. chili pepper, cumin, salt
ushed and Chico Black Pepper,
minced potatoes and carrots and bring the
liquid to a boil. Add chicken
pieces.
Place the lid on top of the skillet,
lower heat and simmer for 30 minutes
or until the chicken is cooked through.
Serve over teamed rice and sprinkle
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international environmental instruments are provided in.Table 1.

-Table 1: An example of Biosafety-related Law's. of Guyana and
their linkages with relevant articles of the Cattag.eha Protocol on
Biosafety and other relevant regional, international Agteements, Con-
ventions and Treaties.

PLEASE SEE TABLE ON PAGE XVII













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MUMBAI: About 20 Hindi film stars have been asked to submit details of
international stage shows they have participated in. The demand has gained urgency
23,000 euros addressed to her.
The Enforcement Dir ectorate has directed actors like Akshay Kumar, Dino Morea, Bipasha

shows organized by anun Thakur, an Andheri-based event manageagementent firm which was raided in
November 2005.
Since January 2006, directives have been issued to actors."
Rai's counsel, Girish Kulkarni, said the actress's office had received no such notice.
"We have no information about the documents and information recovered by the ED about some rectly by the Dubai-based events management firm that had contracted them.
stage shows in 2004 for which payments were allegedly made in 2003. In any case, in 2003 there In fact, though one of the shows was cancelled, payments close to Rs50 lakh were received by
was no law on money laundering in India." Rai and other stars. ED officers say these payments were made via the havala route.
When questioned, Thakur allegedly told ED officers that payments to the actors were made di- The ED may summon the actors in another 10 days.



Chris tina
Christina Aguilera on her Switzerland tour 9




Aguilera
J- s I"&,"= ,-d,*-. ". -. -


REUTERS: Anti-fur advocate Christina Aguilera is furious with designer Roberto Cavalli after he
tricked her into wearing real fur onstage.
The Italian couturier is designing all the outfits for the singer's current world tour, and was reportedly
instructed by Aguilera not to include any real animal fur.
But Cavalli admitted to magazine Women's Wear Daily he sent her a stole made from real white fox
fur, which she subsequently slipped on to perform gigs in Europe.
Aguilera was tipped off by PETA (People For The Ethical Treatment Of Animals) vice president Dan
Mathews, who sent her an email with a link to a video showing foxes getting killed by anal electrocution
for their fur.
The singer quickly replied, saying she was "very upset" insisting she "only ever wears fake fur".
mi She has now replaced the stole for a fake fur version, in time for gigs in Switzerland, Austria
S. and the Czech Republic this month.