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Guyana chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00211
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Portion of title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown, Guyana
Publication Date: 8/20/2006
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
sobekcm - UF00088915_00180
Classification: lcc - Newspaper N & CPR
System ID: UF00088915:00211
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text


S fU N D A4 Y The Chronicle ls at http/llwww.guyanachronicle.com
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O s x d v uour backs" Anica G, a 21-year-old worker at the Federal Labour Anica told the daily she and her colleague had not bro-
Prf SBX dlv UOUU Office, told Bild. ken any rules because the emails were written on breaks.
S BEJRLIN (Reuters) Two German women con- The emails between Anica and colleague Christina S., with de-
plaining on office email about their partners' scriptions on how the women try but fail to arouse their partners, WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF
poor sex drive found the details of their private were first sent by accident to other colleagues in their department
a i lives broadcast to thousands after one of them at the Labour Office. A
hit the wrong button, Bild newspaper said yes- They were then forwarded to thousands throughout the Labour
terday, .' Office and other government agencies and widely distributed by q
"'Everyone stares at us now and whispers behind recipients to people across Germany. -


9,) DAYS TO GO**1O D1

COMMANDER-in-Chief
of the Armed Forces,
President Bharrat Jagdeo
yesterday joined others in
praising the "good work" by
those "hard-working ranks"
in last week's relentless
and determined ...
President praises Joint Services operation success Page three

Important
victory
against
criminals
TeixeiraT
HOME Affairs Minister
Gail Teieira has lauded
the significant success
by the ... Page nine











U IB I,]J^ilia^B )ON STAGE: Sesame Street characters on stage at the National
I ;HHH:i^ BCultural Centm in Georgetown yesterday. (Delano Williams photo)
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We intend to continue to:


Modernise the infrastructure of the police force; enhance wages and
salaries and improve conditions of service; provide more local and
international training; build a new crime laboratory including the
improvement of forensic and investigative capacity; strengthen
intelligence gathering capabilities; create SWAT teams to tackle
serious crime; and use the best international expertise to
support the police force's fight against crime.


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE' AlAiu~t 20 2006 3


Sesame


Street craze


THE National Cultural Cen-
tre in Georgetown was filled
to capacity with excited chil-
dren of all ages and their par-
ents in tow yesterday during
the Sesame Street show.
The children, mostly
preschoolers and toddlers, sang,
clapped their hands and joined
-in the popular songs sang by the
Sesame Street characters.
They were enchanted with
the highly charged performance
especially with the Professor,
Big Bird, Elmo, Oscar the
"Grouch, Smiley, Buffy, Bert
and Ernie, Twiddlebugs and the
Bear Family.
Some parents were seen tag-
ging along with three and four
children of the same household


yesterday while others simply
sat beside their children and
watched the show in awe.
Sesame Street is an educa-
tional American children's tele-
vision series designed for
preschoolers, and is recognized
as a pioneer of the contempo-
rary standard which combines
education and entertainment in
children's television shows.
Sesame Street is well
known for the inclusion of
the puppet characters cre-
atec by the puppeteer Jim
Henson. More than 4,000
episodes of the show have
been produced in 36 sea-
sons, which distinguishes
it as one of the longest-
(Please turn to page eight)


'GOOD


JOB'


Irsi et p I se Jin.t Seri cp i o s


By Mark Ramotar
COMMANDER-in-Chief of
the Armed Forces, President
Bharrat Jagdeo yesterday
joined others in praising the
"good work" by those "hard-
working ranks" in last
week's relentless and deter-
mined Joint Services opera-
tion in Rose Hall and the dif-
ficult backlands of certain ar-
eas in Berbice.
"I want to commend the
police and the army for the good
work that they did in Rose Hall
and that they continue to do to
keep our country safe and for
apprehending some of those
criminals who created havoc on
the East Bank (Demerara) and


MORE Sesame Street characters on show yesterday.


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killed some of the pressmen
from Kaieteur News," the Presi-
dent told a news conference at
the PPP/C Media Centre at
Freedom House, Georgetown.
"There are times when I am
critical of the security forces and
there are times when I praise
them and I think today it is only
fitting that I say that we are
very proud of what our Joint
Services did after the bank rob-
bery," the Guyanese Head of
State declared.
"They were very profes-
sional; they persevered and I
think the nation needs to com-
mend all of those soldiers and
policemen who worked hard to
deal with that situation and who
continue to work today to pro-
vide safety to all of us," he said.
"We know that sometimes
the conditions are difficult out
there but I have always main-
tained that we have good police-
men and soldiers some of the
best trained in the world." the
President added.
He said it is for this reason
that he was "a little bit dis-
turbed" when there was a
rumour out of Trinidad last
week that Guyana had asked
them for troops to boost secu-
rity here during the upcoming
elections period.
"Our soldiers and policemen
are some of the best in the
world. We don't need
Trinidadians. In fact their crime
situation is worse than ours al-
though they are better
equipped, so I have confidence
that our policemen and soldiers
can do the job with appropri-
ate support and that is why we


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intend to reform the police force
to give them that support."
According to Mr. Jagdeo,
that support comes in the form
of better equipment, better con-
ditions of service, improving the
intelligence capabilities of the
army and police, improving their
forensic and investigative capa-
bilities and hiring the best skills
from around the world.
The President yesterday
also reiterated that the PPP/C
administration, if re-elected at
the August 28 elections, will hire
former New York Police Com-
missioner Bernard Kerik for a
possible key role in the anti-
crime fight here and as part of
the overall reforms slated to
take place shortly within the
Guyana Police Force.
He also said that a post-Au-
gust 28 PPP/C administration
plans to send more policemen
and soldiers abroad for training.
"A significant (number) of
them (ranks from the army and
police) will be sent abroad for
training," the President said, add-
ing that "this is going to happen
very soon" since the financing


Qualify


for this has already been se-
cured.
He also said the
administration's commitment to
the police and the army can be
seen by its spending in this sec-
tor.
Alluding to the significant
spending currently in the secu-
rity sector, the President
pointed out that for the army
alone, the government is spend-
ing about $3.4B per annum in
this year's budget compared to
about $600M that was the bud-
getary allocation when the PPP/
C took office in 1992.
He also pointed out that the
wages of soldiers have grown
from $264M per annum in
1992 to almost $2B annually
this year.
He said the Police Force is
a similar story with budgetary
allocations for wages for police-
men growing from $336M in
1992 to $3.6B today.
"This is a ten-fold in-
crease; this is something that
is unmatched, unheard of in
any part of the world," the
President asserted.


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-SUNDAY CHRONICLE'-AbMubt 20'. 2006 ...... ... ...


. . 3


i







4'- SOIRDAYTWiROIC E AWM fMOW .


Israeli raid in Lebanon


strains UN truce


By Nadim Ladki

BEIRUT, (Reuters) Israeli
commandos raided a
Hizbollah stronghold in
eastern Lebanon yesterday,
which UN Secretary-General
Kofi Annan said violated a
UN-backed truce that ended
Israel's 34-day war with the
Shi'ite guerrillas.
"The secretary-general is
deeply concerned about a
violation by the Israeli side of
the cessation of hostilities as
laid out in Security Council
resolution 1701," a spokesman
for Annan said in a statement
posted on the United Nations
Web site.
Israel said the operation, in
which commandos were airlifted
into the area by helicopter, was
defensive and was designed to
disrupt weapons supplies to
Hizbollah from Syria and Iran.
It denied it had violated the
resolution, which allows it to act
in self-defence, and accused
Hizbollah of doing so by
smuggling weapons.
A senior United Nations
envoy in Beirut, Terje Roed-
Larsen, said that if the guerrilla
group was found to have
smuggled weapons, it would be
in breach of the truce.
More than 20 hours after
the raid, details of what took
place remained unclear.
Lebanese security sources said
Israeli helicopters unloaded two
vehicles carrying commandos
who headed towards an office of
a Hizbollah leader, Sheikh
Mohammed Yazbek, in Bodai,
26 km (16 miles) from the
Syrian border.
The Israelis were
intercepted and withdrew under
cover of air strikes, they said.
The sources said three
Hizbollah guerrillas were killed
in a firefight with the Israelis,


although Hizbollah said none of
its fighters were killed or
wounded.
Israel said it had suffered
one dead and two wounded.
Lebanese Prime Minister
Fouad Siniora described the
operation as "a naked violation
of the cessation of hostilities
declared by the Security
Council."
The UN statement said
Annan spoke to Siniora. adding
Annan had called on all parties
"to respect strictly the arms
embargo. exercise maximum
restraint (and) avoid
provocative actions".
Annan also discussed the
raid with Israeli Prime Minister
Ehud Olmert. who "pointed
out the importance of
supervision of the Syrian-
Lebanese border", an Israeli
official said.
Syria, like Iran. denies
arming Hizbollah.
KEY PROVISION
Washington. Israel's chief
ally, said it had noted the
Jewish state's position.
"The prevention of the
resupply of weapons to
Hizbollah by Syria and Iran is
a key provision of the UN
Security Council resolution
1701," a White House official
said.
Lebanon's defence minister
said that, if Israel carried out
further, similar operations in
Lebanon, he would ask the
cabinet to reconsider its
decision to deploy Lebanese
troops to the south of tne
country.
That would be a serious
blow to a UN plan for southern
Lebanon, which envisages a
30,000-strong force in the area
made up of Lebanese and UN
troops.
Fifty French military
engineers disembarked in


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Naqoura in. the south on
Saturday, the first
reinforcements since the war.
The engineers were among
200 pledged by France, which
has disappointed UN and U.S.
hopes that it would form the
backbone of the expanded force
to supervise the truce, support
the Lebanese army and monitor
the withdrawal of Israeli troops.
In his weekly radio address
yesterday. U.S. President George
W. Bush said the UN force
would help the government in
Beirut restore sovereignty and
"stop Hizbollah from acting as
a state within a state."
The Lebanese army began
deploying in the south on
Thursday. Hizbollah fighters
have lain low. without giving up
their weapons including the
rockets they fired into Israel in
the war.
At least 1.183 people in
Lebanon and 157 Israelis were


killed in the conflict.
Israel said it killed more than
530 Hizbollah fighters at least
five times more than the group has
acknowledged. Hizbollah buried
54 guerrillas across Lebanon
yesterday, the largest total on a
single day.
The conflict began after
Hizbollah captured two Israeli
soldiers in a cross-border raid on
July 12, saying it wanted to trade
them for Lebanese and Arab
prisoners held in Israel.
Israel is also trying to free
another soldier captured in the
Gaza Strip on June 25.
Israel seized Palestinian
Deputy Prime Minister Naser al-
Shaer. a top official of the Hamas
militant group, at his home in the
occupied West Bank yesterday.
Hours later, a Palestinian
gunman killed an Israeli
soldier near the West Bank
city of Nablus and was then
shot dead by troops, the army
and medics said.
(Additional reporting by
Jerusalem, Washington and
UN bureau)


I I IIII I *III~ I
NASAF'~ stat! s de111 ~UI]icae job k [


By Irene Klotz

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.,
(Reuters) NASA workers at
the Kennedy Space Center in
Florida began a risky repair
job yesterday to replace faulty
bolts on the U.S. space shuttle
Atlantis a week before its
scheduled launch.
Technicians set up work
platforms to reach into the
forward portion of the shuttle's
60-foot-long (18-metre-long)
payload bay as Atlantis stood
upright on its launchpad.
Atlantis is due to blast into
orbit on Aug. 27 on the first
shuttle mission aimed at
resuming construction of the
$100 billion International Space
Station since the 2003 Columbia
disaster. Two shuttle missions
carried out since the Columbia
accident have tested safety
upgrades.
NASA decided to swap two



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of the four bolts holding Atlantis'
main communications antenna in
place because they were found to
be dangerously short, and liable to
pop out during liftoff with
potentially catastrophic results.
The mistake was made 25
years ago when Atlantis was built
and the spacecraft has safely
flown 26 times.
The repair itself is tricky.
A sole technician, lying on his
or her side on a narrow gangplank
attached to a work platform, will
replace the suspect bolts. Access
is difficult because of the shuttle's
vertical position.
Shuttles Endeavour and
Discovery also were found to
have faulty bolts, but since they
were in horizontal positions in
processing hangars, the repair
work on them was relatively
simple.
NASA expects the work on
Atlantis to finish today. The
space agency says the repairs
should not delay Atlantis' Aug. 27
launch.
"The bolt change-out work
itself is probably going to be
very straightforward, assuming
we don't get into any
'gotchas,"' said NASA launch
director Mike Leinbach.


t RESULTS


DRAW DATE


475


2006-08-19


467


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17

CRI C KET


South Africa

dismisses AIDS

policy criticism

By Andrew Quinn

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) South Africa dismissed
harsh criticism of its AIDS policy b a top UN official
"with contempt" yesterday and said he was no Messiah
for Africa's HIV/AIDS crisis.
UN specialenvov on AIDS in Atnca Stephen Lewis cloned
a global conference on Frida:, v.nh probjblh the most
blistering attack e.er on South Africa's "lInatic fringe"
approach to AIDS, calling it immoral and ieffecne\
Lewis' commentic. echoed b\ other speakers at the
Toronto conference, represented u diplomauc broadside against
President Thabo Mbeki's government, w which faces one of the
world's biggest HIV/AIDS caseloads.
About five million people, or one in nine South Africans,
are infected.
Health Ministry spokesman Sibani Mngadi issued a
statement yesterday rejecting Lewis' speech "with
contempt."
"Lewis is not Africa's Messiah," Mngadi said, detailing
South African accomplishments on AIDS including the
distribution of millions of free condoms and a free drug
programme that now reaches more than 175,000 infected
people.
''What Africa needs now is not unsubstantiated attacks
on democratically elected governments, but delivery on the
many resolutions made with regard to addressing poverty and
underdevelopment which increases the vulnerability of our
population to disease," Mngadi said.
South Africa has long been at odds with .AIDS acuti' ts
and medical experts over how to deal with an epidermc which
kills more than 800 people in the country every day.
RESISTED OFFERING DRUGS
Mbeki's government first denied that the HIV virus causes
AIDS and then resisted offering HIV drugs to its people, calling
them expensive and potentially dangerous.
The government bowed to public outcry in 2003 and
launched a public antiretroviral (ARV) drug programme which
officials now call one of the biggest in the orld.
But Health Minister NManto Tshabalala-Msimang still
questions ARVs and instead promotes home-grown remedies
such as olive oil. beetroot and garlic. She says they boost
nutrition and immune response but activists say her
prescnption leads to thousands of unnecessary deaths every
year.
"It is the only country in Africa whose government
continues to propound theones more worthy of a lunatic fringe
than of a concerned and compassionate state," Lewis said on
Friday.
Mbeki's ruling ANC signalled it had no plans to revise its
strategy. issuing a statement on Fnday savaging the Treatment
Acuon Campaign iTAC). South Afnca's .ADS acu ist group
which led criticism ol Tshabalala-Msimang at the Toronto
conference.
"While such confrontational posiunng ma\ be necessary
for the maintenance of the TAC's international profile, it does
nothing to strengthen the country's comprehensive response
t.l HIV and AIDS." the ANC said.
The cnticism at the Canadian conference drew\ echoes
from South African commentators yesterday.
Vukani Mde. a columnist in Business Day Weekender
newspaper, said the turmoil in Toronto enraged him.
"Tshabalala-Msimang is no longer wacky or funny
in any wa)." Mde wrote. "Her behaviour is beyond the
realm of the idiotic and now borders on the murderous."


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Guantanamo inmate set

to return to Germany

media
BERLIN, (Reuters) -A Turk with German residency held
at the US. prison camp in Guantanamo Bay since 2002
will be freed this week, German media reported yesterday.
Weekly Der Spiegel and daily Financial Times Deutschland
said that after months of talks between the U.S. and German
governments, a deal has been struck to release Murat Kurnaz,
a Turkish national who was born in Germany in 1982.
They said be could be released as early as Tuesday and
flown to Germany.
A spokeswoman in the German Foreign Ministry
acknowledged the governments had been in talks on the matter
but declined to comment on whether Kurnaz's release was
imminent.
Dubbed the "Bremen Talban" after the city in northern
Germany where he lived, Kurnaz was in the process of
becoming a German citizen when he was arrested in Pakistan
in late 2001.
He was taken from there to Guantanamo on Cuba, where
the United States is holding hundreds it suspects of backing
Osama bin Laden's al Qaeda or Afghanistan's radical Islamist
Tab ban.
Kurnaz has said be has suffered abuse at Guantanamo
and interrogation techniques including sexual humiliation.
water torture and the desecration of Islam.
The United States has come under criticism from human
rights and some of its allies for holding some 450 foreign
guerrilla suspects at the naval base in Cuba, many for four
years or more and without charges.
It is not the first time that reports have said Kurnaz
was set for release. In March, German Interior Minister
Wolfgang Schaeuble said he would be freed soon.





CARACAS, Venezuela, (Reuters) Venezuelan Presi-
dent Hugo Chavez poked fun on Friday at the freshly
appointed chief of U.S. spy operations on Venezuela and
Cuba, Jack Patrick Maher, calling him "Jack the Rip-
per."
During a speech to hundreds of screaming supporters in
his home province of Barinas, Chavez, who is running for re-
election in December, was handed a CNN report saying Maher
had been appointed to head U.S. efforts to collect intelligence
on the two Latin American countries.
Chavez, a constant critic of Washington who says social-
ism can unite South America against U.S. "imperialist" influ-
ence, said the appointment of Maher was a sign that "the
empire is organizing a plan for December or before Decem-
ber."
Chavez often accuses the United States of plotting to over-
throw him.
vualtatIuv rUiL plaln mgon, W gUll LU UVl


Candidate registers to


face Chavez


CARACAS, Venezuela,
(Reuters) Venezuelan
presidential hopeful Manuel
Rosales yesterday led a march
of thousands of supporters to
register his candidacy against
popular President Hugo
Chavez in December
elections.
Rosales, twice elected
governor of the western state of
Zulia, has the backing of a group
of fractured opposition parties
hoping to oust Chavez, who has
built up strong support among
the poor in the world's No. 5 oil
exporter.
"Look how the people of


Caracas and the people of
Venezuela are here in the
streets, that have dared to
change this government that
represents the past," Rosales
said during the march toward the
National Electoral Council in
Caracas.
His supporters, dressed in
Venezuela's yellow, red, and
blue national colours, marched
through drizzle to a hip
campaign theme song.
Rosales is expected to be
Chavez's strongest challenger,
but polls show he trails
considerably with around 55 per
cent of voters saying they will


back the president in the Dec.
3 elections.
Rosales has promised to
share out 20 per cent of the
nation's oil revenue to
Venezuelan families, and put an
end to Chavez's oil cooperation
programmes with other Latin
American nations that critics
call giveaways.
"This is our
opportunity to kick out
the dictator, to have a
democracy," said Julia
Mendez, who travelled to
Caracas from Rosales'
home state of Zulia for the
march. "Rosales is going
to lift us out of misery and
stop giving away our oil."
Chavez has built a solid
political base by spending


billions of dollars in oil revenues
on health and education
programmes largely focused on
the poor.
A former soldier, Chavez has
also galvanized supporters with
outspoken criticism of U.S.
"imperialism," a highly-
publicized friendship with
Cuba's Fidel Castro and
promises to unite Latin America.
Critics say Chavez has
become increasingly authoritarian
and boosted his control over
state institutions, including the
electoral authority.
Some opposition parties,
including Rosales' former
party Accion Democratica,
have called on supporters to
boycott the December
elections.


Chile Escondida mine says union talks progress


By Manuel Farias
ANTOFAGASTA, Chile,
(Reuters) The world's
largest copper mine, Chile's
Escondida, made progress in
talks with union workers
yesterday toward ending a
strike that has cut production
in half, the management said.
Workers at Escondida,
majority-owned by global mining
company BHP Billiton, returned
to negotiations after Chile's
government stepped in on Friday
to try to resolve the strike that
saw violent demonstrations last
week.
"We have progressed. We
have negotiated and as such I
would say it was positive,"
Escondida spokesman Pedro
Correa said of yesterday's talks.
The two sides agreed to
continue the negotiations today.
The 2,052-member union at
Escondida walked out on Aug. 7,
demanding a substantial raise


and a special $30,000 bonus
linked to copper prices that
have jumped five-fold since the
previous contract was signed in
2003.
"There are proposals and
counterproposals and this is
normal in a negotiation such as
this one," union secretary Pedro
Marin told Reuters as talked
ended for the day.
Correa said, "part of the
negotiation process requires


ceding some ground and as
such, we are all confident about
reaching a satisfactory
agreement."
The company, which
reported $2.9 billion net profit
in the first half of 2006, offered
in its last proposal a 3 per cent
raise and $15,000 in bonuses
and soft loans.
The mine, which declared
force majeure on deliveries of
copper concentrates shortly


after the strike began, produces
8 per cent of the world's copper.
The company said on Friday
deliveries of copper cathodes had
not been affected by the strike.
Escondida closed down
completely late on Thursday
after two days of worker
protests on access roads to the
mine, located high in the
mountains that overlook the
Pacific coast in northern
Chile.


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Editorial)

W HEN overseas-based Guyanese citizens
cast their ballots yesterday to be counted
along with votes for the August 20 presidential
and general elections, they would have been
well aware of how things have been changing
for the better over the years to strengthen elec-
toral democracy since ithe process of free and
fair elections was experienced for the first time
in October 1992 after an absence of 24 long
years.
The Guyana Elections Commission (GECOM) dis-
closed on Friday that ballot papers and other related
elections materials had Ibeen made available to
Guyana's foreign diplomatic missions to facilitate non-
resident Guyanese who are eligible to vote ahead of next
Monday's poll.
This consciousness of electoral democracy as a
norm in our political culture would also be experienced
tomorrow when about 8,000 members of the Disciplined
Services (police, army, prison and fire services) cast their
ballots.


SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 200(



THE 'DEMOCRACY' VOTE


In contrast to that political dispensation when it was
not possible to verify the authenticity of overseas ballots
cast, or for that matter, other categories such as "proxy"
and "postal votes", the non-resident Guyanese who ex-
ercised their franchise for the August 28 poll have no
such fears to worry over irrespective of party affilia-
tion or preference.
As will also be the case with respect to the votes be-
ing cast tomorrow by members of the Disciplined Ser-
vices, secrecy of all ballots cast ahead of next Monday is
fully guaranteed.
Their ballots will be added to the overall volume to
be counted in the presence of polling officers and party
agents, and with the presence of local, regional and for-
eign observer missions very much in evidence.
Do not expect the strident opponents of the current
governing party to concur with the contrasting political
situation from what existed until the elections of Octo-
ber 1992.
The reality, however, is that with every successive
presidential and general elections since then, Guyana
continues to benefit from constantly improved arrange-
ments to ensure free and fair elections.
In addition to the heavy expenditure made to enable


GECOM to function as efficiently and fairly as possible,
having various observer missions and media monitor-
ing mechanisms in place are now regular features of
presidential and parliamentary elections in our nation.
All who have valiantly joined in the battle for the res-
toration of electoral democracy should be very proud of
the continuing efforts to make multi-party democracy and
good governance a lived experience for this and future
generations.




CHRONICLE
Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Sunday Editor: Michelle Nurse
Editorial: 227-5216; 227-5204: 22-63243-9
Sports: 225-7174
After hours: 226-3243-9
Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is at www.gnyanachronicle.com
e-mail address sundayeditor@hotmail.com
Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown, Guyana.


A missed opportunity by CARICOM


Lae vaue rspns to -sr ew 9 9 cnfic


WITH the exception of a "solidarity" gesture by
Trinidad and Tobago to Lebanon at the height of
the ferocious 33-day old Israeli/Lebanese conflict,
the governments of our Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) may well be remembered for the op-
portunity ignored.
The opportunity missed to denounce war crimes committed
against civilian populations and, in so doing, show that small and
poor states can also be bold with their convictions.
The jury is still out on who were the real "victors", the power-
ful Israeli military or 'Hezbollah, the resistance movement in that
war in which the George Bush administration seems to have had
much more prior knowledge, if not complicity, according to main-
stream media reports.
At the time of writing a lasting "peace"" remained quite remote
as United Nations agencies and international aid workers grappled


with the enormous task of providing basic hlumaniltarian ncds like
iatcr, io d and itedicinICC to luinl eds I l t lious.inds 'pi .'i l
l ebhancse civilhlins.
(iiuyi)all is in lite inaIl sltagcs ot cIcllct loIsl-reiildne ,ss t101 LI ,\A ii
28 but iI canIInot l l ;11 m ni ot 1 .i9 1111 uI L 'tindl1fu! (! -' !! li hl!!,. u t ;! c 'st
hIL' war land whi\ H should also ILIt's)nd to thlie iIulCed NatItti, plia


for humanitarian aid.
Like other sub-regions of the global community, our area of the
Greater Caribbean would also have closely followed the horrendous
tragedies, on both sides of that conflict greater. of course, in
Lebanon that followed the July 12 capture of two Israeli sol-
diers by Hezbollah, with expectations of a prisoner swap for
which nrcc''edenit o' xios
Operating primarily in southern Lebanon and with representa-
tives in the Lebanese parliament and government. Hezbollah is of-
ficially deemed by Israel and its principal ally. the U.S., as "fanati-
cal Islamist terrorists", backed by Iran and Syria. In contrast, in the
wake of the 33-day war. they are currently being hailed as "he-
roes" across the Arab/Muslim Middle East.

HERSH'S EXPOSURE
The American Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Seymour Hersh,
who had first exposed U.S. military crimes at Iraq's Abu Ghraib
prison and much earlier the infamous "My Lai massa-
cre" during the Vietnam war, has written in the current
issue of The New Yorker about reported
collaboration between Israel and the George Bush admin-
istration on a planned attack on Hezbollah's stronghold
BEFORE the capture of two Israeli soldiers.
For those in this region familiar with the abuse of
America's politics of power, the war was almost three
weeks old when, finally. CARICOM chose to break its
deafening silence with a nine-line statement released on
August 9 by the community Secretariat.
It was so vague, so lacking in focus, that those fa-
miliar with the community's claims about foreign policy
coordination and commitment to peace and fundamen-
tal principles of internationalism, must still be wonder-
ing why it took so long to come forward with a
mere expression of "support" for the call that was made
about two weeks earlier by UN Secretary General, Kofi
Annan. for a cessationo n o hostilities" to give diplomacy
a chance?
The qu(eslion is a:' the molr' re lec\;nt since it has Iong'
een recognized bvt Itl (I\ Cl'llleni tlll of u coill'lllln ilt
S olf 14 sovereign ilstai thal ,i/,' aind limitations of re-
i? 'sources should not pricllid' ('\ CARI('OtM I'roim riismnl ;i
S. moai l o\ iceC on an inilternati iiail Is5"t' of iimpotl Illce thul l
SCo i ul also tIldlircCil hi\ \ i 'L loll.'ilc.'ecs lti sl -tii '.-ionll
1. .. lik ,e outs;.

" ,^ ", lir I .' ll l 1 i'" i .' ) ,.i ; [''. l '.1 1 'l I i '.',I ,"


III,: l I'.
c i 'r,' O l h\)ll \ h' e i :.'It lli;ll ,, Il Il ll, -\u'n u'I oIl 'l, i I 'in I l,'
Im emII li;C'" l'i;tii s itic 11W ; l.rl l; ['l l l ( n,,ninii inille\ x\Ipnr .. I '11 k li\iVL" c011
cc 'll t\ 'l Hc jic ht;tlin- i.'o lliil il b.' Il l ilt li I..;t1 l tiil M id 'lI'CI Ill,'
r:!,:i !!:! !*. .:. :'; i!'! I. t! ;l; Cl'.it; I'c ]! 'l[ l\ l' ll 1 h \\ ,)t1 1'n 1 ;hll el lh l
(drci. ais \ t.' [ii i'. ide \MJ.'s r; laI .csii lrct li iii


"The ongoing and intensifying conflict in an already volatile re-
gion poses a threat to international peace and security. CARICOM
reiterates its attachment to the principles enshrined in the Charter
of the United Nations, in particular the peaceful settlement of dis-
putes."
"CARICOM. therefore, supports the call of the UN Secretary
General for an immediate cessation of hostilities. This would bring
an end to the human suffering as well as create the conditions for
the necessary negotiations for a lasting peace."


That statement came 19 days AFTER the war was creating
havoc with civilian lives and massive destruction to infrastructures.
In choosing to speak about the "situation in the Middle East",
CARICOM may also have expediently forgotten Israel's ongoing
occupation and destruction of Gaza and degradation of the Pales-
tinian people.
I cannot recall I hope I am wrong ANY official CARICOM
statement on Israel's vicious cycle of destruction in Gaza since it
chose to return its military might to that strip of Palestinian terri-
tory from which it had claimed to have ended its "occupation".

THIS MICROCOSM
It must not be overlooked that our Caribbean Community, which
is not, by any means, bereft of intellectual resources to articulate
principled positions of regional and international importance, is
recognized as a microcosm of the nationalities, ethnicities, religions
and cultures of the world.
It is known to have among its citizens, nationals with origins
across the Middle East. including Israel. Lebanon. Syria, Iran. Irhaq.
.Iordan and lIgypl.
The Trinidadl and Tobagco Gosveernmenl. to its crcdil.
had demlConsratlcd its own such awareness \\hen. on Jul\ 28,. it inmlti
an initial token pledge of US$30.000 a"s e "ergenci nidl" to slit:tr
iln I. .'bahll.'tL' l\liill Illn ulii l lii' I Ul)Tiic lort I ,toi 'hi.; n, w. .i
l-lui anttarian .-\ fair,, ('C'l [ ..\L .
'I tihat e litlT' \\.is ;ai: ,u;i.iplllul !'" ,Ill C\lori.' it" (l sOlid:itl'.


[l tNI l l 's I) l i ) I 'W [ "' 0 1 ; ..1i' 1 ' 1. 1 11 i 1 1 ; 1 \;, l l \, l' i' .1 1 1 0 11 ;: t ls i; ,I
ilol In Zi viI\ \ l, ]\ 1 l,' ,llt',! l l he 'l t in Illil I '.A', well |ha\'"(lo
voked llt I cOtIIl'l iI
O r,. 111 tjhl l ,!iona;lil "dii)I ;a -) N :';!,n in(! 'rl act'liol lI 1 11
hi ll ,x < 40 I lok t I ht f ki-h e lini 4', a lli .l in li ,t-w's I); t il i llsa n d s -
spread d(lstrlii'tlo n iand :hi. hoir il 'i! a.nm'c 's :'Iacing huindlreid
olf thousands dislocatc'Jtl l t\ -ih t t.l; Iiwar tihat lstl nsii)l
started over tIle/lb li;al i \ ..Iptu; of two Israeli soldiers.






SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 20061


Th







the



BEING fat is the new nor-
mal, but it won't last ,
The global urge in over-
weight people is concentrated
among lower-income city-dwell-
ers, and some may choose to
slim down as they climb further
up the income scale.
("You can never be too rich
or too slim.") But the real guar-
antee of a slimmer world, unfor-
tunately, is climate change.
"Obesity is the norm glo-
bally, and under-nutrition,
while still important in a few
countries and in (certain
groups) in many others, is no
longer the dominant disease,"
said Dr. Barry Popkin of the
University of North Carolina
last week at a conference in
Queensland, Australia.
Dr Popkin studies "nutri-
tion transition." the changes that
accompany the shift from a tra-
ditional rural diet to a modern
urban diet, and he has concluded
that thanks to high-speed
urbanisation, the fat now out-
number the starving.
We have grown accustomed
to Americans who look almost
perfectly spherical, and we are
seeing more and more Europe-
ans who seem to aspire to the
same goal.
Popkin's point is that this
is not due to some moral failure
in the American and European
populations, but to the changes
that come with urbanisation:
higher incomes, mass marketing
of processed foods, and work
patterns involving much less
physical labour. His proof is
that the rates of obesity in de-
veloping countries undergoing
rapid urbanisation are rapidly
catching up with the levels in
the rich countries.
Mexicans of all ages and
both sexes are now on average
as fat as Americans. In Kuwait,
Thailand and Tunisia, 25 to 50
per cent of the population are
suffering not only developed-
world levels of obesity, but also
similar plagues of "non-commu-
nicable" obesity-related diseases
like diabetes and heart failure.
South African and Egyptian
women are as fat as American
women (although their men lag
behind their American counter-
parts).
In some places, specific lo-
cal factors play a role as well.
In much of Africa, for ex-
ample, fatness in women was
traditionally seen as testimony
to the wealth and generosity of
their husbands, and recent re-
search in South Africa has re-
vealed a new, additional factor:
the fear that being slim will
make people think you have
AIDS.
Half of all women in South
Africa are overweight, compared
to only a third of South African
men, and the problem is particu-


Fat


and


Starving


larly acute among black women,
one-third of whom are clinically
obese.
"Regretfully," says Tessa
van der Merwe of the Interna-
tional Association for the Study
of Obesity, "there is a percep-
tion that if a black woman is
thin, she might have HIV/A1DS
or that her husband can't afford
to feed her well." So South Af-
ricans, with far lower average
incomes than Americans, are
only 20 per cent less overweight
than people in the United
States, generally conceded to be
the world's fattest country.
But the shift in dietary
patterns and the consequent


rise in obesity among the urban
population affect the great ma-
jority of lower- and middle-in-
come countries in Asia, the
Middle East, Africa and Latin
America.
Moreover, this is happening
at a much earlier point in the
economic and social develop-
ment of these countries than
was the case in the "old rich"
countries.
The typical pattern in nine-
teenth-century Europe was that
the high-income groups put on
weight first. (Think of the ste-
reotypical cartoon plutocrat -
he's always fat.) Only much
later, when cheap fats and


sweeteners, became generally
available to the working class,
did the urban poor start to bulk
up as the rich slimmed down.
But this pattern is now
kicking in at a point in countries'
development where malnutrition
is still widespread.
In urban Brazil, for ex-
ample, the poor are now on av-
erage significantly fatter than
the rich, even though the same
slum households may also still
contain some malnourished
people.
Urban adults in China and
Indonesia are twice as likely to
be obese as rural adults. In the
Congo, city-dwellers are SIX


The cost of





terrorism
(The writer is a former Caribbean diplomat who publishes widely on small states in
the global community)


A WEEK after a dramatic ter-
ror plot for British airports
was revealed by security
forces, major disruption con-
tinued and the travel and air-
line industries began count-
ing the costs of the delays
and cancellations.
These costs are astronomi-
cal, estimated by some experts
at US$570 million and climb-
ing.
Almost 2,500 flights were
cancelled at London's three
major airports since the police
announced a scheme by a
group of British born Mus-
lims to plant bombs on board
several trans-Atlantic air-
planes.
In addition to the costs of
the cancelled flights, airlines
have had to pay hotel acconmmo-
dation for some stranded pas-
sengers and refund tickets.
Worse yet, they have had to
spend vast sums of money try-
ing to reunite passengers with
some 20,000 bags that went
astray in the chaos that gripped
British airports.
Now the question arises
about the impact this will have
on tourism and the heavy bur-
den of costs it will place on
other countries, especially those
whose economies are highly de-
pendent on the tourist industry.
British Airways, which has
been hard hit by the flight can-
cellations, has already an-
nounced that it will be seeking
compensation from the British
government and British Airports


Authority, the private company
thi runs the lhree main London
airports. Other airlines, includ-
ing Virgin Atlantic. have said the
same thing. But. it is unlikely
that they w would be successful.
And. if they aren't, recoup-
ing the lost revenues could ulti-
mately be borne by passengers
in the form of higher fares.
Should that happen. it will have
an adverse affect on tourism
from Britain to long-haul desti-
nations such as those in the Car-
ibbean, but this is left to be
seen.
What is clear is that new
security measures will be intro-
duced at airports around the
world and airport authorities
will pass these higher costs on
to airlines. In turn, the airlines
will, undoubtedly, apply the
costs to the passengers, and this
is bound to adversely affect
tourism in the medium to long
term.
For the time being, how-
ever, the major disruption of
British airports that lasted for
more than a week has had no
dramatic effect on the tourist in-
dustry.
This is largely because, un-
like 9/11 in the United States,
the plan to blow up several air-
craft bound from London on
trans-Atlantic flights was foiled
by security forces, and nothing
actually happened.
There were no burning
buildings. no exploding aircraft
and no horribly muiilateld bod-
ics.


In the absence of such
dramatically frightening images
and any clear and evident dan-
ger to aircraft, travellers con-
tinued to throng British air-
ports despite cancellations of
over two thousand flights. The
worst they endured were new
security measures that se-
verely restricted what they
could take on board as hand
luggage.
But. as the British Home
Secretary, John Reid has
warned, the threat of other ter-
rorist activity remains real in
the United Kingdom and
throughout Europe. And, since
aviation is a popular target,
further attacks on airplanes
cannot be discounted in the
longer term.
The safety of air travel.
therefore, has to be an area of
constant vigilance by security
authorities around the world.
And. this will cost money.
In all countries it will divert
financial resources flroi health.
education, housing and higher
pensions for old people. The
diversion of such financial re-
sources will be felt hardest by
the people of developing coun-
tries.
If the terrorists manage
again to blow up an airplane
with hundreds of passengers on
hoard, the effect will undoubt-
edly be catastrophic ifr tourism.
And. the terrorists are not
a:boutt to give up.
IThey are well awI are that
ill'\ \\on stunning psychologi-


times likelier to be fat.
It's not a pretty picture -
a world full of Michelin men and
women but the alternative is
worse: a world of very hungry
people. And the alternative, alas,
is far more likely by the end of
this century.
Cheap and plentiful food for
the urban masses of a multi-bil-
lion-population world is an as-
tonishing achievement, but it is
probably in its last few decades.
Most of the world's great fish-
eries are nearing collapse due to
overfishing and pollution, and a
couple have already died (like the
Grand Banks off Newfound-
land).
More worrisome still is the
likely impact of global warm-
ing on the great agricultural re-
gions that feed most of those
billions of people, like the Chi-
nese river valleys, the Ameri-
can Midwest, and the north
Indian plain.
A couple of years ago Dr
Jyoti Parikh, director of IRAD
(Integrated Research for Action
and Development), a New
Delhi-based NGO, did a de-
tailed study for the World Bank
about the probable effects on
Indian agriculture of a two-de-
gree (Celsius) rise in average
temperature.


r ',
,. -w


AI


cal victories with 9/11 in the
U.S.: with the London train
bombings on July 7th last year:
and with the previous bombings
in Spain. Kenya and Bali.
Each of these incidents has
emboldened them. particularly
when they witness the enor-
mous economic damage they
cause even when their plans are
foiled.
The worry for other parts
of the world, including the Car-
ibbean, which is host to hun-
dreds of thousands of tourists
from the United States and Eu-
rope, is: when will their airports
and airlines become attractive
targets for terrorism?
There is no good reason to
believe that targeting airports in
tourist resort areas such as the
Caribbean could not or would
not happen.
Time and again the world
has witnessed situations in
which intensified measures in
one place to curb an activity
have pushed that activity into
areas where policing and enforce-
nient is weak.
Efforts to combat drug traf-
ficking is a good example. In the
Caribbean, when new and tough
anti-drug trafficking machinery
was introduced in Jamaica. the
scale of dllri, trafficking escalated
in tChe 1astlern :Carilbbeain.


The impact was different
for different regions of the
country, of course, but she
concluded that overall Indian
food production would be
about one-quarter less than at
present.
The world is probably go-
ing to get considerably hotter
than that, and most of the other
great bread-baskets of the world
will be similarly affected.
Obesity is not our long-
term problem.
(** Gwynne Dyer is a
London-based independent
journalist whose articles are
published in 45 countries.)


All this calls for new in-
vestment in technical equip-
ment for airports.
Chris Yates. who is the
aviation security editor at the
magazine, Jane's Aviation Re-
view, is quoted by the British
Broadcasting Corporation
(BBC) as saying that "explo-
sives can be disguised and will
not get picked up by the ordi-
nary X-ray machines currently
in use across UK airports".
He pointed out that at
London's Heathrow airport
"three Rapiscan Systems Se-
cure body scanners for detect-
ing high-tech plastic and ce-
ramic firearms and explosives"
have been introduced.
it will not be long before
airports all over the world will
be required to install such
equipment in order to satisfy
international standards for
safety.
Developing countries -
particularly small states such as
those in the Caribbean and the
Pacific will be expected to
spend money to buy new
equipment as part of heightened
security for their airports. But.
they need access to low cost
funding if they are to do the job
properly.
International financial in-
stitutions. such as the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF)
and the World Bank, as well as
the governments of the United
States, the European Union.
Canada and Japan, should now
acknowledge that it is time for
them to match lending policies
to the need to combat terror-
ism.
The IMF and World Bank
should amend their policies to
provide low cost funding with-
out their usual conditions to
developing countries who.
themselves, should be pressing
for attention to be paid to their
plight in this matter.
(Responses to:
rmadd.si(lders29 @ hotnuail.conm)


8/19/2006. 10:48 PM


I.- I






8 SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006




Streret
+ + -
'~~ i


A SECTION of the crowd at
the PPP/C rally yesterday
at Anna Regina, Essequibo.
(Photo, courtesy PPP/C)


(From page three)


running shows in televi-
sion history.
Sesame Street is produced
in the United States by non-
profit organization Sesame
Workshop, formerly known as
the Children's Television Work-
shop (CTW), founded by Joan
Ganz Cooney and Ralph
Rogers. It premiered on Novem-
ber 10, 1969 on the National
Educational Television network,
and later that year it was moved
to NET's successor, the Public
Broadcasting Service.
Because of its positive
influence, Sesame Street has
earned the distinction of be-


ing the foremost and most
highly regarded educator of
young people in the world.
No television series has
matched its level of recogni-
tion and success on the inter-
national stage.
The original series has been
televised in 120 countries, and
more than 20 international ver-
sions have been produced, not
including dubs.
The series has received
109 Emmy Awards, more than
any other series in television
history. An estimated 75 mil-
lion Americans watched the
series as children; millions
more have watched around
the world, or as parents.


PPP/C Presidential Candidate Bharrat Jagdeo addressed a rally of the party yesterday
at Anna Regina, Essequibo. (Photo, courtesy PPP/C)


STHE PHARMACY COUNCIL OF GUYANA


DATE:
TIME:
VENUE:
TOPICS:


NOTICE
ALL PHARMACISTS
THE PHARMACY COUNCIL OF GUYANA
MANDATORY CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMME
SECOND OFFERING OF CREDITS 2006
Sept 10, 2006
09:00-013:00 HRS
Ocean View Convention Centre
1. INVENTORY MANAGEMENT
2.PHARMACO ECONOMICS
3.THEADOLESCENT- FRIENDLY PHARMACY 11


Fee:$ 1500 percredit
Pre Registration is necessary.
Forfurther information contact can be made on Telephone Nos. 227-5262 or
231-6751.
PLEASE NOTE: Two credits are required for Registration for the year 2007.
Persons arriving 15 minutes after the session has commenced would not be
granted a Credit


PNCR-1G Presidential Candidate, Mr. Robert Corbin, displaying the party's manifesto for
2006 to the crowd at a rally at Golden Grove, East Coast Demerara on Friday. The party
will officially launch the manifesto tomorrow at the Stabroek Market Square in
Georgetown at 16:00 h. (Photo, courtesy PNCR)


For a Safe and Secure Guyana


. -


P NC G X
rmms1 MI ^
PnlCR-m An ?T


Jar,







SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006


Important






against cr


victory






'iminals


-Teixeira


By Mark Ramotar

HOME Affairs Minister Gail
Teixeira has lauded the sig-
nificant success by the Police
and Army in the recent re-
lentless and determined
Joint Services operations,
saying it is "a very, very im-
portant victory" against the
criminal networks that have
spawned a reign of terror in
Guyana and a crime scourge
that has been eating away at
the very fabric of the
Guyanese society.


IMPORTANT VICTORY: Hon

She. however, cautioned
that while the events of the past
week have resulted in some
long-awaited and tangible re-
sults by the Joint Services. the
joint operation or the unwaver-
ing commitment by the Army
and Police in the light against
the crime scourge is in no way
over as yet.
"It is not all over yet.
The dramatic part may be
over at this point for the
public and in terms of getting
the bandits but there are still


lots more work to be done
and I am quite confident that
with this mood and the
morale...we are on the right
track now," Minister Teixeira
told this newspaper in an in-
vited comment Friday night.
Since the massive joint
operation was launched im-
mediately after a daring and
dramatic daylight robbery of
two banks in the bustling
Rose Hall town two Fridays
ago, eight of the bank robbers
have been killed in armed en-
counters with the Joint Ser-


ie Affairs Minister Gail Teixeira

vices ranks who trailed them
in swampy terrain for a
week.
The eight men died trying
to escape the Joint Services in
the difficult backlands of
Berbice where the some 15-
member heavily armed gang fled
after the daring and precision
robbery attack on Demerara
Bank and the Republic Bank lo-
cated in the heart of the busy
Rose Hall town.
Several bags full of Guyana
currency were recovered along


with several of the high-pow-
ered AK-47 rifles that shock-
ingly disappeared from the
Army's camp Ayanganna base
in February this year and sus-
pected to have been in the
hands of dangerous criminals.
Also, several persons
wanted in connection with some
of the most brutal and horrific
execution-style murders in re-
cent times, including the grue-
some slaying less than two
weeks ago of five Kaieteur
News pressmen, have been cap-
tured, placed before the courts,
charged and are currently re-
manded in prison.
Speaking with the Sunday
Chronicle, Minister Teixeira was
full of praise for the Joint Ser-
vices ranks for their "fine work"
in the field and their "very laud-
able" successes over the past
week.

FANTASTIC JOB
"I would like to go on
record to congratulate the Joint
Services for their very fine
work; I think it was a fantastic
job done. I think that the mo-
rale is high but we still have
more work to do and more chal-
lenges to face."
She also extended congraitu-
lations to Police Comlmisisisoner
I lenry Greene. the Guyana Po-
lice force in general and "Ithose
men iromn the police who \were
out in the back dam going
through sme pretty awful
stuff".
Teixeira was also full ol
praise for Army Chief of Stall
Brigadier Edward Collins and all
the soldiers who were involved
in the operation and were cru-
cial to the success achieved.
According to the Home Al-
fairs Minister, it was the larg-
est and most sophisticated joint
operation between the Police
and Army from two Fridays
ago right through to last Thurs-
day night.
"It really was an experi-
ence for the Joint Services


(and) I believe it showed
their competencies and their
ability to go after the crimi-
nals," the minister said.
"We were not getting the
kind of success that we wanted
or we expected but it shows
also that sometimes in crime
fighting, pieces have to come
together that allow the Joint
Services the police and the
army to do what they are best
trained to do and so I think this
is a very, very important victory
in a sense," she posited.
"We must also remember
that we have been able to ap-
prehend six people who are in
prison right now and who were
charged with some very serious
crimes, including a number of
murders, very horrific murders
(and) in addition to that there
are other persons who are still
being investigated and persons
who we still have interest in."
Teixeira added.
Asked what may have
contributed to the success
achieved in this operation.
unlike previous operations.
the minister said it was a
"combination of a number of
variables".
"I think there are ar num-
her of variables that are re-
sponsible for that: 0ou can'
point at onel \riable hut I
think there are \ ery manv
ariatbles and that's prohabl
for the histolri.an anid tile
outrnalists to tantal te tbti)
in crime fighting sometimes
there are different pieces of
the puz/ile all over the place
and then thle patterns emerge
and vou begin to see the con-
necting points and so I think
thal is \\ hat we have reached
now."

STORM IN A TEACUP
The minister also dismissed
as "nothing but a stornl in a tea
cup". the misleading reports
that appeared in certain sections
of the media, especially the
Kaicteur News, last week that


some Joint Services ranks stole
millions of dollars from the
money recovered during the
joint operation.
"You don't want anybody
to steal but I think that Kaieteur
News made a storm in a tea
cup...but certainly investiga-
tions are continuing because the
army and the police are con-
cerned that their name and the
operation is not besmirched by
anybody compromising the very
fine work that they have done,"
Teixeira said.
"So right now I
characterise this as a storm in
a tea cup...and let's see what
comes out of the investiga-
tions," the minister told the
Sunday Chronicle.
The Joint Services said a
search of the Charlotte Street,
Georgetown home of one of the
ranks led to the discovery of a
total of $113,125 in 'wet' cash.
Several more ranks have since
been detained as the investiga-
tions continue.
The Joint Services last
week refuted reports in sections


of the media that the sums of
money seized amounted to mil-
lions of dollars.
"These reports, carried in
sections of the print media
(Thursday), are false and mis-
leading and have caused the mo-
rale of the uniformed ranks in-
volved in the pursuit of danger-
ous criminals in the Berbice
back lands to be affected," the
Joint Services stated in a release.
On Wednesday last, the
Guyana Defence Force (GDF)
helicopter, cleared for flying
again after repairs, joined the
continuing operations by the
Joint Services to capture the
other members of the heavily-
armed gang.
The chopper played a key
role in helping to intercept a car
on a road in West Berbice that
same day and the detention of
several persons.
Teixeira commented that
now that it is back in opera-
tion, the Army chopper will
make a "very, very significant
contribution" in the crime
fight.


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SUNDAYCHRiONLtlAli; ust'2d. 2i)06


'I'm ready to bridge




the Berbice River'


Duch xprI


"I'M EAGER to start build-
ing the bridge over the
Berbice River. It's been a
long time in coming but fi-
nally we are at the start of
the project."


on-site for the long awaited
bridge.
"For me personally, the
start up is also a milestone
because I have been working
on this project since 2001. I
was involved in the
modification of the
Demerara Harbour
Bridge in 1998-1999,
and still upkeep a
yearly maintenance
programme on that
bridge with my local
company Hycos
Inc."


In 2004, he became
Sales Manager Off-
shore and Special
Projects, at the Bosch
Rexroth Company in
the Netherlands, which
also expressed interest
in this project.
PROJECT Manager on-site, Mr Henny According to
Muskens. (Photo, courtesy BBCI) Muskens, "The al-
ready established re-
Mr. Henny Muskens of lationship between the
Bosch Rexroth of the Neth- Mabey & Johnson Group of
erlands is Project Manager England and me was easily


connected to Bosch Rexroth,
since both are professional
companies and working at
the highest levels of quality."
He adds: "The experience
with the Demerara Harbour
Bridge, as well as the specific


knowledge and experience of
bridge management helped us a
lot in finding the right and most
efficient solutions and applica-
tions within the available bud-
get.
A floating bridge requires


by its nature a flexible solu-
tion, therefore the 'COM-
PACT 200' panel bridge sys-
tem of Mabey & Johnson is
the best available in the
world for this purpose. The
company had obtained the


rights to build the Demerara
Bridge which was designed
and built by Thomas Storey
in 1974.
The Berbice Bridge has
similar outlines. However, de-
velopments over the past years
increased the possibilities and
capacities for the new Berbice
structure.
Major differences are
the approximately 25%
higher side panels, which
allow heavier traffic loads
and larger spans. The
number of pontoons under
(Please turn to page 19)


I .
..,s.:


WHAT the bridge over the Berbice River will look like. (Courtesy BBCI)


PGS IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THAT THEY HAVE BEEN CONTRACTED
TO PROTECT CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL & AUTO SUPPLIES.
WE REQUIRE MORE INSPECTORS, FIRST LIEUTENANTS, TRUCK DRIVERS
ARMED SERGEANTS & BATON RANK OFFICERS (MALE & FEMALE)
Al ..-eo s*- -.-.sialac .-..s
of p@frdeah o oai5rhliabilt nuy


NEW INCREASED INCOME PLUS
NUMEROUS ADDITIONAL BENEFITS
1. High-basic pay plus high hourly incentive award equal
h2. take home pay rinin sss food drs
2. Double Basic pay at training classes, food, drinks .


plus hourly incentive award.
3. Double basic pay on all Sites on all national holidays
plus hourly incentive award.
4. Double basic pay on all Sundays on all factory sites
plus hourly incentive award.
5. VHF radio provided on all sites.
6. FREE Supernumerary Officer Arms training by the
Guyana Police Force.
7. Additional cash incentive awards quarterly for the
Best Shift Commander, Bank Shift Commander,
Factory Shift Commander, Inspector, Driver, Radio
Operator, Armed Officer and Baton Equipped Officer
worth $10,000 each.
8. Annual incentive award based on productivity and
service ranging from one four weeks extra pay.
9. All overtime paid according to law on basic pay.
10. Uniforms provided from our in-house, customer
tailor shop, FREE OF CHARGE.
11. All ranks work on only prestigious sites.
12. Most shifts are of 8 hours duration.
13. Ranks previously emoloved with aood records


, -,


.- - --- - ----
are welcome to return.
Apply in person to:
S PROFESSIONAL GUARD SERVICES INC
81 Fourth Ave Subryanville, Georgetown
with two valid recommendations and an up-to-date
Police Clearance between 9am 4pm Mon Fri
AY :j~qU,.'0 I k 9Wi,,.1AZI r


i4k,


THE ARTS JOURNAL
Critical Perspectives on contemporary Literature, History,
Art and Culture of Guyana, the Caribbean and their
Diasporas


IlMS iss


What is needed in Guyana at this time is a transformation of consciousness
within each and every citizen to the centre of the arts and culture in human
growth and development.

Art and Culture are the bedrock of a civilization and must be brought back to the
centre of daily life

To all young people aspiring to leadership positions:
* Expand your intellectual horizon
* Raise your level of awareness and self-knowledge
* Discard entrenched stereotype habits
* Change your society through changed attitude and thinking
* No democracy can survive without the ability to think critically
* Critical thought and analysis are vital to nation building

Subscribe to
THE ARTS JOURNAL


Available fromAustin's Book Services, Universal Bookshop; Michael Forde
Bookshop; Castellani Gallery; Margaritas Gift Shop; Oasis Coffee Shop or from the
Editor (Tel: 227-8825)
G$2,000.00 (Individuals) and G$2,500.00 (Institutions)


The Arts Journal makes perfect gifts for friends, relatives and clients overseas
Website: www.theartsjournal.or.gy


2


-~--------


II


I l l 1 1 1 I I


I calm gl 8ookRg1 0


-i


fl










nd


voting


begins...
Sm 9I


Weekly viewpoint by Robert
Persaud, MBA
MONDAY, August 21, mem-
bers of the Disciplined Forces
will cast their ballots for the
2006 General and Regional
Elections.
Our security and other ser-
vices will cast their ballots one
week before so that they can be
in-line (full alert and on duty)
for Elections day.
The 2006 Elections might
see the largest deployment of
security officers and ranks
around this period to protect
our democracy from the agents
of terror, fear and political con-
frontation.
President Bharrat Jagdeo
has already announced that the
deployment of the Police and
Army will be to ensure that
people are free to cast their
votes and to prevent any at-


tempts to thwart the demo-
cratic will of the Guyanese
people. This is more crucial as
the expected campaign of fear
and intimidation by armed killer
gangs working at the behest of
some 'intelligent mind' went to
work at Bagotsown, Kaieteur
News' printer and the Rose
Hall town two weeks ago.
Swift and massive response
by the Joint Services leading to
arrests and even deaths of
members of these gangs has cer-
tainly brought a degree of relief
to the Guyanese public. The
members of the security forces
who confronted the criminal
gangs armed with AK-47s, in-
cluding the set stolen from the
Army Headquarters must be
commended.
This demonstration of effec-
tiveness must continue until
these gangs are captured and the
criminal menace removed from


GneoreR tn I's








Nishjay's College
Congratulates Randolph
The Nishjay's College of .ll
109 Agriculture Road,
Mon Repos, ECD is proud
ofthis year's SSEE Student
Randolph Gansham Tulsie ,
who gained 547 marks and
placed 85th in the Country.
Randolph also known as
Gansham by most students
of the College has been a
student of the College. "Extra Lessons" since
January 2005 when he was admitted to Grade 5
(Primary three). The College has credited
Randolph's commendable performance through
hard work and dedication. He has always been a
very disciplined, polite and co-operative student.
The Nishjay's College which offers tuition for
both Primary and Secondary students, came into
operation on October 11, 2004 and has also
entered its first batch ofCXC students this year in
several subject areas.

The principal Mr. Hiralal Bissessar a former part-
time lecturer of the Teacher's Training College
wishes to express heartfelt thanks to Mr.
Deonarine Etwaroo Managing Director of IPA
who has been very instrumental in making this
dream of the college a reality. Mr. Bissessar would
also like to congratulate the other students of the
College who have gained places in the top
secondary schools in the country.


our midst. This type of re-
sponse sends a strong signal to
the agents of fear and their han-
dlers that our security forces
have the capacity to deal with
their evil, murderous designs.
Our security forces have
never been so well paid and
equipped to get the job done.
Salaries for the Disciplined
Services have risen by over
600% during the past decades.
Police and Army ranks have also
benefited from special tax-free
bonuses announced by the Com-
mander-in-Chief on two occa-
sions. Officers now enjoy duty-
free concession on vehicles im-
ported, support for the Joint
Services Housing schemes, local
and foreign training opportuni-
ties along with their regular re-


muneration benefits.
This year alone, $7.5 billion
is being expended on the secu-
rity sector compared with less
than billionn when the PPP/C
came into office.
The policy environment has
been made more conducive. The
Government has entered into a
number of bilateral agreements
for overseas technical help to
beef-up the training as well as
sourcing vital state-of-the-art
equipment for our security
forces. The past five years have
seen intensified assistance from
the United States and United
Kingdom governments and law
enforcement agencies. Other
countries such as India and
China are also responding to the
Government's efforts.


MR. ROBERT PERSAUD
The just-concluded
US$22M (after two years of
negotiations) citizens' security
programme will modernise and
reform our criminal justice sys-
tem.
These interventions follow
the toughening up of anti-crime
legislation which was not sup-
ported by the Opposition. In
fact, during the past decade, the
government faced roadblocks by
the Opposition for every at-
tempt to create a conducive en-
vironment for the maintenance
of law and order.
Some, for electioneering rea-
sons, now want to sound tough
on crime. But during the past
years they sought to benefit po-
litically. privately and profession-
ally from a volatile security situ-


siUNDAJ-CHIpjllCHPJi)JRr^ 06 F_


GUYANA ELECTIONS COMMISSION


CLOSE OF POLL

The Guyana Elections Commission (GECOM) takes the
opportunity to remind voters that on Election Day, Monday,
August 28, 2006



THE POLL WILL OFFICIALLY BE

CLOSED AT 18:00 HRS (6 PM).

However, if at the hour of closing there are voters at a Polling
Station waiting in the queue to vote, the poll remains open for a
sufficient period of time to enable those electors to vote. The
Presiding Officer will take the name of the last voter in the queue
at 18:00 hours (6 pm) and instruct the Police Officer at the Polling
Station to stand behind that voter.


NO VOTER WHO SEEKS TO JOIN THE VOTING

QUEUE AFTER 18:00 HRS (6 PM) WILL BE

ALLOWED TO VOTE.


Go to your Polling Station and cast your vote early on


ELECTION DAY

Monday, August 28, 2006


ation. Also, these individuals,
when they were in Government,
did little to improve the lives of
the men and women who
worked in the Disciplined
Forces. In Opposition, they pro-
tested, rioted and even openly
attacked some of our law offic-
ers who carried out their jobs
professionally to stop protesters
and rioters from running amok.
Even now they are denying
themselves once again, the op-
portunity to contribute to the
national response to crime. The
National Commission on Law
and Order was set up to give
political parties, civil society
and groups, a voice in crafting
and monitoring a national crime
response.
Sadly, two vocal Opposi-
tion political leaders who attack
the government on crime have
failed to attend any of the
seven meetings held by the
Commission. The Minister of
Home Affairs has written to
these individuals who owe the
public an explanation. I will give
them time to respond to the
Minister before making their
names public.
I guess the public and our
lawmen and women will take
careful note of these facts
when they exercise their
democratic choice.









Another good day for Guyana birding


By Kirk Smock

RUTLAND, England FOR
one weekend a year in
Rutland, England, a series of
white tents are discreetly


erected behind some tall trees
on the edge of a field.
The collective mass is re-
ferred to as the British
Birdwatching Fair (BBWF).
Within these tents it's pos-


sible to have a conversation
with a lady from Uganda, a na-
tive of Fiji, or a Kiwi from New
Zealand. One particular tent is
a place where visitors can be
transported to the plains of


Mongolia, the Pyrenees of
Spain. the springtime of Esto-
nia. and the Rupununi River of
Guvana.
..The virtual trip to Guyana
comes towards the end of the
41second day (yesterday) of the



GUYANA ELECTIONS COMMISSION



KNOW YOUR POLLING STATION BEFORE

ELECTION DAY


The Guyana


Elections


Commission


(GECOM)


takes the


opportunity to urge all voters to take steps to get to know the
respective Polling Stations where they are registered to vote
at the 2006 General and Regional elections.


GECOM has established Registration Offices in every Region in
Guyana. GECOM has also established Offices for each of the
ten Returning Officers who are responsible for the conduct of the
elections in the ten Regions.


GECOM has also posted the 2006 Official List of Electors and the
2006 List of Polling Places on its website which could be accessed
at http://www.gecom.org.gy.


Voters are urged to check with the Registration Office or the
Office of the Returning Officer that is responsible for their
respective areas to get clear directions about the location of the
Polling Station where they are registered to vote.


If you do not know the location of the Registration Office or
Returning Officer responsible for the area where you live, simply
call any of the GECOM'S hotline numbers 225-0277, 226-1651,
226-1652, 223-9650 or visit the GECOM website at
httD://www.Qecom.orq.qv


BBWF. Folks seem happy to
have a seat to rest their weary
legs after hundreds of exhibits
and hours of walking have
zapped their energy.
Diane McTurk, their host,
also deserves to be tired. She has
spent the day chatting with
hundreds of people about
Guyana and her work with the
Karanambu Trust. Diane has
every right to be envious of her
audience's chairs, but if she is,
she certainly doesn't show it.
With apparent endless en-
ergy and ageless grace, she lets
her passion guide a rapt audi-
ence through the more than
twenty years she has spent re-
habilitating orphaned wild giant
otters in Guyana. Since 1985
she has worked with 37 otters
and educated local communities
in an effort to save the popula-
tion.
She is proud of the otters
she has been able to re-release
into the wild, and says she loves
"knowing that I have contrib-
uted to the education of the lo-
cal people in the area."
Partial credit, she says, goes
to her operations at Karanambu
Ranch, as it has shown locals


that it's necessary to protect
wildlife to continue bringing in
tourism dollars to support nec-
essary conservation issues.
Diane's words are a fitting
end to the second successful day
for the Guyana contingent at
the BBWF.
Representatives of Guyana
Tourism Authority (GTA),
Guyana Trade and Investment
Support (GTIS), and Guyana's
tourism operators are at the fair
in an effort to bring Guyana to
the forefront of the birding tour-
ism industry.
At a booth representing
Guyana, GTA Director, Indira
Anandjit, answered an endless
stream of questions posed by
potential tourists, while Tony
Thorne of Wilderness Explorers
and a team from GTIS had a se-
ries of meetings with prime
birding media and tour opera-
tors.
During a quick afternoon
break Tony reflected on the
success Guyana is having at
the BBWF. "Guyana was
here four years ago, as well
as two years ago, so people
(Please turn to page 19)


NATIONAL INSURANCE SCHEME






Persons who are registered for the
NIS SEMINAR Scheduled for 29th
& 30th August, 2006 are asked to
make urgent contact with the
Publicity and Public Relations Unit
on Telephone number 227-3461


,Pablici.ff^ a,, ,,dtp Ac


SHOWCASING GUYANA: Indira Anandjit at the booth


S. . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . ..rrTfim>^T ^il-^ i t l' 'i ij .i .. -
/'V [ /.i7 i11/


- --


-----------------------


SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 20Q06


12, ,


I -


"~~ :~.:. ': ~


"" ''"


L 1-", %,







SUNDmY CHeONICdL tE gidaf6'Osb:- = 13



Student diagnosis and placement in schools


INTRODUCTION

PLACEMENT in schools de-
pends, to a great extent, on
the objectives, criteria and
instruments used.
So far our placement proce-
dures are ill-defined and rela-
tively unrefined. The single test
such as the Caribbean Entrance
Examination (CXC) and the
former Secondary School En-
trance Examination (SSEE) are
quite inadequate and lack reli-
ability as assessment tools. Too
often also schools or the system
have failed to specify
programme foundation.
The teacher then is hanm-
pered. if not prevented. frolim af-
iccting accurate placement.
More use should be made of cu-
iulatitve records. academic
grades. etc. so as to locate the
"best fit". The strengths and
\weaknesses of the students are
not easily determined and so we
play a guessing game.
However. because students
must be instructed some (or
any) diagnosis and placement is
employed.
Placement is the process of
identifying the stage or point
when and where students' in-
structions should begin in a
prograune. The aim is to ensure
efficient future learning.
It is a vital mediating pro-
cess between diagnosis and in-
struction. The information ob-
tained from placement data can
determine strengths and weak-
nesses. It can help to determine
curriculum materials and peda-
gogy.
Placement differs from se-
lection and classification. Clas-


sification involves two or more
criteria, e.g. where an individual
in the police force or business
is assigned a different job or
training. Placement is biased on
a single score. e.g. college place-
ment score, and it is often done
with one or more predictions
with single or multiple criteria.
By examining a different
battery of scores one can pre-
dict if a trainee will be a good
math scholar or a better science
student.
Psychological tests come in
different forms and they help to
profile our individual socio-
temolional traits. Intelligence
tests are groups of aptitude
tests vi/. numnrerical aptitude.
verbal aptitude, spatial aptitude.
etc.
An aptitude test is anl
area of intelligence with a
specialized ability. knowl-
edge or skill. Such special-
ized areas are mathematical
aptitude, verbal aptitude, me-
chanical aptitude, etc.
Each of these tests must
have acceptable validity and re-
liability. Validity is the purpose
or aim for which the test was
designed. Each test is con-
structed for a special purpose.
A test designed to predict future
performance (such as in high
school) must have predictive
validity. Reliability is the con-
sistency with which the test or
tests measure a particular trait.
even with the lapse of time.
These tests are different
from achievement tests, tests
where teachers give their stu-
dents to find out if they have
learned the materials taught.
While it is not appropriate.


quite often teachers use achieve-
ment tests to predict high
school, college or later perfor-
mance.
Why use a Ihalllmer to cut a
piece of wood when a saw is
more appropriate? The problem
often is that teachers are not
trained in these areas of testing.
Diagnosis and future place-
ments are all testing only a
small sample of behaviour when
the greater the nutmtber of items
employed ciouild come closer to
help prediction.
Diagnosis ithe tIesing
present of .conditions or
behaviors thal has tie potien-
lial to ilmeaslure capacity or lfu-
lure pcrI!tiiinaniees. Thlli is only
done \\ ith inl emipirictal ir\ouI.
"Diagniosis is a Greek
word that Ce.ans "'to discern" or
"to disting'uiish". It \\as used tol i
mean in\u'iSgating .t disease.
"Di" means i \\ 0 aLnd
"gnosisi" ieains "to kno\\" alnd
thus literally means "'more to
know the separate parts". It is
an attempt to analN ze t le parts
of behaviours.
The aimn of such practice is
to correct or deal with the prob-
lem of learning and leaching.
The aim of the diagnosis to
remedy the situation.
By implication the word
"diagnosis" is to help in place-
ment. However, present
behaviour is used to predict fu-
ture ones.
These tests help to estab-
lish norms: to determine what is
the average and those who are
above and below the norm.
Such tests are also used for
clinical purposes, to classify
children with certain abnormal


conditions, e.g. mental retarda-
tion or communication disor-
ders.

PROBLEMS
Over present tests are not
designed to yield placement in-
formation. They merely reflect
a student's achievement in rela-
tionship to a group norm.
These tests may have con-
tent validity but little predictive
validity. While tile former is es-
tinlated to determine present
conditions. the latter is aimed at
future performance. Besides.
information gathered fltirom these
tests cotles I'rol a luniti ed range
of skills viz. herball anid nu-
mierical.
li'\ the \ erbHal and math
tesls .i'r otlten reculatetd. As
:1 res'l,. poor sttldenis do
\er\ poorly and high fly-
cis" do vecr\ \\x ll \\il little
discrimination of aptlituil or
ability.
Little informnaion is galh-
cred below\ or above lie grade
level assessed bh the test. F ur-
ther, these tests do not mieasilre
deficiencies but weakness s and
lthus do l it pro 1\id lthe data
needed to remllo\ e or prevent
the deficiencies.
As a result, tlie teacher
guesses where the student
should be placed anId lhe aitsts
to see the results. Quite often
students are crushed or lost in
the programme.
Selection is where students
Mae accepted or rejected. Screen-
ing is a form of rough selection.

BENEFITS
There are numerous ben-
efits to efficient diagnosis and


placement. When students are
correctly placed there is greater
probability of learning.
This is done because there
is more accuracy in understand-
ing the skill base. This is the
collection of programnie skills
that a student has previously
mastered and can master or ap-
ply to a higher level of diffi-
culty.
The more efficient the


* I
",


placCmnlent the more probable
tihe studetl \\ill be able to ap-
ply prior learning to lthe new\
skills. Where rclirors are made in
thie placeiclentl a teacher inmay be
able to adjust.
Anolher important factor in
effective placement is the iden-
tification of skill weakness. In
sonle instances the skill weak-
ness may be single or a group.
In such instances the child may
not fail but there is consistent
mediocre performance and there
seems to be no explanation.
A third importance in the
placement is the elimination of
extraneous factors from the
teacher's consideration when
instructing students.


A student wrongly placed
may cause a breakdown in the
learning process, even when a
motivated teacher and an effi-
cient lesson is presented. Learn-
ing often is built on prior learn-
ing and when there are gaps, the
efficiency will break down.
In Mathematics the first
four rules of addition, sub-
traction, multiplication and
division are basic and must be
mastered. Gaps in any of
these four rules may hinder
the application of these rul-
ers to a higher learning or-
decr
A fourth importance is the
establishing of instructional
groups. With proper placement
students may be grouped' more
efficiently according to their
strength s and \weaknesses.
Learning then becomes inore ef-
ficient and the \\ ork of the
teacher is made easier.
Where students are placed
often depends on the
prograumine to be administered.
Different techniques may be
-needed with different ability
groups and proper sequence
may be established.
Another useful result of ef-
ficient placement is the appro-
priate selection of materials
suitable to meet the needs of
the individuals or groups.
Slower learners may need more
visual or hands-on learning.
Time may be saved when stu-
dents are placed. suitable mate-
rials selected and students learn
more efficiently.
The end product in this
all is that the student is effi

(Please turn to page 14)


ku'. ~ f~i

-cI


ANNOUNCING -


NEW OFFICE HOURS


We have extended our closing

hours at all of our locations by

1 hour.


OFFICE HOURS


Monday



Tuesday

to Friday


- 8:00am to 4:30p.m





- 8:00am to 4:00p.m


Come and let us treat you special


GTM FIRE & LIFE GROUP
INSURANCE COMPANIES
27-29 Robb a Hincks Streets, Georgetown
Tel. #: 225-7910-9 Fax: 225-9397
E-mail: ghgroup@gtm-gy.com
Weobsite:: t-g.com

. ,00i


MINISTRY OF TOURISM, INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE

1. The Minististl of Tourism. Industlr, and Commerce invites suitably qualified
Contractors to submit bids for the Earth filling of Bclvedere Industrial Estate
Belvedere Corenync Region6.

2. Tender documents for the above ork will be available from Monday. August 21.
2006 and can be obtained from the Ministry of Tourism. Industry and Commerce
uponpa ymcnt ofa non- refundable sumof G$5.000.00 each.

3. Each Tender must be enclosed in a scaled. plain envelope w which must not. in any
way. identify the Tenderer and should be clearly marked on the top left hand
corner Earth filling of Belvedere Industrial Estate Belvedere Corentyne
Region 6.

4. Each Tender must be accompanied by valid Compliance Certificates from
Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA) and National Insurance Scheme (NIS).
Tenders without valid certificates will be disqualified.

5. Tenders must be addressed as stated below and submitted not later than 09.00 h
on Tuesday. September 05.2006.

Chairman
National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main and IUrquhart Streets Georgetown

6. Tenderers or their representatives are invited to witness the opening of the Bid
Documents on September 5. 2006 at 09:00h at the National Board of
Procurement and Tender Administration boardroom.

7. The National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration does not bind
itself to accept the lowest Tenderand retains the right to reject any Tender i\ilhout
assigning specific
reason (s)


Willet Hamilton
Permanent Secretary
Government ads can be viewed on htt //www Qina.glv.jv,


-----7







14' SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006


Emancipation Day in Trinidad and Tobago:





A highly aesthetic





popular holiday


By Watson R. Denis, PhD

A COUNTRY'S calendar of
national holidays can teach
us a great deal about its vi-
sion of the world, its culture
and history, as well as the be-
liefs and religions that are
professed there.
After following the parade
ofTrinidadians and Tobagonians
on Emancipation Day, last Au-
gust 1st, I proceeded to exam-
ine the country's calendar of na-
tional holidays. Based on their
appellations and resonances, it
is apparent that there are reli-
gious, political, historical, as
well as general holidays. Eman-
cipation Day falls into the cat-
egory of historical holidays.
Historical, in the sense that
on that day, Trinidadians and
Tobagonians commemorate the
proclamation of general free-
dom. In fact, England, for vari-
ous political, economic and his-
torical reasons, declared August
Ist 1834 the end of slavery in
its colonies, among them two
former colonies comprising to-
day the Republic of Trinidad
and Tobago. It was only on Au-
gust 1st 1838 that this act ac-
tually materialised.


What moves me to enter
into a discussion on this holiday
is the manner in which it was
celebrated in Port of Spain. A
popular holiday celebrated in
the highest form of cultural aes-
thetics.
A national holiday becomes
a popular holiday when it is not
confined to the official circles of
power. It is taken over by a
large portion of the populace
and exudes a certain symbolism
that is shared by that part of the
population.
As a result, in Trinidad and
Tobago Emancipation Day was
officially instituted in 1985, but
over the past five years more
and more people have felt the
need to celebrate it through a
number of events. During such
events, the obvious symbolism
is reflected in the African ap-
parel.
I was personally struck by
the African dress donned by
Trinidadians and Tobagonians
during the commemorative pe-
riod leading up to August 1st.
It was visible everywhere from
the Three Queens Concert
(Singing Sandra, Ella Andall,
Miryam Makeba) at the Jean-
Pierre Complex to the Indepen-


dence Square parade. It seemed
to me that the streets of Port of
Spain were transformed into a
large parade of African fashion
where anyone could win a prize
for aesthetics.
For some, it was special oc-
casion apparel. Hairstyles were
superbly coiffed and scarves
were deftly tied high above the
women's heads. Some men were
also conspicuous in their kingly
costumes carrying a staff
symbolising power.
The parade route was
strewn with vivid colours, the
colours of life and power. This
garb was worn by adults as well
as youths and children, which
means that succession is guar-
anteed.
All these beautiful people
marched zealously to the rhyth-
mic beats. On the one hand, the
music vendors on Independence
Square raised their decibels to
the highest level both to attract
new clients and to contribute to
the festivities. On the other
hand, wheeled floats enlivened
the atmosphere.
Naturally, the calypso
reigned supreme, but a large
number of persons moved to
the beat of the musical rhythms


of African origin emanating from
the floats.
Participating in the parade
were such groups as The Eman-
cipation Support Committee,
Mix Mood and Attitudes
Cheerleadings Squad, Procession
of Queens, Ajuka Gbogbo
Orisha Ati Gbogbo Egun,
Mantamby Freedom Drum-
mers, Brotherhood of the Cross
& Star, Indian Walk Community
Council, as well as some
steelbands, that phenomenal art
form invented by local musi-
cians.
All in all, Emancipation
Day is commemorated by wear-
ing majestic African attire, lis-


The Greater

Caribbean This Week


tening and dancing to music
reminiscent of the Alma Mater,
cultural exhibitions, the parade
of music bands playing African
religious incantations, concerts
and friendly gatherings during
which a dish calling to mind the
far-off continent of the ancestors
may even be sampled.
The commemorators have
done their utmost to evoke and
represent Africa, a mystical and
glorious Africa, one of beauty,
splendour and delight. Never-
theless, the commemoration of
the holiday is not only an
idealisation of the glorious past
of Africa, but also portrays a
certain vision of the reality of
today's world.
There were implicit de-
mands in my interlocutors' re-
marks. Some believe that the ac-
quired freedom is not complete
since Blacks do not yet hold the
reins of the world economy.
Others are of the opinion that
some of their fellowmen are not


totally free since they still carry
within the stigma and forms of
the hegemonic thought, not for-
getting the traces of racial dis-
crimination that still pervade.
Once again, a national holi-
day can indicate the extent to
which a nation identifies with its
history and culture. It may also
give somewhat of an idea of its
vision of the world and its fu-
ture, especially when it becomes
the expression of a national con-
science.
Finally, let's say that Eman-
cipation in Trinidad and Tobago
is a holiday that is firmly en-
trenched in the three dimensions
of time or history: the past,
present and future.
(Dr Watson Denis is the
Political Adviser of the Sec-
retariat of the Association of
Caribbean States. The opin-
ions expressed are not neces-
sarily the official views of the
ACS. Feedback can be sent to
mail@acs-aec.org)


Student diagnosis


(From page 13)

ciently guided from one step
to the other.

CURRICULUM
Sequencing of the curriculum
materials Apart from the lo-
cation and use of appropriate
materials the teacher can move
at a pace that is suitable to the
group or individuals:

(a) establishing a base
skill
(b) movement from one
level to another
(c) redeeming value of
the skill at any time in the
programme
(d) the suitability of the
materials to the teacher for a
particular skill or skills
(e) establishing appropri-
ate assessment levels and pro-
cedures

The sequencing must be
tied to flexibility and to allow
for individual differences, the
pace at which children will learn
and not only as individuals but
as groups.
Too often only lip service
is given to this ideal because of
too much opposition to change
from an established system and
experienced ande entrenched edu-
caltors.

DESIGNING EFFECTIVE
INSTRUCTIONAL
SYSTEMS '
Th'' v ,C V, 1o; <. iillpol .ill

ar.l I" lilt.' t; ,'-". *j rlCJ, 0
proigramm.nle ooun daiTonls and cri-
tenorn-referencc tests (based on
its criteria or obhictives).

ta) The aim of a place-
ment programinle is to help
teachers to link student diagnos-
tic scores to the programme
foundation. These are to be
specific to help determine the


students' strengths or weak-
nesses. Teachers should not
guess the location of the
programme skills or it will ad-
versely affect instructions.

(b) Criterion reference
tests. This is when the chil-
dren are evaluated based on the
group performance. In this in-
stance, it is the skills to be
learned, instructional format,
programme offerings, etc. The
appropriate content of the cur-
riculum is judged from the group
performance.

(c) Placement param-
eters. Each system may de-
velop its own parameters for
placing students. There are
points, for example, where stu-
dents should not be placed.
The aim is to reduce student
failure because of misplacement
and to increase probability of
passes. It may be used to de-
velop a set of criteria or condi-
tions before the test is adminis-
tered.

Placement parameters may
be hierarchical or cyclical where
one skill is built on another
with a sequence. A child will
then nmcv to a higher level of
competency. Learning is often
built in nits with mastering of
one and hen to the next.
The .' is no movement if a
pre-detc nined number of skills


are not mastered. The degree of
stringency and flexibility must
be considered by teachers and
test designers.
The more restrictive the
placement parameters, the less
chance there will be of over
placement. Similarly, undue
stringency may mean under
placement.

CONCLUSION
The issue of psychological
testing has long been a contro-
versy, especially to children of
minorities and the disadvan-
taged.
Because much resides with
tests scores, parents and teach-
ers are understandably cogni-
zant. They are used for place-
ment in colleges, to determine
scholarships and educational di-
agnosis.
Over the years the instru-
ments have become more so-
phisticated and while some are
calling to end its abuse, others
are asking not to throw out the
proverbial baby with the
bathwater.
Our psychometricans, psy-
chologists and teachers need to
become more skilful in the use
of diagnostic and placement of
evaluative tools.
It is the way to become
more systematic and efficient
in adequate diagnosis test
and proper placement of our
student:,.


S u


COMMUNITY ANIMAL FIRST AID

ASSISTANTS

TRAINING PROGRAMME


Oxfam in collaboration with the Ministry of Fisheries Crops and
Livestock will be providing two (2) training programmes for
CommunityAnimal FirstAidAssistants in Regions 2, 4 and 5.
This training is intensive and will be held for four (4) days a week for
four (4) weeks. Programmes will be conducted from mid-September
to mid-October 2006 in Region 2 and October 2006 in Region 4.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
The minimum entry requirements are:
* Applicants should be above 18 years old
* Should have at least a secondary education
* Should be living in one of the following areas; Regions 4 and
5: East Coast (Haslington to Mahaica Bridge), Mahaica,
Mahaicony or Abary Rivers, and Mahaicory Village,
Mahaica Village. Region 2: Essequibo Coast and Pomeroon.

Females are especially encouraged to apply

Applications should be- submitted within rEeconmmndat. III i2'11e, -'
V\ilage CounciiSo,.

Application forms can be uplifted from RDC/N C Offices Regiors
2,4and5
Applications for both training should reach the following address by
August 23,2006:

The Project Manager, Oxfam, Lot I Cummings & Lamaha Streets,
Alberttown, Georgetown.


14' -'


SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006




SUNDAY CHRONICLE Auaust 20. 2006


MARINE DEVELOPMENT, MACHINERY & EQUIPMENT
According to the budget estimates of 1992, no funds were allocated for machinery and
operational equipment for the Guyana Defence Force.

G$2.015 BILLION PER ANNUM ON EMPLOYMENT COSTS
compared with G$264M in 1992.

MORE THAN G$65 MILLION PER ANNUM ON TRAINING FOR
THE GUYANA DEFENCE FORCE
compared with G$0.9 million spent for the same purpose in 1992.
The PPP/C is committed to providing our soldiers with the best possible
conditions of work and to transform the Guyana Defence Force into
one of the most modern and effective in the Caribbean.



.VOTE PPP/C E.XJ
. .. .,. g f




16 SUNDAY CF
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RONICLE August 20, 2006 17


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18 SUN0AY CHRONICLE August 20Qo2006



PUT

YANA

N YOUR

HEART

GAP-ROAR HAS ALWAYS
INSISTED THAT WE IN'
GUYANA HAVE TO
AGGRESSIVELY BREAK IN
TO THE NEW MARKETS
OF SOUTH AMERICA, WE
HAVE TO TAKE
ADVANTAGE OF
NORTHERN BRAZIL.
NORTHERN BRAZIL
ALONE IHAS A
POPULATION OF OVER 15
MILLION PEOPLE THAT :
GUYANESE PRODUCTS'
CAN TAP INTO SO GAP-
ROAR WILL
AGGRESSIVELY,
AGGRESSIVELY I SAY TAP
INTO NORTHERN/SOUTH
AMERICAN MARKETS.
Ra m. : :-- 7







SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006 lT


(From page 12)
were aware of us."
But at tradeshows, a gap in attendance is all it takes for opera-
tors to set their sites on a different budding destination; consistent
attendance is key.
But, as Tony says, Guyana didn't come to this year's BBWF
unprepared. "The current GTA-GTIS birding programme, with as-
pects like the marketing plan, the new website
(www.guyanabirds.com), and planned familiarization tours for me-
dia and operators, has put Guyana in people's minds."
Tony and his colleagues have been hitting the tradeshow circuit
for years, and the results of their hard work can be seen through-
out the fair.
Six major tour operators at BBWF are handing out full-colour
catalogues marketing birding trips to Guyana. Tony developed the
itineraries and he now says, "it's necessary to drive customers to
that page of the brochure."
One way of attaining this goal is by convincing the tour opera-
tors and their guides that Guyana is an ideal destination for their
clients. The best way to do this is through a familiarization trip, or
fam trip as it is called in the industry.
Judy Karwacki, a niche tourism marketing specialist from
Canada, has been hard at work planning one in Guyana for No-
vember.
Grinning, Judy joins the conversation. "We have developed an
'A' team of nine birding tourism operators and all have accepted
our invitations." And, she continues, "We've even had to turn down
some other operators."
It seems Guyana's reputation as a pristine tourism destination
is growing.
When asked about Guyana, Hillary Bradt of Bradt Travel Guides
said "Guyana is on the cusp," and that a guidebook is in the plan-
ning stages.
The editors of Birds Illustrated and Birdwatch magazines both
say they would be interested in looking at Guyana as a destination
for their readers. And in two days, Judy and Tony have talked to
15 tour operators who have shown a strong interest in running trips
to Guyana in the future.
Pleased with the results gained from the entire team, Tony says,
"We have created momentum."
Now it's time for Guyana to harness this momentum and
move forward.


PUSHING Guyana birding: Diane McTurk, left, and Indira
Anandjit


(From page 10)

the bridge is therefore
significantly fewer (39 in-
stead of 106 over the same
length).
The anchoring system of
the bridge is completely dif-
ferent. The Demerara Bridge
holds on to concrete blocks
as laid out on the riverbed.
The Berbice Bridge will
be anchored to the river bed,
using an offshore, anchor type
device specifically designed
for the soil conditions in the
Berbice River. The anchor
will be pressed into the river-
bed to approximately 18
metres deep and will have a
holding power of 50 tons
each.
The bridge also will have
a high span passage for river
traffic, with a clear opening
of 12 metres high and 40


metres width. In order to al-
low sea going vessels to pass,
a similar retracting system as
applied on the Demerara
Bridge will be installed.
Another major development
will be the road decks.
The construction of the
decks is made of boxes. The
type of construction will retain
its form better than the decking
panels on the Demerara Bridge.
Special bolts guarantee no
loosing up from the construc-
tion.
The surface of the decks
consists of a thin layer of ep-
oxy and a mixture of bauxite
granulate. This provides a very
high quality and durable anti-
skid road surface with a mini-
mum of noise production as
traffic passes.
At this moment, our engi-
neers and designers are working
hard to prepare all the bridging


parts, elements, pontoons an-
chorage and drive and control
systems.
We expect to start prepara-
tions on site from October 1st,
2006.
Our work site base will be
established next to the ferry
selling in Rosignol, while our
head office shall be established
in Georgetown.
Local staff shall be con-
tracted through the company's
Industrial Fabrication Project
Services, one of our sub-con-
tractors.
Physically, the first instal-
lation activities on site will be
visible by the end of this year.
Completion of the project is
scheduled for the first quarter of
2008.
The consortium of Bosch
Rexroth and Mabey & Johnson,
and the project management,
will be in the hands of Bosch


Rexroth B.V.
I'm proud to be in the po-
sition of Project Manager on
site of such a challenging
project.
Rexroth Bosch is a
US$43 billion company
based in Holland with ties to
Germany. It is among the
leading technology groups in
systems and engineering with
operations in 18 lines of busi-
ness worldwide."
Henny Muskens will be
based in Guyana perma-
nently during the construc-
tion of the bridge across the
Berbice River.
He has become some-
what of a "naturalised
Guyanese citizen", as he
has also cemented other
social ties to the Guyana
location.'(ISSUED BY
BERBICE BRIDGE COM-
PANY INC)


THE GUYANA OIL COMPANY LTD





CUSTOMER SALES OFFICER
Qualifications and Experience

Degree in Management/Economics/Engineering plus two (2) years experience
OR
Diploma in Marketing/Management plus five (5) years experience
OR
Five subjects GCEICXC inclusive of Mathematics and English Language plus five (5) years experience.
Must be computer literate Microsoft, Excel
Essential Functions:
Responsibility for Marketing Bituminous products.
Develop a Customer Database for Bituminous products and lubricants handled by the Marketing
Department.
Maintain contact with key Customers.
Function as Marketing Assistant Develop new ideas & marketing strategies to ensure greater market
share of products sold by the Company.
Maintain record of the Competition in the Market and advise, assist and make recommendations to the
Marketing Manager.
* Execute all assigned special mandates and other related functions.
Must posses a valid driver's licence and be the owner of a vehicle

CUSTOMER SALES REPRESENTATIVE
Qualifications & Experience

Diploma in Marketing/Management/Economics. Plus .hrtce (3) years experience
OR
Three (3) subjects GCE/CXC including M. i.hn'-i,..is and English Language plus three (3) years
experience in Sales

Essential Functions:
Responsibility for marketing in th. West Coast Demerara to Linden areas the Company's products Fuel.
Lubricants & Bitumin
* SetF .'roliratl.i the Company's products to new' and existing Customers in the assigned region as directed
by the Marketing Manager and in accordance r Sales C .i- and Targets.
* Review Customers Salets. Records and mrak recomnmendaliiors to the, Marketing Manager i -.:
* Prepare in conjunction with tr' e Mar.i.ng I-a'icanagpl. Annual Sales Forcr'as.tor Rf R.eio Under control
I Advsse, assist and make recommendations to the Marl , i Manager, on all natlers . ; within hs
J lj:.L;in 1' ..a( and execute ai assgned special nma'daers and other related duties
Must posses a valid driver's licence and be the owner of a vehicle

SALARY/COMM;SSION & BENEFIT"
Attractive, iepe ribnri orn qualification and experience.
Applications '-:':t .. ,' i l l curriculum vidIe aln names of two(2) refero s should be submiined bv 15:00
hours on September 11. 2100Gi -o
Administrative Manager/Company Secretary.-
The Guyana Oil Company Limited,
166 Waterloo Street
Georgetown


'I'm ready to bridge the ...






20 --- SUNDAY CHRDNICLEAug'st 220, 2006


$40,000 Back-to-School "All-Correct"

CTtl, CROSSWORD COMPETITION

20 1 1 E jA E110 11EEE' R


R
E
12

B


R


NA\M E: ........................ .................... .......... .....

A. D D R ES:.S:......................... .... ........... ..................


ACROSS:

1. Musical term.
5. Word used to
indicate an
alternative.
7. Low case (Abbr.).
8. Acronym for
"Winning Eleven".
9. A conceited and
self-centered
person.
12. Proverb: "Better
no *** than '** not
enforced".
13. Legalterm.
14. Broadband
Network (Abbr.).
15. Warrant Officer
(Abbr.).
18. An advertisement.
19. Point on the
compass.
20, River on the Right
Bank of the
Mazaruni River in

m Ia ,f ii II


Hi Fans!
The Official Solution of this
competition is now presented
to you. Must-Be-Won'
competitions always have
winners and at last Friday's
drawing Mr. Desmond Pitt
emerged the winner with two
'two-errors' entries.
-Congratulations to our newest
winner. He out-played several
players with three errors to
-capture this prize.


Guyana.
23. Finalist at the Football
World Cup tournament in
1998.
25. A very aromatic
beverage that replaces
coffee with an
advantage, as it is
digestive,
healthy and nutritious.
27. Synonym for the noun,
cure.
29. "Blessed is the man to
whom the Lord will not
******sin." Romans4:8.
32. Ernst &Young
(accounting firm).
33. Container with handle.

DOWN:

2. Musical instrument.
3. Athletic Club (Abbr.).
4. Synonym for the word,
cure.
5. Word used to express
sudden pain.
6. Legal term.
7. Low tension. (Abbr.).

. . .;' ~l~:-


Mr. Desmond Pitt of Mahaica,
E.C.D and the following 40+
and 80+ entries players are
required to collect their prizes
from the Georgetown Head-
Office on Wednesday, August
23, 2006: Mr. R. Khan, R.
Millington, Dennis Dillon, C. E.
Bracelly, S. Chapman, J. R.
Lord, R. Samai, and S. M.
Dinool. A suitable form of
identification is also required
when uplifting payment.

Another simple Back-to-
School puzzle for $40.000.00
is presented to you. This time
it's an "All-Correct"
competition and it is schedule
to be drawn on Friday,
September01, 2006. The rules
of the competition remain the
same, except that an all-correct
entry wins the prize money of
$40,000.00.

The additional incentives of
$1,000.00 and $2,000.00 for
the 40+ and 80+ entries


S \ : ....................................... ..... ... ... .............. ..

1)1 ) S : ........................ .. ...... ..... ......... .... ....


9. Part of the human
anatomy.
10. "The more I saw of foreign
countries the more I loved
my ***." De Delloy.
11. The night of 22" and 23'"
August 1791. in Santo
Domingo (today Haiti and
the Dominican Republic)
*** the beginning of the
uprising that would play a
crucial role in the abolition
of the transatlantic slave
trade.
16. Organisation of African
Unity (Abbr.).


17. River on the Left Bank of
the Mazaruni River in
Guyana.
21. Preposition.
22. Winner of the Football
World Cup tournament in
2002.
24. Synonym for the verb,.
intertwine.
26. "Men are not govemed by
justice, but by law or
persuasion. When **** refuse
to be govemed by law or
persuasion, **** have to be
govemed by force, or fraud,
or both.". George Bernard


W IS EB S I

AC, ad, aid, a at attend, BNN, Brazil, ,;
Brazil, dolce, egoist, elbow. EY, fix, forte,
France. ICUL, impute, ITU, join, jug, knit,
law, LC, lien, LT, malt. mug, NE, OAU, or,
organ, OW, own, plea, PN, remedy, retire,
revoke, saw, SE, they, TE, Wabaru, i_
Waiamu, Wanapu; Waparu, WE, ; WO.


groupings are in effect.
If you play smart you can win
this offer of $40.000.00.
Remember, it's an "All-
Correct" competition. You
can be another winner. So
play smart and WIN!

It's puzzling, exciting,
informative and
educational.

The more you play the
greater is the possibility of
winning. The amount of
entries submitted must be
covered by the relevant sums
of money (i.e, $20.00 for
each entry or $40.00 for two
as they appear in the Sunday
and Wednesday Chronicles)
or they will not be judged.
Then place those entries in a
Chronicle Crossword box at
a location nearest to you.

If you need coupons and
clues just purchase a copy of


the Sunday or Wednesday
Chronicle. For additional
coupons, purchases can be
made at our offices in
Linden, New Amsterdam
and Georgetown. You can
also obtain coupons from Mr.
Vincent Mercurius of
D'Edward Village, Rosignol,
Berbice. They cost $20.00
each or $40.00 for two as
they appear in the Sunday
and Wednesday Chronicles.

Players are reminded that no
entry is opened before
12:30pm on the day the
puzzle is drawn and judging
does not begin before
4:30pm when the last entry
is opened. The solution to
the puzzle is not known
before that time.

Thanks

Crossword Committee


. . .-.. . .*..I ,.- . '. ".


Black New York frets

changing face of Harlem


By Daniel Trotta

NEW YORK (Reuters) Nick
Bunning represents either
the greatest threat or the
greatest hope for Harlem,
New York's famous, predomi-
nantly black neighbourhood.
Bunning is an architect who
restores Harlem townhouses to
their former grandeur. His work
is part of a construction boom
that is remaking Harlemn now
one o( thle nore desirable places
to live in New York's hot prop-
crly market.
Therein lies the fear of
many liarlem residents, who
sa\ soaring property values
may price poorer and mainly
black people out and deprive
Harlem of its heritage, going
back to Harlem's great jazz
clubs of the 1920s and '30s.
For Bunning. 47 and w white.
howe\xer man\ wealthier people
move in. Harleln will still retain
its character.
"Harlem's always going to
have a gritty quality to it." said
Bunning. whose tattoos snake
out front beneath the collar and
sleeves of his New York Yan-
kees jersey.
According to the 2000 cen-
sus, blacks outnumber whites
82.750 to 2.189 in Central
Harlem. The original Cotton
Club may be gone, but the
Apollo Theater remains.
"It's never going to be pol-
ished. There's going to be
wealthy families mixed in with
much less wealthy families."


Harlem.
SHADES OF GRAY
Gentrification of Harlem is
not as simple as black and
white. There is construction on
almost every block, which some
neighbours welcome for improv-
ing blighted areas. Although
working-class families have been
forced out, so have criminals.
Substandard housing has been
improved.
But some say safeguards
for the poor are under attack by
landlords seeking to bring in
white-collar tenants.
"T'his is the last hastion of
affordable real estate in Manhat-
tan and there is an effort to
force people out." Ne\ York
State Assemblyman Adriano
Espaillat said. citing eviction
notice data "It devastates these
cultural enclaves w which are so
much a part of the city."
The districts of East. West
and Central Harlem have
145.368 housing units, accord-
ing to city data. Some 51.216
are designated "affordable" and
reserved for people of moderate
to low income. A further 24.207
are public housing, or
"projects."
Raymond Russell, a retired
corrections officer, remembers
when "rib joints" and black
Muslim "steak and take" restau-
rants typified Harlem busi-
nesses, unlike the sneaker stores
and gold shops of today.
"What made Harlem Harlem
is no more." said Russell. 54.


MtN play cness on me corner or Lennox Avenue ano
125th Street in the Harlem neighbourhood of New York.
(REUTERS/Keith Bedford)


Still, the trend is clear.
From 2000 to 2005. an es-
timated 32.500 blacks moved
out and some 22.800 whites
moved in to the Congressional
district that includes Harlem
and other neighborhoods in the
north of New York City, U.S.
Census Bureau data show.
"A lot of white folks have
come through here and really
changed the complexion of the
neighbourhood," said Bernard
Moore, 51. an unemployed black
carpenter who said he cannot find
work in Harlem because contractors
bring in their own crews of largely
immigrant workers.
"The cost of rent is so high
even churches are selling their
buildings to prospective apart-
ment buildings that are out of
reach for most black folks,"
Moore said.
Housing prices on the open
market in Harlem have soared
247 per cent in the past 10
years to $458 per square foot
compared with a 217 per cent
climb in the whole of Manhat-
tan to $965 per square foot, ac-
cording to Miller Samuel real es-
tate appraisers.
In the middle of the trans-
formation, former U.S. President
Bill Clinton opened an office on
125th Street, the centre of
. "i1 , 1.. ,


"The old-timers can't live here
anymore. The culture is eroding.
Old people, they held it to-
gether as a community."
His musical tastes, too, are
in the past.
"You could walk down the
block hearing jazz all the time.
You don't hear that anymore,"
he said. "I'm a jazz man. Hip
hop's got to go."
Harlem was not always pre-
dominantly black. It changed
from farming village in the
1700s to upper class redoubt in
the 1800s to magnet for blacks
migrating from the south in the
last century.
Bunning. the architect, has
lived in Harlem for 10 years.
patrolling the streets as a cop
for part of that time and serv-
ing on the Community Board.
He's still trying to fit in.
He tells how once when he
was walking throOgh the
neighbourhood a black man
called out, "There's a real light-
skinned brother over there."
"I thought that's a cool
thing. Maybe I'm fitting in,"
Bunning said. Later, coming
back, "A different guy says
'You might have all those tat,
toos but you still ain't noth-
ing.' And I thought maybe
I'm not fitting in,"
,:! > ;,, .,


- -~U"~""""~Wes~s~PsW"~""~~;;"~' *'~ ''~Q~~


. i I -.







SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006 21


^^^^^*i^^_^^^~~~~~~ ~ ~ ^^ ^ W ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ *^^- -1


DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE
CLOSURE TO ROAD TRAFFIC


NCN INC. CHANNEL 11

02:00 h NCN 6 O'clock
News Magazine (R/B)
02:30 h Late Nite with
GINA
03:00 h Movie
05:00 h The Mystery of the
Body
05:30 h Newtown Gospel
Hour
06:00 h NCN 6 0' Clock
News Magazine (R/B)
06:30 h BBC News
07:00 h Voice of Victory
07:30 h Feature
08:00 h Lifting Guyana to
Greatness
08:30 h Rally Round Up
09:00 h Anmol Geet
10:00 h Close Up Conflict
Tran lforniat ion
10:3'0 h FCtuL'H '
1 i:00 h tol..nitrc!ct h

11:30 h Weekly Digest



14:30 h Catholic Magazine
15:00 h Grow with IPED
16:00 h Cricket Show with
Anthony Khemraj Live
16:30 h Family Forum
17:00 h Lutheran Men's
Fellowship
17:30 h Guysuco Round Up
18:00 h NCN 6 O'clock
News Magazine Live


18:30 h Kala Milan
19:00 h One on One
19:30 h Close Up
20:00 h Feature
21:00 h Documentary
21:30 h Planitum Vz Hour
Entertainment
22:00 h Movie


Channel 13

09:00 h Hope for Today
10:00 h Revival Crusaders
10:30 h Children Gospel
14:00 h Charlotte Street
Wesleyan Church
14:30 h Methodist Church in
Guyana
15:00 h -TBN
15:30 h Faith & Truth
16:00 h Golf
18:00 h -Movie
20:00 I0h Mlo\ic


Channel 46

07:30 h Indian Music Video
08:00 h Live with RY
11:00 h -Movie
13:00 h Discovery Health
14:00 h Travelers Extreme -
Live
15:00 h Movie
17:00 h- Movie
19:00 h Movie
21:00 h Khans Family Time
21:30 h CAC 2006 Women
Single Finals (Squash)


00:00 h Sign Off


MTV

05:45 h Inspirational
Melodies
06:00 h- Bhajan Melodies
06:15 h Muslim Melodies
06:30 h Religious Melodies
06:45 h Emma's Taxi Music
Break
07:00 h Dabi's Musical Hour
07:30 h Transpacific Bhajan
Hour
08:00 h Christ for the Nation
(Live)
08:30 h Avon Video & DVD
Musical Melodies
09:00 h Caribbean Temptation
Music Nix Gospel
09:30 h Ral;a\ a.tl
10:0(0 h Indian Movie
13: '0h Rh\thm BlIt
14:00 11 ViId a"'< Gos'pe'l lour
14:30 h Sitco0m
15:00 h Entertaining Mantra
15:30 h Focus on Youths in
Islam


16:00 h Bollywood Sensation
17:00 h Birthday & Other
Greetings
17:15 h Death
Announcements
18:30 h GINA Programmes
19:30 h IBE Highlights Live
20:30 h Indian Movie
23:00 h English Movie
Sign Off


Channel 4

06:30 h Sign On
06:31 h Morning Melodies
(Old)
07:00 h Cartoons Movie
09:00 h Patsans Premanjali
10:00 h Movie (Religious)
12:0-0 I -Movie
14:00 h Family Movie
10:00 h Movie PG
I S:t00 h \,1j\it moo \ ilb
Lix\c)
19.00 Iahshir Voice ol Islam
20:00 h SITVS Creole Gaff
21:00 h Movie
23:00 h Movie
01:00 h Sign Off


For Sunday, August 20,2006 14:30h
For Monday, August 21,2006 14:30h
For Tuesday, August 22,2006 14:30h
For Ocean Going Vessels opening lasts about 1-1b2hrs


PEDE S -- DO NO_.S T


SI


16:15/20:30 hrs "MUJHEKUCH KEHNA HAl"
S "X MEN 3 tli Tusshar& Kareena i
STHE LAST STAND" I 16:15/20:30 hrs
I plus "TAKE THE LEAD
I "BIG MOUM _S with Antonio Banderas
HOUSE 2"
I with Martin Lawrence SUPERM RETURNS
*"SUPERMAN RETURNS '


1 .
Ilk l .dillI


M o nd] Cit y C]ioutncffl!B











to the Daily and Sunday







NEWS PAPER


and enjoy the DISCOUNTS offered


For periods of: 3 months

6 months

dnd 12 months
FOR MOK' ImOKNMATION
CALL : 225-447.5/22fiv.243-9

FREE A1,LIVEH1'


-------i~-L---a---s---------i m


VACANCY


SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN

An established Corporate client is looking for a Systems Technician.
The selected applicant will oversee and monitor the client Local and
Wide Area Network among other responsibilities.

Key Responsibilities
* Configure user privileges in accordance with Corporate Network
Access Levels.
Monitor and maintain optimum performance of the corporate servers
at various locations.
Install, configure and maintain network routers, hubs, and switches
within the corporate Local and Wide Area Networks.
Perform maintenance, configuration, installation and troubleshooting /
repairing of servers, desktops, workstations, printers.
Monitor and track upgrades, fixes, etc. for PC platforms.
Install, upgrade and maintain virus software.
Maintain inventory for all PC's and related equipment.
Support specialized project development activities associated with
the computer environment.

Skills Profile:
COMPTIA A+, MCSE certification or related discipline
Degree / Diploma in Computer Science from a recognized university.
Experience in a Windows / network administrative environment.
PC troubleshooting and technical support and knowledge of structured
cabling and electronic and electrical repairs would be an asset.

Applications must be submitted to the:

Officer-In-Charge Human Resources and Administration
PO Box: 101080
Georgetown
.7 ..,- '. .,- ,- " . v .-,--'-,- ., . .-., ,-. *,.* ,>.^,-.,^

......... ... -- ............... .. ..... .. -I.- . ... ......................... .. .. .............


MM9


SUBJETTCHANGE








22 SUNDAYCHRONICLE August 20,2006




.... .,
COUNSELLING 22, -A-4-. 17 Falx: 2l).;-Of(;6,
WANTED otr c'Wtl il', tls ;a
- f- .--l I LAND FOR SALE FOR HIREW tl, llnAvc ltc
f LEGALS BEAUTY SALON PROPERTY FOR SALE EDUCATIONAL I el ir I'ark
TO LET LEARN TO DRIVE HERBAL MEDICINE AUTO SALES ( (Georv(o,'.
SERVICES DRESSMAKING HEALTH MASSAGE


AS C!lK!YO.IADSO.N.IHEFIRSTlDYOFAPP.EARANC .IFORQUEIECAIAI |MA|.].i6-3ffi)


BUIDLING Contractor -
mason38-FT. BOAT, seine,
englumbin, ice boxlin. 1 Pool Table,
1 Canter, 1 Nissan Pick Up, 1



CoronaCar Tel. 275-0344/275-and reliable
0305



BUIDLING Contractor -
mason, carpentry, painting,

services. Free estimates. Call
622-0267, 629-2239.



VISIT Natural Attraction
Salon, 291 Church Street. We
specialise in relaxing, cuts, hair
colour, jerry curling, pedicures,
manicures, etc. Tel. 226-7754.
INDRA'S Beauty Salon,
122 Oronoque Street, for cold
wave, straightening, facial,
manicure, scalp treatment and
design on nails. Also Beauty
Culture available. Tel. 227-
1601.



WORK from home for
US$$$$ weekly. Information?
Send stamped envelope to
Nicola Archer, P.O. Box 12154
Georgetown, Guyana.
BE your own boss. Use
your spare time filling 100
envelopes for US$500 or more
weekly. For information send
stamped self-addressed
envelope to Randolph Williams,
P.O. Box 12154 Georgetown,
Guyana.
CONTROL your income
working from home filling 100
envelopes for US$500 or
more weekly. For information,
send- stamped self-addressed
envelope to Nathaniel
Williams, PO Box 12154
Georgetown, Guyana.



FOR PROFESSIONAL
COMPUTER Repairs, Sales &
Services Call Kersting's
Computer Repairs & Sales
Centre @ 227-8361, 618-8283.
Home & Office Services
available. 24 hrs.
www.kerstings.org.



ARE you cursed,
depressed, demon possessed
OR need finance? Call
Apostle Randolph Williams -
# 261-6050 (20:00 h 23:00
h.)



DOLLY'S Auto Rental -
272 Bissessar Avenue,
Prashad Nagar,
Georgetown. Phone 225-
7126, 226-3693. Email:
dollysautorenatal@yahoo.com



HEAVENLY Sunlight Play
Group & Day Care Centre. 28
Creen Street, Newburg. Tel. #
227-0087, 227-7291.
ENROL at May Flower Play
Group & Day Care Centre at 104
Brickdam (opposite GT&T).
Places are available for Sept.
Affordable fees. Phone 226-
2248 or 621-8761 for more
information.



FOR all types of
dressmaking uniform and
altering at affordable price
in Kitty and around G/town.
Call Sharon 649-2358.
JEAN offers courses in
Elementary to Advance
stages in Dressmaking, Fabric
Designing, Curtains,
Cushions, Soft toys, Bedroom
Elegance, Foral, Cake
Decoration. 226-9548. Kitty -
dressmaking services also.


K. SANKAR of Courbane
Pk., Annandale offers
Elementary. Intermediate &
Advance Dressmaking
Courses. Call 220-9532. 8
am 8 pm.



PRIVATE Tutoring
Service. All subject areas
including phonics. Call
231-7578, 615-4246, 223-
0914.
EVERGREEN Nature
Study Club (Regionsl-10)
www.sdnp. org.gy/
evergreen. TEL. 226-
4634, 627-9285. 664-
5947
THE LANGUAGE
INSTITUTE INC. Foreign
Language Courses for
children (3 13 yrs.), CXC
Students (4th & 5th Formers)
and Adults. Tel. 231-7303.
EARN a Certificate,
Diploma or Degree, in any part
of the world from home
T H R O U G H
CORRESPONDENCE. For
information, call CFI Global
Education Link #261-5079.
CLASSES will be
offered by competent and
qualified teachers in
panish, English A Forms 3
- 5, POB, POA, Maths,
Reading. Contact 227-
4563, 628-6703. At the
Maraj Building.
ENROL now for City &
Guilds, Pitman
qualifications English,
Reading, Writing,
Typewriting, Shorthand,
Office Procedures and
Computer Lessons. Personal
attention. Campville
Secretarial School. Tel.
226-0708.
ENROL now at XENON
ACADEMY established &
recognized private school -
Nursery to Secondary. Tank
Street, Grove Public Road,
EBD. Tel. 624-4659. Also
our new Branch in Linden,
Lot 2 Burnham Drive,
Wismar. Tel. 442-0720.
Register today at XENON
ACADEMY.
APEX EDUCATION -
Come celebrate with us this
September our 91h
Anniversary. Now
registering for full-time
classes for academic year
2006 2007 (up to 20%
discounts). Nursery through
Primary to Secondary
faculties in over 15 subject
areas. 22 Atlantic Gardens,
East Coast Demerara. 220-
8265, 220-9303 & 626-
2080.
INTERNATIONAL
BUSINESS COLLEGE, 262
THOMAS STREET, NORTH
CUMMINGSBURG, GITOWN.
IBC is currently registering
students for the following
classes: (1) Full-time
Secondary School for
Forms 1 5: (2) Evening
Classes for Adults and CXC
Repeaters; (3) Association of
Business Executives (ABE)
and (4) Certificate
Computer Courses. Call
today for more information.
TEL. 225-5474, 223-7210
AND 225-2397.- IBC -
Student Success is our
greatest Concern.
IMPERIAL COLLEGE is
registering students for Full-
time Classes (Forms 1 5).
Afternoon lessons for
secondary school pupils,
Evening classes for Adults,
Foundation Classes for early
school leavers, CXC
repeaters and computer
courses. Subjects offered
are: Math, English A & B, all
Science, Arts and Business
subjects. CONTACT US AT
FIRST FEDERATION
BUILDING, 6 CROAL AND
KING STREETS OR 227-
7627, 227-3768 & 647-
9434. AFFORDABLE
MONTHLY FEE OF $1 000
PER SUBJECT.


SHERIFF Canter Service,
reasonable rates. 227-3336 or
231-4110.



SCARPOTIC Itch ulcer
pain, cholesterol pressure,
gall stone, impotentcy, colds.
20-7342, 608-1309.



MEMBERSHIP or
exchange novels, story books,
magazines, educational &
informative. Juliette's Book
Library, 143 West Ruimveldt (by
GILHUYS Square). Tel. 223-
8237 or 648-6098, 9 am 3 pm
Mon- Fri., 8:30 am 5 pm -
Sat. & Sun. 10 am 4 pm.



PRUDENTIAL School of
Motoring "You Train to Pass".
248 Forshaw St., Q/town. 227-
1063, 226-7874.
ENROL at Genesis
Driving School. Manual &
automatic. 48 Princes and
Camp Sts. Summer Classes
$10 000. Tel. 225-7755.
ENROL now at Shalom
Driving School. Lot 2 Croal
Street, Stabroek. You could
also obtain an International
Driver's Permit. For more
information, call 227-3869, 622-
8162, 611-9038.
R.K's Creating Masters
in Driving since 1979.
Students need security and
comfort to learn. Students
must kanow who they deal
with. Driving is serious
business, not a fly by night
business. R.K's Institute of
Motoring. 125, Regent Road,
Bourda.



MRS. SINGH'S Massage
Hotel and Home Service
available by appointment. I
also work at my home. Tel.
220-4842, 615-6665.
STRESSED out? Over
worked? Try Massage
Therapy. It releases muscular
and mental tension. Certified
Massage Therapist Ulelli
Verbeke. 615-8747.



MAGAZINE of Worldwide
Pen Friend. Information?
Send stamped envelope -
CFI, PO Box 12154
Georgetown, Guyana.
28 YRS. female seeks pen
pals. Hobbies: Reading, writing,
swimming, cooking, etc. Write
to: Priya Deodat, Morashee,
High Level, EBE, c/o Parika Post
Office.
COMMUNICATE with
interested persons by
telephone for friendship or
serious relations. Call CFI -
Telephone Friendship Link -
261-5079, Everyday, 07:00 to
21:00 h.
LOOKING for friends or a
serious relationship? Call The
Junior/Senior/Single Dating
Service, 18 80 yrs. Immediate
link after registration. Mon. -
8:30 am 5 pm, Sat. only 10
am 4 pm. Tel. 223-8237. 648-
6098.
FORTY years old East
Indian male who describes
himself as honest, decent, non-
alcoholic and non-smoker
seeks pen friends between the
ages of 20 and 50 years
worldwide for serious
correspondship. Full details
along with recent full pose
photograph required. Write to
Lall, P.O. Box 101778,
Georgetown, Guyana. Only
responses with photos will be
answered.


WIZARD Cabs short drops
$260, Splashmins, Parika $3
500, Airport special $3 500,
($5 000 return with one hour
waiting time). Call 225-7722.

SPIRI !IAL JIILIN
SPIRITUAL Healing Lord
Shiva International Interfaith
Trans-healing Gifted
spiritual Healer. Love
problems, demonic
possession etc. Helps cure
arthritis, diabetes, pressure,
skin problem, etc. Tel. 333-
3611.



SERVICE done to all
Satellite Dishes. Parts of sale.
Call 623-4686, 223-4731.
PRESSURE WASHER
REPAIRS AND REBUILDING.
CALL 627-7835.
INVESTMENT no need
to work, invest and earn $25
000 per month. For info, call
276-1195, 618-0701.
TECHNICIANS available
for appliance repairs -
washers, dryers, microwaves,
stoves, deep fryers, etc. Call
622-4521/218-0050.


S 1Canadian mmigratin

Balwant Persaud
Associates Certified
Canadian Immigration
Consultants of Toronto,
Canada can produce results
and solutions for alv our,
immi.!i r -.!0 maltelrs and
O SU."l .:S C ', A
Lawyers tha are Approved
by the Canadian Governmenl
Skllea Workers. 5 '. ',,,, ..,:
Students. Work Permns.
Rekzf ees. Family S nsorhlipsn
ppeais for Refused Cases, etc



Email:
Ca.n .da


SCHOOL bus available.
Ensure your children are
transported to and from school
safely at a reasonable price.
Call 223-2814, 642-7274.
FOR all your construction,
repairs renovations, as well as
masonry, varnishing plumbing
and painting, contact
Mohamed on 223-9710/614-
6634.
FOR reliable and accurate
preparation of Accounts Taxes,
projections, NIS, PAYE and
other accounting related
matters. P.O. Box 101-601. Call
cell 647-9592.
FOR efficient service and
repairs washing machines, gas
stoves, microwaves,
refrigerators, etc. Telephone
227-0060, 616-5568,
Freezezone Enterprises 6 'A'
Shell Road, Kitty.



TRUCK DRIVERS
Kwakwani Logging Grant. Tel.
629-0551.
1 TRUCK Driver. Contact
233-2423. Goldfield Inc. Lot 'C'
Eccles, EBD.
VACANCY exists for
Cosmetologist. Call 225-1280
or 231-0144 Orlando
TREE SPOTTERS/
LINESMEN Kwakwani Logging
Grant. Tel. 629-0551.
LABOURER. KWAKWANI
LOGGING GRANT. TEL. 629-
0551.


VACANCY existd for one
experienced washman to work
at wash bay. Tel. # 220-4058.
ONE experienced
seamstress, great wages and
benefits. Roxie's 122
Merriman's Mall, Bourda.
VACANCY exist for an
experienced Hairstylist. Must
have clients. Call 226-7268 for
more information.
MEDICAL Technologist/
Lab Tech. to work in Medical
Center. Tel. 646-3226. Email:
medical.usa@gmail.com
1 ACCOUNTS Clerk. Send
written application to:
Technical Service Inc. 18 23
Industrial Site, Eccles, EBD.
TWO experienced sewing
machine Operators. Contact
No. 622-4386/227-8538 or at
122 Merriman's Mall, Bourda.
MECHANIC experience
with D6 Clark skidders, Bedford
and 6 x 6 trucks. Kwakwani
Logging Grant. Tel. 629-0551.
.OFFICE Clerks, Lumber
Ohekers. Apply in person to:
AmerAlly Sawmill, 29 Strand,
New Amsterdam. Tel. 333-
3025, 333-2616.
2 DRIVERS. Licensed to
drive motor bus. Must have
secondary education, from
around Georgetown. 35 Delphi
Street, Prashad Nagar.
ONE Typist/Receptionist -
25 30 yrs. Three years working
experience on manual
typewriter. Tel. 226-2112, 226-
2117. 225-2258 after 4 pm.
DEBT Collectors needed.
Must have transportation. Apply
to: Agency Secretary,
Professional Collection
Solution., 85 Quamina St., C/
burg. 225-9080, 226-0195.
SECURITY Guard. Must
have at least 3 years
experience, ages 30 50. Apply
to Shakoor's Seafood, 80
Industrial Site Eccles, EBD. Tel.
# 233-2546.
SALES Clerks must have
knowledge of Maths and
English. 2 yrs working
experience. Apply in person with
written application to Lens,
Sheriff & Fourth Streets, C/ville
VACANCY exists for honest
and reliable Security Guard
also one Supervisor. Apply with
necessary documents. National
Security Service, 80 Seaforth
St., C/ville. Tel. 227-3540.
VACANCIES exist for
security guards. Must be willing
to work day or night shifts. Apply
in person with written
application to May's Shopping
Centre, 98 Regent Street,
Georgetown.
ONE Handyman/Gardener
needed to work full-time. Must
have knowledge of caring and
tending to plants. Apply in
person to May's Shopping
Centre, 98 Regent Street,
Georgetown.
TYPIST Clerk, Grade 11 -
Maths & English. Computer
Literate, Ages 25 40 yrs.Apply
to: Agency Secretary,
Professional Collection
Solutions.85 Quamina St., S/
C/burg. 225-9080, 226-0195.
Vacancies exist for 2
female Accounts Clerk. Must
have passes in Eng., Math,
Accounts also two years working
experience in a similar position.
Apply to Alabama Trading,
GEORGETOWN Fer Stelling,
tel. 623-1615, witl: a written
application.
20 MALES and ft:males to
work at University of G..yana and
other East Coast locations.
(Former employees can re
apply). Contact The Security
Administrator, Unp rsity of
Guyana. Turkeyen, impus or
R.K's Security. 1: Regent
Road. Bourda.


SECURITY Guards must
be able-bodied; 1 Handyman;
Office Assistant must have
motorcycle, Bag bay
Attendants. Apply in person with
application, 2
recommendations and Police
Clearance. To: The Manager,
Exclusive Styles. 200 Camp
Street, Georgetown.
CAR, van, lorry Drivers:
Decent non alcoholic Drivers.
At least 5 yrs. experience. NIS,
private $1M Insurance, annual
leave or work on contract.
Watch Commanders, Visiting
Inspectors, Security guards.
Contact RK's Security Services,
125 Regent Road, Bourda.
VACANCY exists for (1)
Clerk to work at Kishan's
.Aluminium Window Factory.
Must have 4 CXC, be computer
literate and working
experience: (2) Salesman to
visit construction site. Must
have own transportation; (3)
Factory workers. Apply in person
to 27 28 Courbane Park.
ONE (1) computer literate
female with excellent typing
skills. Must have Grade 1 or 11
CXC English Language or
Advanced Pitman's English.
Must have good
communications skills, be
pleasant and willing to learn.
Contact Maryann, R K's
Security Services, 125 Regent
Road, Bourda.
ONE Female Office
Assistant, with knowledge of NIS
and PAYE Roll. Must be
Computer literate, must be
between ages 25 and 30,
knowledge of Maths and
English. Apply in person with
written application and 2
references to Lens, Sheriff
and Fourth Streets,
Campbellville, G/town.
VACANCIES exist for full-
time and part-time trained or
qualified teachers for the
following subjects:
Mathematics, English A.
Accounts, Business, Office
Administration and Physical
Education. PLEASE SEND
WRITTEN APPLICATION AND
RESUME TO P.O. BOX
101652.
APEX EDUCATION -
instant employment for
Ancillary staff. Needed five (5)
experienced security guards
and maintenance officers,
electrical, carpentry, masonry
and plumbing skills will be an
asset. URGENTLY, TWO (2)
CANTEEN STAFFERS TO
WORK IN CANTEEN (MUST
HAVE FOOD HANDLER'S
CERTIFICATE). Apply in person
22 Atlantic Gardens, East
Coast Demerara. 220-8265,
220-9303 & 626-2080.



8 ACRES of land at West
Coast Demerara going cheap.
Tel. 225-8802, 629-5387.
CAMP and Quamina
Streets. Call Tony Reid's Realty.
Tel. # 231-2064 or 225-2626.
Q/TOWN double lot on
corner Sheriff St., Bel Air, EC -
EBD. 227-4876, 616-3743 -
Ryan..... _.............. .................
80 Acres RICE land
Parika, Ruby Backdam.
Contact. Dhanraj Singh. 642-
5351, 613-6143.
PRIME commercial land
for sale 115 ft x 31 ft,
Charlotte Street, Bourda.
Contact owner 226-0683
(anytime).
LAND FOR SALE. LAND
FOR SALE OLEANDER Gardens
89 ft by 152 ft. Price $25M.
Call: 612-0349.
LAND situate at east of
Windsor Forest Cricket Ground,
comprising an area of 2.422 of
an English acre. Call: 220-
9675.
DUNCAN STREET- $18M,
60 x 120; Camp Street,
Turkeyen, Sheet Anchor,
Berbice- $5M. Turkeyen. 642-
3026.


c i, .. ... ~.-.,,,,,,~ ..-.. ,. ., I, ..-.............. --------------








SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006 23


SAILA PARK Vreed-en-
Hoop, Housing Scheme. House
lot for sale, near the public
road. Prime location, 2 miles
from V/Hoop Stelling. Tel. #
225-7670 or 254-0397.
LBI $2.5M, ATLANTIC
GARDENS $6.5M, SECOND
ST., CAMPBELLVILLE $10M,
CUMMINGS ST. $10M &
$14M. TEL. 226-8148, 625-
1624.
LAND OF CANAAN 40
acres of developed transported
land, including man-made lake
(840' x 380'x 8'), concrete
bond (75' x 44') and two-
storey house. Tel. 218-2319,
612-8912.



FURNISHED flats for
overseas visitors. Phone 227-
2995. Kitty.
FURNISHED flat to let.
Overseas visitors. Tel. 226-
0242.
ROOM FOR SINGLE
WORKING FEMALE. TELE-
PHONE: 227-0928.
FOR overseas visitors
apt. to rent in Kitty. Call
226-1640.
ONE 2-bedroom top
flat at 220 Thomas St.,
Kitty. Check within.
FURNISHED house -
79 Atlantic Gdns. Call
220-6060, 626-2066.
ONE-BEDROOM
apartment in Eccles Park. Call
621-8500 or 624-3845.
KITTY, Campbellville -
furnished and unfurnished
1, 3-bedroom apts. 233-
6160.
SHORT TERM RENTALS
FOR OVERSEAS
VISITORS. PHONE 225-
9944.
ONE bottom flat two-
bedroom apt. for a decent
couple or family. Tel. 621-
8255.
3-ROOM apartment and 3-
bedroom apartment and $15
000 room. Tel. 664-2999.
2-BEDROOM unfurnished
apt. inside bath and toilet at
Cummings Lodge. Phone 222-
3036.
1-BEDROOM apartment
for MATURE WORKING
COUPLE in Kitty. Call 616-
4690.
ONE unfurnished two-
bedroom bottom flat in
Alberttown. Price $50 000. Tel.
# 226-8234.
HOUSE by itself apt. -
US$500 with AC, phone.
Tony Reid 225-2626, 231-
2064. -
2-BEDROOM bottom flat -
$25 000. Location 88 Middle
Road, La Penitence. Tel. 225-
6184.
EXECUTIVE office situated
on United Nations Place
Stabroek, with telephone lines.
Tel. 226-7380.
ROOMS and apartments
to let on a daily/nightly basis
from $4 000 daily. Call 227-
3336/227-0902.
2 APARTMENT to rent
upper flat 2-bedrooms lower flat
1 bedroom 32 North, Vryheid's
Lust. ECD.
FURNISHED and
unfurnished executive homes
around Georgetown. Call
Rochelle 609-8109, anytime.
ONE 2-bedroom self
contained, parking suitable for
professional. Tel. 222-6940 -
30 000 per month.
ROOMS and apartment for
short term rental. Prices begin
at $4 000 daily/nightly. Call
227-3336 or 227-0902.
ONE fully furnished
apartment. Preferable non-
smoking mature couple or non-
resident worker. Tel. No. 227-
0882.
ONE self-contained
bedroom apt. situated at
Dennis Street, Sophia $12
000 monthly. Call 616-9227,
621-3094.
FURNISHED ROOM -
DECENT SINGLE WORKING
FEMALE. TEL. 226-5035
(08:00 17:00 HRS.).
FURNISHED/urfurnished
residential/commercial
buildings/flats apts. Country
wide. Tel. 227-4876, 616-
3743, Ryan.


3-BEDROOM apartment,
fully furnished in Craig St.,
Campbellville for overseas
guest. Short term. Call Tel. 223-
329.
SFURNISHED apartment for
overseas guest at Garnett St.,
C/ville, G/town. Contact Ms. Dee
on 223-1061 or 612-2677
ONE two-bedroom lower
flat, mature responsible couple.
Call after 3 pm. 118 Cowan, St.,
Kingston. 226-8700 or 664-
3329.
NEW concrete building, 2-
bedroom upper flat BN, ECD -
$25 000 monthly, working
persons only. Contact Mrs. Grant
220-3173.
PLAZA Taxi Service prime
location with all the necessary.
Executive Barber Shop, fully
furnished (Sheriff St.). Call 225-
0431.
NEW 3 b/room house in Bel
Air Gardens, furnished to meet
International Standards. Asking
US$2 500 neg. Contact 641-
8654.
FOR overseas visitors, 2-
bedroom flat, fully furnished, air-
conditioned, parking space,
grilled, meshed, Subryanville.
Tel. 226-5369.
ONE two-bedroom bottom
flat house fully furnished, with
cable TV, phone, own drive way.
Situated at Nandy Park. Call
624-7243.
GOOD large Princes, Russell
& Camp Sts. Corner bottom
flat suitable for any business.
Small Shop for any business.
Call 226-3949
SMALL space available.
Suitable for Stockroom,
Accountant's Office $35 000
per month. Grilled, Centrally
located. Tel. 227-1379.
NEW semi-furnished
concrete house in gated
community with 24 hrs security,
fully grilled, water tank installed.
Farm EBD. Call 625-6734.
EXECUTIVE houses by itself
area- Ogle, Atlantic Gardens. Price
$100 000 to $250 000 neg.
Enquiries pis call 220-7021, Cell
624-6527.
.NEW concrete building, 2-
bedroom upper flat B/V, ECD -
$25 000 monthly, working
persons only. Contact Mrs. Grant
220-3173.
REGENT and Light Sts. -
Restaurant US$2 500 monthly
neg. Ederson's 226-5496
ederson@guyana.net.gy
ONE three-bedroom upper
flat, back building. Address 179
Pike Street, Kitty. Tel. No. 225-
2067. Price $60 000.
ONE concrete upper 2-
bedroom and lower flat 2-
bedroom, Turkeyen, ECD,
opposite Caricom Head
Quarters. Tel. 222-3254.
ONE-BEDROOM and two-
bedroom apartment at Mon
Repos, ECD with inside toilet
and bath. Tel. 220-0979, 612-
3916.
ONE 3-bedroom semi-
furnished house by itself to rent,
completely grilled with all
modern conveniences, in
Diamond. Price $35 000 per
month. Tel. 618-5667.
ALL Agents please call. 2-
storey concrete building, top
flat, 3 bedrooms, in Kitty. All
amenities. Tel.226-3033 or 616-
5960, between 7 am and 5 pm.
ONE 2-bedroom bottom flat
- unfurnished apartment at 6th
Street, Cumming's Lodge,
Greater Georgetown. Price $20
000 per month. Tel. # 222-4913.
TWO-BEDROOM house,
spacious sitting area, fully
grilled, secured garage, fenced
yard. Section A, Diamond, EBD.
35 000. 616-1598, 614-1043.
1 3-BEDROOM lower flat at
Anaida Ave., Eccles. Price -
$55 000 negotiable. Contact
Anil on tel. # 233-2625 or 642-
1645, between 4 pm and 7 pm.
ONE 3-bedroom upstairs
house with overhead water tank
- $40 000 per month. Located at
128 Middle Road, La Penitence.
Tel. # 225-5258, 225-5533.
FULLY furnished 3-bedroom
bungalow wind solar, hot water,
in gated community. Weekly or
monthly rental. Contact Ganesh
- 618-5070, 641-2946.
EXECUTIVE houses by
themselves area Ogle, Atlantic
Gardens. Price $100 000 to
$250 000 neg. Enquiries pis.
Call 220-7021. Cell 624-6527.


APARTMENT TO LET NEW
ROAD, V/HOOP. 664-7675.
3-BEDROOM top flat
Lamaha Gardens $65 000,
3-bedroom top flat, Industry -
$35 000. N. P. FINANCIAL
SERVICES 223-4928, 648-
4799.
FULLY furnished 2-bedroom
bottom flat self-contained, water
and light bill. One hundred
thousand dollars a month.
Contact C & S Night Club. Tel.
227-3128.
TOP flat in prime
commercial area Camp Street
for Airline, Salon, Real Estate,
Advertising Agency, Office or
any other business. Contact
Samad. Tel. 225-5026
UNFURNISHED $20 000,
$22 000, $32 000, $45 000, $50
000. FURNISHED $26 000, $30
000, $45 000. ROOMS $11 000
$16 000. Call 231-6236
FURNISHED and
unfurnished apartments one,
two, three & four bedrooms.
Queenstown residential, from
US$25 per day, long term also
available. Tel. 624-4225.
UNFURNISHED apartment -
$40 000, business place $80
000, snackette, restaurant, Day
Care Centre, Bond Space. K. S.
RAGHUBIR Agency. 225-0545,
642-0636.
QUEENSTOWN, fully fur-
nished 1 & 3-bedroom apart-
ment with parking space to rent.
Suitable for overseas visitors on
short term basis. Tel. # 226-
5137/227-1843
A FURNISHED two-bedroom
concrete house situated at
Lamaha Park. Parking space, big
yard space, light, water, phone.
Price $60 000 neg. Call 223-
2919 or 629-6059.
ONE new one-bedroom
apartment in Georgetown with
inside toilet, bath, wash sink,
kitchen, and dining room for
single female or UG student,
etc. $30 000 per month. 621-
4928.
CALL Vish Realty for renal
of properties, apartments, office
space, business premises and
bond space. Price $40 000 -
US$2000. Tel. 225-9780, 612-
7377.
PRASHAD Nagar US$800
furnished. Republic Park -
US$600, Queenstown,
Kingston, Bel Air Park and other.
Call us at Goodwill Realty 223-
5204, 662-9788, 628-7605.
SPACIOUS three-bedroom
upper flat apartment situated at
First Street, Meadow Bank.
Appropriate for a couple with
children or students attending
school in Georgetown. Phone
623-9965.
TO let or purchase. One
wooden and concrete building
with two bedrooms situated at
1096 Parika Public Road. Half
a mile from junction. Recently
built. Contact Victor. Tel. 619-
1870.
PRIME REALTY. Executive
houses & Apts. for Diplomats &
large companies in highly
secure areas from US$600 -
US$3 500 neg. Also for middle
income families from $40 000 -
$100 000. Contact 222-1319
(anytime).
COURIDA Park: furnished 1-
bedroom $40 000; Bel Air
Gardens, 4-bedroom executive
house US$1 500; Nandy Park,
furnished 3-bedroom US$600.
N. P. FINANCIAL SERVICES -
223-4928/648-4799.
NEWTOWN, Kitty (1) one
two-bedroom top flat, air
conditioned, grilled, semi
furnished; bottom flat two-
bedroom, kitchen, sitting room,
etc. Both available from
September 1, 2006. Call 626-
7179, 612-3724 for information.
PRIME location for overseas
visitors. Long or short term rentals.
Self-contained furnished
apartments, toilet & bath, wall to
wall carpet, TV, AC, fridge, etc.,
well-secured, meals can be
arranged only US$100 per week.
Call 222-6708/6510
FULLY FURNISHED HOUSE
- Section K, C/ville US$1 300,
or top apartment US$700,
bottom apartment US$600, 1
FURNISHED APARTMENT,
KITTY $80 000, Business place
- Robb St. TEL. 226-8148, 625-
1624.


CHECK out Sunflcwer Hotel
& Fast Food Cool and
Comfortable. AC/TV, fan rooms,
daily stay, monthly stay, hours
stay, short time stay. Opening
time 24 hours daily. Prices to suit
your pocket. 229 Cummings
Street & South Road. Call 225-
3817 or 223-2173.
UPPER top flat, (back
house), 2-bedroom house with
toilet, bath, overhead tank, fully
grilled, private yard at 47
D'Urban Street, Wortmanville, G/
T. Working couple preferred.
Serious enquiries. Rental $35
000. Call 225-1080, 622-3241
between 9 am and 7 pm.
DEL CASA BUILDING -
BOTTOM FLAT& FIRST FLOOR.
MIDDLE STREET, 3 HOUSES,
EAST OF CAMP STREET,
SUITABLE FOR DOCTORS LAB,
OFFICES, RESTAURANT, TV
STATION, CONFERENCE. TEL.
225-5591, 619-5505.
VANIES Realty & Auto
Sales 225-4872, 643-1695 -
4-bedroom and 3-bedroom fully
furnished, AC, master rooms,
parking, fully grilled, telephone
US$700, US$750 per month.
Lamaha Gardens unfurnished
whole house US$800, Thomas
St., top flat 2-bedroom
unfurnished $65 000 much
more.
KITTY $32 000, C/ville -
$50 000, Eccles; EXECUTIVE
PLACES Republic Park US$1
000, Be! Air Park US$800,
US$1000, Lamaha Gardens,
Prashad Nagar, Bel Air Gardens;
UNIVERSITY GARDENS, New
Haven, Happy Acres, Courida
Park, Bel Air Gardens; OFFICE
BUILDING Main Street, Middle
Street, HIGH STREET. Others.
Mentore/Singh Realty 225-
1017, 623-6 36.
ATLANTIC GARDENS: Fully
furnished 4-bedroom, master
with AC US$600. THOMAS
STREET: 2-bedroom,
unfurnished top flat $70 000
and a whole 3-bedroom
building, unfurnished $100
000 PLUS many great homes in
Prashad Nagar, University
Gardens, and Bel Air Park with
rents ranging from US$1 500 to
US$5 000 and lots more all over.
Call 226-7128, 615-6124
ABSOLUTE REALTY for "Homes
with Style."
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
"Have Faith in Christ, today".
227-1988, 623-6431, 270-4470.
E m a i I :
jewanalrealty@yahoo.com
GEORGETOWN: High Street
(office/residence) US$2 500,
Bel Air Park US$1 500, Kitty -
$60 000, $45 000, US$750 (F/
F). US$500 (F/F) Caricom/
GuySuCo Gardens US$1 200.
EAST BANK: School- $120000,
Providence -$50 000, Eccles
AA' (F/F)- US$2 000, Diamond
US1 500. EAST COAST:
Courida Park US$3 00 (F/F),
Atlantic Gardens US$5 000/
US$2 000/US$1 000/US$500,
Happy Acres US$2 000/US$1
200/US$500, Non Pariel $35
000, Le Ressouvenir- US$2 500,
Ogle US$700/US$1 000.
OFFICES: Central Georgetown
US$4 000, Georgetown $100
000/$60 000, Queenstown -
US$2 000, Sheriff US$1 500,
North Road US$1 200,
Brickdam US$800, bond,
restaurants, etc. Versailles -
executive US$3 000. 3-storey
residential/office/bond US$1
500, Nandy Park US650,
residence/business/office -
Cummings & Light $120 000,
East St. $75 000, Kitty $45 000



ONE wooden and
concrete house 50E Sheriff
Street. Phone 223-1529.
1 HOUSE lot with 4
houses: Persons interested
please call. Price negotiable
CANAL NO. 2, North
Section 3-bedroom house
(concrete & wood). Tel. 263-
5739.
2-FLAT wooden (four-
apartment) building needs repair
(back lot). $8.5M neg. Call 618-
3526.
DOUBLE-LOT 3-bedroom
property for sale in Amelia's
ard, Linden. Price negotiable.
Call: 223-4938.
DO you have a property to
sell/rent? DeFreitas Associates,
Realtors, Valuators. Tel. 225-
0502. 609-2302.
PLAISANCE three-
bedroom Ocean View. corner lot
house and land. One block from
E.C. Public Road. Asking $5.9M.
Call 225-5591.


WE have the best above 10
million, 50% deduction. Phone
225-2709, 225-5198.
CRAIG 2-storey three-
bedroom with land size 35 x
144. Must see deal. House needs
work. Asking $3.9M. Call 225-
5591.
TWO-STOREY wooden
building located in Triumph
Backlands on large plot of land.
Make an offer. Must be sold. Call
220-6586.
ONE going business
premises; one secured
beautifully tiled office; one
three-bedroom house fully
grilled in New Amsterdam. Tel:
333-2500.
OVERSEAS/Loca! owners of
buildings we have
management services paying
your bills. Ederson's 226-5496
ederson@guyana.net.gy









JEWANRAM'S REALTY
AND PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT SERVICE
'HAVE FAITH IN CHRIT TODAY"
For allyour Real Estate needs. Buying,
Selling, Leasing of residence"
commercial and industrial
land/property also
mortgage/financing approval,
valuation, property
planning/managemenl.
Call anytime
Jewanram's Realty
227-1I988/2710-4470/623-643
Emta ijewanarealty@yhoo.co

URGENTLY needed
residentiallcommercial
buildings to buy/rent -
Georgetown/other areas.
Ederson's 226-5496
ederson@guyana.net.gy
2-STOREY business/
residential property at 56 Section
D Cumberland. East Canje phone,
electricity etc. Price neg. Tel. 628-
5264, 339-2678.
4-BEDROOM concrete &
wooden house. Ketley St.,
Charlestown, formerly Rudy's Liquor
Restaurant (comer lot) $18M neg.
Contact 227-6204.
POPULAR Video Club in very
busy area in New Amsterdam.
Terms of Sale & Occupancy can
be negotiated. Call 333-2990 or
after hours 333-3688.
PARIKA Reserve Road just
off main road Pet Shop.
Building 3-storey building and
land. Asking $39M. Norbert
deFreitas 231-1506/642-
5874.
GROVE H/S $6.5M,
Ruimzeight Gdns. $9.5M,
Atlantic Gdns. $22M, George
St., Werk-en-Rust, G/T $5M.
Call Seeker's Choice 223-
6346, 263-7110.
'CC' ECCLES- $15M, GROVE
$6.5M & $12M, W. Ruimveldt -
$8M, P/Nagar $25M. N. P.
FINANCIAL SERVICES 223-4928,
6 4 8 4 7 9 9 .
Nepent2002@ya-
2-STOREY concrete
building in Kitty. All amenities,
45' x 30, Land 61 x 48,
driveway 120'x 8. Tel. 226-
3033 or 616-5960, between 7
am and 5 pm. All agents please
call.
ENMORE $6.75M,
INDUSTRY $7.75M. KITTY -
$7M TO $14.5M, CUMMINGS
Street $12M, MC DOOM -
$5.5M. TEL. 226-8148, 625-
1624.
33%, 33%, 33% Discount.
Buy quickly. Q/town $11.5M,
Meadow Brook $12.9M,
Prashad Nagar $11.9M, Kitty-
$9M, Guyhoc Park $8.5M.
Phone 225-2626, 231-2064,
225-2709.
2 Two acres plot of land
at New Hope, between
Friendship and Craig on the East
Bank Demerara, road to river.
Ideal for residential or industrial
purposes. Tel. 664-8256. Serious
enquiries only.
PROPERTY at Courbane
Park $16M; one front property
at Non Pariel $9M; one
property in Duncan Street -
11M; Single lot in Mon Repos -
$1.5M. Contact Kisan. Tei. 220-
0979, 612-3916.


THOMAS Street
Cummingsburg $9.5M, Kitt
(business premises) $21.5M,
Bel Air Park $12.5M,
Queenstown $14.5M, Atlantic
Ville $35.5M, Bel Air Spring
$50.5M, Sheriff St. (land)
$40M, Camp St. $120M,
Atlantic Gardens $20.5M,
Blyzeight Gardens $15.5M.
Call Vish Realty. 225-9780,
612-7377.
SOUTH Ruimveldt Park,
Aubrey Barker Road, two-
storey, family, five-bedroom -
$12.5M, Bar Street, Kitty,
popular business place,
rashad Nagar,- Thomas
Street, Cummingsburg, two-
family front house $11.5M
neg. Contact Roberts Realty,
First Federation Life Bldg. Tel.
227-7627, 227-3768, 644-
2099 cell.
FOR SALE BY OWNER -
2-storey fully concreted house
5 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms,
American fixture faucet, sink,
toilet, cabinet, hot water tank,
eating kitchen, built-in
wardrobe, central air-
conditioner, car garage, front
view to Public Road. Lot 6
Nandy Park, EBD. Interested
person only to call. Day 226-
7806; evenirn 225-8410
QUEENSTOWN $9M &
$5M, Bel Air Park (4 corners
business/res.)- $13M,
Oronoque St. $7.5M, Kitty -
$10M, $8M & $7M, Hardina
St. $3.5M, Eccles (new
house) $6M & $3M (land -
50' x 150'), East Bank (front
house by Harbour Bridge) -
$2.5M, Bent St. $2.5M,
Waterloo St. $3.5M, D'Urban
St. $6M, South $7.5M &
$6.5M, Cummings St. $7.5M,
Providence (newly renovated
3-bed) spacious yard $6M,
Herstelling $2.5M, West
Ruimveldt $2M, Meadow
Bank (2 lots) $4M, Diamond -
$400 000. Call 231-6236.
HIGH ST. Ctiarlestown,
property on land 31' x 80' -
$18M; one two-flat concrete
building on large land, Nismes,
WBD $8.5M; two house lots.-
80 x 113, LBI $6M each; one
three-bedroom concrete and
wooden house on 14 000 sq.
ft. of land, LBI $18M; one
three-bedroom concrete and
wooden building in good
condition, W/Rust $22M neg.;
one five-bedroom concrete
and wooden building on
double lot, Atlantic Gardens -
$20M; one two-bedroom
wooden cottage on stilts, St.
Stephen's Street, Charlestown
$2.8M; one three-bedroom
building on '/ acre land, Land
of Canaan $15M; one large
property on High Street,
Kingston 60 x 180 ft. -
$125M; one concrete split level
two-bedroom building on
large land, Canal No. 2, WBD
$6M; one two-flat concrete
and wooden five-bedroom
building in good condition,
Bourda $16M; one sawmill
operation complete with
equipment on large land by
riverside with own transformer
$50M. WILLS REALTY 227-
2612, 627-8314.
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
"Have Faith in Christ, today".
227-1988, 623-6431, 270-
4470. Email:
jewanalrealty@yahoo.com
Bel Air Park 45/26/22/13, Bel
Air Gardens $50M,
Blygezight $23M,
Campbellville $15M/$30M,
Middle St. $30M/$55M,
Carmichael St. $28M,
Subryanville $26M,
Queenstown $45/$30M/
$20M/$15M. Kitty $17M/
$15M/$12M, D'Urban St. -
$18M, Prashad Nagar- $20M,
Section $45M, North Road -
$32M, Georgetown business -
$575M/$85M. EAST BANK -
Prospect (business) $12M,
Eccles AA/BB/CC, Nandy Park
$18M, Grove- $16M/$10M,
Diamond, Friendship $15M.
WEST BANK/COAST -
Roraima Trust $12M, $60M,
Parika $120M, De Kendren -
$9M, EAST COAST -Atlantic
Gardens $34M/$28M/$26MI
$13M, Happy Acres $26M,
Foulis/Enmore $8M. Kissoon
Park Good Hope $26M/
$9M./$3M, Courbane Park -
$6.8M. Ogle $25M. Lusignan
$12M/$3.3M, Imax Gardens
$8M/$6M/$5M, Triumph -
$8M/$18M. Mahaica
(business) $50M. Earl's Court.
LBI $10M. Prices negotiable.








24 SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20,2006


-'-:

SALE by owner: Front
two-storey. 4-bedroom,
grilled, concrete house with
toilet & bath, enclosed
garage. Second house both
located at Triumph, ECD. 2-
bedroom house with toilet and
bath at Cove & John. Price
negotiable. Tel. 227-6993.
ONE three-storey
building 33 000 sq. ft. at
Parika. deal for Hotel, Store,
Hospital or any other type of
businesses, etc. Any
reasonable price would be
considered. Contact Len's at
Sheriff St. for further
information. Tel. 227-1511.
N.B.: Extra lard to extend
building or new one.
SOUTH Ruimveldt $4M,
$6M, $8M, $12M, North Road
- $22M, $15M, Robb Street -
$15M, $40M, $18M, $20M,
Kingston $15M, $35M,
$80M, $65M, Bel Air Gardens,
Bel Air Park, Bel Air Springs
and other. Call us at Goodwill
Realty 223-5204, 662-9788,
628-7605.



PAINT mixed colours.
Tel. 220-1014.
PUREBRED Doberman
pups. 233-5859, 623-0501.
STALL # 17 Section C
Bourda Market. Call 624-
7684.
ONE STHIL FS 45
Grasscutter. Tel. 227-
6012, 218-1711.
LARGE quantities of
mango achar. Call 227-3285
or 623-9852.
EARTH FOR SALE.
DELIVERY TO SPOT. TEL.
626-7127.
FRIDGES & freezers at
giveaway price. Tel. 225-8802,
629-5387.
KING size bed, 1 -
settee/desk folding table &
chairs. Call 218-1797.
BRAND new sthil 2880
grass-cutter $95 000. Tel.
627-7982.
SLIGHTLY damaged alu.
Sheets. Telephone # 226-
7054 (working hours).
BOB Cat skid steer &
trailer extra grapple bucket.
Tel. # 254-1366 Price neg.
FOR sale 2 commercial
Combo connection gas
ovens. 110 v. Call 613-6567.
BOB Cat skid steer &
trailer extra grapple bucket.
Tel. # 254-1366 Price neg.
NEW Canon Photo
copiers 15 paes per
minutes $1l65 00. Call
225-2611.
2 FULLY grown pure
bred American Pitbulls.
Contact 327-5343. Price
negotiable.
1 HONDA CBR 900 RR.
Tel. 226-5351, 227-3336.
Sheriff Taxi Service Building.
PURE bred Rottweiler
pups vaccinatc J &
dewormed. Call 339-2288
or 622-3413.
NEW Briggs & Stratton
Pressure washer 2200 psi
pressure $98 000. Call 225-
2611.
FOOD Warmers, exercising
machine. AC, 12 000 BTU.
643-5431. 223-9316.
ADULT male Dachshund
and Pomeranian and
Dachshund female pup. Call
231-7590. 627-3330.
1 (ONE) Used Hyundai
monitor computer. (Internet
Ready). Tel. 226-6462, Cell
622-2068.
CHLORINE tablets 3"
for swimming pools only.
Phone 227- (am 4 pm).
Mon. Fri.
ONE used gas stove going
cheap. Contact 218-4188 after
5 pm. Cell 622-2068 anytime.
NEW Pioneer DVD
duplicators copies 5 DVDs
simultaneously $169 000.
Call 225-2611.
1 set of RAV 4 wheels and
tyres, slightly used. 216 x 70 x
16. Contact 624-3044. 222-
2459.
ONE new 13 cu. ft. Ultra
Chef Dispfay cooler $180
000. Contact 616-2126 or 644-
6637.


2" diesel with 15 x 28 ft.
purple heart sluice S0.5M.
Located Middle Mazarunm. Call
223-5050.
1 STEEL boat 96-ft.
length, 14-ft. 6 inches width, 6-
ft. depth. Contact 619-3090,
339-3'102.
SMALL fridge, queen
size bed, dining set, nibby
chair set, used computer.
Going cheap. 231-5767.
1 20-feet stainless steel
holding room (freezer) with
compressor and blowers. 233-
5859, 623-0501.
1 NINTENDO Game Cube -
3 controls, 5 games, 1 memory
card. Call 227-3165, 231-1568.
ONE Nissan diesel patrol
Station Wagon Toyota car AT
140, Honda generator 6 500
watts. Tel. 220-1014.
PURE BRED German
Shepherd pups. 7 weeks, fully
vaccinated & dewormed. Tel.
223-4472, 623-6335.
SKY Mundo Satellite
Network Television that fits
your lifestyle. For. more
information, call 646-5860.
DVD Players, Landline
Telephones, Universal DVD/TV
remote control. Telephone #
226-7054 (working hours).
ORIGINAL Reebok's (men) -
$10 000, new aluminium sash
windows, black 24 x 48 $10
000. Phil 220-3173.
1 DIESEL Generator 3 KVA,
next to new, excellent condition,
ideal for remote areas. Give
away price. 629-4236.
PARTS for Dryers/
Washers. Thermostats, pumps.
motors, belts, valves, knobs, etc.
Technician available. Call 622-
5776.
TOYOTA Cressida Mark 11
car, perfect condition. Property
at 75E Garnett Street, Kitty.
Phone 225-1911 office hours.
IBM Think Pad Lap top
P111 500 MHz, 196 MB RAM,
10 GB H/Drive. CD ROM, WIN
XP $75 000. Tel. 626-8911.
38-FT. BOAT, seine, engine,
ice box. 1 Pool Table, 1 Canter.
1 Nissan Pick Up. 1 Corona Car.
Tel. 275-0344/275-0305
NEW Dell Dimension
Pentium 4 computers 17" Black
Dell monitors, internet ready, lyr
warranty $98 000. Call 225-
2611.
1 DIESEL Fuel Injection
Pump calibrating machine
complete with gen. set in
immaculate condition. Call 626-
5306. 644-8952.
1 PURE Bred German
Shepherd female 7 months and
1 Pure Bred German Shepherd -
19 months Call 233-5859. 623-
0501.
ONE Invacare Homecare
bed, imported in August 2005.
No reasonable offer refused.
Please call telephone number
226-5335.
4 X 4 PAJERO. Diesel
excellent condition; 1 30 Hp
Yamaha Outboard engine; 1
Power Inverter. 1 000 watts. Tel.
228-2525.
1 COMPLETE music set with
2 5-disc CD player. 2 amplifiers,
1 cassette player, 1 equaliser. 1
mid range, 1 CD burner. Tel.
619-6595.
1 OPTIMA Drycell battery
1125 cranking amps (new) 1 base
Maxirniser car audio, 1 6
channel cross over. Tel. 254-
0413. 647-5011.
1 JIALING JH 125 cc,
motorbike in immaculate
condition. Low mileage and
almost brand new. Low price.
Contact 618-7283.
HOUSEHOLD items
microwave $18 000, stove -
$8 000. 2 gas bottles $6 000,
wooden cabinet $20 000. Call
226-5053.
ONE Electromax Freezer in
working condition, next to brand
new, to do business. Price $95
000. Contact Kamla on
telephone 619-5366.
1 COMPLETE VIDEO & DVD
Club (1300 DVD & 5000 cassettes).
Located at Merriman's Mall. Contact
Ronald 223-0972/223-0919.
ONE large aquarium one
deep fryer, one set of 5-hole mag
rims and tyres. All items brand
new. Call 229-6603. or 624-
0037. Ask for Seeta.


SHOP SMART massive 8
days. SALE EVENT from Fri. 18
to Sat. 26 Aug.. 06. DVDS 5 for
$1 000 high on quality low on
price. 264 Thomas St., N.
Cummingsburg, Georgetown.
Above Steppers Vege Lounge.
VARIOUS types tools
including: Cordless Screwdriver
kit, Precision wood knife set,
Cordless Drill, electric nail gun,
angle grinder, Jobmate Rachet
set, Torchlight set, Coleman
1850 watts generator. Telephone
# 226-7054 (working hours).
Equipment for Sale. One -
Caterpillar 966 Front End
Loader; One Caterpillar 215
Excavator; Two- Caterpillar 236
Skid Steer Loader; Two 12-
Wheeler twin steers Leyland DAF
Trucks; One 3.5 cubic yard
concrete Truck. Tel. # 623-
0129.
COMPUTER Programmes
(from $2 000) Office 2003, Corel
Draw 12, AutoCAD 2006, Adobe
Premiere Pro, Alter Effects,
Hollowcod FX, Any Accounting
& Point of Sale, Dreamweaver
MX, 7TPpro, Antivirus, Maves
Beacon Typing 15 and much
more. Call Anthony 222-5330,
233-5192, 625-7090.
1 KENDALL pipe treading
machine, 1 Wilson 18" Surfacer
& jointer, 1 Junior white head
tools 12" surface, 1 Wadkin 18"
surface & jointer, 1 Richmond,
2 Wadkin sharpeners, 2 cross
cut saw, 3 spindle moulders, 1
- Wadkin 6-head moulder, 1 J.
J. Smith Co. 5-head moulder, 1
- dust collector, flat blades,
slotted blades, blots and nuts for
slotted blade, V Joint & Grove &
Tongue Cutter, Drill press,
Grinders, sleeves, compressor
jointers. Tel. 270-6460, 644-
0150, 609-7852
1 000 PIECES new
cellular phone parts and
accessories for all types of
cellular phones included
chargers. All for $300 000. 1
large photocopy machine,
Xerox 5028. needs servicing,
240v $150 000. 1 inter
system consists of 6 complete
computer, complete 1 server,
complete units with all cables
and accessories monitor, CPU,
Printer. Key board, UPC
stabilisers, scanner headphone,
etc. $350 000. lots of extra
spares you can't believe it 2
round tables, 1 plastic, 1
fibreglass with 1 umbrella $20
000. 1 large metal cabinet two
half doors. 5 shelves, for storage
of stationery $25 000. 2 4-
drawer metal filing cabinet $20
000 each Owner migrating.
621-4928.
1 2 000 WATTS transformer.
110v 240v to 110v $8 000. 1
digital camera used floppy disc.
complete with charger S20
000. 1 16-feet aluminium ladder
in 2 -- 8-feet half new English
trade $25 000, 1 4-feet
platform ladder for cleaning -
10 000. 1 Makita electric chain
saw 110v $26 000. 1 cross cut
saw, 110v Black & Decker $8
000, 1 large drill press Milwakee
Delta. 110 240v $105 000, 1
bench type drill press, 110v
English $60 000, 1 side and
edge sander, 110v 240v on
stand $30 000, 1 industrial
and commercial Dayton vacuum
cleaner with large dust bag,
110v $35 000 1 truck hydraulic
dump pump $40 000, 200 new
tyre liners for truck size 20 $1
00 each, 1 large fire proof, 1
small iron safe, need fixing, both
- $105 000, 1 bench grinder
large 110v $30.000 neg, 10 5-
gallon bucket carpet paste
sealed $5 000 per bucket.
Owner migrating 621-4928.
BOOKS FOR SALE.A
Former 5"' Form Science
Student of Mae's Secondary has
the following books to sell in
excellent condition. To Kill a
Mockingbird $1 000; Mastering
English for CXC $2 000;
Mathematics General
Proficiency 1990-2000 $2 500;
Computer 7'" Edition Brief
edition $3 500; Caribbean
Environment $2 500; Wide
Sargasso Sea $1 500; Animal
Farm $700; Literature made
easy Romeo & Juliet $700;
Literature Guide Romeo &
Juliet $600; -Writing
Summaries & Statistic Reports
$2 000; Chemistry for CXC $2
500; Practical Chemistry for CXC
- $2 000; Physics A Concise
Revision Course $1 500; A
Comprehensive English Course
- $2 000; Romeo & Juliet $1
000; Senior Secondary
Agricultural Science $1 800;
Mathematics Macmillan CXC
Revision $1 620: A New
Geography of Guyana $2 500.
Contact Hazeline on 623-6743
or 231-3048.


1 COMPLETE gas welding
set, US made. 1 110v new
industrial hand drill, 1 like new,
5550 watts standby generator.
Contact 616-6907.
BRAND new Whirlpool super
capacity dryer $130 000,
Amana portable room air
conditioner, 12 000 BTU $125
000. Tel. 218-4384, 611-8824.
EARTH, sand and reef sand
delivery to spot. We also
specialise in excavating, grading
leveling of land clearing, pipe
laying. Tel. # 229-2520, 619-
5660.
1 518C Cat skidder (rebuilt),
1 2 000 series Perkins gen. set -
285 kilowatt, 1 700 kilowatt
double throw automatic switch.
Call 335-3043, 642-9344, 615-
1944.
1 HONDA pressure washer,
brand new; 2 drills; 1 saw; 1
Jialing motorcycle, next to new;
1 amplifier; 1 truck pump; 1
battery charger; 1 bicycle. Tel. 265-
5876.
HOUSEHOLD appliances,
American made: Whirlpool
fridge, Maytag stove, bar-be-que
grill, China cabinet, AC, chair set,
recliner, TV, etc. Call 259-3054.
1 TEC. Cash register $35
000, 1 tel./fax machine $12
000, 1 3 pcs. baby set-play pen,
stroller, plus carrier and feeding
chair $15 000. All in excellent
condition. Tel. 627-7982.
1 7.5 KVA Single phase
generator, welding torch, welding
transformer, caterpillar, Cummins
and G.M engine parts, fuel
pumps nozzles, injector lines,
etc. 225-6046, 226-0011, 621-
1696.
BUILDING a new hotel/guest
house? Have a brand new living
room. Then call 276-3826 or 609-
7625 for a BRAND NEW WICKER
SET a sofa piece, 2 single seaters
and a coffee table.
BODY parts- AT 170,AT 150,
AE 91, FB 13, FB 12, ET 176,
SV 22, ST182, EP 82, EP 71,
Turbo engines & transmission.
door fender, windscreens.
Contact Eddie's Auto Spares -
227-2835.
RADIATORS. RADIATORS -
New AT 192 radiators. Brass and
copper type with full one-year
warranty. Price $48 000. Other
models also available. Call 227-
2844, 8:30 am 5 pm. Mon. -
Fri.
SKY Universal. authorized
dealer for the best offer in Phillips
digital dish View up to 125
channels including Pay Per View
channels and also Direct TV
Contact: Tel. 231-6093. 227-
1151 (Office)



21 BEDFORD
MODEL M TRUCK. TEL:
455-2303.
1 HILUX SURF 4-DOOR.
233-5859, 623-0501.
AT 192 CARINA.
excellent condition. Tel.
649-8239.
ONE TOYOTA TUNDRA.
F 150. TEL. 623-5534,
227-3717
ONE 3 / TON TOYOTA
DYNA FOR SALE. CONTACT
# 623-0957.
1 RZ minibus good
working condition. Tel. 227-
7548. 629-3996
1 NISSAN B 12 Sunny mags,
spoiler $400 000. Call 270-
4266.
1 450 Night Hawk in working
condition. $320 000. Call 610-
0785.
ONE Bedford TL 500 10-
ton dump truck, GFF 4370.
Call 626-1315.
TOYOTA HIACE MINIBUS
- 15 SEATS $1.7M NEG.
TEL. # 642-5899.
246 Caterpillar Skid,
steer, excellent condition.
Call 623-3404, 222-6510.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma,
unregistered. Price neg.
Contact Ryan 629-7010.
ONE CBR MOTOR BIKE F
3600 HONDA $700 000. # 619-
9222.
1 CARAVAN mini bus.
Excellent condition. Tel. 627-
5259 or 227-7458.
ONE Toyota Sera, PJJ
series, excellent condition.
Contact Mark 624-7684.


ONE TOYOTA CROWN
PRICE $500,000.CONTACT
USHA 616-9378.
1 DODGE Dakota Sport
Extra Cab Pick-up, 20 000 km.
Tel 222-5741- Sally.
NISSAN Pick up diesel,
extra cab, 4x4. Price neg. Tel.
641-9547 or 623-5463.
ONE four-door Black Toyota
Starlet. Contact Shelly on 225-
9404 8 am 4 pm.
2 RZ mini-buses, 1 -
Liteace mini-bus. All in excellent
condition. Phone 268-3953.
1 JEEP Wrangler excellent
condition for sale. 1 Jeep
Wrangler shell. Tel. 625-1188.
IRZ minibus music, mags,
excellent working condition -
$1.1M. Contact 611-0845.
ONE (1) Four-Runner,
immaculate condition, PHH
series. Call 220-0903, 640-2068.
1 SILVER Grey Ceres,
excellent condition $950 000
neg. Call 223-4472, 623-6335.
1 RZ long base mini bus,
working condition, mags,
music, etc. $900 000. Call
265-3989.
AE 81 COROLLA -
automatic, metallic, paint, in
ood condition. 229-6838 or
610-3327.
STARLET Glanza.
Immaculate condition.
Vehicle never registered -
$1.8M. Call 225-2611.
1 AT 192 CARINA, PHH
series, spoiler, mag rims. Tel.
256-3795, 626-7635. Ask for
Ravi.
1 TOYOTA -Tundra
(white). Going cheap. Suzuki
Vitara, 4-door. Call 227-5500,
227-2027.
1 ONE Toyota Land Cruiser
diesel) 13 sweater, manual
$4.1 million. Please contact
623-7031.
1 GJJ Leyland Daf, double
axle truck with hyhab, dump, 20-
cyd. Tray. Price neg. Call 640-
2365.
4-WD RANGE Rover -
Land Rover with alloy rims &
Sony CD player. Priced to go.
# 621-7445
MODEL 'M' Truck, GHH
series, mint condition. Any
reasonable offer accepted. Te.
229-6336.
CARINA AT 212. fully
powered. On wharf. going
cheap. Must be sold. Sheriff
Street. 225-6356.
2 000F 150 XLT Super
Cab 4 x 4 4-door. Best looking &
best equipped one around Call
626-2266.
1 2002 model Bob Cat.
only finished 2 000 hrs, along
with trailer. $3.9M. Tel. 225-
0995, 628-0796.
1 TOYOTA 4 X 4, 1 Nissan
Caravan minibus, both in
excellent condition. Tel. 225-
8802, 629-5387.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter -
PHH, enclosed 2-ton. In good
working condition $1 700 000.
Tel. 259-3158.
1 TOYOTA Super Custom
bus, PFF, in good working
condition $600 000. Tel. 259-
3158.
ONE Coaster bus in good
working condition. Contact
616-3736 or 660-1564. No
reasonable offer refused.
TOYOTA 6 212 and 6 -
192 RZ and Caldina wagon,
wholesale make offer for
package. Tel. 642-4827.
TOYOTA Corolla AE 91 and
AE 100 Carina AT 170, Corona
AT 170. Call City Taxi Service.
226-7150.
JUST arrived with low
mileage choice vehicles -
Toyota 192, 212, RZ and
Caldina Wagon. Contact 642-
4827.
AT 210 CORONA 1998
Model excellent condition, late
PHH series. Price negotiable.
Phone # 640-4573.
2-TON Toyota Dyna, 1.5-ton
Toyota Dyna, both 1997 model,
never registered. Call 231-5680.
Terms available.
ONE Nissan Sunny wagon,
mag rims, in working condition.
$250 000 or best offer. Tel. 270-
4465 or 642-6159.
2005 TOYOTA Tacoma,
access doors, Extended Cab.
2003 Toyota Tundra, fully
loaded. 619-0063, 643-9891.


1 RZ TOYOTA minibus for
sale. BJJ series. 1 Toyota
Ceres car, PHH.Contact 623-
7394.
AT 170 CORONA EFI,
excellent condition; 2 AT 192
Carina EF-, fully powered.
Tel. 222-2905, 541-0821.
1 NEW Model RZ Coieel
3000 CC Turbo, GJJ series,
Long base, never worked hire.
Tel. 220-6699 or 664-3323.
1 RZ.minibus music,
mags, excellent working
condition $1.1M. Small
credit can be arranged.
Contact 218-4060.
ONE AA' 60 Carina, in
excellent working condition,
needs bod work-, tape deck,
AC etc. Tel. 617-4063/
225-0236.
TOYOTA MK 11, GX 81 -
mags, AC,PW, P/L, power seat.
Immaculate condition. 74
Sheriff St., C/ville. 225-6356.
BLACK Toyota Levin
Sports car excellent
condition, leather interior, 4
age 20v (manual), 63,000 Km.
Tel. 645-3036.
1 AT 170 TOYOTA Corona
- excellent condition, mag
rims, fog lamps, original
soiler. Price neg. Telephone
622-0322.
2005 Tacoma X Runner,
2005 Yamaha R1, 2002
Toyota Tundra (bubble black
with side step)..Tel. 612-0099,
444-6617.
MITSUBISHI RVR PJJ
series, immaculate condition
- $2.4M negotiable. Mint
condition. Contact 276-0245.
628-4179.
ONE Toyota Four-Runner
Surf, Burgundy in immaculate
condition. Asking $2.3M.
Please call 771-4299 or 616-
5869.
LEXUS LX 450 SUV. Acura
Legend, fully loaded leather
interior, Chappy and Adley
Scooters. TeL# 226-6432,
623-2477.
TOYOTA Hiace minibus -
15 seats, Long Base with music
system, mag rim in excellent
condition. Tel. 270-4335, cell
627-7004.
1 1998 Model Toyota 4-
Runner (2700 cc engine), auto
and fully powered. PHH
series. $4.1 Million. Tel. 225-
0995. 628-0796.
FORD 150 Pick Up, 3
doors, good condition. CD/
Tape player. bubble tray, dual
air bag, mag rims, etc $5.5M
neg. Tel. 220-7416.
ONE Nissan Laurel fully
loaded. Model C 33, 4-
cvlinder, gear, (PW. PM. PS).
Price n- : Call: 223-9021,
Cell: 419 (Monty).
1 BLUE Toyota Hilux
diesel 2L Turbo 4 x 4. Extra
Cab auto, fully loaded,
rmas, crash bar. bed liner, etc.
Call 223-5172. 617-7026.
SV 40 Camry (immaculate
condition) $1.7M. SV32
Camry (Vista) auto and fully
powered (well-kept)- $1.4M.
225-0995/628-0796.
580 C HYMAC with
swamp tract, 10 tons (3)
wheel roller, 3 tons vibrating
roller. All in good working
conditions. Call 623-3404.
222-6708.
TOYOTA Corolla EE 103
Wagon, 1996 Model.
Excellent condition, never
registered $1 350 000
negotiable. Contact 276-
0245, 628-4197._
HONDA Prelude 2-door
Sport car. Fully loaded, 5-
speed, AC PW, PL, mags, CD
cancer, V.Tec, nice clean car.
74 Sheriff St. 225-6356.
1 DUMP truck, 1 water
tender and 330 Timber Jack
Skidder all are in good working
condition. For more
information Contact: 264-
2946.
1 TOYOTA AA 60 Carina,
manual, mag rim (new engine
and gear). rice $475 000.
Contact Rocky 225-1400,
621-5902.
1 NISSAN Pathfinder.
immaculate condition,
automatic, fully loaded.
crash bar $1.4M Contact
Rocky # 225-1400 or 621-
5902.
1 FOUR-RUNNER V6 -
fully loaded, alarm, CD.
Price $2.2M. Credit
available. Contact Rocky -
225-1400, 621-5902.
1 AT 150 CARINA.
automatic, executive
condition, one owner. Price
$425 000. Contact Rocky -
225-1400, 621-5902.


--mm-.j







SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20,2006 25


1 HONDA Integra, 5-speed,
gear, fully powered, mag rims,
immaculate condition $650
000. Contact Rocky 225-
1400, 621-5902. ---
1 NISSAN Vanette Largo
minibus, 12-seater, manual,
excellent to fetch goods. Price
$450 000. Contact Rocky -
225-1400, 621-5902.
1 4-CYLINDER Nissan
Laurel fully loaded. 1 AT 212
fully loaded. 1 Toyota Mark
11. Call Kishan 220-0979,
612-3916.
HONDA CRV 1999
Model, excellent condition,
PHH series, very low mileage.
Price negotiable. Phone # 624-
.3007, 261-2375 weekend
'only. 231-2110.
ONE AT 170 Corona car.
Toyota standard mags, lately
refurbished. AC, PW, PM, tape
deck $775 000 negotiable.
Tel. 619-5087, 218-3018.
1 AVANTI AC Unit 3 000
BTU $45 000; 1 HP Printer -
$19 000: 1 Pentium 2
Computer, mouse & keyboard -
$15 000. Call 226-2053.
AT 212 CARINA. AT 192
Carina, AE 100 Sprinter &
Corolla, EP 92 Starlet 4-door,
T 100 Toyota Pickup, Mark 11.
Amar #227-2834, 621-6037.
4 DOORS TOYOTA DYNA
TRUCK- 3Y. A/C Dual
Rear Wheel. Immaculate
condition. 74 Sheriff St.,
C/ville. Tel. 225-6356.
1 AE 100 Corolla,
automatic, fully powered, AC,
mag rims. CD player, hardly
used. Price $1.150M neq.
Contact Rocky 225-1400,
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Land Cruiser -
stick gear, mag rims. 4 x 4 V6,
excellent working condition.
Price $1.3M. Contact Rocky
225-1400. 621-5902.
2 AE 91Toyota Sprinters
one owner AC, spoiler, mags,
music, etc.. 17 mags. low
profile tyre. Excellent
condition, never in hire. Price
$700 000. Call 629-4236.
1- TOYOTA Long Base RZ
mini-bus came in new. never
worked (route), is in private
number. AC, works perfect -
$1.8M. 225-0995/628-0796.
MUST BE SOLD. 2 RZ
in immaculate condition; 1 -
Buick car with AT 170
engine, AE 91. AE 81, Pickup
van etc. all in excellent
condition.. Call: 220-
5124,663-4120.
TOYOTA Corolla Levin AE
110 fully powered, CD & 12-
disc changer, mags, spoiler,
remote start. Owner leaving
country $1 250 000
negotiable. 643-5431, 223-
9316.
ONE Black Toyota 4 x 4
Pick up truck (one owner), (lift
kit), 4WD. Immaculate
condition. Tel. 226-6527 or
623-7242 for information or
Tennessee Night Club. 8 to 4
pm.
: TACOMA Pickup, 4-
Runner, Surf. Sport car RX7, AE
100 Corolla, 1 small-bus, 1 ET
176 Wagon. All vehicles in
immaculate condition. Call
220-5124. 663-4120.
ONE of a kind Toyota
IPSUM fully powered, CD and
DVD with 8.5" monitor, mag
rims and spoiler, chrome,
mirrors and grilled. 322-5226
or 322-5435.
1 TOYOTA Hilux Surf
enclosed 5-door 3Y,
automatic, fully powered,
mags crash bar, roof rack,
immaculate condition. Price
$2M. Contact Rocky 225-
1400. 621-5902.
MARINO fully automatic,
PGG series, excellent
condition, credit available.
Pete's Auto Sale, Lot 2 George
Street. Werk-en-Rust,
Georgetown Tel.226-9951.
226-5546. 231-7432.
1 TOYOTA 4 X 4, 2-door
enclosed cabin carriage, 3Y,
PGG series, manual. crash
bar. CD player and power
wrenchr spring leave back
and ifro 1 4M. Contact
Rocky c 2.5-1400 21-
5902
i TOYOT., R V...4 icatp in
brand i te: a bc.n: ati c fill ,v
powered. AC ch-0!-1,& mag
rins. CD rolaver alarm, remote
star" roo! IaK crah bar auwo-
4 : 4 Price 52 .
(lrrimnia ulate 'Ji'ht,.
Cr.i ,' Rock! y'. .;' 22; 'I. r -
or'I'' .. .. .


1 RZ minibus music, mags,
excellent working condition -
$1.1M. Small credit can be
arranged. Contact 218-4060.
NISSAN PULSAR 4-DOOR
FULLY LOADED, LOW MILES.
ASKING $1.9M. CALL 225-
5591.
1 EE Toyota Corolla Wagon
manual, excellent condition.
Price $650 000. Contact Rocky
225-1400, 621-5902.
ONE Toyota AT 192
Carina, in excellent condition.
AC, mag rims, fully powered,
etc. Tel. 256-3216, 621-3875.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter truck,
Long Base, in good working
condition. Contact 264-2391.
622-1782 Ravi.
1 HONDA Accord
automatic, fully powered, mag
rims, working condition. Price -
$450 000. Contact Rocky 225-
1400, 621-5902.
1 AT 192 CARINA -
automatic, fully powered. AC.
mag rims, spoiler, immaculate
condition. Price $1.4M neg..
Contact Rocky 225-1400, 621-
5902.
KHAN'S BUYING &
SELLING AUTO SALES. 2
Toyota back wheel drive
Wagons, needs spray job.
$250 000 anyone. 1 Carib 4 x
4 Wagon (Sprinter) $675
000 neg 225-9700, 623-
9972, 233-2336.
ONE RAV 4L, PJJ series,
fully loaded. TV, CD. bull bars,
excellent condition, woman
driven and one Nissan Single
Cab Pickup, GHH series.
excellent condition. Tel. Bobby
220-4221, Frankie 266-0309
1 MITSUBISHI Pajero.
1995 mode!, PJJ series, 5-door,
automatic, fully powered. AC,
mag rims. (4 x 4), leather
interior, crash bar, immaculate
condition. Price S4.9M. neg.
Contact Rocky 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA RZ Super
Custom diesel 2L Turbo EFI
engine, automatic, fully
powered, AC. chrome mag rims
CD player, flare kit, sunroof &
moon roof. immaculate
condition, GKK series. Price -
$2.8M. Contact Rocky 225-
1400, 621-5902.
CALDINA WAGON fully
automatic, PJJ series, excellent
condition, (one owner) credit
available. Pete's Auto Sale, Lot
2 George Street, Werk-en-Rust.
Georgetown (behind Brickdam
Cathedral Church, South into
George Street) Tel. 226-9951,
226-5546. 231-7432.
AT 170 CORONA PHH
series, fully automatic, excellent
condition, (credit available).
Pete's Auto Sale, Lot 2 George
Street, Werk-en-Rust,
Georgetown (behind Brickdam
Cathedral Church, South into
George Street). Tel. 226-9951,
226-5546, 231-7432.
1 TOYOTA 4 X 4 RUNNER
automatic, fully loaded, CD
and cassette Player, fog lamp,
nickel mags, competition
exhaust, crash bar, side step
bar, brand new looks and
drive. Contact Mr. Khan Auto
Sales -, 28 'BB' Eccles EBD. Tel.
233-2336, 623-9972.
PREMIO 210 CORONA -
fully automatic, PHH series,
excellent condition, (one
owner), showroom style. Pete's
Auto Sale, Lot 2 George Street,
Werk-en-Rust, Georgetown
(behind Brickdam Cathedral
Church. South into George
Street). Tel. 226-9951. 226-
5546, 231-7432.
1 CHEVROLET Silverado 5-
door enclosed van. automatic.
4-wheel drive, side bars, power
steering, mag wheels, good
tyres, good for interior or tourist
trip $650 000 neg. 1 automatic
Austin Morris car 4-door
resprayed. never registered.
from England $750 000 neg.
Owner migrating. Ouik sale -
621-4928.
AT 170 CARINA WAGON -
:ul!y auomatic. PHH sor-ih<
-.xceleri condition Prli
850 OC.p pay downr i$60
000 a!,r i 1'ce w h'i ouw' iI r, st
Pete's Auto Sale. Lot' r;;:,
Street. Weil .
Georgetown (behind Birckdainm
Caz.hedral Churclh, Souil h,;'
' ^.- 'treet). Tel 2, -, ni-i
231-7432


AT 170 CORONA WAGON -
fully automatic, PHH series,
excellent condition. Price $700
000, pay down $400 000
balance without interest. Pete's
Auto Sale, Lot 2 George Street,
Werk-en-Rust, Georgetown
(behind Brickdam Cathedral
Church, South into George
Street). Tel. 226-5546, 226-
9951, 231-7432.
DAVID Auto Sale 238 South
Rd. & Alexander Sts. We buy and
sell used vehicles. We have AE
81, AE 91, 100 Corona and
Sprinter, AT 170 Carina &
Corona, AT 192 Carina, AT 212
Carina, Pajero, Mitsubishi
Lancer, SB 40, F 150 Long and
Short base minibus. Tel. 227-
1845, Monday Saturday 9
am 4 pm 229-6253.



ARE YOU BUYING


OR SELLING


YOUR VEHICLE?






tII&Ai 'T
THE SMART PLACE TO
BUY AND SELL A CAR!
LOT 2 GEORGE &HADFIELD STS.
TEL: 226 5546 OR 226 9951

KHAN'S BUYING & SELLING
AUTO SALES 1 AT 192, private,
mags. automatic, fully loaded.
Asking S1.2M neg.. 2 AT 170
Carina. Never worked hire, PGG
series m.-i--n music, automatic -
$750 *:* ..e- 1 HB 12 Nissan
Sunny, private, 5-forward, 14"
mags, etc. $375 000 neg: 1
Extra Cab Hilux, GHH series,
mags. 5-forward, 4 x 4 drive.
crash bar. side step bar. roller bar,
fog lamps, CD player, etc Asking
$1.2M neg or best offer: 1 2-ton
Canter, Double back wheel diesel
best offer accepts, credit
available, neat condition: 1
Toyota Sera, flip-tip doors,
automatic, mags, air condition,
etc. Make an offer lady driven,
very neat and original: 1 XT 600
Yamaha Trail. 1 Kainou 125 road
bike, both bike legally registered,
immaculate condition. 225-9700,
623-9972. 233-2336. Behind
Brickdam Police Station.
JUST ARRIVED- TOP QUAUTY
RECONDITIONED VEHICLES.
CARS: TOYOTA COROLLA NZE
121, TOYOTA WILL VS (2004)
MODEL, TOYOTA CARINA AT 192,
TOYOTA COROLLA AE 110,
TOYOTAPRIUS (HYBRID), TOYOTA
CYNOS SPORTS COUPE, TOYOTA
VISTA ZV 50, TOYOTA STARLET
EP 91 (4-DOOR), MITSUBISHI
LANCER CK 2, HONDA CIVIC EK
3, TOYOTA RAV 4 SXA 11, TOYOTA
COROLLA WAGON AE 100.
PICKUPS: TOYOTA HILUX LN 170
EXTRA CAB, LN 100 SINGLE CAB
NISSAN FLAT BED BD 22 DIESEL,
NISSAN SINGLE CAB QD 22,
MITSUBISHI CANTER TRUCK 3-
TON OPEN TRAY. ORDER EARLY
AND GET THE BEST PRICES ON
DUTY FREE VEHICLE, FULL
AFTER SALES SERVICE AND
FINANCING, AVAILABLE. DEO
MARAJ AUTO SALES. 207
SHERIFF AND SIXTH STREETS,
CAMPBELLVILLE. 226-4939. A
NAME AND A SERVICE YOU CAN
TRUST.
NOW IN STOCK. Toyota
Corolla -- NZE 121, AE 110, EE
103. Honda Civic EK3 & ES1,
Toyota Hilux Extra Cab -LN 172, LN
170. RZN 174. Toyota Hilux Double
Cab- YN107. LN 107. LN 165. 4 x
4, RZN 167. RZN 169, Toyota
--lilux Single Cab LN 106,
Toyota Hilux Surf RZN 185 YN
130, KZN 185. Mitsubishi Canter
FE 638E, FE6387EV, Toyota
Carina AT 192, AT 212,
Toyota Marino AE 100. Toyota
Vista AZV 50, Honda CRV RO,
Toyota RAV 4 ZCA 26. ACA 21.
SXA 11, Toyntn Mark IPSUM SXM
15 Tfoyo Marl 2 GX 1001 Lin'er CK
'A. IToy t, Co ona iPi iii AT

i'.It: bis., r ,dliia l..ia SC..'A
yE 1 0a Colofla ... .

Auto Sales, 22(i Snuillt R, I .,
Bourda. G oiii-,etown t Te l .i -
8953. 2.:.619/73 227 3 1 5.
Fax. 227-3 I U; \c/e ii.)vL you
,!'le i i l1


ONE Taxi Driver. Call 227-
2256.
1 LIVE-IN MAID. CALL 233-
5755.
ONE TAXI DRIVER. TEL.
222-3267.
MEN to do body work. Call
Tel. 226-5487.
1 BUS DRIVER. TEL. 627-
5259 OR 227-7458.
HIRE CAR DRIVERS
24 HRS).CONTACT TEL.
27-0018.
ONE Carpenter Masonry to
work in Georgetown. 621-4928
LABOURER. Kwakwani
Logging Grant. Tel. 629-0551.
1 LIVE-IN DOMESTIC,
40-50 YEARS.
TELEPHONE 642-8781.
ONE experienced
Excavator Operator.
Contact # 623-0957.
TWO Handyman to do
bond work packing,
cleaning, etc. 621-4928.
GIRLS to work in
Dressmaking Establishment.
Call 226-0013 Dacia.
ONE experienced Cook,
one experienced Cake
Decorator. Call 641-5631.
3 MACHINISTS. APPLY
18-23 ECCLES INDUSTRIAL
SITE, E B DEMERARA.
TRUCK DRIVERS.
KWAKWANI LOGGING GRANT.
TEL. 629-0551.
TREE SPOTTERS/
LINESMEN Kwakwani Logging
Grant Tel 629-0551.
TO purchase 1 Diesel
LN 20 engine 4-cylinder for
Nissan small bus. 621-
4928
A HIRE CAR Driver or work
car around Georgetown at
Taxi Service 621-4928.
2 WAITRESSES. Apply
Bibi Jameels. 14 Vryheid's Lust,
ECD. Tel 220-5244.
EXPERIENCED Bar Maid
and Waitress, living on the West
Coast Dem Call 629-4236.
ONE live-in Domestic from
the country area between 17
years and 30 years. 621-4928.
BUILDING for school in
East Bank or West Coast
Demerara. Tel. 223-7226/
227-4798.
1 SECURITY Guard, 1 DJ.
Contact C & S Night Club on
Sheriff Street. Tel. 227-3128.
SALESMEN with Driver's
Licence and 5 CXCs or
University Degree. 225-5198,
231-2064.
HOUSE KEEPER wanted
in Trinidad for Indian family.
Please call 0011-868-341-
3534.
1 AT 150 Carina -
automatic, excellent condition.
Price $450 000 neg. Contact
Sandra. Tel. 227-8365.
THREE-BEDROOM apt.
for working persons in city or
suburban with moderate
rental. 226-9410.
TUG Captain. Must have
knowledge of Quarry. Call
227-2027. General Domestic.
Call 227-2027.
ONE Night Security (able-
bodied), good wages. Tel. 226-
6527 or Tennessee Night Club
8 to 4 pm.
1 BABY-SITTER $15 000
weekly, 1 male Office Assistant
with Secondary Education. Call
220-0672.
LUMBER Purpleheart mill
and chain saw. Price $170,
$250/BM. Call 623-8353, 225-
6359, 641-7243.
COOK & D. J. to work at
Hotel Purple, Rest & Bar,
Charity. Essequibo Coast. Call
626-6909. 629-0037.
One 16.000 sq. ft land in
Bel Air Springs $26M This is
the only lot for sale. Phone
225-2626/231-2064.
ONE Cook and Bai
Rai, 315 MI iddlo St b twoi [

i L:,' in M : :.', tro .1
vIC A pil l i l l ,l l


ON : ;\ I' I
I L N E W n'^ -i..P I R I; .V i\ .
G 1 ilL v\A 1,: C1 : ;A .
BR (* .- i:Pi i i


1 BAKER & 1 Pastry Marker.
Call Lawrence at 322-0309.
HONEST and responsible
person to work in Snackette.
Apply 353 East St., opposite G/
town Public Hospital Corp.
TWO experienced sewing
machine Operators. Contact No.
622-4386/227-8538 or at 122
Merriman's Mall, Bourda.
PUMP Attendant and
Salesclerk. Please walk with
written application and ID, NIS
Card. Apply Esso, Mc Doom,
EBD.
ONE Salesgirl, one Cleaner/
Packer. Age 18- 25. Must be
pleasant and friendly and live
on the ECD. Call 615-8121.
SALESCLERKS, Porters,:
Domestic, Handyman. Hamid
General Store, 244 Regent
Street. Tel, # 225-3811, 226-
8961.
ONE live-in Domestic/
Nanny. Must like children
preferably from the country area,
age 35 to 45. Tel. 609-6931/223-
5260.
URGENTLY needed one
Domestic Maid to live-in.
Contact number Tel. 223-7781,
614-4633, between 5 pm and 8
pm.
EXPERIENCED curry cooks,
counter servers. Apply in person
Hack's Halaal Restaurant.5
commerce St G/town. 9-11 am.
URGENTLY needed 2 Auto
repair man for straightening and
prepave on vehicles. AFso 2
helpers. Tel. 645-0955, 233-
6262
EXPERIENCED Salesgirls.
Apply with written application
to Regent Household
Electronics. 143 Regent Road.
Tel. 227-4402.
SKILLED Technician with
attitude needed at Fantasy
Nails & Hair, 51 Norton Street
& Louisa Row. Tel. 226-3822.
613-4272.
MECHANIC- experience
with D6 Clark Skidders. Bedford
and 6 x 6 trucks. Kwakwani
Logging Grant. Tel 629-0551.
SALESMEN with Cars to sell
Real Estate on commission.
Must have character and
integrity. Email
tonyreidsrealty@hotnmail.corn
DECENT working female
roommate to share furnished
apartment in Kitty $19 000
including light & water. Call
Sharon- 649-2358.
COUNTER Clerks with some
experience. Apply in person with
Reference and Police
Clearance to Bish & Sons, 159
Barr Street, Kitty.
ONE experienced
Supervisor Apply in person with
written application to Regent
Household Electronic, 143 Regent
Road. Tel. 227-4404.
BARMAN and Waitress to
work at Sheriff St., (flat shop).
Call 225-1710 and one Barman
to work at V-Hoop. Call 264-2263:
between 5 pm and 7 pm.
1 LIVE-IN Domestic
between 25 35 yrs. preferably,
from country area. Only live-in
need apply to Purple Shop, 12'
Fort St., Kingston. Tel. 226-'
1377.
EXPERIENCED Hairdresser.
Must know to do manicure,
pedicure, facial and hairstyles,.
etc. Also chairs to rent. Please
contact. Tel. 2235252 or 6283415.
ONE Male Office Assistant,
age 17 25 years. Must have
sound secondary education and
possess own transportation.
Apply to P.O. Box 10441,
Georgetown.
URGENT. Urgent
properties to let urgent, also
properties for sale 'rental hfor
$25 000, sales from 1.5
million Vanies Realty & Auto
Sales 225-4872. 643-1G95
I- CASHIER. Apply w.ith
written application to Haimson
General Store, 116 Regent
Road, Bourda with Police
Clearance. 1 passport photo and
roferein, from iLit e'1plyeI 'i
3 PUMP ATTENDANTS, 3
SALESGIRL. 2 FEMALE
COUNTER CLERKS AND ONI
MAID. APPLY IN PERSON WIllti
WRITTlEN APPLICATIONS NA
S'IEVV: TI-XA(C Vi.ISSENNi-.,
ROAD


,- 'P \ P
.1 P.l ,A i ,- l ,, : j


HONEST, reliable and
experienced Taxi Drivers to
work in a popular Taxi Service.
Fully loaded cars available,
good salary guaranteed. One
reference required. Must have
Hire Car Licence. Call 226-
0731, anytime.
50 SECURITY Guards for
Baton, Armed and Canine
(Dogs) Division, 2 lorry and van
Drivers to work as Drivers on
contract (like minibus).
Contact The Manager, R.K's
Security Service 125,
Regent Road, Bourda.
ONE experienced male or
female sewing machine
Operator to supervise the
sewing of shirts, pants and
other garments. One
experienced Cutter to cut with
cutting knife at Sooksons
Garment Factory, above R.
Sookraj & Sons on Regent St.
Attractive salary offered.
EXPERIENCED Drivers.
Requirements must have a valid
Driver's Licence. Must have 5
years driving experience.
Licensed to drive with left and
right hand vehicles van, lorry.
minibus. Must walk with 2
references. Valid Police
Clearance. Apply at BEEPATS
101 Regent Street, Lacytown,
Georgetown.
ONE Television Station
Sales Rep. requirements two
(2) or more years, experience
in sales will be an asset. Must
possess a Driver's Licence. Must
at least possess a basic
knowledge of Book Keeping.
Send application along with
CV to The General Manager
at Lot 16 Mudlot, Kingston.
Georgetown or Call Tel. 223-
5273/4.
TWO young men tc wo'
in Aquarium Fish Farm
Soesdyke. E. B. Dam E..
work. Also aqua--.n: fisr
suppliers nraede fr- -
Mahaica Creek, Canr ..
Demerara River, P.:-
Essequibo Rive : -
Creek, other a'-.- '
Fishes '., ex : ct
Moham, .
Soesdyke _..
261-5993.
SUPPLY : roo-inu
materials. De.. a : 6 weeks
to Pin. Ve ,-.: s. WBD.
Material type. .: .,unheart or
comparable 18 000 BM Savn
lumber, 1 500 BM dressed
lumber. Construction workers.
general labourers, skilled
workers, foremen. Contact
Roraima Trust & Investment
Inc.. Pin Versailles, West Bank
Demerara. Phone 264-29,16/7.
Fax 264-2949.
TRINIDAL DOMESTIC/
BABYSITTER UNDER 23
YEARS. MUST HAVE VALID
PASSPORT, BE ABLE TO
COOK ROTI, HONEST. CLEAN.
APPLICATION WITHOUT
RECENT PHOTO WILL NOT
BE ACKNOWLEDGED. SEND
TO ROHINI DASS.
WATERBRIDGE. ROAD BLUE
RANGE, DIEGO MARTIN
TRINIDAD. WEST INDIES.
Wanted to work at
reputable emerging, enterpr
located at Charity. EsseqL'
Coast Assistant Fact
Manager (Pomeroon Oil
Inc.). Requirements: more ti
three (3) years experience
the administrative field will b.
an asset. At least two (2) year-
experience in stock control.
Must be computer literate.
Passes in Maths & English for
either CXC or A/Level.
Accounts Clerk- (Pomeroon Oil
Mills Inc.) Requirements.
passes at CXC, must include
Maths. English. POA & POB.
More than one (1) year
experience will be an asset.
Must be computer literate
Attractive salary General Store
'i ,, ; Geneial
-i ... t,, .... i passesin
Maths F, r"-:-i- ~f-r either CXC
or OiL (5) years
expel ence in a similar field
will b- an as-.cet. Must bL
**'r !.Lui(er lit'i alp Televison I
t t;,l' ; R ;.)lt'! r -(RCA TV CH 1
S nt," s
', ,,\ P F " : L


-----


"'in"?nn^ *fi 41 Df-i






26


2 ,SLP@RT CHRONIC


Guyana, Barbados seek victories


as they chase places in final


GEORGETOWN, Guyana,
(CMC) Hosts Guyana and
title-chasing Barbados will
seek victories in order to
enhance their claim to
places in the final, when
the fourth and penultimate
round of the TCL Group
West Indies Under-19 Chal-
lenge bowls off today.
Guyana, the only team to
complete a victory in the last
round, head the points table
with 30 points, six more than
second-placed Barbados going
into this round.
Further, they need only
first innings points from their
clash with Jamaica at Enmore
to be assured of a place in the
final as they hunt their 12th
title at this level and first
since 1997.
Guyana's batting line-
up, which includes two
West Indies Under-19 play-
ers, is their strength but
left-arm spinner
Veerasammy Permaul, who


has had two Man-of-the-
Match performances on his
way to 20 wickets so far in the
series, will pose a threat.
Skipper Steven Jacobs, a
first-class player, has offered
support with his steady, if not
destructive, off-spin and could
emerge as one of the leading all-
rounders in the competition.
Jamaica has been a big dis-
appointment although Jamie
Trenchfield, who led the team
to championship honours in
2004, returned to form with a
half-century in the last game af-
ter giving up the captaincy to
concentrate on his batting.
Like Guyana, Barbados, the
runners- up for the last two
years, have played consistent
cricket, and once they do not
lose to the Leeward Islands in
their fourth round game at
Wales will be assured of a
place in the final.
The last day of their last
two matches were completely
washed out and Barbados


EXPERT I E N C E D SECURITY Guards.
Salesgirls and Handyboys. Porters. Salesgirls and
Apply with written Salesboys Apply Avinash
application to Regent Complex. Water Street. Athina's
Household Electronic at by the East Coast Bus Park &
143 Regent Road Bourda. Anand's Regent Street.
Telephone No. 227-4402. Contact 226-3361. 227-7829
SCRAP Copper. brass. ONE young and
aluminium, alum!r iurm tins/ energetic worker with
Ss ractical computer
cans, radio ators to buy kowledge, who lives around
HAROLD'S METAL STORE G town. ppy with
223 '..- i.... Street, application to Managei at
Georgetown (near to Strand Petes Video Club. Lot 2
Cinema Phuon 225-6347, George and Hadieold Streets.
226-8026. Apply in person.



: .. S ~: ,, 8

MrI Clifford Stanley on 6 18..6538/328.2304


1 NISSAN Pathfinder
(V6 EFI), automatic, fully
powered. 330 Bedford
ump Truck. just rebuilt.
Never used. Night Hawk
motorcycle. Tel. 338-
2345.



CIRCUIT City Internet
Cafe and om uter
School, Lot 2 D'Edward
Village, W/!C/B. All
Internet facilities,
photocopying, Scanning
and Fax services. Tel.
327-5369 or 625-7189.


1- GOING business
place. 30ft x 35ft. 1
secured beautifully tiled
office 30ft x 25f1. 1-3
bedroom .house fully
grilled in N/A.uCall 333-
2500.
UPPER flat of two-
storeyed building for
business o purposes -
located in Coburg Street
(next to Police
Headquarters). Call
Telephone #618-6634


1 3-STOREYED
build .g.newly built in
the heart of New
Amsterdam. Price
reduced drastically.
Cali 333-2457, 337-
234 8
2-3 TOREY prime
president l property
situated in Canefield
Canje Pub!l: Road. Price
S2 r million,
ieactiable Contact Tel.
327.-.'IC4


JUST arrived-Caterpillar
312 & 320 Excavators (long and
short boom); All sizes of Road
Rollers: Prices negotiable. A
Sookram Auto Sales, D'Edward.
WCB. Tel. 327-5419. 623-9125.


CHURCH View Hotel.
Main and King Streets,
NA. Tel: 333-2880. Gift
Flower and Souvenir
Shop, Main & Vryheid
Streets. # 333-3927


WOODWORK Door
Store, panel doors,
cupboard doors, windows
and mouldings. Pitt
Street & Republic Road.
N/A. Tel.333-2558


OXYGEN and acetylene
industrial gases, Vf 58
Village, Corentyne, Berbice.
Phone 338-2221. (David
Subna ut h).
One Ransom 3-Disc
Plough, one pair MF 35-
cage wheel, one 35 MF
back blade one steel rake
Call Tel: 333-3460
1 LITTLE Giant
dragline with 371 engine; 1
- 4 x 36" pitch propeller:
(1) 3'" dia. x 13 ft 6 ins.
ro seller shaf t; 1
Perkins marine with
transmission: 1 Bedford
block with
,,..I I crank shaft and
head, all sizes of 3-
phase motors: cutting
torch: one complete qgas
welding set: one 7 1
GM e n i n e I T el
333-322.


opener Jed Yearwood (the only
batsman with 300 runs) who
pounded 186 against the Wind-
ward Islands, and half-centuries
against Trinidad & Tobago and
Jamaica, will hope for as much


JEDYEARWOOD


cricket as possible to increase
his aggregate.
Yearwood, Guyana's
Gajanand Singh (100) and
Windward Islands Skipper
Lauron Francois (135) have
been the only batsmen to
reach the three-figure mark
on the slow. low Guyana
pitches.
West Indies Under-19 fast
bo\ Icr Kemar Roach. already
with 14 wickets, should prove
a handful for the Lees\ard Is-
lands batsmen.


The Leeward Islands' bid
for an outright win in their last
game was affected by the
weather but if they can beat
Barbados and Trinidad & To-
bago in their final two games,
and should Guyana beat Barba-
dos in the last round, they could
still reach the final.
Leeward Islands pacer Chad
Hampson, who captured a five-
wicket haul in the first round,
should spearhead the attack
while the return of Kieran
Powell from the Stanford 20/20
tournament strengthens the
team's batting.
While Powell wasted his
wicket with big shots against
the Windward Islands, his abil-
ity will be a threat to Barbados.
especially if 15-year-old opener
Chesney Hughes, already with
two half-centuries under his
belt. and skipper Allan Powell
get going.
Defending champions
Trinidad & Tobago have been
a major disappointment and
has lacked the killer instinct
associated with champion
teams.
They face bottom of the
points table Windward Is-
lands at the small Demerara
Cricket Club ground in the
other fourth round game to-
day. But like Janmaica, they
are out of the running for
championship honours.


NEW YORK. NY (Reuters) Former heavyweight champion
Evander Holyfield scored a second-round knockout over jour-
neymnan Jeremy Bates on Friday in Dallas.
Holyfield. 43. rocked Bates at the end of the opening round
and had his 32-year-old opponent in deep trouble before the bell
sounded to save a dazed Bates.
Late in the second round, an overhand right hurt Bates
and a flurry by Holyfield pinned his opponent against the
ropes. The fight was stopped at 2:56 of the round with Bates
unable to withstand the barrage.
Holyfield, who had not fought since November 13. 2004 when
he lost a unanimous decision to Larry Donald at Madison Square
Garden, improved his record to 39-8-2 with 26 knockouts.
The victory was Holyfield's first since June 1, 2002 when
he beat Hasim Rahman.
Bates, an insurance salesman, fell to 21-12-1.
W .7-73PER"i -


: -Ia. "- B


The win over Jeremy Bates was Evander Holyfield's first
since June, 2002.


SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20,2006


Watkins celebrates


long jump gold at


World Juniors

BEIJING, China, (CMC)- Rhonda Watkins captured Trinidad
and Tobago's second gold medal at the 11th IAAF World Jun-
ior track and field championships when she landed the
women's long jump title yesterday.
The 18-year-old Watkins used her third jump of 6.46 metres
to capture the gold medal at the Chaoyang Sport Centre and join
men's 400-metre gold medallist Renny Quow as meet champions
for T&T.
Her effort was the third gold medal at the meet for the En-
glish-speaking Caribbean after Quow and Jamaican women's
400-hurdles champion Kaliese Spencer and the first ever
women's long jump gold for the Caribbean in the 20-year history
of the World Juniors.
She opened with a moderate 6.01-metre effort and then posted
6.24 metres before her championship-winning third jump, and
closed out her series with jumps of 6.03 metres, 6.20 and 6.26.
The versatile Watkins, an American-based student at the Uni-
versity of California in Los Angeles (UCLA), has an outstanding
record in regional competition.
She is a five-time CARIFTA champion, including the Un-
der-17 long jump/high jump double in 2003. She repeated
that feat in the senior division last year.
With a long jump personal best of 6.56 metres. Watkins had
a promising opening year at UCLA that included victories at the
West Region and Pac-10 meets in May.
At the West Region meet, she copped the long jump/high jump
double at 6.55 metres and 1.76 metres. respectively, and she won
the Pac-10 high jump title at 1.81 metres.
And at last month's Central American and Caribbean (CAC)
Junior Championship at home. she logged personal bests 6.56
metres (long jump) and 1.83 metres (high jump) for double gold
at the meet.
Meanwhile, the Jamaican team of Winston Barnes. Remaldo
Rose. Jervis Cawayne and Yohan Blake ran a world junior lead-
ing 39.18 to be the quickest into the men's 4x100-metre final to-
day.
The Cayman Islands ran a national junior record 40.92
for sixth in heat one and were climiiated.
The Jamaicans are also through to the women's sprint rela\
final after winning their heat in 44.69. but Caribbean colleagues
Bahamas are out after a 45.41 clocking for fourth in heat two.
The ULSA werc quickest of the morning at 43.67 seconds. fol-
lowed by France 44.02.
In the women's 1600-nietre relay semis, the 1998 cham-
pions .Jamaica placed second in three minutes 33.26 seconds.
behind Nigeria (3:33.00) to enter today's final as the second
fastest qualifiers. Defending champions USA won heat two
in 3:34.83 ahead of China (3:35.16).
The Jamaicans, who were bronze medal winners two years
ago in Italy. used Sherene Pinnock. 400-hurdles champion Spen-
cer. Shanna-Gaye Tracey and 400-metre silver medallist Sonita
Sutherland. in that order.
Jamaica also made it into the 1600-metre men's relay final
after clocking 3:08.57 in heat two chasing Poland (3:07.69).
Other Caribbean teams Bahamas (3:10.71) and Trinidad and
Tobago (3:08.27) failed to advance and Russia were quickest in
the heats at 3:05.59 seconds.
In the 110-metre hurdles semi-finals. Jamaica's Keiron
Stewart (14.15) and Andre Collins (14.40) failed to advance
while Poland's Artur Noga ran a championship record 13.43
in heat two.


Coca Cola wins for


Alpha United, GDF

ALPHA United beat Pele 3-1 and the Guyana Defence
Force (GDF) needled Mocha Champs 1-0, to book places
in the semifinals of the Coca Cola Super 16 knockout
football competition at the Uitvlugt Community Centre
ground, Friday night.
Playing the second match of the double-header. Alpha and
Pele were deadlocked 1-1 at halftime. Scott Nurse gave Al-
pha the lead after 19 minutes of play. but Shawn Bishop
struck back for Pele in the 36th minute.
But within five minutes of the second half, Quincy
Madramootoo produced the lead for Alpha and Neil
Hernandez netted the sealer in the 85th minute.
Earlier, GDF and Mocha played to a goalless first half.
but Seon Brewley was accurate in the second half for the
lone and winning goal.
Another quarter-final match is fixed for today at the
same venue with homesters Uitvlugt taking on Young
Warriors at 16:00 li.


_ 1_1~ I__





SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20 2006





Charles storms past finish


(From back page)
called it a day.
Earlier, Andy Singh was the
top young rider, winning the
Juveniles 10-lapper, along with
the two sprint prizes, with
Christopher Holder finishing
second and Enzo Matthews
third.
Holder started the day, with
capturing the 12-14 years race
and the sprint prize, ahead of
Johnatan Fagundes in second.
The Veterans Under-45 race
went to Lovell who also won


the sprint prize and Shameer
Baksh was second, while
Compton Persaud was the top
Over-45 rider, beating Beresford
Bookie to second and Clement
Douglas third.
National distance runner
Kelvin Johnson claimed the Up-
right glory and its sprint prize,
with Shawn Frank second and
Ryan Bharrat who graduated
from the BMX category, taking
the third place.
The top BMX rider was
Kwame Cumberbatch who
won the Open race, Fagundes


took the 12-14 years race,
ahead of Neil Reece and De-
von DeJong, while Ravendra
Karim won the 9-12 race,
with Anthony Freeman sec-
ond and Asif Shaw third.
Vivekanand Ruderdeo won
the 6-9 race, Rawle McLean
was second and Kareem
McLean third, while 6-12
Girls' race went to Cristal
Blackman.
Medical representative of
Geddes Grant Limited, Sunich
Maikoo, presented the prizes,
along with Seven Seas gifts,


m..


which included Sportflex, a
supplement designed for crick-
eters in England.
The race was organised by
National cycling coach Hassan
Mohamed as part of the annual
Teach Them Young coaching
programme in the National
Park, now in its 30th year. The
first one started on August 19,
1977.
Another meet in the Na-
tional Park two Saturdays
hence, September 2, will
wrap up the coaching
programme.


KARACHI, Pakistan,
(Reuters) Football authori-
ties in Pakistan have dropped
restrictions on men watching
women play soccer a senior
official said yesterday.
"Anybody can come and
watch the matches." Pakistan
Football Federation technical di-
rector Mir Farooq told Reuters.
"We have made adequate secu-
rity and seating arrangements
for everyone."
When the women's champi-
onship was launched last year
in this Muslim country, the
PFF did not allow unaccompa-
nied men to watch.
Only men who came with
their families were allowed
in.
Farooq said the women
players had to wear baggy track
suit trousers and long-sleeved
shirts and their matches were to
be supervised by a women ref-
eree, helped by one male and
one female assistant.
"We want to promote
women's sports but we are
also aware of the sensitivities
associated with women's
sports," he said.
Women regularly take part


in sports including soccer and
cricket but they are supposed
to follow strict dress codes that
ensure their bodies are covered
and they arc segregated front
men.
National football coach
Tariq Lutfi said more women
were playing soccer, particu-
larly after the World Cup. As
a result, 12 teams are taking
part in this year's competi-
tion, up from eight last year.


' WILLIAMS: In everlasting memory of KEITH
WILLIAMS of 1239 Canje Pheasant Lane,
South Ruimveldt Park who departed this life on
August 22, 2005.
What words can say how much he gave /'
To all who knew him as he lived kind and gentle
For him, life was a reality and not a fantasy
A friend he was to all among us
Who did just well without a fuss.
What was his name and who's this man ?
No other one hut Keith Williams
Always and forever will be missed by his wife, sons,
S daughter, grandchildren, sisters, brothers, nieces,
nephews and other relatives and friends.
' AlM May the Lord grant you eternal peace and rest. ,


IN bEBVINi MEMORY BF


of Jamaica, Queens, New York and formerly of
201 Barr Street, Kitty and Sarah Johanna, East Bank Demerara
who departed this life on 19th August 2000.
" Verily Allah will admit those who believe and do
righteous deeds, to gardens beneath which rivers flow."
INNA LILLAAHI WAINNA ILLAIHIRAAJI-OON


Remembered by his wife Elizabeth, children Nazeema,
Naeem, Nafeezah, Haseeb, Reia and other relatives.


Death

Announcement

The death is announced of:

Romeo Barakat

Abraham a
of iethem, Rupununi who
died on August 16, 2006
lHe i as tihe hulsLhandt ol rlita Al\braiiil ni e Micl\ ill k
THE FATHER of Mark. likce. Angelique. Matthew\
.I udc. Ruth and Romeo (J.nr. ika 'l'uidds '.
THE GRANDFATHER of'Richard. Joshuua. D)ominique
Ashili. Raw\ldon. Maxine. .onathan. Yusuf Samantha.
- uliette. Scott. Fabian. Shakira. Rachael and Jude (.Jnr.).
THE SON oflCannen Juliet l)e rcias ol Canada and the
S late Yusuf ltIarakat Ibrihimn
THE BROTHER of Maria Nc\\tn ol England, Adele
Scachi. Clristine De Abercu. hl li/.alhet Opashino\. LJune-
Ann liligno all of Canada and the late Rita Mann and
Abel l'atl l c lereitas.
FATH ER-IN-LAW ofl'atrick dte Groot. 'lssa. Sonja and
Shelly Abrahain. Elsie Malcolm and TernrRamiohn.
FUNERAL SERVICES of the late
ROMEO BARAKAT ABRAHAM \ ill be held on
Sunday August 20" 2006 at 3:00 p.m. at
()tu Lady olf Peace R.C. Church in L.ethetn
then on to Bon Success Burial Ground


I


There's nothing
your laughter
cares.
A mother whc
and fears;
'iWho sia,;: y
yea"'. 'Th 's


IN LOVING MEMORY


In loving memory of our beloved
mother, Doris Nelson who departed
this life on 19th Augu-' 2005.



ig as nice as a mother who shares
, your secrets, your wishes and


's there through your good i me 14


Sour -:;-c ': C vour -i"rnd :ro ,..' '. :
yo u mI.


| We mS'?yni; *'*-* *,:; IX Ich.. We RTiO'.! wt I'rh'in "' over -'.. Yv)4 -,
J :r.-i;fig so;; "ar .;; y~ -2(rj.Jt- Yresen and Oe)Sis:
g
a"""""'"-----'~- '------ ---


LISA WANITA KANSINALLY
Sunrise: October 17. 1982
S Sunset: August 21, 2000
Six years have passed since that sad day
When our dear Lisa was called away
God took her home it was His will
\ But in our hearts she liveth still
Gone is the face we love so dear
i Gone is the voice we love to hear


r?1 i -


i. Youi smiles, your laughs, your loving ways
i I ; remain with us to the end of our days
o some you may be forgotten
i ;. To others a pait of the past s_ _a._r_:
R: ut to those who loved and lost you
The memories of you will always last
Slo ove O yi :,,o!! but Jesus !o"os you best

S ieep on 0 ,',. i. o.', ., ..

t. Fo;: ,or mi ls --- ;i- rer -ni,.,o;.' '. '- ov, *is :d Vii';.. i
". a fo ror' I''zt c) tI. orotlrr ti- cr1 C rt : .; S tliln'i CHos'. irillna .'M-'
i Ra lamit',, alaini,, grandpaIeiiL., iiHiiS, unctiCe, ZOUSMil, , .
S'" g oaiocarents i~jndot',c m rreiatives i .,nids.
*^~~~~h |."- I-J >^' (*
^^.^ ^_^^ ^^ ba ^^ifitLt^^:(Ct^-YilliP


In loving memory of our beloved
JAMES RICHARD WILLIAM
AUSTIN who departed this life on
August 21,2005.
If tears could build a stairway
And memories a lane
We'd walk right up to heaven T
And bring you home again
Sadly missed by his loving wife Lorraine,
mother, brother & sisters, nieces, nephews,
uncle, aunt, cousins, relatives & friends.


Pak11istaTjfni auhortie

let mnnmwatch
women's soccer~I II II(


II


...,





28,.. SUNDAY CIRONIlCLE AgstqO, t 200&6


South Africans


defend tour decision


I


l'RT CHRONICLE,

World basketball ...


Wins for US, Lebanon



but Serbs stunned


JOHANNESBURG, South Africa (Reuters) The South Af-
rican cricket team arrived back in Johannesburg yester-
day saying they felt the decision to abort their tour of Sri
Lanka was fully justified after a bomb blast close to the
hotel in which they were staying.
Seven people were killed on Monday when a bomb exploded
in the Liberty Plaza shopping mall, 600 metres from the team's
Colombo hotel and often frequented by the players.
"The criticism was upsetting and a tough pill to swallow,"
Mark Boucher, who captained the team in the absence of the
injured Graeme Smith, said.
"The series would have
been a good opportunity for
the younger players to have a
go at a winning selection for
the World Cup. But, as a
team, we always believe in all-
for-one and one-for-all.
"We could not even leave
the hotel to practise and, per-
sonally, I like to get out and
experience what touring is all
about," Boucher said.
Coach Mickey Arthur
said the South Africans had
been eagerly anticipating
the limited-over triangular
series that also featured In- MARKBO ER
dia, after losing the Test se-
ries 2-0 to Sri Lanka.
"From a cricketing point of view, abandoning the tour was
a disaster and we are all very disappointed that it had to hap-
pen," he said.
'"The guys were really vamped for the one-day series and
we were looking forward to it. It would have been a great op-
portunity for the younger players."'
: The coach added that South Africa's decision to leave had
been supported by many Sri Lankans.
"There was a noticeable change in the climate in Colombo
and the locals became a lot more uneasy. There was a lot of
sympathy for us and many people said we'd made the right
decision.
S"We can understand the disappointment of the cricketing
people, though, and it is important to try and reschedule the
matches," Arthur said.
Cricket South Africa's corporate communications man-
ager, Steve Elworthy, said South Africa would play two one-
-day internationals against Zimbabwe and may also travel
to Abu Dhabi to play in a series against Pakistan and pos-
sibly Australia.


from a slow start in Sapporo.
"At first I think we were
over-excited finally starting,"
Anthony said. "Once we settled
down we were good. From the
second quarter there was no
panic. We know we can score."
The U.S. finished an em-
barrassing sixth at the last
world championship in India-
napolis in 2002 and took
bronze at the 2004 Athens
Olympics.
They won the last of their
three world titles in 1994 and
their last Olympic gold medal in
Sydney six years ago.
"We're worried we could
have problems with anybody,"
U.S. coach Mike Krzyzewski
said. "We respect everybody."
Lebanon's players were
forced to endure an arduous bus


Juniors


impressive in


open badminton


tournament


UNDER-19 women's cham-
pion, Michelle Astwood, cre-
ated a major upset last
Thursday, the opening day of
the Guyana Badminton Asso-
ciation (GBA)/National


I- O R S O


tI Lot 3611 North Raimneldl.
Gceorgelowu
.0 1


() ih.lch \ %II. Highi HBank
I' s..LA u' hu HiA1.i


(3) Parcel 16, Block
XXXVI Pmlantatio'
-lope East .l (st
lDemearara


(4) BLOCf(K "L' ZEI:LANDIA,
\Ak.\lENAA M ISLtA\)
ENEQT. IBO RJIVR
(LAN.D oN'N)


Interested persons are asked to submit a sealed, written
bids to the tnder-mentioned address no later than
August 25, 2006:
The Credit Risk Manager
Bank of Nova Scotia
104 Carmichaei e t&"reet


e orgei~o 7ivn
0;7SZj:P'~;~~- ~I;i ::;:'


Sports Commission (NSC)
Open tournament at the Cliff
Anderson Sports Hall when
she defeated senior player
Nadia Salick 2-0, 22-20 and
21-18.
The victory was lauded by
president of the association,
Gokarn Ramdhani. He told
Chronicle Sport that Astwood
has been practising a lot re-
cently.
Two other juniors, U-19
doubles champion Akash
Persaud and Delmar Abrams,
even though losing against
Haymant Ramdhani and Deodat
Etwaru in the men's doubles 21-
15 and 21-10, put up a good
fight, according to Ramllhani.
which shows progression for
the sport's future.
In the men's singles,
Abrams got past Jamal
Shamsudeen 21-9 and 21-7,
Michael Hales edged past
Binsaud Baksh 21-13, 19-
21 and 21-19. Ricky E auis
defeated Persaud 21-10 aind
21-15, and Anju Singh
made light work ot' Scl)iyn
Dl)aniels viitnning 21-15 and
21-8.
Along with llAst\\ooil in the
ladies' singles. sce;.isolicd c mln-
paiigneri. ('ant'lvss Spl' is also
claim d ;] \il i *,'_ l ',lI ng


! .lllllhl 'il. i .ili U \ it l .': \ i IK!IJ

, t .'.'ht n I ,\ t', .\,| on nm h<

i,\ .'r r ,i' .* !' lll .i ;lii t .1:lili;ii
SI Tlmr+.i ikv I li'O .nlv l 1 0 ,i l -
tinu ne'x\ 'Si;' ;ii a t( lie


C.A. .... ..-. ;-, t 1


journey through bombed-out
villages into Syria and Jordan to
escape Israeli air strikes before
arriving in Japan.
But they looked sharp in


Gianluca Basile had 27
points to lead Italy, who made
13 of 25 three-point shots.
"We prepared.well for the
game but the three-pointers


By Alastair Himmer
SAPPORO, Japan, (Reuters)
- The United States began
confidently while Lebanon
brought a fragment of joy to
their war-torn country on day
one of the world basketball
championship yesterday.
Olympic gold medallists Ar-
gentina also made a smooth start
but defending world champions
Serbia & Montenegro fell victim
to a run-and-gun Nigeria team in
the first big upset in Japan.
Carmelo Anthony scored 21
points as the U.S. produced an
efficient 111-100 win over
Puerto Rico in their Group D
opener.
Fellow co-captain LeBron
James added 15 points as the
tournament favourites recovered


their opening Group A game
with Venezuela, Fadi El Khatib
pouring in 35 points in a con-
vincing 82-72 victory.
TENACIOUS DEFENCE
New York Knicks guard
Ime Udoka grabbed 18 points as
Nigeria's tenacious defence and
open-court speed brought a de-
served 82-75 win over Serbia &
Montenegro in Group A.
Argentina avoided an early
slip-up against France, San An-
tonio Spurs guard Manu
Ginobili hitting 22 points in a
solid 80-70 win in the evening
game in Group A.
Olympic silver medallists
Italy overcame a rampant Yao
Ming in an 84-69 victory over
China and Slovenia underlined
their credentials as potential
dark horses with a 96-79 win
over Senegal in Group D.
Yao scored 30 points but
had little support while


killed us," said Yao. "We
showed our inexperience.in de-
fence and we lost control of
things in the second half. It was
a tough lesson."
Meanwhile, Dallas Maver-
icks star Dirk Novitzki scored
27 points as Germany began
with a comfortable 81-70 vic-
tory over hosts Japan in Group
B.
African champions Angola
beat Panama 83-70 and Spain
blew past New Zealand 86-70
in later games in Hiroshima.
Australia upset Brazil 83-
77 in Group C with C.J. Bruton
scoring 16 points and Sam
Mackinnon 15 for the
Boomers.
European champions
Greece overpowered Qatar
84-64 while Turkey produced
a surprise 76-74 victory over
three-time Olympic bronze
medallists Lithuania in the
other Group C games.


| q'|r / al

.im for DharSm


I i.'Waea I esu


THlE Guyana Floodlight Soft-
hall team will collide with a
Dharaml Wadkar' Persaud
XI in a feature 25-over under
the lights oil Siaturday 26 at
the (G uylai.i Softball.
\ indball aind 'ricket Asso-
ciation I'ro of l'crs' a; d'; '*.,',:icil hiirthda\.







while I' i i Per ld uniit will
'Olll -, cl R, '; :m'. luscin.
<,anii\ (jittc'.- ;u1(i skipper
iRiky "'B ul>la!' t)eonmariliC
while xli. .5r1,ud Uii will
Si: n 't' )oli"


W'


"-HARAM 'WADEKAR'
'-RSAUD


Ib


US Carmelo Anthony (2R) fights for a position with Puerto
Rico's Angelo Reyes (R).Anthony (C) scored 21 points and
LeBron James added 15 to lead the United States past
Puerto Rico 111-100 here in a Group D opener at the World
Basketball Championships. (Yahoo Sport)


I1






sONDUY CKftIUClE JM^ J26 29


Pakistan's Shoaib Malik fit

for England one-dayers
KARACHI, Pakistan (Reuters) Pakistan all-rounder
Shoaib Malik has been declared fit for the five-match one-
day series against England, chief selector Wasim Bari said
yesterday.
"We have informed the team management that Malik is now
fit and has been cleared to play by the Pakistan Cricket Board's
(PCB) medical panel. The management has to decide when to
call him," Bari told Reuters.
The 24-year-old, who has played in 15 Tests and 118 one-
day internationals, had to return home before the first Test of
the current tour with an elbow injury.
"He is now okay and keen to resume playing again.
His inclusion will further increase Pakistan's options for
the one-day series which is also important for us," Bari
said.
Pakistan lost the second and
third matches to concede a Test
series in England for the first
time since 1982. However, Bari
said the team would aim to
redress the balance in the one-
dayers.
The 'former Tei t
wicketkeeper said no [unl \,
decision had been taken n '
retaining Mohammad Hafeez lor
the one-dayers as yet, although
he was in fine form. SHOAIB MALIK
"I think he should stay for
the one-dayers as he is a very useful all-round player but
let us see what the team management wants."
Hafeez was sent to England to shore up the batting and
scored 95 in the final Test at the Oval on Friday after a three-
year absence from the side.
Both Malik and Hafeez are opening batsmen, off-break
bowlers and sharp fielders and have had their bowling actions
reported in recent times.
Pakistan sent back openers Taufiq Umar, SalmanxButt
and left-arm pacer Samiullah Niazi before the Oval Test
and Bari said a decision on the final one-day squad would
be made in the next week.


:::f
in
'
.v--ur


By Mitch Phillips

LONDON, England (Reuters)
SReading enjoyed a
memorable first taste of the
top flight yesterday when
they came from 2-0 down at
home to beat Middlesbrough
3-2 on the opening day of the
Premier League soccer
season.
That match was one of eight
that produced 24 goals and three
red cards, with champions
Chelsea and Manchester United
both still to play today.
Arsenal's new era at the
Emirates Stadium started with a
1-1 draw against Aston Villa.
where 17-year-old England
international Theo Walcott
finally made his debut and
created the Londoners' late
equaliser.
Sheffield United,
promoted behind Reading
last season, drew 1-1 at home
with Liverpool but Watford,
the third new side, lost 2-1 at
Everton.
Tottenham Hotspur, who


Windies A on successful learning curve Howard


By Kevin Pile

BRIDGETOWN, Bar]
(CMC) Though
enjoying the type of
anticipated, team ma
Tony Howard has
described the West In
tour of England as succ
Speaking to CMC
after the abandonment
final day of the there
match against Nottingha
on Friday, Howard said t
had achieved some c


LI


LENDL SIMMONS
objectives as most o
players had deve
individually.
"At the end of the
held an interview with all
players to find out whet]
not they think that wha
wanted to accomplish her
accomplished," Howard s
"Almost to a man, they
found that this A-tour
different from most of the
It actually involved working
planning and thinking abo
cricket; so from that persp
I would say yes (tha
objectives had been achieve'
He continued: "The r
were not the ones we were lI


for but be that as it may, I think
the players learnt a bit more about
bados, how to construct a game, they
not leamt of course that the opposition
results here was going to be different on
inager their own home grounds and
still conditions that were suitable to
dies A them.
eessful. "It showed them they had
Sports a lot of work left to do to
of the become international cricketers."
ee-day After winning their first
mshire match convincingly against
he tour Durham, the regional side failed
rucial to win another while losing four
successive games to
Worcestershire, Warwickshire,
Derbyshire and Glamorgan.
They conclude their tour of
England with a one-day match
against Hampshire at the Rose
Bowl today.
One of the success stories
on tour however has been
Runako Morton whose 546
runs has spearheaded the team's
batting.
Twenty-one-year-old opener
Lendl Simmons also shone with
centuries against Leicestershire and
Pakistan while out-of-favour senior
team opener Devon Smith emerged
from a slow start to the tour to
register a classy century against
Glamorgan and half-centuries at
Warwickshire, Derbyshire and
f the Nottinghamshire.
loped Medium pacer Darren
Sammy shone among the
tour I bowlers with 14 wickets
of the including a five-wicket haul
her or against Warwickshire while fast
t they bowler Daren Powell has taken
re was 10 wickets and fellow qiick
aid. Tino Best, nine wickets.
y have In their most recent fixtures.
was the regional side have been
others frustrated by the damp nlilis
igand weather with rain ruining the
tut the two limited overs matches
mective against the louring lakistanis
t the last weekend.alo.ng with ihe
ed)." three-day match against Notts
results this week.
kingg "The (first) one at


Shenley against Pakistan,
they were playing very well.
Lendl Simmons batted really.
really well and made a hundred."
Howard noted.
"They were trying to get
into that game but unfortunately
the rain came and in this one
again, we had a good start .
Devon Smith and Lendl
Simmons played really well.


HUNAKU MUOOUN


Sylvester Joseph started to
come into his own and Morton
but after that they fell away.
"Still they came back.
(Darren) Sammy bowled
really well and we were there
or thereabouts and then
again the rain fell and
finished the game so it was a
bit disappointing for the lads
because they really wanted to
get stuck in and see how they
were improving but those are
the vagaries of cricket."
Howard said lie was pleased
with how the batsmen shaped
up against the Pakistani
speedster Shoaib Akhtar in the
40-over match last Saturdaly.
"Afler 40 overs. I thought
all of our players played Shonaib
very well although lie \was now
coining back (from injury) lbuil
still lie is a world-class boM I r."
I low, d slii icssed.
"It fwas good to see Lendll
Simmllons and Runako Mortion
and l)wayne Smith batting very
well against him."


looked good in their pre-scason
games, went down 2-0 to two
early goals at Bolton Wanderers
whose Spanish midfielder Ivan
Campo scored their second with
a 35-metre thunderbolt.


Steve Sidwell made it 2-2 at
halftime and Leroy Lita, a
halftime replacement for Kitson,
won it for the new boys in the
55th minute.
"Today will be typical of


Reading 3-2 Middlesbrough: Steve Sidwell levels as
Reading battle back from 2-0 down in their first ever
Premiership game (BBC Sport).


Portsmouth thrashed
Blackburn Rovers 3-0 with the
visitors ending with nine men
while Newcastle United beat
Wigan Athletic 2-1 and West
Ham United beat Charlton
Athletic 3-1.
Reading fans had spent the
sununer itching to see their club,
formed in 1871. playing at the
top level for the first time but
it appeared to be all going wrong
after Stewart Downing and
Aiyegbeni Yakubu had
Middlesbrough 2-0 up after 21
minutes.
GOING WRONG
However, two goals in two
minutes by Dave Kitson and


what the Premiership will mean
to the promoted clubs ... we are
fighting as hard as we can to be
competitive in this division,"
Reading manager Steve Coppell
told Sky Sports.
It also seemed to be going
wrong for most of the 60 000 fans
watching Arsenal's first game in
their new Emirates Stadium
when Olof Mellberg's
thumping header after 53
minutes had Martin O'Neill's
Villa ahead.
However, the introduction
of Walcott in the 73rd minute
added real zest to Arsenal and
it was his cross that was
converted by Gilberto for the


equaliser six minutes from the
end.
The new season had begun
at lunchtime when Sheffield
United marked their first top-
flight appearance for 12 years by
holding Liverpool at Bramall
Lane.
United stunned the 2005
European champions a minute
into the second half with a Rob
Hulse header.
Liverpool levelled with a
70th minute Robbie Fowler
penalty after Steven Gerrard
had been tripped a
decision that left United
manager Neil Warnock as
usual fuming at the referee.
"I think he made a mistake,
there is no Way that's a penalty
but we'll have to get used to
that this season," he told Sky
Sports after watching the game
from the stands, courtesy of a
touchline ban for his outspoken
comments last season.
Portsmouth debutant
Nwankwo Kanu scored twice
after coming on as a substitute
for the last half-hour but missed
the chance of a hat-trick when
he missed an injury-time
penalty.
There were also two for
Bobby Zamora as West Ham came
from behind to beat London rivals
Charlton while Everton's 8.6 million
pounds ($16.2 million) record
signing Andy Johnson got off the
mark with the opener against
Watford.
Chelsea begin their bid
for a third successive title at
home to Manchester City
today, when Manchester
United are also in action at
home to Fulham.


US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Global

AIDS Program Guyana invites all Advertising Agencies

and interested persons/groups to submit proposals for the

following:-


1. Branding of the M.A.R.C.H. behavior change communication

project which comprises a radio serial drama and community

reinforcement activities.

2. Promotion of the Radio Serial Drama

3. General Publicity for the Project


Please uplift an information package from:-
The Receptionist
CDC GAP Guyana Office
4'h Floor,. )1)1. Builtling
44 Iliili Street. kingston
Tel: 223-0859/79

Closing, date for (lie subitiission of proposals is Slep)teber I. 2006


8/19/2006, 11:08PM


;~4~


Promoted Reading kick off



with 3-2 comeback win






30 .. SUND-Y CiRONicLE -AugLst'2';. 2006


*~dq-~~~ A;;2''CS~i A~ I L -LIJ.J I LT I C~i~1J


.s;a,
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FT?
~'
'k 5~


England need 331 to avoid innings defeat


By Tony Lawrence

LONDON, England (Reuters)
- England, needing to score
331 to avoid an innings
defeat against rejuvenated
Pakistan, closed on 78 for
one after a rain-affected
third day of the fourth and
final Test yesterday.
Captain Andrew Strauss
was 37 not out, with Alastair
Cook undefeated on 33 as
Pakistan heaped further
humiliation on the home side at
the Oval.
Marcus Trescothick
continued his wretched run.
caught behind for four off
paceman Mohammad Asif. The
left-handed opener has totalled
135 runs in the series at an
average of 19.28.
England, despite a
blundering performance in all
departments, are sure of
winning the series after victories
in the second and third Tests.
Pakistan, replying to the
home side's first innings 173,


earlier resumed on 336 for
three and batted through
several rain interruptions
before being bowled out for
504.
Mohammad Yousuf top-
scored with 128 although he
never regained the fluency he
displayed on Friday.
His statistics form a striking
contrast with those of
Trescothick.
WORLD RANKINGS
Fourth in the world
rankings, Yousuf has made 631
runs in England, including
innings of 202 and 192. at an
average of 90.14. He has
compiled 1 123 Test runs in
2006. more than any other
player.
Steve Harmison swept up
the Pakistan tail with two
wickets in three balls to finish
with four for 125 while
Matthew Hoggard took three
for 124.
Hoggard deserved far
more. dismissing three of the
top four batsmen and having


three catches dropped.
Harmison deserved far less,
spraying the ball in all
directions.
His wickets took his series


after having skipper Inzamam-
ul-Haq caught at second slip for
31.
Harmison suddenly found
an extra yard of pace as well


1 i.


Steve Harmison celebrates after claiming the first wicket
of the day when Inzamam-ul-Haq fends a ball to Strauss.
He went on to finish with four for 125. (BBC Sport)


tally to 20 but he looked out of
sorts for long spells, only
coming to life in the afternoon


as a sense of direction,
removing Kaniran Akmal in
similar fashion for 15. That


gave him two wickets for one
run in 15 balls.
In the 46 overs before
removing Inzamam, a barren run
going back to the third Test at
Headingley, the lanky strike
bowler from Durham had failed
to take a single wicket.
If Harmison needed
inspiration, he should have
watched the 24-year-old Asif.




ENGLAND 1st innings 173 (U. Gul
4-46, M. Asif 4-56)
PAKISTAN 1st innings (o/n 336-3)
M. Hafeez c Strauss
b Hoggard 95
I. Farhat c Trescothick
b Hoggard 91
Y. Khan c Read b Mahmood 9
M. Yousuf c Read
b Hoggard 128
Inzamam-ul-Haq c Strauss
b Harmison 31
F. Iqbal not out 58
K. Akmal c Collingwood
b Harmison 15
S. Nazir c Hoggard
bMahmood 17
U. Gul Ibw b Panesar 13
D. Kaneria c Trescothick
b Harmison 15
M. Asif c Cook b Harmison 0


Asif, in only his sixth
Test, produced a masterclass
of seam and reverse-swing
bowling in England's first
innings and shone again at
the start of the second,
leaving Pakistan fans
wondering what might have
been if he had not missed the
first three matches with an
elbow problem.



-- -- ------- -- ---- ---
Extras: (b14, lb-9, nb-8, w-11) 32
Total: (all out, 129.5 overs) 504
Fall of wickets: 1-70, 2-148, 3-325,
4-379, 5-381, 6-398,7-444, 8-475,
9-504.
Bowling M. Hoggard 34-2-124-3
(nb-6), S. Harmison 30.5-6-125-4
(nb-1, w-3), S. Mahmood 27-3-101-2
(nb-1), M. Panesar 30-6-103-1, P.
Collingwood 6-0-29-0, K. Pietersen
2-0-9-0.
ENGLAND 2nd innings
M. Trescothick c Akmal b Asif 4
A. Strauss not out 37
A. Cook not out 33
Extras: (Ib-2, nb-2) 4
Total: (for one wicket, 18 overs) 78
Fall of wickets: 1-8.
Bowling: M. Asif 9-1-40-1 (nb-2), U.
Gul 5-0-25-0, M. Hafeez 1-1-0-0, D.
Kaneria 3-0-11-0.


Jones says traces of EPO found in test coach


By Gene Cherry

RALEIGH, North Carolina,
(Reuters) Marion Jones's
coach said he had received a
text message from the former
Olympic champion telling
him traces of erythropoietin


(EPO) had been found in her
failed drug test at June's U.S.
championships.
"She said "I have got some
traces of EPO'," Steve Riddick
told Reuters in a telephone call
yesterday from his Norfolk.
Virginia. home.


"I started laughing, but she
said she was serious."
Jones hurriedly withdrew
from the Zurich Golden League
meeting on Friday and returned
to the United States.
A source' later told
Reuters Jones had failed an
initial drugs test at the U.S.
championships in
Indianapolis.
Jones has never previously
failed a dope test and has
always denied taking
performance-enhancing drugs.
If her 'B' or second sample
is positive and Jones does not
clear her name in an arbitration
hearing, the 30-year-old would
face a two-year ban from the
sport.
Riddick, who has worked
with Jones for the past two
years, said he was sure the 'B'
sample would be negative.
"I would stake my life on
it she did not take EPO," he
said.
NO SENSE
Jones had been making a
comeback in the sport after
giving birth in 2003 and won the
U.S. 100 metres championship
on the day she was tested.
Riddick queried why any
100 metres runner would
take EPO, a substance that
boosts endurance by
increasing the number of
oxygen-carrying red blood


cells.
"It doesn't make any sense
unless she wanted to commit
public suicide," Riddick said of
Jones, who won five medals at


MARION JONES


the 2000 Olympics, three of
them gold.
He also raised the
possibility of a mix-up in her
sample.
Neither USADA nor the
U.S. Olympic Committee
(USOC) would comment on her
test.
Jones's general counsel
denied she had used banned
drugs.
"Marion Jones has always
been clear, she has never
taken performance-
enhancing substances, not
now, not ever," Rich Nichols


said in a statement to
Reuters.
However, Jones has been
under scrutiny by the U.S. Anti-
Doping Agency (USADA) since
being linked to the BALCO
scandal in 2003.
The man whose laboratory
sparked the BALCO scandal
said he stood behind comments
he had made about seeing Jones
use banned drugs.
"I have always told the
truth regarding my relationship


with Marion Jones," convicted
BALCO founder Victor Conte
said in an e-mail to Reuters
yesterday.
Conte, who served four
months in prison on steroid
distribution charges, has
previously said he provided
Jones with a variety of banned
drugs.
Jones denied the
allegations and filed a $25
million defamation lawsuit
against Conte that was
settled this year. Terms of the
settlement were not
announced.


DHAKA, Bangladesh (Reuters) Bangladesh coach Dav
Whatmore is hoping his team can qualify for the ICC
Champions Trophy in India in October.
"We have a reasonable chance to do well and qualify in the
Champions Trophy and that is our number one objective now,"
Whatmore told reporters at Dhaka airport on their return from
a tour of Africa.
Bangladesh beat Kenya 3-0 in a one-day international series
last week after losing 3-2 to Zimbabwe.
Bangladesh will play Sri Lanka, West Indies and Zimbabwe
in the qualifying phase of the Champions Trophy between
October 7 and 15.
"We are in the playoff and we need to put our best foot
forward," Whatmore said.
The top two teams will qualify for the main competition
from October 15 to November 5.
"We have to beat Zimbabwe, preferably Sri Lanka and
West Indies or one of these two and it seems not very
unrealistic though we have to work hard," Whatmore said.


~ Sunday, August 20, 2006




e .7-s artaica Beacon ^pim GFC- Grosundc Bourd"a

i Santos vs Beacon 4pm,-, GFC Ground, Bourda-


More than fifty


horses gallop today

MORE than 50 horses will be galloping in the historic
Banks Derby Day racing meet, to be staged today by the
Rising Sun Turf Club in collaboration with Banks DIH
Limited.
One of the largest ever first prizes in local horse racing
history) will be al stake in the Three-Year-Old Derby over 1400
metres with the lop prizes totalling $1 million. The winner
will pocket a grand $550 000.
Bay colt Chenir k) owned by Chatterpaul Deo, chestnut
colt Peace of Mind and bay filly Miss Davinci take the course
as firm favourites for the coveted first prize and the Banks
DIH trophy.
Several Trinidad-bred horses will be on show. M. Mohan's
bay colt Little Panny will come up against Lloyd Naljit's
Prospectors Pride and Sir Balogie in the Two-Year-Old Classic
over 1100 metres.
In the other feature event over 1400 metres, chestnut colt
Isle Be True will tussle with Spin and Squeez, Donna, Delmur
Gold, Ice Folly and Sarifena in the C & Lower. The first prize
in that event is $120 000.
Kris Jagdeo's chestnut gelding Fire Power will take
on the field in the F & Lower race over 1300 metres -
coming up against Let's Dance, Fast Company and
Sequins.


--------------- I


t-


I


I I


I


I


I






SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 2Q, 2006

oil L


TWO teams will move closer
to $1.5 million, the largest
purse in the history of local
club football, with four teams
from three associations
battling in the semifinals of
the President's Cup
knockout football
championship at the GFC
ground, Bourda, today.
Defending champions Pele
will take on Bartica in the
second match from 20:00 h and
Bakewell Topp XX will clash
with the Guyana Defence Force
from 18:00 h in the first.
The triple-header will
also feature a Premier League
match of the Georgetown
Football Association (GFA),
formerly the Georgetown
Football League, pitting
Beacon against Santos from
16:00 h.
Sparks are expected in the
two semifinals, with Pele
fielding a strong line-up of
present and past national
players at various levels,


including Shawn Bishop, who
had a good run the National


team against St Lucia, Dirk
Archer and Konata Mannings.
Opponents Bartica have
been producing top youth
players, who shone


especially in the Coca Cola
National schools
championships and are
now maturing to be
formidable senior players.
Topp XX are the reigning
Kashif & Shanghai champions
and they boast several past and
present National players,
including mid-fielder Kayode
McKinnon who was the star of
the National team against St
Lucia.
But the GDF have been
making noticeable inroads
in club football, after years
of dormancy, and striker
Seon Brewley's name is
etched on the nets of many
a goal.
Last year, Pele beat Santos
in the final at the GCC ground.
Bourda. the venue again for this
year's final fixed for next
month.
The winner will pocket the
cash prizes for both the
President's Cup and Nations
Cup. put up by the government


through patron of the
championship. President
Bharrat Jagdeo.
Courtney Benn
Construction Services is also
L:Ai. -" I


one of the sponsors of the
championship, staged by the
GFL under the president
Odinga Lumumba.


Guyana look to increase points tally against Jamaica


By Ravendra Madholall

TNE national Under-19
cricketers, coming off an
emphatic eight-wicket win
over defending champions
Trinidad and Tobago,
recommence their hunt for
regional honours when they
take on Jamaica from today
at the Enmore Community
Centre ground in the fourth
round of the 2006 TCL Group
West Indies three-day cricket
challenge.
The hosts disposed of the
Trinidadians in two days and
will no doubt be eager to keep
adding points to their table.
Guyana are at present
leading that table with 30 points
while last year's runners-up
Barbados are on 24. Jamaica,
who have beaten Guyana the
last two years, will go into the
match hoping they could add to
their disappointing nine points.
Meanwhile, Chronicle Sport
caught up with the manager of
the national youth team, Alvin
Johnson, at the Ocean View
International Hotel yesterday
where the team is encamped. He
said that the guys are very
anxious to go out there and
represent their country.
"The guys have shown a
lot of enthusiasm and
determination in the
previous three matches
where we got two outright
victories and definitely that
has spurred the players to
continue to play positive
cricket in the remaining two
matches," Johnson, who has
been in this position for the
past four years, declared.


Asked if Young West Indies
opening batsman, Richard
Ramdeen, has fully recovered
from his hamstring injury that
ruled him out for the two last
matches, Johnson said: "Yes he
has passed the fitness test and


JAMIE TRENCHFIELD


he seems to be well, so he will
once again return to the winning
unit and will accompany the in-
form Shemroy Barrington at the
top."
Ramdeen also said he was
very happy to be back in the
team and is looking forward to
a good performance against
Jamaica.
"I am extremely glad to
be fit again. I knew my injury
really curtailed my
appearance this year having
missed two consecutive
matches, but that's the way it
goes; I know the selection
has been tough, given the fact
the three other opening
batsmen have been doing
well.


Barrington has been the
most productive of the batsmen
for the local boys so far, with
an aggregate of 241 runs and an
excellent average of 60.25 while
left-arm orthodox spinner
Veerasammy Pennaul has been
the leading bowler grabbing 19
wickets including two five-
wicket hauls that landed him
man-of-the-match on both
occasions.
Skipper Steven Jacobs,
vice-captain Gajanand Singh,
Mohindra Boodram and
Rajendra Chandrika have done
reasonably well with the bat
while Krishna Deosaran has not
made an impression with the bat
as yet.
Leg-spinner Danney
Narayan will lend support to
Permaul while the fast bowling
department will have Ryan
Hercules and Brandon Bess to
share the cherry.
Guyana 4eam reads: Steven
Jacobs (captain), Gajanand
Singh (vice-captain), Shemroy
Barrington, Mohindra
Boodram, Rajendra Chandrika,
Richard Ramdcen, Krishna
Deosaran, David Wallace.
Troy Gonsalves, Danney
Narayan. Veerasammy
Permaul, Maxwell Georgeson
(wkp.), Ryan Hercules and
Brandon Bess. The manager is
Alvin Johnson and the coach
is Hubern Evans.
Jamaica team reads:
Cordel Simpson (captain),
Jamie Trenchfield, Andre
Creary, Robert Weir, Shacoya
Thomas, Marion Johnson,
Sheldon Powell, Zeniffe
Fowler, Rashed Outar,
Marcel Parchment,


Chrisiopher \\ialson. Andre
Russell. Ja-.on IDa)nic and


Andre Lindisa.. The manager
is Frilz Harris i. ith Rolber


Samuels as coach.
Limpires. for thli,
encounteLr are- Rntlh.in
MoAkan and D ilndra
Anandjiil ill (..Ias in
if toniar .ar lllhird linmnir,.


I r -- I r


-/ .. -- -4%-,--






. ,PU LC N.O


VACANCY


Web Research Clerk: '

* Must be computer literate with certification in advanced
computer courses.

* Knowledge of Google Search, Corel.

* CXC English Language, minimum Grade 3

Please bring application with resume and one passport
size photograph to:
The Personnel Officer, Gafoors Houston Complex,
Houston EBD.


. . . . . .


Guyana, Barbados win to book

berths in both team finals
BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, (CMC) Guyana and Barbados
were poised to contest both the men and women's finals
of the 19th Southern Caribbean Squash Championships
yesterday.
In the women's competition on Friday at the Barbados
Squash Club, Guyana booked their place against Barbados when
they scored a comprehensive 4-1 win over Trinidad & Tobago
while Barbados crushed the OECS 5-0.
World No.37 Nicolette Fernandes led her team's victory
with a 9-1, 9-0, 9-1 whipping of Rhea Khan while Kathy
Shuffler beat Tessa Martins, also in straight games 9-2, 9-0, 9-
2.
Chantelle Fernandes and Kristina King were both stretched
to four and five games in their respective encounters before
Guyana prevailed.
Fernandes emerged with a 9-3, 9-10, 10-9, 10-9 victory over
Michelle Cornilliac while King eked out a 9-4, 7-9, 6-9, 9-3, 9-
2 verdict over Nicole Currie.
Nakita Poon-Kong gave T&T their only victory when
she got past Tiffany Solomon in four games 7-9, 9-4, 7-9,
0-9.
Barbados' women were dominant against the OECS with
Karen Meakins, Jenny Armstrong, Lilianna White and Cheri-
Ann Parris all scoring victories. Nadia McCarthy won in a.
walkover.
Barbados' men did not have that fortune against T&T
however, as they struggled before putting away the twin-island
republic 3-2.
Gavin Cumberbatch was beaten by Trinidad's Colin
Ramasra 9-0, 9-5, 9-2 while Shawn Simpsokalso went down
to Josh Pinard 6-9, 2-9, 9-3, 10-8, 9-1, as T&T grabbed what
seemed like a winning advantage.
But Mark Sealy downed Ryan Abraham 9-7, 9-5, 9-4 to
give Barbados hope and Fabian Goodridge and Marion White
completed victories over Mark Laughlin and Mark Pontifex
respectively, as Barbados romped home.
Guyana's men grabbed a 3-2 win over the OECS to also
book their place in the final.
In a topsy-turvy clash, Guyana went behind when Robert
Fernandes was beaten 6-9. 9-7, 5-9, 9-3, 9-4 by James Benthick
but Kristian Jeffrey carved out a convincing 9-2,.9-0, 9-2 victory
over Paul Cyrus to level the tie.
Julian Chin and Jerry Bell then scored the necessary
victories in their matches against Shane Slater and Roy
de Freitas respectively to ensure Guyana triumphed.











3 _0, Grenada held

-1 by Aruba
PORT OF SPAIN, Trhidad, (CMC) Trinldad & Tobago
beat Guyana 3-0 while Grenada were held to a 1-1 draw
with Aruba when the Caribbean Football Union Under-16
Youth Cup continued on Friday at the Larry Gomes Sta-
dium.
Playing in Group E of the tournament, Stephen Knox's first
half goal put T&T ahead 1-0 at the interval and Daniel Cyrus
and Ryan O'Neil were on target in the second half to complete
the shutout
In the other game played earlier, an Alan Munroe strike gave
Grenada the lead in the dying moments of the first half but
Aruba equalised through Francois Croes early in the second half
to put the clash on even keel.
T&T confirmed their dominance of the tournament with
Stephen Knox opening the scoring in the 10th minute, after strike
partner Daniel Joseph showed great vision in holding the ball
up just outside the defence before releasing a wonderful pass.
The goal was the only bright spot in an otherwise
scrappy first half as neither team could ind their rhythm
and settle down.
T&T could have gone up 2-0 but Robert Primus' header
off Leston Paul's 15th minute comer was just over the bar.
Guyana, meanwhile, had few chances in the first-half and
Dwayne Blake's free-kick, following Brenton Balbosa's foul in
ite 27th minute, did little to threaten T&T goalkeeper Glenroy
Samuel. .
:- 3iveninutesaifter the interval, Daniel Cyrusdoubled T&T's
lead with sho at poit blank range and the hosts completed
hiigedUBitiailt e miamitwfwi RyamONidehotme
biscondgoalof etournampnL r -
~-rEari Mauroe scored for the yeang Sjpice Boys two
ifnute-bE are the interval to grab a crucial lead in that
aWntest bt Crks responded for Araba the 64th minute
f-sare -s-tahui-ate .


q ~


1II


B) Isaiah Chappelle
TRAILING just after claim-
ing the first sprint prize,
John Charles stormed past
the finish line in one hour 24
minutes 40.62 seconds to win
the feature 35-lap Schoolboys


& Novices race in the 3rd
Seven Seas cycling meet at
the National Park, yesterday.
Ossie Edwards rode in
second in the tight finishing
pack, followed by Royston
Anderson, Kennard Lovell,
Jaikarran Sookhai and Chris


HI


Persaud.
Charles claimed two sprint
prizes, Edwards three, and
Anderson, Lovell and Andre
Petty one each.
The winner, Alonzo
Greaves and Albert Philander
rode together chasing the main


Edward B. Beharry
& Company Ltd.


WINNERS' row: Triumphant riders display their trophies and Seven Seas gifts. (Delano Williams photo)


Turdes live for Hundreds of Years


T- GUARFLEJxTI IPN -xOME FOR LIF


Gu.AR-A.NTEED INCOME FOR LIFE!


Call A Clico Agent -(592)-226-2626, 191 Camp St C/burg Georgetown


Printed and Published by Guyana National Newspapers Limited, LamaAvenue, Bel Air Park,Georgetown. Telephone226-3243-9(General); Editorial: 227-5204, 227-5216. Fax:227-52o SUNDAY, AUGUST 20, 2006


bunch, up to the 24th lap, then
Philander overlapped on
Greaves, fell and his cycle
broke, putting him out of the
race.
Two laps later, Charles
connected with the leading
bunch, and after chasing for
another three laps, Greaves
(Please turn to page 27)


ll/

oA


IJ M.MJI Mo~ rJ~ a.JH


~r-


-M


II


~ft;S-'
''
r:


I


Moore, Howard

boxing showdown

pushed back

LEON 'Hurry Up' Moore and Vincent 'The Kid' Howard will
have to wait longer than a week for the big showdown in the
Guyana Boxing Board of Control (GBBC) boxing card.
The professional card billed for Thirst Park on Saturday has
been postponed, and a date will be announced later.
Moore and Howard were the headline in the card, Aith
both boxers already throwing verbal jabs at each other in the
RE build-up to the main event.












eteorg eown







SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006


I'


YOU'RE having an affair: he
swears that he is going to
leave his wife.
So far. so predictable. But
what if he really left her'
Would you live happily
e\er after. or would there be the
fear of him stra ing again '
Some mistresses are satis-
fled with playing second fiddle
to the wife. or are realistic
enough to know that the rela-
tionship wouldn't work an%
other way. but most live in hope
that one day the situation will


change and the man i Ill be all
theirs.
Ruth Houston a cheated-
on wife who exacted her revenge
by wnitng a book called "Is He
Cheating on You'' and reinment-
ing herself on TV as an infidel-
ity expen both here and in the
U S. confirms "Studies show
that onl\ three per cent of the
cheaung husbands who divorce
their wives marry their mis-
tresses. and when they do these
mamages have a %\er high fail-
tre rate between 75 and 90 per


cent If he cheated with \ou.
he's likelI to cheat on .ou. be-
cause cheating is his \wad of
dealing ihth mannial or relation-
ship problems. lnsiead of seek-
ing professional help or trying
Ito coinnunicate with his p:il-
ner, his solution is to hase an
atfair
Annabel Ruthling. 30. h.',
been sulfenng the hunulianon of
her husband's second vern pub-
lic affair within to years N'et
she had formerly played the
mistress herself. She became


S .

',"-.


pregnant w ih their first child
while he was still married to his
pre\l~ous wie. so she shouldn't
have been totally surprised
when he started straying agamn.
Sure. the famous words
*' hen you marry your mis-
tress, you create a vacancy'
should apply here.
So can an ex-mistress wife
ever really feel safe? "I felt like
I had to sleep with an emotional
gun under my pillow I needed
to protect myself at all times",
says Rhianna Saunders, 32, who
married her lover after they had
both divorced their spouses.
"When we were having an affair
our relationship was so simple
- we went to the same trade
shows around the globe. We
were together six to eight weeks
a year with no strings attached:
it was exciting. But when I left
my husband, taking our two
kids, and moved in with Reggie,
suddenly I was the woman at
home. I couldn't travel as much
without having my husband to
cover the childcare. So I was
sitting alone for weeks with Reg
away."
And no matter how much
Reg tried to reassure her he was
being faithful, Rhianna felt she
had no reason to believe him. "I
soon became convinced, if I
couldn't get hold of him in the
evening that he was with an-


other woman. Once he caught
me looking through his mobile
and' got really angry. He
snapped Don't you trust me?'
I felt I was turning into his ex-
wife, who I knew he despised
for being so possessive. He
started to have the same bored
look on his face that I'd seen
wheii he talked about his ex.
Maybe some women can marry
their lover and feel confident
about it, but I felt like I'd made
a.pact with the devil. I felt I
didn't really deserve to have
him all to myself when I'd sto-
len him from someone else.
Even on the day we were mar-
ried, I was paranoid that some-
body would shout out at the
back of the church 'It should'a
been me"'.
The biggest irony is that,
even if a mistress marriage is not
scuppered by the woman's fear
- real or imaginary that she
has fallen for a serial adulterer,
the marriage can just as easily
founder for lack of excitement.
After all the thrill of an affair,
the secret liaisons and romantic


weekends abroad manage can
pro\e a dull reality, a bit like
taking James Bond to the super-
market.

CONSIDER THIS -
If you hope to turn an af-
fair into a successful marriage,
ask yourself:

** What was it about his
marriage that went wrong? Are
you just an antidote to his wife
- in which case will yours just
be a transitional relationship?
** Are you ready for a long
term relationship, or does this
affair only work because it's
part time and gives you plenty
of your own space?
** Are you really in love
with the man, or just with the
excitement, the danger, the risk
of being found out?
** Do you have friendship
and compatibility as well as
sex? Will you lose interest when
the sex clams down? Or might
differences between you, which
are stimulating in an affair,
prove destructive to a marriage?
** Finally, are you pre-
pared for the risk that he
might cheat on you too?
Don't assume that it won't
happen.


SlC Ethnic Relations Commission

m PublicService Message

As Guyana prepares for Regional and General Elections,
the Ethnic Relations Commission (ERC) takes this
opportunity to remind the general public and political
parties of the following:
It is against the law for persons to willfully
excite or attempt to excite hostility or ill will
against any section of the population or any person,
on the grounds of their or his or her race.

It is an offence for persons to make or publish or
take any action that result or can result in racial or
ethnic violence or hatred among the people.

Persons engaged in such actions may face fines and
imprisonment.
Persons wishing to report acts or attempts to excite
racial or ethnic hostility or ill will can call the
ERC Hot-line 225-7144, 225-7151, 225-7154, 225-7087
A message from the ERC


~-~
~s~ ` "aa~


r~~L~, Q
;
:.:.:






anUaR UtIfUmfErL uqJu~ ---,------ --


remembering


ukesh


1960s and 1970s, the plaintive
Ek tone and pathos of his songs
11. ; ~ls, brings back nostalgic memories
Sof simpler times the days
One would rr- a when radio and cinema offered
7usi hl- ofl h.\ no the only forms of entertainment.
;." One is reminded of the early
o .\in Ci. et morning radio shows of Sonny
NMohalmed and Ishri Singh, of
SAvube H amid's Indian NMemory
I ou' r,, '-n Album on Monday evening, of
i ~ ~t, o" the afternoon filmi programs,
ds ),\sj or \\hen those enchanting melo-
H,-than ,,, dies had many flocking to the
Cinemas just to hear the movie
soundtracks.
I "',"r" ",- ,, t\X Mukesh came on the scene
S oi' 'ls, in the Golden Age of Hindi cin-
ema and became a prominent
The real singer of this song star in a firmament of talented
was Mukesh. For lovers of singers the likes that was not
Hindi film music the words seen before or since. That era
given by Mukesh remains saw the eniergence of Lata
with them. His legacy en- Mangeshkar. Nohamned Rafi.
dures and his voice still lin- Noor Jehan. Kishore Kumar.
gers three decades after his Asha Bhosle. Shamshad Begunm.
demise on the radio, on tele- Manna Dey,' Mahendra Kapoor.
vision, on the Internet and in Hemant Kunar and Talat
the hearts of millions of Mehmood. Mukesh and the
people across the globe, others, along with great music
Mukesh's immortal melo- directors and talented lyricists.
dies, some 1100 songs from produced a body of sweet, me-
Hindi movies, are played in the lodious music that characterized
Caribbean, on the Indian sub- the music playback scene of
continent, the Middle East. in that period and which is no more
North America and in diverse as Hindi cinema is now engulfed
countries like Yugoslavia and by Western -type techno music
Nigeria. His bhajans and gets and modern dance crazes.
are sung at worship services. Unlike his great contempo
The eight-volume Tulsi Das rary, Mohamed Raft, who was
Ramayan, his magnum opus re- versatile and could sing in vir-
corded between 1973 and 1976, tually any style, Mukesh was
remains a standard in Hindu re- not a classically trained singer


; ". ligious music. There is a con-
stant line of CDs and DVDs fea-
luring his songs. Websites on
the Internet play his tunes. His
S,--. voice is still imitated as Mukesh
singing competitions are still
Sheld in several countries.
a r"In today's turbulent world
filled with upheavals, violence
and inhumanity, the music of
Mukesh offers a respite it is
an oasis where one can be im-
The legendary Mukesh mersed and emerge refreshed to
face the challenges of our mod-
ern society. For many
Guyanese, growing up in the


Candidate must possess a strong analytical science
background, good problem solving skills and the
ability to communicate effectively.
Requirements:
1. Degree / Associate Degree in Microbiology, or
degree in Biology, Chemistry, Food Technology,
Food Science or any other related field
2. Computer literate
3. Laboratory experience would be an asset.


UNIVERSAL
OUTBOARD
2T mixture
for outboard
engines
TL2323


INVITE YOU TO STUDY THE

BIBLE

By correspondence. For your

FREE course please print
your complete name and
address and send to:

World Bible School
245 Brent Lane
O~n;~.r-nl c Ci. .~FI /.4F i


Please send applications to the USA
Human Resources Manager Upon completion you will receive
Edward B. Beharry & Company Ltd. a beautiful certificate
19 treetLyo:-GeorgetoT---- -- a--- u---- ---u--tcertficate
: ': ,' 19 th, eetre ,L y. w 'w w r.. --!. . . . . .


and had a limited voice range.
But the poignant tone and mel-
ancholy he instilled in his lyr-
ics tugged at the heartstrings.
Few after listening to his soul-
ful, sentimental songs could not
feel soothed and tranquil.
Despite the limitations of
his singing repertoire. Mukesh
rose to the top of the Hindi
playback industry and remained
there for three decades. He won
the first ever Filmfare award
(Bollywood's equivalent of the
Oscar) given for Male Playback
Singer in 1958 for his evergreen
hit "Sab Khuch Seekha." from
the movie 'Anari'. He went on
win the award on three more
occasions in 1970 ('Pehchan'),
in 1972 ('Beimaan') and in 1976
('Khabhi Khabhie'). He was
also honoured in 1974 with the
National award for his song
from the movie 'Rajnigandha'.
He was born Mukesh
Chand Mathur on July 22. 1923
in Delhi. His singing talent was
recognized by his relative
Motilal. a Bombay actor. He
took Mukesh under his wings
and introduced him to several
studios. His good looks allowed
him to be cast as a singing star
in the movies 'Nirdosh'(1941),


'Dukh Sukh' (1942) and 'Aadab
Arz' (1943). But these films
were miserable flops at the box
office. There followed a lean
time when Mukesh was re-
duced to singing for cigarette
commercials.
His big break came in 1946
when music director Anil Biswas
offered him a chance to sing in
the movie 'Peheli Nazar'. The
song was "Dil jalta hai to jalne
de aansoon na baha faryad na
kar and he sang in a vein remi-
niscent of his idol the great
singer Kundan Lal Saigal. Saigal
himself was heard to say, "I
don't remember singing that
song". Despite.the success of
that song it was felt that he was
another Saigal imitator.
But Mukesh soon carved a
niche for himself with hits from
the movies "Mela' (1948) and
"Andaz' (1949). He then
teamed up with music direc-
tors Shankar Jaiksihan and lyri-
cists Shailendra and Hasrat
Jaipuri. The combination pro-
duced an unrivaled string of hit
songs from movies in the 1950s
and 1960s, including 'Awaara'.
'Shri 420', 'Barsaat'. 'Sangam',

(Continued on page IV)


A MULTICULTURALISM
WRITING COMPETITION

The GuyberNet Multiculturalism Project, an
initiative of GuyberNet with support from USAID's
Guyana Democratic Consolidation and Conflict
Resolution (GDCCR) Project is hosting a writing
competition under the following categories.

Essay Competition (Persons 18-25 years eligible only) -
Write an essay of 1200-1500 words titled
"'Multiculturalism in Guyana".

Short Story (Persons 13-17 years eligible onl )- Write a
short slonr of 800-1000 words using Multicullturalisnm as
tile central theme.

Poetry (Children 8-12 years eligible onl )
Write a poem with the title. "Rainbow\ people" \\ ith
Mullicltluralisin as the main theme. Not more than 12
lines

Theme (Open to all ages)
Compose a theme of not more than ten (10) words, to be
used in the Project's upcoming promotions.

Send entries to:
Multiculturalism Writing Competition
do Guybernet,
112 New Market Street,
North Cummingsi rg, GeorgetowJ ~v
For further details, lease call 223P *


- - ~ I K


Large quantities of Copra Meal,
Crude and refined Golden Brook
Vegetable Oil.
Available in cartoons of:
V, Lt., 1 Lt., 2 Lt.. 3.5 Lt. Bottles
18 Lt. Pails. 45 Gin. Drums and
also in bulk for export.


NN


i


:2
.-..-~ ~-.... ~. .~~~.~~~.-In~l-rl~l~,~-~ .r~~.~-rlr,I.ll,.-.--:l.-rl Ill


' G dAT "UnllUNIbLE LI 13:51 o. ," UO o .......






i ... ........... .. .. ...... .


st*~AY cmou~:A~'~0~ ~


Guilty








Mind


MY WIFE worked for her
previous employer for 10
years and became friendly
with her male boss.
Three years ago when the
company was being sold, a se-
ries of meetings was held out of
town with the merging business.
During one of these trips she
and her boss were alone for
three days.
Business travel was nothing
new for my wife. Each evening
while she was away she would
call me and the kids around the
dinner hour. Late each night she
would call me again to say
goodnight.
This was a standard you
could bet on. During this par-
ticular trip she did not call for
30 hours.
Upon her arrival home the
kids and I were glad to see her.
I casually said, "Gee, no call
to me or the kids?" I was dum-
founded when she snapped
back, "I was sleeping." She does
not sleep well when away, even
on family vacations, and she
never ever sleeps the entire
night.
I got a terrible gut feeling.
That night a strange thing
occurred. Normally she would
unpack the next morning. How-
ever, this time as I was laying
in bed about midnight she de-


cided to unpack. She opened her
suitcase, pulled out only her
underwear, and placed them in
the laufidry basket in the bath-
room.
When I got up to go to
work, they weren't on top of
the clothes basket. Thinking it
odd, I looked among the dirty
clothes until I saw them all
tucked tight in the middle of the
basket.
From that trip forward she
was extremely cold to me. She
did not want me to see her nude
while dressing or preparing for
a shower. She rolled away from
me each evening in bed, and her
body jumped when the male
character on a television show
shared the same name as her
boss.
This was also the first year
I did not get an anniversary card
from her.
Certainly emotional infi-
delity took place, and if I


were ;I l'ting l ii ai.1 I'd sa \
something physical happened
as well.

KIERAN


KIERAN, sometimes
behaviour falls so cleanly
into an archetypal pattern it
makes us want to scream.
When your wife came
home late at night and removed
her underwear from her lug-
gage, what could we think of
except Shakespeare's
"Macbeth"?
In that play Lady Macbeth
urges her husband to kill
Duncan, the previous king, and
then in her sleep tries to wash
imaginary blood off her hands.
"Out damned spot! Out, I say."
All your wife had to do was go
to bed and deal with the laun-
dry in the morning.
But her guilty mind would
not leave her alone.
Most people with guilty se-
crets have a problem. They
don't know how to act to con-
ceal what they've done.
If you watch true crime
shows, you often see the same
pattern. The person who killed
a spouse can't convincingly be-
have like someone whose
spouse was taken from them by
a violent act. This is true even
when the murderer is a highly


intelligent person like a rabbi or
a surgeon.
People cannot resist telling
you who they are. Even in
spite of themselves they can-
not resist telling you who they
are.
You will never know the
truth from your wife, except by
inference, but inference is a
powerful way of knowing and
your betting instincts are cor-
rect.
Aristotle grouped adultery
with deserting a comrade in
battle. From a religious stand-
point, two of the ten com-
mandments forbid adultery.
One says don't do it, and the
other says don't even think
about it.
Our own emotion, jeal-
ousy, tells us we can never be
satisfied except with someone
who loves us exclusively.
It makes sense that your
wife didn't want you to see her
naked. Aside from possibly
hiding physical evidence, she
was separating herself from
you to be faithful to her new
man.
Cheaters want fidelity
even in their infidelity.

WAYNE & TAMARA


PO.ox-,.. ...ng i MO680 re -mi
Di A *nsw ers@W aynA -T -


Remembering...

(From page II)

'Milan' and 'Diwana'.
Mukesh's popularity stretched into the 1970's with hits
from movies like 'Saathi', 'Anand', 'Sanyasi' and
'Dharmatma'. He sang for many actors including Dilip Kumar,
Dev Anand, Sunil Dutt, Rajendra Kumar, Manoj Kumar,
Rajesh Khanna and Amitabh Bachchan.
However he will always be remembered as the voice of
Raj Kapoor. He sang 118 songs in 34 films for the great actor
starting with 'Aag' in 1948 and ending with 'Dharam Kharam'
(1975). Raj Kapoor's early films, when his character a la
Charlie Chaplain tramped dusty roads singing Mukesh songs,
were popular in diverse places as Russia and Africa. Appro-
priately Mukesh's last recorded song "Chanchal Sheetal Nirmal
Komal" was from the Raj Kapoor directed film 'Satyam
Shivam Sundaram' (1978).
The great singer had many imitators who strived to
emulate the melancholy and pathos of his voice. The no-
tables among them include Manhar and Babla Mehta from
India, Neil Persad of Trinidad and our very own Prakash
Gossai, Davendra Pooran and Kumar. It was Kumar who
won the first Mukesh singing competition held in Guyana
in 1981.
Mukesh made several overseas concert tours to Africa,
England, USA, Canada and Surinam. He came to Guyana in
1967 and performed at the Queen's College auditorium to an
appreciative audience.
He died on August 27th, 1976 while on a USA tour with
his longtime singing partner Lata in Detroit of a heart attack.
Raj Kapoor on hearing of his death said, "I have lost my
voice."
For music fans it was the loss of a legend and of a man
who give so much of himself in his songs. In Mukesh's home
there hangs a plaque with the following words words that
capture the essence of this great singer:

That man is a success:
Who has lived well, laughed often and loved much;
Who has gained the respect, of intelligent men and the love
of children:
Who has filled his niche and accomplished his task;
Who leaves the world better that he found it, whether by
an improved poppy;
A perfect poem or a rescued soul;
Who never lacked appreciation of earth's beauty or failed
to express it;
Who looked for the best in others and gave the best
he had.


Foreign Exchange Market Activities
Summary Indicators
Friday, August 11, 2006 -Thursday, August 17, 2006
1. EXCHANGE RATES


'"Buying Rate
A. US Dollar NOTES OTHER
Bank of Baroda 197.00 198.00
Bank of Nova Scotia 190.00 196.00
Citizens Bank 192.00 199.00
Demerara Bank 19700 199.00
GBTI 190.00 195.00
RBGL 201.00 198.00
Bank Average 194.50 197.50

Nonbank Cambios Av. (5 largest) 200.00 -

BoG Average Market Exchange Rate: USS 1.00 = G$200.00


B. Canadian Dollar
Rank Average

C. Pound Sterling

Bank A average


142.50 156.00


320.33


A Ii-Ut


NOTES i OTHER


201.00
201.00
203.00
202.00
201.00
203.00
201 83

203.00




164.33


350 17 36033


-'I "I .


203.00
204.00
204.25
203.00
201.00
204.00
203.21






172.00



371.17


I Euro
51) ..... 5241 25 261.25

L. Selected Caricom Exchange F. IIBOR- ISS G. Prime Rate
Rates l.ondon [lnterbmk (Offered
Rate tour Tu ,ug. 17. '000


BdosS S )1.80 months 5.4.5. .o lS S. o
JS= (;S 4.45 I year 5. 4S7", (1u"(twt ) I14 S2"
1:('S- G$65.(S
3clhic$ Gc $ 93.t89')
Source: Internrationial Department. Bank of Guyana.


nanp 4 & 91 noP


GUYANA SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE










LECTURER MATHEMATICS


,The Guyana School of Agriculture invites suitably qualified candidates to
apply for the position of Mathematics Lecturer.

JOB SUMMARY:

The central task is to deliver and maintain a high standard of teaching and
lecturing in Mathematics to both Diploma and Certificate students.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

First Degree in Natural Science with three years experience in the field.

Further details of the post may be obtained from:

The Principal
Guyana School of Agriculture
Mon Repos
East Coast Demerara
220-2297/220-8955

The deadline" fo' _,yliC.l' IiS Aui _LI 'IU 3 ... 2ul' *' "
.1______________a


-


I Sellino Rate


F


I n


7-


7


11





SUNDAY CU1OIILE Augu 20o.206 'V


Cinema's Influence on



Guyanese social stability


BY TERENCE ROBERTS

HOW does the cinema's role
in social development func-
tion in a Guyanese context?
The first necessity which es-
tablished the possibility of
Guyanese social development
was the common goal of lit-
eracy in the English lan-
guage. Without an agreement
on a common value, such as
efficiency in a specific lan-
guage used by all Guyanese,
no shared common logic in
communication would exist
to promote agreement and
peaceful co-existence among
Guyanese. Skilled literacy in
English therefore opened the
doors to comprehension and
participation in literature,
music, films available in that
language. This shared lan-
guage among all Guyanese
led to a secure pride in their


everyday lives, in the capital
city and communities and vil-
lages that had traditionally
sprung up around sugar es-
tates, rice mills, agricultural
farms, and mining towns.
Pride in both the colony of
BG, and independent
Guyana, was sustained be-
cause those who felt this were
able to see their nation glo-
rified daily on postage stamps
which depicted every local in-
dustry, every race; newspa-
pers and radio programmes
also fed the optimism of lit-
eracy. Literacy in English be-
came the foremost guide
which bound labourer, profes-
sional, merchant, civil ser-
vant together in the enter-
prise of Guyanese social sta-
bility and development since
over a century ago in the co-
lonial era. Indeed, it was dur-
ing the colonial era of BG


that one of the most precious
Guyanese songs in English
emerged to inspire and guide
young Guyanese with these
words: "Onward, upward may
we every go, day by day may
strength and beauty grow."
It was the cinema that con-
tinued and developed the edu-
cation of ambitious Guyanese in
their hours of freedom from
work. Classic films taught
Guyanese how to separate the
function of the roles they saw
on screen, from the race and na-
tionality of the foreign actor
who acted them out, and
thereby grasp what was helpful
to them by identification only
with the role. The role acted as
a bridge between the optimistic
desires of the audience and an


optimistic real life after absorb-
ing the film. Even when local
cinema viewers were faced with
films in which members of their
race were portrayed in menial
jobs or low social positions,
they were nevertheless only
spectators able to decide what
benefits for them were implied
by the scene. For example in
several of Frank Capra's socially
inspiring black and white films,
such as "It happened one night",
"Mr Smith goes to Washing-
ton", "It's a wonderful life", and
others, coloured people are
shown in small jobs as baggage
handlers, household servants,
railway stewards, etc, as indeed
many were in the 1930's when
these films were made. How-
ever, to coloured Guyanese
viewing such films in BG, or
even today, to identify with the
functions of such jobs was in no
way demeaning, lacking in self-
respect or self-pride, or imprac-
tical, since for those who occu-


pied tenement yards or humble
lodgings such jobs which en-
tailed helping others, cooking
and cleaning skills, or nannying,
were an asset to their lives, and
a vital necessity in Guyanese
society, where to this day at lo-
cal airports, hotels, affluent
households, restaurants, etc,
such jobs remain in demand and
are an absolute necessity which
no honest social revolution
could define as an unfortunate
eyesore of "poverty", since the
holders of such jobs are not
lesser humans because of them,
nor are they people condemned
to social stagnation.
On the other hand, among
local cinema audiences viewing
such films, were non-white
Guyanese who did not identify
at all with the porters, servants,
nannies, etc, of their own race
who they saw in such roles, but
instead with the white actor or
actress in the role of engineer,
such as Tyrone Power in
"Suez", or aircraft pilot, such as
Gary Grant in "Only Angels
Have Wings", or idealistic re-
porter, such as Clark Gable in
"It Happened One Night", or
Barbara Stanwysk in "Meet
John Doe", or even the simple
girl who believes in love and
choosing her own lover, rather
than having one chosen by her
family, such as Donna Reed in
"It's a Wonderful Life". Male
and female non-white Guyanese


who identified with such white
actors in such roles were not ex-
pressing a desire"'to be white",
but a shared ambitious belief in
the function of such roles,
which held out hope for simply
an optimistic life based on hon-
est work, dedication, social free-
dom, and an educated type of
morality.
Similarly, the 1950s Rogers
& Hammerstein's Technicolor
musical "Oklahoma", a truly en-
tertaining classic Hollywood
film with a story of simple out-
door life and personal ups and
downs in the American frontier,
or West, became extremely
popular among Guyanese in the
1950s and 60s. When we look
at this film's clean bright rural
scenes and listen to its songs
which express sheer exhilaration
at everyday life, we understand
why such Hollywood old films
are an asset to Guyanese social
stability. One particular scene in
the film became unforgettable
for Guyanese of that era: Early
one morning the White Cow-
boy, acted by Gordon McRae,
rides his horse very slowly
across the fresh countryside
looking at nature's gifts: the
earth, the trees, the sky, the
birds, the streams, etc, as he
sings: "Oh what a beautiful
morning, oh what a beautiful
day, I've got a beautiful feeling,

(Continued on page VII)


Gary Grant (seated) in a rum saloon with fellow pilots, labourers, and earthy women, in
South America, from the famous Hollywood film "Only Angels Have Wings", 1939.


a I[.YiH


The Guyana Association of Bankers wishes

to advise the general public that effective

Thursday August 17, 2006, the hours of

business at all commercial banks will be as

follows:


Monday Thursday


Friday


- 08:00h -13:00h



- 08:00h -13:30h


UNIVERSITY OF GUYANA




HEAD UNIVERSITY OF GUYANA CONSULTANCY ORGANISATION

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the position of
HEAD, UNIVERSITY OF GUYANA CONSULTANCY ORGANISATION in the
Office of Resource Mobilisation and Planning.

Job Summary

To lead the rapid development and management of a vibrant and sustainable consultancy
organisation through which international, public or private agencies, institutions, industries,
companies and individuals can gain effective access to consultancy services provided by the
University of Guyana; to make available to these agencies, appropriate expertise and facilities at
the University, as well as others which may be accessed by the University; to provide consultancy,
research, developmental and problem-solving services; to enhance the University's involvement in
national, regional and international development projects and income-generating capacity.

Requirements

At least a Masters Degree or equivalent professional qualification plus previous high-level
experience in the development and management of consultancies or related enterprises including
experience in project proposal and execution and experience with regional and international
financial institutions. Strong/dynamic leadership and negotiating skills with a proactive business
outlook are compulsory attributes. Experience in the private sector and in marketing would be a
distinctadvantage.

Remuneration Package

Placement in appropriate salary range are determined by level of qualifications, experience and
research/publications. Housing, travelling and entertainment allowances. Contributory Medical
and Pension Schemes and Gratuity (where applicable).

Anyone recruited from overseas will receive up to four (4) full economy air fares (i.e. for self. spouse
and two (2) unmarried children up to eighteen (18) years of age) from point of recruitment (as
determined by the University regulations), limited removal expenses and a settling-in allowance.
Applications with Curriculum Vitae, THREE (3) COPIES, stating full name, date of birth,
marital status, qualifications (with dates and overall grades obtained), work experience (with
dates), full names and addresses of three (3) referees, who can testify to the academic and/or
professional capabilities of the applicant, (one of whom must be your present or last employer,
where applicable) must reach the Personnel Division, University of Guyana, PO. Box 10-1110,
Georgetown, Email: pd@telsnetgy.net Fax No. 592-222-4181. or Courier Service, not later than
Saturday, September 2,2006 (Tel. Nos. 222-4181/5271) Websit., wWv\w uog edu.gy


r-


m


I --qlmw


I


- -- --






VI SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006


Kohl 5l


J files By George Barclay


Murder accused


sentenced to death


Escapes


Thirty years ago, murder ac-
cused Robert Lewis was sen-
tenced to death for fatally
stabbing another man.
Lewis' appeal however, re-
sulted in three Court of Ap-
peal Judges ruling that he
had lost his chances of an ac-
quittal due to misdirections
by the trial judge, said
misdirections resulting in
the jury finding him guilty of
murder and the judge sen-
tencing him to death for the
killing of Roy Henry.
The facts of the case dis-
closed that on 27th October.
1974. at Victoria Plaisance. East
Coast, Demerara, the appellant
Robert Lewis and the deceased
Roy Henry had an altercation
in a restaurant in the presence
of three persons who were en-
gaged in a game of skittles.
At the close of the game
Lewis and the deceased Henry
resumed their quarrel. They be-
gan to fight on the public road
in the presence of the same
three persons one of whom.
Randolph Camacho. saw the
appellant (Lewis) with an S
inch blood-stained knife in his


ciallows on appeal


hand at the time.
Camacho had previously
seen an unknown man pass the
knife to the appellant over the
skittles table but said nothing
about it to the police or the
magistrate, because he said he
was not asked about it.
Blows were exchanged with
fists and during the struggle and
Roy Henry (now deceased)
was seen to hold the
appellant's neck in a "half-
nelson" wrestler's lock while
the appellant cuffed away at the
region of the deceased's abdo-
men. Suddenly one of the blows
lifted the deceased off the
ground causing him to fall al-
most in a standing position in a
nearby trench where he fell
backwards into the water.
An autopsy was to disclose
a stab wound on the left side of
the deceased's chest. The doc-
tor said it could have been
caused by a sharp-pointed knife
or a sharp piece of tin or bro-
ken bottle and must have en-
tered the body with a great deal
of force since it travelled in-
ward and upwards penetrating
the left ventricle of the heart.


I
The injury, the doctor had
said, caused massive visceral
haemorrhage which served as the
cause of death.
According to the judgment
of the Guyana Court of Appeal
by Chancellor J. O. F. Haynes.
Justices of Appeal. Guya
Persaud and Victor Crane. the
accused was charged with mur-
der.
At his trial, he admitted
fighting with the deceased on
the evening in question, but he
did not admit to having been in
possession of a knife: he did
complain about the "half-
nelson" wrestler's lock to his
neck.
At the hearing of the appeal.
Attorney-at-law. Mr. Jailall
Kissoon represented the appel-
lant while the Deputy Director
of Public Prosecutions Mr.
George Pompey. iho later be-
came a High Court judge, ap-
peared lor the State.
On the appellant's behalf.
counsel advanced the theory
that the fatal injury was received
by accident when the deceased
fell into the trench on a piece of
broken bottle, it being the


doctor's view that that was
quite "possible though not
probable". The jury rejected
this theory in the same way as
they rejected the defences of
self-defence and provocation
which the trial judge left to
them and they found the appel-
lant guilty of murder. Self-de-
fence and provocation were not
however specifically raised by
the defence but arose on the evi-
dence.
On appeal, it was contended
the wound might have been
caused by accident when the
deceased slipped and fell on a
heap of stones on receiving a
blow from the appellant, also.
that there was a vital omission
on the part of the witness
Camacho not to reveal to the
police in his statement nor to
the examining magistrate that he
had seen an unknown man pass
the accused a knife for the first
time in the restaurant and that
it was highly unsatisfactory for
him to explain away this omis-
sion by saying that no one had
asked him about it.
On self-defence it was ar-
gued that the real and substan-
tial case of self-defence raised
on the evidence was never really
put to the jury and might well


be said to have been withdrawn
from them.
The Appellate Court judge-
ment was based on six central
points. The first was if the
wound was received from the
fall on the ground. that would
not in law support a defence of
accident since the fall was from
an unlawful act of fighting on
the part of the appellant.
The second point was that
the trial judge should have given
the jury a more helpful direc-
tion on the possible import of
the omission on Camacho's
credibility. Had the judge given


adequate direction on the mat-
ter of the knife in the posses-
sion of the accused at the res-
taurant and at the scene of the
struggle, a reasonable jury must
have found the appellant left
home with a knife to find the
deceased or obtained one some-
time after then and before the
fatal accident.
Thirdly, even if all
Camacho's evidence about a
knife was discredited, the re-
maining circumstantial proof
that the appellant started the

(Continued on page VIII)


NOTICE
:idi',l[riri y i i ^L'Tl


The Ethnic Relations Commission has received a complaint from the Executive
Committee, Campaign for Justice in Guyana, JIG/UK alleging that the book
"Indians Betrayed"
1. "...falsely and maliciously portrays African Guyanese as a degenerate
and criminal race in Guyana by selectively appropriating news reports
about crime in Guyana
2. ...is an incitement to racial hatred and racial violence against Afro
Guyanese by portraying Indo Guyanese as a community in clear and
present danger of mortal attacks byAfro Guyanese
3. ...is deliberately insulting and derogatory of (sic) Afro Guyanese in a
way which ... constitutes a breach of Guyana's race laws"
It is the desire of the Commission to deal with this matter. It has, therefore,
decided to hold a public hearing on the complaint; and as a consequence extends
an n.il illon to interested parties and individuals-
1) To submit written submissions on the matter on or before Friday,
September 22, 2006
2) To indicate in writing no later than Friday, September 15, 2006 their
desire to appear before the Commission to give evidence in the matter
THIS IS A DECISION OF THE COMMISSION
All letters are to be addressed to:
The ChiefExecutive 0C. .-,. ~ Secretaof
Ethnic Relations Commission
BIDCO Building
66( Peter Rose and Anira Streets.
Quleens( iown.
GEORGETOWN


r BUREAU OF STATISTICS



VACANCY


HEAD OF DIVISION, DEMOGRAPHY

AND VITAL STATISTICS

The Bureau of Statistics is seeking to recruit a highly qualified individual to fill
the senior position of HEAD OF DIVISION, DEMOGRAPHY AND VITAL
STATISTICS.
REQUIREMENTS:
Education/Qualification:
A University Degree in Statistics, Demography or Geography with post-
graduate specialisation or above in Demography. Previous experience in the
management of Demographic Units will be of significant advantage, as well
as previous analytical work, particularly in Census and Survey analysis.

Experience:
Experience in the planning and execution of Household Surveys and
Population and Household Censuses, and familiarity with GIS technology
and usage will be a distinct advantage.

COMPUTER KNOWLEDGE

Candidates must possess a high degree of computer literacy and proficiency
in the use of customised software packages for population projections.

Applications with detailed Curriculum Vitae and two (2) recent testimonials
should be submitted no later than August 21, 2006 to the:


Chief Statistician
Bureau of Statistics
P.O. Box 1070/Avenue of the Republic and Brickdam
Georgetown.

Ii-- I


~


. . I I I I I


- - - 7 -


1ij:1 A ii .11 1 l e






SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006


Sometimes


sore

Perhaps at some time, we all
suffer from a sore throat. But
while this seems normal, the
cause and evolution of the
disease may vary quite a lot.
Included in the respiratory
system disorders, the acute or
chronic condition generally
arises from causes such as
infection, allergies, tumours
and drug reactions.
Sore throat is usually a
prominent symptom of a wide
variety of diseases among which
rheumatic, scarlet are and relaps-
ing fevers, (the latter is spread
by a tick). Others include po-
lio, tetanus, tonsillitis and vita-
min B deficiency. What we
commonly call the throat is re-
ally the oropharynx which is
visible at the back of the mouth.
situated below the nasopharyx
and above the larynx (voice
box).
Tonsils are spongy tissues
at the back of the throat, com-
posed mainly of lymphocytic
cells. There are three types.
The palatine tonsils usually re-
ferred to as "tonsils", are visible
between the arches that extend
from the uvula (bell shaped
structure at the centre of the


a


E l e 1


opening), to the floor of the
mouth.
The pharyngeal tonsils, of-
ten called adenoids, lie at the
back of the throat. These gen-
erally shrink as a child grows,
but may have to be surgically
removed if they become en-
larged and influned. The lingual
tonsils are on the upper surface
of each side of the back of the
tongue. The tonsils' function is
to protect the pharynx (com-
mon entrance of the gullet, nose
and windpipe) and the rest of
the body from infectious organ-


isms (bacteria. \ irusecs and
fungi).
Infection ol the ton-
sils called tonsillitis, may
serve as a source of infec-
tion elsewhere in the body.
The tonsils form lympho-
cytes which are white
blood cells that produce
antibodies to combat
harmful organisms
trapped in the mucous
membrane lining of the
throat. In fact. the lym-
phocytic tissue circum-
scribing the throat actu-
ally represents the first
line of defence against invading
pathogens (germs that cause
disease). In reality, the HIV is
too frail to kill anyone. Most
people who die from AIDS suc-
cumb generally as a result of ei-
ther pneumocystic carinii pneu-
monia or cancer. These situa-
tions develop because there is a
depletion of special white blood
cells known as T4 Lymphocytes
which have the responsibility of
providing immunity against the
aggressive germs. In fact. the
count of these cells often indi-
cates if the person is infected
with HIV.


The AIDS virus also in-
vades and kills thle T4 ympho-
c\tes leaving the body vulner-
able. These protective cells are
manufactured in the tonsils.
bone marrow and spleen. A sore
throat that is not responding to
conventional treatment may be
gonorrhea of the oropharynx
contracted from oral sex. Also
occurring sometimes, is diph-


(From page V)

everything's going my way."
This song and these words come
to be heard frequently from the
galvanised bathrooms in poor
yards, and average households,
as Guyanese of any race poured
water over their heads or stood
beneath a shower, before leav-
ing for whatever ups and downs
their day ahead held. This scene
and song has even more pre-
cious significance for all human
life today threatened by conflicts
involving nuclear warheads
which \would damage the natu-
ral life of the planet totally.


The Dentist Advises
..I........ .la lrijii i i i


lhcria which hbcgits gradually
with fever. sore throat and
\vWoiicli il i pi nodcs giantss) 1in
neck.
A thick while nmemibrane
forms oil Ihe Itllnils and ll na
obstructl brcathlling Ito necessilale
the surgical opening of the
windpipe. Heart muscle and
nerves may be affected, causing
paralysis and sometimes death.
The throat communicates with
the middle ear; located behind
the ear drums, by means of a
passage called the Eustachian
tube. This is why the pain of
an ear infection is occasionally
expected when the victim has a
cold. Ear specialists usually


send first-visit patients to the
dentist so as to eliminate the
possibility of an earache heing
caused by a decaved tooth.
With a sore throat, the
typical complaint is a raw, dry
or burning sensation and pain
on swallowing all but cool
substances, such as ice
cream. If the infection
spreads downwards to the lar-
ynx. a hoarseness and tempo-
rary loss of voice may ensue.
Treatment for sore throat
usually consists of adequate
doses of penicillin, aspirin,
rest and warm saline gargles
and the treatment of dental
and gum infections.


When today's young gen-
eration of Guyanese hear
about older local generations
with less hostile and socially
dangerous attitudes, or
behaviour patterns, it is re-
ally the beneficial social ef-
fect of such classic cinema
which subtly shaped and
guided the lives of citizens
in past decades. But before
anyone believes that simply
urging a return to cinema at-
tendance of today's films
would remedy or reverse this
sad situation, they are
wrong. It can never be over-
stressed that such a Golden


LLir


SQUESTIOI

What is Olc

I


M


I Age Grant, and who is eligible t


o receive this? o
E l


ANSWER

An Old Age Grant is a single payment made to someone I
who is 60 years old and over and who does not qualify I
for an Old Age Pension (Does not have 750 Contributions) I
I
The lump-sum payment equals to one-twelfth (1/12) times 1
the average annual insurable earnings for each group of
fifty (50) contributions, whether paid or credited or paid -
and credited.


I I
Do you have a question on N.I.S ? Then writelCall.,

INIS MAIL BAG I
I C/O Dianne Lewis Baxter
Publicity and Public Relations Officer (ag)
National Insurance Scheme
Brickdam and Winter Place
P.O. Box. 101135
E-mail: pr_nis@solution2000.net
Tel: 227-3461.


Cinema's Influence on...


Era of Cinema was based on
the quality of films made
and constantly shown back
then, and until the totally
idiotic local opinion that
Hollywood films in black and
white and colour made since
the 1930s are old outdated
irrelevant films is given up
entirely, there can never be
much hope of cinema once
again influencing Guyanese
social stability. The history
of cinema is not a passing
fashion or trend, but actually
a record of our success and
failure at being truly hu-
man.


I









U mm~ llIn


The Guyana National


Library and Me


By Petamber Persaud

I became a member of the
Public Free Library (now the
National Library) in the
1960s. The National Library
gave me life and continues to
sustain me even unto this
moment as I write this ar-
ticle. It was that early that I
formed a deep respect for
books, that early I became a
book lover, that early I ac-
quired the joy of reading for
leisure and it is why now,
reading for research is not a
burden.
I can recall many important
events of my formative years
but none as vividly as becom-


ing a member of the National
Library; a situation that became
my calendar and diary. My life
was measured in library time,
and my growth by my weekly
sojourns to the library. I looked
forward to Saturdays, library
days; there was excitement just
waiting to return a book and to
borrow another, cracking open
gems of knowledge, travelling to
worlds unknown and wallowing
in endless entertainment. A most
satisfying extension to that was
sharing with colleagues what I
read, retelling stories and regur-
gitating facts and figures.
This all started with my
mother's resolve that her chil-
dren must be educated, much


better than those from her gen-
eration who were literally stuck
in the mud, planting rice and
cutting cane. Without a proper
financial base that resolve to-
wards education was difficult
but my mother solved the prob-
lem when she got the idea that
books held the key to knowl-
edge and therefore the key to
success. And she was right; al-
most everything I know I ac-
quired from the books in that li-
brary. I think my navel string is
buried in the National Library.
The National Library,
Georgetown, Guyana. was
institutionalized in 1909. Al-
though funding provided by
American philanthropist, An-


drew Carnegie, was available, it
took about two years of prepa-
ratory works to qualify for that
funding. A site for erection of a
building had to be located, de-
sign for erection approved and
ordinances for the purchase of
books and other requisites had
to be passed. A Provisional
Committee appointed in 1907
effectively dealt with those is-
sues resulting in enactment of
the Georgetown Public Free Li-
brary Ordinance and the laying
of the foundation stone one year
later in 1908.
In 1935, the original erec-
tion was extended to house the
Economic Science, Anthropo-
logical and Historical Sections of
the Museum. That was a bless-
ing in disguise for there was
need of space for a separate
children's library. So when in
1951, the museum exhibits were
moved to the new museum
building, the library utilised the
whole structure for its opera-
tion.
Branches of the library
were established after the 1950
legislation was passed to extend
the library services outside of
Georgetown; first in New
Amsterdam (1953) then
Mackenzie (1955). Other
branches across the country
were set up eventually.
What needs the central li-
brary and its branches couldn't
satisfy had to be met by the op-
eration of a bookmobile. The
first bookmobile service was es-
tablished in 1970, catering for
areas like Tucville, Peter's Hall,
Houston, Agricola, Providence
and Soesdyke. A second book-
mobile was put into service in
1976.
Apart from the physical im-
provements to the building,
there were numerous develop-
ments in services offered by the
library. The most significant
was the publication of a


Guyanese National Bibliogra-
phy in 1973. That invaluable
recording of our literary heri-
tage became possible as a Na-
tional Library came into.being
when in 1972 the Public Free
Library Ordinance became the
National Library Act. The com-
pilation of a Guyanese National
Bibliography was made more
favourable when the Newspa-
per Ordinance was amended in
1972 to make the National Li-
brary one of the legal deposito-
ries for all materials printed and
published in Guyana. That
meant that one copy of every
material that is printed or pub-
lished in Guyana must be de-
posited at the National Library.
Other services offered by
the National Library include a
photocopying operation which
came on stream in 1-966, a
gramophone record library
opened in 1969, a reading room,
and a toy library established in
1981 in the juvenile department
to cater for the needs of
preschoolers. At the turn of the
new millennium, there was need
for more space for the head-


quarters of the library and so a
new wing was added. Com-
pleted in 2001, the extension
housed the Administrative De-
partment, Technical Services
and Rural Departments, creat-
ing more space for the Refer-
ence and Juvenile Departments.
Even with the extension, the
central library could not meet
the literacy needs of the whole
country. The National Library
has become so entrenched in the
psyche of Guyanese people
that more and greater demands
are being made of its services.
For the first half of 2005, there
were 211, 643 recorded users of
the National Library while in
2004, there were 181, 539.
That record indicates a substan

(Continued on page VIV)


Murder accused ...
(Frompage VI)
quarrel on the public road with a knife in his possession
and stabbed the deceased with it was cogent enough.
The fourth point set out by the Appeal judges for their
decision was that there was some material on which a reason-
able jury could find a verdict of manslaughter instead of mur-
der, and after dealing with the issue of self-defence the trial
judge had to direct the jury that, if they rejected it, they may
find manslaughter on the ground of provocation notwithstanding
it was not relied on at the trial.
Point five was that the directions on the law of manslaugh-
ter were inadequate in that the jury were not told as they ought
to have been, that the onus was on the State to prove that the
provocation was not sufficient; neither were they told that if
they were left in any reasonable doubt as to whether the facts
show sufficient provocation, the issue must be determined in
favour of the accused.
And finally, in summation, by reason of these
misdirections, the appellant lost a fair chance of acquittal of
murder, so the verdict of murder must be set aside and a ver-
dict of manslaughter substituted, ChancellorHaynes declared.
The appeal was allowed, the verdict of murder was set
aside and a verdict of manslaughter substituted.


TCL GUYANA INC.
VACANCY FOR
DISTRIBUTION & INVENTORY CONTROL OFFICER
Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for this position in a
Companythatwill be starting up operations in the nearfuture.
Job Summary:
TCL Guyana Incorporated is seeking to employ a self-motivated, dedicated individual
who will be responsible for the receipt of goods, stocking, and distribution of finished goods
from the warehouse and for the efficient operation of stores, Performs activities to monitor
and maintain inventory control of merchandise or materials.
Major Responsibilities Include:
Coordinates Bulk deliveries with customers to ensure that their needs
are met.
SSupervises the mobile equipment operators and the contracted jetty
workers.
SEnsures trucks are dispatched to Packing Plant and monitors loading
times for trucks.
> Responds to all customer requests on sales information, truck loading
time, etc., in a timely manner.
> Reconciles Daily Sales information to Plant Superintendent and
verifies physical documents with Sales System data.
SAdheres to all quality standards with reference to documentation,
dispatch of proper product.
> Checks incoming materials to ensure that they meet quantity and
quality specifications.
Ensures materials are checked, labelled, stored and recorded in the
established location.
Reports shortages, damaged and non-conforming materials for
corrective action.
> Ensures materials are issued in accordance with stated policy
> Processes issues and receipts as requested utilizing the appropriate
software.
> General housekeep duties are in order in relevant work areas.
Requirements:
Qualifications
Minimum of a Diploma in the field of Materials Management or Marketing

Experience
1 3 years relevant inventory management experience
Excellent organization and interpersonal skills
Computer literate with a working knowledge in Microsoft Office Applications

Applications labelled "Distribution & Inventory Control Officer" should be sent to:
The Plant Manager
TCL Guyana Inc.
GNIC Compound
Lombard Street
GEORGETOWN
Applications close Aug. 31, 2006
Unsuitbble ppjipp ts..will not be acknowledged. .


TO ALL MEDICAL PRACTIONERS


The Chief Medical Officer wishes to notify all Medical
Practitioners that the elections for the appointment of
members to be Medical Council will be held on Friday,
September 1, 2006 at 15:00 h in the Conference Room of the
Ministry of Health, Brickdam, Stabroek, Georgetown.

Medical Practitioners desirous of witnessing the opening of
the Ballot Box and the counting of the ballots are hereby
invited.
DR. R. O. CUMMINGS
CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER
2006-08-11


-..................... ... ..... . ......... .. .....:.... BuA.o i' o'< lhl-'Au u t20 2 6


PRESEVING OU^" 1 ^r'RTiY11'y S LTERARYT^ HERI f ^TAGE





8/19/2006,1:08 AM


I IIII I re


HOTHEAMERICAN ERE nf0f00 000, nOgem8D (9000 S.


SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 2,0,-


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nini of .ingstoi. Ge.wi is o rgt Gaif b na .n this Aa utho
With eve: 59 -2 1-31 demand3 to ly nd n tee n )-- t o
A-. Govrnm oG~i*a -
X. U F:. ..1..






Uuans Liuyaata HIV/AI Up date
(From page V) oc casion, demonstrating a users through the collectionuyana U.S isnde for the purchase of the following








overn ment Project) invites applicnte- organisations fro m suitabltioy vecle:
qu tial year to year increase in us- llce and upkeep of the fa- and preservaposition of inforn:a-








Registration # Description of Vehicle Location
Opwas set in tration of switchboin library'sd and provision stof an efficient receptionists'.
ninT of that noble institution. which is,d'To satisfy both na- Responses to this author










MINIMUM RECRUITMENT STANDARDS: mentioned location during the period August 092006 to August 23.or2006, during normal
Th r ee (3) subjects CXC, one must be English Land recre- guage plus minimum
noble institution rise to the national nce libras a receptionist. Knowledge Tenders must be placed in sealed envelopes bearing no identification of the tenderer on

of word processing and Spreadsheet application the outside and must be clearly marIked at the top left-hand coer "TENDER FOR


S" SALE OF VEHICLE, .MINISTRY OF HOME AFFAIRS, REGISTRATION # PGG
(GApplications t incl(A v the name, address and contact nmer of at







Government Project) invites applications (1) from suita community member and oriole:







former employers as to fitness for the position.
The envelope should be addressed to The Permanent Secretary. Minist of HomeVehicle Location
Please send applications to the PR PGG87RAM ASSISTANT, USAlb AffairsMotor Car LotBrickda
GHARP Op eration of switchboard and provision of an efficient receptionist, no







later than August 25, 2006 at 16:30 brs. Tenders are to be deposited in the Tender Box at the Ministry's Headquarters. Lot 6
JbThis vehicle will be sold on 'As is where is' basis and can be inspected at tdpe above
MINIMUM RECRUITEN SANDAR en owned lo o dr e erod st 09: hrs on Wtoy August 23. 2006-. dring noprsen
of two (2) years relevant experience as a receptionist. Knowledge Tenders must be placed in sealed envelopes bearing no identification of t.e tenderer on
























tendereApplications must include the name, address and contact number of at SO HIE ITRHOSE T Topening at the
ONleast two (2) referees, one (1) from a community member and orMinist ofHomAffirs.
e envelope should be addressed to The Peanent Secretary. Ministry of Home
Ple(From page VIII) occasion, demonstrating a users through the collection Afairs.
itmnt to th Project, 3 d F 44 mainte-High S Kings aton, eordissemination o [ *
tial eater thincrease in ugust- nance25,2006 at 16:30 hrs Tender s are to be deposited in the Tender Bo at the Minist's Headuarters. Lot 6
age of the facility, a trend that ility. All in keeping with the tiou in printed and other for- .* *,* i i i ,, ,


















JobWith every new demnan be uplifted at internationally telephone (592) 226-0065 or .3lss. 5llk0II0Geogtw ola n 0 ugust 23,- "f
tenderersthe stakeholders of that the information and recre- e a i I designated representatives ho choose to attend te opening at the
noble institution rise to the national needs of the library's oraltradition2002@yaED oo.com ist' oHome Affairs.

A oint Governent of Gaa S. Gonn Pernanent Sclctan
(GHARP) Project (A Joint Government of Guyana U.S The Miistry of Home Affairs is inviting tenders for the purchase of the following















Government Project) invited mis applied nations Infrom suitably vel cle:l





of two (2) years relevannnt experience as a receptionist. Knowledge Tenders must be placed in sealed envelopes bearing no identified can be viewed on of the tenderer on g








j 5 ~ J E 5 E I nu .tstU .I u .... U .I ..tIU hL 'JYS I lfl hI U .IU TlID .U I .IUIJDL % D5 S5tl D *DD.., D.'. I.D 't.'t rl r, "'A i G overnm ent ads can be view ed on h ttp //w w wVg lna go ; gy ,





SUNDAY CHRONICLE AuaustO 20QQ6..


Let"

BY NORMAN FARIA

Most Guyanese associate the
game of darts with pubs in
England. We remember
scenes from TV shows or
movies showing the fellows A
in tweed suits and caps
throwing their darts at the
circular dartboard while their
pint of ale or Guinness sits There are ni
on the bar, waiting for them. and even a
However, the game is tion.
widely played in clubs all over Guyana
the US and Canada and the Scan- our large, u
dinavian countries for example, the 16th C.


ook at a curious sport


national competitions
World Darts Federa-

Sis no exception, as
upbeat contingent at
aribbean champion-


ship held in Barbados early this
month readily attests. Our 14
member team didn't do too well,
except in the Men's Single cat-
egory where Norman Madhoo
took the title. We placed 5th in


GUYANA REVENUE AUTHORITY


Customs & Trade Administration

PUBLIC AUCTION
The Customs & Trade Administration is offering for sale by public auction, on Thursday,
August 24, 2006 from 09:00 hrs, at the Guyana National Industrial Corporation (GNIC)
Wharf, Water Street, Georgetown,"Want of Entry Vehicles" presently stored at the
following wharves/locations:

DIDCO Friendship, E.B.D
GNSC Lombard Street, G/town
GNIC Lombard Street, G/town
John Fernandes Ltd. Wharf Water Street, G/town
John Fernandes Ltd. Terminal Mandela Avenue, G/town

The vehicles can be inspected from Thursday 17th to Wednesday 23rd August, 2006 from
08:30h to 15:30h atthe above mentioned wharves/locations.

All prospective bidders must present at the time of inspection, personal identification in
the form of their Passports/National Identification Cards.

Terms & Conditions of Sale
All items are being sold on an 'As is, where is basis'. Delivery services are not available. All
vehicles purchased must be removed from the sale site within fourteen (14) days of
purchase. Vehicles not removed within the specified period will be forfeited. Payment must
be made in cash or Manager's Cheques, payable to the "Guyana Revenue Authority".

The Customs & Trade Administration reserves the right to reject any or all bids during the
sale.

Special Conditions of Sale
The sale of all vehicles advertised, will be conducted at the GNIC Wharf on
Thursday, August 24, 2006.

(a) All prospective bidders are required to be registered.

(b) Registration for the Auction Sale will commence at 08:00h at the GNIC
Compound on Thursday, August 24, 2006.

(c) All winning bids are subject to a 2% auction fee payable immediately at the
Sale site.

(d) Winning bids of $100,000 Guyana dollars and under must be paid immediately
at the sale site. For bids exceeding $100,000 Guyana Dollars, an initial deposit
of $100,000 Guyana dollars to be paid at the sale site to formalize the sale. The
remaining balance to be paid at Customs House, Main Street,
Georgetown. All final payments must be made before 14:00h on
Friday, August 25, 2006.

(e) Deposits and auction fees will be forfeited if bids are not honoured.


., i ..:.....:...:...........
S Khurshid Sattaur
Commissioner-General


I paqe 10 & 15 p65


the overall category and 7th in
the team category. Bahamas
and Trinidad and Tobago won
those respective titles.
What happened? Manager
Grantley Culbard : "We had a
strong team but weren't per-
forming as we had expected. We
were throwing good darts but
not finishing well enough."
Aside from Madhoo, one of the
region's top players who is of-
ten in Barbados winning other
tournaments, the Guyana team
included two experienced play-
ers in the form of Jacqueline
Clarke, now resident in New
York and Floyd Jaundoo, who
came in from Texas. As usual
with these types of tourna-
ments, there were nevertheless
benefits and achievements espe-
cially, for example, for younger
players such as teenager Chris-
tina Fulton
How is the game going in
Guyana? Culbard, himself a
keen player since the 1970s and
once again President of the
Guyana Darts Association, feels
it is holding its own. Clearly. it's
not a mass audience sport on
the scale of cricket and football.
But Culbard is optimistic.
"There can be no comparison
with the cricket or football but
there is still a sizeable interest
in it. We are now trying to
widen its appeal and spread it
countryside. We are trying to
get it into the school system."


Culbard, the well known
trade unionist who once served
as President of the Caribbean
Congress of Labour, stationed in
Barbados from 1983 to 2000,
said it isn't expensive to get
into. Sending teams overseas-can
be. He disclosed that the trip to
Barbados cost Guy$1.5 million.
The Darts Association was very
grateful to its major sponsor,
Banks DIH, now celebrating its
50th anniversary this year.
Another Association Execu-
tive member, Raphael De Souza,
also sees more enthusiasm for
the sport. He said it would help
if the players had a permanent
venue of their own.
"If we had some land where
we could build a clubhouse, we
feel this would encourage even
more to come in (and enjoy the
game)" Presently, he explained,
they use clubhouses at cricket
grounds and the Pegasus Sports
Club for example.
Tournament Director Gre-
gory Blenman of host organiza-
tion Barbados Darts Associa-
tion, said they had teams from
all over the Caribbean for the
apparently well organized get
together. Brazil and Bermuda
get invitations while Florida,
which was a founding member,
also comes along for the Cham-
pionship which was sponsored
by Digicel.
Blenman was glad Guyana
participated. We have been
strong supporters of the cham-
pionship over the years. In
1994, Guyanese Victor Baker
and Vibert Yearwood (Whatever
became of them?) won the
Heineken Doubles, one of our
highlights.
At home among this 200
plus regional mix of peoples at
the Sherbourne Center venue
was Guyanese team member
Floyd Jaundoo, presently based
in Texas where he emigrated in
1986. He once played badmin-
ton for Guyana. What made him
take up darts? He answered:
"A new sport to me is always a
challenge and I had always like
to be competitive".
In the US, as with almost


everything else, there is a "pro-
fessional" dimension to darts.
"You can you can make a living
from it, If you are good enough,
you can play a tournament ev-
ery night. I myself am not full
time but I occasionally play in
what is called Open Money
Tournaments," says Jaundoo
who was once classed by the
American Darts Association
among the U.S.'s top 100 play-
ers.
Is it a difficult game to learn
and play?
"It's not difficult but as
with any other sport it takes
skill and discipline. I would say
it is 60 per cent mental and 40
per cent accuracy (in getting the
darts to land in the right places).
You've got to know when to
slow the game up or to go fast
according to how your partner
or opponent is playing. ven-
tures Juandoo who hails from
New Amsterdam.
Darts isn't that expensive
compared to other sports. The
main cost is the dart board
which will cost US$35 on aver-
age. The darts, depending on
what kind of game you play, can
range from US$8 per set of
three to the top line, handmade
equipment such as the $175 per
set Hammerhead brand Jaundoo
uses.
As with other sports, it can
have its dangerous aspects. The
darts can inflict a painful
wound. This can happen if you
throw one too hard and it
bounces off the pieces of wire
on the dart board. Incredibly,
explains Jaundoo, experienced
players learn how to catch the
darts as they bounce back. Once
sensible precautions are taken,
including how to hold the darts
properly, there are very few in-
juries. There are special soft
tipped darts. In the US, young-
sters start from age eight or
nine, he said, while there are also
senior leagues.
He referred to some of the
top world players such as Phil
"The Power" Taylor (UK) and
(Continued on page XTV)


v


M4AADA



MAHAICA MAHAICONY ABARY

AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY




Cattle farmers who have cattle grazing on the Right Bank
of the Abary River between Belladrum and Bath are asked
to remove their cattle from this area immediately. These
cattle are destroying drainage and irrigation works
currently in progress.


The MMVA will impound any cattle found in this area after
August 31,2006. All cattle farmers are asked to cooperate.


A. Charles
General Manager (ag)
MMA-ADA
^ _<---~.'U ''_;-:.-r---- ~ 4'


_ --s\7rr~\l~;j~rL~iL;CIPCUli~;C~CLC~L~CL


J





eIIMSAV tImn~uu rJuu rv ruv


. . I,


A Lille Princess entered our home A

Son the Oclober31 1987.

This Beauliful ittle Princess

left our home on the August 17,2005

to be with God as one of his precious Angels.


Sandy lived at 256 Duncan Street, Newtown and attended St.Gabriel Primary School, then attended S: Mary's High
school. Sandy then ventured into the field of cosmetology at Indra's Beauty Salon where she did the course that became
her greatest passion which combined her love for beauty and art. She worked at the Magic Touch Hair Salon for four years.
Perhaps the greatest gift that Sandy had was her ability to lead people positively, a natural gift with the people she loved.
Agreatgirl who will be remembered by all those who lives she touched, loved and shared.
Seventeen years you spentwith us and lived such a wonderful life,
If there was a stairway to heaven we surely would climb it no matter how high,
Just to hear the sound of your voice, see your beautiful face,see you dance,
Hear you laugh we miss all of that,
We wake up in the middle of the night and cry,
But if we had to choose between you and our tears we surely would choose you.


Always willing to help others,when herself should be at rest,
She was the kindest of daughters,now amongst heavenly blessed,
Loving and kind in all her ways upright and just to the end of her days,
Sincere and true,in her heart and mind, beautiful memories leftbehind,
By whispering your name today Sandy, the tenderwords unspoken,
The letter never sent, the long forgotten message,
The wealth of love unspent, and while she lies in peaceful sleep,
Her memory we shall always keep and never part again,
Down a road that's calm and peaceful guided by God's loving Hand.
Long days, long nights, you bore the pain and hoped for cure, but all in vain,
Then God decided what was best, He took you home and gave you rest,
A page in our book of memories is silently turned today.


4


Oh, for the touch of a vanished hand, and the sound of a voice that is still,
Our hopes,our joys ,our fears but one day in God's garden,
When the master calls us to come ,you'll be at the gates with open arms and say to us,welcome home,
Within our hearts we always keep a special place for you and try to do our best to live as you would want us to
as we loved you so we miss you,
In all the world we shall not find a.sweet Daughter, a heart so wonderfully find ,so soft a voice, so sweet a
smilean inspiration so worth while,
A sympathy so sure,so deep a love, so beautiful to keep.

We thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new,
We thought about you yesterday,and days before that too,
We think of'you in silence,we often speak your name,
Now all we have is memories and your picture in a frame,
Your memory is our keep sake,with which we'll never part,
God has you in His keeping,we have you in our heart.
The golden gate stood open,one year ago today with farewells left unspoken,
Our dear one slipped away she suffered much in silence,
Her spirit did not bend; she faced the pain with courage until the very end,
We think of you dear Sandy ,and hearts are filled with pain,
This world would be heaven,could we hear your voipe again,
SThe year has swiftly passed,but still we don't forget for the hearts that loved you best, your memory lingers yet.


Remembrance is a golden chain, death tries to break, but all in vain,
To have, to love, and then to part is the greatest sorrow of one's heart,
Time may wipe out many things ,but this it will wipe out never,
The memory of those happy days,when we were all together.
When twilight hours draws near,and sunset frames the sky,
We think of you ,dear Sandy ,and the happy days gone by,
Thoughts of you come drifting back,within our dreams to say,
To know that you are resting, when the twilight ends the day.
You tried to make others life complete,
But it couldn't be without you,
We know for sure you'll always be in our heart,
But still it would never be the same with you not around.
Like the sun that rises & brightens my everyday, ,J* I
Like a rose that comes alive every spring ',
With a fragrance that takes my breath away,
Sandy I miss you like crazy,
Every second of every minute of everyday,
No matter what I say or do
There's no getting over you.
You always had that love shining in your bright eyes
And it always comes with a sweet surprise
I love you. I miss you, miss you, and miss you. TO Al


SI.. MOM: Petal, DAD: Rudy, BOYFRIEND: Avi
Grandparents, Aunts, Uncles, Cousins,
33 7 Rahki Brothers and other


- I \M RLIVR'0 aiiu IlIIIIII


S. ....... ,, .-- .--..-- ......- .- -..--. IIciauv b ae nu. IienllUs.
c B MAMHAPAPPYLOVE AND

* ^A ^S^t^ r^ ^^'^ ^^.'^ ****ffu i** l. n *' **^jn.. ..-** vt ;* 11. 1.: ': ^ i* ib i* ," .., .^*


NSs YOU VERY


c IIBl .IIV i'Unl ahII E.. A i 'luu 'i2t. ,'. l',fi ;.' ,- ...,- .. .....


-. ... .-........ .. ...-1... ..A.X


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~7r


T-,


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xnf SUNDAY Chroi


Scenes


from


old


Geor


3i 2.
- Ii~~ .
-
i ~Jisd~j w.


An 1888 drawing showing the intersection of High Street ( a.k.a. Avenue Of the Republic)
and New North Street (a.k.a. Company Path), Georgetown. On the left is the Hand-In-Hand
Fire Insurance Co. building, with the old post office tower in the background. On the right
are the Assembly Rooms. The Post Office and the 'Assembly Rooms' were destroyed in
the 1945 great fire. The Bank of Guyana and the Georgetown Museum are now located
on the site previously occupied.


Central Garage, High Street


An engraving of Water Street Georgetown, by Milton Prior, published in the Illustrated
London News on April 23rd, 1888.
1 - 1


$ j

is


ilki
* t \
M::1 "r A
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'1^~~ i^-il

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'- "-" "'w. ^ ..
,,.-- *i ., .


Bookers Dug Store, Church & Main Streets.
., Bookers Drug Store, Church & Main Streets.


Wm. Fogarty, Ltd, Water Street.


I w tf S Ma- WStsee__t."_ __, -_, ,-,,-,
The Tower Hotel, Main Street.
I- ~ "' --11111111-111-1 I.'. I- - -.- --1 1-1I.--- I .1-' -'-- '- -'. 11 1- 1- 11- 1- - ''"


-I.


A
5.1


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Hand-in-Hand Fire Insurance Building


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(I. 0t = ,,


idle August 20, 2006


town


Wm. Fogarty Stationery & Book Store, Water Street.


Booker Bros., McConnell & Co. Ltd., Water Street, Georgetown.


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S9 ~


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Et::i< ;!.


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.


Wm. Fogarty, Ltd., Head Office & Wholesale Dry Goods Dept.


Original design by Cesar Castellani 1882 .


Sandbach, Parker & Co., Ltd., Head Office & Hardware Store, Water St


Queenstown Livery Stables & Funeral Furnishing Parlour




--.. .Vaca











(A) Sale Supervisor Paint Department
Minimuin grade 3 and at least five years experience
n t related f


ibtfl& f q"'


B.G & Trinidad Mutual Fire Insurance Co. Ltd., Robb & Hincks Streets.



Vacancies

(A) Sales Supervisor Paint Department
Applicants must Ihave at least three (3) subjects at
CXC. Minimum grade 3 and at least five years experience
in thie related field.


(B) Auto Electrlcian
Must have at.least five (5) years experience in
rewiring light and heavy duty vehicles.

Attractive Salaries
Please send applications C.V and one passport size photograph to
the Personnelff..cer.Gafsons lodustries Ltd. Houston Complex-Houston E.B.D
th-Irone.fice.G I s l Hoso


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xlv I~-UD~ CHOIL.Asas 0 06


The African Demerara /


By Colin Bobb-Semple

During Emancipation Month,
the 18th August is regarded
as an important date in the
Guyana calendar. It is a day
when we remember the role
of Quamina, the African
Demerara Martyr, and oth-
ers, in the movement for free-
dom of slaves of African de-
scent, from the horrors of
slavery on the plantations of
Guiana, where the worst
atrocities and violations of
law and justice throughout
the colonies, were perpe-


treated.
Professor Emilia Viotti da
Costa provided a detailed ac-
count of the uprising in her book
"Crowns of Glory, Tears of
Blood". In this article, much re-
liance has been placed on her
analysis.

Quamina and Gladstone
Quamina, sometimes known
as Quamina Gladstone, was a
slave who was born in Africa
and was the head carpenter at
Success plantation, which was
located next to Le Resouvenir,
Success was owned by John


Gladstone M.P., who was a
wealthy absentee plantation
owner. He was born in Scotland
in 1764, and conducted his com-
mercial activities from
Liverpool. His surname was
originally Gladstones, but the
final letter was dropped by
royal letters patent in 1835.
Gladstone had developed a
business of insuring ships be-
fore going into the business of
real property transactions. In
1800, after his first wife died,
he remarried a Highland Scottish
woman. He diversified his busi-
ness undertakings, which in-


Martyr




eluded trading in c,.iin., sugar
and coffee. In 153 he and an-
other busin:.s .j-aociale ad-
vanced a mortgage on an esidie
in Demerara He alko supplied
timber, salt herring and oiher
commodities and hecamne an
agent for other pl.aniltions
Gladstone supported the
abolition of he l.i\e trade. hul
was very much i.'ppo.ed i,- the
abolition of slavery. He sent
ships to South America and In-


. '


HiOUSEOLD PRODUCTSt. .n

*Stainless Steel Utensils


-f 'l k Yia'


*Travel goods ,
4I0


*Gvm Equioment


nual &
ctronic


S-Ia
Treadmills


Venetian Blinds Various Colou
Several Sizes


0 Houston shopping hours

I (1). Monday to Thursdays 7:30am to 5:00pm

(2). Friday & Saturdays 7:30am to 6:00pm

(3). Sunday 10:00am to 2:00pm

S*Land of Canaa *Rose Hal *Broad St
14 Tel: 624-9003 Tel: 337-4649 Tel: 226-1837
5 P Fax: 24-90O2 Fax: 3374650 Fax: 225-1236


dia and in 1809 he was elected
chairman of the Liverpool West
Indian Association. He acquired
a half-interest in Success planta-
tion, and in 1818, he was elected
to the House of Commons (da
Costa, p. 311) John Gladstone
was an MP for nine years. He
was created a baronet in 1846.
His son, William' Ewart
Gladstone, a Liberal, became UK
Prime Minister, and devoted his
first substantial speech in the
House of Commons to defend-
ing slavery on the family's plan-
tations in British Guiana
(Fryer, pp. 43-44). As well as
being chairman of the West In-
dia Association,. he was a
founder member of the British
Guyana Association, formed in
London in 1823 (Colonial Office
records. CO 111/43).


When his son, William, was
campaigning in 1832, a public
journal reminded electors that
John Gladstone had amassed a
fortune through West India deal-
ings, meaning that a great part
of his wealth had sprung from
the blood of black slaves. The
compensation paid to him in
1837, following emancipation,
under the Slavery Abolition Act
1833, was 85,600 for 2,183
slaves (Williams, pp. 89-90).
Quamina was one of five
deacons chosen by the congre-
gation during the month after
Rev. John Smith had arrived at
Le Resouvenir in 1817. The
deacons played an important
role in the mission and enjoyed
a privileged position in the
(Continued on page XV)


Let's pIa9 .

(From page X)
John "Darth Maple" Part of Canada. "These fellows are
worth millions of dollars or pounds. They can pretty much hit
anywhere on the board they choose. It is incredible to watch
them" says Jaundoo whoi early this year donated US$1000
worth of gear to the Association in Guyana. Trina Gulliver of
the UK is the six time Women's World Professional Champion.
How do you play it? Don't ask this writer who hasn't a
clue. But players at the Association will happily explain the ba=
sics. Which go something like this You play against another
person or another team. Unlike most other games, you start
with a score, usually 501 or 301. Every time your dart hits an
outlined area on the dart board, you subtract the number of
points indicated therein. Whoever reaches zero first, wins.. The
shooting player always has to stand 1;73 metres (5 feet 8 inches)
away from the board which is made of sisal fibre. It's a bit
more complicated thai that and there are many variations in
different countries and at amateur and competitive level.
It is said the game originated in England when soldiers or
hunters, using crossbows with small arrows, shot them into a
cross section of a tree trunk. Another theory is that the shafts
were shot into circular bottoms of wine caskets. Eventually*
people simply threw the small arrows by hand. The game was
probably brought to British Guiana by expatriates during colo-
nial times.
The preserving popularity of the game of darts in
Guyana today, the existence of the Darts Association and
the participation and work of dedicated players and offi-
cials all of this attests to the unending creative search
by Guyanese people of all races-to participate in and en-
joy sports of all types. We must encourage this healthy ac-
tivity and let it continue to contribute to the ongoing de-
velopment.of our, peoples and the country as a whole.
(NORMAN FARIAJIS GUYANA'S HONORARY CON-
SUL IN BARBADOS)
i . o /


Bench Presses


....... ..... -..SUNDAY CHRONICLE. AUoust 20, 2006-


X IV I ...- --1 -.... .. ..


I


WOOS













Quamina


(From page XIV)

chapel. Quamina was the most
loyal, well-behaved, trustwor-
thy and pious of the deacons.
He prayed with much emotion
and became Rev. John Smith's
favourite deacon (da Costa, pp.
145-46). He reported to Rev.
Smith in 1821, that Susanna, a
slave woman, who was a mem-
ber of the congregation and
partner of Quamina's son Jack
Gladstone, had been "seduced"
by Hamilton, the manager of Le
Resouvenir. Rev. Smith and
many of the members of the
chapel disapproved of this re-
lationship, and a meeting of the
congregation decided to exclude
her from the chapel (da Costa,
p. 149).
Quamina became the head
deacon at Bethel Chapel and
was well respected. He had had
several wives, but he had lived
with his wife Peggy, said to be
a free woman in the 1820's, for
twenty years, until she died in


1822. On the day of her death,
he had been sent to work a con-
siderable distance away, and
when he returned, he found her
dead. This was part of the trau-
matic experience of slavery. He
had been humiliated and se-
verely punished, once so se-
verely that he was ill for six
weeks. It also upset him very
much when he had to miss Sun-
day services because he had
been required by the manager to
work (da Costa, p.181).

Rumours of 'new laws'
from the UK
In March 1823, Thomas
Fowell Buxton presented a mo-
tion in the House of Commons
in the UK that slavery was re-
pugnant to the principles of the
British Constitution and of the
Christian religion, and that it
ought to have been abolished
gradually. George Canning, the
Foreign Secretary, presented
proposals for reform, placing
emphasis on amelioration of the
conditions of slaves, in prepa-
ration for gradual abolition. A
dispatch dated 28th May 1823,
was sent from Earl Bathurst, the
British Colonial Secretary, to
Governor John Murray, of the
combined colony of Demerara-
Essequibo, urging that legislation
should be enacted in the colony
to comply with the recommen-
dations of the British govern-
ment for the amelioration of the


conditions of slaves. The dis-
patch was laid before the Court
of Policy of Demerara-
Essequibo on 21st July 1823. It
included measures for prohibit-
ing the flogging of females and
the abolition of the use of the
whip in the field. The Court of
Policy met to discuss the rec-
ommendations, but were indeci-
sive for several weeks, until the
first week in August, when they
finally decided in favour of the
proposed reforms. No public
announcement was made, as
several planters had opposed
the reforms. In the meantime,
the slaves heard planters dis-
cussing the reforms and
rumours started to spread
across the plantations that the
king of England had declared
their freedom, but that the Gov-
ernor and their masters were
withholding their emancipation
(da Costa, pp. 177-79).
Rev. Smith had noted that
on 25th July 1823, Quamina
had gone to see him and asked
whether it was true that King
George had sent orders to the
Governor to free the slaves. He
noted that his response was that
he had not heard this and that
if such a report had been in cir-
culation it was not to be be-
lieved because it was false
(Northcott, p. 53).

The Uprising
On Sunday 17th August.
Quamina and a few others, went
to Rev. Smith's house after ser-
vice. Rev. Smith overheard talk
about 'new laws' and when he
asked them about their conver-
sation, Quamina stated that


'A0


The Ministry of Home Affairs invites Guyanese to
submit a design for a Logo for the newly established
National Commission on Law and Order.

The design must also include the letterhead to be used by
the National Commission.

The competition is open to Guyanese sixteen (16) years
and over, and a cash prize of thirty thousand (30,000)
dollars will be awarded for the best design.

All entries must be addressed to:

The Permanent Secretary,
Ministry of Home Affairs,
Lot 6 Brickdam, Stabroek,
Georgetown

And must reach the Ministry on or before August 24, 2006, at
4:30pm.


"0'! C-..

Sig. 220. Sldaventransport in 2tfrifa.


they were only saying that it
would be good to send their
managers to the town "to fetch
up the new law". Smith advised
against any such action and
Quamina promised that they
would do nothing they could be
sorry for (da Costa, p. 197).
Following this, there was a large
meeting of the slaves at Success
Middle Walk, when decisions on
strategy were made. Jack
Gladstone took the lead. Some
slaves wanted to rise against the
planters, some wanted to hold
a strike or other form of protest,
and others wanted to wait. In
the end, they decided to begin


the uprising on Monday
evening, to confine managers
and overseers in the stocks and
to seize their weapons and am-
munition. Quamina tried to
stop Jack and the others, but it
was too late (da Costa, pp.
196-97).
The uprising commenced at
Success on the evening of Mon-
day 18th August 1823, and ex-
tended to several plantations
along the coast from Plantation
Thomas, adjoining Georgetown,
to Plantation Grove, at
Mahaica. It involved nearly
13,000, many of them Christian,
slaves, from the following plan-


stations, as over 9,000 had been
proved to have participated, by
the evidence given in several
court trials, according to a des-
patch sent by Governor Murray
to Earl Bathurst:-
Turkeyen (180), Plaisance
(184), Better Hope (196),
Vryheid's Lust (249), Montrose
(302), Le Resouvenir (387),
Success (332), Chateau Margo
(224), La Bonne Intention
(301), Beteiverwagting (137),
Triumph (176), Mon Repos and
Endraght (496), Good Hope
(445), Lusignan (443), Friend

(Continued on page XVI)


USAID Guyana HIV/AIDS Reduction and Prevention (GHARP) Project
A Joint Government of Guvana U.S. Government Project
44 High Street. Kingston. Georgetown. Guvana. South America
STel: 592-231-6311 Fax: 592-231-6349

USAID Guyana HIV/AIDS Reduction and Prevention (GHARP) Project
(A Joint Government of Guyana U.S Government Project) invites
applications from suitably qualified persons to fill the position of:

/ Director. Prevention & Mitigation


To provide leadership, guidance and support to USAID/GHARP
prevention programs and manage the HIV/AIDS Prevention and
Mitigation Unit ensuring the appropriate application of theory and
best practice to the design and implementation of prevention and
mitigation interventions within comprehensive HIV/AIDS programs.

MINIMUM RECRUITMENT STANDARDS:

PhD or Masters Degree in public health or relevant field and ten
years professional health care experience including at least five
years specialized experience in HIV/AIDS prevention programs in a
developing country settings plus at least four years management
experience. Experience must reflect knowledge, skills and abilities
listed above. Strong writing and analytical skills required.

Applications must include the name, address and contact number of at
least two (2) referees, one (1) from a community member and or
former employers as to fitness for the position.

Applications are also welcome from persons residing within the
Caribbean.

Please send applications to the PROGRAM ASSISTANT, USAID
GHARP Project, 3rd Floor, 44 High Street, Kingston, Georgetown, no
later that September 8, 2006 at 16:30 hrs.

Job descriptions can be uplifted at the above address.

USAID/GHARP IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

ONLY SHORTLISTED CANDIDATES WILL BE CONTACTED.
NO TELEPHONE CALLS PLEASE.

' ljS A I D USSAID Projeo implemented by Family Health Internatimon l, (kotelli Associates Inc., Howard Delafield :r \
S .International, M ngenelt Sciences for Health and The (aoribbean (lonfe ence of Churches. "' .
-1- lk)- ,.l-i W iRIC nentio nal,! Manage' P..liK 'l~ l --- -- -


SUHPY HO2CM A!s._ . ............ .-.......


619






L___SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20. 200g



Quam ma --------- ------


OCwamina weN.^a


(From page XV)

ship (138), Vigilance (216),
Coldingen (183), Non Pareil
(228), Bachelor's Adventure and
Enterprise (661), Elizabeth Hall
(199), Paradise (270), Foulis
(148), Porter's Hope (322),
Enmore (268), Haslington (206).
Golden Grove (259), Nabaclis
(287), Cove & John (272).
Northbrook (now Victoria, 279).
Bcllefield (61), Nooten Zuyl
(133). Bailey's Hope (290).
Clonbrook (362), and New Or-
ange Nassau (181) (British Par-
liamentary Papers, Sch. A).
When Governor Murray
confronted a group of slaves at
the beginning of the uprising on
the Monday. they told him that
they wanted their 'rights' and
'unconditional emancipation'.
Governor Murray declared mar-
tial law on 18th August 1823.
Some properties were burnt.
A few proprietors, several man-
agers. overseers and others,
were confined in the stocks and
humiliated by the women slaves
who slapped them in their
faces, and their weapons and
ammunition were seized. Two


planters and one soldier lost
their lives, as Quamina, his son
Jack and some of the leaders,
urged restraint (da Costa, pp.
192-203).

Brutal suppression
Governor Murray convened
a meeting of the Court of Policy
and called in the militia. The
21st North British Fusileers, the
First West India Regiment and
the Demerara Militia were de-
ployed in brutally suppressing
the uprising. Lieutenant-Colonel
Leahy of the 21st Fusileers.
Captain Muddle Rix of the ma-
rine battalion and Lieutenant-
Colonel Goodman of the
Georgetown Brigade. led the
armed forces (British Parliamen-
tary Papers. p. 147). Over 200
slaves were massacred by
troops at Bachelor's Adventure.
Following this, the troops went
to various plantations along the
East Coast on a hunting exercise
of terror over several days.
Colonel Leahy conducted mock
trials on the spot, summary
courts-martial of ringleaders.
whom he ordered to be shot and
to have their bodies hung on


gibbets in front of their houses.
Some were tied to trees and
shot. Heads were cut off and
placed on poles along the East
Coast, as a gruesome deterrent
and to drive terror into the
hearts of the Africans (da Costa,
pp. 216-27; Northcott, pp. 68-
76). Governor Murray later ad-
mitted that 58 slaves had been
shot out of hand, executed sum-
marily (Northcott, p. 75).

Breaches of natural
justice
Over 100 prisoners were
taken to Georgetown on Satur-
day 23rd August, for trial by
courts-martial, convened with
indecent haste by Major-Gen-
eral Governor John Murray.
who was the proprietor of a
plantation on the Arabian coast.
between Demerara and
Esscquibo (da Costa. p. 97). In
breach of' the principles of natu-
ral justice, lie failed to constitute
an impartial court to conduct
the trials, and appointed Lieu-
tenant-Colonel Stephen Arthur
Goodman, Commandant of the
Georgetown Brigade of Militia.
to be President of the court.


DISTRIBUTION OF NATIONAL

IDENTIFICATION CARDS

The Guyana Elections Commission (GECOM) takes this opportunity to

announce that National Identification (ID) cards are currently being

distributed from all GECOM Registration Offices located across Guyana's
ten Administrative Regions.


Registrants of the following categories are required to uplift their respective

National Identification Cards from the GECOM Offices that are

responsible for their respective areas:-



(i) New Registrants.


(ii) Registrants who have applied for replacement of their ID Cards
because of loss or damage.


(iii) Registrants who have applied for corrections to incorrect

information on their respective ID Cards.


(iv) Registrants who have applied for new ID Cards because they
have changed their names.


Visit the GECOM Registration Office responsible for your
area and UPLIFT YOUR NATIONAL IDENTIFICATION
CARD TODAY

For further information, call GECOM's hotlines at
225 0277, 226-1651, 226-1652, 223-9650
or visit the GECOM website at
http://www.geconi.org.gy
. . . . . ____________


Goodman was also the vendue
master and conducted the auc-
tion of 100 slaves between 20th
and 28th August 1823
(Northcott, p. 76).
Several officers appointed
to sit in judgment, had been en-
gaged in active service in sup-
pressing the rebellion. The rank
of Lieutenant-Colonel was hast-
ily conferred upon the Chief
Justice of the colony. Charles
Wray, and he was the only ju-
dicial member of the court. The
trials commenced just one week
after the uprising, on Monday
25th August. As soon as they
were tried and convicted, the


slaves were taken in a public
procession, including Lieuten-
ant-Colonel Goodman, guards,
officers and others, accompa-
nied by bearers of empty cof-
fins and a band playing the fu-
neral march, to the Parade
Ground in Cummingsburg.
They were hanged on the gal-
lows erected there. On Friday
12th September, nine were ex-
ecuted and were accompanied
by 60 of their fellow prisoners
who were marched to witness
the public spectacle. Though
several were executed, many
others were ordered to be pun-
ished by flogging, with up to


1,000 lashes administered in
some cases (da Costa. pp. 229-
45).

Quamina's execution
Quamina fled to the bush,
but was pursued by a planter.
Captain Michael McTurk of the
Militia and Amerindian agents,
beginning on August 26. He was
tracked down in an area of
heavy bushes behind Chateau
Margo plantation. He was un-
armed when he was shot dead
on September 16, by an
Amerindian called Cattow (alias

(Continued on page XVII)






,.SUNDAY CHRONIC August 20, 2006 xVI
SUNDAY CHROI~iCL August 20, 2006______* * .. .. .. . ... .-... .. .. ... .......... '. . . ....------xv


Quamina -
(From page XVI)
Skillikelly) (Craton, p. 287) who first ordered him to stop, but
he neither stopped nor ran. He continued walking without look-
ing back, as if he had not heard the order. A knife and a bible
were found in his pockets. He had been determined that he was
not going to be taken alive (da Costa, pp. 228-29). His body
was carried to Success, where a gibbet was erected on 17th Sep-
tember, on the road at the front of the plantation. His body
was then hung there in chains (da Costa, p. 229). Wasps were
said to have built a nest in the cavity of his stomach and had
been flying in and out of his jaws which had hung frightfully
open (Craton, p. 289).
Jack was tried by court martial of officers and the Chief
Justice, hastily convened a week after the uprising, and he was
sentenced to death, but Governor Murray recommended clem-
ency and transportation to Bermuda. Jack was eventually sent
to St Lucia (da Costa, p. 244). Rev. Smith, who was blamed
for fostering the plot and failing to notify the authorities, was
tried by court martial of officers and the Chief Justice, and sen-
tenced to death, but died in prison from pulmonary consump-
tion, before a grant of clemency arrived from England, on the
recommendation of the court. He became known as "The
Demerara Martyr".
The African "Demerara Martyr" was Quamina.


REFERENCES
British Parliamentary Papers, (1969) Proceedings of a
Court Martial in Demerara, on Trial of John Smith, A
Missionary, and Further Papers Relating to Insurrection
of Slaves in Demerara, Slave Trade, Vol. 66, Sessions
1823-24, Irish University Press.
Colonial Office records, UK Government, National
Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey.
Craton, M., (1982) Testing the chains Resistance to
Slavery in the British West Indies, New York: Cornell
University Press.
da Costa, E. V. (1994) Crowns of Glory, Tears of Blood
- The Demerara Slave Rebellion of 1823, New York,
Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Fryer, P. (1984) Staying Power The History of Black
People in Britain, London: Pluto Press.
Northcott, C., (1976) Slavery's Martyr: John Smith of
Demerara and the emancipation movement 1817-24,
London: Epworth Press.
Williams, E. (1994) Capitalism and Slavery, Chapel Hill:
The University of North Carolina Press.
(The writer is Senior Lecturer, Inns of Court School of
Law, City University, Gray's Inn, London; Chairperson,
Guyana Law Association (UK); Solicitor and Attorney-at-law)


From white vans




to war zones


By Simon Atkinson
Business reporter, BBC
News, Gibraltar
(BBC News) From
Gibraltar's Bufadero army
complex, a clear day allows
views across to the coast of
North Africa.
At the height of the British
military's presence, this was a
fully functioning military base,
home to some of the 10,000
forces stationed here.
Today, in a territory where


kets designed to absorb the
impact of anti-personnel
landmines.
In the shadow of the im-
posing Rock of Gibraltar, it
supplies about 30% of all ve-
hicles going to charities, gov-
ernments, non-government or-
ganizations (NGOs) and aid
agencies in the developing
world.
The United Nations,
UNICEF, Oxfam, Save The
Children and Medecins Sans
Frontieres are among its more


..-
-"~''


"They are basic vehicles that are


there to do a job"


the financial services and
internet gaming are now big
business, it plays a part in per-
haps Gibraltar's most unlikely
enterprise.
Instead of rows of troops
on parade, visitors today see
line upon line of gleaming white
four-wheel drive vehicles which
could soon be shipped off from
this business centre to develop-
ing nations or even war-torn
states.

Unusual requests
They belong to a car deal-
ership where the term "op-
tional extras" does not mean
electric windows and plush
leather seats.
Customers of Toyota
Gibraltar Stockholdings are
more likely to want oversized
bull bars and ballistic blan-


STAFF VACANCIES




Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the following
vacancies:
Disciple esNo. of Vacant Positions
Discipline Desination

Catering & Hospitality Lecturer I 2
Household Management Lecturer I 2
English/Mathematics
Social Studies Lecturerl 1
Information Technology Lecturer 1 1
Job Description & Job Specifications can be collected from the General Office.
Carnegie School of Home Economics.

All Applications must be addressed to:

The Chairperson,
Board of Governors,
Carnegie School of Home Economics,
Durban & High Streets,
Georgetown.


S Each application must be accompanied by two (2) recent testimonials.
Deadline for submission of applications:
August 23. 2006 G :..eirim.er. a i.i t .i c -ed .:n hntF:,lp.; .I/.A r qy
. --.- I ..


GARY SUMMERS
WORKSHOP MANAGER
well-known customers.
From Iraq to East Timor,
Aceh to Pakistan and now Leba-
non, such organizations are us-
ing four-wheel drives kitted out
in workshops on a Gibraltar
back street.
After beginning in the 1980s


The new vehicles
workshop

as an extra service offered
normal Toyota dealership
plying the aid commun
now its sole business.
Selling mainly
Cruisers, Hilux and 1
models at a rate of
month it has at leas


are stored before going to the


d by a vehicles in stock ready to be
?, sup- customised.
lity is About 75% of its vehicles
go to humanitarian projects in
Land Africa as part of on-going work
Prado in countries such as Sudan and
300 a
t 600 (Please turn to page XVIII)


Call for Proposals for Community based Micro-projects
to be funded by the European Commission under the
Guyana Micro-Projects Programme

Publication reference 2006/001 Lots 1 to 7
The Ministry of Finance of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana, represented by
the Chairman of the Board of the Guyana Micro-projects Programme is seeking
proposals for community based micro-projects. The full Guidelines for
Applicants are available for consultation at:-

The Guyana Micro Projects Office
109 E Barrack Street
Kingston,
Georgetown,
Phone 226-3305 or 226-3423.
Fax 225-0183, or
email: gmpp@guvana.net.gy
and on the following internet sites: wwwA.gmpp.gy,
www.delguy.cec.eu.int and
http://europa.eu.int/comm/curopeaid/cgi/frame 12.pl

There are 3 remaining deadlines in the year 2006 for the receipt of concept notes:
31" August at 16:00, 29"' September at 16:00 and 31" October at 16:00 hrs local
time.
Information sessions on this call for proposals will be held on the first Thursday
of the month at 15:00 hours in the Micro-projects office at the address given
above.

The purpose of the Micro-projects Programme is to improve the socio-economic
conditions of vulnerable groups through the development of sustainable and
participatory self-help schemes.

A ceiling of curo 30.000 (Guyana dollars 7.170,000) will apply for all micro-
projects in Georgetown and the Coastal Areas. However, in the hinterland.
projects may be approved up to an amount of euro 50.000 (Guyana dollars
11.950.000). A 25% minimum contribution by the beneficiaries in cash or in kind
is essential ifa proposal is to be approved.


r'
g~rslJ~.


E --- ffllsq - -- MtiT







(VIII SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006


From white vans to ..


"When agencies are sending food. mlcdlicine andl
shelter they are also sending people, and they
eCCd tihe vchicics io lmtO\c iicill"
\li( !H !**. M N I.\ :1AFE.
*- I..!: iMANA(;FR


(From page XVII)

Sierra Leone.
In one of the workshops,
mechanics are stripping out the
back of a Land Cruiser as they
convert it into a field ambulance
- tinting the windows and fitting
it with medical equipment and
wipe-clean plastic interiors.
Colleagues, meanwhile,
equip it with as many as three
radio systems.
And while all vehicles are
white, the occasional re-paint is
required.
A recent order was for two
black mortuary vans.

Practical design
"These are nothing like the
four-wheel drives you find in
the UK suburbs, that have be-
come a status symbol." says
workshop manager Gary Sum-
mers standing amid shelves
packed with bull bars and sup-
plies of tyres.
"They are basic vehicles
that are there to do a job.


"'(.' l-,IOiltrI s donIl \\ aint
comiplicaited ekl.ctrolnics. IfI it's
being 'tcent to an Irnc;l \here thev
are not used to Clectlrolnics sys-
Items then ileC maly lnot know
how to repair it.
"Given the conditions
they'll be used in dirt. dust,
bogs they're designed fo; as
little to be able to go wrong as
possible."
The average vehicle costs
between 15,000 and 20,000 -
with extra accessories typically
adding 5,000 to the bill.
The demand helped the firm
turn over 70m last year.
But as well as simply get-
ting the sales. Toyota wins an
added benefit, sales manager
Michael McElwee argues.
"It gives a prestige to the
brand, when their vehicles are
shown on the BBC or CNN in
these disaster situations, delivering
aid to stricken regions." he says.
"Having said that, most of
the work our customers do is
on-going projects which don't
make the headlines."
When organizations are able


S'ACANCIES


Within weeks they are being used in places sucn as sierra
Leone


Shields offering protection
added

to plan ahead, they order ve-
hicles directly from the manufac-
turer in Japan. That makes for
slower preparation and delivery
- perhaps three months or more
- but a much lower price tag.
But sometimes, when ve-
hicles are needed urgently, cus-
tomers contact the Gibraltar
firn directly with their specifi-
cations. An average of 16 hours
are then spent making each ve-
hicle ready for its destination.
"When the Asian Tsunami
struck we had 70 right-hand


G1


Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to'l i ri,
vacant positions' ii;i the Human & Financial Resouices Division.

DIRECTOR Training, Development & Industrial Relations
Qualification:
Bachelors Degree in specialization in HLuman Resource
Management. Economics. Business Management. Public
.Administration or Intei national Reilaions or i ul:-ed fields.

Experience:
*In the management of the' I', i .;n iii.: ti ..i. od sin, development
and delivery of training programmes.
'I i in: field of Industrial Relations and negotiation of collective agreements.


DIRECTOR- PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION & COMPENSATION
Qualification:
Bachelors Degree with specialization in Human Resource
Management, Economics, Business Management, Public
Administration or International Relations or related fields.

Experience:
*A minimum of six years experience as a Human Resources
Management Practitioner in providing guidanceto the Personnel
and Administration functions of an organisation.
*In wage and salary administration policy, compensation structures
development and management, development and maintenance of
job and salary structures.

DRIVERS
Requirements (Education & Experience)
Sound Primary education with a valid Driver's Licence to drive car/van.
Must have knowledge of mechanics, general maintenance and minor repairs
to motor vehicles, with no less than three (3) years experience as a Driver.

HANDYMAN
The incumbent will be responsible for:
The general upkeep of building and compound.
Background in electrical maintenance would be an asset.


Applications with detailed CV should be submitted no later than
Friday 25th August, 2006 to the
Commissioner-General, Guyana Revenue Authority,
357 Lamaha & East Streets, Georgetown.


drive vehicles in stock," says
Michael McElwee. "Within two
weeks we had none left."
And within days of the out-
break of conflict in Lebanon, the
firm had supplied eight vehicles
with orders. More are expected
as the scale of the humanitarian
aid becomes clearer.

Distribution difficulties
"When agencies are sending
food. medicine and shelter they
are also sending people, and
thev need the vehicles to move
them." he says. "Transport is a
vital part of aid and develop-
iment.
Sending vehicles to far flung
corners of the globe is not
cheap. Some 95'%/ go by sea.
usually hcing driven into Spain
and then shipped on from there.
To get an order to Senegal
this \wa\. for c\xmplC. takes
about Clghl days.
But in emergency situa-
lions. c'speciall\ \\hhen govern-
nicnit are donLatin aid flight,.
air Irrighl is used.


One of the biggest problems
the firm faces is finding space to
store the vehicles on densely-
packed Gibraltar.
As well as the army base it
has a number of other sites, in-
cluding hiring an entire floor of
a multi-storey car park.
It is acutely aware that its
profits are reliant on the hard-
ship of others.
As part of the after-sales
service, the firm sends staff to
areas where the vehicles are be-
ing used, to run training courses


on maintenance and advanced
driving.
"We develop very close rela-
tionships with the organizations,"
Mr McElwee says.
"We recognize that our
customers are in the tough
position of having to respond
to emergencies and hope-
fully we're providing a re-
ally good service that helps
them to do that a service
that is based on partnership
rather than just pushing
through a sale."


Vehicles are expected to be used in rough terrain


BUREAU OF STATISTICS



VACANCY


HEAD, HUMAN RESOURCES AND

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION

Applications are invited for the abovementioned position. The successful candidate
must satisfy the following requirements:

QUALIFICATIONS

a) A good fFrst Degree or equivalent in Public Administration, Personnel or
Human Resources Management, Accountancy or related qualifications,
together with at least five (5) years organisational and management
experience at senior level in managing the human and financial resources of
an organisation.

b) A very good knowledge of industrial relations and practices, current public
accounting procedures and proven capability in leadership, staff motivation,
training and development is required.

c) Computer proficiency is essential.

Applications with Curriculum Vitae and two (2) recent testimonials should be
addressed to:
The Chief Statistician
Bureau of Statistics
Avenue of the Republic & Brickdam

TEL: 225-6150
to reach not later than August 21. 2006.






SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006 AxA



The Exciting World of BIOMES i .-.
i C .


Hello Readers,
Have you ever wondered
why certain types of plants and
animals live within certain dis-
tinct areas of the Earth?
This week we have a very
exciting topic to discuss -
Biomes!! Biomes are a highly
technical term used by scien-
tists to group major ecological
zones and the plants and ani-
mals that associate with them.
Our aim this week is to help
you understand how a biome is
defined, types, and how we can
conserve and preserve them.
What is a Biome? (http://
www.nceas.ucsb.edu/nceas-
web/kids/biomes/intro.htm)
The Earth is filled with a
wide array of living organisms
(from complex plants and ani-
mals to very simple, one-celled
organisms ) which choose to live
within different environments.
These environments vary in
temperature, amount of light
and many other climatic factors.
The resulting communities form
distinct complex relationships
among plants, animals, and the
place where they live. We call
this a Biome.
Some scientists classify


biomes into hundreds of catego-
ries and other use fewer major
groupings. Some major biomes
include deserts, forests, grass-
lands, tundra, and several types
of aquatic environments.
Location and geogra-
phy.
The special character-
istics and adaptations of the
vegetation.
A list of animal spe-
cies, specific parts of their
body, the ways in which they
behave and interact with that re-
gion that allow them to flourish.

Types of Biomes

At present, it is known that
eight types of biomes exist on
earth and these are:

Marine biome
Tundra biome
Desert biome
-Savannah biome
Grassland biome
Tropical rainforest bionme
Deciduous biome
Coniferous forest biome

Of the eight types of
biomes that exist only four can


Tundra comes from the Finnish word tunturia,
meaning "treeless plain"; it is the coldest of the
biomes


We Care


GEORGETOWN

PUBLIC HOSPITAL

CORPORATION


be found in Guyana (marine.
grassland, savannah. and tropi-
cal rainforest bionies). What is
it like where \Yo live?

The continent of North
America and the continent of
Africa are just two of the places
where all of the eight biomes
can be found.

Ecological
Relationships of
Biomes
Last week we discussed the
vital inter-dependence between
the health of the natural environ-
ment and us. The same holds
true for Biomes and humans
changes in the atmosphere in
far-off regions of the world can
affect the quality of other envi-
ronments. For instance, the
eruption of a volcano in Mexico.
or Southeast Asia can lower the
earth's temperature for several
years. Together with these natu-
ral phenomena. human activities
effects may increase the magni-
tude of these effects.

Importance of Bionics
(hlip://I\\ww.ucIp.be'keley.edu/
g o s s a ry/g o s s 5 /b i o mie/
importance.hltmil)

The importance of bionies
cannot be overestimated. Scien-
tists continue to build a body of
evidence to show ho\\ Bionmes
respond to climate changes. The
environment in which Dino-
saurs walked the earth had e\ ry
different conditions and biomes
than today. Trying to under-
stand where how those Bionice
are distributed and how they
responded to change helps us
today as w\e continue to deal
wilh issues ofglobal \\arming.

Since bionmes arc relatively\
large areas it would mean that
within a particular biome withh
its' different climate) there are
several benefits. These may in-
clude:
SWide variety of living or-


NOTICE OF CME LECTURE


All Medical PractiUtioners


Topic:


Pancreatitis and its complications


Presenter: Dr. William Harris
Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery,
McMaster University, Thunder Bay
Regional Health Sciences


Date:

Time:


Friday August 25, 2006

18:00h (6 pm)


Venue: Eye Clinic Waiting, Area,
Georgetown Pubic Hospital C, rip .i -.i


One CME Credit will be awarded


Dr. Madan Rambaran
Director, Medical & Professional Services
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation


ganisms that may only be asso-
ciated with specific habitats
thereby enhancing;
SGenetic diversity: makes
an ecosystem more robust and
stronger against diseases.
SSupports world economies
and livelihoods.

Conservation and
Preservation of Biomes
Arguably, human activities
have drastically altered the com-
plex communities thatexist
within Biomes. Thus, conserva-
tion and preservation of biomes
should be a major concern.
Water is the basis of life, it
supports life, and countless
species live in it for all or part
of their lives. Aquatic biomes


are probably the most impor-
tant of all the biomes. Their me-
dium, water, is a major natural
resource and highly productive
system. Freshwater biomes
supply us with our drinking
water, water for crop irrigation
etc.
Biomes are definitely our
major life support systems be-
cause they contain all of our
food sources dwell within them.
By educating people about the
consequences of our actions, we
can all gain abetter understand-
ing of how to conserve the
earth's natural biomes. We can
prevent other areas from being
destroyed or severely damaged.
Next week we will look at
the types of biomes found in
Guyana and the threats they


face.
We like hearing from you.
Send your letters to: "Our En-
vironment", C/o EIT Division,
Environmental Protection
Agency, IAST Building,
Turkeyen, UG Campus,
GREATER GEORGETOWN
Or e-mail us at
eit.epaguyana@yahoo.com,
epa@epaguyana.org with ques-
tions and comments.


VACANCy


CIVIL WORKS ASSISTANT

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
EDUCATION FOR ALL FAST TRACK INITIATIVE (EFA-FTI)
Grant No. 053679

The Government of the Co-operative Republic of Guyana has received a grant from
the International Development Association (IDA). and intends to apply part of the
proceeds of this grant to minor Civil Works (upgrading of utilities sanitary facilities.
water & electricity & Construction of Teachers' Housing) at Schools primarily in the
Hinterland Regions (1. 7. 8 & ')) under the Ministn of Education. Education For All
Fast Track Initiali\ e.

The M inistrx of Education. Education For All Fast Track Initiative (EFA-FTI) now
invites suitable qualified persons to fill this \acancN.

RESPONSIBITY

The Civil Works Assistant will offer support to the Civil Works Specialist in managing
the overall Civil Works Program. In this respect. the Civil Works Assistant will. inter
alias:

Assist with the preparation of final designs and implementation services
regarding teacher housing and improving the status of utilities at the assigned
schools:
Assist CW Specialist to prepare progress reports of civil works activities
supportedby EFA-FTI."
Under the direction of the CW Specialist. make site visits: liaise with school
officials. Clerk of Works, contractors and regional authorities in carlring out
supervision duties.
Assist with the supervision of all Civil Works being executed under the EFA-
FTI program.
Work with Ministry officials and head teachers of the assigned schools to
develop and implement an effective school maintenance program.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

First Degree in Architecture 1 Civil Engineering from a recognized university
with at least t\o (2) years of similar work experience or equivalent
qualifications w ih at lest two (2) years of similar work experience.

Terms of Reference for this position can be obtained from Personnel
Department. 2 I Ri ickdam

Applications \ith detailed Curricultum Vitae should be submitted no later than
Tuesday. August 21). 2006.

Applihalions should be cLarl'N marked CIVIL. WORKS ASSISTANT on the envelope
and placed in the Tender Box. Nimiistri of Education. 21 13rickdam. Georectow\n.
Gu\;n ` ia.

Pt !R i ANI:ENiSm RI t- \ TI
MIN i'ITRY (OFI )I('.\: 'O IN
$' I M I 2"ill "In'" l. l .,


I i-





1Xx,, _SUNQDAY CWINCL ,AugusAu,20, 206


GOVERNMENT OF THE CO-OPERATIVE
REPUBLIC OF GUYANA
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
EDUCATION FOR ALL FAST TRACK INITIATIVE (EFA-FTI)
Grant No. 053679
CONTRACTORS FOR UTILITIES UPGRADING
SCHOOLS & TEACHERS' HOUSING
The Government of the Co-operative Republic of Guyana has received a grant from the
International Development Association (IDA), and intends to apply part of the proceeds
of this grant to minor Civil Works (upgrading of utilities sanitary facilities, water &
electricity & Construction of Teachers' Housing) at nine (9) Primary Schools under the
Ministry of Education. Education ForAll Fast Track Initiative.
Contracting services are required on the educational institutes listed below:


NameofSchool
Imbamadai Primary
72 Miles Primary
Chiung Mouth Primary
Kamana Primary
Kaibarupai Primary


Location
Imbamadai Village. Upper Mazaruni.
Region 7
72 Miles, Kaburi. Bartica. Region 7
Chiung Mouth Village. North Pakarima.
Region
Kamana Village. North Pakarima,
Region
Kaibarupai Village. North Pakarima.
Region


The Ministry of Education. Education ForAll Fast Track Initiative (EFA-FTI) now invites
eligible Contractors to submit quotation(s) for schools listed above. A Contractor will be
selected in accordance with the procedures set out in the World Bank's Guidelines:
Procurement of Goods or IWorks. Experience as a Contractor in the Hinterland Regions
willbe considered.
Bids shall be valid fora period of thirty (30) days after Bid opening and shall be delivered
to the National Procurement and Tender Administration Board on or before September 5.
2006 not later than 9:00am.
The Bidder shall seal the original and a copy of the Bid in two inner envelopes and one
outer envelope. duly marking the inner envelopes as "ORIGINAL If and "COPY". The
inner envelopes, shall be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the address given in the letter
of Invitation to Quote. and on which should be also written "QUOTATION FOR
UTILITIES UPGRADING SCHOOLS AND/OR QUOTATION FOR TEACHER'S
HOUSING"
The inner and outer envelopes shall:
1. be addressed to the Employer at the address provided in the Bidding Document
(Preliminaries):
2. bear the name of the school: and
3. provide a warning "Do not open before the specified time and date" for Bid
opening as defined in the Invitation to Quote.
All documents must be placed in a sealed envelope addressed to:


The Chairman
National Procurement and TenderAdministration Board
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown, Guyana


and placed in the Tender Box located in the building of National Procurement and Tender
Administration Board situated at the back of the Ministry of Finance Building on or
before September 5. 2006 not later than 9:00 hours. Bidders or their representatives are
invited to the opening.
Interested Contractors can uplift "Tender Documents" from the Finance Department of
the EFA-FTI unit. address below, between the hours 8:30hrs to 15:00hrs Monday to
Friday. for a non-refundable cost of five thousand Guyancse dollars $5.000.00 (GUY).
Payments can be made by Manager's Cheque. Bank Draft or Cash. Cheques must be
addressed to Education For All Fast Track Initiative.
Tender documents can be reviewed prior to purchasing at:
Ministry of Education
Education ForAll Fast Track Initiative (Finance Department)
NCERD Lot 3 Battery Road,
Kingston, Georgetown. G UYANA
Tele: 592-226-4)046, Fax: 592-2264-0506
Pennanent Secret ary
Ministry of Education
Government ads can be viewed on http:/www gina.gov gy


WITH AUNT MICHEY
Hello Boys and Girls,
These are some of the names we gie as measure used for different items.
Have fun!


L AT B R


F LEGAL UT


TACM D CE


O


E I H E L


T I A I ROON NB R


J RM


GMA


U HUK


RHAE UT CCL PH


O E R U


A K D


ST N M


O I


E E L SOE CC ML


PCTOQE BOI E R P N M
A ENE BG NUS U E RA I


OCCI MMNN


SRS E A N


EDCKOHOOEHRL TB


P E NH PL T
DQTU L1 R


GL D E I


N RR


E T


GL OC


R AT A OA N A O U OA


F S GU MP


YT DMF F


W


V B


Correct solutions will be in next Sunday's issue.


ACRE
AMPERE
ATOM
BALE
BARREL
BUSHEL
CARAT
CELSIUS
CUBIC


INCH
KNOT


DECIBEL
DIGIT
FATHOM
FOOT
FURLONG
GALLON
GRAM
HOUR


OHM


ONCE
PECK


LEAGUE PINT


LITRE
METER
MILE
MINUTE


POUND
QUART
REAM
SECOND


YARD


MONTH TEASPOON






il .C.R"l.CL" ...... .......... ... -- ..


The Excerpt
A waning moon had turned the muddy waters of
Oyster Creek to quicksilver. Not so much as a
zephyr stirred the inlet where our 42-foot ketch
Breath lay in the delta of Africa's mighty Cambia
River near Banjul, the capital of Gambia. Days be-
fore, we'd sailed in off a thousand miles of ocean.
Snug in this anchorage, we could still hear surf
thundering just beyond the low span of the Denton
Bridge.
A chance to see Africa had brought our family
back together for a couple of months. Our older son,
Rafael, 20, had taken leave from college to join the rest
of us: Diego, 13, my wife, Dorothy, and our little black
dog, Santos.
Breath had been our only home since I built the
vessel on St. John in the Virgin Islands in the early
1980s. Life afloat had knit close bonds. Everyone had
responsibilities the boys were standing watch when
they were six. And for the past eight years, Santos,
our loving, feisty, 11-pound schipperke, was at our
side.
When we went to bed that night, Santos lay on
the cabin top, which he vacated only in the worst
weather. He touched his nose to Dorothy's face as she
bent low to nuzzle him good-night. His ardent eyes
flared briefly he worshiped her then he turned to
his duty.
We slept easier with him aboard. It was his self-
appointed mission to ensure that no one, friend or foe,
approached within 100 yards of Breath without a warn-
ing. He'd sailed with us through the Caribbean, the At-
lantic and the Mediterranean, keeping sharp watch and
good company, and bringing us luck. In eight years
we'd never suffered a mishap. But during the night of
January 2, 1991, that would change.
We were asleep when, just passed midnight, our
dock lines began to creak. At first I thought a passing
boat had sent a wake, but Santos would have barked.
The creaking grew louder. By the time I climbed on
deck, the ropes groaned against the cleats that teth-
ered our boat to another vessel......
On such a calm night there could only be one
cause current. My boat was tied stern to stream, and
a glance over the side at water speeding past the hull
alarmed me. The ebb had tripled its usual spring-tide
rate. The cleats on the other boat looked ready to snap.
If anything gave, both vessels could spin off bound to-
gether, helpless to avoid destruction. I had to cast off.
We were in a difficult spot. Just a few boat-
lengths downstream, two high-tension power lines
hung across the creek. About 100 feet behind them
loomed Denton Bridge. If we couldn't turn in time, our
metal mainmast might hit the wires. If the boat hit the
bridge, both masts would be pinned by the roadway
while the hull was sucked under....

About the Excerpt
You have been reading the beginning of a story based
upon a true experience of a family at sea. This story
carries you upon happenings aboard a 42-foot ketch.
What is a ketch? Find it out.
Note how the story introduces new terms, we are
sure. Take time off to use your dictionaries and ency-
clopedias to get really acquainted with the new words.
Make a consorted effort to have them woven into your
working vocabularies.




Men wonder at the height of mountains, the
huge waves of the sea, the broad flow of rivers,
the course of the stars and forget to wonder
at themselves.
St. Augustine


Again, our business today is to let you see how
real life happenings can be churned into good stories,
in this case, an adventure story.

1. Find the meaning of all the words in bold type.
Use them as often and as appropriately as possible in
your own writings and speech.
2. Write a story based upon a real life experience
whether personal or vicarious.


Identify Pronoun Case (Continued)

Last Week's Solutions (Solutions to 2-4 only)
Then tell what case each is, and how it functions in
the sentence.

Example:
1. My brother and I took Joey to a basketball game
last Sunday morning.

Answer:
my possessive, replacement for possessive noun;
I nominative, subject;
him objective, direct object.

2. We arrived early so that he could see the players
shoot practice shots.
we nominative, subject;
he nominative, subject;

3. Our seats put Dad, him and me near the half-
court line.
our possessive, replacement for possessive noun;
him objective, direct object;
me objective, direct object
4. One player smiled at us as she stopped to fix her
sleeve.
us objective, object of preposition;


......................... .... .. .....................................
Case Singular Plural
Pronoun Pronoun
Nominative I, you, we, you,
she, he, it they
Objective me, you, us, you,
her, him, it them


Possessive my, mine, our, ours,
your, yours, your, yours,
her, hers, his, their, theirs
I its


she nominative, subject;
her possessive, replacement for possessive noun

Reminder: Study the Personal Pronoun Chart be-
low to recall the case forms for the different personal
pronouns.
Personal Pronouns


More about Personal Pronouns
3. After a form of the linking verb be, use the nomi-
native case of a pronoun.

The winner was her. Andy hoped that it would be
him.

NOTE: Today this rule is not strictly observed. In
formal speech, people often use the objective case af-
ter a form of the linking verb be; they say It's me,. It


was him. There are some authorities who even ad-
vise using the objective case in informal writing to avoid
appearing pretentious. In formal writing, however, al-
ways use the nominative case after the linking verb.

4. Do not spell possessive pronouns with apostro-
phes.

This bottle is yours. The boat is theirs.

Remember that it's is a contraction for it is. Never
try to confuse it's with the possessive pronoun its.

It's her dress that is hanging out to dry.
Its right strap must be replaced.

A very important rule: Use possessive pronouns
before gerunds (-ing forms used as nouns).

Your laughing is infectious at this forum.
They were amused by her singing.?

Choose the Correct Case Form
For each sentence, write the correct personal pro-
noun from each pair in parentheses.

1. When Jason offered tq help her with her report
on a famous explorer, (he, him) and (I, me) chose Sir
Walter Raleigh, one of the greatest explorers of all time.
2. It was (he, him) who became one of the persons
to be knighted by a British queen.
3. What distressed the class and (I, me) is that he
was later discarded.

Story Writing
Let's hope that you make a special effort to write
stories and store them in a folder with an attractive
name.

Here is an opportunity to add another effort. Write
a story based on the picture


Function in
Sentence
Subject or predicate
nominative
Direct object,
indirect object, or
object of preposition
replacement for
Possessive noun(s)


below.

Let
400 to
iblw


it be approximately
500 words in length.


You must write in Stan-
dard English.
On a Personal Note:
What have you mastered
well in your writing so far?
Check and come up with a
fair answer, and then resolve
to use more skills to improve
character and plot.


. -.I
.L. ~ ~~~C LIC+L
I *Fl













Planets





plan





boosts





tally to 12


By Paul Rincon
Science reporter, BBC News

(BBC News) The number of
planets around the Sun could
rise from nine to 12 with
more on the way if experts
approve a radical new vision
of our Solar System.
An endorsement by as-
tronomers meeting in Prague
would require school and univer-
sity textbooks to be rewritten.
The proposal recognizes
eight classical planets, three
planets belonging to a new cat-


Astronomy. Cambridge, told the
BBC: "The public are very clear
about what they understand by
'planets'. Those are the big.
dominant bodies in the Solar
System that we're all familiar
with, the eight or nine if you
include Pluto.
"1 think including more is
going to add confusion to the
public, but not really be particu-
larly useful for astronomers."
Experts have been divided
over whether Pluto further
away and considerably smaller
than the eight other planets in


"For the first time in more than 75 years,
we will be able to discover new planets
in our Solar System "


egory called plutonss" and the
largest asteroid Ceres.
Pluto remains a planet, but
becomes the basis for the new
pluton category.
The plan has been drawn
up by the International Astro-
nomical Union (IAU) with the
aim of settling the question of
what does and does not count
as a planet.
Some 2,500 astronomers
gathered at the IAU General As-
sembly in Prague will vote on
the plan next Thursday.

New era
"For the first time in more
than 75 years, we will be able
to discover new planets in our
Solar System. This is a fascinat-
ing prospect," said Richard
Binzel, a member of the IAU
planet definition committee
which put together the pro-
posal.
But the solution was not
popular with all experts. Robin
Catchpole, from the Institute of


RICHARD BINZEL, IAU
our Solar System deserves the
title.
Since the early 1990s, as-
tronomers have found several
other objects of comparable size
to Pluto in an outer region of the
Solar System -alled the Kuiper
Belt.
Some astronomers believe
Pluto belongs with this popu-
lation of small, icy "Trans-
Neptunians", not with the ob-
jects we call planets.
Allowances could once be
made for Pluto on account of its
size. At just 2,360km (1,467
miles) across, Pluto is signifi-
cantly smaller than the other
planets. But until recently, it
was still the biggest known ob-
ject in the Kuiper Belt.
That changed with the dis-
covery of 2003 UB313 by Pro-
fessor Mike Brown and col-
leagues at the California Insti-
tute of Technology (Caltech).
After being measured with the
Hubble Space Telescope, it was
shown to be some 3,000km
(1,864 miles) in diameter, mak-


Pluto was discovered in 1930 by US astronomer Clyde
Tombaugh


Mercury


Sun


ing it larger than the ninth
planet.

Kicked upstairs?
The IAU draft resolution
recognizes eight "classical" plan-
ets Mercury, Venus, Earth.
Mars. Jupiter. Saturn. Uranus
and Neptune three plutonss"
- Pluto, Charon and UB313 -
and the asteroid Ceres.
Charon is currently de-
scribed as a moon of Pluto. but
because of its size some experts
consider it a twin planet.
Professor Owen Gingerich.
who chairs the IAU planet defi-
nition committee, said: "In a
sense we're demoting Pluto by
taking it off the list of classical
planets. But we're promoting it
by making it the prototype of
this new category of plutons."
Dr Andrew Coates of the
Mullard Space Science Labora-
tory in Dorking said: "Some-
thing had to be done about the
definition. It does change the
textbooks somewhat, but it also
demonstrates that this is a vi-
brant area of research.
"The surprise is Ceres, be-
cause most people thought of it
as an asteroid."
Ceres is the largest object in
the asteroid belt between Mars
and Jupiter, and like a planet is
spherical in shape.
"This a step backward,"


said Alan Boss, an astrophysi-
cist at the Carnegie Institution
in Washington DC. "It's a de-
motion of the word planet."
The Carnegie researcher.
who believes there are only
eight true planets. said the term
would lose its prestige under
the proposed definition because
anything round of a certain size
could join the club.
"Folks aren't going to have to
worry about learning the planets
anymore because it's a list that
doesn't mean anything," he said.

Seeking
endorsement
The basis for this re-evalu-
ation is a new scientific defini-
tion of a planet which uses grav-
ity as the determining factor.
According to this definition,
two conditions must be satis-
fied for an object to qualify as
a planet:
The object must be in or-
bit around a star, but must not
itself be a star
It must have enough mass
for the body's own gravity to
pull it into a nearly spherical
shape
On whether he was confi-
dent the resolution would be
passed, Professor Gingerich told
the BBC News website: "It will
be a very awkward situation if


Dutch plan


orangutan


web dating

A zoo in the Netherlands plans to set up a wehcam to help
its orangutans form long-distance relationships with poten-
tial mates in Indonesia.
The Indonesian orangutans are kept in small cages at a centre
in Borneo, protected from loggers and palm oil firms operating in
their habitat.
Anouk Ballot, spokeswoman for the Dutch ape park in
Apenheul, said the Borneo apes had been short of entertainment.
She hopes the apes will now "meet and interact with each
other".
The rescue centre in Borneo receives 30 new admissions a
day.
A keeper attached mirrors to the many small cages, allowing
the apes to communicate with each other.
Small gestures and facial expressions indicated to the keepers

Ropes were then attached to baskets and the iraumatiscd apes
could give each other food.
Ms Ballot, based in the Dutch city of Apcldoorn, says they
are now hoping to replace the ropes with picture icons and the
mirrors'w1hfa'et"illputer screen.


they don't.
"On Sunday afternoon, we
proposed it out of the blue for
the division chairmen and they
voted unanimously that they
would be prepared to back it.
That's a good cross-section of
astronomers.
"I'm sure it will be contro-
versial to those with a stake in
some other solution, but 1 hope
we will get an overwhelming en-


future. The IAU has a
"watchlist" of at least a dozen
they don't.
"On Sunday afternoon, we
proposed it out of the blue for
the division chairmen and they
voted unanimously that they
would be prepared to back it.
That's a good cross-section of
astronomers.
'I'm sure it will be contro-
versial to those with a stake in
some other solution, but I hope
we will get an overwhelming en-
dorsement."
More objects are likely to
be announced as planets in the
future. The IAU has a
"'watchlist" of at least a dozen


2003 UB313: bigger than
Pluto
other potential candidates that
could become planets once more
is known about their sizes and
orbits.
These include the distant
objects Sedna, Orcus, Quaoar
and 2003 EL61 and the aster-
oids Vesta, Pallas and Hygiea.
The IAU spent two years
debating the matter among its
membership. A seven-member
committee was set up to con-
sider the findings and produce
a draft proposal.
The body has been re-
sponsible for the naming of
planets and moons since
1919.


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.,





ol e s .e -


Small gestures convey interest


is still potential for a firsl online date to tiun serious.
"If they particularly like each other, 1 am sure they will also
point that out to their keepers," she says.
She said the webcam films would also provide a record
of the anhhhls' behaviour for future generations.


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AUIqMUNAY %PnglUl I -i Ainj 0 08 XI


Living in the





shadow of a volcano


By Samanthi Dissanayake
BBC News

(BBC News) Matanag is a
small farming village nest-
ling in the shadow of the
most active volcano in the
Philippines, Mount Mayon.
The village lies virtually
deserted because its residents
have been evacuated.
Over the past month,
Mayon has been spewing ash
and thick streams of molten
lava, raising fears that a major
eruption is imminent.
But Matanag's villagers
told the BBC News website
that some farmers chose to
remain behind and many are
eager to return home despite
the threat posed by the vol-
cano.
"It's been a tradition for ev-
ery eruption that the men look
after the houses and they only
evacuate when the volcano is
really dangerous," said 19-year-
old Margie Aydalla, speaking
from an evacuation centre in
Legazpi city, the capital of
Albay province.
"My father and the rest of
the men in the family are still
in the village to look after our
livelihoods. There are those that
own poultry and pigs, they
have to be home to feed the ani-
mals.
"Many women -also go
back to the village to do the
laundry."

Evacuation limbo
This is not a practice the
city authorities wish to encour-
age, according to Marlene
Manaya, the social welfare and
development officer for
Legazpi city.
"We know the villagers are
really inconvenienced by this,
but we have to keep them


Villagers nave complained ot overcrowding at evacuation
centres


away. I can't say how long this
could last for. The military is
guarding the area but we know
that some people are successful
in sneaking back."
There are about 1,500
evacuees from Matanag at the
Albay Central School evacuation
centre, with about 14 families to
a classroom.
"It's crowded and noisy
here, babies are crying and there
is no privacy, no comfort. Sani-


station and hygiene is a prob-
lem," said Margie Aydalla.
"But people from our vil-
lage are very traditional. We
value community spirit at these
times. Here you can see people
cooking food for the rest of the
families in their rooms."

Most frightening
Mrs Manaya says the city
authorities are working hard to
expand the number of class-


"I saw with my

own eyes the

bodies of my

villagers at the.

foot of Mount

Mayon"
-MARYCRIS

rooms and evacuation centres to
tackle the problem of over-
crowding.
Matanag's village chief, An-
tonio Alcera, is grateful for the
shelter.
"We have been given thbe
best accommodation here.
Safety and security are being
enforced and we can use ,a cur-
few to prevent evacuees from
leaving the centre," he said.
"Yes, people are very wor-
ried about their homes and their
livelihoods, but we have in:the
past experienced the punish-
ment of the volcano's: explo-
sion."
In 1993 Mayon. erupted
unexpectedly, killing 75 people.
"Farmers from our village
died because of that eruption,"
said Mr Alcera.
Mary Cris has experienced
four major eruptions while liv-
ing in Matanag but, she says,
1993 was the most frightiiing
occasion.
"We were caught unpre-
pared. We were taking exams "
when suddenly we heard a very
loud explosion. The next thing,.
we were running as fast as we
could.
"We lost our slippers and
got scars and wounds on our
feet. I saw with my own eyes
the bodies of my villagers.
Their families could barely


Mount Mayon is the most active volcano in the Philippines


recognize them."

Fears for livelihoods
Those villagers "sneaking
back" to Matanag are fully
aware of the dangers.
Molten lava has already
devastated large stretches of
land at the foot of the mountain
outside Matanag.
But people are desperately
concerned about their liveli-
hoods, and say they cannot af-
ford to leave their land unat-
tended.
"Just like my family,
which has a coconut and veg-
etable plantation, the biggest
fears in the village is losing our
livelihoods," said Margie
Aydalla.
Village chief Mr Alcera says
people depend on farming.
"They go back because this is


the only source of the family
income. They feel they have no
choice," he says.
Despite the perils of living
in such close proximity to the
mountain, the people who live
at its base still hold it close to
their heart.
"I dearly love Mount
Mayon," said Mary Cris. "I
never felt sory of living near its
foot despite the danger she
brought to our lives. She has
given us so much for our living,
rich land and water for farm-
ing." '
Mr Alcera says he speaks
for the village when he speaks
of the mountain.
"The volcano is a natural
beauty made by our creator.
It is deeply connected to us'
and we will continue to live
there."
--


Pyroclastlc TIows nave come closer to villages


'\V /.i.^. Welcome to the 413L" edition of
(--/ L / "Champion Cookery Corner", a
weekly feature giving recipes and
tips on cooking in Guyana.



Champion Pastas make a great base for a wide range of salads healthy but filling
dishes which can be enjoyed by the whole family.


INGREDIENTS:
2 cups Champion Mini Mac
2 small cucumbers, chopped
2 tomatoes, chopped
1 green bell pepper, chopped
1 onion, chopped
salt
Chico Black Pepper to taste
1 3/4 cups creamy salad dressing
1/4 cup milk


r "_ -


Cook Champion Mini Mac a in a large pot of
boiling salted water until aldente. Rinse with cool
water and drain.

In a large bowl add the chopped cucumber,
tomatoes, green bell pepper, and onion.

Blend the milk and creamy salad dressing together
in a small bowl until smooth and to your desired
thickness. Add cooled pasta and salad dressing
mixture to large bowl of chopped vegetables. Add
salt and Chico BlackPepper to taste.

Refrigerate until chilled. Serve as a delicious side
dishb.


INGREDIENTS:
' Ib uncooked Champion Pasta of your choice
1 cup sweet corn kernels, drained
1 cup sliced mushrooms
2 cup diced celery
1/4 cup minced onion
cup sliced green olives
/2 cup diced green bell pepper
1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
3/4 cup Italian-style salad dressing
2 cup mayonnaise
10 ounces cooked chicken, chopped
salt and Chico Black Pepper to taste


Bring a large pot oflightl) alted '.,aeil to .1 boil
Add Champion Pasta and cook for S ti: 10 minlinule
or until al dente; drain and pour p.itr.l inrl: 3 large
dish.

Stir in the corn. mushroom.. cclr., onion ohi es.
bell pepper and cheese.

In a separate bowl, whisk btogetlier ithe ~alad
dressing and mayonnaise, then pour this mixture
over the salad and toss again, to coat.

Add chopped chicken and toss gently a final time
and season to taste.


SPONSORED BY THE MANUE4CTURERS OF

Baking Powder
Custard powder ASTA
Black Pepper


Curry Powder
Garam Nasala
" '-TW."E T I".


PHILIPPINES

0 Manila

&L Moutnt Mayon


XXIII


Y AQ(IUS CHil0N CL 6




















Fans get


chance at


new 'Star


Trek' bible
By Chris Michaud
NEW YORK, (Reuters) Fans of "Star Trek" get a new
chronicle of the enormously popular franchise with the
release next week of a 500-page catalogue of the memo-
rabilia to be auctioned off this fall in Manhattan.
The splashy two volumes feature some 4,000 items, from
a costumer's clipboard to a model of the starship Enterprise
estimated to sell for as much as $35,000 at the three-day auc-
tion at Christie's in October.
"People are flipping out" over the catalogue, said Cathy
Elkies. Christie's director of special collections, from Las Ve-
gas. where "Trekkies" were gathered for the annual Star Trek
Convention.
"'Its an amazing visual journey, really more of a reference
bible chronicling 40 years of "Star Trek,'" she said of the cata-
logue, wnnen by Michael and Denise Okuda, authors of the
"Star Trek Encyclopedia," who also worked on the television
shows and films.
With colour photos, extensive footnotes, commentary, an-
ecdotes and quotes, the coffeetable-worthy tome is limited to
a run of 10.000 and is pre-selling well at $90, Elkies said.
Most of the items on auction are models and miniatures.
costumes and props and, with price estimates as low as $100.
fans can at least dream of scoring an item.
But pnces at memorabdia auctions can soar, and Ellaes said
the value of objects with such devoted fan bases is notoriously
difficult to gauge.
"We don't factor in that emotional fury generated around
this kind of maternal she said.
Past auction estimates for items owned by pop-culture
icons such as Manlyn Monroe and Jacqueline Kennedy were
far off the mark. with winning bids reaching 10 and even 100
times the pre-sale projections.
Given the strong interest in the sale, Christie's has
instituted a lottery for admission with a Sept 15 applica-
tion deadline.


6t


C2


su7"


c



GUYANA Folk Festival 2006
will be celebrating the
threads t make up the
Caribbean tapestry and the
ties that bind the peoples of
the Caribbean, both at home
and in the Diaspora.
The Guyana Folk Festival,
organised by the Guyana Cul-
tural Association, a New York
based, non-profit organisation
11\L


^SlH


for the past five years, has be-
come an important end of sum-
mer holiday destination for the
Guyanese and Caribbean
Diaspora.
This year's activities will be
held under the theme 'Carifesta
72 Revisited: Celebrating Our
Caribbean Culture'.
Past years themes have been
'Celebrating Guyanese music',
'Celebrating the Guyanese


BIANCA'S MILLION-



DOLLAR 'TALENT'


Sometimes, good things-such as solid gold pipes-come
in small packages.
\Winning the hearts of 'viewer' and proving Piers Morgan
rightI I-N.ear-old singer Bianca Ryan captured the $1 million
pnze Thursday night on the finale of Amenca's Got Talent.
Morgan, who played the role of a slightly less acerbic Simon
Cowell for the duration of the NBC show, said to Ryan Wednes-
day night after her soulful performance of Janis Joplin's "Piece
of My Heart": "I think you're going to win the competition."
Week after week, the Philadelphia native wowed the judges
with her you-can't-believe-she's-only-ll voice, although Mor-
gan did instruct her at one point during the competition to change
her hair and clothes. Well, she did, taking the stage last night in
a stylish (is that the right word for a preteen?) green dress, loose
curly hair and bare feet.
Morgan, a British TV personality and former editor of the
Daily Mirror, wasn't the only judge in awe of Ryan, but he
was the only one who didn't seem to feel that his career was
threatened.
"You make me want to go practice," Brandy, the token nice
judge and a hit-maker in her own right, told the aspiring super-
star.


Wildcard judge Da"id Hlaselholl told R\.n \\eilnesdj\ that
he thought she was *the bes in lhil co-impelllnn" .ndJ c'lmpared
her o1. uni. Lili Minnelhl' iLien ithugh the oungsier don't
ifvour the .sme -tI le ol I iul.'l,. doe.n'ih harbour a .inilar Iiinre in
her voice and doesn't remotely resemble the diva.)
"She makes you feel things" when she sings, Hasselhoff ex-
plained. Well, if you put it that way.
But although the judges had been making the big decisions up
until this week, it was the fans who ultimately, by phoning in or
text-messaging their votes, chose the winner. The tension built and
points were made Thursday as the uniquely talented Blue Man
Group (you can't quite pinpoint their appeal, but it's there) and
the singing sister duo Aly & AJ performed.
After host Regis Philbin announced that Ryan had beat out,
among others, the sentimental favorite Rappin' Granny, the impres-
sively in-sync clogging quintet All That, and the comedic juggling
duo who call themselves The Passing Zone, the newly crowned
champion couldn't believe what she had heard.
"You all right?" Philbin asked Ryan, who earlier in the week
got to meet one of her singing idols, gospel star Yolanda Adams.
"Bianca, how do you feel darling? You okay?"
"Oh my god, I don't even know!" the tweenager said, tears


Big winner, Bianca Ryan.


flowing, reminding cynical at-home viewers that these reality show
competitions qualify as life-changing events for some people.
A whole new crop of people hoping to receive national
recognition for whatever it is they do will get a chance to
live the dream next year when the second season of America's
Got Talent kicks off in January.


L .-.c


~(I~YI I_C


.. /.




SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006 A
____________________T., W


You are invited


to the launching of the


m m -


The people


s manifesto


developedfor


presented to the people

.F, ,
-k ~


Monday, August
Stabroek


21


Join us on
at 16:00 hrs


Market Square


(Kitty-C/Ville Minibus Park)



L --1--------- : PidAtf.^i.(i
#9 y':"* ^^^'^?^3^


Move forward with


One


Guyana


the people


PNCR-1 G


---- -


*Ar .-."


0010







Blg iida luxurious bathroom withlbath ltb and.
fWhilrlpool pefoon.
I|AddEiwthtex qubisltel(oto e .
So ur, ow wide range of autifnl nl. . ran ra _^'=_, .


-_- -' - t-- a mp - - Com plete


Sripol Compf te .
-:.-th ;O s:. . : . .. ,-.





---r C,-r r- -. - -*
it hPup

Ic- n -

ily at their *parika *Rose Hall Houston Complex
ranches: Tel: 2 .0-4602 Tel: 337-4570 Tel: 226-3666
TFax: 260-4515 Fax: 337-4650 TFx: 226-7897


SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006


u In through some error
I i'"* ir ocus o. n thr "' yesterday was lost in
; '"'" o'' A "grief, don't lose today
f lis Omniscience .
is ):28. by keeping it in your
S memory.


Winners of our


7th




1 Sharda Truman,
97 Thomas St. Kitty.


-.f1i_-. EEND C
. :_. '... -. ,,. .

.. -- .. .. ~~-,..; ..-
-:^ _: .+ .-- .- .. . + +- V -". -. . .


-,,:;---i-+.., .;.+ :--+. . ; +., ... ---+ ; ..... -.- :,, - . i .. ..


2 Nadira Chand,
218 Lamaha Street, North Cummingsburg.

NORTH AMERICAN"
Y fynasa.csm
126 Carmichael Street,
South Cummingsburg, G/town, Guyana.
Phone: (592) 227-5805, 227-3896
Fax: (592) 227-4164.
Website:




In loving memory of
TAI JWA NT SUNDAR.
Born: August 31, 1987;
Died August 18, 2001
Full of Blessings
Not of Want
Joy to the eyes the
life he spent
Though his smile is
Gone forever
And his hands we
cannot touch
Still we have so
many memories
We miss you in so
many ways
Life moves on and years
go by, but
Love and memories will
never die
Your memories are
precious and we will always
cherish them
Ot r thoughts are
al-ays with you
Yc ir place no one can fill
N( tears, no words R 4l
ca ever say
He v much we
mi s you everyday

M ay Lorl Shiva always keep you in Is hvig care
Inserted by his Loving parents,
brother, grandparents, uncles,
a aunts, cousins and friends. ..'
.....~-`-~ ;--~-` :: ....-* + I:






SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006 C
iC


4'.


Guyana Lands and Surveys
22 Upper Hadfield Street, D'Urban Backland;
GEORGETOWN
A S


Guyana Lands and Surveys Commission invites suitable persons to
apply for the under-mentioned positions: -
* Administrative Assistant (SECRETARY)
QUALIFICATION AND EXPERIENCE:
Possesses at least GCE "0" Level/CXC/equivalent passes, with a
pass in English Language (General).
Experience and Knowledge
He/she must be computer literate and proficient in using
Microsoft Office, Excel and Power Point and must be able to
type at least 25 words per minute. He/she should have at least
3 years experience in a similar position and good interpersonal
skills
Salary Range $ 30,966 $ 52,024 per month
S DRIVERS
QUALIFICATION AND EXPERIENCE:
ust have at least a sound primary education and possess a
clean and valid Driver's License authorising him/her to drive
Motor Car and Pickup Van.
Experience and Knowledge:
He/she must have a minimum of three (3) years driving
experience, and must have a basic understanding of the
operation and maintenance of automobiles. He/she must be
aware of basic protocol, the Guyanese transportation network
and basic traffic regulations and have defensive driving skills.
Salary Range $ 28,489 $ 43,353 per month
* SURVEYS INFORMATION ASSISTANT
QUALIFICATION AND EXPERIENCE:
Must have at least 3 GCE 'O' Levels or CXC passes (General)
with Mathematics included.
Experience and Knowledge:
Two (2) years proven experience as an Office Assistant or a
Customer Service Officer and able to operate photocopier and
plan copier machine will be an asset. He/She must be a quick
learner and must be able to communicate with and attend to
customers.
Salary Range $ 28,489 $ 43,353 per month
A copy of any of the Job Specification and Job Description can be uplifted
from the Human Resources Section of the Commission at the below
stated address between normal working hours.
Suitable and Interested persons can submit their applications including a
detailed Curriculum Vitae and the name and contact of at least two
references no later than Friday, September 1", 2006, to:
The Corporate Affairs Manager
Guyana Lands and Surveys Commission
22 Upper Hadfield Street,
D'Urban Backlands
GEORGETOWN


Expression of Interest


Expressions of interest are invited for one Nissan
Pathfinder PHH 7099.

A copy of the vehicle specifications may be obtained
from the Secretary of the Manager, Corporate Affairs;
the vehicle may be inspected by appointment from
08:O0hto 10:00h each day.

Bids may be submitted in sealed envelopes, addressed
to the Manager, Corporate Affairs, Guyana Lands and
Surveys Commission, 22 Upper Hadfield Street,
Durban Backlands, GEORGETOWN to be received no
later thanAugust 21, 2007.


As the elected representative from the Private
Business Sector on the Ethnic Relations
Commission, I have had opportunity to meet
and speak with Guyanese from all walks of life
across Guyana.

What I have seen and heard strongly indicate that
Guyanese as a whole are against violence before,
during or after the Elections.
Mr. John Willems
Commissioner- ERC I take this opportunity to appeal to all business
people and citizens everywhere to denounce any
violent act or any action that can lead to violence or animosity during this
period and to desist from engaging in any such action.

I also call on politicians to urge their supporters NOT to engage in any act
to cause fear or intimidation

Guyana is our country, let us work to develop it not destroy it.

A message from the ERC, EAB & IRO.




G GUYANA REVENUE AUTHORITY





INVITATION TO TENDERS

1. The Guyana Revenue Authority invites sealed bids from eligible and qualified bidders
for the projects listed hereunder:

(a) Extension of the Licence Revenue Office
(b) Construction of Lethem Dwelling Quarters
(c) Construction of Office Complex, Linden

2. Bidding will be conducted in accordance with National Competitive Bidding (NCB)
procedures.

3. Interested eligible bidders may obtain further information and inspect the Bidding
Documents from the Deputy Commissioner, Human and Financial Resources
Division, 91 Middle Street, Georgetown from 09:00h to 15:00h, Monday to Friday.

4. Qualification requirements include:
(a) A valid Certificate of Compliance from the Commissioner -
Guyana Revenue Authority.
(b) A valid National Insurance Certificate from the General Manager -
National Insurance Scheme.

5. A complete set of Tender Documents may be obtained by interested bidders from
the address above upon payment of a non-refundable fee of two thousand five hundred
dollars ($2,500). The method of payment must be cash or manager's cheque.

6. Tenders must be enclosed in a plain, sealed envelope, which does not in any way
identify the Bidder and should be addressed to the Chairman, National Procurement
and Tender Administration Board, Ministry of Finance, Northwestern Building, Main
& Urquhart Streets, Georgetown.

7. Tenders should be marked at the Top Left Hand Corner "TENDER FOR.....- Guyana
Revenue Authority". Please note that each project tendered for should be submitted in
a separate envelope.

8. Tenders should be deposited in the Tender Box at the Ministry of Finance not later than
09:00h on Tuesday, September 5, 2006, when Tenders would close. Bidders may be
present at the opening, which would take place immediately afterthe close of Tenders.

9. The Guyana Revenue Authority reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids
without assigning any reason and not necessarily to make an award to the lowest
bidder.


....... i !: .':.. .. ...:. .. ..... ...
Khurshid Sattaur
Commissioner-General






D SUNDAY CHRONICLE August 20, 2006


EMPLOYER'S INDEBTEDNESS FOR OVER THREE MONTHS


NO Reg,No NAME OF EMPLOYERS


1443
03547
18840
22758
23007
23882
22451
18793
22489
00273
23880
23835
23660
22448
22451
24945
25268
25444
25948
24565
25815
25976
26872
26354


25368
22585
26858
27372
08980
02607
26859
23659
23744


23055
26903
22757
21497
22449
22906
23382
17697
20813
23469
26035
25997
26119
7898
18879
19957.
23087
23087
26396
8358
20165
25682
20358
22817
3423
16806
26597
26727
22293
27017
27152
27445
26819
20274
25556
23959
24353
24602
17697
20813
23469
26035
25997
26119
.7898


NO Reg. No NAME OF EMPLOYERS


BARTICA LOCAL AUTHORITY
WILLIAMS GENERAL STORE
PAM'S PRIME POINT
MAURICE-BALGOBIN
EXECUTIVE BUSINESS SERVICES
JAINAT SINGH
VERONICA CHARLES
NIZAM KASSIM
CHEE KEE
NAGASAR SAWH LTD.
ATTACK'S SPEED BOAT SERVICE
AVAABRAMS UPPER LEVEL
ERROLD SINGH
PARAMDIAL DOOBAY
PARMANAND RAMLAGAN
GANADAI PERSAUD
SHABBIR ALl
STANIE HUGGINS
DEVNARINE PERSAUD
ZEN'S PLAZAAND HOTEL
MILLENNIUM SPEED BOAT SERVICE
SHRENE BAPTISTE
BEBE MOHAMED
DEVON DOUGLAS
ZULFIKAR HACK
JAMELA CURRICA
GRACE KHAN
ANTHONY MURRAY
NIGEL FORDE
MILLER'S DVD & VIDEO CLUB
GUYANA SAWMILLS LTD.
BARACAR QUARRIES INC.
MYRNA JAY-HAR-BAR-COVE
IAN BECKLES
BELLE'S SPEED BOAT SERVICE
VALDINE JOSE' MAGALLHEAS
ERROL HARRY
WILLIAM BURY
JACQUELINE K. THOMAS
WILLIAM JONES
ROCKCLIFFE PARRIS
-GERALD JORDAN
DEVENDRA SEENARINE
SASENARINE PERSAUD
R. BACTAWAR & SON
D. ANIROOD
TOP SPOT SNACKETTE
PRAVIN'S CLOTHING-& VIDEO CLUB
AKBAR ALLI
EBASCOL
SAYROO'S BAKERY
MOTOR TREND AUTO REPAIRS
RICHARD FERGUSON
RAMGIAWAN RAMLAGAN
LEATHA SOLOMON
GROVE/HASLINGTON NDC
KUMAR JEWELLERY
GLADYS BEER
MAJOR FOOD MFG.
NARESH VARIETY STORE
LAKHRAM JAIPARGAS
MAHAICA CONS. CO-OP SOCIETY
CHANDPAULPERSAUD
CYBERNET INTERNET CAF
SHAUN SUMMERSON
P&P LUMBERYARD
DEOLALL DOOKIE
GEORGE N. SOMWAR
PEARL RESTAURANT
ROYAL PRIESTHOOD DAY CARE
GLOBE MFG & DRUGS CD.
DOODNAUTH MAHADED
INSTITUTE OF BUSINESS EDUCATION
PAN TYRE MART
BUDGET SUPER CENTRE
OUR DAILY BREAD
RAMKISSOON LUMBERYARD
ZAHEIR BACCHUS
DENISE OCTOBER
CENTRAL DEMERARAACADEMY
DEDNATH SOOKLALL
FYAAD MOHAMED


83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
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111
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113
114
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142
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145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
.161
162
163
164
165


18879
19957
23087
23087
26396
8358
20165
25682
20358
22817
12604
17971
18402
20877
27416
16980
26324
27520
27916
7768
26684
22635
27479
27681
IN PROCESS
27937
24737
27711
17716
19987
21527
26796
25363
27380
21640
00000
18160
17181
21881
21527
22716
00000
27538
26328
26458
26516
26617
27266
11127
27521
27376
27920
27940
23778
23002
26833
08528
08528
24102
27888
22627
16719
24554
22900
24722
15517
27684
23733
018170
15790
18420
14068
23735
25858
27057
26825'
23966
25356
26161.
26195
01027
023527


ALICIA'S DAY CARE
GUYANA FURNITURE MFG.
PRIVILEGE DAY CARE
SUNSHINE MFG.
JAI RAMPERSAUD
EMRAN KHAN
YAMAN SINGH
IMRAN'S GENERAL STORE
CHURCH OF GOD
MOHAMED KHAN
BOBB'S FUNERAL ESTABLISHMENT
RAYMOND BROS.
PURANAND HARICHARAN
BHAGWANDEEN LALGEE
DESIGNER CUTZ BARBER SHOP
DAVEON'S TRAVEL SERVICE
MOHAMED SALIM DRY GOODS
CRIME BUSTER SECURITY
MAHENDRANAUTH SUKGDEOTRUCKING
BEST/KLIEN POUDEROYEN N.D.C
YUSUF GENERAL CONTRACTOR
SUNFLOWER MANUFACTURING
SUN CHINESE RESTAURANT'
GOBERDHAN GOBIN
VICASH SAMAROO
CHU'S MAN INDUSTRY
BESS INVESTMENT
LILLY'S MANUFACTURING
ABDUL HAMID
DEODAT DEOKINANDAN
JOYCELYN MC GARRELL
NEW LINE AQUA FARM
BAXANI'S TRADERS
NARESH S ANGELA CONST.
MADEVCO & COMPANY
NEW LINE CONST. ENG & TRUE. SERV.
ALFRED RAMDHANY & SONS
MADHO BROS. RICE MILL
BIG GILL FASHIONS
JOYCELYN MC GARRELL
JAINUL HUSSAIN
GANESH RAMRATTAN
B&P MACHINE SHOP
RAMNARACE MOHAN
MICRO COMP. & TECH. CENTRE
JULIET BROWN-SEALEY
UNIQUE ACADEMY
KAYS VARIETY STORE
CANAL NO. 2 CANE FARM. CO-OP
LUCKY GARDEN CHINESE REST.
P.D CONTRACTING
TOTAL COMPUTER SERVICES !
R.P.H. MAC. RENT & GEN. CONST.
DHARMENDRASUKHDEO
ANDREW FORRESTER
GUYANA DATA FORMS
T.K.B & SON
ABDOOLSAMAD
TYRON BACCHUS
SHEIK'S HEALTH CARE PHARMACY
KAMROOL ZAMAN ALL
NANDNARINE
JAIRAG NARINE.
NAYLON NEWLAND
GOLDEN STAR CONTRACTING
WEST DEMERARA CONSUMER COOP
PRO BODY ENTERPRISE
EBENEZER CHRLSTIAN CHURCH
MOHAMED HANIF
AUSTIN'S PLACE
ALLEN'S ENTERPRISE LTD
KAYMAN SANKAR & CO.
CHUNILALL BAIGOBIN
ORIGINAL JUICE
MOHAMED HASIM & SONS
RAINBOW PRE SCHOOL
GODFREY TACOORDEEN
RIF LIMA FISH PORT
KHAN'S GEN. STORE
.BACHAN LALL
A. MAZAHARALLY & SONS
WAZIR HUSSAIN


NO Reg. No NAME OF EMPLOYERS

166 19859 E/BO RICE PROD. LTD
167 22355 BASDEO MANMAN
168 2002. RAJENDRA SANKAR
169 25957 TWO BROTHERS REST.
170 24061 E/BO CHAMBER OF COM
171 01193 FRANCIS SHURLAND
172 22479 TEAKUMAR
173 26011 E'BO NEW FUNERAL HOME
174 24011 DAISY PETRIE
175 00659 W.A. LORD
176 22327 DHARAM RAJAH
177 27032 TALESH PARSOTAM
178 27288 RICH RESOURCES
179 17944 NARAIN'S ENTERPRISE
180 24852 MARK PERSAUD
181 26168 ROOKMINIE HANIFF
182 25969 FAROUKALLY
183 14925 ANTHONY DE ABREU
184 19610 JAMES RAMPERSAUD
185 11618 RUDOLPH GAJRAJ
186 25354 TAPOUNG WATER MANAGEMENT
187 24726 DAVID SAYWACK
188 24155 PETER SAYWACK
189 26038 WALTER SANDIFORD
190 27251 LANBACHAN NARAYAN
191 24420 GIRDED PERSAUD
192 27775 RABINDRA SAMAROO
193 04746 GEORGE KHAN GROCERY
194 21596 CLARENCE BELLE
195 23243 CHARLES CHISHOLM
196 R&R CONSTRUCTION CO.
197 23718 ORIN BELLE (TATIANA TAXI SERVICE)
198 17649 LESLIE DOWDEN17649
199 MICHAEL CUMMINGS
200 L.J.P WILLEMS
201 25880 VERBIN CHARLES.
202 25947 JOHN BAPTIST INGLIS
203 22446 TOLACH NARINE SINGH
204 25371 FITZROY THOMAS
205 SEON'S BAR
206 25916 SHREENAUTH MISIR
207 26295 DANIEL MURRAY
208 WAYNE NURSE
209 26856 NAIM KASSIM
210 24156 MAHENDRANAUTH DOOBAR
211 MOHAMED ZAHEER SHERIFF
212 27345 ASHRAF MOHAMED
213 27519 TERRY SALARU
214 26476 CHANRAKUMAR PHARDOMAN
215 02390 A. MAZAHARALLY & SONS
216 24458 .DEON STEPHEN
217 24166 BESS S IN VESTMENTS
218 ANNAND CHATTERPAUL
219 22645 SIMEON EDWARDS
220 REWANTIE PRINCE


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