<%BANNER%> xml version 1.0 standalone yes
Volume_Errors
Unscanned
PreviousPageID P30


Guyana chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00199
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Portion of title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown, Guyana
Publication Date: 5/14/2006
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
sobekcm - UF00088915_00180
Classification: lcc - Newspaper N & CPR
System ID: UF00088915:00199
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text

.47V DAY


The Chronicle is at http://www.guyanachronicle.com


A TICKET TO YOUR
DREAMS!
RESULTS HOTLINE 225-8902


No.10------SUNDAY,--MAY-14,-2006--GUYANA'S-MOST--WIDELY-CIRCULATED- NEWSPAPER PRI.CE:-$- 00
E ,,,, l. C HE E S Y sioned an aromatics firm to create Eau de Stilton, described on The perfume will be available from
'L CY the association's Web site as featuring a "symphony of natural www.stiltoncheIse.com.
base notes including Yarrow, Angelica seed, Clary Sage and Vale- '
LONDON (Reuters) Some say Britain's pun- rian." WIT TH OMPLIMENTS OF
gent blue-veined Stilton cheese smells of.old "Blue Stilton cheese has a very distinctive mellow aroma and ?
socks. But its fans have turned the rare odour into our perfumier was able to capture the key essence of that scent i Aft I
a perfume. and recreate it in an unusual but highly wearable perfume," said an
The Stilton Cheese Makers Association commis- association spokesman. WI~ 9 4ll< -' -


HER DAY: it's Mother's Day today and preparing for it yesterday at Fogarty's store in Georgetown were mom Jennifer Wilkie and her daughters and Donna Ellis with her daughter
and granddaughter. (Cullen Bess-Nelson photos)


Drastic

laws -


drunk


)ming


driving


TOUGH laws against drunk driving are being
drafted to help curb the alarming carnage on
Guyana's roads, Home Affairs Minister, Ms Gail
Teixeira announced yesterday. Page two
Page two


Charles McKenzie
leaves a fitting Page eight pasotp
example for emulation


SL











Drastic





drunk





driving




laws




coming


By Chamanlall Naipaul
TOUGH laws against drunk
driving are being drafted to
help curb the alarming car-
nage on Guyana's roads,
Home Affairs Minister, Ms
Gail Teixeira announced yes-
terday.
At the launching of a re-
vived National Road Safety
Council as part of the campaign
against mounting lawlessness on
the roads, she said legislation is
under draft at the Attorney
General's Chambers to deal
with driving under the influence
of alcohol, speeding and ampli-


'A i


HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
FOR SALE
Everything must go
No used things
Lovely for
/ /('J ,/ ;<.
Contact
183 Albert St. & Almond St.,
Queenstown
Tel: 223-5730


fied music.
These pieces of legislation
are being modelled on similar
laws existing in Barbados and
Jamaica, she told a gathering at
the Umana Yana in Kingston,
Georgetown.
Teixeira said curbing the
road carnage and the lawlessness
on the roadways is a key chal-
lenge facing the Guyanese soci-
ety, and while the Guyana Po-
lice Force has a major role in
meeting it, a partnership among
all sections of society is re-
quired to ensure success. Road
safety is everybody's business,
she stressed.


PROPERTY FOR SALE

Road to river
Located: Plantation New
Hope, East Bank
Demerara
Ideal for Industrial
Operations
River channel 30 feet
from boundary line
Tel: 664-8256
Serious enquiries only.


NRSC LAUNCH: from left, Ms Denise Dias; Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Home Affairs, Ms Angela Johnson;
Chief Constable of the consortium of Scottish and English Police Officers, Mr David Garbutt; Home Affairs Minister, Ms
Gail Teixeira; Chief Inspector of the consortium of Scottish and English Police Officers, Mr Bob McFarlane; Deputy
Police Commissioner Sydney Bunbury and Chairman of the Interim Management Committee of the NRSC, Mr Michael
Browne during the launch of the NRSC yesterday. (Cullen Bess-Nelson photo)


The minister observed that
road deaths are ripping families
apart and in many cases result
in the loss of breadwinners, as
well as leaving indelible emo-
tional scars and lifelong disabili-
ties in other cases.
These fatalities and disabili-
ties further increase the cycle of
poverty which is a serious prob-
lem in poor countries like
Guyana, she added.
The minister also under-
scored the need for greater edu-
cation and awareness
programmes pertaining to road
safety as well as revamping traf-
fic laws and setting up traffic
courts.
She suggested that there is
a critical need for traffic courts


KNIGHT'S




+ pUio"ial
Visde PaAodackwOa
awd Ei4F meeAd.


because und
system there
of traffic cas
corruption.
Mr Chan
the Enterpris
sociation -
such groups
that betwe
present tin
have died fr
with a signifi
ing children.
Traffic
Alleyne repi
causes of ac
are speeding
influence of
keeping to t
of roads, str
indiscrimin


er the present court lights by drivers.
:is a huge build up Mr Alleyne observed also
;es and this lends to that accidents on interior roads
which in the past weie minimal
ndarpal. Persaud of have recently been:on the in-
se Road Safety As- crease..
one of the oldest Teixeira pointed out too
in Guyana noted that deaths caused by road ac-
en 1995 and the cidents in Guyana exceed those
ne 1,883 persons' from murders. However, she
'om road accidents emphasisedd that statistics are
icant percentage be- not what matter, but "the hu-
man factor" is what is crucial.
Chief Roland The reviving of the NRSC
orted that the main which became defunct in 1990
:cidents in Guyana ,is another small step, she said,
, driving under the among the efforts and initiatives
alcohol, drivers not aimed at promoting road safety.
he left or near side On assuming the Home Af-
ay animals and the fairs portfolio, the minister said
iate use of bright she felt that the road safety
problem had to be tackled
through building partnerships
Ir] yiw I I and inclusivity, as it is an issue
VEILER AND which is non-political and non-


G ERMAN SHEPHERD
MIXTURE


ethnic because all are vulnerable
to road accidents.
Consequently, efforts got
under way in November last
year and an interesting dialogue
began between representatives
of public transport and the GPF
with the Home Affairs Ministry
acting as a facilitator to recon-
stitute the council, she said.
The private sector, the min-
ister noted, could also play an
important role which does not
involve much financing, in pro-
moting road safety by printing
road safety slogans on their
products, among other steps.
In this regard, she com-
mended the efforts of the Alicia
Foundation established through
an initiative of Ms Denise Dias,
who was also instrumental in
the formation of the Mothers in
(Please see page three)


Contact: Dr. Nicholas McLean's
Tel: 226-3592/227-0116/225-8454 II/FAL E RECE
i a EelI .AnX FOR HOTEL PENTHOUSE
1 HONDA PRELUDE Requirements: (1) Secondary Education
S!PORTS CAR (WHITE) (2) Knowledge of Clerical Work (3) 30 years over
Never registered $1M B. Bhaichande n Ltd.
LW11ii ,n!. ErJ1I 6 Commerce Street, Georgetown.


INTRODUCING THE MP4 DIGITAL MUSICPLAYER
Features include:
I 1. FM radio signal
S 2. MTV video, music and movie playback. I
3. Built-in microphone.
4. Full color picture display.
5. Easy to carry. GIFT ,HOPPVARITY STO01
6. Private information storage. Camp & Hadfield Sts. Tel. 227.0615
7. Mpl, MP2, MP3, WMA,WMV, ASF, WAV multi-music format. Regent& Alexander Sts. Tel. 227.5662


L3[m RESULTS


FREE TICKET 2006-05-13 DRAW DATE
LETTER BONUS iLL
2 3 31 J 3

G i308
382


2006-05-13
TTLE-D

540 838


yaity
Million$
MONDAY 2006-05-08
TUESDAY 2006-05-09


24
CYRING


WEDNESDAY 2006-05-10


THURSDAY
FRIDAY
4ATLURDAY


2006-05-11
2006-05-12
2006-05-13


RESULTS
02 03 11 12 23
01 18 12 25 24
12 08 10 19 15
03 08 24 26 13
03 04 06 17 22
17 12 11 03 21
9\SW ^


I


I


~I


1


I


r-


ROTTW


-4


I -


I


I lOTO ESLT


.






SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006 3


East Coast housing scheme upgrading continues


WORK is continuing on in-
frastructure development
costing more than $100M in
several housing schemes
along the East Coast
Demerara.
In a check on progress,
Housing and Water Minister,
Mr Shaik Baksh yesterday vis-
ited Block 11, Enterprise Gar-
dens, and Lusignan Pasture, to
follow-up on road projects be-
ing done at a cost of $36M and
$31M, respectively, the Gov-
ernment Information Agency
(GINA) said
Roads and drainage net-
works are being created in the
two housing schemes as a result
of the rapid rate of occupancy,
the agency noted.
Baksh, it said, explained to
residents that the projects are


Drastic

drunk

driving ..
(From page two)
Black group.
Alluding to imminent
road links between Guyana
and Brazil and other South
American neighbours,
Teixeira said transportation
and communication are criti-
cal to the developmental
process, and as such new
roadways have to be devel-
oped. But, she noted, with
them come new challenges
which have to be catered for.
Apart from the resusci-
tation of the NRSC, she said
other initiatives are under
way to help ensure greater
safety on the roadways.
One such is an Inter-
American Development
Bank (IDB) funded
programme to modernise the
GPF with a major compo-
nent being traffic manage-
ment.
A consortium of Scot-
tish and English police offic-
ers is in Guyana assisting
with this programme, she
said.
In addition, she said
the National Commission
on Law and Order also has
a sub-group which deals
specifically with traffic is-
sues.


part of the government's plans
and programmes aimed at alle-
viating poverty. He said the
contractor for the road projects
which started a few months ago
is trying to complete them be-
fore the rains become more in-
tense.
The minister then visited
Sand Reef, Annandale and Mon
Repos where issues of regular-
ization were discussed, GINA
said. Residents also raised con-
cerns about the inaccessibility
of potable water and the minis-
ter promised to discuss the is-
sue with the Guyana Water In-
corporated (GWI) as soon as
possible.
While at Success, residents
expressed their desire to have
the area regularized and Baksh
said his ministry is involved in
the process, but is being im-
peded as a result of persons
squatting on government re-
serve.


"Nevertheless, we will be
moving forward with the regu-
larization process now that you
have expressed your concerns
once those on the reserves are
willing to move," he said. Per-
sons on the reserve will be re-
located.
Damendra Mangal of Block
11 Enterprise Gardens said,
"The road has really trans-
formed this area; we are very
thankful to the government and
Minister Baksh. We were really
suffering in this area."
In 2005, GINA said, the
government spent about $1.3B
in its continuing drive to bring
affordable housing to the popu-
lation with more than $760M
expended on the provision of
housing infrastructure and ser-
vices for about 5,000 house-
holds under the Low Income
Settlement Programme.
To date, more than 10,000
house lots have been serviced


ONE TRUCK
DRIVER


under this programme in several
areas and about 4.300 titles have
been approved.
Under the locally-
funded infrastructural de-
velopment programme,
$434M was expended on
roads, drains and other
structures in areas such as
Vigilance, Bartica and
Wisroc, the agency said.


Ganja plants

found in

Joint

Services raid
THE Joint Services said they
uncovered marijuana (ganja)
seeds and about 300 plants on
a farm at Kuru Kururu on the
Soesdyke/Linden Highway
when they continued cordon
and search operations yester-
day.
A Joint Services release said
a woman and four men were ar-
rested as a result of the find.
It said two houses in
Bachelor's Adventure. East
Coast Demerara, were also
searched between 03:30 h and
13:30 h.
A camouflage shirt was
found and two men detained.
A house on Company
Road. Buxton was also searched
but "nothing of significance"
was found, the Joint Services
said.
The cordon and search
operations follow the discov-
ery of 30 AK-47 high-powered
rifles and five pistols from the
Army's Camp Ayanganna
headquarters in Georgetown
about three months ago.
r r


London


plans 40th


Independendence


anniversary affair
GUYANESE in London will be hosting a mammoth family
sports and fun day from noon on Monday May 29 at the
Crystal Palace National Sports Stadium.
The event, sponsored by Western Union, is being held to
commemorate the 40th Anniversary of the Independende of
Guyana. Some 4,000 Guyanese and friends from all covers of
the United Kingdom and beyond will participate in a variety
of activities and a spectacular cultural extravaganza.
Popular Florida-based Guyanese calypsonian Slingshot and
the sensational Guyanese duo X2 will entertain the crowd.
The stadium will be transformed into a mini Guyana with
mouth-watering traditional Guyanese cuisine and products on sale
in "Bourda Market"; field and track events at "Eve Leary Sports
Ground" and traditional games in the "Rupununi Savannahs".
Organised by the Federation of Guyanese Nationals
(UK) and the Guyana (UK) Sports Development Associa-
tion, it is now the biggest event on the Guyanese calendar
in the United Kingdom, keeping alive Guyana's rich cul-
tural heritage among the diaspora.

UA


Qualify


Yourself!


Internationally Recognized
Diploma in Computer Studies


Beginners : I. Windows & Internet Operations
Advanced: 2. "Word 3. Excel 4. Access 5. PowerPoint XP

Diploma in Advance Computer Studie
(Two Certificate courses -S7()00 each)
1. Advance MS Ollice 1- Word & Excel Projccts
2. Advance MS Ollice 11- Word. Excel .Access & lPowerPoint

Diploma in Computerized Accounting
Excel 1&11 -$5000 QuickBooks & Peachtree $7000 each
Diploma in Computer Repairs
1. Hardware 2. Software & Networking $12000 each.
Diploma in Desktop Publishing & Webpage Design.
1. CorelDraw 2. Adobe Photoshop 3.Web Design $7,000 each
**Courses begin May 16, 17, 18, 20 & 22*


IUA GATES BELTS
i pr~e 'I-


iAE 8 BOLTS, riUTS & WASHERS.
Sizes ranging from 1/4" to 1/2". Available from stock in wholesale and retail quantities.


I -Feeguard-


.. .. .. .. ..4




r rtz tz,
ShB~rr'naaaa~g.g'sga I gi2ia gasB^ S~BB~I~BgHB ib~fal lfiletll


-I


0,-


Available from stock for
M a! -


I rI


VIENNA MEETING: President Bharrat Jagdeo meets
Federal Chancellor of Austria Mr Wolfgang Schussel
at Friday's summit, in the Austrian capital Vienna, of
leaders of the European Union, Latin American and the
Caribbean. Mr Jagdeo said the summit was a success
but expressed disappointment at the EU's reluctance
to budge on the crucial issue of sugar price cuts
which will have a devastating impact on Guyana and
other sugar producing countries of the African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) bloc.


Internet Ready Computer
Systems From $15,000

Mlandela Ave. 225-7441, 223-6181
Zeeburg 277-0589/277-1121
PIarika 26(1-4753/260-4580


U


_ ,~~ I ,~ _. ~-s~------- - --- I r -


i-_


_.... ~l._.~x.l-. -I- I --


ulD "stributor


.0


I


L


-r






4 SUNDAY CHRONICLE: M '44, i 006'.


rEM


jY kJgBBCEIUIu


Iran will talk to any




country but Israel


By Achmad Sukarsono and
Jerry Norton

NUSA DUA, Indonesia,
(Reuters) President
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said
yesterday Iran was ready to
talk with any country except
Israel but not under threat of
force.
The comment came as
Iran's foreign minister told Eu-
ropean states not to repeat what
he called the mistake of forcing
an end to talks on Tehran's
nuclear programme by demand-
ing it stop uranium enrichment,
the official news agency IRNA
reported.
Ahmadinejad, in Nusa Dua
on Indonesia's resort island of
Bali to attend the Developing
Eight (D-8) summit, told report-
ers Iran was "ready to hold dia-
logue with all countries of the
world except for the Israeli re-
gime."
But he added: "If they want
to resort to the use of force we


- president


will not go into dialogue with
them."
The United States has said
it would not rule out the use of
force to stop what it considers
to be an Iranian drive for nuclear
weapons, but intends to solve
its dispute by diplomacy.
Ahmadinejad also said
Tehran would abide by the
nuclear Non-Proliferation
Treaty and the International
Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
in cooperating with other coun-
tries.
Tomorrow, European minis-
ters prepare to discuss a new
proposal in Brussels to end the
long-running standoff over
Iran's nuclear programme.
The plan includes incentives
for cooperation in ending ura-
nium enrichment but also a
threat of targeted sanctions if
Tehran was seen as obstruction-


The United States and west-
ern allies suspect Iran's declared
civilian nuclear energy
programme is a smokescreen for
a nuclear weapons programme.
Iran accuses the three main
European negotiators Britain,
Germany and France of uni-
laterally cancelling a round of
talks on Iran's nuclear row in
August 2005 shortly after Iran
resumed its nuclear research and
development activities.

OVERTURE
"The European countries
should not repeat the 'August
experience'," IRNA quoted For-
eign Minister Manouchehr
Mottaki as saying at the D-8
meeting.
Mottaki did not elaborate
further, but said Iran would co-
operate fully with European


Vatican marks 25 years



since John Paul shooting


ROME, (Reuters) The
Vatican yesterday marked the
25th anniversary of the near-
fatal assassination attempt on
Pope John Paul, holding a
mass to commemorate one of
the most notorious and myste-
rious crimes of the last century.
Italy's most senior cardinal,
Camillo Ruini, was due to lead the
service giving thanks for the life of
the late Pontiff who believed he
was spared death by the direct in-
tervention of the Virgin Mary.
The Vatican has laid a
marble plaque on the cobble-
stone floor of St. Peter's Square
at the exact spot where John
Paul was shot as he travelled in
his open-top 'pope-mobile' on
May 13, 1981, by Turkish gun-
man Mehmet Ali Agca.
John Paul said he survived
the attack because the Madonna
of Fatima a vision of the Virgin


who first appeared to Portu-
guese children on May 13, 1917
- intervened to divert the bullet.
"By the intercession of Our
Lady of Fatima, my life was
given back to me," he said of the
shooting. Towards the end of
his life, the Pope told a close
aide: "One hand shot me and
another hand saved me."
The Vatican also believes
that the attack was predicted in
the 'Third Secret of Fatima', a
message given to the Portuguese
children who saw the Virgin's
apparition.
No less mysterious is the
motive behind the attack.
Agca, a right-wing gangster,
was found guilty of attempted
murder and served several years
in an Italian prison before being
deported to Turkey where he is
still in jail for the killing of a
newspaper editor in the 1970s


and for robbery.
But a report by an Italian par-
liamentary commission published
in March this year said the assas-
sination attempt was a plot by the
Soviet Union, a claim dismissed by
the Russian government.
At the time of the shooting,
events in the Pope's Polish
homeland were starting a domino
effect that was eventually to lead
to the collapse of communism in
Eastern Europe in 1989.
The Pope was a staunch
supporter of Poland's Solidarity
union and most historians agree
he played a vital role in events
that eventually led to the fall of
the Berlin Wall.
At a trial in 1986, Italian
prosecutors failed to prove
charges that Bulgarian secret
services had hired Agca to
kill the Pope on behalf of the
Soviet Union.


-mu


Electronics Technician

* Three (3) years Experience in repairing
DVD Players. Televisions, Stereos, etc
* Five (5) Subjects CXC or Equivalent
* Certification necessary
* Sales experience in electronics will be an asset
Submit application with two references



1 ar H4mes5l' Soi u Cumming t.urg irgeltrnri Gu',na


states if they accepted Iran's
right to have peaceful nuclear
technology and enter a dialogue
based on that.
The U.N. Security Council
is considering a draft resolution
by Britain and France and
backed by the United States
that demands Iran suspend ura-
nium enrichment. But Russia
and China oppose parts of the
text.
U.S. State Department
spokesman Edgar Vasquez, re-
acting to Ahmadinejad's com-
ments in Indonesia, said Iran
must suspend uranium enrich-
ment, cooperate with the IAEA,
and return to good-faith negotia-
tions.
"By all appearances up to
now, they only seem to engage
in delaying and stalling while
going down the road of acquir-
ing a nuclear weapon," he said.
Ahmadinejad sent a letter
earlier this month to U.S. Presi-
dent George W. Bush which
some interpreted as an overture
to ease the nuclear dispute.
But he told reporters yes-
terday the letter was not related
to Iran's nuclear programme.
"This letter was meant to
open a new horizon for the poli-
ticians in the world,"
Ahmadinejad said after the
summit of Muslim-majority na-
tions.
Shortly before he spoke,
the D-8 issued the summit's
closing declaration, which made
no direct reference to Iran's
nuclear programme or the dis-
pute over it. The declaration
did make a general endorsement
of peaceful development of
nuclear energy.
However, Indonesian
President Susilo Bambang
Yudhoyono, whose country
took over the chairmanship
of the group from Iran at the
meeting, said he had told his
Iranian counterpart directly
"continued cooperation
should be made between
Iran and IAEA to have a
peaceful, just solution" to
the dispute.


VIENNA, (Reuters) Differ-
ences between leading mem-
bers in the World Trade
Organisation's (WTO) Doha
round may not be bridged in
time for a deal this summer,
the European Union's trade
chief said yesterday.
European Trade Commis-
sioner Peter Mandelson said he
had "a good discussion" with
Brazil's Foreign Minister Celso
Amorim at a summit of EU and
Latin American leaders.
"There are gaps still to be
bridged. I cannot say at this
stage whether that will be pos-
sible by the summer but we are
resolved to keep working to-
gether and with our negotiating
partners," he told reporters.
The round was launched in


* I


Passengers wait at a bus station for regular transportation
service to resume while a tropical storm batters the
region in Manila yesterday. (Romeo Ranoco/Reuters)


Typhoon toll rises


in Philippines


By Dolly Aglay

(Reuters) A typhoon whipped
through the northwestern
Philippines yesterday, killing
at least 23 people in stormy
seas and leaving more than
10,000 people stranded as air
and ferry services were sus-
pended.
Most of those killed were
from a boat that capsized off
Masbate island in the south of
Luzon region, the Coast Guard
said.
At least 21 people on the
vessel, named the Mae Ann,
were killed and 18 were rescued,
Coast Guard spokesman Joseph
Coyme told reporters in Manila,
citing details from the Coast
Guard's district commander in
Bicol region.
A fisherman also drowned
while his four companions were
rescued when their boat sank in


2001 to help developing coun-
tries and boost world trade.
But differences remain be-
tween leading members of the
WTO, chief among them the EU.
Brazil and the United States,
putting in doubt whether a July
deadline for agreement on the
most important issues can be
met.
Ministers from WTO coun-
tries were likely to meet again
in June. Mandelson said.
Negotiators say the July
deadline is important be-
cause a year might be needed
to translate any deal into the
small print of a final agree-
ment covering thousands of
tariff lines in each of the
WTO's 149 member coun-
tries.


rough seas off the coast of
Negros Occidental province in
central Philippines, the coast
guard said.
In Batangas province, near
Manila, a 36-year-old woman
was killed after a fence swept
by floods crashed into her hut,
officials told local radio.
The National Disaster Co-
ordinating Council said about
24,000 people were either af-
fected or displaced by Typhoon
Chanchu.
Hundreds of families fled to
evacuation centres as Chanchu,
with gusts of up to 120 kph (75
mph), battered a wide area.
In Manila, winds blew over
billboards and snapped tree
branches, causing power out-
ages in some parts of the city.
In Bicol region, flooding and
strong winds destroyed the
homes of 300 families.
Some power suppliers were
expected to resume services in
Bicol yesterday after automati-
cally shutting them down dur-
ing the peak of the storm on
Friday.
Chanchu is slowly moving
west but will continue to cause
bad weather in the Philippines
for another day or so. Weather
Web site
www.tropicalstormrisk.com
forecasts the typhoon strength-
ening to a category four storm,
with five the maximum. in the
next few days as it turns north-
west toward Hong Kong.
"It's now in the South
China Sea. with winds of 110
kph and gusts of 140 kph,"
Ludy Alviar. a meteorologist at
the Philippine weather bureau.
told Reuters.
About 20 typhoons hit the
Philippine archipelago each
year, with around half a dozen
crossing the country, mostly
during the rainy season that
runs from mid-May to Sep-
tember.


EU sas canot cont o


*I
*5
'*9 ..~
a~a~






SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006 "


Gang attacks on


Brazilian police


leave 30 dead

By Reese Ewing

SAO PAULO, Brazil, (Reuters) Overnight gang attacks
on Brazilian police in and around Sao Paulo left 30 people
dead and 32 wounded yesterday in the worst outbreak of
violence in the greater metropolis in years.
"The police will not retreat from these attacks," Saulo de
Abreu, the Secretary of Security of Sao Paulo state, told Globo
News TV "They have struck at the spial cord ... of our secu-
rity."
A spokesman said the roughly 12 hours of attacks with ma-
chine guns and grenades were believed to be related to a trans-
fer in the jails of orgamsed crime leaders of the First Command
Capital, know as the PCC in Portuguese.
The leaders were being transferred in an anempt to foil a
coordinated rebellion m various prisons across Sao Paulo state
planned for the Mother's Day weekend.
Two pnson rebellions m the cities of laras and Avare broke
out on Friday in Sao Paulo state with over 25 hostages between
them. the secretary of penitentianes said. They are ongoing and
officials are negotiating for their end.
The secretary said there were signs that rebellions may bave
broken out at two other pnsons in the state, Araraquara and
Ribeirao Preto, bui t was waiting for more information.
The prison uprisings are believed to have been organised
by the PCC, officials said. In February of 2001 29 prisons in
the state of Sao Paulo sunultaneously broke out into revolt, leav-
ing 19 dead.
By midday yesterday, 16 police, three civil guards, four off-
duty penitentiary agents, two civilians and five bandits had been
kdled in attacks. And 13 police. two penitentiary agents, two
civilians and 15 bandits had been wounded, the secretary of se-
curity said.
Local TV footage showed scenes of bullet-hole-riddled
police cars and stations with puddles of blood in seats and
on the pavement.



Tensions ease in Brazil-

Bolivia energy dispute


VIENNA, (Reuters) The
leaders of Brazil and Bolivia
yesterday toned down a row
over Bolivia's nationalisation
of its energy sector which has
exposed deep rifts in Latin
America where the radical
left is on the rise.
"There was a lot of smoke
and not very much fire," said
Brazilian President Luiz Inacio
Lula da Silva after a breakfast
meeting with Bolivia's new left-
wing leader Evo Morales at a
Vienna hotel to patch relations
after the May 1 nationalisation.
Morales said planned in-
creases in the price of Bolivian
gas vital to Brazil's industry
would be negotiated "ratio-
nally".
He said he looked forward
to visiting Brazil. "I'm keen to
watch some football with the
Brazilian president." he said.
The dispute, together with
other fights between Latin
American nations which have
long spoken of the need for more
integration, overshadowed a
summit between the region's
leaders and their European Union
counterparts in Vienna this week.
Brazil was enraged by
Bolivia's decision to nationalist
its energy sector including lo-
cal operations of Brazilian state
energy company Petrobras and
to raise prices Ior Bolivian gas
exports to Brazil and Argentina.
The rise of radical left-wing
leaders such as Morales and
Venezuela's Hugo Chavez has
worried many of 'hciriojie


market-friendly neighbours,
particularly because of their
large gas and oil reserves at a
time of tight energy supplies.
Concerns have also spread
beyond Latin America.
On Friday, British Prime
Minister Tony Blair urged Mo-
rales and Chavez not to act ir-
responsibly.
Moves this year by Russia
to renegotiate its gas contracts
with neighboring Ukraine raised
the prospect of energy-rich
countries using natural re-
sources for political purposes.
About the same time as Bo-
livia began scrapping with Bra-
zil, Venezuela stormed out of an
Andean group of countries be-
cause Peru, Colombia and Ecua-
dor had angered Chavez by sign-
ing trade deals with his ideologi-
cal rival, the United States.
That row, which sucked in
Bolivia as Venezuela's ally, al-
most wrecked planned trade
talks with the EU which the
other Andean nations had hoped
to set on course in Vienna.
Peru's President Alcjandro
Toledo said on Friday talks
would go ahead even if Bolivia
opted out.
Ideological differences have
added venom to Latin America's
bout of disputes.
Toledo said Chavez was
taking his region's relations
with Europe "hostage" and
the Venezuelan, a self-de-
clared revolutionary, has
called Toledo a lackey of the
U united States.


TRINIDAD EXPRESS -
HIGH COURT judge
Rajendra Narine on Friday
night blocked moves being
made by Prime Minister
Patrick Manning to begin a
second wave of impeachment
proceedings against Chief
Justice Satnarine Sharma.
A team of lawyers, includ-
ing Deborah Peake SC, Rikki
Harnanan, Devesh Maharaj and
Adrian Byrne, representing
Sharma approached the High
Court shortly after 5 p.m. Fri-
day with an application for ju-
dicial review seeking to challenge
Manning's decision and on the
basis of bias, procedural impro-
priety and prejudice on the
Prime Minister's part.
Narine, after reading a 50-
paragraph affidavit of Sharma
and the complaints raised in his
lawsuit, granted the Chief Jus-
tice permission to challenge the
May 10 decision of Manning,
who stated in a media release
that he had triggered Section 137
of the Constitution to determine
whether the Chief Justice ought
to be removed from Office.
Manning backtracked on
that statement during his address
in Parliament Friday stating that
he will not recommend to Presi-
dent George Maxwell Richards
the question of removing Sharma
"unless I am fully satisfied that
there is a prima facie basis in fact
to warrant such an investigation".
High Court Marshals were
Friday night dispatched to serve
Manning with a copy of the
judge's order.
Narine also ordered that all
actions or proceedings conse-
quential upon the decision to in-
voke Section 137 be stayed
pending the hearing and deter-
mination of the lawsuit. He ad-
journed the matter for hearing on
June 13, when attorneys repre-
senting Manning are expected to
put in an appearance.
The situation is similar to
last year's attempt by Manning
to initiate impeachment pro-
ceedings against Sharma over al-
legations that he tried to influ-
ence Attorney General John
Jeremie and Director of Public
Prosecutions Geoffrey
Henderson to drop a murder
charge against his friend Prof
Vijay Naraynsingh.
That matter remains in the
hands of mediators and will re-
sume on Tuesday before Justice
Carlton Best.
Manning's media release of
May 11 listed a two-pronged
approach to deal with allegations
being made by Chief Magistrate
Sherman McNicolls that Sharma
attempted to influence him to
find former Prime Minister
Basdeo Panday not guilty of
three criminal charges one un-
der the Constitution, to appoint
a tribunal to investigate whether
Sharma should be removed from
office and the other was turned
over to the Attorney General.
Jeremie. in turn. submi-ited
the McNicolls report together
with a statement from Sir Timo-
thy Cassel QC. which corrobo-
rates certain aspects olf the Chief
Magistrate's statemen., to act-
ing Comminssioner of Police
Glen Roacilh ;'d [he D)PP' 1 cll-
ing for s'\ ift a on.


Roach and Head of the Spe-
cial Branch Assist. Commis-
sioner of Police Wellington
Virgil visited Sharma at his Hall
of Justice Chambers Friday
around 12. 15 p.m. and inter-
viewed him in the presence of
his attorneys, Russell
Martineau SC and Desmond
Allum SC.
The top cops left the Hall
of Justice at 12.55 p.m. and
Sharma deposed in his affidavit
the circumstances surrounding
the meeting.


In a release issued late Fri-
day, Henderson stated that he
has taken the decision to dis-
tance himself from the investi-
gation relating to Sharma and
has delegated his functions un-
der Section 90 (3) of the Con-
stitution.
The Express understands
that he has passed on the baton
to Deputy DPP Carla Brown-
Antoine with specific instruc-
tions to "take any decisions you
consider necessary".
In arriving at this decision,


the DPP took into account the
fact that he was a witness
against Sharma in the
Naraynsingh impeachment pro-
ceedings.
"The Director of Public
Prosecutions is not in any
way involved in the review of
the matter submitted for his
attention by the Honourable
Attorney General in his let-
ter dated 11th May 2006, and
any decision that is required
thereon," Headerson as-
sured.


- ---- * E


HEAVEN'S CHILD

... -
-_ ..


Especially My Mother, '
.lIrs. I atifm a Khan,formerly of :
S Lot 6 Kingston, Corriverton '.
Now residing at 582 Bellamny. .. .
Road, Scarborough, Ontario, '
Canada, M1HI 1 G4.
J
AS TIME FLEETS BY, MANY DAY I STAND STIRE THE
SKIESANAD THE ST4RSAS THE COLORS OF THE WIND AND
COLORS OF THE MUSIC BLAST MY 4 CE AND MIND, WITH
THE MYSTERIOUS SOUNDS OF THE SPHERES RINGING ITS
CELESTIAL PLANETARYROM,4NTIC VIBES, MY THOUGHTS, THE
TRANSCENDENTAL ONESALIfA YS CENTERS ON YOU.
THE VISION IS YOU AND YOUR EVERY-GLOWING SMILE THAT RADIATES
THE EVER EVER VESENCE OF YOUR EVERLASTING LOVE.
IT STARTS W7TTH YOU, BEARS ON YOUAND LIVES INME FORALL TIMES.
MA, MOTHER DEAR. MOM.
IN IIY MIANY REFLECTIONS I 7RY TO FIND NLV IV,4T hWAY YOU
HAVE NOT INFL UENCED ME POSITIVELY....JUST ONE AREA,
BUTALAS! I COULD FIND NONE. I CANALWA4YS SAYMY
MOTHER TAUGHT ME 'THIS'AND MYA OTHER TAUGHTME 'THA T'AND
FOR ALL THEIR CHILDREN. MOTHERS ARE AL AYS THERE FOR THEM
MOTHER, THE GREATEST OF GOD ALMIGHTY'S CREATION, SHE IS THE
RECIPIENT OF DIVINE CREATIVE POWERS OF
REGENERA TION CREA T10N OF HUMAN LIFE. SHE MOTHER / WOMAN IS
THE BENEFACTOR OF MANAND HIS HUMANITY. SHE ONLY CAN BEAR 9
MONTHS OF WRITHING PA INAND TEARING
OF FLESH TO CREATE HER CHILD, WITH LIFE-SCARSAS MEMORY ON HER
BODY. SHE ONLY CAN SUCKLE HER YOUNG
AND SHE ONLY COULD HAVE FED US THROUGH HER BLOODSTREAAL
MOTHERS, WILL PERMITNO HURT TO HER INFANTAND EVEN IIHEN MAN
OR IVOMAN, SHE WILL BE EVER
THERE TO TEACH, GUIDE AND DEFEND, EVEN IF WE HAVE
HURT HER, BEEN UNGRA TEFUL A ND CA USED HER PA INFUL TEA R.
AT 75 NOWI MY OW'N DEAR MOTHER, IT IS SCA4R I i OVNDER
LIFE WITHOUT YOU IFAND WHEN GOD ALMIGHTY CALLS, FOR
THAT IS THE DECREE OF HIS CREATIONANI HIS ORDER OF
THINGS. I CANNOT VISUALISE NOR FATHOMAN EXISTENCE
I4JTHOUT YOU. I I(ONDER IF I HA VE DONE ENOUGH TO HELP YOU; TO
MAKE YOU PROUD THROUGH YOUR TRA VILS TO EDUCATE, ENRICH IME
SPIRITUALLYAND UPLIFT MYLIFE.
GOD ALMIGHTY CREATIVE GENIUS IS WITHIN THE CA CITIES OF
W OMAN. OUR IAOTHERS' IWOMVB. AND THROUGH WHICH LIFE EMITS! LIFE
CREATES, FERTILISES!
GERMIINA TES!........SO THAT IE MA Y LI VE AND BREATHE.
WOMAN! GENTLEMEN, WOMAN: .... OUR Il/OTHERS, SISTERSAN)D WIVES,
DO NOT BE CRUEL TO THEM. TO HURTANYOF
THEMlE IS TO INFLICT INJURY ON (;ODI ALMIGHTY FOR HIS
POWERS RE IN HER W-OMBI!
TI/AT YOU ARE! TIH/A YOU BEC-4 ME! TfHAT YOU If ERE HORN
OUT OF NOTHING!
O NOT' HE-4 T YOUR IVIFE H EN.-; SOME OF YOlUARE KANOWIN TO
EN/.IO I HIS. NEl ER HURT HER FEELI:NGS. 1)0 NOT3 MOLES7
IIER NOR PUT HER TO StI-M4IE. SHlE IS THE C.HI.)1) OF G(OD
.1T L'IGHTY A1 iND CHIL. D) OFANOTHER H O'11/A"N WHfO PRA YEI) A ND
SACRIFICED FOR HER. SHE IAS NOT i.4DI)E FOR TORAI ENT BUT
INSTEAD FOR PURE ETERN.4L SNITISED L.OVIE. GIV E HER
YOUR 1.OI EAND D)EDIC4 TION FOR SHE IS .LOVE, SHE IS GOD0
AS THE SCRIPTUE RS OF RELI(;G. TEA CH THAT "PARA4 DI
LIESA .T THE FEET OF THY ANOTHER. "
S I "While theiri wrld celebratesv inotlher's diluv onIce' earl,
.for tme EVER DA} IS MOTHER'S D.4 :


l ,,\ 11 1 1. ,, a .I i .

I. ,. ,,l 'I I l ', t,., ,,l l
I ,\< , ,11 ,'h, ,. . i I K i ,,l


f I... I .
N . .


High Court allows



judicial review


T 111 11


.; t;..-.fP~g.": --%: =-C .


.; ,q ..,..,.






6 SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006


Editorial

THE INAUGURATION of an elected Head of State in the
Caribbean-Latin American region is usually a ceremonial
occasion for joyful celebration, witnessed by national,
hemispheric and international leaders or their represen-
tatives.
Today's oath-taking ceremony in Port-au-Prince of the 63-
year-old agronomist, Rene Preval, who returns to the presidency
of Haiti after serving for just one term in the 1990s, should
have been no different.
Except, that the harsh realities of daily life in what remains
the poorest, most poverty-stricken nation in this hemisphere,
would understandably impact against any national celebration
of significance.
Preval, once a loyalist of Jean Bertrand Aristide, the popular
Roman Catholic priest turned politician, governed in his first
term as Head of State virtually in the shadow of Aristide who
was twice the victim of coups against freely elected govern-
ments of that member state of our Caribbean Community.
Today, Preval takes the oath of office on the basis of free
and fair elections held on February 7. He would be aware that
his hopes to serve out a full elected term would very much de-


HAITI PREVAIL'S




CHALLENGE


pend both on his own efforts to reach out to his opponents, as
well as in securing practical assistance from the international
donor community and governments to help alleviate the enor-
mous suffering of the Haitian masses.
CARICOM, which will be represented at today's inaugu-
ration ceremony, is on record as having pledged to do whatever
possible to help ensure democratic governance and human rights
observations while continuing to lobby international develop-
ment aid for Haiti.
We wish the very best for the new Preval administration.
Our hope is that the President gets the kind of support from
the new Haitian parliament that will be crucial to enabling good
governance in the prevailing very difficult circumstances.
To all mothers we also take this opportunity to extend
warmest wishes for a very Happy Mother's Day!


CHRONICLE
Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Sunday Editor: Michelle Nurse
Editorial: 227-5216; 227-5204; 22-63243-9
Sports: 225-7174
After hours 226-3243-9
Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is al www.gu.anachronicle.com
e-mail address sundayeditor@guyanachronicle.com
Lama Avenue. Bel Air Park. Georgetown, Guyana.


REAL AND PRESENT DANGER TO GUYANA


HE UNITED STATES authorities, and its
anti-narcotics agency in particular, seem all
fired up to prosecute in an American court,
a Guyanese national, Roger Khan, allegedly a
major narco-trafficking 'businessman'.
As long as this is being done by due process and respect for
the sovereignty and laws of both countries, then not only Khan
but the other leading drug dealers reportedly known to the US Drug
Enforcement Agency, US Embassy
in Georgetown and also, as often
claimed, by the Guyana Police
Force should be speedily appre-
hended and placed before the
courts.
What is quite puzzling at the :
present time, however, is that there
seems to be a deliberate, concerted "
effort, involving local and foreign
forces, to shift the focus away
from uprooting the very dangerous,'
heavily armed and well-connected
criminals embedded in Buxton, to
that of a single suspected drug ROGER KHAN
dealer, namely Roger Khan.
He is someone I have never met and have no interest in meet-
ing. By his own admission he has been a collaborator with US
embassy and anti-narcotics officials.
None of today's key political, diplomatic and security play-
ers in the threatening security
climate of Guyana can be so ob-
tuse as to accept that one drug
dealer however exaggerated his
"influence" is more of a danger
to this country's political stabil-
ity and social harmony than the
murderous armed gangs that
continue to make a mockery of
the "intelligence" and "might"
(sic) of the combined Guyana
Police Force and the Guyana
Defence Force.
And by extension, of greater
US AMBASSADOR BULLEN "concern" to the USA in its rela-
tions with Guyana than in focusing its attention and resources to
enable, indeed insist, on the flushing out of ALL criminals posing a
threat to the nation's security and the peace for which Guyanese
desperately crave.
There are elements in the security forces reputedly working with
well-connected criminal gangs, and specifically those who have a
fortified "command" base in Buxton from where they are protected
by advanced "intelligence alerts" prior to so-called joint operations
by the police and army that have so far produced very little amid
the flow of media publicity.
Denials of existence of such rogue elements in the security forces
should, in the current social/political climate, rightly be treated with
skepticism.
Similarly, expressed commitment by US intelligence and
drug enforcenmept agencies to help Guyana solve some of the


more recent bizarre execution-style killings including that
of a cabinet minister the theft of 30 AK 47 rifles and five
pistols from the GDF, and the highly controversial bugged con-
versation between Police Commissioner Winston Felix and
PNCR Vice-Chairman Basil Williams, should all be treated
with a grain of salt.
Until, that is, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the
US Drug Enforcement Agency could deliver RESULTS on the vari-
ous cases on which they have been
invited to cooperate, and, on the
other hand, the local army and
police succeed in replacing media-
designed "assurances" with deliv-
ered SUCCESSES against the mur-
derous armed criminal gangs hold-
ing this nation to ransom.

FELIX/WILLIAMS
"CONVERSATION"
After the taped worrying so-
phisticated "diversion" of ques-
tions at a media conference in the PRESIDENT
wake of the slaughter of eight BHARRATJAGDEO
Guyanese nationals at Agricola vil-
lage yet another example of unnerving failure by the security forces
to act promptly and effectively the precision by which Agricul-
ture Minister 'Sash' Sawh and three others were brutally murdered,
was to further underscore the nightmare facing this very troubled
nation.
Yet, to follow the propagandistic interventions and orchestrated
media leaks of recent weeks about claimed noted drug-dealer Roger
Khan and his alleged collaborators, one could easily be misled about
the real and present danger to the Guyanese people:
Such as, for instance, located in the bowels of the armed crimi-
nal gangs of Buxton that the security forces seem impotent to dis-
lodge. Also, the threats that often emanate from that opposition
party perceived as a possible alternative government.
There is also a self-styled "African Guyanese Armed Resis-
tance" group whose warnings border on treason but being expedi-
ently ignored by the Director of Public Prosecutions and the high
command of the Guyana Police Force.
It is relevant to ask, as well, whether the FBI would ever pro-
duce its findings on the sensational Felix/Williams "tapegate" epi-
sode.
The result of the FBI's independent assessment of
the voices on that tape voices that are quite widely known in
Guyana remain critical to the Police Commissioner's own
integrity and credibility as much as to the overall issue of na-
tional security and the independence and professionalism of
this nation's police force.
From my perspective, while the US authorities are quite fo-
cused in protecting "America's interest" in its relations with Guyana,
(and that's fair enough), it needs to be reminded by more than the
customary weakness and politeness shown by the Guyanese ad-
ministration, that in the war against "armed criminals" and "terror-
ists" the United States ought to be more forthcoming in providing
wider practical cooperation in the national security interest of this
country.
Therefore, let today's expressed anxieties to "nail" one or a few


reputed local "drug lords" -exporting their poisonous substances
to America, the biggest consuming nation of illegal drugs,
be sensibly meshed with an overhaul "war" against all forms
of threats to both Guyana's national security, as well as that
of powerful friends like the USA and other allies represented in
Georgetown.

URGENT PRIORITIES
In this context, President Bharrat Jagdeo himself should criti-
cally review his own "consultative"/briefing meetings in terms of
frequency, specificities and results with the high command of the
police and army on crime and security.
He should also consider exposing himself more often to the me-
dia than resorting to talking through press releases from the Gov-
ernment Information Agency (GINA).
Finally, it cannot be over-emphasised that there is urgent
need for a focus shift by the foreign diplomatic missions in
Georgetown, the USA in particular, from the criminality of a
few narco-traffickers (why were others not also named in
the last US anti-narcotics report?) to the real and present
danger that faces the Guyanese
people from the network of
heavily armed criminals, some
k perhaps with guns stolen from
the security forces..
Compared with successes
scored by their counterparts in
other regional "trouble spots", like
( Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago,
it is perplexing and distressing to
witness the strange inability of
Guyana's security forces to
effectively crush the "armed crimi-
nal resistance".
COMMISSIONER The games being played be-
tween some in official uniforms
and politicians, whose sweet, reassuring messages conceal
their own dangerous covert actions, are only further eroding
public confidence in our institutions and threatening national
security.
For a start, let the security forces score the long elusive vic-
tory against the Buxton-based criminal network.
Let there also be a decisive breakthrough in capturing the as-
sassins of Agriculture Minister Sawh, his siblings and security guard;
as well as opposition militant Ronald Waddell and businessman Gazz
Sheermohamcd.
Further, the Guyanese people should be provided, as
soon as possible, with the results of the FBI's assessment
of the bugged "conversation" between Police Commis-
sioner Felix and the PNCR's.Williams,








SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006


"4




A GOOD man I knew died
last week and with his pass-
ing came a flood of memories
- of good times and bad
times.
Charles 'Bracey' McKenzie
was one of a breed of fine men
I was honoured and lucky
enough to have come across as
a young journalist determined to
make it far in a tough and de-
manding profession.
Others included old stal-
warts like Carl Blackman, Hank
Harper and Jerry Daniels, who
in their own and separate ways
shared in my moulding, my test-
ing, my trials, my honing in a
field you have to be born to
love.
Good people like tower-
ing mountain peaks etched
across the skyline stand out
and stand the test of time and
each of us come across persons
who, no matter how far they
may go and how long ago they
may have crossed your path,
will forever remain in the spe-
cial recesses of your mind where
good memories are treasured, to
be sifted and delighted in from
time to time.
And Charles 'Bracey'
McKenzie stands out and
stands tall in my memories of
him, now that he has passed
away.
A reporter of long standing
in local radio, he collapsed and
died while on duty for the Na-
tional Communications Net-
work (NCN) in the Supreme
Court in Georgetown last Tues-
day. He was 72.
I hadn't seen much of
'Bracey' in recent years fresh
demands on time have not al-
lowed for much renewing, of
contacts with old friends, but
the little I saw of him showed
the endearing qualities did not
fade with the slow but sure ad-
vance of years.
'Bracey', or 'Mack', was
always impeccably dressed;
posture upright; pleasant and a
warm smile ready for all around
him.
Only the other day, one of
our young reporters who came
across him on a court assign-
ment, said "Mr McKenzie
asked me to tell you hello; he
said you worked together and
are good friends."
"Oh, 'Bracey'! He's always
smiling, always pleasant", I re-
marked.
"That's him", she quickly
replied.
That was 'Bracey'. Always
smilingly willing to help a
young reporter if required; and
polite to the end.
He was among those who
taught me good and bad things
depending on how you look
at it.
Our gang in the newsroom
at the radio station on High
Street, Georgetown (now
moved to NCN on Homestretch
Avenue) included Ulric
Hetsberger, Peter Haynes,
Edwin Alli (now in the U.S.);


If you could,





you would


Edgar 'Moon' Moonsammy,
Harry Harewood [News Editor]
and B.L. Crombie [Sports Edi-
tor] whom 'Bracey' has now
joined wherever good journalists
go when they die.
Ulric and I were the young
guns in a pack of older radio
sharpshooters who, almost all,
unselfishly shared their fine
skills with us.
Ulric. Peter, 'Moon',
'Bracey' and I also bonded
much after work, the older
hands teaching Ulric and I the
ways of drinking and other
things men should know.
We learned well, in many
ways Ulric and I from those
fine stalwarts and I sure Ulric,
from his base in Washington,
would agree that 'Big-Hearted'
Harry, 'Moon', B.L. and now
'Bracey' would be keeping a
close watch on us, their prodi-
gies, in many senses.
From that gang, and others
of the breed, in those tough
days, we learned not to com-
promise on truth, fairness, ac-
curacy, balance and the other


qualities that are integral to the
profession we have chosen.
And even when I moved
on from that radio station
newsroom, those hardened
pros kept in touch, ready to
advise and comfort, in good
times and bad.
And, even though I am to-
day much more than a radio
newsman, I shake my head,
and I can see, in my mind's
eye, Harry, B.L., 'Moon' and
now 'Bracey', also nodding in
agreement at the far cry radio
is today from what we knew
it when it made us all so
proud.
Standards have fallen and
those in charge have to do much
more to get radio back to the
heights it once scaled in this
country.
Do that, and 'Bracey', with
his group in radio journalism
heaven (I am sure), would not
be in danger of losing that smile
he never lost, despite the tra-
vails while he doggedly stayed
the course in the radio land of
the living.


That pleasant smile, that al-
ways correct and proper
demeanour, however, masked a
deep sense of humour that
characterized 'Bracey'.
Once, we were at a party at
the house of some prim and
proper people and 'Bracey'
somehow found himself resting
his glass on a highly polished
and obviously highly prized pi-
ano in the big room set aside for
dancing.
Every time he rested that
glass on the piano, a female
member of the household
would rush up and move it
away, giving 'Bracey' a look
that could kill. And 'Bracey'
would just smile that smile of
his, and again rest the glass in
the same spot.
At one point he suggested
to the woman keeping watch on
the prized piano that he should
play it to entertain the guests.
She nailed him with another
of those looks, gritted her teeth
and said, "If you could, you
would." That was clearly her
verdict on what she thought


Keeping an eye on




Trinidad's economy


By Linda Hutchinson-Jafar

LAST week I sat down to a
panel discussion on whether
the Trinidad and Tobago gov-
ernment was using the rev-
enues from high oil and gas
prices in the best interest of
the population and putting
aside savings to benefit fu-
ture generations.
I wish Patrick Manning
could have cancelled all his ap-
pointments and taken the half
day off to hear the economic
lyrics coming from his former
Finance Minister Wendell
Mottley, former Central Bank
governor Winston Dookeran
and Dr. Ronald Ramkissoon and
Lyndon Guiseppi, two senior
economists in the banking sec-
tor.
If he did, the.next day af-
ter a restless and sleepless
night, Mi. Manning, the
country's Finance Minister,
would have called his three jun-
ior ministers and other financial
technocrats to put a screeching
halt to a lot of expenditures or
at least scale down the spend-
ing.
Well, truthfully, I doubt
Mr.. Manning would have
slowed down and in fact might
step harder on the gas.
With his government's dis-


mal failure to deal with rampant
crime and with general elections
constitutionally due late next
year, Mr Manning seems to be
in a race with himself to see
how many construction
projects he could build and how
many more stone-painting,
bush-cutting jobs he could cre-
ate before the bell rings.
We're already hearing from
him about how many buildings
were being constructed by his
government and that thanks to
the job-creating programmes,
unemployment figures are now
down to an historic single digit.
But what will he tell the
electorate about rising inflation,
soaring food prices, banks ra-
tioning foreign exchange because
of high demand for imports for
the construction sector; rising
poverty, falling real income lev-
els; decline of local food produc-
tion; decline in infrastructure
support and the overall increase
in the cost of doing business?
And there's crime too and
plenty of it.
It also looks like the gov-
ernment has lost track of deal-
ing with the more apparent is-
sues of high poverty levels and
further diversification of the
economy into areas such as ag-
riculture.
Instead, the government


has been using the state money
to build massive structures in
the two cities of Port of Spain
and San Fernando; throwing
more money into the Unem-
ployment Relief Programme to
give a "seven days" road side
jobs and expanding CEPEP, dis-
guised as an environmentally-
friendly programme where thou-
sands of young people are hired
by small companies, some
formed almost overnight by rul-
ing party supporters to paint
stones and boulders and chop
down bushes.
No wonder the country has
an acute labour shortage and has
to import labourers all the way
from China to work in Trinidad.
And what about all the ex-
tra money that is coming into
the government from soaring oil
prices that is supposed to be
going into the so-called Heritage
Fund for future generations?
Looking at the per capital
investment (dividing the invest-
ment in the fund by popula-
tion), Mottley who worked in
a previous Manning govern-
ment, said the per capital invest-
ment of the Alberta fund in
Canada was US$4,000; Alaska
- US$38,500; Norway -
US$32,600; Abu Dhabi-
US$500,000 while the Heritage
Fund in Trinidad was a mere


K

C


about his piano playing skills,
but it was a line that stayed with
'Bracey'.
That little episode at that
party so tickled' his funny side
that it often came up whenever
we recalled happy times after
that.
It's how I'll remember him
- seeking out the funny side of
life, despite the adversities and


US$695.
There are also concerns that
the ruling party is repeating the
mistakes of the 70s during high
oil prices and frittering away the
country's earnings in pampering
the electorate who constantly
demand the government's sub-
sidy on various products, par-
ticularly in the run-up to general
elections.
With food prices particu-
larly fruits and vegetables prices
going through the roof, Manning
also wants to go the way of a
70s policy by having price con-
trols. A question that arises is
what has happened to the gov-
ernment plans to transform
some of the former sugar plan-
tations to plant food for the
country?
While the country's food
import bill is over $1.2 billion,
arable lands are being used for
the government's housing
project or being sold and trans-
formed into hardware-type
buildings.


smiling as he advises, "If you
could, you would."
And the best tribute those
in charge of radio today could
pay 'Bracey' and others of his
breed is to try to regain the
principles and standards that
that bunch set for'radio.
It can be done "If you
could, you would."
Rest easy, 'Bracey'.


It just doesn't make
sense.



I would just like to add my
thoughts on the latest un-
folding drama in Port of
Spain between the Execu-
tive and the Judiciary, oth-
erwise termed the continu-
ing battle between Manning
and his second attempt to
remove Chief Justice
Satnarine Sharma from of-
fice.
After sifting through the
various press releases, I'm left
more baffled than ever, from
whatever angle I look, as to
who is telling the truth. So
many tales, so many conflict-
ing stories with fingers point-
ing about who is lying against
whoi and various conspiracy
theories.
Members of the public,
giving their views on radio and
on television, are already seeing
ethnic and political motivations
behind the latest battle.
The finger pointing be-
tween the Chief Justice and
Chief Magistrate Sherman Mc
Nicholls cannot be good for the
judiciary, cannot be good for the
country which is already in
deep political decay.
There are calls from the so-
ber-minded for both men to
temporarily step down from
their positions until the matters
are determined.
Now is not the time for
egos. Go, before the judi-
ciary, already suspicious of
delivering fair justice, is fur-
ther dragged into the gutter.


rI I


r c P c 9 w 'k6W-







8 SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006


The South African



Succession


YOU couldn't Imake it up.
Former South African deputy
president
Jacob Zuma, defending him-
self in court against a charge of
rape, explained that the woman
who brought thd complaint, a
family friend less than half his
age (she is 31, he is 64) who
was staying in his home, had
signaled that she wanted to have
sex with him. Hpw? By wear-
ing a knee-length skirt and sit-
ting with uncrossed legs. So
what was a gentleman to do?
If the woman truly wanted
to have sex with him, Zuma
pointed out, th n the rules of
Zulu culture obliged him to
oblige her. Not to have done so
when she so clearly wanted it
would, by the rules of Zulu cul-
ture, have been tantamount to
raping her. In other words, he
had to have sex' with her in or-
der not to rape her.
Indeed, so great was Zuma's
desire to do the right thing that
he had unprotected sex with her
despite the fact that she is an
AIDS activist who makes no se-
cret of the fact'that she is HIV-
positive. There was no condom
handy, he explained, and "ev-
erybody knows" that men
don't often get the HIV virus
from women, and besides, he
had a shower afterwards.
Jacob Zunla has had no for-
mal education,,but he is not gen-
erally seen as a stupid man.
Perhaps he really believes that
heterosexual men who take
showers are safe from AIDS
(despite the fact that he was
married for almost two decades
to a medical doctor who ended
up as minister of health).
Or perhaps he is secretly
HIV-positive himself, and so he
doesn't give adamn. We'll never
know, because the prosecutor
didn't demand a blood sample
from him.
Her only! justification for
doing so would have been that
he had recklessly endangered the
health of another person (which
could lead to a life sentence).
But it wouldn't have led to a


IV NW lo "w W -'" Iew i


stiffer sentence in Zuma's case
even if he had been convicted,
since the woman he was ac-
cused of raping was known to
be HIV-positive already.
In the end, on May 8, Zuma
was found not guilty by the
judge,
Willem van der Merwe, who
explained his decision by say-
ing that "it would be foolish for
any man with a police guard at
hand and his daughter not far
away to surprise a sleeping
woman and to start raping her
without knowing whether she
would shout the roof off." Van
de Merwe added that the alleged
victim "has a historic of making
false accusations of rape."
This history was helpfully
provided by a string of defence
witnesses who claimed to have
been accused of raping or try-
ing to rape the complainant,
though she mostly denied know-
ing them. They did not face
strict cross-examination, how-
ever, since by the rules of the
court (not to be confused with
the rules of Zulu culture) if she
denied knowing them, there was
no more to be said. Just choose
to believe them or to believe her.
The judge believed them.
Zuma emerged from the
court to be greeted by the usual
mob of cheering, mostly Zulu
supporters, and joined them in


a rousing rendition of
"Awulethu Utishini Wam"
(Bring Me My Machine-Gun).
And although h still faces a
further and quite separate trial
on corruption charges in July, it
already feels as if)he is back on
track as the leading contender
for the presidency of South Af-
rica when Th bo Mlbeki retires
in 2009. ;
Goodbye 'rainbow nation",
hello Zimbabwe South.
Jacob ZumI was a real hero
in the anti-apartheid struggle.
He spent ten yars imprisoned
on Robben Island and almost
twenty years in exile, ending up
as the Chief of the Intelligence
Department of the African Na-
tional Congress. As the highest-
profile Zulu in an organisation
whose leadership has been
dominated by Xhosas (including
both Nelson Mandela and
Thabo Mbeki), his ascent to the
posts of deputy president of
South Africa and deputy leader
of the ANC was swift and
smooth. The problem is that he
is a ruthless demagogue and, in
many people's eyes, a crook.
Last June, Zuma's financial
adviser, a Durban businessman
called Schabir Shaik, was sen-
tenced to fifteen years in prison
for corrupt dealings in connec-
tion with the government's pur-


agency to this," he said.
Porous in vast stretches
and often invisible, America's
5,500-mile (8,900-km) border
with Canada is drawing closer
scrutiny after U.S. President
George W. Bush, Mexican
President Vicente Fox and Ca-
nadian Prime Minister Stephen
Harper agreed in March to
work together on border secu-
ri y.
Residents in some towns
on the world's longest unde-
fended border have long entered
the United States with little
more than a wave of a hand or
a flash of a driver's licence.
Under rules written by the
U.S. State and Homeland Secu-
rity departments designed to
implement legislation passed
by Congress in 2004, passports
or credit card-sized PASS cards
with biometric features will be
(Please turn to page 10)


chase of warships, a proposed
waterfront development! iA
Durban, and lavish spending. o
Zuma's residence in Nkannld.
The trial judge described th red-
lationship between Shaik 'an~i
Zuma as "generally corrupt'',
Mbeki asked for his resignation
as vice-president, ahnd he Iw.s
committed for trial this Jul, n
corruption charges.\ i
His supporters on the. l ft
of the ANC and his devoted
Zulu followers claim thai the
rape charge was further evi-
dence of a plot to thwart
Zuma's presidential ambitions,
but it was actually an unfor-
tunate coincidence. The; case
had little chance of success
(the vast majority of accused
rapists in South Africa go
free), but it was a huge distrac-
tion from the corruption issue,
and his exoneration on the
rape charge will cast doubt in
the public's mind on any sub-
sequent conviction for
corruption. So Zuma may re-
ally be back in business, with
a good shot at the succession
when Mbeki retires in 2009.
That would not be happy
news for South Africa.
(Gwynne Dyer is a Lon-
don-based independent jour-
nalist whose articles are pub-
lished in, 45 countries.)


By David Ortiz

NEWPORT; R.I., (Reuters) -
Five Canadian provinces and
six Northeast U.S. states
agreed yesterday to fight U.S.
legislation that! would re-
quire passports or sophisti-
cated ID cards to enter the
United States from Canada.
The new rules ti take effect
from 2008 aimed at tighten-
ing security hfter the Sept. 11
attacks would create a bu-
reaucratic nightmare, damage
trade and shake up border life,
said the U.S. states and Cana-
dian provinces.
"The impact would just be
devastating,"' Quebec Premier
Jean Charest told the annual
Conference of New England
Governors and Eastern Cana-
dian Premiers.
"This needs further thought
before it's implemented. We
need to bring q real sense of ur-


What's in




a name?

By Luis Carpio

"That which we'calla rose
By any other name would smell as sweet"
William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet (II, ii)

PLEASE allow me to introduce Alberto, Beryl, Chrs, Debby,
Ernesto, Florence, Gordon, Helene. Isaac, Joyce, Kirk,
Leslie, Michael, Nadine. Oscar, Patty, Rafael, Sandy, Tony,
Valerie and William. The pleasure is all theirs, believe me.
These are the twenty-one names which the LIS National
Hurricane Center, which has been doing this since 1953, has
budgeted (at least alphabet-wise) for hurricanes this year. That
is. unless we run out of letters n the Roman alpbabt and have
to resort to the Greek, as in 2005 (Alpha, Beta, Ganima. Delta.
Epsilon. and Zeta. Talk about under-budgeting!
Last year's season in fact. was a record-breaker, leaving ush-
ered m the retirement of Dennis. Katnna, Rita, Stan and Wilma
(by itself a record-breaker, with 882 millibars of pressure); names
which have been shelved for posterity out of respect for the
incalculable misery they wrought.
This does not mean, of course, that we can guarantee 21
phenomena to come barrelling through our region, though at least
fi'e of the forecast 9 are expected to be "'major". meaning that
winds could exceed 110m mph (when the average is 2 3). There
are also 17 named tropical storms predicted for fhis season
(when the.seasonal average is 9.6). This forecast is. considered
robust, being based on 52 years of data, though I! must point
out, however, that 2005 fooled all the experts in this art/sci-
ence who seriously underestimated the season.
It is a pop-culture article of faith that naming lour fears is
the first step toward conquering them. However, when it comes
to the risks to life and limb in particular and to sustainable de-
velopment in general, posed by being in die path of nature's
wrath and given the reiterated evidence from the past, one has
to wonder at the steps that we are taking, particularly at the
regionallevel.
No one doubts that, whilst most countries in the Greater
Caribbean (GC) are particularly vulnerable to the effects of haz-
ards, some are better prepared and are ready'to offer coopera-
tion. Furthermore, as is becoming increasingly frequent, two
or more GC countries can be impacted by a single event, which
only serves to strengthen the argument for the need to sup-
port regional disaster mechanisms and capacities as well as
those of the UN, in order to enable them to respond effectively
to various disasters simultaneously.
In this scenario, the need to enhance the exchange of infor-
mation on hazard risk reduction, lessons learned and best prac-
tices during the whole disaster cycle (preparedness-response-
recovery), which begins well before early warning, cannot be
overstated. For example, the urgency of strengthening regional
capacities for early recovery in the aftermath of a disaster, which
effectively integrate risk reduction into the recovery process and
development plans in general, to prevent reconstruction at pre-
disaster standards is clear if we want' to end the vicious cycle
of destruction-rebuilding-destruction in which we are trapped.
In the GC we already have in the Agreement for Regional
Cooperation
on Natural Disasters a tool for collective action in response
to our continued exposure to hurricane, tornados, storms, tidal
waves, floods, tsunamis, earthquakes volcanic eruptions, land
slides, forest fires, epidemics, epizootics, agricultural plague and
drought, among others. This Agreeme t needs to be signed, rati-
fied and implemented ASAP. -
In the area of Natural disasters common sense answers
the Bard's question on "Whether Ptis nobler in the mind
to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune or to
take arms against a sea of troubles, and by opposing end
them?"


I -- -4--- -- - -- -
Sd AkiwjwdSab i& S&sWci CadCeA
140 'B'Quamina St.
TeL #: 225-238"or 22 7-5095
This currency counter is
light yet strong, with touch
sensitive control panel &
counterfeit detection.


De La Rue, A British company, is the world's
largest commerical security printer and paper-
inaker, involved in the production of over 150
national currencies and a wide range of security
documents such as travellers cheques and
vouchers. Employing over 6,500 people across
31 countries, it is also a leading provider of cash
handling equipment and software solutions to
banks and retailers worldwide, helping them to
reduce the cost of handling cash.


VACANCIES
EXIST FOR
ONE CASHIER
ONE SECRETARY/ACCOUNTS CLERK
/ Knowledge of Computer required
S/ Previous experience will be an asset
Apply in person with application at
H.N. Super Centre
50 Sheriff St., Campbellville. Tel: 231-7180


\gD rn ^ ; '^
,,,*
p" .:~~~e


"D' L- 1
A~~"~~l"


Op sition grows toI ~ I






SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006 9


DARK CLOUDS OVER T&T JUDICIARY

Second bitter clash between thePrime Minister and Chief Justice


By RICKEY SINGH

HERE they go again, was the
initial reaction to another
public showdown between
the Prime Minister and
Chief Justice of Trinidad
and Tobago last week
involving allegations of
improper judicial
interventions and counter-
claims of political threats to
independence of the
judiciary and the rule of law.
As this was being written,
speculations of imminent
criminal charges being brought,
against the Chief Justice,
Satnarine Sharma, were being
blended with fears of political
interference at the highest level
of the executive branch of
government in the justice
administration system.
Calls for an independent
probe in this second public
clash between the Prime
Minister and the Chief Justice
in a year over allegations of
interference by the latter to
influence court decisions, have
come from Opposition Leader
and former Attorney General,
Kamla Persad-Bissessar, and
the Trinidad Guardian
newspaper.
Had the once high
profile Caribbean BarAssociations
(OCCBA) been functioning today,
it would have been in a position
to alert its national affiliates to the
sensational and unprecedented
developments taking place
between the political and judicial
arms of government in that twin
island state of our Caribbean
Community.
Unfortunately, as things
are, the regional umbrella
organisation seems to be
reflecting the moribund status
of so many of its affiliates
across CARICOM with
members of the legal profession
evidently too busy to even


ensure regular meetings to
discuss matters of importance
to their profession
and country
Current exception may be
the Law Association of
Trinidad and Tobago which
has been propelled into
activity by the escalating
controversy between Prime
Minister Manning and Chief
Justice Sharma.
At issue, as it was the
case just a year ago, is an
alleged attempt by the Chief
Justice to influence a court's
decision in favour of a very
high profile accused former
Prime Minister Basdeo
Panday.

Recurring allegations
First, there was accusation
of alleged influence-peddling in
the murder case against a
surgeon friend of the Chief
Justice, Professor Vijay
Naraynsingh.
Secondly, a recurrence of
such an allegation against the
Chief Justice in the criminal
matter involving Panday who
was last month slapped with
a maximum two-year jail term
for failing to disclose to an
Integrity Commission details
of a London bank account he
shared with his wife, Oma,
while in office.
Within 11 days of
Manning's 2005 public
disclosure that he had advised
President Maxwell Richards to
appoint a three-member
tribunal to probe whether there
was sufficient evidence to
warrant impeachment of the
Chief Justice for claimed
improper behaviour and,
consequently, have him
removed from office, Sharma
had hit back with a lawsuit
challenging such a course and
requiring Manning to appear
before a judge to defend the


allegations made against him.
The Chief Justice. claiming
extreme bias and improper
interventions hy the Prime
Minister with whom, he said,
personal relations were
characterized by "conflict and
discord" following his
appointment in July 2002, had in
turn assembled a team of legal
luminaries as Manning had also
done to represent him.
But last week's confrontation
with Manning over claims brought
to the Prime Minister's
attention by Attorney General
John Jeremie, that the Chief
Justice had sought to influence
Chief Magistrate Sherman
Nicholls against imposing a guilty
verdict on Panday, the relentless
pressure from the executive arm
of government seems to have
shaken the ground from under
Sharma.
Speculations of an imminent
criminal charge being brought
against the Chief Justice was
being fuelled last week by the
earlier challenge from the Prime
Minister, as headlined on May
10, that Sharma either resign or
face charges of misconduct in the
case of Chief Magistrate Nicholls'
ruling against Panday.
In the wake of Manning and
Sharma publicly locking horns,
Chief Magistrate Nicholls was
provided a brief on Thursday to
Director of Public Prosecutions,
Geoffrey Henderson.
That meeting of the two
further added to the excitement
about likely legal action against
the Chief Justice. He, in turn,
had vehemently protested to the
Judicial and Legal Services
Commission about attempts to
tarnish his integrity. He said he
is a victim of a political
conspiracy to force him out of
office.

Full-blown battle
The Chief Justice mounted a


team of high-profile lawyers in
preparation for a full-blown
battle to protect his integrity
and "preserve independence of
thejudiciary" from interference
by the executive arm of
government.
For his part, Prime
Minister Manning set into
motion a process as he did last
year when allegations erupted in
the Naraynsingh murder case -
leading to likely impeachment of
the Chief Justice for improper
conduct in office.
Following the first public
showdown in 2005 between
Manning and Sharma, surgeon
specialist Naraynsingh was
acquitted of the charge of
murdering his ex-wife.
Separately, an independent
two-member mediation team of
legal luminaries was quietly
addressing the problem, as
President Maxwell maintained a
hold on appointment of the
tribunal requested by Manning
to consider a case existed for
impeachment of the Chief
Justice.
Now, Manning's Attorney
General is once again very much
at the centre of second public
confrontation between the
Prime Minister and Chief
Justice, this time over alleged
interference for a ruling
favourable to Panday.
The difference in the current
Manning-Sharma verbal storm is
that instead of the Director of Public
Prosecutions, Geoffley Henderson,
being cited, along with the Attorney
General, for implicating the Chief
Justice in the Naraynsingh case,
Chief Magistrate Nicholls is being
challenged, along with the AG
for allegations ofjudicial interference
by the embattled Sharma.
Allegations and counter-
claims of an improper land
purchasing deal by the Chief
Magistrate have also surfaced as
being relevant in the war of


words over the Chief Justice's
reported attempt to influence
Nicholls' ruling in the Panday
case, which is being appealed.

Law Association's
warning
The Council of the Law
Association of T&T on
Wednesday expressed its deep
concern in a press statement for
the implications of the public
row resulting from the Prime
Minister's threat to the Chief
Justice to resign or face charges.
It declared Manning's
position to be "a clear abuse of
power by the Prime Minister,
direct assault on the
independence of the Office of
the Chief Justice and of the
judiciary in general, and a
blatant infringement of the
separation of powers under the
Constitution...
"Further", the Law Association
said, "more alarming is that implicit
in the statement alleged to have
been made by the Prime Minister
is that he has, or is of the view that
he has authority and control over
the Office of the Director of Public
Prosecutions and the Police
Service and that those institutions
are subject to his direction."
Some leading lawyers, in and
out of Trinidad and Tobago,
are being careful not to take
sides in this unfolding drama of
grave judicial and political
consequences.
At the same time, they have
differently come to the
conclusion of
questioning whether with the
impeachment proceedings still
pending against him in the
Naraynsingh's murder case, that
Chief Justice Sharma could
really have been that
injudicious, irresponsible to
seek to influence, as alleged, a
ruling in Panday's favour by the
Chief Magistrate?
There may be much more in


PATRICK MANNING
the proverbial mortar than the
pestle in this latest battle
between the Prime Minister and
Chief Justice of Trinidad and
Tobago with its varying
implications for independence
of the judiciary and the rule of
law.
Little wonder, therefore,
that High Court judge Herbert
Volney made a public appeal to
jurors in his San Fernando
court on Wednesday (May 10)
to pray for the judges
"When you go home", said
Volney, "those of you who are
praying souls, pray for our
country. What we read is
happening is quite frightening,
especially to us who hold public
office. Pray in particular for the
judiciary because we are in need
of your prayers..."
So, in that multi-ethnic,
multi-faith CARICOM state,
noted for its public
controversies in the areas of
politics, culture, religion and
justice administration, the
national atmosphere is being
increasingly poisoned with
sensational claims and actions
by public officials from whom
better is expected.
For now, we await the
latest on the Manning-
Sharma duel which may or
may not reach its
expected dramatic stage by
the time you read this
column.


DELCASA BUILDING -



FIRST FLOOR

Middle Street

3 houses East of Camp Street.


Suitable for doctors, lab, offices, restaurant.

TV station, conference



Tel: 225-5591/2274., 323


iC al; ".4 0
I. '.; '...



MAHAICA MAHAICONY ABARY AGRICULTURAL
DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY


IRRIGATION SCHEDULE



SPRING CROP 2006

Rice Farmers are asked to note that as a result of representation by the Guyana
Rice Producers Association (RPA) the irrigation Schedule for Abary/Berbice
area is as follows:


DESCRIPTIONOF AREA
2. Abary/Berbice
(a) Area 5
(b) Areas 1 -4


DATE OF COMMENCEMENT OR IRRIGATION


Monday, May 15,2006
Saturday, May 20, 2006


Farmers within these areas are advised to time their operations in order to make
the best use of the services provided and to avoid any damage to the works.
Farmers are also warned that it is an offence to damage Drainage and Irrigation
infrastructures, which is punishable by imprisonment for six (6) months under
Section 34 of the MMA Act.



Mapager, Operation & Maintenance Divjsiqn,. , -
SMMAADA .. ^. ,-..- .. .






10 .SUNDAY CHRONICLE-May 14, 006


Commonwealth moral authority



vital to Caribbean interests


By Sir Ronald Sanders

(THE WRITER IS A
BUSINESS EXECUTIVE
AND FORMER CARIBBEAN
DIPLOMAT WHO
PUBLISHES WIDELY ON
SMALL STATES IN THE
GLOBAL COMMUNITY)
THE preservation of the
moral authority of the
Commonwealth (formerly
the British Commonwealth)
is vital to the Caribbean.
Sidelined, as they are, in
international organizations
because of their smallness and
lack of clout, the
Commonwealth presents the
leadership of Caribbean states
with unique opportunities to
advance their concerns in the
international community.
The Commonwealth is the
only multilateral organisation in
which heads of government of
Caribbean States enjoy equal
status with heads of larger and
more powerful countries such as
Britain, Canada, Australia,
India, Nigeria and South Africa.


They can present their causes in
the Commonwealth and, having
won support, expect the larger
countries to back them in
organizations such as the IMF
and the World Bank.
But the Commonwealth's
moral authority is being eroded
because of its silence over
Zimbabwe where the
government of President Robert
Mugabe has violated human and
civil rights, destroyed
democratic institutions and
presided over the ruin of a once
vibrant economy.
This issue has come into
focus in the last few weeks
during the official celebration of
the 80th birthday of Britain's
Head of State, Queen Elizabeth.
The Queen is also Head of
the Commonwealth, a voluntary
association of 54 States made up
of Britain and many of its
former colonies in the Americas,
the Caribbean, Africa and Asia.
But, repeatedly, the
international media have been
questioning the authority of the
Commonwealth which did not


Inserted by her children Pam, Roy, Neirmela, Mala, Sharmila
and Rakesh. Grands Vijeta, Kevin, Alex, Alana, Mellissa,
Anela, Alicia, Rishi, Rahual and Andrew. In-laws Boyie,
Dennis, Singh,Anil and Susie.

M1ay) iCersouf continue to rest peace









The wife, children, grandchil-
dren, brothers, sister, neph-
ews, nieces and other rela-
tives of the late RIPUDAMAN
PERSAUD, Barrister-at-Law,
wish to thank all his friends
who sympathised with them in
their recent bereavement.

God's blessings

on everyone.


deal with Zimbabwe at its last
Heads of Government
Conference in Malta late last
year, and on whose work
agenda Zimbabwe does not now
appear.
Journalists have pointed
with alarm to the response of
Don McKinnon, the
Commonwealth Secretary-
General, to the question: why
was Zimbabwe not discussed at
Malta? The Secretary-General
said that Zimbabwe was no
longer a member of the
Commonwealth, Mr. Mugabe
having withdrawn his country's
membership prior to the
Conference.
These journalists have been
quick to point out that South
Africa's withdrawal from the
Commonwealth did not stop
the organisation from discussing
its atrocious Apartheid policies,
nor did it stop the
Commonwealth from taking
initiating international action
against the Apartheid regime
including sanctions.
There are many in the
Commonwealth who, like the
journalists, worry that the
Commonwealth is weakening its
credibility and authority by not
dealing with Zimbabwe. And
such persons include the
strongest supporters of the
Commonwealth.
The Commonwealth has a
unique responsibility for
Zimbabwe. It was the
Commonwealth that stood up
against the infamous Unilateral
Declaration of Independence
from Britain by a white
minority government led by Mr.
lan Smith under a Constitution
that deprived black
Zimbabwcans of rights in their
own country.
Heads of Commonwealth
governments had repeatedly
called for "the removal of the
illegal Smith regime and the
dismantling of its apparatus of
repression in order to pave the
way for the creation of police
and armed forces which would
be responsive to the needs of


the people of Zimbabwe and
ensure the orderly and effective
transfer of power"
(communique, London 1977).
Zimbabwe's independence
under majority rule with Mr.
Mugabe as President was
uniquely a Commonwealth
achievement for the organisation
persuaded the UK and U.S.
governments to turn away from
Ian Smith and contemplate
independence for Zimbabwe
under majority rule.
Caribbean governments
were extremely active on behalf
of Mugabe and the majority of
the Zimbabwean people. They
had spoken out and acted
against racial discrimination,
political oppression, and the
denial of human rights. They
expected that Zimbabwe would
become a model for African
development based on majority
rule, peaceful racial coexistence
and respect for democracy.
Instead, Mr. Mugabe has
cut down political opponents,
repressed opposition, and
pursed polices that have
wrecked the Zimbabwean
economy including the seizure
of once arable farm land that are
now unproductive.
Few would have quarrelled
with Mr. Mugabe's position that
80 per cent of the country's
arable land in the hands of a
minority of white farmers was
wrong. Right thinking persons
would have supported a well
thought-out policy of land re-
distribution which included
adequate compensation and the
continued productivity of
farms.
But, there was illegal
seizure, little or no
compensation, and land was
given to persons with no
experience of farming. Today,
a country which once offered
the prospect of being one of the
richest in Africa has all but
collapsed economically, and
democracy has been discarded
as Mr. Mugabe hangs on to
power by force.
1 suspect that when Mr.


PROPERTIES FOR SALE


AT AUCTION AT THE
I N S A NCE ) F THE
R EGISTRA R OF THE
SUPREME COU RI.

- Lot 5. containing an area of
100.866 acres. being part of
Belmont. East Bank Berbice.

SPart of the northern fiont quarter
of Lot 49 (Public Road) situate in
that part of the Town of New
Amsterdam called Stanleytown,
Berbice.


p,'
0rr 9nlln


TUESDAY', MAY
13:00 HOU
\WAR EI I )HUSE
GEORGETOWN


16, 2006 AT
RS STATE
KINGSTON,


McKinnon justified not
discussing Zimbabwe at Malta,
he did so to preserve the
organisation from a deep rift
between some African countries,
particularly South Africa, and
other Commonwealth members.
Thabo Mbeki, the President of
South Africa, has to manage a
difficult racial situation in his
own country that could ignite
over Zimbabwe.
Mr. McKinnon had himself
secured a policy decision in
2003 to continue Zimbabwe's
suspension from the
Commonwealth and he had
quietly initiated several
diplomatic efforts to engage Mr.
Mugabe. These were all
rebuffed.
But, as conditions in
Zimbabwe worsen, the
Commonwealth cannot appear
to be standing aloof on the basis
that the country is no longer a
member of the Commonwealth.
If the Commonwealth is to
maintain its integrity and moral
authority, Zimbabwe must again
become a focus of its concern,
and African countries
particularly South Africa should
be persuaded that the majority
of Commonwealth members are
of this view.
But, Mr. McKinnon needs
the help of the member States of
the Commonwealth if he is to
initiate action on behalf of the
people of Zimbabwe.
The two groups of countries
best placed to give the Secretary-
General such help are the
Caribbean and Asia.
Caribbean governments
should be expressing their deep
concern to the Secretary-General
and Commonwealth
governments in Africa not only
about the abuse in Zimbabwe,
but also about the damage being
inflicted upon the
Commonwealth by its inaction.
It is in the interest of
Zimbabwe, the
Commonwealth, and their
own countries that Caribbean
governments express such
concern.


Opposition

grows to

U.S.-Canada

border pass-

port plan

(From page eight)
required for anyone crossing
into the United States from
Canada by land starting on
Jan. 1, 2008.
Senior officials from the
five Canadian provinces and
U.S. border states said the rules
could drive a wedge between
border communities that are
culturally and economically
entwined, and strain the
world's biggest trading relation-
ship by slowing the $1.1 billion
in trade flowing each day
across the border.
More than 300,000 people
travel between the United
States and Canada each day.
Only about 20 per cent of U.S.
citizens and 40 per cent of Ca-
nadians hold passports, which
cost nearly $100. The PASS
cards would cost about half
that price.
In a draft statement released
at the end of the two-day con-
ference, the governors or senior
officials from Connecticut,
Rhode Island, Maine, Massa-
chusetts, Vermont and New
Hampshire, and the premiers of
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New
Brunswick, Newfoundland and
Prince Edward Island said they
would urge the U.S. Congress
to delay implementation of the
law.
They also agreed to explore
other options that would have
less negative economic and
social impact. Only two states
sent governors, although all sent
representatives to the
conference. Four of the five
Canadian provinces sent pre-
miers.
Vermont Gov. James
Douglas said the new regula-
tions would make daily life
much more difficult along the
border where children have long
played sports in both
countries.
Rhode Island Gov. Donald
Carcieri said: "We shouldn't be
thickening the border, what we
should be doing is working
together, the two nations, to
protect North America."
"I think a lot of
Americans don't fully un-
derstand or appreciate what
is at stake here," he said.


LensrAr fl
OPTICAL~1
0 P T I CR AI .".


FREE EYE ELIMINATION
Enjoy smashing 10% discount on all Rx spectacles
Wide selection of frames for you to choose from

*Flex Rimeless
*Roma
*Channel
*Joan Collins L
*Alpha
oBourgois, etc


Supply your frame and pay for your lenses only
We accept all NIS vouchers
Call for appointments

LEHS CRAFT OPTICAL
AI ftI I U/ 1ii!'


*I] In Z 1- -rc.


.
*-

;
.


SOORSATTIE RAMJEAWAN a/k
LUCILLE of Best Village, W.C.D.
We don't know how you do it
But you've surrounded us
With yourlove and care
When we were down
It was yourlove that got us up again
U've helped us walk
U've inspired us to fly
And today wejust wanna say
Thank you for everything you have
done for us Mom
We all miss u MOM and wish if you
.. . j .' ,,


" C






._I.:11


-SNDY: A NiiIC' fN 06


By Norman Faria

A FEW weeks ago, I was
heartened to visit a whole-
sale outlet in Barbados which
supplies retailers in the is-
land with Guyanese rice.
Not only did the
operations underscore the con-
tinued success of our exporters
on the regional and extra-re-
gional markets, but I was inter-
ested for another reason: the
straightforward, tight, no-frills
packaging. For marketing and
trade reasons, we wouldn't
mention the brand name, except
to say it is from an enterprising
Berbice businessperson. What
struck me was the clean, com-
pact way the five sizes (1, 3, 4,


9 and 22 kilograms) were pre-
sented. No extra, air-filled pock-
ets in the plastic bags which
noted proudly 'Produce of
Guyana'. What you saw is what
you got!
Compare this with some of
the products on supermarket
shelves both in Guyana and
Caribbean islands like Barbados.
Some of the non-transparent
bags, boxes and other contain-
ers are only partially full. The
shopper is given the impression
that the contents fill up (right to
the top) the bags, box or other
containers. But they don't, and
this is misleading.
Look at some of the frozen
potato chips from the US. I
picked up one brand. A third of


How'Dddy'


affct iyor i-o


ByElnWufos

VIENA(Rutrs NE YRK(Rutrs Sucese oIfil

ures f emloyee in he wokplae cabetcdtow t
kido ahe hyhd apyhlgs t rus i e
book
In'h ahr atrSepa ole ist iesye
fahes Spe-ahivng tmebo bpasve aset ndcon
pas ioat /in ntr wh hae pwerulinfune oIh a


mod.Ths nuiieailte.mk hm oda scI b


meeopnmtut.sidPule, liialpycoo istw oas
wok ithaolsetsi LsAgee ae chos
"I'v senmoepepl ht hirhedsonwatthy. al
gasc iligo e en ali hir crees,. ndi t'I w atI
cal te aterfato,"Pout sidinaninerie .-ha rl


the package was simply air.
Have you bought a box of corn
flakes lately? Open it and the
top of the contents are
generally an inch or even more
below the top of the container
- more air.
An important dimension of
a firm's marketing thrust is the
packaging of its product. The
harsh reality of the competitive
retail sector is that attractively
presented products generally
will catch the consumer's eye
first. In fairness to the astute-
ness and "shop smart" outlook
of the consumer, there has,
however, been a steady growth
of 'No frills' or 'No brand'
stores in North American and
UK cities. What this means is
that products are
packaged without any brands.
It appears though that
the average consumer still
prefers to chose from
among a variety of often
extravagantly presented products
on the shelves. A recent is-
sue of the British consumer
magazine 'WHICH?' quotes
the giant UK supermarket
chain Sainsbury: "Packag-
ing helps promote and sell
the product". But the maga-
zine also reports that many
shoppers ignore labels to
see the exact quantity in-
side. "(We) judge by the
look and feel", the maga-
zine said.
The magazine goes on to
point out how unnecessary, ex-
cessive packaging can be harm-
ful to the environment. "(It)
spells disaster for the environ-
ment as they mount up in the
landfills," it said.
There is too much plastic. I
went to a large supermarket near
my residence in Barbados and
looked over the vegetable sec-
lion. Nearly each individual iteml
was nestled in a while
Styrofoam plate covered by
plastic wrap. though there were
choices where people could bag
your own and buy by the kilo-


TOURISM & HOSPITALITY ASSOCIATION OF GUYANA






Notice is hereby given of an extraordinary meeting of the Tourism & Hospitality
Association of Guyana (THAG) to be held on Thursday, June 08, 2006 at 17:00 hrs,
Hibiscus Room, Hotel Tower Limited.

AGENDA:
1. To appoint trustees of the unincorporated association: Tourism and Hospitality
Association of Guyana Ltd.
2. To amend the Articles of Association of the Tourism and Hos'I:..l,' Association of
Guyana Ltd. to convert the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana Ltd. into
a private company.
3. To approve and ratify the appointment of the Secretary of the Company.
4. Any other business
E% , ,. :'11;,- E ..:,.. "


Maureen Paul
Exec'iute Director Scretarv


gram. There were bagged im-
ported 'English' potatoes from
the US. Bagging them in plastic
was unnecessary. The landfills
in densely populated islands
such as Barbados are stressed
by the disposals of this non-
biodegradable (the plastic won't
breakdown like cardboard for
example) element.
While on a visit to
Georgetown last September, I
went out one night to a 'fast
food' outlet. I bought a small
piece of chicken. When I saw the
counter woman was putting it in
one of those large white
Styrofoam containers with the
lid, I said just wrap it in a pa-
per napkin and put it in a small
paper bag both bio-degrad-
able. And she did.
As WHICH? magazine
reminds us, a certain amount
of packaging is necessary. It
points to eggs for instance.
But even here, we should be
disappointed about recent
trends. I remember my
parents bringing home eggs in
a perfectly good and sanitary
type of paper-based con-
tainer. It would dissolve if it
got wet, but it lasted and in
fact, you could return them
and get a refund if it was
still in good condition. It was
replaced by an allegedly
cleaner Styrofoam. Now we
have the clear "disposable"
(even the term is touted by
advertisers as
worthwhile) plastic contain-
ers which are frustrating to
place in garbage bags.
We have seen how plastic
containers clogged up the canals
and drains and made cleaning
difficult during recent floods in
Guyana. It was, and continues
to be, an unwelcome situation
which the Daily
Chronicle recently reminded us
about w\ilh pho10o of a mnan
clearing a manhole at High and
America streets of plastic
bottles and other debris block-
ing the systems.


Eventually, as in other coun-
tries, Guyana will have to inten-
sify its research and use of
added value and environmen-
tally friendly products from'our
traditional crops and industries.
The making of grocery bags and
fast food containers from ba-
gasse and rice husks, which
would normally be thrown
away, is an example. Those in-
dustries making plastic prod-
ucts should undoubtedly use
creative ways to phase out and/
or diversify.
The campaign sponsored
by the Environmental Protec-
tion Agency, UN Agencies,
Banks DIH and Demerara Dis-
tillers Limited to encourage the
recycling of PET plastic con-
tainers is a commendable move
indeed.
There is the view by the av-
erage shopper that the prolifera-
tion of plastic packaging and
stacks of (free!) plastic grocer-
ies bags at the cashier is a sign


of prosperity and economic
progress. In a way, this is cor-
rect. Aside from the image of
the unprecedented (compared to
the shortages and hardships in
Guyana during the 1970s and
1980s) availability of the con-
sumer items, there is the conve-
nience. No one expects the av-
erage shopper to once again
walk with a shoulder bag to get
a few ounces of flour or sugar,
though for small quantities this
isn't bad idea. People still like
to go in a supermarket and select
individual packaged products.
There is an ongoing effort in
Guyana and elsewhere to take
stock of what type of packaging
is currently used and replace it
with a less misleading
and environmentally friendly
version. That campaign is also
worth considering
and supporting.
(Mr. Norman Faria is
Guyana's Honorary Consul
in Barbados)


PUBLIC ASSISTANCE DURING THE CLAIMS &
OBJECTIONS PERIOD FOR THE 2006 PLE

The Electoral Assistance Bureau wishes to infonn the
General Public that persons wishing to check for their
names on the Preliminary List of Electors (PLE) can
call the EAB hotline: 225-6739 or 225-6799. Please
have your ID Card on hand when you call.

The PLE will also be available for persons to check at
the EAB's Office at the Private Sector Commission
Building. 157 Waterloo Street. North Cummingsburg.
Georgclo\\ n.

E-mail requests to check the PLE can be sent to
eabu, nli i. x a\hoo.com. Please slate ou full name.
tldidrcss and NaItioa;l iia Card number


Project Director
EAB


VACANC&SC

MINISTRY OF LABOUR, HUMAN SERVICES & SOCIAL SECURITY
Thle Mliuslr of Labour. lHumlnii Sen ices & Socicl Soi ecui r in\ lies applications 1rom
suitlbl\ quallified persons for the position of:

PROBATION AND SOCIAL SERVICES OFFICER 1, 11

All applications must be sent to:

Permanent Secretary
MinistrN of Labour. Human Services & Social Securitx
1. Water & Cornhill Streets
Stabrock
Gcorgetow\ n.

Closing late for applications is lMa 31 2006.

Job descriptions and.job specificltlois in respect olfthe abo\e-meilioned position call
be obtained Ironi the Personnel ciepiari.icni. linistrl of Labour Hiimanii Sen ices &
Social Seccurlt .
_--" ':--" :" j '. ..... ' 7 ": : ,,


How excessive packaging




can mislead shoppers and




harm the environment





Rotary introduces youths


to leadership concepts


The British High Commission is offering for sale
the following vehicle:
Suzuki Grand Vitara
(5) speed manual transmission
The above vehicle may be viewed in the
High Commission Compound on
Monday 15~' May between 0800-1400hrs.
Written bids should be delivered sealed by,
1200hrs on Tuesday 16th May 06
(Clearly indicating 'Suzuki' on the envelope)
and addressed to:
Management Officer
British High Commission
44 Main Street, Georgetown
Sale of the vehicle is on an "as seen as is" basis.
The British High Commission reserves the right to
accept or reject all part of any offer that might be made.


SOME 80 young people last week were
introduced to the concepts of leadership
in a programme organised by the Rotary
Club of Georgetown.
The youths, aged 14-25, were drawn from the
Guyana Red Cross Society, four Rotaract and
four Interact Clubs. They learned the benefits of
Rotary and volunteerism, effective leadership,
budgeting and money management, sexual and
reproductive health, the Caribbean Court of
Justice and the Caribbean Single Market and
Economy.
Known as Rotary Leadership Awards
(RYLA), the programme provides education
and training for young people with
outstanding potential.
RYLA participants receive training from successful
professionals, with special emphasis on the
importance of ethics and community service.


The graduating class and members of the Moravian
Church.
IN ITS quest for further growth and development, the
Moravian Church in Guyana embarked on a training
programme for the Lay Pastoral ministry.
The programme, which covered a penod of 18 months,
entailed Biblical Studies of the Old and New Testament, Church
History Pastoral Care Ministry.
Eight candidates from arious congregations pursued the -
programme which was the first of such magnitude for the
Province.
On May 7. 20X6. a vern impressive and historical graduation
and installation ceremony was held for their commissioning as
Lay Pastors
They ill primarily be a'isting in the overall pastoral
mjnlstrNy of ihe congregalln.'
At the ceremony, the feature address was delivered by
Reverend Paul Woolford. one of the facilitators of the
programme, while the charge was given by Reverend
Brinmore Phaul. Chairman of the Moravian Church in
Guyana.


A miessag fro I Mayo and ityounil
^^ Iii Sm ggg a' A ^^^ IEEII I


HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY 2006
b. -- "0_____


GBTI
emr0srl~ulra..a


PROPERTIES

FOR SALE
AT AUCTION AT THE INSTANCE OF THE
REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT
* Cultivation land situate at blocks numbered 46 and
47, parts of the southern sections of Perseverance,
Essequibo comprising 7.50 and 32.67 acres
respectively.

* Residential land (approx. 2400 sq ft) situate at Lot
64, North of Central Dam, Pouderoyen, West Bank
Demerara with one flat wooden and concrete
building (approx. 800 sq ft)

Household furniture, 3 used gas cylinders, and
other miscellaneous items.

TUESDAY, MAY 16, 2006, AT 13.00 HOURS.
STATE WAREHOUSE, KINGSTON, GEORGETOWN
Please contact telephone numbers
227-8167/226-0718 for further information


Participants of the Rotary Club of Georgetown programme.


.9i WPV 910WPERS
)wY 2006

S The Board of Directors, Management and Staff of the,
SGuyana Responsible Parenthood Association (GRPA)
Extend the warm and loving greetings to all mothers on
Mother's Day.

~,We are pleased to honour all mothers on this occasion for,.
\\ e are aware that mothers give their unconditionally love,1: K6
time and energies towards the well being and development
Softhe family.

i-We join with fathers, children and all others in salutini,
Smothers in Guyana on the occasion of Mother's Day 2006.



,q hf/,al" / j'rw az X z 4 IZ
rr////r' r' f^)r// fyff *-L


------- -- ------- -~"~' '~'~`~~'~ ~ ~ i~'''` ~ ii ~ i ~ i "- -


. .... k ..... L a %* ,. .... .. % c -j1 *. ,, .. ..


Moravian

Church

trains Lay


Pastors


~.~ ,SU~~FHRP~!F# rWlb~iYatr~SPsI :, : .





13


Y ADNUS CHRONICLE 6


40th In nI ni v


'Green Land of Guyana:
Landscape and Vision in
Guyanese Art', an exhibition
celebrating Guyana's 40th
anniversary of Independence,
opens on Thursday, May 18,
at the National Gallery,
Castellani House, at 17:00
hrs.
A release from Castellani
House said yesterday that the
exhibition includes works from
the National Collection, and
private collections by artists
including Stanley Greaves, Ron
Savory, Aubrey Williams, Philip


Moore, Leila Locke, Bernadette
Persaud, Marjorie Broodhagen,
Terence Roberts, Angold
Thompson, Merlene Ellis,
Winston Strick, and many
others, less well known.
"The varying approaches to
landscapes, cityscapes and aspects
of the natural world will be revealed
in paintings, drawings and some
sculptures in the exhibition", the
release promised.
It added that of particular
interest will be the works from
the early generation of
Guyanese artists including R.G


How 'Daddy' affects your job...
from page 11


come the boss, Poulter writes.
Even absent fathers affect
how their children work, he
writes, by instilling feelings of
rejection and abandonment.
Those children may be
overachievers, becoming the
person their father never was,
or develop such anger toward
supervisors or authority figures
that they work best when they
are self-employed, he writes.
"A lot of people say, 'I


never knew my dad,"' he said.
But, he added: "You knew the
myth, you knew your mother's
hatred, you knew your anger,
you knew your dad was a loser.
Trust me, you knew your dad.
"The father's influence in
the workplace is really one of
the best-kept secrets," he said.
Poulter co-authored an earlier
book on mothers and daughters
called "Mending the Broken
Bough." 'The Father Factor' is


Sharpies, Hubert Moshett,
Basil De Freitas and Alvin
Bowman, which were among the
earliest ever bought for the
National Gallery of Art by the
specially formed Joint Art
Committee of the 1940s, some
fifty years before the National
Gallery's existence. With names
like 'Saffon Street Scene',
'Versailles', and 'Ice on the
Line', they reveal glimpses of
Guyanese life of an earlier era
that create a pleasing sense of
nostalgia.
The exhibition's opening


set for release next month by
Prometheus Books.
Looking at the influence of
fathers fits with other recent
research on workplace
behaviour, said William Pollack,
a psychology professor and
director of the Centers for Men
and Young Men at McLean
Hospital, part of Harvard
Medical School.
"There's been a good deal
of research to show not only
that our family-life experi-
ence and our experience with
our parents affects our
personality, but it affectsour


also marks International
Museum Day, the day on or
around which galleries and
museums worldwide highlight
their role in society. This year's
theme is 'Museums and Young
People'.
The exhibition is open to
the public from Friday May
19 until Saturday July 29.
The gallery is open from
Monday to Friday from 10:00
hrs to 14:00 hrs, on Saturday
from 14:00 hrs to 18:00 hrs.
The gallery is closed on
Sunday.


corporate personality, both
as leaders and followers,"
said Pollack, author of "Real
Boys."
"There's also good
research to show that for
men and women, the way
they identify with their
father and their father's role
may well affect how they
interact as a manager or
leader in the workplace."
Poulter, by the way,
describes his own father as the
absent type. After this book, he
said, "my dad won't even talk
to me."


VA CANCYNO TWICE





A Diplomatic Mission in Georgetown is seeking an individual for the position of Fraud
Investigator. The incumbent performs moderately difficult and responsible work
pertaining to a limited range of investigative work. The incumbent will also assist in work
pertaining to the processing and issuance of immigrant and non-immigrant visas.

SALARY: G$2,488,141.00 per annum, if all requirements are met.

QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS:

All applicants must address each selection criterion detailed below with specific and
comprehensive information supporting each item.

1. Completion of Secondary School is required.

2. From two to three years of progressively responsible experience in investigative work,
such as military or police agency or private security claims in investigative
organization.

3. Good working knowledge of English in reading, writing and speaking, is required.

4. Must be familiar with local laws and practices affecting marriages, divorce, adoptions
and legitimization.

5. Must be able to write reports clearly and concisely.

6. Must be able to use a computer and type at a minimum of 40 w.p.m.

TO APPLY:

Persons wishing to apply should submit the following or the application will not be
considered:

-- Current resume, or curriculum vitae, with a cover letter.

-- Candidates who are U.S. Veterans must provide proof of Veterans preference.
-- Required work and/or residency permit if residing in country and candidate is not a
Guyanese national.
Applications must be addressed to:
Human Resources Office
(Fraud Investigator)
P.O. Box 10507
Georgetown
CLOSING DATE: May 25,2006.
Only applications meeting qualifications listed above will be acknowledged.


Potato chip in space


(MSNBC) The latest picture from the European
Southern Observatory documents a double blast in a
warped galaxy that's been compared to "a gigantic potato
crisp."
The dit,.,rred ,hape ,f the th ghil. \ r:und spiral. offlicill:.
l.noui n as NGC 319rl. i< due 1to graI taional tidal interacii.,'n
In fact. the \.\rp is so pronounced th:al asronomers Inlitill'
gave the southeastern lip of the spiral a different galactic
designation, NGC 3189
Scienu is believe a super ni-.jsie black hole is sudden tnhin
the gala.\ s bright centre but from their point of view. the
rarest features of this picture are a couple of barely perceptible
flashes within the interstellar dust.
Those flashes, pinpointed in this picture, are Type la
superno.ae that were first spotted in 2002. Type la supernova
is used to calibrate our cosmic yardsticks and as a re-ult.
shed lght on such my'renes as the expansion rate of the universe
and the effect of mystenous dark matter.
"Two supernovae of this type appearing nearly
simultaneously in the same galaxy is a rare event, as norm.dl%
astronomers expect only one such event per century in a galaxy,"
the ESO said in the image release last week.
NGC 3190. which is 70 million lightl-ears from Earth in
the constellation Leo. has been closely watched ever since 2002's
twin explosion. The image seen here was derived from a 14-
minute exposure in March 2003. usig the ESO's Very Large
Telescope in Chile
The potato chip galaxy's crunched shape calls to mind
another galaxy, ESO 510-G13, which contains a warp first
noticed by the ESO and most famously imaged by the
Hobble Space Telescope.


is pleased to announce
The Ambassador's Fund for HIV/AIDS


The United States Embassy will award grants for community-based initiatives
on HIV/AIDS-related issues that assist in reaching the goals of the President's
Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) program in Guyana with the
overall goals for preventing 15,432 new infections, enabling 9,000 persons
including orphans and vulnerable children to receive care and support, and,
administering treatment to 1,800 persons;

The Ambassador's Fund for HIV/AIDS is designed to enhance and support
existing or new community activities to combat HIV/AIDS, and to encourage
communities to cooperate in fighting the epidemic and reducing the
associated stigma and discrimination.


Who is eligible to apply?

The Fund provides limited financial resources to launch or complete small,
constructive, community-based projects. Community-based groups,
professional organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGO), faith-
based organizations (FBO), media, and the private sector are eligible for
funding.

The project must:
S1:"" be a minimum of US$200. and although larger projects will be
considered, the Fund is intended primarily for projects under US$5,000, at the
..Uhnited States Government rate of exchange:
provide 25% (in cash or in kind) of the cost of the activities;
3 be responsible and accountable for all monies distributed under the
Fund;
4be accessible to the entire community regardless of race, religion, or
gender; and
.5 have a reasonable probability that there will be demonstrative impact
and/or follow-up activities once completed.

: Full details on eligibility will be provided when the applications forms are
uplifted.

H1ow to apply:

The Ambassador's Fund for HIV/AIDS is funded by the Government of the
United States through the Ambassador. Information on the Fund and applications
can be obtained from the Receptionist at the US Centers for Disease Control &
Prevention Global AIDS Program, Guyana, 44 High Street, Kingston. Fourth
Floor. Their office can be contacted on telephone numbers 223-0859/79

Proposals are due by June 12. 2006. Proposals received after this date will not
be reviewed.


ounumi VLnnuMIULL IV] vu






14 SUN[


Tomorrow I

will walk down to

Boston harbor











(For "Sash", late Minister of Agriculture, assassinated
along with his brother, sister, and guard)


By Sasenarine Persaud

You did not have to return
and, yes you did driving
through unpretty snowstorms
a spring picnic ofexiles
in the Morningside park
chilly, even for apple
blossoms and the dead-white
skins of peeling paper birches

take a shot of XM or
Eldorado rum for the cold
fingers, dalpuri to warm
stomachs. In Danny's car
on highway 7, or another
time in the bus returning
from Ottawa-I have pictures
in black and white: picketing

on Parliament Hill near
the eternal flame, meeting
a minor government official,
please help restore democracy
to our land. Forget it all.
We're in the chartered bus
back to Toronto; meadows of
yellow
daisies flashing past.

I could gather some; now,
here in the greening fields


of Boston; this highest hill
looking over, in the distance,
a balcony on which colonists
read The Declaration, went
to that famous party dressed
as natives. You would have
loved

such a prank. Bunker Hill
wasn't.
"The whites of their eyes"
must have been visible-not
the
shot from behind. You did
have to go back to that land
ashes, now, all remaining
of all we knew; I will break
every rule of grammar and
"good writing" Mr. Editor,
but I shall never set foot

on that soil again
as you have: many homes and
none. Tomorrow I will walk
down to Boston harbor
and spill tea in your memory.

(Mr Persaud is Current Epstein
Fellow at Boston University in
the English Department's
graduate writing school and the
author of eight books)


By George Barclay

SEVENTY-two-year old jour-
nalist, Charles, 'Bracie' 'Mr
Mack' McKenzie, who col-
lapsed on duty last Tuesday at
the Supreme Court,
Georgetown, and was pro-
nounced dead on arrival at the
Georgetown Hospital, has left
behind a kernel of conduct
which is a fitting example for
young members of the media
to emulate.
He was a credit to the pro-
fession, always impeccably at-
tired, and respectful to his supe-
riors, his subordinates, his col-
leagues, his audience and all
those with whom he came into
contact.
He never believed that he
knew it all. Despite his wide
range of experience, he never re-
jected a piece of advice and was
always prepared to listen to
what the other person had to say
on any subject that came up for
consideration.
Like many of his colleagues,
he experienced good days and
bad days, but this did not deter
him from giving of his best in the
interest of his employers and
himself. He was able to meet
with triumph and disaster and
treat those two impostors just
the same.
I had the good fortune of
knowing Mack for over 50
years, beginning from the time
when we were both junior report-
ers, he at the Main Street
Chronicle, under Mr. George
Willock, and I at the Guyana
Graphic, at Robb & King
Streets, under the editorship of


- ESs
BSlJDY1M
Elistaurant


A OMtiA --


.. ,








Special 39te fet A-itei I-
(dtu t o(trdet f wrn HIam -2pm


S 137 SHERIFF


SSTmp intmtaWy. iYTfwE~rapf
fit wscuey dining. Ailatfthe


F ST. G/TOWN. TEL 231-4100


- ................................ . ................................................. ........................................... .....................................................


Mr. A. H. Thorne.
At that time, there were
three daily newspapers the
Daily Graphic, the Daily
Chronicle and the Daily Argosy
Young McKenzie completed
his sojourn with the Chronicle


when he fell to the retrenchment
hatchet. He then made efforts to
join the Graphic under the then
editorship of Monty Smith.
But as Mack told me: "I
was being given the royal run
around by Editor Smith who


would keep telling me to come
back tomorrow when Mr. Rich-
ard De Corum, the then Editor
of Radio Demerara, invited me
to report right away for duty at
the Radio Station. From then
there was no turning back."
Zy


Sij



i. N
. = .


I.
'3


FLASHBACK: Mr. Charles McKenzie is presented with his sole long service award by Chroni
at the Guyana Press Association's 60th anniversary award ceremony last December.



Survivor relieved jilted man


i.


INJURED survivor, Glarey
Bowling, 42, still a patient in
the Burns Care Unit of the
Georgetown Public Hospital
(GPHC) told the Chronicle
that she was relieved that the
alleged arsonist, former son-
in-law, was arraigned at the
Vreed-en-Hoop Magistrate's
Court for murdering her
loved ones.
Bowling was still in a criti-
cal condition in the institution
yesterday with third degree
burns on about 90 pei cent of
her body.
She said family members
told her that the arsonist was
apprehended by the police and
later confessed to the crime and
was charged.
The jilted man, Arsha Ally,
29, of Good Hope, East Bank
Essequibo, will return to court
on June 20.


Her hands received the
brunt of injuries while she was
grabbing for her daughters who
were burnt alive when a channa
bomb (crude Molotov cocktail)
was hurled onto her bed.
Anida Bowling, aged just
one year and seven months, her
four-year-old sister, Devika
Bowling, and their 66-year-old
grandmother, Victoria Benjamin,
all perished when fire broke out
in their Parika Backdam, East
Bank Essequibo home before
dawn Tuesday.
She said she had been asleep
in the upper section of the tiny
two storey house really a ten-
by-sixteen foot hut raised on
stilts with the bottom enclosed
- which she shared with her
mother and seven of her ten chil-
dren. Her father and two other
relatives slept downstairs.
Bowling told the Guyana


Chronicle that by the time she
had a chance to get up and in-
vestigate the noises, what was
later revealed to be a channa
bomb was hurled onto her bed.
It caught fire immediately,
she said, recalling how she
grabbed her two youngest chil-
dren who were on fire since the
incendiary device was hurled di-
rectly on them. As a result her,
hands were badly burnt and she
could no longer endure the heat
and flames that engulfed her.
"I tried desperately to save
my children but the fire was too
much and it was on them di-
rectly and I had to jump through
the window to save myself," she
cried from her bed in hospital last
week.
The two children, Anida and
Devika, were burnt alive. So was
her elderly, bed-ridden mother,
Victoria Benjamin.


Documentaries on HIV/AIDS

to be launched on NCN


THE Ministry of Health with
support from the Global Fund
launches its 'Living in a
World with AIDS' documenta-
ries on NCN 11 tomorrow, the
National AIDS Programme
(NAPS) has announced.
The five 30-minute docu-


mentaries, which begin at 20:05h,
look at the HIV/AIDS epidemic,
condoms, getting tested for HIV,
treatment and care for people
who are HIV positive, and stigma
and discrimination.
According to NAPS, the
documentaries are part of the


'Stop the spread of HIV: Respect
Yourself, Protect Yourself' cam-
paign launched by the Ministry
of Health in November last year.
The campaign has seen sev-
eral television and radio adver-
tisements being broadcast. Post-
ers, brochures, billboards and a


Charles McKenzie



fitting examplefor


i







mAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2005



leaves a



emulation


Because of his competence,
his commitment and dedication
to his work, Mack was retained
as a contract worker when he
reached 60, the age of retirement.
He was given the responsibility
of covering the Magistrates'


W as,- I1


Courts and the Supreme Courts,
a position which he held until his
death.
Mc Kenzie had joined the
journalistic field at a time when
a cub reporter had to be an all-
rounder and not a specialist in a
particular area. Beginning in the
Magistrate's Court, his training
covered such beats as Sports,


Parliament, Chamber of Com-
merce, Town Council, Village
councils, Police, Politics, and any
other assignment one could think
about.
It was on the basis of his
good performance as an all-
rounder that he was retained af-
ter reaching the retiring age. As a
specialist Court reporter, he did
a splendid job, culminating in his
making the final sacrifice, en-
abling him to say like Lord
Nelson, "Thank God I have done
my duty."
Whether his efforts were ap-
preciated by his bosses could be
answered in the positive and the
negative.
From conversations with


Mack, I learnt that he believed
that he had cause for satisfac-
tion and dissatisfaction.
He noted that apart from
the Guyana Press Association
which honoured him with a long
service award recently, his work
remained unnoticed.
He used to recall the words
of Editor CJ. Kirton of the
Daily Argosy, who, when asked
why some journalists were
treated so shabbily in their life-
time replied: "We get wreath not
bouquet."
During the recent flood,
wreath nearly came his way. He
was on his way to work walk-
ing along the flooded D'Urban
Street, when he accidentally


walked into an open man hole.
He would have died from
drowning if it were not for a
child who saw him disappear
and raised an alarm that caused
a stout-hearted citizen to go to
his assistance.
I will not dwell more on
the life and death of my dear
friend Mack. But I hope that
I have said enough to cause
those concerned to do some
conscience searching so that
lessons learnt from Mack's
misfortune whether it be in
the field of small pension or
otherwise, it will serve as a
guide to those concerned
when considering what is
good and proper for their fel-


low men.


low men.
He has left to mourn his
wife, Patricia, four children -
two boys and two girls one
brother, one sister, two nieces,
two nephews, seven grand-chil-
dren and numerous friends.
His funeral service which
will be conducted by the Deane
of Georgetown at the St.
George's Cathedral, will not be
held before Friday since two of
his children, and other relatives
including Mr. Wainwright
McKenzie, a former President of
the Georgetown Chamber of
Commerce, who are overseas,
cannot make it back before then.
Goodbye dear Mack, may
you rest in peace.


Happy MMMtEI

mmMothers Day!


le reporter, Ms. Michel Outridge




charged
Glarey Bowling-recalled that
after she landed on the ground
outside, she was severely injured
and could not move from the
spot so she cried out for help. She
was later taken to the GPHC by
an ambulance.
Fourteen-year-old survivor
Onissa Bowling told this news-
paper that she was awakened by
her mother ordering them to
"throw water, throw water."
She got up to find her
younger brother trying to break
open a window, while a fire
blazed "all around". She said by
the time they had opened the
door and escaped, her two siblings
and her grandmother had already
been burnt to death.
During her initial attempts
to escape, she said she looked
through a window and saw two
men walking away from the
house.

magazine also complemented the
national mass media campaign.
The launching of the docu-
mentary series on NCN will take
the form of a panel discussion for
the first half hour after which the
documentaries would be shown.
The campaign was de-
signed to change the compla-
cency that exists among many
individuals, since, according to
NAPS, the glaring fact is that
many are vulnerable to HIV/
AIDS but do not know it.


Today is Your Day
.t tbea wed with a warm mug
"rad ae warm bug.

0M--.MILO


A/


-, --ic t


fi~,7U;~'liTilll;~T~.~?Ci~


.rr
.r..:
rc~ .I
;-
i' "




SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006


A mother's love

is the best


medicine


- AFC


The Alliance For Change (AFCi. in a message to mark
Mother's Day being observed today, said the fledgling
movement is looking to the Mothers of Gu ana for comfort
and assurance.
"We recognize that "e are a Niung fledgling movement that
is depending on all the nururing and support we cjn receive to
aid our growth and mdturiit, and look to the Mlolhiers of Guyana
for that comfort and assurance.
"We are aware that world%, ide it is didicult being a mother.
but moreso in Guyana and are hoping by Mother's Da\ 2007
there would be a change in this our beloved county and lie for
mothers would improve tremendously. Vith this in mind the
AFC would like to renund you that the Future of Guiana needs
the best medicine in the world which is a mother's lose
"A Happy Mothers Day from the AFC. and May God
Bless all Mothers." the AFC said.


The Ethnic Relations


Commission and you


THE Ethnic Relations
Coinnssion lERC'i among its
24 functions in article 212D)
states that the Commission
seeks to roster a sense of
security among all ethnic
groups b. encouraging and
promoting the
understanding. acceptance
and tolerance of diiersit3 in
all aspects of national life
and promoting full
participation bh all ethnic
groups on the social.
economic, cultural and
political life of the people.
\er\ often \ie comeT across
the %ord 'olerate" or
'tolerance'


What is tolerance?
Fhe word 'tolerance' is
*urely imperfect, yet the English
Language offers no single word
lth-i embraces the broad range of
skills we need to live together
peacefully.
Reverend Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. used the Greek term
.iga.pe' to describe universal
lo \i that 'discovers the
neighbour in every man it
nieels.'
In its 'Declaration on the
Principles of tolerance',
UNESCO offers this definition
'of Tolerance. Tolerance is
respect, acceptance and
appreciation of the rich


diversity of our world's
cultures, forms of expression
and ways of being human.
Tolerance is harmony in
difference.
We view tolerance as a
way of thinking and feeling
but most importantly of
acting that gives us peace in
our individually, respect for
those unlike us, the wisdom
to discuss human values and
the courage to act upon
them.
In Guyana, we are a
people of six races with
rich cultures and heritages.
It is therefore incumbent
on all of us to "tolerate"


UNIVERSITY OF GUYANA


VACA NQIES


Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following positions in the
University of Guyana, Turkeyen and Berbtce Campuses:

(1) ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT BURSARYY. TURKEYEN CAMPUS)
QUALIFICATION:
A relevant University Degree or equivalent plus previous experience in an
Accounting Unit. Some experience at the supervisory level and working knowledge'
of relevant computer applications would be a distinct advantage.
OR
Diploma in Accountancy (UG) or equivalent plgiat least five years experience in an
Accounting Unit. Some experience at the supervisory level and working knowledge
of relevant computer applications would be a distinct advantage.

(2) DEPUTY UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN (BERBICE CAMPUS)
JOB SUMMARY
The Deputy University Librarian gives support in coordinating and directing
activities of the Library including such areas as staff development, personnel
matters, administration and control budget allocations, stock development
programmes, to support teaching and research activities.
QUALIFICATION
At least a Master's Degree in. Library/Information Studies plus familiarity with
computer applications in Libraries or a specialist qualification at Ph. D or Master's
Level with experience in the field of specialisation. Such specialist qualification
should not only include specific academic fields but such areas as book
conservation, information technology, archival administration and computer
technology.
PLUS
Evidence of outstanding research ability and professional library experience.with at
least three (3) years in administration.positions.
DUTIES: List of Duties may be obtained from the Personnel Division.
SALARY: Placement on salary scale would depend on, qualification and relevant
experience.
Benefits currently include non-taxable housing arid travelling allowances,
contributory medical and pensions schemes, gratuity where applicable), annual
vacation/study/sabbatical leave (whichever is applicable), leave passage and book
allowances.
Applications with Curriculum Vitae (3 copies) stating name, date of birth,
marital status, qualifications,.(with dates and overall grades obtained), work
experience (with dates), full names and addresses of three (3) referees (one of
whom must be your present or last employer whereapplicable) must reach the
Personnel Division, University of Guyana, P. O. Box 101110, Georgetown, E-mail
ugpd@telsnetqy.net, Fax No. 592-222-4181, or Courier Service, not later than
Tuesday, June 13,2006. (Tel. 222-418115271) Website: www.uyog.edu.gy.
PERSONNEL DIVISION
2006-05-12
, , ,,| I, , ,__________________ ___ J L I I,11111 I , 1I


Elizabeth Angela Bhaichandeen"
Born 26th october, 1955, Died 27th April, 2006.
Elizabeth was born in Georgetown,
/ Guyana. She was the daughter of the


Slate Balram and Jasoda Bhaichandee
of46 Brickdam, Stabroek.

Elizabeth was a former student of St. Rose's High School (1967-1973). She
migrated to Canada in 1974, where she attended the University of Toronto,
successfully obtaining a Degree in Bsc. and Major in Psychology.

Elizabeth was the mother of Natasha.

She was the sister of: Marlin, Randolph, Balwant (Bunny) Jennifer and the late:
Joycelyn, Dr. Barbara Mooneram & Rudolph. Aunt of Dr. Arif Valibhoy of
Singapore, Karen, Tony, Troy, Terry, Sean, Jason, Michael, Kavim, Dhruvam,
Mariella Indira Ralph, Andrew, Charles, Crystal and Jade.
Godmother ofMark Foo, Kamini lssurdatt& lam D'andrade.

She was a very loving and caring mother, loyal & devoted sister and friend. Those


who knew her will recall her passion for gardening and was fondly known to have
a green thumb. Her loving and kindhearted personality endeared her to all her
family and friends.

Elizabeth's death was sudden and unexpected. However, her memory will live in
our hearts forever. For those who wish to view the service and cremation of
Elizabeth you can log on to the website-&- .c .:;:: Family name:
Bhaichandeen.


WOODLANDS/FARM
NEIGHBOURHOOD DEMOCRATIC COUNCIL
Lot 4 Zeskendren, Mahaicony
Telephone #221-2237
May 12, 2006






The Woodlands/Farm Neighbourhood Democratic Council Region No. 5
(Mahaica/Mahaicony) wishes to notify all cattle farmers that as from 2006-06-
01 animals found on the roadside and the Bellamy Canal will be impounded.
The Council has employed a Stray Catcher for this purpose.
By Order of Council
Sgd: K. P. Deokarran
Chairman
Woodlands/Farm NDC


*n


.... .:.. ........... ..........

^) 0

each other in the true sense
of the world.
Development comes
through a culture of peace.
Therefore tolerance is a
necessary condition of peace
among individuals and among
peoples. The determination
to live together in one
cohesive society is an
achievement by itself for a
nation. The "good
neighbourliness" among
men must be foremost in the
minds of every one of us.


I --


I


;TI





a it .4fl*S6 E A.. ... .. ..I nn -


Y ADNUS CHRONICLE May 1 6


NCN INC. CHANNEL 11
02:00 h NCN News
Magazine (R/B)
02:30 h Late Nite with GINA
03:00 h Movie
05:00 h The Mystery of the
Body
05:30 h Newtown Gospel
Hour
06:00 h NCN 6 0' Clock
News Magazine (R/B)
06:30 h BBC News
07:00 h Voice of Victory
07:30 h The Fact
08:00 h Lifting Guyana to
Greatness
08:30 h Grow with IPED
09:30 h 7'h ODI West Indies
vs Zimbabwe
13:00 h Lotto Cricket Info &
Quizz Live
13:40 h Cricket Resumes
17:30 h Guysuco Round Up
18:00 h NCN 6 O'clock
News Magazine Live
18:30 h Lutheran Men's
Fellowship
19:00 h One on One


19:30 h Close Up
20:00 h Weekly Digest
20:30 h Kala Milan
21:00 h Catholic Magazine
21:30 h 2 Hour
Entertainment
22:00 h Global Perspective
23:00 h Movie
CHANNEL
06:00 h BBC News
06:30 h CNN News
07:00 h NBC Today
09:00 h CBS Sunday
10:30 h Face the Nation
11:00 h Late Edition Wolf
Blitzer
12:00 h Chicken Little
13:15 h Soccer
15:00 h PGA Golf
16:00 h NBA Basketball
18:00 h Eye on the Issues
18:30 h NBC News
19:00 h 60 Minutes
20:00 h Extreme Makeover
21:00 h Law and Order
23:00 h NBC News


SUBJECT TO CHANGE

WITHOUT NOTICE


If you drink

don't drive


DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE
CLOSURE TO ROAD TRAFFIC


weatherr







TODAY'S FORECAST:Occasional Cloudy spells with
moderate showers are expected over most of Guyana.
WAVES: Moderately high to high reaching about 2.3m
in open waters.
WINDS: North-easterly to Southerly at 1 to 7mps.
HIGH TIDE: 04:23h at (2.86m) and 17:05h at (2.71 m)
LOW TIDE: 10:50h at (0.51 m) and 22:51 h at (0.93m)
G/TOWN TIMEHRI
SUNRISE: 05:37h nil
SUNSET: 18:02h nil
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE: 28.0-31.0C over coastal
areas & 30.0-32.2C over inland and interior locations.
MINIMUM TEMPERATURE: 22.0 24.0C over coastal
areas & 21.0-23.5C over near inland and interior
locations
RAINFALL G\Town:trace
RAINFALL ACCUMULATED: 140.7mm
MARINE ADVISORY: Fishermen and other marine
users are advised not to damage or interfere with the
ocean platforms, whose data are vital to the provision
of the weather information and warnings for the
safety of the marine community.
HIGH TIDE ADVISORY:Residents of coastal, riverain
and low lying areas are advised to take precautions
against possible flooding,due the above normal tides.
SPRING TIDE ADVISORY: Nil
FOR WEATHER RELATED QUERIES PLEASE CALL -
261-2216, FAX 261-2284




Watch your business

GROW! Advertise in

the Guyana Chronicle.

Tel: 226-3243-9 or 225-
4475


For Sunday, May 14,2006- 05:30h
ForMonday, May 15, 2006-05:30h
ForThesday, May 16, 2006-05:30h

For Ocean Going Vessels opening lasts about 1-1mhrs




^^^j^^ir'n^^FIl^^


16:15/ 20:30 hrs
"THE PINK PANTHER"
with Steve Martin
plus
"DATE MOVIE"
with Eddie Griffin


14:45 hrs
"BLUFFMASTER"
with Abhishek &
and Priyanka

16:30/20:30 hrs
"FIREWALL"
with Harrison Ford
plus
"THE ISLAND"


44


Web Care


GEORGETOWN PUBLIC
HOSPITAL CORPORATION


NOTICE OF CME LECTURE


ALL MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS


TOPIC:
DATE:
PRESENTER:


TIME:
VENUE:


Current Surgical Approaches to Peptic Ulcer Disease
Friday, May 19, 2006
Dr. Shea Chia
General Surgeon
Canadian Association of General Surgeons
18:00h. (6 p.m.)
Eye Clinic Waiting Area.
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation


1 CME Credit will be awarded


Dr. Madan Rambaran.
Director, Medical & Professional Services
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation


GNCB

PROPERTIES FOR SALE

AT EXECUTION SALE AT THE INSTANCE OF THE
REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT

* Property situated at sub-lot # 59 of lot lettered K, Section A. Alness, Corentyne.
Berbice.

* Property situated at sub-lot # 183 of lot lettered K. Section A. Alness. Corentvne.
Berbice.

* Parcel of land, part of a tract of land lying and being in the rear of Plantation
Good Faith. East Coast Demerara containing an area of 49.17 acres of land.

* Tract lettered 'A having an area of 25.45 acres and being a portion of Grant No.
7269 Plantation Marias Delight. Essequibo Coast with building and erections
thereon.

* Property at lot 10 being part of the North /2 of St. Lawrence. situate on the right
bank of the Essequibo River with building and erections thereon
TUESDAY, MAY 16. 2006 AT 13:00 HRS
STATE WAREHOUSE, KINGSTON, GEORGETOWN


* 9jjii-feM-tr;


'. : .,i
** ^^ .. '^ ^-BB
- . i-.:: ,_ .. .. ..* .- '^ W ^


-17








18 _SUNDAY CHiRONICLE IMay 14, 2006


COUNSELLING -- ""
WANTED -I, f lit,. I I
LAND FOR SALE FOR HIRE I r1 \ i;;
LEGALS BEAUTY SALON PROPERTY FOR SALE EDUCATIONAL I.\ ',.
TO LET LEARN TO DRIVE HERBAL MEDICINE AUTO SALES ( ..' ,.
SERVICES DRESSMAKING HEALTH MASSAGE
19217 A!I! I..I.I. J!IMMII.> IT. M1241.ll, !


BOAT FOR SALE 18 FT.
BAY LINER BOAT WITH IN-
BOARD 4.3 MOTOR. LIKE
NEW. CALL 225-5591 OR 619-
5505.



BUILDING contractor -
mason, carpentry, painting,

2239.



NAYELLI SCHOOL OF
COSMETOLOGY is now
offering special 3 month
Cosmetology package. Also
evening classes starting May 8,
2006. Courses in Air brushing,
Acrylic nails, Barbering, Basic
& Advance Hair Cutting class.
Tel. 226-2124 or visit at 211
New Market Street, North
Cummingsburg.



USE your spare time
filling one hundred
envelopes for US$500 or
more weekly. Send stamped
self-addressed envelope for
information to Chaitram
Phagoo, 35 Section B
Woodley Park Village, West
Coast Berbice, Guyana.



FOR PROFESSIONAL
COMPUTER Repairs, Sales &
Services Call Kersting's
Computer Repairs & Sales
Centre @ 227-8361, 618-8283.
Home & Office Services
available. 24 hrs.
www.kerstings.org.
EXPERT computer
repairs, upgrades, custom-
built PCS done at your
home/office. 24 hours. # 626-
8911, 231-7650. Genius
Computers.
FOR professional
computer repairs, upgrades.
programming and building of
computer systems. Contact
"THE TECH TEAM" Home and
offices services available.
Contact Tel. # 227-6824 or 664-
3011.


EVERGREEN Nature Study
Club (Regionsl-10)
www.sdnp.org.gy/evergreen.
TEL. 226-4634, 6279285, 664-
5947
SHEER Magic Salon &
Beauty School. Want to be a
cosmetologist and hate
writing? Then come and
learn while you work in a
pleasant environment.
individual attention. Tel. #
226-9448.
PRACTICAL electronic
course beginning 61" June. Learn
to repair televisions, CD Players,
amplifiers, combination stereos,
monitors, etc. Classes taught by
professional with more than 20
Krs. experience. Call ABDUL
electronics. 226-6551 or 225-
0391. 349 East Street.
IMPERIAL COLLEGE -
REGISTER NOW FOR OUR
FULL-TIME (FORMS 1 TO 5,
AFTERNOON, EVENING
(AGES 17 35) AND
WEEKEND CLASSES. CXC
subjects offered are Principles
of Accounts and Business,
Office Administration, Social
Studies, Information
Technology, English A-and
Mathematics. MONTHLY FEE
- $1 000 PER SUBJECT. Tel.
227-7627, 647-9434. Croal
and King Streets.


BOBCAT Rentals &
Trucking Service. Also
grading, levelling, clearing
of land. Tel. 626-7127.
SAFE scaffolding easily
assembled diagonal straps and
comfortable storage from
overseas. Call Sugar 233-2378
and negotiate.
SCAFFOLDS, Chain saw,
ransom and other
construction tools. Contact
us on telephone #'s 225-
3466, 225-7268 or 23 North
Road, Bourda.
TRAVELLER International
Sound lighting system, musical
instrument, Ultra violet lights
lasers, fogging foaming,
bubbling disco lighting for
socials, parties, stage lighting
generators, tents and stage. We
cater for all Indian wedding
reception, churches crusade.
Small or large venue. Tel. 226-
6527. 623-7248.


JEAN'S Health Spas For
body massage, steam baths.
Enema's vapour. etc Call Jean -


DOLLY'S Auto Rental 227-8980.
272 Bissessar Avenue.
Prashed Nagar. Georgetown.
l Phone 225-7126. 226-3693
E m a i i JUST arrived! Novels. StorI
doiivsautorenatal@yahoo com books. magazines. comics
informative and toxic to
"" n -erslt level Also books os
sale froni- S20 $30 F' ;:
'ow T.el 223-82371
0 R all ty pes o F 8 30 arn 5 p Sat.
J. making unifornmr and am 4 pim.
i n g a t a fr, d a b I e
S in Kitty a!
G w)vn Call Sharor -'.,- -
349-2358. LOW INCOME HOMES -we
.T professional ei;q g build Low income Homes Ca i
doI.e for yvou in .:8 .rs. Syl.e 227 2479, 2287-2154 ; niy
'' n aii,-. working hrs 218-1957 after nrs
Q Vour taste. Cad Rox e -


227-3538. 622-4386. Also
cusLcr made swim suits and
Guy 'vear.



NAIL tipping. designing,
silkwrapping, manicuring,
pedicuring course- P-i'.-
from $4 000 per .... II
Michelle 227-7342. 222-

TECHNICAL Studies
Institute 136 Shell Road.
Kitty. Tel. 225-9587. Electrical
instal:ition and wiring.
tele',i s'n repairs air
cond:c;uning and refrigeration
THE LANGUAGE
i ST!TUTE INC. Foreagn
. La g ; age Courses fcr
Sc'tren (3 13 yrs ), CXC
St iden'ts (4th & 5th Formers;
' Ir Adults. Te: 23:-73 3


ENROL now at Shalom
Driving School Lot 2 Croal
Street, Stabroek. 'ou could
also obtain an International
Driving Permit. For more
information, call 227-3869.
622-8162, 611-9038
R.K's Creating Masters in
Driving since 1979. Students
need security and comfort to
learn. Students must know
who they deal with. Diving is
serioususiness, not a fly by
night business. R K's Institute
of Motoring. 125. Regent
Road. Bourda.



V JU jit SuiK.u'ig ',' yo3
sport self-defence health Enrni
for classes. Contact 228 Cam;',
Street, N/C/B


MRS. SINGH massage. If you
need a balanced massage try my
therapeutic massage combined
with reflexology. Tel. 220-4842
or 615-6665.
STRESSED OUT? Over
worked? Try Massage
Therapy. It releases muscular
and mental tension. Certified
Massage Therapist Ulelli
Verbeke 615-8747.
FEELING tired, not
sleeping well stressed out?
Then try a massage. Definite
result. By certified therapist.
Contact Sally on 276-323.
Located in West Demerara.
MOTHER'S SPECIAL -
Give a gift that will always be
remembered. Purchase a
Massage Gift Certificate for your
one of a kind mother. The first
ten (10) GCs purchase will
receive a gift. el. (592)225-
3335/612-5078



MAGAZINE of Worldwide
Pen Friend. Information?
Send stamped envelope -
CFI, PO Box 12154
Georgetown, Guyana.
LINK across Guyana &
overseas immediate
connections. The Junior/
Senior Singles Dating Service
18 80 yrs. Tel. 223-8237.
648-6098. Mon. Fri. 8:30
am 5 pm. Sat 10 am 4
pm.



RAJA Yoga Hindi Classes
Planet, Tabeej Protection.
other spiritual areas guidance
and protection for spiritual
people. Contact Buddy 225-
0677.



PRAYER TO ST. JUDE.
Most Holy Apostle. St. Jude,
faithful servant and friend of
Jesus, the church honours and
invokes, you universally, as the
patron of hopeless cases of
things almost despaired of. Pray
for me, Im so helpless and
alone. Make use, I implore you,
of that particular privilege given
to you. to bring visible and
speedy help where help is almost
despaired of. Come to my
assistance in this great need that
I any receive the consolation
and help of Heaven in all
necessities, tribulations and
si-:i5tenncrco. particularly here
mrak yntur request) that I riay
pra:is, God wilh voui and all ihe
Eieci forever i promise. 0
Blessed St. Jude to be ever
mindful ot this great favour. to
a;'ia.?S hIonour you a, miy special
and powerful patron. and to
traieiutlv e. nco;i.rate devotion to
ou. A ren P D & Fa'milv ST
iJUDE. Noven prayer mtus be
said SiX times each day for NINE
cn s: utive days lea ing NINE
':o ie-; i!! CILlrrch each clay
Prae,i wii ibe answered ofn or
before the nintn day and has
NEVER been known to fail.
NO VENA PRAYER. Mlay the
mo st Sacred Heart f Jesus be
adored and loved in all the
tabernacles unti l the end of time
Armen Blessed be the Sacred
Heart o' Jesus. Blessed be the
iinmaculate Heart of Mary.
Blessed he Saint Jude
Thaddeus. In the entire world
and for all eternity. (Say this
prayer. followed by Our Father
and Hail Mary). Our Father. who
art in Heaven. hallowed he thy
name. Thy ,,., come thy
,ill be done :, as it is in
Heaven, Give us this cay our
daily bread, and forgive us our
trespasses as we forgive those
that trespass against us and lead
us not into temptation, but
deliver us Ifrom evil Amen Hail
e elary fii! : f grace the Lor: is ;!th
Tieer. easseld art otiou anong


,~-'xA t'''
:-ftr~rl: ", ;'3','; .n : t.~ ; iO !"


TYPING SERVICES. TEL. #
218-1711, 227-6102.
PRESSURE WASHER
REPAIRS AND REBUILDING.
CALL 627-7835.
SERVICE done to all
Satellite Dishes. Parts of sale.
Call 623-4686, 223-4731.
SEWING Machine
repairs. Email
gregramgt@yahoo.com 629-
7396 Gregory Ram.
WE rent or sell your
property at reasonable rates.
Call Rochelle at Cluster
Marketing on Tel. 609-8109,
anytime.
ON THE spot service,
repairs & installation to all.
Refrigeration & Air
Conditioning units. Call 622-
7971 anytime.
HAVING problems with
your air conditioning units,
fridges, washing machine,
as stoves, etc. Then call
inden. Tel. 641-1086.
TECHNICIANS available
for appliance repairs -
washers, dryers, microwaves,
stoves, deep fryers, etc. Call
622-4521/218-0050.
FOR all your construction,
repairs renovations, as well as
masonry, varnishing plumbing
and painting, contact
Mohamed on 223-9710/614-
6634.
COMPUTERISED your
accounting system today! For a
one time low cost that includes
free software and full support
services. Call 644-3243.
PC repairs and
maintenance, networking, home
& small offices, website
designing, data recovery, IT
Consulting. Call 220-4518, 615-
6542. Email:
Trevorck @yahoo.com r
PROFESSIONAL sewing
and other services
alteration, etc. done in 48
hrs. Call Roxie 227-8538,
622-4386. Visit 122 & 121
B Merriman's Mall, Bourda.
FOR efficient service and
repairs, washing machine, gas
stoves, microwaves, refrigerators,
etc. Telephone 227-0060, 616-
5568. Freezezone Enterprises -
6 'A Shell Road. Kitty.
ROBBY'S Enterprise. For
your professional carpet supplies
installation and cleaning Free
estimates. Best prices 166
Charlotte Street. Lacytov.ni
-. .-49. Fax 59 -222't
1435
robbyent@yahoo con,
KNIGHT'S PRODUCTION
For ail your prioessionai t,.leo
production ns i ,.; !ici' r. .ids
RECEIVE 100 FREE! PHOTOS
WITH EVERY WEDDING WE DO
FOR YOU, DONE ON DVD. WE
CAN ALSO ADVERTISE YOUR
GOODS OR SERVICES FOR
YOU AT AVERY LOW COST. Tel.
# 227-4043, 611-6190.



FEMALES & males to ,'ork
at car wash. Call 231-1786
621-5332.
ONE experienced person to
operate grasscutter Tel. .227-
6012. 218-171!.
ABLE-BOCIED Porters
Apply in person to Mav s
: ,' i Centre 98 Regent St.,

ONE experienced
seamstress, great wages arnd
benefits. Roxie's 122
Merrimanrs Mall. Bourda
ONE Wiaitress. one Cook
Apply 27 North Road.
Lacvtoiwn Vet Clinric. Tel. 223-
4472. 618-4481
Ri, C op! 0 '!i -, Les

Si ,,is
ie !


1 FEMALE Clerk 25 years
up. Apply in person at 288
Middle St. Tel. 231-
5171.Handler's Certificate
at 8 North Road, Lacytown.
Tel. 225-8985.
DRIVER for Leyland 10-ton
lorry. Valid lorry Licence. Five
years experience. Police
Clearance. Telles Steel &
Hardware, 74 Hadfield St. 226-
4537. RS
CASHIERS/Salesclerk.
Must be computer literate.
Apply in person at ARK
Enterprise The Container
House. 17 Lombard St. Tel.
225-9412, 227-3580.
SEWING Machine
Operators and 1 male to spread
material. Apply at Kent Garment
Factory Ltd., 12 Plaisance
Public Road, ECD. Tel. # 222-
2541.
ONE Driver must have at
least 5 yrs. experience with valid
Licence for car, van, lorry and
minibus. Apply in person to May's
Shopping Centre, 98 Regent
St., Georgetown.
VACANCIES exist for
salesgirl and porters. Apply in
person with written application
to Hamid's General Store, 244
Regent Road, Bourda. Tel. 226-
8961. 225-3811.
VACANCIES exist for Cook,
Bill Clerk and Handyboys.
Applicants must apply with
written application and passport
size photograph to Survival, 16
Duncan St. & Vlissengen Road,
Newtown. Kitty.
20 MALES and females to
work at University of Guyana and
other East Coast locations.
(Former employees can re
apply). Contact The Security
Administrator, University of
Guyana, Turkeyen, Campus or
R.K's Security, 125 Regent
Road, Bourda.
ACCOUNTS Clerk.
Requirements: must have at
least 3 CXC subjects (Grades 1
& 2) including Maths and
Accounts. Work experience and
computer literacy would be
definite assets. Guiyana
Furniture Manufacturing
Ltd.,60 Industrial Estate,
E .-i,:i .: -. il,.-. E C D .
ONE Female Office
Assistant. with knowledge of
NIS and PAYE Roll. Must be
Computer lite-ate. Must be
between ;ges 18 and 30,
knowled e of Maths and
English App, in person with
,.,,r;:ten app ration and 2
ref're'c, s t :..ens, Sheriff


HOi ,'{ v tS ''ar mo.
i. -


Yora,: w Corne t
o'/:o trains'

PROSPERITY ( CLUB a-v
C, n 'ii' p n Saturdi
t Pa s ,"uya aS ho i
F mp' .

BE YOUF' OWN BOSS: Ea!
loiC tiai' i uJ 000 rnonthi
working r arl'c We provide
trallnii Nq a ,os- No investment
rentuie k frorm n hon'e
Corme to PROSPERITY CLUB
anyv '''edi"nes: 'y 5 pm or
Salurday- 1 ::n" io 89 Brickdam
ooposp ie tir' Palms. Ne'.,,
G'yana Slorlne Compotund
SALESPE ) P L E
REQUIRED .;irn I )re than
GS100 0OC c .:,nthi working
part-time !.vc ovic. training
"o boss lbNo i ,*.,,-*.in en -equired
.',c rrk from -.'e ,onme to
PROSPERITY CLUB any
W'ednesa ;',n or saturday -
h1 pin to rpda p o
the PalrnF it --.. Guy, S u-;-
Compound
DRIVER > -)
Reqoiiroments '
valid Driver s : .:
l rry Shou! ea
vedts re-.! 'v C-'p '* Cp
racen : P,- at
|"tora si 'i ; ,' i

limited,:' : t: : s!; .
eterverwar," a "
C U. Ura


VACANCY exists for 2
Cooks, 3 Counter Clerks to
work in Cafeteria. Also one
male. Come in with a
written application at Lot
8 Stone Avenue Blygezight
Gardens or call 223-9316,
615-8920
MAINTENANCE
TECHNICIAN. Must have both
electrical and mechanical
expertise. Must have at least 3
years experience working in a
maintenance department.
Apply in person with a written
application, recommendations
and proof of qualifications to:
Guyana Furniture
Manufacturing Limited, 60
Industrial Estate,
Beterverwagting, East Coast
Demerara.
VACANCIES exist for the
following teaching positions in
Full-time and Part-time
capacities Mathematics,
English A, Social Studies,
Principles of Business,
Principles of Accounts, Spanish
and Information Technology,
Professional Studies ABE
programme Business
Commun i c a t i o n,
Management, Quantitative
Method, Economics,
Organisational Behaviour,
Please send written application
and CV to PO BOX # 101652.



117 MARIGOLD St.,
Enterprise Gardens size
50 ft. x 100 ft. Tel. # 626-
3955, 222-3610.
LARGE piece of land
next to Parika Market from
Public Road to water front.
Tel. 226-4177, 225-2873.
PRIME commercial land
for sale 115 ft x 31 ft,
Charlotte Street, Bourda.
Contact owner 226-0683
(an y ti e) .. ................
LAND FOR SALE. LAND
FOR SALE OLEANDER
Gardens 89 ft by 152 ft.
Price $25M. Call: 612-0349.
LAND situate at east of
Windsor Forest Cricket
Ground, comprising an area
of 2.422 of an English acre.
Call: 220-9675.
AT Long Creek Soesdyke,
Linden Highway 20 acres
of cultivated farm land with
creek. Fo;- more information.
call 628-<231 or 615-2773.
HOPE EBD River-side
n(:: i" 'h: t,,/arho .usc-/bond!/

itS"':- 0)'P(' Ederson's ;i'>-





(r USS7! O Ederson's



only 2 house lot; for i :
:h e tini:tv o' .
r5 r a rd -SP ( li ,i II
e5er. Phone Tony Reid's
Realty 25-62 :
ony 2 house for64

50 ACRES of land situated
at DakFra and Red VWater
Creeks F-;ea. 15 mr-imues drive
from the .;irport. Price S 12 5M
neg Tel 220-1068 or 626-
7684- Av.
SAILA PARK Vreed- n-
Hoop. Housing Scheme
House lot for sale, near the
public road Prime location
2 miles from V/Hoop
S T4 225-7670 or
97
280 ACRES ON HIGHWAY
SAND PIT '7 acres Dakara
c( k $ "' Pashao Na ar
V
Fo, _
La .' 5 & ,. ?d. vc"", c es
TEL 226-8148, 625-
1621 ,


I







SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006'
_-,_ _


ONE-APARTMENT IN
KITTY. CALL 226-8268.
ECCLES US$500.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
SUBRYANVILLE
$100 000. Keyhomes -
223-4267.
FOR overseas visitors
apt. to rent in Kitty. Call
226-1640.
ROOM FOR SINGLE
WORKING FEMALE.
TELEPHONE: 227-0928.
FURNISHED house 79
Atlantic Gdns. Call 220-
6060, 626-2066.
SUBRYANVILLE
US$100 000. KEYHOMES -
223-4267.
PRASHAD NAGAR. -
US$500. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
BEL AIR PARK US$1
000. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
KITTY 2-bedroom -
$32 000 per month. 233-
2968, 613-6674.
FOR short break
accommodation in Bel Air Park.
Call 225-3517.
1 2-BEDROOM bottom flat
Austin St., C/ville. Call 223-
1713, 225-0438.
ONE (1) 2-bedroom
bottom flat, Liliendaal.
Tel. 222-3436, 614-
9583.
BUSINESS space
available on Cummings St.
and North Rd. Call 227-4272.
EXECUTIVE BEL AIR
PARK US$1 500.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
2 2-BEDROOM apts. to
rent. Contact 220-5782, 220-
3975, 646-0023.
2-BEDROOM house -
Success Railway
Embankment. Tel. 220-
4839, 2 pm & 6 pm.
FURNISHED rooms for
young single working female.
Call 226-7001.
FURNISHED 3-
bedroom apt. for overseas
uest in Craig St., C/ville.
223-1329.
SHORT TERM
RENTALS FOR
OVERSEAS VISITORS.
PHONE 225-9944.
FULLY furnished 2-
bedroom air-conditioned
house in Bel Air Park. Call
225-8153.
KITTY, Campbellville -
furnished and unfurnished
1, 3-bedroom a'ts. 233-
6160.
UPPER flat 322 East &
New Market Streets. Call 233-
2255. Rent $70 000 neg.
LARGE space to rent in
prime spot in Regent
street. Price negotiable.
Tel. 225-2873, 226-9029.
1 PLACE for Club or
games room. 48
rinces & Russell Sts.
Phone 226-6603, 225-
3499.
2-BEDROOM bottom flat
to let from May 15. 2006.
Contact R. Persaud at the
above address.
ROOMS and
apartments for short term
rental, from $4 000 daily/
nightly. Call 227-0902 or
227-3336.
EXECUTIVE office
situated on United Nations
Place Stabroek, with
telephone lines. Tel. 226-
7380.
-- -- .- .------- -----..... .........- .. ..-.----- --
FURNISHED and
unfurnished executive
homes around Georgetown.
Call Rochelle 609-8109,
anytime.
ESTABLISHED business.
flat to rent for any type'of
businesses. Ideal for bond.
Barr St., Kitty. 'Call 226-
4014.
UNFURNISHED th'ree-
bedroom top flat wvith,
telephone. K, S. Raghubir
Agency, Office 225-0545;

EXECUTIVE furnished
houses and flats' in
residential areas. From
US$500. Sonja Realty -,
225-7197. 623-2537.
FURNISHED ROOM -
DECENT, SINGLE WORK-
ING FEMALE. TEL: 226-
5035 (08:00 17:00 HRS).


FURNISHED apartment
for overseas guest at Garnett
St., C/ville, G/town. Contact
Ms. Dee on 223-1061 or 612-
2677
FULLY furnished 3-bedroom
top flat in Prashad Nagar -
US$650. Call ROSANNA 231-
3348/647-6711.
2-BEDROOM apartment
fully furnished in Grove, EBD.
Short term for overseas guest.
Call 233-5421. 265-3111, 623-
8654.
OFFICE space to rent over
3 300 sq. ft. Queenstown. G/
town. Telephone & lots of
parking space. Price
negotiable._ Call 6.24-4225.
n o _- ---------------
OFFICE space available
in Church Street $40 000 per
month. Utility Bill inclusive.
Contact Sandra 226-3284,
616-8280.
NEW one room fully self -
contained apartment in Bel Air
Park, facing Duncan St. Tel.
226-2675.
1-BEDROOM top flat with
overhead tank, toilet and bath -
$25 000. Decent working
couple. Call 226-6096.
ONE-BEDROOM apt. 67
Garnett St.. Newtown Kitty.
Preferable couple single male
and female. Contact the above
address.
GOOD large Princes, Russell
& Camp Sts. Corner bottom
flat suitable for any business.
Small Shop for any business.
Call 226-3949.
OFFICE or business 24
x 25 space. 331 Cummings
St., facing Sixth Street. Call
Julian 227-1319, 225-4709,
625-9477.
ONE two-bedroom
bottom flat apartment will be
available from July 1, 2006
at 211 9"' Street, Industry
Housing Scheme. ECD. Call
644-1230.
2-BEDROOM top flat in
Bel Air Park fully
furnished with telephone
and parking $80 000. Call
ROSANNA 231-3348/647-
6711.
RESIDENTIAL and
commercial properties furnished
and unfurnished. Prices ranging
from $50 000 up. Tel. 226-
1192, 623-7742.
NANDY Park, Eccles, Kitty,
Ogle 1 2 3 4-bedroom
apartment, furnished and
unfurnished. 233-6160.
EXECUTIVE houses by
itself area Ogle. Atlantic
Gardens. Price $100 000 to
$250 000 neg. Enquiries pls call
220-7021, Cell 624-6527.
BEL Air Park/Gardens,
Prashad Nagar, Section 'K'
Campbellville, Kitty. South
Ruimveldt $50 000 US$2
500. 225-3006, 225-7173.
COMING from overseas.
Check out Sunflower Hotel or
other location. Long term. short
term 3 hrs, 4 hrs. AC TV, etc.
Call 225-3817 or 223-2173.
TOP flat in prime
commercial area Camp
Street for Airline, Salon. Real
Estate, Advertising Agency,
Office or any other business.
Contact Samad. Tel. 225-
5026
QUEENSTOWN. fully fur-
nished 1 & 3-bedroom apart-
ment with parking space to
rent. Suitable for overseas
visitors on short term basis.
Tel. #226-5137/227-1843.
FURNISHED and
unfurnished apartments one,
two, three & four bedrooms.
Queenstown residential,
from US$25 per day, long term
also available. Tel. 624-4225.
FURNISHED and
unfurnished apartments one,
two, three & four bedrooms.
Queenstown residential,
fromm US$25 per day, long term
also available. Tel. 624-4225.
; 'BEAUTiFUL FULLY
FURNISHED PROPERTY -
Prashad Nagar: Waterloo St.,
.Diamond. Executive
uhfurnished in Queenstown.
TEL. 226-8148, 625-1624.
.' :ATLANTIC Gardens semi-
furnished house 5 bedrooms,
stand by generator, AC, insect
mesh. very clean US$1 000
neg. Excellence Realty 233-
5192. 625-7090.
EXECUTIVE 2-bedroom
fully furnished luxurious
apartment security alarm and
more in residential
neighbourhood US$500.
Excellence Realty 233-5192,
625-7090.


BUSY 4-corner business
spot, upstairs of Electronic Cell
Phone Store, measuring 60 x
30. Perfect for cafe, barber
shop. sports bar. etc. Call 624-
8402, 227-7677, for info.
A FURNISHED two-
bedroom concrete house
situated at Lamaha Park.
Parking space, big yard space,
light, water, phone. Price $60
000 neg. Call 223-2919 or 629-
6059
FULLY FURNISHED 1 & 2-
BEDROOM APARTMENTS -
AIR-CONDITIONED, HOT AND
COLD, PARKING SPACE TO
RENT. FOR OVERSEAS
VISITORS. TEL: 218-0392, 648-
7504, 218-0287, 649-1513.
UNFURNISHED 1 2 3-
bedroom $18 000, $22
000, $30 000, $40 000, $50
000. Furnished $30 000,
$60 000, Rooms $12 000 -
$16 000, House $70 000.
Call 231-6236.
PRASHAD Nagar 2-
bedroom $80 000; Kitty 3-
bedroom fully furnished top flat
- $90 000 per month; Versailles
WBD; huge mansion fully
furnished $700 per month.
233-2968, 613-6674.
FURNISHED one & two-
bedroom apts. suitable for
short & long term overseas
guest. Meals can be arranged-
Grilled & security. Along UG
Road. Call 222-6708, 6510,
between 12 noon and 6 pm.
FULLY furnished apartment
to rent on short term basis,
including air-conditioner,
security and parking. Only
overseas guest. One office
space (about 15 ft. x 20 ft). Tel.
231-8748, 627-4151.
LAMAHA Gardens vacant
2-storey business building, 6
offices, area for bond/storage
cement containers US$700
per monthly. Ederson's 226-
5496. Email:
ederson@guyana.net.gy
GREATER Georgetown -
vacant corner shop. Ideal for
Chinese restaurant other
business $70 000 monthly, area
- salon, tailor shop $25 000
monthly. Ederson's 226-
5496. Email:
ederson@guyana.net.gy
EXECUTIVE houses fully
furnished with all modern
conveniences, Bel Air Springs,
Bel Air Park, Shamrock Gardens,
Section 'K' Campbellville -
US$1 500 $2 500. Call
ROSANNA 231-3348/647-
6711.
REGENT St., Georgetown
- vacant 3-storey concrete steel
building top, middle, ground
floor 68' x 78' 45 00 sq. ft.
Each floor divided into 4
sections, fully AC. For rental -
US$16 000 per annum.
Ederson's 226-5496. Email:
ederson@guyana.net.gy
3-BEDROOM furnished
house in GT @$75 000:
independent house in GT
@$90 000; 2-bedroom apt. -
both rooms self-contained with
AC. electric alarm, telephone,
parking, balcony and fully
furnished with all amenities
@S60 000, others short and
long term furnished and
unfurnished, residential and
commercial. Call 226-2372.
FULLY furnished S/B!
ville US$700, B/A/Park -
$80 000, Q/town $140
000, unfurnished S/K/
Campbellville $70 000.
Garnett St. $35 000. 2 apts
(beautiful) US$500.
Garnett St. $80 000. P/
Nagar (w!house) USS800,
Liliendaal $35 000. Home
owners are you looking
for a reliable agent?
Contact us # 222-1319.
616-5693 (anytime).
UNIVERSITY GARDENS:
Exquisite 4-bedroom
mansion, fully furnished,
generator US$3 500.
QUEENSTOWN: 5-bedroom.
furnished beauty USS3 000.
BEL AIR PARK: 8-bedroom
giant, pool, lawn tennis court,
furnished US$5 000, and
another 5-bedroom, pool,
furnished US$4 000.
APARTMENTS: 3-bedroomr
fully AC USS800 and 2-
bedroom top. furnished
US$700 and lots more all
over. Call 226-7128, 615-
6124. ABSOLUTE REALTY
for "Homes with Style."


KITTY S32 000; C/ville
- $45 000; D'URBAN
BACKLAND. furnished $90
000; Happy Acres USS600;
EXECUTIVE PLACES,
Kingston US$1 500; New
Haven US$2 000,
furnished; Bel Air Park, semi-
US$1 000; Lamaha
Gardens, Subryanville.
Queenstown, Prashad
Nagar. Happy Acres.
UNIVERSITY GARDENS,
Republic Park, others.
OFFICE BUILDING -
Kingston, Main Street, Church
Street, High Street. New
Market Street. Barr Street, Bel
Air Park. BUSINESS PLACES
- Regent, Robb, Sheriff. Croal,
others. BOND PLACES -
central Georgetown, East
Coast, Lombard, others.
LAND FOR SALE Oleander
Gardens, 130 x 90 feet -
$16.5M; Happy Acres, Atlantic
Gardens, Bel Air Park -
$16.5M, others. MENTORE
SINGH REALTY 225-1017,
623-6136 OR 64 Main and
Middle Streets, Georgetown.
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
"Have Faith in Christ, today".
227-1988, 623-6431, 270-
4470. Email:
jewanarealty@yahoo.com
GEORGETOWN: Dowding
Street US$700, (F/F), Kitty
(business) $75 000, (upper),
Campbellville (business) $65
000, High Street (office/
residence) USS2 500, Bel Air
Park US$2 000, US$700,
Queenstown US$2 000/US$1
000/US$1 500/US$800,
Subryanville US$700/US$1
000, Kitty US$750 (F/F)
US$500 (F/F) New Market -
$80 000, Caricom/GuySuCo
Gardens US$1 500. EAST
BANK: Providence 4-
bedroom $50 000, Eccles
'AA' (F/F)- US$2 000, Diamond
- US$1 500, Republic Park -
US$2 000. EAST COAST:
Courida Park US$3 000 (F/
F). Atlantic Gardens US$2
000/US$1 000/US$500,
Happy Acres US$2 000/US$1
200/US$500, Atlantic Gardens
(whole house) $80 000,
Lusignan whole house $50
000, B.V., lower flat $45 000,
Non Pariel $35 000,
Plaisance $25 GOO. Le
Ressouvenir US$2 500, Ogle
- US$700, BV $50 000,
Oronoque St. US$800.
Greenfield Park US$1 000.
OFFICES: Central
Georgetown US$4 000,
Queenstown US$2 000,
Sheriff US$1 500,
Subryanville US$1 500,
North Road US$1 000,
Brickdam US$800, bond/
space, restaurants, etc. Land
and properties from $3Mi
$600M (negotiable).



ONE wooden and
concrete house 50E
Sheriff Street. Phone 223-
1529.
1 HOUSE lot with 4
houses: Persons interested
please call. Price negotiable.
HOUSE and land for sale
at Mocha Arcadia. Contact
No. 226-7973
1 TWO-BEDROOM house
for sale, 35 Robb Street,
Bourda. Tel. 227-0552.
PROPERTY for rental for
business on East Bank and
West Coast Demerara. Call
223-7226.
CANAL NO. 2. North
Section 3-bedroom house
(concrete & wood). Tel. 263-
5739.
1 HOUSE and land
transport Anna Catherina.
WCD $5.6M. Call 276-0520
or 612-2423.
PROPERTY for sale by
owner. Two-storey concrete
building, Bel Air Park. Tel. No.
226-3479.
PROPERTY for sale in
Queenstown. Price $14 .8M
neg. Call 628-9274, 629-
3528.
DOUBLE-LOT 3-bedroom
property for sale in Amelia's
Ward. Linden Price
negotiable. Call 223-4938.
HOUSE & land for sale in
Stewartville. Vacant
possession, transported land.
Tel. 226-9029. 226-4177, 225-
2873.
RESIDENTIAL and
commercial properties. Prices
ranging from $7M upwards.
Tel. 226-1192 623-7742.


PROPERTY for sale in Bel
Air. 2-storey concrete reduced
from $16.5M to $14M. Phone
225-2626/231-2064.
NEWLY built 4-storey
business property on
Cummings St., near to North
Road. Tel. 647-2900 or 227-
4272.
ONE executive property
in Meadow Brook Gardens,
drop from $18M to
$13.9M. Phone 231-2064,
225-2626.
3-STOREY building corner
of Charles & Sussex Sts.,
Charlestown. Package offered.
Price negotiable. Call 225-
7389, after 12.
TWO-STOREY wooden
building located in Triumph
Backlands on large plot of
land. Make an offer. Must be
sold. Call 220-6586.
ONE going business
premises; one secured
beautifully tiled office; one
three-bedroom house fully
rolled in New Amsterdam.
el: 333-2500.
OGLE Airstrip Road -
spacious concrete house and
land transported. Excellent
location reasonable offer -
bargain. Phone 222-7516.


PROPERTY FOR SALE








TUCVILLE
Immediate possession
immaculate condition,
luxurious interior
furnishings, tiled verandah,
grilled, concrete yard,
fenced, potted plants
$17M,

inclusive/negotia bte




RUIMZEIGHT $2.2M.
GORDON ST. KITTY $7.5M neg.
Industry $8M. Alberttown -
$8.9M. TEL. 226-8148, 625-
1624.
2-STOREY business/
residential property at 56
Section D Cumberland, East
Canje phone, electricity, etc.
Price neg. Tel. 628-5264, 339-
2678.
4-BEDROOM concrete &
wooden house. Ketley St..
Charlestown, formerly Rudy's
Liquor Restaurant (corner lot)
- $18M neg. Contact 227-
6204.
POPULAR Video Club in
very busy area in New
Amsterdam. Terms of Sale &
Occupancy can be
negotiated. Call 333-2990
or after hours 333-3688.
TRANSPORTED property
with (2) two-storey buildings at
Lot 40 Robb St., Bourda, G!town.
One flat, presently vacant. Price
- $20M. Phone 225-0056
1 TRANSPORTED
concrete house, top and
bottom flats with phone, water
and lights. Section 'C'
Enterprise, ECD $2.7M neg.
Contact 663-0897. anytime.
ONE (1) wooden and
concrete business property
situated at Better Hope. Public
Road, ECD. Vacant possession.
Contact Tel. # 226-2278.
Owner leaving country.
BARGAIN PRICE
PRASHAD NAGAR,
Premniranjan Place 4
bedrooms, spacious yard
reduced to $22M. Norbert
deFreitas 231-1506/642-
5874.
SD'URBAN St., Lodge 2-
storey concrete building with 4
- 2-bedroom designed
apartments, your monthly rent
will pay your mortgage $14M
or US$70 000. Ederson's 226-
5496. Email:
ederson@guyana.net.gy
ROBB St.. Bourda near
market vacant 2-storey concrete
building 40 x 88' land 50' x
100', future development 4-
storey, general store $40M or
US$200 000 Ederson's 226-
5496. Email
ederson@cguyana.net gy


NORTON STREET $6M.
SHELDON 642-0838.
ATLANTIC Gardens, ECD
vacant 2-storey mansion on
3 house lots. Ideal for bond
store, cement/containers -
535M or US$175 000.
Ederson's 226-5496. Email:
ederson@guyana.net.gy
BEL AIR PARK vacant 2-
storey concrete Hollywood
designed 4-bedroom mansion
- $24.5M or US$122 000.
Ederson's 226-5496. Email:
ederson@guyana.net.gy
ECCLES, EBD vacant
large bond 6 000 sq. ft.. 25-ft.
high roof to store cement
and do others business $50M
or US$250 000. Ederson's -
226-5496. Email:
ederson@guyana.net.gy
ALBERTTOWN vacant
2"" building 2-storey 5 offices -
internet cafe, computer class -
$8.5M, US$42 000. Owner will
give possession $3.5M. US$17
000. Ederson's 226-5496.
E m a i I :
ederson@guyana.net.gy
THOMAS/Kitty near
Vlissengen Rd. vacant 2-
storey concrete/wooden semi-
furnished 4-bedroom mansion
- $15M. US$75 000.
Ederson's 226-5496. Email:
ederson@guyana.net.gy
OVERSEAS/Local
urgently needed commercial/
residential buildings for sale
or rent Georgetown/East
Coast Demerara/East Bank
Demerara. Other areas not
mentioned. Ederson's 226-
5496. Email:
ederson@guyana.net.gy
OVERSEAS/Local owners
of buildings we have
management services/paying
your bills and landscaping.
Ederson's 226-5496. Email:
ederson@guyana.net.gy
REGENT St., Bourda -
vacant 2-storey business
building 2 large offices ground
floor. Ideal insurance, internet
cafe $19.5M. US$97 000 neg.
Ederson's 226-5496. Email:
ederson@guyana.net.gy
STATION St., Kitty,
Vlissengen Rd. vacant new
2-storey mansion, 3 bedrooms
residence, bottom business
- $25M, US$125 000.
Ederson's 226-5496. Email:
edeison@guyana.net.gy
KERSAINT Park,
residential vacant 2-storey
concrete Hollywood designed,
3 bedrooms mansion $15M,
US$75 000. Ederson's 226-
5496. Email:
ederson@guyana.net.gy
SALE by owner: Front
two-storey, 4-bedroom,
grilled, concrete house with
toilet & bath, enclosed
garage. Second house both
located at Triumph. ECD.
Price negotiable. Tel. 227-
6993.
PRASHAD Nagar,
Section 'K' Campbellville,
Campbellville. Newtown,
Bourda, South & North
Ruimveldt, East Bank
Demerara, etc. from $9M.
225-3006, 225-7173,
Marbollers@hotmail.corn
SUBRYANVILLE $26M;
Bel Air Park $28M;
Vryheid's Lust $16M
Charlestown S7M; Regent
Road $50M: Prashad Nagar
- $17M: Robb St. $8M.
Sonja Realty 225-7197,
623-2537.
TRANSPORTED front
building with two self-
contained apartments, no
repairs needed. Price 510M.
Immediate vacant possession.
K. S. RAGHUBIR Agency
Office 225-0545. 642-0636.
PLAISANCE 3-
BEDROOM OCEAN VIEW
CORNER LOT, ONE BLOCK
FROM E..C. ROAD. VACANT
POSSESSION. CALL 225-
5591 OR 619-5505.
CRAIG 2-STOREY 3-
BEDROOM 10 YEARS OLD
HOUSE AND LAND, SIZE- 35-
X 144. HOUSE NEEDS WORK.
MUST SEE. DEAL, ASKING -
$3.9M. CALL 225-5591 OR
619-5505t
ONE two-storey wonden
concrete building: one qas
station and s -- arti.
(ocing business .s 24
and 25. Land of Plenty
Etsequibo Coast. 150 > 50
P'ice S25 00i 000
!;gotlable. Phonp :-'-
:';J9. 642-6345


- --- --~-


a








20 SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006


BEL AIR PARK 5-
bedroom $20 000: Gordon
Street Kitty. 2 buildings $17
000; Queenstown 3-storey
recently refurbished 48M:
Subryanville $45M; Nandy
Park house on double lot -
$22M; Meadow Bank 2-
fami'y house S7M. 233-29C8.
613-6674
ONE three-storey building
-33 000 sq. ft. at Parika. Ideal
for Hotel, Store. Hospital or
any other type of businesses,
etc. Any reasonable price
would be considered. Contact
Len's at Sheriff St. for
further information. Tel.
227-1511. N.B.: Extra land
to extend building or new
one.
BEAUTIFUL PROPERTIES
- Sarah Johanna 4-bedroom
- $35M; Happy Acres 4-
bedroom $30M; Prashad
Nagar 5-bedroom $12.75M
& $25M; 2-family Industry-
$8M; Ruimzeight $2.2M; Da
Silva $7.5M. LE
RESSOUVENIR LANDS AND
PROPERTIES. TEL. 226-8148,
625-1624.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
- 2-storey fully concreted
house 5 bedrooms, 2 full
bathrooms, American
fixture faucet, sink, toilet,
cabinet, hot water tank,
eating kitchen, built-in
wardrobe, central air-
conditioner, car garage,
front view to Public Road.
Lot 6 Nandy Park, EBD.
Interested person only to
call. Day 226-7806;
evening 225-8410.
OGLE: 3-bedroom
concrete $8.5M.
CAMPBELLVILLE: 4-
bedroom with business
below $20M.
QUEENSTOWN: 5-bedroom -
$20M, and cottage $12M.
BEL AIR PARK: 4-bedroom
fully furnished, 2 living
rooms $28M. BEL AIR
GARDEN: 5-bedroom beauty
with great grounds $90M.
MEADOW BANK: 2 vacant
lots $5.5M and lots more
all over. Call 226-7128, 615-
6124. ABSOLUTE REALTY -
"The Home of better
Bargains".
AUBREY BARKER
ROAD double with 5-
bedroom two-storey house
suitable for school or
general business $17.5M
neg. Lamaha Gardens -
flat ranch house, three-
bedroom $15M neg.
Atlantic Ville three-
bedroom wooden house
needs repairs $6.5M neg.
Kitty, Robb Street,
Campbellville, Happy
Acres, Bel Air Park,
Republic Park and others -
$6.5M $100M. Roberts
Realty First Federation
Life Bldg., 227-7627 -
Office, 227-3768 Home,
644-2099 Cell.



EARTH for sale.
Delivery to spot. Tel. 626-
7127.
ARC Welder 295 Amp
220 volts $150 000. 220-
4791.
ONE STHIL FS 45
Grasscutter. Tel. 227-6012,
218-1711.
ONE Perkins diesel
enerator 38 KVA. Call 220-
890.
LAPTOPS IBM -Think pad
$80 000 each. Call 648-5281.
2 METAL working
lathes. 6-ft. and 7-ft. bed.
614-5321, 226-7613.
USED zinc sheets.
Contact Deosarran
Mangar at 61 Public Rd.,
Kitty.
WHITE antique bedroom
set, one Canopy bed.
Contact 222-4333.
4 POOL tables (slate)
size 8 4 x 4' 8. Price $550
000 neg. Tel. 265-2103.
SHOCK treatment
for swimming pools.
Phone 227-4857 (8 am
4 pm), Mon. to Fri
ONE 20" Samsung
colour television. Perfect
condition and reception,
1 ;, 6"1 1-53
i(! '.m-, -- T corntazer
(freezer type). Tel 220-1068 or
626-7684- Ally.
S.ULGHTLY damaged
Wsara-5s-v alu sheets.
Telephone 226-7054 (business
hours).


IMPORTED fibreglass
stall 36 x 36 with swinging
glass door. Sheriff St. -
223-9687.
CHLORINE tablets 3"
for swimming pools only.
Phone 227-4857 (8am ..- 4
pm). Mnn Fri
1 DAEWOO Solar 200 111
excavator. Price negotiable.
Contact Sam on 625-7741, 771-
4646.
SMALL fridge, queen size
bed. dining set, nibby chair
set, used computer. Going
cheap. 231-5767.
1 CRAFTSMAN generator
2400 watts, 120 volts, at give-
away price. Call 622-4275 or
255-3718.
RARE Dutch bottles, 18
and 19 Centuries, all quality
and mint. Call 260-0059,
661-9848 Cell.
SLIDING bath tub glass
door. Swing glass door for
shower fits or 32" to 37 inches.
Sheriff St. 223-9687.
1 BOAT 96-ft. long, 14-
ft. 6 inches width and 6 ft.
draft complete with engine.
Contact 619-3090, 339-3102.
ONE used Yamaha 2 500
Watt, 110 volts, low noise
generator. Price reasonable.
Contact 226-1769 or 612-
3607.
LEOTARD and tights,
dancing shoes as low as
$500. 622-4386, 227-8538.
Visit Roxie's 122 Merriman's
Mall.
ONE Pegasus cover stitch
heavy-duty machine. 622-
4386, 227-8538. Visit Roxie's
122 Merriman's Mall,
Bourda.
INDUSTRIAL Transformer,
Welder 3 phase, 260 Amps.
Can weld aluminium. Junior
- 328-2205, 621-4568.
(1) 48 YAMAHA Out Board
engine, new inside, very good
condition $250 000. No.
615-0639. 662-7290.
GOING out of business.
Internet Cafe computers,
printers, copiers etc. Call
227-1319. 225-4709, 625-
9477.
(1) 6-cylinder Ford cargo
diesel engine. (1) 4-cylinder
Ford cargo diesel engine. Tel.
220-1068 or 626-7684 Ally.
CBT NUGGETS-MCSE
2003 and Comptia A+ video
training. Last set available. Call
Junior on 223-5916, 618-8748.
PIT bull puppies, 8 wks
old, vaccinated and
dewormed imported blood.
Price neg. Tel. 223-4472,
623-6335. 618-4481.
COSMETICS, antioxidant
face wash firming cream and
serum, etc. Also antiques
pieces, Chinas, brass, etc. Tel.
226-8652.
4 X 4 PAJERO, Diesel-
excellent condition; 1 30 Hp
Yamaha Outboard engine: 1
Power Inverter, 1 000 watts.
Tel. 228-2525.
BRAND new Carrier air-
condition Units 38 000 BTU,
central air system with ducts and
vents. 1 electric stove. Call 233-
2314.
1 TK Dump truck. 1 10-
ton 3-wheel roller. 1 3-ton
vibrating roller, 2 580C
Hymacs. All in working
condition. Call 222-6708,
623-3404.
KENMORE refrigerator -
32 x 32 x 68, frost free, ice
making capability in
freezer. Also Toshiba DVD/
VCR Combo. Call 613-9559.
PARTS for Dryers/
Washers. Thermostats,
pumps, motors, belts, valves,
knobs, etc. Technician
available. Call 622-5776.
ONE Invacare Homecare
bed, imported in August
2005. No reasonable offer
refused. Please call
telephone number 226-
5335.
FREON gas 11, 12, 22.
502 134A & 404A. Also
Helium for balloons and
argon gas. Phone 227-4857
(8 am 4 pm) Mon. to Fri.
PIANOS LIKE NEW -
Halls Piano ware house, 25
John St. & Delph Avenue, C!
ville. Call 226-2714 or 621-
6540.


PUPPIES for sale
Rottweiler and German
Shepherd (mixed) vaccinated
and dewormned. Contact
telephone no. 223-0754.
NEW General
generators. US made, 7550
watts electric start. unused
- $370 000 neg. Call 220-
6770, 645-1905.
1 COMPLETE VIDEO &
DVD Club (1300 DVD & 5000
cassettes). Located at Merriman's
Mall. Contact Ronald 223-
0972/223-0919.
FOR SALE/RENT 3 stalls
in Vendor's Arcade facing
Mahaica Bus Park. Ideal for
snackette, cell phone, grocery,
etc. Call 646-6105.
OXYGEN and acetylene
gases, fast and efficient
service. 10 11 Mc Doom
Public Road, EBD. Phone
223-6533 (8 am 4 pm).
Mon. to Fri. (Sat. 8 12).
COMPLETE computer
XP DVD Rom, DVD Burner
converts VHS to DVD, watch
TV, Play radio, printer -
stabiliser- $175 000 neg. Tel.
226-8652.
USED wheels 235/75 R15
with rims for 4 x 4 $45 000; 4
- 13 inches mag with tyres -
$25 000; 4 tyres 31 x 10.5R
15, Good Year $20 000. 220-
4791.
ONE General Electric
fridge and one Frigidaire stove
4-burner and oven in good
working condition. Please
contact Richard or Shameeza
on 265-5876.
1 HONDA pressure
washer, brand new; 2 drills;
1 saw; 1 Jialing motorcycle,
next to new; 1 amplifier; 1
truck pump; 1 battery
charger; 1 bicycle. Tel. 265-
5876.
WESTPOINT 2-door fridge
- 110v-7.8 cu. ft., TV 6 x 9 20"
- $30 000, carpet 6 x 9 $5 000,
other household articles very
cheap. Owner leaving. Call 610-
3167.
SONY Portable CD
Player Walkman, down load
CDs from computer Plays
MP3 files, Koss computer
speakers, microwave
Whirlpool 900 watts, 120v.
Call 231-3020, 626-1948.
AQUARIUM Fish export
business foreign exchange
earner large holding station at
29 and 30 Soesdyke, EB Dem.
Will advise purchaser for 4
months. Phone 225-9201, 227-
0310.
1 PANASONIC 19"
television, 1 white Westinghouse
double door fridge, 1 Whirlpool
chest freezer, 1 Chester drawers.
Contact 226-0616, 170
Garnett St., Newtown, Kitty.
1 13HP 3 500 PSI
Pressure washer in
excellent working condition
- $175 000 neg., 1 9Hp
Honda, 1-cylinder engine in
excellent working condition
- $75 000 neg. Call 220-
4058.
SKY Universal, authorised
dealer for the best offer in
Phillips digital dish. View up
to 125 channels including Pay
Per View channels and also
Direct TV. Contact: Tel. 231-
6093. 227-1151 (Office).
PRESSURE washer $175
000, STIHL edger & trimmer,
Dewalt Buffer, car radio -
Panasonic DF 783U, grill work -
$10 000 each, two 100-lb gas
bottles $10 000 each. Call 648-
5281.
CAUSTIC Soda 55-lb.
$4 000; Alum 55-lb. $5
000; Soda Ash 55-lb. $7
500; Sulphuric Acid 45-
gal. $45 000; granular
chlorine, chlorine gas.
Phone 227-4857 (8 am 4
pm) Mon. to Fri.
CUMMINS 6 CTA 230 Hp
diesel engine with twin disc
pto on bed, good general
conditi" on $1.25M. 4H ft.
steel pontoon EX 12' diesel
with 15 x 28 ft. purple heart
sluice $0.5M. Located
Middle Mazaruni. Call 223-
5050.
Going cheap Lister Water
cool engine, TL cab 4 5-speed
gear box, 5 7 & 10-ton
differential, 330 500 complete
engine front TK & TL back spring
chassis dump tray & romp. hub,
Massey Ferguson parts. 1 Tarq
converter for front end loader.
Tel. 339-3608.


ENGINES 3406B
Caterpillar 425Hp Cummins
855, 250Hp, Perkins 63544,
Detroit Diesel 8V92, Marine
350 Hp. Honda pressure
washer 2 500PSI. We import
all heavy-duty equipment
such as log skidders, wheel
loaders haulers and for all
your heavy-duty diesel
engines over hauling. Call us
first on 623-1003. 218-3899,
218-1469.
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT AND FURNITURE
IN EXCELLENT CONDITION.
FOOD WARMER (STAINLESS
STEEL, 8-HOLE, DISPLAY
COOLER, REFRIGERATOR
ASSORTED KITCHEN
UTENSIL. PRICE. EXCELLENT
AND NEGOTIABLE. CALL
625-8763 (BET. 9 AM AND
5:30 PM).
ONE PROF. MUSIC SET
INCLUDING DOUBLE DISC
DRIVE WITH MIXER,
CROSSOVER, 20 BAND EQ,
THREE AMPS. WITH WATTS
TOTAL 2 600. TWO 15" 1
100 WATTS BASS, TWO 12"
MIDRANGES, TWO HORN
MIDRANGE SIX-BULL
TWEETERS. COST $400
000 NON NEG. TEL. 613-
9442.
LOW PRICES complete
computer systems and
accessories, electronic
typewriters in excellent
working condition. CXC and
Accounting text books and a
wide range of school supplies
which include Trapper
Keeper, Files, Geometry Sets,
Writing pads, pencil, pencil
cases and a lot more. For more
information, call # 225-9249
or visit us at 161 Pike and
Alexander Streets, Kitty,
Georgetown.
TOYOTA Starlet EP 82 -
immaculate condition
automatic, EFI, mags, etc. -
$925 000 neg. Air
compressor (Quincy) US
made, 220V single phase,
B16 5 horse power, 80-Gin
tank $250 000. One 4E
Starlet engine completes
with transmission, alternator,
steering pump AC motor,
EFI. Phone 233-5557, 233-
5826, or Aybue W/shop by
M & M, opposite Harbour
Bridge 6 Bagotstown,
EBD.
NIGEL WOODWORKING -
19 20 COLDINGEN, ECD.
TEL. # 624-7023. KITCHEN
CUPBOARDS, FURNITURE,
PANEL DOOR & SPINDLE,
PURPLE HEART DOORS.
SQUARE SOLID DOOR $18
000. SQUARE INNER ARCH
DOOR $21 000, OUTER
ARCH WITH SINGLE FRAME -
$35 000. SINGLE DOOR WITH
DOUBLE ARCH FROM $50
000. DOUBLE ARCH DOOR
WITH DOUBLE FRAME $80
000. FREE DELIVERY.
1 000 piece new cellular
phone parts faces, carry
casing, lighting circuit,
lighting antenna, charges
all types batteries,
complete casing sets, ear
pieces, and many many
more, all going very cheap
for wholesalers $400 000
neg. for the lot. 1 large
General Electric stand up
freezer, 110 v, hardly used,
USA made $105 000. 1
Honda EG 2 500 watts
generator in good working
condition $105 000. 1 18
000 BTU new Peak Split air
conditioner, complete 240V,
remote control, never used
- $105 000. 1 new set of 4
Nickle sizes 15 rims to fit
any vehicle with 4 Nickle
covers, never used in box -
$75 000. 1 Electric 110v
pressure pump washer
complete with nozzle $45
000. 1 Electric chain saw,
110v complete $35 000. 1
cross cut saw, 110v $8 000.
1 complete internet system
with lot of computers and
accessories, backup,
printers, cords, bill
machine, scanner and many
many more, the entire lot
bargain $400 000 along
with large photocopy
machine and manual. 1 new
blue large bath tub
fibreglass never used $30
000. 4 4-drawer metal filing
cabinet at $20 000 each.
1 large vacuum cleaner on
wheels, industrial and
commercial. 110v large
dust bags, for carpet or
floor Dayton $30 000. 1
large water pump with
pressure tank, 110 240v,
automatically operated -
$30 000. 1 Mitre saw on
adjustable table, 110v
$30 000. Owner leaving
621-4928


WATCH AND
CALCULATOR BATTERIES
WHY PAY MORE? WHEN
YOU CAN GET THE BEST
MAXWELL SILVER OXIDE
BATTERIES FOR ONLY TWO
HUNDRED DOLLARS. INSIST
ONLY MAXWELL SILVER
OXIDE. AT GUYANA VARIETY
STORE AND NUT CENTRE, 68
ROBB ST., LACYTOWN.



TOYOTA HILUX JEEP,
ETC. 225-2500.
21 BEDFORD
Model M truck. Tel:
455-2303.
ONE Toyota Tundra, F
150. Tel. 623-5534, 227-
3717
ONE 212 PJJ 125.
Owner leaving $1.8M. #
641-8851.
TOYOTA Hiace
minibus 15 seats -
$1.7M neg. Tel. # 642-
5899.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma,
unregistered. Price neg.
Contact Ryan 629-
7010.
ONE AE 91 Toyota
Sprinter $750 000 neg.
Tel. 226-5768, 626-8502.
RZ long base mini-bus,
BHH series, music, DVD,
alarm, mags. Tel. #615-3862.
1 TOYOTA 2002 Hilux
Extra Cab Pickup, fully
loaded, 1 mth. old. Call 623-
7291.






LINCOLN TOWN CAR
Fully powered, 48,000 miles
DVD Systemn
4 Million

MAZDA CONVERTIBLE
SPORTS CAR
18,000 miles onlycon) lliy~r,
hard & soft top
BMW CONVERTIBLE 325i
Auto, loaded low miites.
1)VD stzscemma whees, -'S2M
190E MERCDES BENZ
fully looded,skirte mag wi iel,
(3) system.
It, si n .ir,-i pia i
Call: 647-3000/2254631

NISSAN D21 Pick-up,
good condition $550
000 neg. Contact Bobby
336-6625.
1 AT 192 CARINA.
excellent condition. Price
neg. Contact 220-9058 or
609-7247.
1 L-TOURING Wagon,
immaculate condition, Sports
style. One owner. Call 619-
4831.
1 RZ long base mini
bus, working condition,
mags, music, etc. $900
000. Call 265-3989.
2 TOYOTA TUNDRAS
V6 and V8 4 x 4, GKK
series. Low mileage. Tel.
442-3244.
ONE Toyota Townace
minibus. BFF series. Price
negotiable. Call 623-7526/
623-3686
VAUXHALL Vintora
fitted with 2T engine,
driving, body work needed.
Tel. 642-9947
120Y DATSUN
excellent condition.
broad rims, spoiler. Tel.
259-0836, 622-0192.
1 JEEP Wrangler
excellent condition for sale.
1 Jeep Wrangler shell. Tel.
625-1188.
1 NISSAN Vanette
minibus. BHH series $375
000 neg. Contact 623-5551.
218-3494.
MINI Van FOR SALE
Mazda MPV V6 mini
van. Price negotiable
Tel. # 629-0829.
1 ONE Toyota Land
Cruiser (diesel)- 13 seater.
manual S4.1 million.
Please contact 623-7031.


1 AT 170 CORONA- PFF
series, fully AC. player $900
000 neg. Contact 610-6677:
TOYOTA G-Touring
Wagon. 5 A engine.
automatic, like new. 74
Sheriff St.. C/ville 223-
9687
4-WD RANGE Rover -
Land Rover with alloy
rims & Sony CD player.
Priced to go. # 621-7445
ONE RZ minibus short
base, BGG series. Music,
mags $1.2M. Contact no.
218-4060.
...........................................................................
AE 110 Sprinter.
Immaculate condition, AC,
mags, etc. PHH series. Phone
660-5724.
1 TOYOTA -Tundra
(white). Going cheap.
Suzuki Vitara, 4-door. Call
227-5500, 227-2027.
ISUZU Jeep 4 x 4
Turbo Diesel. Fully
powered, 8 seats, like
new. 74 Sheriff St., C.I
ville. 223-9687.
TOYOTA Carina AT
170, Corolla AE 91,
Corolla AE 100. Call City
Taxi Service 226-7150.
1 BURGUNDY 50CC
Motorcycle, low mileage, CD
9077. Price neg. Contact
233-5201, 621-8305.
1 RZ excellent
condition, BFF series -
$1.1M neg. Call 621-9210
before 5 pm, 218-4102 after
5 pm.
TOYOTA Corona AT
150, excellent
condition. Price $650
000 neg. Tel. 615-
9465.
1 SERIES 111 Land Rover,
110 engine, diesel $850 000
neg. Call 613-3752.....
ONE mini miner PFF
series. Excellent condition.
Price negotiable. Contact No.
647-3725.
ONE Nissan Caravan.
Excellent working
condition. Price
negotiable. Contact 277-
0108, 626-1138.
CARINA 192 PHH,
fully powered, AC, like
new. Must be seen. 74
Sheriff St., C/ville. 223-
9687.
1 BACK Wheel drive AT
140 Corona, ood
condition. Price $340
000 neg. Call 626-9483 or
611-7971.
COROLLA Ceres AE 100
PHH series, good
condition, 2"` owner $1 250
000, negotiable. Call 228-
2780.
AE 100 SPRINTER,
PGG series, 16" nickel rim,
spoiler, CD Player. Price -
$975 000 negotiable. Call
641-6117.
2 580C Hymacs, TK
dump truck 10-ton 3-wheel
roller. All in working
conditions. Call 222-6708.
623-3404.
NEW model Toyota
Starlet four-door, PJJ series,
low mileage. Brand new
motorcycles. Tel. 225-2873,
226-9029.
ONE TT 131 CORONA
in good condition mag
rims, stick gear, tape deck.
Tel: 626-6837 after hours -
# 220-4316.
ONE Coaster bus in
good working condition.
Contact 616-3736 or 660-
1564. No reasonable offer
refused.
% TON Ford Truck.
enclosed, parts for Mercedes
200 series, engine &
transmission for minibus
Call 227-7777.
ONE Honda CRV -
excellent condition, Burgundy.
automatic, powered. PHH
series $2.6M. Tel. 226-0176.
1 MITSUBISHI Lancer,
immaculate condition,
automatic, tiptronic, chrome
mags. flare kit, crystal lights.
Call 220-6770, 645-1905.
MITSUBISHI RVR PJJ
series, immaculate
condition $2.4M
negotiable. Mint condition.
Contact 276-0245. 628-
4179.


- - - -








SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14,2006I


1 AT 170 TOYOTA Corona
- excellent condition, mag
rims, fog lamps, original
spoiler. Price neg. Telephone
322-0322.
ONE AA 60 Carina, in
excellent working condition,
eeds body work, tape deck,
tC etc. Tel. 617-4063/
?25-0236.
(1) TOYOTA Marino PHH
series, excellent condition.
Fully loaded, mags, music, AC,
spoiler, etc. Tel. 220-3355,
624-6050.
2000 MODEL Extra Cab
Toyota Tacoma fully loaded,
mag rims, etc. Toyota Provia
minivan. Tel. 225-2873, 226-
9029.
ONE MITSUBISHI
LANCER, one HONDA
INTEGRA both fully loaded,
17' rims. Owner leaving
country. Tel. 646-1944.
ONE Nissan Laurel fully
loaded. Model C 33, 4-
cylinder, gear, (PW, PM, PS).
Price neg. Call: 223-9021,
Cell: 629-7419 (Monty).
MUST BE SOLD. 2 RZ
in immaculate condition;
1 Buick car with AT 170
engine, many more. Call:
220-5124,663-4120.
FORD 150 Pick Up, 3
doors, good condition, CD/
Tape player, bubble tray,
dual air bag, mag rims, etc.
- $5.5M neg. Tel. 220-7416.
ONE AT 150 Corona -
stick gear/front wheel drive,
in good condition. Price -
$460 000 negotiable. Tel.
621-3343. 648-8153.
ONE AE 110 Corolla,
one AT 192 Carina, both
automatic, fully powered.
Price $1 400 000 neg.
#645-0899. 623-7684.
1 AE 100 MARINO -
fully powered, fully flare,
17-inch rimsl spoiler, etc.
Call Terry. Tel. # 276-
1184, 660-3698. Quick
sale.
1 AT 192 TOYOTA Carina,
PKK series, immaculate
condition $1.4Mvl neg. Call
226-3441 or 625-2518. Ask for
Ray or Kim.
ONE RZ minibus, Long
Base, in immaculate
condition, mags, sunroof,
etc. Contact us on 233-2939
or 616-4638 ask for Ram.
TOYOTA Corolla good
working condition,
resprayed, etc. Price $450
000. Terms available, owner
leaving. Phone ??2-7516.
Toyota Carina AT 192 -
1996 model, Toyota Dyna 2-
ton truck 1997 yr. model.
Reasonably priced. Contact
Tel. # 231-5680.
ONE Burgundy RAV-4 -
PJJ series, sun roof,
alarm. CD player, full
power. Excellent
condition. Tel. No. 223-
9870, 255-0069.
TOYOTA Carina AT 150
- automatic, power steering/
window. Good working
condition, CD $475 000.
Tel. 269-0591.
MITSUBISHI Canter
enclosed truck with
refrigeration system, diesel,
three- ton. Call 225-5591 or
619-5505.
AT 192 Carina $1 350
000 neg. Mitsubishi, Lancer -
$1.8M. AE 100 Sprinter -
$1.1M. AE 91 Sprinter $750
000 neg. Tel. 226-0176.
.1 DUMP truck, 1 water
tender and 330 Timber
Jack Skidder all are in
good working condition.
For more information
Contact: 264-2946.
1 2-TON Toyota Dyna
truck (enclosed), diesel, stick
gear. GFF series. Ideal for
business. $750 000 neg.
Call 623-9570 or 220-3404.
2 TOYOTA 212 Carinas,
in immaculate condition,
Lady driven, PHH series -
$1.7M and $1.6M neg. Call
276-0313, 626-1141 -
Shahab.
TOYOTA Camry SV22
4S engine automatic,
power steering, power
window. In very good
working condition $650
000. Tel. 660-4884.


2 AT 170 Corona cars. One
Stick gear, EFI, AC, fully
powered, other automatic. Both
cars in good condition. Tel. 218-
3018, 619-5087Z.
ONE Nissan Jeep, in good
condition, PFF series. Contact
GRPA 70 Quamina Street,
Georgetown. Tel. 225-3278 or
227-1438.
FORD Taurus late PJJ
series, automatic, air-
conditioner, fully powered, CD
Player. Excellent 'condition.
Phone 225-46311, 647-3000.
FORD Lincoln Stretch
Limousine (Bla) 7-seater
automatic, fully powered. Needs
work, drives. Solas is $3.8M.
Phone 225-4631, 225-2503,
647-3000. ___
MAZDA M l-5 Miata
Convertible dnly'1l8 000 miles,
hard and soft top, qD player, air-
conditioner, 5-speed, Lady
driven. Tel 647-3000, 225-2503
- $1.9 million Ineg.
2 AT 192 TOYOTA Carinas
and 1 150 cc 3eeley Scooter, in
very good cOndition. Price
negotiable. Tli No. 621-8539
, 226-0176, 227-4918.
TWO Toyota Tacoma
Extra Cab Pick-ups, 4-wheel
drive. Series 1998 & 2000.
One Toyota Tundra 4-wheel
drive automatic. Call 629-
4979, 220-7430._
(1) MASTER Surf Town
Ace small bus luxury seats,
power steering, power window,
automatic, mags $425 000.
No. 615-063_9. 662-7290.
TOYOTA Hilux Surf YN 130
- fully powered, AC, automatic,
crash bar, etc $2.2M neg. credit
available. Call 276-0313, 626-
1141 Shahab.
COROLLA. AE 91 $600
000, Marino $1M, Corolla AT
110 $1.3M. Dolly Auto
Rental 272 Bissessar Ave.,
Prashad Nagatr- 227-7126.
1 929 MAZDA Wagon,
back wheel drie. needs minor
body work, good working
condition $250 000 neg.
Contact 233-5P33 (w), 233-
6250 (h).
TOYOTA HILIJXJEEP- PHH
SERIES, AC, 'AUTOMATIC;
TOYOTA PICKUP GJJ
SERIES, 4-DOOR, AC,
AUTOMATIC. CONTACT SARAH
- 225-2500, 646-5888.
AE 110 COROLLA. 3 AT
192 Carinas, EP 91 Starlet 4-
door, Marino & AE 100 Corolla
& Sprinter, Toyqta Pick-up T
100. Amar 22i7-2834. 621-
6037.
NEW model Suzuki Vitara,
Diplomat's vehicle, low mileage,
super condition. Pete's Auto
Sales, Lot : 2 George and
Hadfield Streets, W/Rust. 226-
9951, 226-5546, 231-7432.
3 NISSAN Extra Cabs 4 x 4
Diesel, 1 AT 170 Carina. 1
Mitsubishi L 200 4 x 4 Double
Cab. 1 Mercedes Benz 4 x 4 280
g Tel. # 623-5463, 641-9547,
223-9860. 641-954
1 TOYOtTA RAV-4, PHH
series, 4-door, fully
powered, A/PC, chrome, mag
rims crash qar, sen roof, CD
Player, autd 4-wheel drive.
Contact Tel. I# 270-4225. Cell
615-1728
AT 192 CARINA fully
loaded, maxi spoiler AC, key
start, alarm, Six-disc, and amp.
AT 170 Carina max, AC, spoiler
and music. contactt No. 220-
2047 ask for Safraz, 645-0404.
TOYOTAITown Ace Van -
enclosed, stick gear, diesel, GJJ
series, excellent condition for -
$1.7M. Contact Pete's Auto
Sales. Lot i2 George and
Hadfield Streets, W/Rust. 226-
9951, 226-5546.
DEAL OF THE WEEK.
TOYOTA CARINA AT 192,
STARLET EP .91, AUTOMATIC,
FULLY POWERED. CASH $1
750 00. DEO. MARAJ AUTO
SALES 207 SHERIFF & SIXTH
STREETS, CAMPBELLVILLE.
226-4939. I
190E Mdrcedes Benz,
Special Edition automatic,
fully powered. 2.6-cylinder, full
flare package aild lots of extras.
Must see. Have pyinor work. sold
as is $1.6M cash. Phone 647-
3000, 225-4631,.
LINCOLN T6wn car (Ford)-
four-door luxury Sedan.
automatic, powerwindows. locks,
seats, digital dash, TV and DVD
players, air-conditioner. Only 47
000 miles. Like new. $4M
negotiable. Phone 647-3000,
225-4631.


2005 TOYOTA TACOMA, X
RUNNER, 20-INCH CHROME
WHEEL, ONLY ONE IN THE
COUNTRY. BRAND NEW. 2005
R1 YAMAHA 2004, 600 NINJA.
CALL 444-6617, 612-0099.
OFF the wharf (collect car
same day) AT 192, AE 100,
AT 212, Lancer, RZ $800 000
- $1M down payment (2 years.
to pay off). Also used cars AT
170, AE 100, AT 192, RZ, etc. -
$500 000 $900 000 down
payment. Call 231-6236. i
1 TOYOTA 4 X4 RUNNF
- automatic, fully loaded
CD and cassette Player, fo,
lamp, nickel mags
competition exhaust,
crash bar, side step toar,
brand new looks and drive.
Contact Mr. Khan Auto Sdles
- 28 'BB' Eccles EBD. We .
233-2336 ,623-997_2.
RAV 4 PGG &'PHH series;
.SRV Honda PHH,, 4-Ru npr
Surf, 4-door and two-door from
- $1.2M $2.6M; RZ buses trom
- $900 to $1.6M BGG, EHH.
BJJ, now at Pete's Auto Sales,
Lot 2 George and Hadfield
Streets, W/Rust. 226-9951, 226-
5546. ___
---- --. --- --. - -- -- --- --- ---
170 CORONA/CARIA,
between $700 000 and $800
000; AE 91 Sprinter/Cotoilla,
between $550 000 and $750
000;. Sunny B 12 EFI, fully
automatic, excellent condition
and many more used vehicles.
Call Pete's Auto Sales. Lot 2
George and Hadfield Streets, W/
Rust. 226-9951. 226-5546.
_ __... .- .- ------------ -
1 INTERNATIONAL
Tractor; 1 15 HP Yamaha
0/B engine; 1 Mini. Bus
scrap; KE 10 engine &
gear box; 2 HP motors;
poultry waters, trays troughs.
etc.; 1 wooden boat. 1
paper feeder, spray cans.
computers and more. Must
be sold. Owner leaving
country. Contact Tel. 233-
6262.
TOYOTA4X4 HILUX SURF
(PGG 1999 LIMITED
EDITION WITH EXTRA CRASH
BARS). ENCLOSED PICK-UP.
AC, AUTOMATIC, CD PLAYER,
(DOUBLE MUSIC SET).
EXCELLENT CONDITION.
PRICE $1.9M. OWNER
LEAVING COUNTRY.
CONTACT 626-7073.
EXOTIC Rentals has of sale
as a going concern White Ford
Lincoln Super Stretch
limousine, largest in country.
Seals up to 16 persons,
equipped with DVD sound,
system, (4 screens) automatic,
.fully loaded, lots of extra too
much to mention. Best realistic
offer accepted. Serious persons
enquire only. Phone 227-7677,
624-8402, 225-2503.
RECENT shipment from
Japan. Toyota Carina AT
192 $675 000, Mitsubishi
Lancer CK 2 $925 000,
Toyota Corolla AE 111 -
$850 000. Toyota Corolla
Wagon $650 000,
Mitsubishi Mirage $1 050
000, Mitsubishi RVR -
$925 000, Toyota Raum -
$1 100 000. All prices are
negotiable and quoted on
th'e Wharf. Contact Fazela
Auto Sales 276-0245,
628-4179.
ONE Hilux 4 .x 4 Surf,
excellent condition, music
set'mags, sun roof,:3Y engine,
craah bar, side step. Price -
$2.4M1: one 4-Runner,
excellent condition,, CD
Player, mags, sun roof, V6
engine, side step. Price -
S1.3M; one Leyland ; Daf.
double axle truck, excellent
condition, GJJ 20-Cyl. tray,
Hyhab. Perfect for sand, scrap
iron and electric pole
planting. Price S4.5M. All
prices negotiable. Call 640-
2365.
STARLET cars, EP 82 PHH
and PJJ series.. excellent
condition: SV 40 Camry for -
$1.6M; Lancer cars from $1.7M
$1.4M; Station Wagons; G-
Touring EP 176 Wagon for $700
000: Mazda Station Wagon for
only seven hundred thousand:
Small Town Ace, automatic,
Marino/Ceres; 100 and 110
Corolla cars. Laurel from four
hundred and fifty thousand: 4
Runners 2-door and four-door,
left and right hand drives; V6 left
had drive Land Cruiser, for
$1.3M, excellent condition.
Contact Pete's Auto.Sales, Lot
2 George and Hadfield Streets,
W/Rust. 226-9951, 226-5546.


AE 81 COROLLA, AE 91
Sprinter & Corolla automatic
& gear; FB 12 & FB 13 Sunny;
AT 170 Corona & Carina gear
& automatic; AT 170 Wagon -
automatic; AE 100 Corolla &
Sprinter PGG, PHH & PJJ
series; AT 192 Carina PGG, RHH
& PJJ series; Lancer PHH &
PJJ series, fully automatic,
excellent condition. PICK-UP -
Single & Double cab PHH &
PJJ series $1.5M; enclosed 4-
Runner PHH & PJJ series; F
150, fully automatic PHH &
PJJ series ($2.7M). BUSES -
RZ Long & Short Base (EFI &
Cab) BGG, BHH & BJJ series -
$1.5M. Now at Pete's Auto
Sales. Lot 10 Croal St.,
Georgetown. Tel. 223-6218,
226-9951 and many more used
vehicles. Credit can be
arranged!!



















1 AUSTIN Morris Marina,
4-door car automatic, re-
sprayed never registered
came in from England -
$850 000. Excellent
condition 1 400 cc. 1
Chevrolet Silverado 5-door
enclosed van, automatic, 4-
wheel drive, side bars.
power steering, mag
wheels, good tyres,
excellent suspension, ready
for interior or tourist trips,
good for transportation
service $750 000. 1
Yamaha V80 motorcycle,
ladies, CE 3362, excellent
riding condition, hardly
used $150 000. 1 1 500cc
Jialing motorcycle, hardly
used excellent condition -
$250 000. 1 container
hauler single def tractor
unit, good for pulling
timber, container, etc.
Nissan diesel working
condition $2.2M neg.
Owner leaving 621-4928.
JUST ARRIVED A NEW
SHIPMENT OF
RECONDITIONED JAPANESE
VEHICLES TOYOTA, HONDA,
MITSUBISHI, ETC. FOR RETAIL
- T/CARINA AT 192 95-96 $1
700 000, TICARINA AT 212 -
97-98 $1 950 000, T/CARINA
AT 212 98-99 $2 400 000,
MILANCER CK2A 97-98 $1
950 000, TICOROLLA AE 110
- 97-97 $1 950 000, T/
COROLLA NZE 121-00-01 $2
900 000, T/HIACE KZH 116,
LH119 & RZH 112, TIHILUX LN
170, LN172, LN106, YN130, TI
RAV 4 ACA21, HONDA CAPA,
H/CRV, TOYOTA ALTEZZA &
AND MANY MORE. ALSO
AVAILABLE FOR
WHOLESALE. CONTACT MR.
PERSAUD. TEL. # 233-2400,
233-2681, 624-7808.
NOW IN STOCK. Toyota
Corolla NZE 121. AE 11'0.
EE 103. Honda Civic EK3 &
ES1, Toyota Hilux Extra Cab
- LN 172, LN 170, RZN 174.
Toyota Hilux Double Cab YN
107, LN 107. LN 165, 4.x 4,
RZN 167, RZN 169, Toyota
Hilux Single Cab LN 106,
Toyota Hilux Surf RZN 185
YN 130, KZN 185. Mitsubishi
Canter FE 638E.
FE6387EV, Toyota Carina -
AT 192. AT 212, Toyota
Marino AE 100, Toyota
Vista AZV 50, Honda CRV
RO1. Toyota RAV 4, ZCA 26.
ACA 21. SXA 11, Toyota
Mark IPSUM SXM 15, Toyota
Mark 2 GX 100, Lancer CK 2A.
Toyota Corona Premio AT
210, Toyota Hiace Diesel
KZH110. Mitsubishi Cadia
Lancer SC2A, Toyota Corolla
G-Touring Wagon AE 100.
Contact Rose Ramdehol
Auto Sales. 226 South Rd..
Bourda. Georgetown. Tel.
226-8953, 226-1973, 227-
3185. Fax. 227-3185.
We give you the best
cause you deserve the
best.


KHAN'S AUTO SALE 10
- 10 HADFIELD STREET,
STABROEK, BEHIND
BRICKDAM POLICE STATION
- AT 192 Carina, AT 170
Corona and Carina, AE 91
Corolla and Sprinter, AE 81
Corolla, AT 150 arina and
Corona, ST 190 Uorona, AT
212 Carina, AE 10 Corolla
and Sprinter, AE 1100 Corolla
and Sprinter, FB a13 Nissan
Sbntra, FB 12 Nistan Sunny,
Hilux Surf ope r back and
enclosed, Single Cab and
Double Cab, Nissan Pick-up
diesel. RZ minibuses long and
short base EFI and
carburetor, small tus Town
Ace, Lite Ace and Mster Surf
Ace, Mitsubishi L4n er, Sera
Sports two-door, RP' 4 L and
J; CRV. For all your buying or
selling, please Oontact the
Professionals Ofji,cer. 225-
9700, Cell Khan t 62349972,
or Sunil 621-1i076. Small
credit can be arranged.
NOW AVAILABLE
R E CO ND IT;I O N E D
VEHICLES CARS:
TOYOTA COROLLA NZE
121; TOYOTA IPSUM (8-
SEATER); TOYOTA PASSO
(2004 MODEL); TOYOTA WILLS
VS (2002 MODEL); TOYOTA
PRIUS (HYBRID.), TOYOTA
VISTA ZZV 50; GLANZA TURBO
TOYOTA COROLLA AE 110;
TOYOTA CYNOS SPORTS
COUPE; TOYOTA STARLET
EP 91 (4 DOORS)/ TOYOTA
CARINA AT 192; HONDA
CIVIC EK 3; MITSUBISHI
LANCER CK 2. TOYOTA
CALDINA WAGON TOYOTA
HILUX PICKUPS. ORDER
EARLY AND GEt THE BEST
PRICES ON DUTY FREE
VEHICLES FULL AFTER
SALES SERVICE AND
FINANCING AVAILABLE.
DEO MARAJ AUTO SALES,
207 SHERIFF AND SIXTH
S T R E E T S
CAMPBELLVILLE. 226-
4939. A NAME AND A
SERVICE YOU CAN TRUST.



SALESGIRLS. Payless
Regnt St. Tel. 223-7864.
LIVE-IN 2 Domestic.
Telephone 227-0060, 616-
5568.
HIRE CAR RIVERS (24
HRS).CONTACT TEL. 227-
0018.
1 LIVE-IN DOMESTIC,
40-50 YEARS. TELEPHONE
642-8781.
WANTED EXCAVATOR
OPERATOR URGENTLY.
CONTACT 623-0957.
WANTED Drivers
must have' hire car
Licence. Call 233-5288.
1 WELDER must know
to do grill welding.
Telephone 222-2394.
3 MACHINISTS.
APPLY 18-23 ECCLES
INDUSTRIAL SITE, E B
DEMIERARA.
ONE Bartender & one
Cook.. to work in G/town. Tel.
# 231-3088. 227-3674
ONE live-in Domestic
between the ages of 25
and ,40 years. Contact
Denise at 662-5033.
SALESMEN with Driver's
Licence and 5 CXCs or
University Degree. 225-
519 8. 231-2064.
(THREE-BEDROOM
apti for working persons in
city or subur an with
moderate rental. 226-
9410.
CARPENTER/Mason
with .own tools. Apply 68
Robb Street, Guyana
Variety Store. Ask for Neetu.
ONE Cook and Bar
Attendant. Apply at Doc's
Pool Bar, 315 Middle St.,
between 10:30 hrs and
12:00 hrs.
URGENTLY Waitresses
18 35 yrs. at Vee Bee's
Bar. Sandy Babb St., Kitty.
Attractive salary.
PROPERTIES for sale or
rental. Available clients.
Contact Sonja Realty -
225-7197. 623-2537.
ONE Driver and Porters
for beverage canter. Call
220-7500. 222-3927/4650,
226-2986, 222-2316


SALESMEN with
Driver's Licence and 5
CXCs or University Degree.
225-5198, 231-2064.
WAITRESSES &
Bartenders. Apply in person
to Plaza hangout Bar, 245
Sheriff St., (Flat Shop).
ATTENDANT to work at
car washing service in South
Ruimveldt Gardens. Tel.
218-1704.
URGENTLY Waitresses
and Bartender to live-in.
Attractive salary. Contact 618-
8375.
SALESCLERK (female).
Apply in person to Royal
Woodworking, Regent &
Alexander Sts.
CLEANING and bar staff.
Apply in writing to Everest
Cricket Club. For more
information, call 225-1975 or
226-6289.
ONE Part-time
Information Technology
private teacher to teach one
student at home. Please call
222-6702.
PUMP Attendants to work
at Gas Station. Please apply
to Low's Service Station,
Shell Vlissengen Road._
URGENTLY need 2 auto
repair. men. 1 Straighltener
and Welder. Experience is a
must. Call-233-6262, 8 am -
6 pm. ___
EXPERIENCED Drivers
to do hire car work and one
male Dispatcher to work
night. Call Jeffrey after 5
pm. 622-8350.
ONE live-in Domestic/
Nanny. Must like children
preferably from the country
area, age 35 to 45. Tel. 609-
6931/223-5260.
ONE Salesgirl, one
Cleaner/Packer.iAge 18- 25.
Must be pleasant and
friendly and live on the
ECD. Call 615-8121.
ONE ARC AND ACETY-
LENE WELDER. MUST
KNOW GRILL WORK.-CON-
TACT: 21 BROAD STREET,
CHARLESTOWN. TEL: 225-
2835.
1 EXPERIENCED Crane
Operator and 5 experienced
Chainsaw Operators. Contact
Goldfield Inc.. Lot 'C' Eccles,
EBD.
ONE experienced Taxi
Driver. Contact Mrs. Khan at 11
Thomas Street, Kitty. Tel. 226-
7948.
SALESBOYS/bicycle
assembler. Salary $5 000
weekly + commission. Apply 68
Robb Street, Guyana Variety
Store.
ONE Live-in Domestic to
do general house work. Salary
depends on experience. Apply
68 Robb Street, Guyana Variety
Store.
ONE heavy-duty 20U or
straight stitch sewing
machine. Call 622-4386,
227-8538, anytime. Visit
Roxie's 122 Merriman's
Mall, Bourda.
CONTRACT Hire Car
Driver to work in Taxi Service.
Call 226-0304 with 2
references one for
experience in driving, and
other for conduct.
ONE General
Maintenance worker between
35 and 45 yrs. to work and
live on premises. Contact
Sandra 226-3284. 616-
8280.
ALICIAS Hair Expose
Beauty Salon & Barber Shop
has for rental chairs for Barbers
& hairdressers. Call 614-6869,
38 Alexander St., Kitty.
DECENT working
female roommate to share
furnished apartment in
Kitty $19 COO including
light & water Call
Sharon 649-2358.
ONE experienced
Supervisor. Apply in person
with written application to
Regent Household
Electronic. 143 Regent
Road. Tel 227-4404
FAMILY to take care
and work at bond both
parties would be occupied.
giving accommodation
provided also one
handyman 621-4928.


)







22 SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006


ONE (1) General live-
in Domestic from the
country side area. At 53
Philadelphia. EBE. Age 30
40. Tel. # 260-4488 or
260-2989.
EXPERIENCED General
Domestic to work Mahaica/
Clonbrook/Unity Area. Age 40
and over Call 259-0953
between 8 am and 5 pm.
EXPERIENCED Hairdresser.
Must know to do manicure,
pedicure, facial and
hairstyles, etc. Also chairs
to rent. Please contact. Tel.
223-5252 or 628-3415.
DECENT Waitresses,
Cleaners. 18 25 yrs. Apply in
person with Food Handler's
Certificate to TAJ
RESTAURANT. 228 Camp St.,
next to Plaza Cinema.
MODELS NEEDED -
females between 18 and 25 yrs.
Make up to $150 000 monthly.
No experience need. Music
videos, photo shoots, car shows.
Call 648-5281.
RESIDENTIAL AND
COMMERCIAL
properties/land!business
places/offices/bonds and
vehicles. Ready buyers/
tenants. TEL. 226-8148,
625-1624.
FEMALE Personal
Assistant wanted
hardworking, honest, loyal
and fast learner. $160 000
monthly. Email
computeiintemetsvcs@carbsurf.com
2 EXPERIENCED
Waitresses, 1 Kitchen staff, 1
able-bodied Handyman, age
18 to 25. Apply with written
application and passport
picture, 189 Barr Street, Kitty.
643-4403.
SECURITY Guards,
Porters, Salesgirls and
Salesboys. Apply Avinash
'Complex, Water Street,
Athina's by the East Coast
Bus Park & Anand's Regent
Street. Contact 226-3361,
227-7829
2 COOKS wanted in
Trinidad for Indian family.
Please call 1-868-645-1433 or
write & send recent photo &
date of birth to: Ramnarine
Sammy, 9 St. Vincent St., Tuna
Puna, Trinidad, W.I.
WANTED URGENTLY! -
one (1) Watchman to work at
residence at Section 'K',
Campbellville for a 12-hr.
period (7 pm 7 am). Salary
negotiable. Contact Tel. 226-
9279, 225-9920. 225-4500
50 SECURITY Guards for
Baton, Armed and Canine
(Dogs) Division. 2 lorry and
van Drivers to work as Drivers
on contract (like minibus).
Contact The Manager. R.K's
Security Service 125,
Regent Road. Bourda.
EXOTIC Rentals is
looking for one experienced
Driver for stretch limousine.
Driver should have a valid
Driver's Licence. 10 years-
average in driving large
vehicle Apply 68 Robb
Street, Lacytown. (Nut
Centre). 227-7677. Ask for
Ms. Cindy.
ONE (1) full-time/part-
time Gardener, Handyman
needed, non alcoholic and
decent to work in Atlantic
Gardens. East Coast
Demerara. Contact R K's
Security Services, 125
Regent Road, Bourda (8 am
4 pm) or 281 Atlantic
Gardens, East Coast
Demerara (5 pm 6 pm).
WANTED at Survival
Supermarket Evening
cashier (4.30 pm 11 pm).
Applicants must apply with a
written application and a
passport size photo to 16
Duncan St. and Vlissengen
Road. Transportation is
provided for employees
living within Georgetown.
Tel. # 227-8506.
ONE (1) Live-in Domestic
17 35 yrs. to assist in
residential chores, private
flat. training in quality
cooking and baking
provided. Experience an
asset but not necessary.
Persons from interior and
country areas may apply.
Contact Mrs. Khan, R.K's
Security 125 Regent Road,
Bourda.


T 'u .'r, r- ,ro per IT ,,r
a.:a, ,-. nou.e Il o i ar I r.
Pu l.. P ,-a ,o n WCD
tIel ei n ', reed-..3 ni .Ho,: ,, &
P a. ,k-a 1,. ,3 u. re .e mn 1aI
area) or Herstellin $5M -
$6M neg. Contact Persaud.
USA (home) 201-332-
2348. Work 201-985-
2884. Suresh tel. 269-
0766.
GIRLS FOR FACTORY
WORK: Labelling, filling
and packaging.
RECEPTIONISTS: with 3
subjects CXC/GCE
including English. Good
presentation and Computer
skills. DRIVER/SALESMAN:
30 45 years old with
previous experience in a
similar capacity is an
advantage. EXPERIENCED
SALESCLERKS AND
MERCHANDISERS.
HANDYBOYS/PORTERS: to
work in stock room and
delivery van. Apply in
person with written
application to: Secretary.
Twins Manufacturing
Chemists, 30 Industrial
Estate, Ruimveldt.


1 NISSAN Pathfinder
(V6 EFI), automatic,
fully powered. 330
Bedford Dump Truck, just
rebuilt. Never used.
Night Hawk motorcycle.
Tel. 338-2345.



CIRCUIT City Internet
Cafe and Computer
School, Lot 2 D'Edward
Village, W/C/B. All
Internet facilities,
photocopying,
Scanning and Fax
Services. Tel. # 327-
5369 or 625-7189.


1- GOING business
place, 30ft x 35ft. 1-
secured beautifully
tiled office 30ft x 25ft.
1-3 bedroom house
fully grilled in N/
A.Call 333-2500.
UPPER flat of two-
storeyed building for
business purposes
located in Coburg
Street (next to Police
Headquarters). Call
Telephone # 618-
6634



1 3-STOREYED
building, newly built
in the heart of New
Amsterdam. Price
reduced drastically.
Call 333-2457. 337-
2348.
2 -STOREY prime
residential .0p property
s ituated ii r Ca nr field
Price 20 million.
negotiable Contact
Tel. 327-7164.. .


STRONG defence: Hornets' Carrin Carter (with ball) is outnumbered by the Caribs. (Photo: Quacy Sampson)

YAMAHA Caribs ladies ship. for seven points. Former West Indies p
turned the table on Hornets Caribs ladies beat Hornets Tennis again was across the Terrence MWCalman cross
as the second league ten-a-, 12-5, with two tries from try line for five more points be- try line to produce the
side rugby competition Abigail Tennis and a conversion fore halftime, but the conversion points for the army in th
kicked off, yesterday, at the from Andrea Lashley. Collette was no good. Caribs led 12-0 at half.
National Park, but their Hope pulled back one try for the break. Hope then got the Down five points at
men could only secure a Hornets. consolation for Hornets in the time, the Caribs bou
draw against the Guyana Tennis scored the first try second half. back with a try from
Defence Force (GDF) as the in the opening half, with In the Men's 15s, the GDF Indies player Theo
second round of the William Lashley making good conversion and Caribs played a 5-5 draw. Henry.
Blackman 15s champion-


CHURCH View Hotel,
Main and King Streets,
NA. Tel: 333-2880. Gift
Flower and Souvenir
Shop, Main & Vryheid
Streets. # 333-3927



WOODWORK Door
Store, panel doors,
cuLpboard doors,
windows and mouldings.
Pitt Street & Republic
Road, N/A. Te1.333-
2558


JUST arrived
Caterpillar 312 & 320
Excavators (long & short
boom); Bulldozers (D8. D
10, FD 30, FD 40 and 650
Komatsu). One 4 x 4 Toyota
Hilux. Prices negotiable. A.
Sookram' Auto Sales,
D'Edward, WCB. Tel. 327-
5419, 623-9125.



OXYGEN and acetylene
industrial gases, # 58 Village,
Corentyne, Berbice. Phone
338-2221. (David Subnauth).
One Ransom 3-Disc
Plough one pair MF 35-
cage wheel, one 35 MF
back blade, one steel
rake Call Tel: 333-3460
1 LITTLE Giant
dragline with 371 engine;
1 48" x 36" pitch
propeller: (1) 3 2" ia. x
13 ft 6 ins. propeller
shaft; 1 Perkins marine
with transmission; 1 -
Bedford engine block
with standard crank
shaft and head; all
sizes of 3-phase motors,
cutting torch: one
complete gas weldiGnq
set: one 371 GM
e ngin e. Tel 3 3 3-
3226.


By Gene Cherry

RALEIGH, North Carolina,
(Reuters) Jamaica's Asafa
Powell has a message for the
man who broke his 100
metres world record.
"Tell Justin (Gatlin) con-
gratulations (but) the record is
only on loan," Powell was
quoted by his agent Paul Doyle
as saying shortly after the
American clocked 9.76 sec-
onds in Doha, Qatar on Friday.
The performance clipped
one-hundredth of a second off
Powell's 2005 world record
and earned the 24-year-old
Gatlin the triple crown of
sprinting.
The soft-spoken sprinter,
who once thought about being
an artist, joins compatriots
Carl Lewis and Maurice Greene
and Canadian Donovan Bailey
as the only male 100 metres
runners to win Olympic and
world championship gold med-
als and set a world record.
"If their rivalry wasn't big
enough yet, the suspense of the
first race (this season) has just
multiplied," Doyle told Reuters
via telephone from Doha after
watching Gatlin break the
record.
The two are scheduled to
meet for the first time this year
at Gateshead, England, on June
11 and several more clashes
could take place in the Euro-
pean summer.
They only raced twice last
year with Gatlin winning both
encounters as Powell suffered a


ASAFA POWELL


groin injury in the second meet-
ing that forced him out of the
world championships.

SURPRISE RECORD
However, both are healthy
now and ready to take their ri-
valry to a new level.
"I'm trying to go 9.74.
9.73." Gatlin told reporters in
Qatar. "The race (Friday) really
wasn't one of my best races."
Despite fulfilling his recent
boasts, Gatlin admitted that
setting the world record so early
in the season had surprised him.
"I know I was talking a lot
and wanted to do it and was re-
ally focused on it, but I did not
think it would come in my sec-
ond race into the season," he


layer
ed the
e five
e first

half-
inced
West
)dore


said during a
news confer-
ence.
His game
S plan from the
beginning of
training at the
latter end of
-. last season
was to break
the record this
year and that
focus had not
changed. even
with the 9.76
clocking, he
said.
"I am actu-
ally more mo-
tivated now to
go out there
and run a
faster time,"
Gatlin said.
Both he and Powell will
compete in the May 28
Prefontaine Classic in Eugene,
Oregon but in different events.
Gatlin was scheduled to run
a 100 metres there and Powell
the 200 metres. Doyle con-
firmed on Friday.
Gatlin also will run 100
metres at New York on June
3, the day after Powell is
scheduled to race the same
distance at Oslo in a tune-up
for their Gateshcad show-
down.
Powell was the world record
holder when the Gateshead
showdown was arranged.
"Now I am the fastest in
the world," Gatlin said. "It
feels great."
", \ .~ rr


...... Powell vows to regain


se contact Mr. Wynter on 3333154/333-6628 Ord record from G tlin
Mr. Clifford Strnley on 618-6538/328-2304 world record from Gatlin


a V

i Loil L 19 mmmmag


I ----~----~I--"


IVIJ




Plci






SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006


N Ull~;u~lYa


, t
t '<


'Zimbabwe will not play Test cricket next year


Simmons: ICC must



deal with Zimbabwe


AS Zimbabwe prepay
take on West Indies
sixth one-dayer at a
bago Trinidad yesterd
Simmons, the forme
Indies all-rounder and
of Zimbabwe, does n
the country should b
mitted to Test crick


Weary


Indian
From back page
small city with a
Indian population aroi
kilometres from Kin
and famous for being i
Steve Bucknor. "Stevi
good umpire," barks
my co-passenger on t
craft, "but he stayin'
long".
Glenn, swigging a i
bel, claims he is a "huge'
fan. "Twenty years ba
would all go to matches
have fun ... knowing tha
ever happened we wou
mately win. Today, thi
different. We need to
about the result too."
Considering the
form that Dravid's o
side are in, the West
may have plenty to
about. Or will
(Cricnfo)


ared to year and has called on the
in the ICC to take a much stronger
.nd To- stance.
lay, Phil "The ICC has taken it upon
-r West themselves to go to Australia to
d coach investigate racial things against
lot feel South Africa (by the crowds),"
e read- said Simmons on Friday, "but
et next yet you have a (Zimbabwe)
board put in with all blacks and
all the Asians and the whites
were knocked off of the original
board. Is that not racism too?"
Simmons was controver-
sially sacked as Zimbabwe's
... coach last August, and replaced
by Kevin Curran. However it
was just a matter of months af-
izeable ter Simmons backed Zimbabwe
to retain their Test status in
und 200 March 2005, after widespread
ngston, calls including from their
home to former captain, David Houghton
e was a that they drop out of Test
Glenn, cricket.
the air- Simmons, who is taking le-
on too gal action against two members
of the Zimbabwe Cricket
SL Union, is calling on the ICC to
ed La- conduct an investigation on the
cricket mismanagement of funds, and is
ack, we adamant that the country don't
s to just have the class to compete at the
at what- top level.
ild ulti- "There is no fast-tracking
inos are, of Test cricketers. Zimbabwe


worry

red-hot
ne-day
Indians
worry
they?


Scare for

Soca

Warriors...
From back page
bases out of alignment.
First we heard a crack then
the stage sank."
Dressed like members of
the national team, students of
the Sixth Company Anglican
School had mounted the stage to
do a dance item dedicated to the
footballers.
About five minutes into their
routine, patrons reported hearing a
loud crack, after which the stage
partially collapsed, causing the stu-
dents and some members of the
footballers to fall.
Earlier, skipper Dwight
Yorke's led his squad from
the Piarco Airport through
villages in the North coast
area, following a similar tour
of his home base in Tobago.
The squad moved on to San
Fernando where hundreds of
schoolchildren and supporters
lined the streets waving flags and
shouting the names of the team
members.
Trinidad & Tobago have
ended their home phase of
their preparation for the
World Cup in Germany in
June and head to Old
Trafford, England, this week-
end to begin the first of sev-
eral training camps in prepa-
ration for the June 9 to July
9 event.


--


r I


will not play Test cricket next
year," Simmons told The Na-
tion. "If they are.allowed to play
cricket with this team, there are
going to be a lot of records.
Brian (Lara's) record is going to
be in danger.
"I heard a statement from
the now convenor of selectors
in Zimbabwe that from the
players just beneath this team
here, he can make a Test crick-
eter in 12 months. I've never
seen a Test cricketer formed in
12 months, other than people
like Lara."
Despite support from his
players including a petition -
he was sacked as coach in Au-
gust. "The circumstances that
led to my departure was that
two people on the board de-
cided they were not happy with
me because 1 didn't play ball
with them," he said. "They de-
cided that they wanted to get rid
of me.
"If you look back at some
statements at the beginning of
December, the then vice-presi-
dent said the rest of the board
were happy that I was doing a
good job."
As again Zimbabwe have
struggled to compete with a
top-level Test nation in the on-


going one-day series against
Weot Indlies Simmnns reitpr


tthe
-ated


that the problems lie with the
board's management.
"The biggest problem with
Zimbabwe administration is
that there are two people, (Pe-
ter) Chingoka and (Ozias) Bvute
who have been accused of mis-
management of funds," he said.
"You have nobody in Zimba-
bwe who can really touch them
because of the fact that they
have connections.
So until the ICC decides
that we are going to investi-
gate all this mismanagement
of funds, it's going to con-
tinue and the two people are
going to stay there and noth-
ing is going to happen.
(Cricinfo)



In cherished memory of our
beloved MR. JOSEPH
RICHARD GOCOOL of 9
Theatre Alley, Republic Road, N/A,
Berbice who departed this life on
May15,1991.
Fifteen years have passed since
thatsadday
When ourbeloved
Joe was called away
A wonderful person has gone to
rest
He was kind, loving and true
His memory would always be with
us
No words can express the grief and
sorrow we felt
Sadly missed by his mother,
brothers, sisters, uncles &
aunts, nephews and nieces and
all other relatives and friends.


W ..
*a -. -\


MEMORIAL


SIn loving memory of
our dear mother.
.". wife, daughter and :,
Sister DULARIE ..
SINGH who died on .
May 12, 1996
S(Mother's Day). Age
44yrs.
SKeep a garden in
.. yourheart
A place that's yours
alone
Where lovely .
memories grow
S Of every happy time
you've known


t '


. ,.
.. <;' -- .... .


I.



's,~ /


Sadly missed by
her loving children
Rayon, Sunil,
Sharon and Anil;
her husband Raj,
daughters-in-law
finf &, faitrowG


.~,, f~I


son-n-law Sarwan; t !
grandchildren
Maria, Alex, Lydia, Nicholas, Timothy & Chrisanna; nieces & nephews
and other relatives.


ijk
rlr Cl-^ ^^( sc l w 1 i./CNI -
* s lr *i / *s **

^ ^. a. F ^ a <'^
.--O ^J--


19 ... -- : 0t.....



SIn sad & loving memory of our
Loving mother, grandmother &
y great grandmother MIRIAM
MOHAMED who has passed
S away on May 15,2004.


It has been 2 years since that r IW

. When our beloved one has .
passedaway
SYour heart was kind & loving
SAnd all your life was spent to
guide & comfort us "Maa"
:' No one knows the pain we felt when
you left
SDeath tries to break, but all in vain
SRemembrance is a golden chain
To have, to love & then topart
Is the greatest sorrowof ourheart
v For us you had done yourbest
SAnd the time has nowcome foryouto rest
Sadly missed & will always be remembered by her children,
grandchildren, great grandchildren, other relatives & friends.
Slay, A Iw n ify /it. //o a yan iiel e ttance ino (/ie.

---
;;:. ; 7-z :: ,-;, -. .- .':: ; :; -- ,;; :';. '-.- ,


In loving memory of our beloved wife, mother, grandmother JOYCE
MARTA BALDEO nee RAMLAGAN, who departed this
worldon May 9,1996.
Don'tgrieveforme. for am free *
S I'm following the path thatGodlaidforme
I took His hand when Iheard Him call '41. '
I turned mybackandleftit all
I couldnotstayforanotherday
To laugh, to love to work orplay
Tasks left undone must stay that way .'
I found that place atthe close of day
If myparting has left a void
SThen fillit with rememberingjoy
A friendship shared, a laugh, a kiss
Ah. yes, these things Itoo willmiss
Be notburdenedwithtimeofsorrow Sadly missed and always be
I wishyou the sunshine of tomorrow remembered by your loving
Mylife'sbeenfull, I'vesavouredmuch husband George, children
SGood friends, good times Valerie, Solomon, Desiree &
Aloved-one'stouch Ruth, grandchildren Diana,
S Perhapsmytimeseemedalltoobrief Donna, Denise, Janice,
SLift up yourheartandshare with me Samuel, Rhea and Mark and
God wanted me now other relatives and friends.
He set me free








In loving memory of a beloved
husband, father and grandfather
BHISHAM PANDAY a/k BISH
of Bish & Sons Trading Co. Ltd.,
159 Barr Street, Kitty
who departed this life on
May 11th, 1987.
Days, months, years we will never forget
Nineteen years have passed since that sad day
Our hearts still ache with sadness
Our secret tears stillflow
Every day in some small way
Memories of him come our way
A wonderfid husband and father has gone to rest
To some he may be forgotten
To others a part of the past
But to us who loved and lost him
His memories will always last
Treasured memories keep him near
As time unfolds another year
He will remain deep in our hearts
Till memory fades and life departs
May Lord Shiva grant him eternal rest
Always remembered by his loving wife, children,
daughters-in-law, sons-in-law,
grandchildren, other relatives and friends


------ ----


SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006


t. ..p~
-~a .
a,* '_B
b. 9~ T
~-~' r
"a
apI;~i~L,
,M;a': ~ ,


"" 'h
~r
lati
s,-
~'trSr


''


4. -..': ,, ,^
' -.'2* '






24 SUMNAY CHRONICLE Mh~-14, 2006


Ia- P )RT CHRONICLE


Suns hold off Clippers,



Wade shines in Heat win


NEW YORK, NY (Reuters) -
Inspired by Shawn Marion's
32 points and 19 rebounds,
the Phoenix Suns held off
the Los Angeles Clippers 94-
91 in Game Three of their
Western Conference semi-fi-
nal series at the Staples Cen-
ter on Friday.
Tim Thomas added 19
points and 14 rebounds for the
Suns, who take a 2-1 lead in the
best-of-seven series ahead of
Game Four in Los Angeles to-
day.
In the day's other playoff
game, Dwyane Wade had 30
points, 10 assists and seven re-
bounds as the Miami Heat beat
the New Jersey Nets 103-92 in
East Rutherford.
Miami now lead that best-
of-seven Eastern Conference se-
ries 2-1, with Game Four in
New Jersey today.
Raja Bell added 14
points for the Suns, while
Steve Nash had an off-night
in scoring just 12 points
but added 10 assists and
made a key basket with less
than four seconds remain-
ing to give the Suns a
three-point lead.
Phoenix coach Mike
D'Antoni was relieved to grab
the series lead despite the fact
his team shot just 37 percent.
"We ground it out,"
D'Antoni told reporters.
Phoenix came into the game
with a 0-8 record in games de-
ciding by three points or less
this season.
Elton Brand led Los An-
geles with 20 points, nine re-
bounds and eight assists,
while Vladimir Radmanovic
added 18 points for the Clip-
pers, but missed a potential
game-tying three-pointer at


the buzzer.

TOOK ADVANTAGE
Los Angeles coach Mike
Dunleavy said his team just did
not take advantage of their scor-
ing opportunities.
"We didn't finish," he said.
"They (the Suns) keep sur-


DWYANEWADE


prising us. We had a lot of easy
shots that didn't go in and they
took advantage of that."
The teams were tied 48-48
at the half but the Suns took a
nine-point lead into the fourth
quarter.
The Clippers rallied to
briefly take the lead in the final
quarter, but the Suns kept their
composure and went 23-of-26
from the free throw line over-
all, with many of those made in
the final quarter.
"We showed it all year,
we're not going to fold,"
D'Antoni said.
"The bottom line is that this
is going to be a long series,"
Dunleavy added.
In East Rutherford, Wade
had to leave the game briefly
when he took an elbow to the
face from Vince Carter, but


quickly returned to rally the
Heat offence in the tight game,
which neither team led by more
than nine points until the final
minute.
Shaquille O'Neal added
19 points and had nine re-
bounds for Miami, while
Antoine Walker contributed
16 points.
Vince Carter scored 43
points to lead all scorers for the
Nets, but he committed several
costly turnovers in the fourth


Payments of Contributions


Employers and Self-Employed persons are

reminded that Contributions for the month of

April, 2006 are due on or before Monday, May

15, 2006.


Payments made after that day will attract

interest.



Employers are also reminded that Contribution

Schedules must be completed in triplicate.

itMIS,, lwK pW jlediw.


quarter.
Richard Jefferson scored 17
points for the Nets, but didn't
score in the fourth quarter.
Jason Kidd was also held
scoreless in the final quarter,
finishing with 10 points, 12 as-
sists and eight rebounds.
The Nets played without
one of their key reserves,
Clifford Robinson, who was
suspended five games by the
NBA for violating the
league's anti-drug policy.


; GUYANA
PROUDLY HOSTING
ICC Cricket
"World Cup
----- -----------
Reporting to:


Location:

General
Responsibilities:




Qualification and


Imam Bacchus

Twenty20 final today
KEEN rivalry is expected today in the inaugural Imam
Bacchus and Sons Limited Twentl20 cricket final at the
Anna Regina Multilateral School (ARMNS) ground from
10:00 h sharp where Affiance and Cotton Field will clash.
Affiance'" formidable line-up uill be led b) senior Essequbo
Inter-county opening batsman Dinesh Joseph and their ine-up
will also comprise several present Essequibo players and
former national Under- 19 crickeiers
Cotton Field, who may look the weaker team on paper.
still comprise some talented players in their leam and may up-
.et the visitors
The winner will receive a trophy and cash prize while
the runners-up .ill collect similar incentive and the man-
of-the-match cash only.


Nadal sets up


dream final with


Federer in Rome


By James Eve
ROME, Italy (Reuters) De-
fending champion Rafael
Nadal set up a dream final
against Roger Federer at the
Rome Masters tennis when
he beat Gael Monfils 6-2, 6-2
yesterday.
, If Nadal beats the world
number one on Sunday he will
equal Guillermo Vilas's all-time
record of 53 consecutive wins
on clay, set in 1977.
The final gives the world's
top two players a chance to re-
sume their intense rivalry in
which Spaniard Nadal holds the
upper hand after winning the
last three contests including the
final of the Monte Carlo Mas-
ters claycourt event last month.
"It's always special when
the top two play each other. It
certainly was in Monte Carlo,"
said Federer, whose best result
in five previous visits to the
Italian capital was runner-up to
Felix Mantilla in 2003.
"We both look forward to
it. It's good for us and good for
the game, especially on clay."


VACANCY


Applications are invited for the
position of Stadium Manager.

Chief Executive Officer of the Guyana
Local Organising Committee in the first
instance.
Stadium Site Providence, East
Bank Demerara

The applicant will be responsible for
managing the Stadium so as to ensure the
smooth operations for ICC CWC 2007
in accordance with directions from
the Local Organising Committee.
Experience:
Degree qualified, preferably with an Event
or Business focus. Strong Project
Management Skills.


Salary will commensurate with qualification and experience.
Further details are available from the:-
Local Organising Office
91 Middle Street
South Cummingsburg
Georgetown.
The deadline for submission of applications is May 19. 2006
Applications must be addressed to the Chief Executive Officer,
Guyana LOC Office.


While Nadal had few prob-
lems getting the better of
Frenchman Monfils in the battle
of the 19-year-olds, Federer was
forced to come from a break
down in the deciding set of his
match against fourth seed David


England great

Trueman being

treated for cancer
FORMER England and Yorkshire fast bowler Fred
Trueman is being treated for cancer.
The 75-year-old is suffering from a condition called small
cell carcinoma and has spent time in Airedale Hospital in west
Yorkshire.
Trueman, who became the first cricketer in history to take
300 Test wickets, will now undergo 15 weeks of treatment.
His former Yorkshire
team-mate Bob Platt said: "If
anyone can fight this Fred
can."
He added: "He is in ex-
ceedingly good spirits, and
the good news is that the
doctors have caught this
early."
Trueman's career spanned
20 years from 1949 to 1969 FREDDIE Trueman earned
and he played 67 Tests be- the nickname Fiery Fred
tween 1952 and 1965. because of his fast
He was famed for his new- bowling.
ball partnership for England
with Lancashire's Brian Statham.
He was also Yorkshire's pace spearhead during his native
county's dominance of English cricket through the 1960s.
Trueman was an expert analyst on BBC Test Match
Special for 26 years until 2000. (BBC Sport)


Nalbandian before winning 6-3,
3-6, 7-6.
It was his second close
brush with defeat in as many
days following his quarter-final
- against Spanish qualifier
Nicolas Almagro which he
edged 7-5 in the third.
Argentina's Nalbandian
promised to be a tough oppo-
nent, having beaten Federer six
times in their previous 10 meet-
ings including in the season-end-
ing Masters Cup final last year.
The first four games all went
against serve. The Swiss broke
in the eighth game and then held
serve to take the first set.
Instead of settling into his
game, however, Federer hit a se-
ries of unforced errors to allow
Nalbandian to go 3-1 up in the
second set and serve out to level
the match.
Federer started the decider
in the worst possible way, los-
ing his serve and flinging down
his racquet in disgust at the
changeover.
He hit back in the fourth
came. which he snatched on his
third break point when
Nalbandian sent a forehand over
thc baseline.
Another break put Federer
4-2 up. He had three points to
take a 5-2 lead but Nalbandian
rallied to break back and level
the set.
In the tiebreak. a netted
backhand by Nalhandian and
a winning service return by
Federer gave the Swiss two
match-points. He converted
the second when Nahlandian
put a forehafid'long. : '






SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006:
S.
C:
/ ' Ji~~


I ~ h U mB~


Liverpool win epic FA Cup final in shootout


By Mike Collett

CARDIFF, (Reuters) -
Liverpool won one of the most
dramatic FA Cup finals in the
competition's 134-year his-
tory, yesterday, with a 3-1
penalty shootout win over
West Ham United after a
heart-stopping match ended
3-3 after extra time.
Steven Gerrard, with two
blistering goals, emerged as one
Liverpool hero, while goal-
keeper Jose 'Pepe' Reina, who
was at fault for two of West
Ham's goals, was the other af-
ter saving three penalties in the
shootout.
Liverpool recovered from
going 2-0 down inside 28 min-
utes the worst start to a fi-
nal by any team for 47 years -
and invoked the never-say-die
spirit they showed a year ago
when they came back from 3-0
down to draw 3-3 with AC
Milan and win the European
Cup on penalties.
This time they hauled them-
selves up off the Millennium


Stadium floor to break the
hearts of the West Ham fans
who had been dreaming of their
first FA Cup win since 1980.
West Ham had gone ahead
when Jamie Carragher turned a
low cross into his own goal af-
ter 20 minutes and went 2-0 up
eight minutes later when Dean
Ashton pounced after Reina
spilled a Matthew Etherington
shot.

PINPOINT PASS
Djibril Cisse pulled one
back with a neat volley after
32 minutes and Gerrard,
whose pinpoint pass led to
that goal, levelled with a thun-
derous shot in the 54th as
both teams poured everything
into attack.
Just when it appeared that
West Ham had lost their impe-
tus as well as their lead, they
suddenly regained it from an un-
expected source in the 64th
minute.
Fullback Paul Konchesky
attempted a long lofted cross
from the left but the ball caught


THE victorious players including penalty-scorers Dietmar
Hamann, Gerrard and John Arne Riise surge towards
Reina. (BBC Sport).


out Reina and curved into the
top corer.
Liverpool looked down and
out until Gerrard, limping
through cramp, seized on a
headed clearance a minute from
time to drive a screaming 30-
metre shot beyond Shaka
Hislop.


There were few chances
in extra time as injured
and exhausted players
dropped all over the pitch
but Reina needed to pro-
duce an acrobatic save to
tip a Nigel Reo-Coker
flicked header against the
post in the 119th minute.


Fiveow rt 0


Test sce m-ap


INDIA will persist with their
new strategy of fielding five
frontline bowlers in Test
cricket, according to coach
Greg Chappell, who believes
the five-bowler theory is the
only way India can win more
matches.
Chappell also sees a key
role for his young pace battery
in improving India's floundering
reputation in Test cricket, say-
ing that the team can improve
only if it can "replicate the les-
sons of our one-day success in
Tests".
"It's the bowlers who win
Tests and we all know that. I
am convinced that India need to
persist with the five-bowler
theory in order to win more
Test matches," Chappell told
PTI shortly after the Indian
team's arrival here. Chappell
said he expects his young fast
bowlers to step up to the task
and excel in Tests as well. "It's
an opportunity for them to
seize the moment and prove
themselves in demanding condi-
tions."


Chappell's eyes looked
blood-shot with the trip across
continents, yet the importance
of the series goaded him into
summoning Ramakrishnan, the
computer analyst, and bio-
mechanist Ian Fraser for an im-
promptu computer session
within a couple of hours of
checking in at the hotel.
Irfan Pathan, Munaf Patel,
Sreesanth and Rudra Pratap
Singh carry the torch of India's
fast bowling challenge, and
Chappell expects them to make
light of hot and humid condi-
tions as well as of wickets
which might not be of great as-
sistance in terms of pace or
movement.
There is also this little mat-
ter of bowling to the irrepress-
ible Brian Lara.
"If they are uptight about
bowling to Lara, I don't know.
But individuals don't matter as
long as you stick to the process.
In any case I'm not too keen to
dwell on the negatives at the
start of the tour," remarked
Chappell.


IRFAN PATHAN
An elementary part of this
"process" for Chappell is that
bowlers should dry up the scor-
ing and build up the pressure
on opposite batsmen. "It surely
is important if bowlers can
build pressure from both ends.
It adds to a team gaining con-
trol of the situation."
India have made a complete
reversal of their fortunes in one-
day cricket under Chappell but
its stock has fallen in the longer
version of the game, with de-
feats to Pakistan and England in
the first four months of the
year.
"It would be good if we
could replicate the lessons of
our one-day success in Tests
but it is also worth remember-
ing that compared to 25 one-
dayers, we have played only
eight Tests in the same period.
"It takes time to understand
the particular rhythm of Test
cricket. It doesn't happen in-
stantly. I'm hopeful the boys
would come to grips with it
soon.
"Chappell felt it was only
a "bonus" for his young team to
get first-hand experience of
these conditions which would
come handy during the World


Cup next year.
He said it was worth keep-
ing an eye on West Indies' fast
bowling resources since they
had a few talented youngsters
in the line-up. "But there is no
reason to believe that our bats-
men wouldn't be up to the task.
How well we would do, who
knows?"
The Indians spend the
next two days in Kingston be-
fore flying to Montego Bay
for a practice match against
a local eleven. (Cricinfo)


It then became the second
successive FA Cup final to be
decided on penalties and with a
record of eight wins from nine
previous shootouts, Liverpool
were favourites.

EARLYADVANTAGE
Dietmar Hamann gave
Liverpool the early advantage
with the first penalty before
Bobby Zamora saw his kick
brilliantly saved at full length by
Reina.
Sami Hyypia then saw
Shaka Hislop save his weak ef-
fort before Teddy Sheringham
made it 1-1 from the spot. The
40-year-old became the third
oldest man to play in the final
when he came on as an 85th
minute substitute. He is also
now technically the oldest
player to have scored in a Cup
final, though shootout goals are
not included in the record
books.
Likewise Gerrard scored his
third 'goal' of the afternoon to
put Liverpool 2-1 ahead in the
shootout before Reina saved
from Konchesky.
John Arne Riise blasted
Liverpool 3-1 up leaving Anton
Ferdinand needing to score to
keep it alive. He did not man-
age it and the drama was finally
over with Liverpool's fans and
players going wild with delight
at the end of a momentous oc-
casion.
"It was an unbelievable
game but we had that never-
say-die attitude and we stuck
in there," Gerrard told the
BBC.

BETI'ERKEEPER
"We always knew if it went
to penalties we had a really
good chance, we felt he was the
better keeper with penalties."
Of his goals he said: "I just
wanted to get good contact on
the first but the second one was
just a dream goal. It was a dream


goal and a dream day."
Reina described the final as
"an absolutely crazy game".
"It was a really bad perfor-
mance from me in the game but
keepers need to live a small line
between mistakes and the saves
and all I had to do was keep
going," he said.
Manager Rafael Benitez
said of his compatriot: "Pepe is
famous back in Spain for sav-
ing penalties so we had confi-
dence in him and he did his job
for us."
"I must give credit to my
players as after a 62-game sea-
son a lot of them had cramp but
they kept going until the end,
never gave up and have done a
fantastic job.
"The energy level the play-
ers showed was amazing. It was
a fantastic final."
West Ham captain Reo-
Coker said: "I think we de-
served to win that; we worked
fantastically hard. I can ask
nothing more from the play-
ers.
"It was a marvellous Cup
final; we gave all we could give.
I hope everyone associated with
West Ham is proud, we gave it
our all."
West Ham manager Alan
Pardew told Sky Sports: "It felt
like a defeat when the third goal
went in but we rallied and had
the biggest chance of extra-time.
"We had to dig in, this was
a top team we were playing but
I really felt we were going to
win it. Only a 35-yard smasher
from Gerrard was going to
change that."
One consolation for West
Ham, promoted from the sec-
ond division a year ago, is
that they will go into next
year's UEFA Cup despite los-
ing as Liverpool are already
in the Champions League
qualifiers, courtesy of their
third-place finish in the Pre-
mier League.


. ~. *1


V



A




C



A




N




C



Y


Three EBFU Banks

Milk Stout matches

billed for today
THE East Bank Football Union (EBFU) Bank's Milk Stout
Super League continues today at Splashmin's Fun Park
ground.
The first game, between Mocha Champs and Kuru Kuru
Lions will kick off at 12:00 h and a clash between Soesdyke
Falcons and Grove Hi Tec will follow, then the feature game
between Banks Sports Club and the Timehri Panthers will take
place.
The match officials are: Shemton Joe and Noel Harry.
The winner of the competition will receive $150 000, while
second-placers will collect $100 000, third- $50 000 and
fourth- $25 000.


GUYANA REVENUE AUTHORITY
Applications are invited from suitable qualified persons to fill the position of:




within the Guyana Revenue Authority.
RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE
Ensuring the strategic management of the total information resources of the
Authority and provision of technical and managerial leadership in the design,
implementation, monitoring and functioning of and integrated information system.

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE
A Master's Degree in Information Technology or related field.
PLUS
A minimum of five (5) years managerial experience in an Information Systems
Environment.
Applications should be sent not later than Thursday, May 18, 2006 to the:
Commissioner-General
Guyana Revenue Authority
375 Lamaha & East Streets,
Georgetown.

UNSUCCESSFUL APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE ACKNOWLEDGED


re;


rilii~ 1

~U a






26 SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006



CS j P3lRT CHRONICLE ^ -,,



England on course



after Sri Lanka avert -



three-day defeat


By John Mehaffey

LONDON, England (Reuters)
- Sri Lanka averted the igno-
miny of defeat within three
days at Lord's yesterday with
a combination of concentra-
tion and judicious stroke play
after being asked to follow on
in the first Test against En-
gland.
The fightback began in the
first session when Sri Lanka
took their overnight total of 91
for six to 192 all out through
some bold stroke play and lax
England fielding.
Needing 359 to make En-
gland bat again, Sri Lanka lost
an early wicket with only 10
runs on the board in their sec-
ond innings before recovering to
reach 183 for three at the close.
Matthew Hoggard was the
day's hero, taking his 200th
Test wicket in the course of a
fine spell of swing bowling to
finish with four for 27 in the Sri
Lanka first innings.
He then dismissed Jehan
Mubarak for the second time in
the match with a late inswinger
which bowled the left-hander
for six.


Hoggard made the early
breakthrough when play re-
sumed under leaden skies, tak-
ing a tumbling, two-handed re-
turn catch to dismiss Farveez
Maharoof (22) after deceiving
the all-rounder with an extrava-
gant late outswinger.
England captain Andrew
Flintoff, assuming the role of
strike bowler in the absence of
the injured Steve Harmison, was
rewarded for his sustained pace
with the wicket of his opposite
number Mahela Jayawardene
caught behind for 61 after 168
minutes of patient application.
CHANCES MISSED
Chaminda Vaas (31) prof-
ited from dropped slip chances
by Alastair Cook and Andrew
Strauss to add 61 runs for the
ninth wicket with Nuwan
Kulaskera (29) before Hoggard
and Flintoff wrapped up the in-
nings.
Sri Lanka looked down and
out with Mubarak's dismissal
before Upul Tharanga and
Kumar Sangakkara combined in
a second-wicket partnership of
109, a record against England.
Tharanga, knowing he is


probably fighting for the one
opening spot available in the
second Test after the decision of
Sananth Jayasuriya to come out
of retirement, played some de-
lightful cover-drives. He brought
up his 50 and the 100-partner-















KUMAR SANGAKKARA

ship with another sweetly timed
drive off Flintoff.
Flintoff finally brought on
left-arm spinner Monty Panesar
from the Pavilion End shortly
before tea for his first Test over
in England to a huge cheer from


Management Sciences for Health (MSH)
invites applications from suitably
qualified persons to fill the position of:

OFFICE MANAGER

To oversee the overall administrative and financial function of the MSH
office in Guyana, ensure smooth operation of technical efforts and field
activities by providing accounting, management, and logistical support
to facilitate the implementation of the activities under SCMS project in
Guyana.

MINIMUM RECRUITMENT STANDARDS:

University Degree in Accounting and/or Business Management, or
equivalent certification from an accredited higher educational
institution with relevant experience. At least three (3) years
experience in an independent administrative position with advanced
bookkeeping responsibility. At least three (3) years experience as
Senior Accountant. English fluency including business terminology
required.



All positions are contractual for one (1) year and renewable for up to
four (4) years.

Applications must include the name, address and contact number of at
least two (2) referees, one (1) from a community member and or former
employers as to fitness for the position.

PLEASE EMAILAPPLICATIONS TO: piojectjobs .Imsh.org.



Job descriptions can be viewed on iSH wv,ebsite at w'\ vw.mh or<

MSH IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


the crowd who had adopted
England's first Sikh player as
their favourite.
After the break as the sun
broke through, Panesar quickly
found his rhythm and was un-
lucky not to dismiss Sangakkara
on 37 when wicketkeeper
Geraint Jones failed to gather a
sharp chance.
Jones made no mistake
when Panesar clipped the out-
side edge of Tharanga's bat as
the batsman tried to glide the
ball square of the wicket and
was caught for 52, compiled
from 126 balls with seven fours.
Jayawardene, the only top-or-
der batsman to show any sustained
application in the first innings, again
showed his class with neat foot-
work and deft deflections.
He watched as Sangakkara
reached his 21st Test 50 with
four boundaries from 121 balls
and continued to play with
calm authority.
Sangakkara stroked Flintoff
through the covers for a bound-
ary then steered Sajid
Mahmood to third man for an-
other four to bring up the pair's
second half-century partnership
of the match.
Flinloff brought Panesar
back into the attack and the
move was immediately success-
ftil when Sangakkara, who had
scored 65, gave Jones his sec-
ond catch of the innings.
Sangakkara struck six boundaries
from 225 balls.
Panesar could have had a
third wicket in the same over
when nightwatchnan Maharoof
appeared to edge the ball on to
his pad where it bounced to
Flintoff at silly point but the ap-
peal was turned down.



ENGLAND 1st innings 551 for 6
decl. (K. Pietersen 158, M.
Trescothick 106, A. Cook 89, P.
Collingwood 57)
SRI LANKA 1st innings
J. Mubarak Ibw b Hoggard 0
U. Tharanga Ibw b Hoggard 10
K. Sangakkara c Trescothick
b Mahmood 21
M. Jayawardene c G. Jones
b Flintoff 61
T. Samaraweera Ibw b Mahmood 0
T. Dilshan run-out 0
C. Kapugedera Ibw b Mahmood 0
F. Maharoof c & b Hoggard 22
C. Vaas c Trescothick
b Hoggard 31
N. Kulasekara c Strauss
b Flintoff 29
M. Muralitharan not out 0
Extras: (lb-8, nb-10) 18
Total: (all out, 55.3 overs) 192
Fall of wickets: 1-0, 2-21,3-81,4-81,
5-85, 6-85,7-129,8-131,9-192.
Bowling: M. Hoggard 14-4-27-4 (nb-
2), A. Flintoff 17.3-2-55-2 (nb-3), L.
Plunkett 11-0-52-0 (nb-51. S.
Mlahmood 13-2-50-3
SRI LANKA 21d inrrigs (o.i /';-E
J. Muba;ak b Hoggard 6
U. Tharanga c G. Jones
b Panesar 52
K. Sangakkara c G. Jones
b Panesar 65
M. Javawardene not out 35
Ext as: (-b-9,b-8.nb-1,w-2) 20
Total: (for 3 wickets, 64 overs) 183
Fall of wickets: 1-10.2-119, 3-178.
Bowling: MA. Hoggard 13-4-26-1, A.
Flintoff 14-2-41-0, S. Mahmood 10-1-
35-0 (w-1). L. Plunkett 7-2-28-0. P.
Co!lingwood 5-1-10-0 (nb-1, w-1). M.
Panesar 15-5-26-2.


MATTHEW Hoggard dives to catch out Sri Lanka's Farveez
Maharoof off his own bowling during the third day of their
first Test cricket match at Lord's yesterday. Maharoof was
Hoggard's 200th Test wicket. (REUTERS/Dylan Martinez).


Hoggard joins


distinguished


company
LONDON, England (Reuters) Matthew Hoggard joined a dis-
tinguished gallery of England bowlers yesterday by taking his
200th Test wicket on the third day of the first Test against Sri
Lanka at Lord's.
Hoggard became the 10th Englishman to reach the landmark
when he caught and bowled Farveez Maharoof from a perfectly
pitched out-swinger.
He then dismissed Chaminda Vaas to finish with four for
27 in Sri Lanka's first innings 192 in reply to England's 551
for six declared.



Independence


table tennis


championships


serve off May 19

THE Guyana Table Tennis Association (GTTA), in
conjunction with the National Sports Commission,
will be running off their Independence Table Tennis
Championships from Friday, May 19 to Monday June
5 at the Cliff Anderson Sports Hall.
According to a release from national coach, Linden
Johnson, the championships should attract the cream of the
country's top players, including last year's defending men
singles champ Christopher Franklin, who is expected to be
challenged by Idi Lewis, Paul Meusa, Andrew Daly. Colin
France and others.
In the women's category last year's champion Michelle
John would not get the chance to defend her title because
of CSEC exams, but, making a strong comeback is Jody Ann
Blake who will have to face the young and quick Trenace
Lowe and former junior player Lisa Lewis, among other
budding stars.
In the junior category boys. last year's most outstanding
player Orlando McEwan will have to play harder against
Tristan Gaime. Joel Alleyne. Darwin Walcott, Anthony
Nilec, De\on Richinond and others while in the Girls'
category young and quick Trenace Lowe will come up against
Tiffany Blair. Varsha Panday. Saskeia Chung and Ambrose
Thomas. to name a few.
Th'.r'' !r ('xn'i\ crt0cn. New Amnslcrdl:m. Linden and
L ilic a i 'C\pecl j i(, j-,.ilticlipate.
.\ l tid 1 25 ,.'n \, ill be co teslced at the
Sdamflan Mhips.
I Daline Ifor cntrici \\ ill bh (,:3(h Thursday. May I8.

1!atI I ;; *.e l. !)l i i iC .ll] ale ,l l llii son
oil tel: 223-3468 (h) 22'-3665/226-3738 (w) 621-
7633i oxi snd enlai; lto .iireilj20032003((, l ahoo.com
or iasit him at the Spo rts Hall after 16:00 h
Ns i(tkdays.










0?.L-t~'t


ON the attack: Georgetown control the midfield and
ultimately the match for their first victory. (Photo: Cullen
Bess-Nelson)

Ashton Taylor Memorial football ...


West Demerara


hammer


Essequibo 9-2

... Georgetown whip East

Bank Demerara 3-0


KELLON Dash blasted a hat-
trick to propel West
Demerara to a 9-2 hammer-
ing of Essequibo in the sec-
ond preliminary round of the
third Ashton Taylor Memo-
rial Under-20 inter-associa-
tion football championships
at the Uitvlugt Community
Centre ground, West Coast
Demerara.
In Georgetown, the hosts
whipped East Bank Demerara
3-0 at Camptown ground in
Campbellville in a Group B fix-
ture.
Other scorers' for West
Demerara in the Group A fixture
were Sherwin Liverpool, Rondel
Hauseon, Keston Tyrell, Kester
Paul, Kester Jacobs and Seon
Alleyne, while Troy Innis and
Eon Garraway found the net for
Essequibo.
But Essequibo were first to
register a goal within 19 minutes
of play, off the boot of Innis.
They enjoyed the lead for eight
minutes, before Dash hit home
the equaliser that turned out to
be the first of his hat trick.
Liverpool gave the West
Demerara boys the lead in the
34th minute and a minute later,
Dash scored his second goal to
further extend the lead 3-1.
Garraway gave Essequibo
some glimmer of hope when he
pulled one back in the 38th
minute to cut the lead, but that
turned out to be last goal for the
boys from the Cinderella


County.
Hauseon re-established the
two-goal margin lead a minute
later and West Demerara led 4-
2 at halftime.
The second half belonged
to the hosts, with four goals
materializing and Dash com-
pleting his hat-trick in the
54th minute to start the goal-
fest again. Tyrell followed in
the 68th, Paul in the 71st,
Jacobs in the 82nd and Alleyne
in the 89th.
West Demerara next play
Upper Demerara at the same
venue, while Essequibo will
host East Coast Demerara at
Queentown on the Essequibo
Coast.
Georgetown's goals came
from Keoma Hemerding,
Rishawn Sandiford and Konata
Mannings.
Hemerding found the net
first when the match was 14
minutes old and Sandiford fol-
lowed two minutes later and
Georgetown led 2-0 at halftime.
Mannings produced the only
goal in the second half in the
67th minute.
The other game between
Berbice and Bartica at Bartica
did not come off, after Berbice
refused to travel and play the
same day.
Georgetown next play
Berbice at Burnham Park in
New Amsterdam and East
Bank Demerara will host
Bartica at Thirst Park.


Morton hits second ODI




ton but rain has final say


PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad,
(CMC) Runako Morton
played with typically robust
determination in compiling
109, an innings that provided
the foundation of the West
Indies total of 263 for six be-
fore persistent afternoon
showers thwarted their quest
for another victory in the
sixth Digicel One-Day Inter-
national against Zimbabwe
yesterday.
Sultry, humid conditions.in
the morning at the Queen's Park
Oval generated a band of rain-
bearing clouds that rolled across
Trinidad, twice interrupting the
tourists' response and finally
forcing the abandonment of the
match as a no-result with Zim-
babwe at 72 for two in the 13th
over.
It was a promising position
after the first disruption of only
two overs had resulted in a re-
vised target of 191 off 30 overs
on the Duckworth/Lewis sys-
'tem. But their hopes for a stun-
ning morale-boosting victory, al-
though still unlikely, were
washed away by the return of
the rains that will have authori-
ties here wondering about the
fate of the final two ODI's of
the upcoming and eagerly antici-
pated five-match series against
India in two weeks' time.
It was the second no-result
of the series after the complete
abandonment of the scheduled
third match in Georgetown a
week earlier and leaves the West
Indies 4-0 up going into the fi-
nal match today.
In the morning heat and
sunshine, Morton's second
ODI hundred, supported by
half-centuries from the
Guyanese pair of Ramnaresh
Sarwan (54) and Shivnarine
Chanderpaul (51 not out), es-
tablished a total that again
looked well beyond the reach of
the woefully inexperienced tour-
ists.
Yet the visitors could still
take heart from the efforts of
fast-medium bowler Tawanda
Mupariwa and spinners Ryan
Higgins and Prosper Utseya.
Their combined efforts
caused the West Indies to lose
momentum when well poised
for a total closer to 300 and it
was only an unbeaten seventh-
wicket stand of 57 in 31 balls
between Chanderpaul and re-
called wicketkeeper Carlton
Baugh that lifted them well past
the average one-day first innings
total of 222 on this ground.
Making the most of pace
and bounce off a newly re-laid
pitch, Mupariwa impressed
with his pace and accuracy, con-
ceding just 12 runs off his first
seven overs and earning the
breakthrough when he bowled
Chris Gayle for two in the fifth
over.
However ile other seclliner
could not match his effective-
ness and Sar;wan joined Morton
in a 134-run second-wicket
stand thati pit the Wecst Indies
in a position lor \\hat the home
Ilns lloped \oulld he a rollick-


ing assault through the final 20
overs.
It was Higgins who changed
the tempo of the innings when
he had Sarwan caught behind by
wicketkeeper Brendan Taylor as
the elegant right-hander at-
tempted to guide a delivery to
third man.
The leg-spinner then
claimed the prized scalp of
Brian Lara to silence a crowd
estimated at just over 6 000.on
a ground still in the process of
completing renovations in time
for next year's World Cup.
Despite their relatively
small number, the fans roared
their support for the West
Indies captain and national hero
on his arrival to the middle.
Already in festive mood as
Trinidad and Tobago's Soca
Warriors bid farewell this week-
end to the national team on' he.
way to a historic first appear-
ance in next month's Worl.Cup
football finals, they weie filly
expecting a stroke-fest from
their hero.
But he never got going, rep-
licating Sarwan's dismissal ,irti
edging an attempted glide into.
Taylor's gloves and walking off
with just two runs to his name
before the wicketkeepeir, nd
bowler had even full3 appreci-
ated the success of their conm-
bined effort.
Chanderpaul joined Morton
at 164 for three and the pair:
were content to safely negotiate.
the remaining overs from
Higgins and off-spinner Ltseya...
the two bowlers conceding just
one boundary in their combined
20 overs, which cost a total of
74 runs.
Morton had earlier hoisted'
Keegan Meth, playing his first
match of the series, for six over
long-off but generally played
with restraint throughout his. in-
nings, collecting most of 'his
boundaries as he invariably
does, with thumping. drives in
an arc between long-off and
deep-midwicket.
It was one of those drives
off Anthony Ireland that
brought him a 12th boundary
and took him to the hundred.
Attempting to accelerate, he
hammered two more fours off
the medium-pacer, but in hitting
out for another, found
Mupariwa at long-on.
Marion Samuels was unfor-
tunately run out without facing
a ball, undone by hesitation in
the running between wickets and
Elton Chigumbura's swift pick-
up and throw at backward-point.


1, ,'. -


RUNAKOI
When Mupariwa returned
for his final spell and promptly
bowled Dwayne Smith for just
three, the West Indies were stut-
tering at 206 for six in the 45th
over.
But Baugh immediately
, picked up the pace, the little Ja-
,maican unfurling his impressive
combination of timing and
power in striking a six and three
fours.
The assault encouraged
Chanderpaul to follow suit as
the former captain hoisted two
sixes of his own and completed
his second half-century in as
many innings in the series to re-
inforce the general impression
that the burdens of captaincy
were a significant factor in his
year-long run of low scores
prior to this series.
Starting their chase under
threatening skies. Zimbabwe
captain Terry Duffin fell to a
gloved attempted reverse sweep
to Baugh off Marion Samuels
and Piet Rinke's horrible tour
continued when he was run-out
by Lara's throw to the 'keeper
when called through for a sui-
cidal single.
Brendan Taylor smashed
20 off 21 balls and with


g ..







MORTON
opener Vusi Sibanda (18 no(
out) also playing positively,"
the tourists sensed they wer,^
in with a chance, until the
weather had the final say. "-:



WEST INDIES
C. Gayle b Mupariwa 2
R. Morton c Mupariwa
b Ireland 109
R. Sarwan c wkpr Taylor
b Higgins 54
B.Lara c wkpr Taylor b Higgins 2
S. Chanderpaul not out 51
M. Samuels run-out
(Chlgumbura) 0
D. Smith b Mupariwa 3
C. Baugh not out 25
Extras: (lb-5, w-10, nb-2) 17
Total: (6 wkts, 50 overs) 263
Fall of wickets: 1-15,2-149,3-164,
193,5-193,6-206.
Bowling: Mupariwa 10-2-41-2 (w-4),
Ireland 7-0-57-1 (nb-2, w-4), Meth 7-
0-44-0 (w-1), Rinke 4-0-33-0,
Strydom 2-0-9-0, Higgins 10-0-39-2i
Utseya 10-0-35-0 (w-1).
ZIMBABWE
T. Duffin c wkpr Baugh
b Samuels 14
V. Sibanda not out 18
P. Rinke run-out 4
B. Taylor not out 20
Extras: (w-13, nb-3) 16
Total: (2 wkts, 12.1 overs) 72
Fall of wickets: 1-33,2-42.
Bowling: Collymore 4-0-23-0 (nb-3,
w-4), Bradshaw 1-0-4-0, Samuels 5-
0-31-1 (w-4) Gayle 2.1-0-14-0 (w-1)..


Sunday, May 14,2006

GFC Ground Bourda

\lpha vs Ncw Amster(Wdam United ( 6 pwn

"' ( I X to


', *L4)


Italy withdraws World

Cup referee De Santis

ROME, Italy (Reuters) The Italian Football Federation
has withdrawn its proposed. referee for the World Cup,
Massimo De Santis, who is under investigation in a probe
into possible soccer fraud.
The federation said in a statement yesterday it had informed
FIFA and UEFA that it was withdrawing applications for De
Santis, and two assistant referees, Alessandro Griselli and Marco
Ivaldi. to participate at the tournament which starts in Germany
next month:
It said the move "must not be considered in any way preju-
dicial of the legal judgements which are the exclusive compe-
tence of judicial bodies both ordinary and of sport". .
All three officials are among those being i''. 'ti.%.'._d
in the sports scandal B which has hit four of Ital 's top clubs.


''~'
C-


-- 1


I


.,.' -
h"a^-


-- -sF r
.,,;, __ ,.,;, ,~;,, ,,,., ,,~,,~,,,,.~,,,


(
I


~,,-
sir


ik!









Weary Indian cricketers



arrive in Jamaica


By Siddhartha Vaidyanathan in Kingston
"ENJOY your stay here, maan, but we hope your team get
thrashed". Shortly after uttering these words in a seriously
passionate tone, the customs officer at Kingston's Norman
Manley airport laughed.
The Caribbean fervour for cricket was there for all to see, yet
even he knew that the days when West Indies 'thrashed' oppo-
nents were long gone.
Exactly 24 hours after they boarded their British Airways flight
from Mumbai, in the wee hours of May 12, India's 15-man one-
day squad resembled a bunch of zombies.
Apart from two long flight trips, spanning close to nine hours
each, they spent close to five hours in transit at London, where
they stood in the immigration queue entertaining autograph-hunt-
ers before enjoying a pleasant bus ride from Heathrow to Gatwick
airport.
Jet-lagged, fatigued and disoriented, Rahul Dravid and his boys
sleepily unloaded their luggage from the conveyer belts at Kingston
-irport.


A weary Dravid reiterated that it was a "great opportunity
for his young side to enjoy themselves" and remembered the
kind of "learning experience" his previous sojourns (in 1997
and 2002) had been. "I remember coming here as a young boy
on my first tour and picking up a lot of things on that tour,"
he continued. "One read a lot about the West Indies while
growing up their crowds, their grounds, their great players
and it is a great place to play cricket.
"Most of our players are coming here for the first time. The
youngsters in our side are very excited and the atmosphere is great.
We've had some one-day success recently and we're looking for a
good start in the one-day series."
He added that playing away gave them the chance to "stay in a
cocoon" away from the spotlight, a fact that "definitely helps in
creating a good team environment", building team unity. "It's been
a long journey but we need to recover from it quickly and look
ahead to the practice game on May 16."
That match is scheduled to be played at Montego Bay, a
Please see page 23


ICC CRICKET
WORLD CUP

WEST INDIES

2007 .


SEdward B. Beharry & Company Ltd.
_ Tel: 227-1349, 227-2526



The Real Thing
MACARO lI CHOWMEIN


-TWRL~ WHEELS


SHELLS
ELBOWS


MINI MAC


SPAGHETTI
VERMICELLI


CRESTE FETTUCCINI


3 -
i' .' 1


,- S arP. fF 6 i.
%J 1 I0 I- e ifWU


J~L %f. ..y*,;2~r~...*. i~ d.
d~. '.4


PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad,
(CMC) Members of
Trinidad and Tobago's Soca
Warriors got a scare during
their tour of San Fernando,
Friday, when a stage on
which they were sitting col-
lapsed.
The incident, which brought


the celebratory road tour to a
premature end, occurred shortly
before 2.00 pm at the Yolande
Pompey Recreation Ground in
Princes Town, while the War-
riors were on the second leg of
a four-leg tour of south Trinidad.
Speaking after the incident,
Princes Town regional corpora-
tion councillor, Clifton De
Coteau blamed the mishap on
the poor construction of the
stage.
"The thing was poorly con-
structed and it was not sturdy
enough. The situation was com-
pounded by people coming onto
the stage," he said.
"It was very embarrass-
ing. I think that when the
children started to do the
Soca Warriors dance, the
shifting may have thrown the


J' 1!
F,-,-^s
1 s ""*

y ^h,..~


Gerrard hoists FA Cup aloft
Inspirational captain Steven Gerrard hoists the FA Cup
aloft to the delight of his team-mates and the ecstatic
fans. (See story on page 25). Yahoo Sport.


N ~..i l Li ,,ited Lam An, ~ l' i ir ereon eehn 2-239(ee); Editorial: 227-5204, 227-5216.Fax:227-5208


ciciGO.OnMI
t- -n-u -lV 'I-V- A f


I


I


P e and Published by G ,


- "
-' -


ADNUS Y, MAY 14, 2006


R


Ofarr0r1








AC C


W- r--
r-


s-.- -.
t7W *4


V..



ihk.
rila --


E AND


* ~4A}7rt tt


Centre


A-c


* >t


'-.-. -=
'.'
Aw l
c".te1s
i ;
.-^i~L~
-/, ;..?


ii


Illl


JTiiiT@I


'Otata00.if6 80wM


W*



- .


'Pdi


jyo1


ONt to be sold separately












A., -A
~T d i


flL'


IMt


lu-


:.i,--, r, .


1~ ..
r-- ---
r"
'' ';
: :-- :-~-~.~....
:....







Pa2e II Sunday Chronicle May 14, 2006


j *,


1/


41 F-,PIr


By Sherry Boilers-Dixon

HE is the easiest to blame. She gets into your busi
ness; she tells you off and sometimes goes a little too
far. But letting her off the hook is the first step to-
ward happiness, self-acceptance and maturity.
An old friend tells me that she can never forgive her now dead
mother and that she shouldn't have to, given how awful she was to
her. And she was awful, treating her as the black sheep, relentlessly
belittling her for being bookish, homely and odd. At one point, this
friend, a fellow journalist, was giving me feedback on a book we
were both reading on forgiveness: "Even if the grievousness of the
wrong is never acknowledged or atoned for, we may want to feel
our way back to a caring place. It's the place we'd rather live." And
yet, when it came to her mother, she had not thought to apply it.
I had an encounter involving forgiveness with another old
friend. He made it clear that he believed so strongly in its im-
portance that he could barely understand why anyone would
withhold it. He marvelled at how 'the. people in the Balkans
keep their tribal feuds going for decades. "What's that all about?"
he asked. "I can't understand it! I said "But you should under-
stand it. You haven't spoken to your mother in 15 years." He
stiffened. "That's different" he said,, without a trace of irony.
"She's a monster."
The sins of our parents are among the most difficult to for-
give. We expect the world of them, and we do not wish to lower
our expectations. Decade after decade we hold out the hope,
often unconscious, that they will finally do right by us. We
want them to own up to all their misdeeds, to apologise. To make
heartfelt pleas for our forgiveness. We want them to give us the
love we've always craved. And this.desire for love has very spe-
cific:wishes attached: Why don't you give me better birthday gifts?
Why don't you remember what I tell you about my life? Why do
you always criticise me always talking about my negatives and
never the positives? We want our parents to embrace us, to tell us
they know we were good children, to undo.the favouritism they've
shown to. a brother or sister, to take back their hurtful criticisms,
to give us their praise.
There's nothing wrong with wanting this. It's a natural
want, No one is perfectly mature, and we may hunger for our
parents to repair whatever damage they've done after we've
become adults. We get into trouble, though, when we let this
hunger rule our lives.
Nursing resentments towards a parent does more than keep that
parent in the doghouse. We get stuck there, too, forever the child,
the victim, the have-not in the realm of love. My writer friend feels
that her mother does not deserve her forgiveness. Even after her
death, she doesn't want to give her that satisfaction. But as a re-
sult; she. still lives with her psychologically, still has the horrible
opinions of herself that they fostered. Strange as it may seem, a
grudge is a kind of clinging, a way of not separating, and when we


hold a grudge against a parent, we are clinging not just to the parent
but more specifically to the bad part of the parent. It's as if we do
not want to live our lives until we have this resolved and feel the
security of their unconditional love. We do so for good reasons psy-
chologically. But the result is just the opposite: We stay locked
into the badness and we don't grow up.
I also know a story of a man in his 40s, who was still waiting
for his father-to be the father he should have been and destroying
his own life in the process. A part of him had remained a small
child, riveted to a father who was often unavailable and insensitive.
My friend couldn't move on with his life, he couldn't really have a
life not a job, not a girlfriend because to do so would mean
moving away, separating from his dad in some way. As long as he
remained a misfit, a patient no therapist could fix, he could stay
emotionally entwined with his father and sull dream of the perfect


When we (forgive), we can begin to
understand the circumstances and
limitations they laboured under, recognize
the goodness in them that our pain has
pushed aside, feel some compassion
perhaps, not only for the hard journey they
had, but also for the pain we have caused
them.

paternal rescue.
Blaming his dad for his failures freed him from having to face
himself. The sad thing about clinging to a parent in this unforgiv-
ing, infantile way is that we foreclose the possibility of getting the
love we need from others. And it is this love available love that
could heal us. Being glued to a hated parent inevitably means that
the worst aspect of that parent lives in one's head as a debilitating
presence judging, blaming, finding fault. Not only that, you are
still living with her and controlled by her [Mother] indeed, is still
enthralled with her in some way.
What then is this place we'd rather live, this place of forgive-
ness. To forgive is not to condone the bad things our parents have
done. It's not to deny their selfishness, their rejections, their mean-
ness, their brutality, or any of the other misdeeds, character flaws,
or limitations that may attach to them. To forgive them is, rather,
to do two important things: First, to separate from them which
is to stop seeing ourselves as children who depend on them for our
emotional well-being, to stop being their victims, to recognize that
we are adults with some capacity to shape our own lives and the
responsibility to do so. And second, to let them back into our hearts.
When we do that, we can begin to understand the circumstances
and limitations they laboured under, recognize the goodness in them
that our pain has pushed aside, feel some compassion perhaps, not
only for the hard journey they had, but also for the pain we have


9 f--- s





caused them.
Perhaps the most crucial aspect of that journey is allowing
ourselves to feel the longings that have been pushed aside and made
unconscious to feel that part of us that is still a child, desper-
ately in love and horribly hurt and hoping against hope that the
parent will be good again and make everything right. When we
can feel these childhood longings, understand them, talk about
them, cry perhaps, a subtle change takes place within us. We are
able to care about our own hurt. Not in a self-pitying way. It is
as if the adult part of us, the secure part of us, is able to embrace
and soothe the child. This is the beginning of a process that can
lead us out of our bitterness, away from our entwinement with
the bad part of the parent, re-introduce us to the good part that
we may have forgotten, and pave the way toward forgiveness.
To forgive our parents is a gift not just to them but to our-
selves, because it brings us back to the good part of the relation-
ship with them, where we experience ourselves as loving and lov-
able people. It strengthens our own sense of self because, like it or
not, we are always identified with our parents. And, finally, it gives
us the opportunity to better enjoy the time we have left with them
and get from them what they may now be able and even longing to
give.
But as valuable as forgiveness is and as important as it is to
strive for, no one can forgive deeply felt wrongs in an instant. Get-
ting to a forgiving place, finding the forgiving self inside us, is a
long and complicated journey. We have to be ready to forgive. We
have to want to forgive. The deeper the wound, the more difficult
the process which makes forgiving parents especially hard. Along
the way, we may have to be angry and resentful, we may even have
to punish our parents by holding a grudge. But when we get there,
the forgiveness we achieve will be forgiveness worth having.
This Mothers' Day perhaps these words may help you to
work at forgiving your mother. Happy Mothers Day to all of
you..


. .' .-


2" X 12" Decorative Tiles.. .
2" X 12" Grade A Tiles........
2".X 12" Anti Slip Tiles.......
2"x-1 2" Porcelain Til es......
6"x16" Porcelain Tiles........


$130.00
$180.00
$180.00
$180.00
$530.00


S.7f f -Z ,- ,.



i1', *

~~ _." '


Te Namiie Yui can Trust


I
I
I
I
I





Page II


Sunday Chronicle May 14, 2006





Sundy Chonile My 14 206Pag II


rF-rallt-at-m-ueggI
I








By Richard Bryden
Are you a mother, or are you motherly?
This question may seem strange and bizarre
But don't hit out at me.
Being a mother does not require much
For all that mature egg needs
Is for a sperm to come and touch,
Life is then motioned into existence
The miracle of birth, through a natural process

To be motherly requires care and affection
True devotion, guidance and protection
To be there during hardships, trials and pain
Triumphs, victories, successes and any conceivable
gain

Being motherly transcends the confines of her
maternal role
She lends, she thinks, she shares, she skimps
She's always in control

Motherliness goes beyond the call of duty
To provide for her children's needs
Even if that child is the doer of a good or wrongful
deed

And when at last her youthfulness passes
Way beyond her youth
Her loving kindness is never surpassed
It runs deep within her roots
Then through her eyes the world survives
To live another day
And when the trials come our way
We know she'll watch and pray

Her smile, her warmth, her love so calm
May move our storm clouds away
Then we realize our greatest prize
Will leave us soon one day

Mothers, dear mothers
Let love, peace and poise run steep
Please let good virtues prevail
For the epitome of being a good MOM
I Is to let your motherliness reign


%Oe Sto of


cSwoihet 9 .qay


he earliest Mother's Day celebrations can
be traced back to the spring celebrations
of ancient Greece in honour of Rhea, the
Mother of the Gods. During the 1600's, England
celebrated a day called 'Mothering Sunday'.
Celebrated on the 4th Sunday of Lent, 'Mothering
Sunday' honoured the mothers of England.
During this time many of the England's poor worked as servants
for the wealthy. As most jobs were located far from their homes,
the servants would live at the houses of their employers. On
Mothering Sunday the servants would have the day off and were
encouraged to return home and spend the day with their mothers.
A special cake, called the mothering cake, was often brought along
to provide a festive touch.
As Christianity spread throughout Europe, the celebration
changed to honour the 'Mother Church' the spiritual power that
gave them life and protected them from harm. Over time the church
festival blended with the Mothering Sunday celebration. People
began honoring their mothers as well as the church.
In the United States, Mother's Day was first suggested in 1872
by Julia Ward Howe (who wrote the words to the Battle hymn of
the Republic) as aday dedicated to peace. Ms. Howe would hold
organised Mother's Day meetings in Boston ever year.
In 1907, Ana Jarvis, from Philadelphia, began a campaign to












S OS S t*


establish a national Mother's Day. Ms. Jarvis persuaded her
mother's church in Grafton, West Virginia to celebrate Mother's Day
on the second anniversary of her mother's death, the second Sunday
of May. By the next year Mother's Day was also celebrated in
Philadelphia.
Ms. Jarvis and her supporters began to write to ministers,
businessman, and politicians in their quest to establish a national
Mother's Day. It was successful as by 1911, Mother's Day was
celebrated in almost every state. President Woodrow Wilson, in
1914, made the official announcement proclaiming Mother's Day
as a national holiday that was to be held each year on the second
Sunday of May.
While many countries of the world celebrate their own
Mother's Day at different times throughout the year, there
are some countries such as Denmark, Finland, Italy, Turkey,
Australia, and Belgium which also celebrate Mother's Day on
the second Sunday of May.


Human Resources Practitioners Association

.i.1..:.. of Guyana


Members are hereby notified that the Annual General
Meeting of the Association is scheduled for May 19,2006
at the Police Officers' Mess at 17:00 hrs.
TheAgenda is as follows:
,, Call to Order.
w- Prayers.
Roll Call of Financial Members.
President's Report.
Secretary/Treasurer's Report.
Introduction of Returning Officer
.r Election of new Executive 2006 -2007.
i- Installation of new Executive.
r Introduction of Guest Speaker.
-r FeatureAddress.
r- Presentation of Life Membership
a- Vote of Thanks.
Please make every effort to attend this meeting.
Mrs. Corletta Benn-Alphonso


GUYANA ELECTIONS COMMISSION
(GECOM)
NOTICE
CLAIMS & OBJECTIONS EXERCISE
REGISTRATION OF NEW REGISTRANTS
To qualify for Registration, applicants must:

Be a Guyanese by birth or naturalisation, or a
Commonwealth Citizen residing in Guyana for one year or
more.
Be eighteen (18) years old or over by July 15, 2006
Not be listed on the PLE used to commence Claims &
Objections



Original Birth Certificate or Valid Passport

National Identification Cards will be issued to new registrants.
'____v ,: '* ". ., " *' ;. ". ,,--, \ -V


VACANT


MINISTRY OF HEALTH
The Ministry of Health invites applications from suitably qualified persons for the
position of: -
MANAGER,
NATIONAL DENTAL CENTRE
Requirements
A recognized Diploma in Public Management or Public Administration or Health Services
Management from a recognized University in addition to three (3) years experience in
administration or management at a senior level.
Applications should be forwarded no later than May 19, 2006 to:


Sccrcl;lri
SleicitI .St v ice l'o iiiiiiiv tn ].
D)e Winkle Building.
Fort Street.
Kineston.
icorgeto~ i..


Government ads can be gied on http~ /Aw gima. gy


IIr I


CY


M


m


Sunday Chronicle May 14, 2006


Page HI





Sunday Chronicle May 14, 2006


Dc ddy


I am in the process of getting divorced from my wife of 30 years,
which she requested. My wife has been an excellent mother
to our two children. Both are grown and married with children
of their own. The entire family is religious. Marrying out of
the religion is absolutely out of the
question. .'
My wife has been having an affair since K,
2002, and my children don't know anything
about it. In addition, he is from another
religion. I only learned about it through
information, including pictures and love
poems, I found on our computer. Her l
betrayal.of me and our marriage continues
to hurt deeply.
Given my wife's ability to keep the
affair secret, it's unlikely the children will
learn about it on their own. I am not looking
for them to abandon their mother as she has
been, and I'm sure will continue to be, a
good mother to them. Primarily, I am looking
to make them understand what I am going
through today.
Do I tell the kids? And if so, only in
person, or can it be done in a letter. Also,
do I include some of the overwhelming
evidence? By the way, my wife's father had an affair, divorced her
mother, and married'the woman.


Frederic, when we say someone had an affair, it sounds like
one event. Actually, an affair involves thousands of mental acts,
and living a double life is a huge psychological burden, a burden
most cheaters are unable to bear. That is why they often accuse
their spouse of being
S-cunfaithful, even when
That spouse is the last
Person in the world
*' : who might cheat.
Add your wife's
S religious background to
49. this, and she needs to
y p r a d make it your fault, at
yea. S least in her own mind.
S Confession is
supposed to be good
for the soul, but she
will be tempted to
prevaricate for two
reasons: to alleviate her
own sense of
wrongdoing, and to
avoid appearing as a
hypocrite one who
gave a religious teaching
to her children which she does not follow herself.
Many people can't lie for a day or two, yet she lied for four,
years. She found pleasure in her desire. Time and energy were stolen
from her family. Many decisions and acts she made during that time


G ipl


Page IV


INVITATION FOR BIDS
MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS AND COMMUNICATIONS

PROVIDENCE CRICKET STADIUM

LANDSCAPING
The Ministry of Public Works and Communications now invites sealed bids from
eligible landscaping contractors for the landscaping of the Providence Cricket Stadium.

The works comprise but is not limited to:

(1) grassing
(2) trees planting

The bid must comprise both technical proposal (concept design) and financial proposal
(cost to implement concept design).

Bidding documents may be obtained by written application from the Ministry of Public
Works and Communications, Accounts Department at a non-refundable cost of ten
thousand dollars ($10,000) from May 8, 2006.

The closing date for the receipt of sealed bids is Tuesday. May 23. 2006 at 09-00 hrs in the
boardroom of the National Procurement and Tender Administration Board.

Bidding documents comprising original and copy must be submitted in a sealed envelope
marked "Providence Cricket Stadium Landscaping" and addressed to:

The Chairman
National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main and Urquhart Streets
Georgetown

Further information ima be obtained from Walter Willis. Technical Advisor to Minister of
Transport & Hydraulics. MPWC. Telephone # 592-225-0000. 592-623-4550.
Fax #: 592-225-6954.

Balraj Balram
Permanent Secretary
Government ads can be viewed on http.//,ww.gina gov g;


INVITATION FOR BIDS
MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS AND COMMUNICATIONS

Guyana International Conference Centre

LANDSCAPING
The Ministry of Public Works and Communications now invites sealed Bids from eligible
contractors for the landscaping of the Guyana International Conference Centre.
The works comprise but is not limited to:
1) clay filling
2) grassing
3) tree planting
4) lotus lily planting

The bid must comprise both technical (concept design) and financial proposal (cost to
implement concept design).
Bidding documents may be obtained by written application to the Ministry of Public Works
and Communications, Accounts Department at a non-refundable cost of ten thousand dollars
($10,000) from May 15, 2006.
The closing date for the receipt of sealed bids is Tuesday, May 30, 2006 at 09:00hrs in the
boardroom of the National Procurement and Tender Administration Board.

Bidding documents comprising original and one copy must he submitted in a sealed envelope
marked "Guyana International Conference Centre Landscaping" and addressed to:
THE CHAIRMAN
NATIONAL BOARD OF PROCUREMENT AND TENDER ADMINISTRATION
MINISTRY OF FINANCE
MAIN AND) URQUHART STREETS
GEORGETOWN

Further information may he obtained lrom lWalter Willis. Technical Advisor to I Ion. Minister
of Transport/Hlydraulics. MPWC. Telephone #: 592-225-000)0. 592-623-4550.
Fax #: 592-225-6954.

Balraj Balram
Permanent Secretary Government ads can be viewed on http /www gna gov gy


_ ii ~ ~1I I~ I ;_i II _ )


affected her family, but they were made because of the way they
affected her lover.
So should you tell the kids? You can't lie by omission as
she did. Her wrongdoing shouldn't make a liar out of you. If
she was in jail, would you tell the kids she was in Hawaii?
What if they found out later? Your honesty would be brought
into question.
Perhaps the best way to tell the children is the way they learned
of the divorce. Don't tell them in anger, and keep it simple. Make
what you say perfectly clear. If they doubt its occurrence, let them
know it is not a matter of belief, but a matter of knowledge. Don't
offer evidence unless asked.
If you tell them in person or on the phone, both parties will be
left with their own perception of what was said. If you tell them in
a letter, they will have a written record in their hands forever. It's
probably best to tell them sooner rather than later.
One of the problems with good people is they can look at bad
behaviour in others and not see it. Why? Because it is not something
they themselves would do, so they don't suspect a loved one would
do it.
The best way to understand the implications of behaviour
- whether it's infidelity or global warming is to look it square
in the face. The best way for your children to understand their
own lives is to understand the lives of others, including their
parents. The best way for us to live is in accordance with
reality.

WAYNE & TAMARA

Send letters to: Direct Answers, PO Box 964,
Springfield, MO 65801 or email:
DirectAnswers@WayneAndTamara.com.





Sunday Chronicle May 14,-2006


Burning Mouth Syndrome he Dentis
DLJIIIIII_________ i-UU I ^y l I II --- ~ ^M isi*tM=~


A BURNING
feeling on the
tongue or roof
of the mouth can
usually be traced to a
steaming cup of bush
tea, or maybe to a hot
bake just out of the
frying pan. But in some
people, particularly
postmenopausal
women, a debilitating
burning sensation in
the mouth can develop
out of the blue. And
then it never leaves.
This condition was once
considered one of the
many symptoms
"nervous" older
women invented for
themselves. But new
research now suggests
that it is linked to taste
changes in mouth.

Burning mouth syndrome
(BMS) is defined as a constant
burning sensation in the mouth
that's usually present in the
tongue and often on the palate,
but it can be anywhere. It often
starts suddenly and then it can


continue for months or years.
People complain that their
mouth feels as though they had
been burnt with hot coffee,
except it just does not go away.
The burning sensation
usually gets worse during the
course of the day. So it's not too
bad in the morning, then it gets
worse after the first meal of the
day and then it peaks in the late
afternoon or by early evening.
Once people go to sleep, the
pain usually disappears. And
then when they wake up in the
morning, they feel fine. And the
cycle keeps repeating itself.
Very commonly, BMS is
associated with a metallic or
bitter taste in the mouth that
also gets worse over the day. A
lot of people complain about
dry mouth. But when you look
in the mouth and check the flow
of saliva it's normal. These
symptoms are often very
severe. There have been a lot of
studies looking at the
psychological impact and if
burning mouth syndrome is
severe and ongoing, it can cause
a lot of depression and anxiety.
The pattern of changes is very
similar to what's seen in other
people who have chronic pain.


Until recently, the diagnosis
of BMS was typically based on
the clinical symptoms. It has
been a diagnosis of exclusion, so
that people were tested to see
if they had an oral yeast
infection or a vitamin deficiency
or diabetes. And if they had
none of those changes and their
mouth looked normal and they
had the typical pattern of
burning, they ended up with a
diagnosis of burning mouth. But
more recent studies show the
association between burning
mouth and taste changes.
Remarkably, there is almost a
footprint of the disorder a
loss of bitter taste at the tip of
the tongue. We can check the
ability to taste sweet, sour, salt
and bitter flavours at the front
and then at the back of the
tongue using a spatial taste-test.
So someone with burning mouth
syndrome may have normal
tastes or somewhat reduced
tastes for sour, sweet and salty
flavors but the ability to taste
bitter flavours, which is located
at the tip of the tongue, is often
gone.
The theory is that taste
inhibits pain and, if there's a
problem with taste (like loss


Multi-Stakeholder Forum

REGIONAL CONFERENCES


The Multi-Stakeholder Forum

will now be conducted at the

Regional level


Region # 1
Region # 2
Region # 3


Region # 4
Region # 5
Region # 7


Port Kaituma Sec. School, Mayl6 at 4 pm.
Anna Regina Town Hall on May 18 at 10 am.
West Demerara Regional Education Annex on
May 20 at 10 am.

Ocean View Convention Centre, May 30 at 5 pm
Fort Wellington Boardroom, May 31 at 10 am.
Modern Hotel Boardroom, Bartica on May 17 at 4


pm.
Region # 9 Lethem Primary School, May 23 at 5 pm


Community representatives and leaders are asked to
take note



1\11C 4


/^' O IAn Ethnic Relations Commission (ERC)
S C project with support of the UNDP
Social Cohesion Programme


OrmisxO


of bitter taste at the tip of the
tongue), there's a loss of
inhibition of the pain fibers,
so someone spontaneously
begins to produce pain. And
the pain is interpreted as
burning mouth pain. Another
test is performed using a local
anesthetic. When a local
anesthetic is applied to the tip
of their tongue where they
have the burning, the pain
often gets worse instead of
getting better.
The disease is most
common in women after
menopause. One of the reasons
that this problem is found in
older women relates to the loss
of estrogen that occurs in the
menopausal period and that
causes a loss of bitter taste
buds. We do see men with
burning mouth, but it's less
common. Sometimes I see
younger people with it, or even
men, but it is usually associated
with a benign condition called
geographic tongue. Geographic


We Care


tongue causes inflammation on
the surface of the tongue
causing red patches that come
and go and move around. That
might affect the taste buds
which then leads to the loss of
pain inhibition and burning
mouth.
When the bitter taste is lost
within the taste bud, the pain
fibres surrounding that bud are
the ones that experience a loss
of inhibition and start becoming
painful. An infection, a
nutritional deficiency of B12,
folate or iron can also damage
taste buds.
And just to make it a little
bit more complex, the people
who are most at risk of
developing burning mouth are
called super-tasters-people
who have the greatest number
of taste buds on the tip of the
tongue. This is a genetic
difference: some people are
non-tasters, some are medium-
tasters and some are super-
tasters. Flavours are much more


intense for super-tasters, and
they have different taste
preferences than non-tasters
and medium-tasters. Women are
much more likely to be super-
tasters than men. So most
people with burning mouth
syndrome are super-tasters who
have had a taste loss for some
reason.
People who do a lot of
clenching are at increased
risk. They keep their tongue
pressed tightly against their
teeth at night and they end up
with their tongue scalloped.
When the clenching is
controlled, through medication
or the use of mouth guards, they
often feel better. In addition,
certain conditions such as
diabetes, thyroid disease and
liver dysfunction have been
associated with burning mouth
syndrome. While there is no
specific drug to treat BMS,
several medications used for
other diseases have been
found to give relief.


GEORGETOWN PUBLIC

HOSPITAL CORPORATION


1. Tenders are invited from suitably qualified persons to provide the following
services to the Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation.

(a) Floor Care, Janitorial, Waste Collection & Disposal Services
(b) Attendant Services

2. Tender Documents can be obtained from the Cashier, Finance Department of
the Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation, New Market Street, from 09:00h
to 15:00h, Monday to Friday upon payment of a non-refundable fee of $1000
each.

3. Each Tender must be enclosed in a sealed envelope which does not in any way
identify the Tenderer and should be clearly marked on the top left-hand corner
"Tender for (specific servicess)).

4. Tenders must be addressed to The Chairman, National Procurement &
Tender Administration Board, Ministry of Finance, and must be placed in the
Tender Box situated at the Ministry of Finance, Main & Urquhart Streets,
Georgetown not later than 09:00h., Tuesday 16th May, 2006.

Tenders will be opened immediately after the closing periods. Tenderers or
their representatives are invited to attend the openings.

5. Each Tender must be accompanied by a valid Certificate of Compliance from
the Commissioner of Inland Revenue Authority (IRD) and from the General
Manager, National Insurance Scheme (NIS) in the name of the individual if
individual is tendering or company if company is tendering.

6. The Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation does not bind itself to accept the
lowest or any Tender.

Michael H. Khan
Chief Executive Officer


................... ..........~.~.~.~-~ -. ; ~~.~~.....~.~. ~sge.~j~. ,:





Page VI


No direction from trial judge as to act '1 in concert...


Robbery convict i




Appellate Court


.eed


by


qn '96


By George Barclay

IN 1996, Satoopersaud was
jailed for two years and or-
dered to receive a whipping of
six strokes after a jury had
found him guilty of robbery
with aggravation, said to have
been committed on two
women, while he was acting
in concert with two strangers.
Dissatisfied with the deci-
sion, Satoopersaud appealed
and was freed by the Guyana
Court of Appeal, constituted by
Justices of Appeal, Ronald
Luckhoo, Guya Persaud and
Percival Cummings, on the
ground that the trial judge had
erred in not giving any direction
to the jury on the question of
acting in concert.
The evidence showed that


while the appellant was robbing
Chinma Baburam, two other
persons were robbing her daugh-
ter, Iris Baburam.
The trial judge told the jury
that it was "quite permissible to
charge (the appellant) in the
present manner as having acted
together with certain other per-
sons unknown", but did not di-
rect the jury that it was neces-
sary to find that the appellant
and the unknown men were act-
ing in concert.
On appeal, the Appellate
Court held that the jury should
have been directed that before
they could find the appellant
guilty of the offence charged,
they must find that he was act-
ing together or in concert with
the two unknown men with the
common purpose of robbing


Chinma Baburam and Iris
Baburam.
The omission so to direct
the jury might well have left
them with the impression that
the mere presence of the two
unknown men with the appel-
lant at the particular time would
have been sufficient for them to
conclude that they had been all
acting in concert.
The appeal was allowed.
Attorney-at-law Mr. Krisha
Prashad had appeared for the
appellant while Mr. George
Pompey, the then Crown Coun-
sel, had represented the Crown.
Justice of appeal Luckhoo,
who delivered the judgment of
the Court, had said:
"The appellant was con-
victed of the offence of robbery
with aggravation contrary con-


INSTITUTE OF PRIVATE ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT
"Promoting Development & Growth of Micro. Small & Mediun Businesses"
PED A National Deelopment Institution



SENIOR BUSINESS COUNSELLOR/FIELD OFFICER LETHEM
The Institute of Private Enterprise Development has vacancy for a
Senior Business Counsellor/Field Officer to work at its Lethem
Branch Office.

This individual will be responsible for managing the operations of the
Branch and must be able to work unsupervised.

In addition, the job entails the processing of loans to Small and Micro
Business Entrepreneurs and subsequent monitoring of the loans.

Potential applicants must display a personal desire to play an important
part in the development of people and their communities within Region 9,
also to have a personal interest in the development of businesses in the
Region.

Interested applicants must possess the following qualifications and
experience:

1. A First Degree in Agriculture Science, Engineering,
Economics, Management or related field.

2. Applicants must be computer literate.

3. A valid Driver's/Rider's Licence.

The incumbent must preferably be a resident of Region 9.

Interested persons can send their applications to:

TheAdministrative Manager
Institute of Private Enterprise Development
253-254 South Road
Bourda
Georgetown

Closing date for applications is Monday, May 29,2006.


trary to section 222 (b) of the
Criminal Law (Offences) Ordi-
nance, Chapter 10, and was sen-
tenced to imprisonment for two
years and ordered to receive a
whipping of six strokes."
Luckhoo said that it was of
some importance to observe the
particulars of the offence charged.
"Sahadeo Satoopersaud on
the 22nd day of August ...to-
gether with certain other per-
sons unknown, robbed Chinma
Baburam and Iris Baburam of
two pairs of bangles."
"The case for the prosecu-
tion was that the appellant, dur-
ing a dark night, forcibly re-
moved a pair of bangles from
the hand of Chinma Baburam
and that two other unknown
persons at the same time and
place forcibly removed a pair of
bangles from the hand of Iris
Baburam. the daughter of
Chinma Baburam.
"The particulars of the of-
fence charged related then to
two robberies, and the circum-


stances of aggravation consisted
of the presence of two other
persons unknown, acting to-
gel:,,r with the appellant, when
Clhiiima Baburam and Iris
Baburam were robbed.
"In general, an indictment
must not be double, that is to
say, no one count of the indict-
ment should charge the prisoner
with having committed two or
more separate offences; but an
indictment may charge the pris-
oner, in the same count, with fe-
lonious acts with respect to sev-
eral persons if it was all one
transaction.
"Counsel for the appellant
raised as his main objection to the
summing-up, the failure of the trial
judge to direct the jury as to what
in law constituted acting in concert,
in as much as the aggravating cir-
cumstances in the particulars of of-
fence required the appellant to be
in concert with persons unknown
if he was to be found guilty of the
offence for which he was charged.
"All that the trial judge told


Procurement

of Engine

and Generator .

Guyana Po.er & Light iGPL Inc. i.tes sealed bids from r
eligible bidders for the SUPPLY OF ENGINE AND -
GENERATOR- GPL-GEN-04

A complete set of bid documents (including technical
specifications for the listed item) may be purchased for a
fee of GS1,500 on submsms-inn of a written application to1

THE CONTRACTS & SUPPLIES MANAGER
Guyana Power and Light Inc.
40 Main St., Georgetown.

Tenders must be accompaieo by valid National Insurance
(NIS) and Inland Revenue (GRA) compliance certificates,
and deposited in the Tender Box provided at the address
above. Deadline for submission is 13:00 hrs (1.00 pm)
on Thursday 251h May, 2006

Bid envelopes must be addressed as follows:
PROCUREMENT OF ENGINE AND GENERATOR GPL-GEN-004
The Secretary to the Tender Board
Guyana Power and Light Inc.
40 Main St.. Georgetown.

Bids will be-opened at 14:00hrs (2.00 pm) on Thursday
25th May, 2006 in GPL's Beard Room 275/279 Middle St.
Georgetown in the presence of bidders/representatives.


P
Pt


the jury on this aspect was:
'The aggravation alleged by the
Crown is that the accused per-
son acted with certain other
persons unknown.
"The case for the Crown is
that the accused acted in concert
with other men who are not
known to the Crown. If they
were known, naturally, as you
might expect, they would have
been in the dock alongside of
the accused. But that does not
make any difference to the of-
fence charged against the ac-
cused, for it is quite permissible
to charge him in the present
manner as having acted together
with certain other persons un-
known. That should not give
you any difficulty to under-
stand.
Justice of Appeal had
explained: "There was no
direction of any kind to
indicate what in law is meant

Please see page VII


lowering The Future
owering The Future!


'' h fprllwwwigli, Ico


,,yn lay,, Cronicje ay 14,, 2006


15 1 1- I 4






Page VII


Robbery convict



freed by ADpellate...
jU m


From page VI
by acting in concert ( and
the Crown concedes this to
be the case) and
consequently the facts of the
case were never considered in
the light of such a direction
which should have been
given.
"On the evidence, the two
unknown men in no way inter-
fered with Chinma Baburam and
the appellant in no way inter-
fered with Iris Baburam. The
jury were never told that if they
found that the two unknown
men were acting independently
of the appellant, when he re-
moved the bangles from Chinma
Baburam and when they (the
unknown men) removed the
bangles from Iris Baburam, then
the appellant could not be con-
victed of the offence as laid.
"The jury should have been
directed that before they could
find the appellant guilty of the
offence charged, they must find
that he was acting together or in
concert with the two unknown
men with the common purpose
or design of robbing both
Chinma Baburam and Iris
Baburam.


"The omission so to direct
the jury may well have left them
with the impression that the
mere presence of the two un-
known men with the appellant
at the particular time would
have been sufficient for them to
conclude that they had been all
acting in concert.
"The jury then would not
have appreciated that where
presence may have been entirely
accidental, or where there was
no participation of one person
in the act of the other, or where
there was no concerted design,
such a conclusion could not have
been reached.
"The trial judge, however,
left the matter to the jury on a
different basis. He put it to tem
this way:
(a) "The crux of the case
lies on the identification of the
accused as the robber of Chinma
Baburam and Iris Baburam."
(b) "Well if you believe
these two women (Chinma and
Iris Baburam) then you should
have no qualms in saying that
the offence has been committed.
( c ) "So, members of the
jury, if you do not believe the
women, that is the end of the
case and you must acquit the


accused."
Justice of Appeal Luckhoo.
added, 'The belief or disbelief of
the "two women" (which in-
cluded the question of identifica-
tion) was only one part of the
case. The other part raised the
question was the appellant act-
ing in concert with the two un-
known men when both women
were robbed? This required a di-
rection in law which would have
sufficiently enabled the jury to
apply the principles of law to
the particulars facts of the case.
"It is difficult to say
whether the jury would still have
come to the same conclusion had
they been properly directed.
"If they were not satisfied
after a proper direction that the
appellant and the two unknown
men were acting in concert, they
would have had to exclude im-
mediately from their consider-
ation -
(a) the aggravating circum-
stances as it affected the rob-
bery of Chinma Baburam, and
(b) the robbery of Iris
Baburam, and of any aggravat-
ing circumstances, involving the
appellant.
With the exclusion of the
said matters from their consider-


S-----------------


I II III I


I



QUESTION : I
ICan you say who is an Invalid, and whether such, I
Person could receive Benefit from NIS and still wdrk2 .
IN

ANSWER

An Invalid is someone who is incapable of work as a
result of a Sickness that has lasted for more than 26
weeks, and who is likely to be permanently incapable of
work.


No. Such a person cannot receive NIS Benefit and still
work. However, if that happens, it would be against the -
ILaw, and NIS has the right to cease payment of any I
Further Benefit.

Do you have a question on N.I.S ? Then write/call
NIS MAIL BAG
C/O Dianne Lewis Baxter
Publicity and Public Relations Officer (ag)
National Insurance Scheme
IBrickdam and Winter Place '
SP.O. Box. 101135
SE-mail: pr_nis@solution2000.net
Tel: 227-3461.


action. they may well have enter-
tained some reasonable doubt as
to whether the appellant robbed
Chinma Baburam at all. Espe-
cially if at that moment they
were to reflect on the evidence
of Norvin Hagobeer (a witness
for the prosecution) a clerk at-
tached to the Mibicuri Rice Mill
and a watchman's assistant, to
whom Chinma made a report im-
mediately after the incident.
This witness said in his evidence,
under cross-examination:
"Chinma Baburam told me
she was going home and got a lift
on a tractor and a man had inter-
fered with her. That is
all......She did not appear dis-
tressed when she made her re-
port to me....Chinma did not say
anyone did violence to them. -
just someone interfered with
them."
After taking all the cir-
cumstances into consider-
ation, the Appellate Court al-
lowed the appeal and quashed
the conviction and sentence.


GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA/
CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK
BASIC NEEDS TRUST FUND FIFTH PROGRAMME

NOTICE OF RE-TENDER



The Government of Guyana (GOG), Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and
the Government of Canada through the Canadian International Development
Agency (CIDA) have recently signed an agreement to finance several projects
under the Basic Needs Trust Fund (BNTF) Fifth Programme. Construction of
the sub-projects is expected to be implemented in 2006/2007. The sub-projects
consist primarily of buildings and other civil works aimed at improving the social
and economic infrastructure.

The Basic Needs Trust Fund invites tenders for the following sub-project

Mabaruma District Hospital Expansion Reg. # 1
Barima/Waini

Tender Documents for this sub-project can be purchased from the Office of the
Basic Needs Trust Fund at 237 Camp Street, G\town in the form of a
MANAGER'S CHEQUE payable to the BASIC NEEDS TRUST FUND.
Tender Documents can be purchased for a non-refundable fee of G$10.000
per sub-project.

Sealed tenders accompanied by valid N.I.S. and Tax Compliance Certificates
(both of which should be in the name of individual or firm submitting the bid)
should be addressed to the Project Manager, and deposited in the Tender Box of
the Basic Needs Trust Fund at237 Camp Street, SIMAP's Building, Georgetown,
on or before 10am on Wednesday, June 07,2006.

Each tender must be placed in a separate envelope with the name of the
sub-project clearly marked on the top left hand corner. The envelope
should in no way identify the tenderer.

The Basic Needs Trust Fund does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any other
tender.

Tenderers or their representatives may be present at the opening of the tenders
at 10 among Wednesday, June 07,2006.

Project Manager
May 9, 2006


'Guyana Folk

Festival 2006'

revisits Carifesta 72
GUYANA Folk Festival 2006 will be celebrating the threads
that make up the Caribbean tapestry and the ties that bind
the peoples of the Caribbean, both at home and in the
Diaspora.
The Guyana Folk Festival, organised by the Guyana Cul-
tural Association, a New York based, non-profit organisation
for the past five years, has become an important end of sum-
mer holiday destination for the Guyanese and Caribbean
Diaspora.
This year's activities will be held under the theme 'Carifesta
72 Revisited: Celebrating Our Caribbean Culture'.
Past years themes have been 'Celebrating Guyanese mu-
sic', 'Celebrating the Guyanese word', and 'Celebrating
Guyanese dance'.
A festival of Guyanese films beginning June 30 to July 2,
at the Meyer Levin School Auditorium, Ralph Avenue, Brook-
lyn, New York, kicks of this year's celebrations. From July 29
to August 6, Caribbean performing arts will be celebrated at the
same venue.
The Association's Awards ceremony and come to 'My Kwe
Kwe' scheduled for August 30 and September I will be held at
venues to be announced.
The 2006 Folk Festival symposium will examine to be held
on September 2, examines Guyana's place in Caribbean creativ-
ity and will take place at the Borough of Manhattan Commu-
nity College, New York.
Prior to the New York symposium, a series of seminars on
the same theme will be organised in Guyana. Atlanta, Florida,
and the Cayman Islands.
The celebrations culminate with the a family fun
day on September 3, at the Meyer Levin School
Ground, Ralph Avenue (between Tilden & Beverly),
Brooklyn, New York.


I


'und 'av idronice Mavy,'WM06





Sunday Chronicle May 14, 2006


Guyanese Non-fiction



Literature before




Independence


by Petamber Persaud

THE first published book on
Guyana was an international
bestseller. Published in 1596,
it was translated into all ma-
jor European languages at
that time. The name of that
historic book is the DISCOV-
ERY OF THE LARGE, RICH
AND BEAUTIFUL
EMPYRE OF GUIANA. It was
written by the English court-


ier, adventurer, scholar and
poet, Walter Raleigh.
A momentous book indeed
for it ignited the imagination of
European nations, influencing
persons from all walks of life to
come in search of El Dorado, the
city of gold.
That led eventually to the
colonising of Guyana. The main
feature in that process was
sugar/slave labour/indentured
labour and attendant machina-


tions.
Many of the books follow-
ing in the wake of that first
publication were welcomed
with great interest and scholar-
ship. For Europe was at the
time caught up in an expansion
fervour that was enabled by the
invention and utilisation of
printing, gunpowder and the
magnet.
So much of the early litera-
ture of this country was writ-


interruptions

for network maintenance

MONDAY BERBICE Cumberland Village
MAY 15 No. 68 'i.'!ll.e to iioleson Creek

TUESDAY DEMERARA- Regent St. bet. High & Camp, Ave. of the epl;.;blic
MAY 16 America St., Part of Wellington & King St.
BERBICE Black Bush Polder

WEDNESDAY DEMERARA- EBD Grove, Dia.inowr1 Prospect, Mocha ,.jfi.i
MAY 10

THURSDAY DEMERARA- Area w ?riJ' by Main, Holmes, Water & Lamaha Sts.
APRIL 27


E ELECTRICITY BILLS


FOR FEBRURIA


2006 A\RE60W


ten by adventurers, naturalists,
missionaries and administrators.
A great portion of that writing
comprised mainly of journals,
travelogues, ethnologies and his-
tories a recording of the exotic
(places, peoples and events).
Some books did capture the true
spirit of this country.
The following examples are
cited to show a cross-section of
writers and their particular in-
terests. In 1695, Adrian Van


08:00 to 15:00 h
08:00 to 16:00 h


08:00 to 13:00 h
08:00 to 16:00 h

08:00 to 16:00 h


08:00 to 16:00 h


Ui 1i


Discoon cews are working in the following areas:
Kitty, CarnmpteIville, Bel Air Park, Gardens & Springs
t ewtowfn, prashad Nagar, Lamaha GardenS
Kingston, Cummingsburg, Stabroe & areas in dotow Georet
I Werk-en-Rust, Atbertown, QueenstOwn, Bourda, Lacytown
S WrD Industry to le Ressouvenir, Success toTriumph Village

ECD Mon Repos to Annandale Stratbpey to C UtooL scheme
WCD Blanlkenburg to Anna Catherila Edinburg to
O Zeerg to Tusfchen, Vertenoegen to Na amfry

EBD Eccles to Mocha Arcadia, HersteliiLg to Grove
'K"' V.'{ YOU FOR PAYING YOUR BILLS ON TIME!


V V. r .' ~ ~ .A~ .5>. -


Berkel who was an administra-
tor published his TRAVELS IN
SOUTH AMERICA, 1670 -
1689. Dr. George Pinckard who
lived in Demerara during the
years 1796 and 1797 while set-
ting up hospitals in Demerara
and Berbice, published LET-
TERS FROM GUIANA in
1816. Thomas Staunton St.
Clair, a military man, born in
Edinburgh, came to British
Guiana in 1805. In 1834, he
published, SOLDIER'S SO-
JOURN IN BRITISH
GUIANA 1806 1808, describ-
ing life mainly in Stabroek and
Brickdam. Moritz Richard
Schomburgh published his
TRAVELS IN BRITISH
GUIANA in 1847-1848 which
was translated and reprinted lo-
cally in 1922-1923. Henry
Kirke born in the UK, lived in
Guyana between 1872 and
1897 where he was a Magistrate
and Sheriff of Demerara, re-
corded those years in his book,
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS IN
BRITISH GUIANA.
Other interesting travel-
ogues include CANOE AND
CAMP LIFE IN BRITISH
GUIANA, 1876, by Charles
Barrington Brown, the first
European to witness the glo-
rious Kaieteur Falls and
THROUGH BRITISH
GUIANA TO THE SUMMIT
OF RORAIMA, 1920, by Mrs.
Marie P. R. Clementi, wife of
Cecil Clementi, Colonial
Secretary of British Guiana,
1913 1922. (Incidentally,
Mrs. Clementi is numbered
among the first women writ-
ers of our literature; the
other two authors with pub-
lications surfacing about that
same period were Gertrude
Shaw and Helen Tee-Van.)
Another body of writing
was the history books like
those of Henry Dalton (THE
HISTORY OF BRITISH
GUIANA, 1855), James
Rodway (HISTORY of BRIT-
ISH GUIANA, 1894) and A. R.
F. Webber (A CENTENARY
HISTORY AND HANDBOOK
OF BRITISH GUIANA, 1931).
Other types of histories
were studies of a particular
people, time or place like
Everard Im-Thurn (AMONG
THE INDIANS OF GUIANA.
1883), Cecil Clementi (THE
CHINESE IN BRITISH
GUIANA, 1915). and Peter
Ruhomon (A CENTENARY
HISTORY OF THE EAST IN-
DIANS OF BRITISHI
GUIANA, 1947).
The colorful and entertain-
ing myths, legends and folklore
of this land attracted the atten-
tion of numerous writers. In
1880, Rev. William Henry Brett
published LEGENDS AND
MYTHS OF THE ABORIGI-
NAL INDIANS IN BRITISH
GUIANA which was a metrical
retelling of legends of the indig-
enous peoples. In 1881,
Michael McTurk published the
highly entertaining. ESSAYS
AND FABLES IN VERSE, un-
der the nom de plume. Quo\\.
In 1915, Walter Roth published
his AN INQUIRY INTO TIHE
ANIMISM AND FOLKLORE
OF THE GUIANA INI)IANS.


LITERARY


Credit must be given to the
newspapers of the period
namely the Chronicle, the
Graphic and the Argosy that fa-
cilitated the publication of
many of the above titles. The
journal, TIMEHRI, which was
the official organ of the Royal
Agricultural and Commercial
Society, was another outlet for
studies on various aspects of
life in Guyana.
And there also some de-
lightful books on the fauna of
the country including
THREE SINGLES TO AD-
VENTURE (1954) by George
Durrell and ZOO QUEST
TO GUYANA (1956) by David
Attenborough.
Not all the books of that
period were written by Europe-
ans; many Guyanese got into
the act as early as the late nine-
teenth century. Joseph
Alexander Van Sertima pub-
lished 'AMONG THE COM-
MON PEOPLE OF BRITISH
GUIANA, 1895, 'SCENES
AND SKETCHES OF
DEMERARA LIFE, 1899, and
'THE CREOLE TONGUE OF
BRITISH GUIANA, 1905.
James Graham Cruickshank in
1905, published NEGRO
HUMOUR (being sketches in
the market, on the road, and at
my back door), and in 1916,
BLACK CHAT (being notes on
Negro Dialect in British
Guiana), both books printed by
the Argosy Company. In 1894,
Joseph Ruhomon published his
groundbreaking lecture, 'India;
the Progress of her People at
Home and Abroad and How
those in British Guiana may
Improve themselves'. Ayubc
Mohamed Edun published the
first book-length by an East In-
dian in Guyana, LONDON'S
HEART PROBE AND
BRITAIN'S DESTINY, just af-
ter his visit to Britain in 1928.
In 1929, N. E. Cameron pub-
lished his magnum opus.
THE EVOLUTION OF THE
NEGRO. In 1937, Edgar
Mitillholzer sell-published
('CROLE fCHIPS which he
hawked from door lo door in
New Amsterdam and other
parts of Guyana. Peter
Ruhomon published CENTE-
NARY HISTORY OF THE
EAST INDIANS IN BRITISH
GUIANA in 1947.
Of course, there are excep-
tions to some of the above cat-
egories of writing because many
books straddle more than one
grouping.
The scholarship offered
by those books is fascinating
and invaluable. However, it's
a pity that many of those
books are rare and mostly
out of print. Perhaps, it's
time for another 'Guyana
Edition', reprinting some of
those books.


Page VIII


U --


__


10001010"


~;fla


; 1, ?! ", &.lF~it~J~ ~lp$~wF irebY


IfFr.7,W A


m


m





Sunday Chronicle May 14, 2006


Vintage US cars keep chugging



in Cuba but face threat


By Nelson Acosta
HAVANA (Reuters) "All
aboard for Capitolio, via
Linea!" cries a jitney cab
driver looking to fill his shiny
black 1947 Chevrolet
Fleetmaster.
Eight passengers pack
into the car fitted with an
extra row of seats, arms


hanging out of open
windows. The motor roars to
life, and the vehicle chugs off
in a cloud of black fumes.
In any other country the
Fleetmaster would be on show
in a museum or in a vintage car
collection. But in communist
Cuba, more than 60,000
American cars made in the
1940s and 1950s are still on the


roads in full use.
Foreign visitors feel they
have stepped into a time warp
at the sight of tail-finned
convertibles, deluxe Cadillacs
and Oldsmobiles, De Soto
limousines, powerful sporty
Buicks, Mercurys, Plymouths
and Chevrolet sedans and
trucks.
Since the collapse of the


A 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air (L) used as a taxi is parked next to other vintage cars near Havana's
train station, May 8. 2006. (Claudia Daut/Reuters)


Soviet Union plunged Cuba into
deep economic crisis in 1991,
the old Americans cars have
been pressed into service as
jitney cabs to fill the void left
by a badly deficient public
transport system.
But the vehicles that have
survived pot-holed streets and
the lack of spare parts due to a
four-decade-old U.S. trade
embargo on Cuba now face a
new threat.
Cuban President Fidel
Castro has vowed to run the
private taxis out of business for
charging exorbitant fares and


stealing fuel and car parts from
the state.
"No one knows how many
of these jalopies are going
around with diesel motors.
Where did they come from?
They charge five or six times
more than the new buses," the
Cuban leader complained in a
May Day speech at Havana's
Revolution Square.
Castro announced plans in
February to buy 8,000 Chinese
buses and trucks, a $1 billion
investment to modernise the
island's transport system.
New air-conditioned


Yutong buses have begun
arriving and are being used
initially for tourist tours and
inter-city bus services.
MECHANICAL WIZARDRY
The privately-owned
American cars have been the
backbone of Cuba's public
transport system for over
decade.
Ford and Chevrolet trucks
from the 1950s provide services
between Cuban towns, with
modified cabins that are packed
with passengers who often
stand for long distances.
Restrictions on private
property introduced alter
Castro came to power in a 1959
revolution make it hard for
Cubans to buy cars.
Pre-revolutionary
vehicles can be bought and

Please turn to page XV


Your One Stop Shop foriFat' Paclk.

l.Laminates (Arborite)8' x 4'- White $ 1,850.00 The Name You can Trust
2.Laminates (Arborite) 8' x 4'-Coloured $ 2,250.00
3.Decorative ply 8ft x 4ft (thick quality) $ 3,260.00 !
4,Contact cement (glue) in one pint tin $ 850.00
5.Perspex $13,815.00 ;


M D F Boards ,. .-/4". .from


f; Puttyv 51??Q c,..from


$ 4.500.00 :i-.. ;,
$ 1,025.00 __


-Get Better Pries,

"Best Quality from

your--....-


I'Js(Cr2 dJ'TI


t7


.mle is ions Sets
" m $ ;;3.600.C.,


Water dispensers
from S ;. 1 25.00


Stereo Systems '
from S 15.5,55.0'


Sioves from


Sons from
? 3 06k .00


rMicrowaves from
S 5.525.00








: Blow Drvers
from s$ .44i'..0
TH j3.,-OI


,.Eidges from
;3 5.900.00


DVD Playe.a
from SI .800.00


Page IX


r:


~!~ ---~

I. I"' r-~.5


^oII


~~PIPB~P ~~84`F8):


,gt~.
''''
L---
I
~-. t
--






Guyana Chron


Horse and carriage dream turn


By Stacey (Bess) Russell

IT WAS 1985 in a Polish city
at twilight...
The delicate clip clop of
hooves against a brick road
stimulated his attention towards
a distinctive wedding procession.
Nine stagecoaches transported
the bridal party.
"There was no wedding
march. Each stagecoach was
draped with a different colour ...
The large horses strutted as
these nine stagecoaches went
along the road. It looked like..."
For Guyanese Calvin Hector
the scene was unprecedented.
Its hypnotic grandeur and el-


egance stole his heart and im-
bued his mind with a timeless 'i-
sion to invigorate the stage-
coach heritage in his homeland.
He sauntered off to an an-
tique shop and bought a minia-
ture stagecoach keepsake in gold.
He has it to this day. And he
told himself that his wedding
would feature a horse-drawn car-
riage.
Recently, the Sunday
Chronicle visited Mr. Hector at


his Tucville, deorgetown work
base to discuss his profession
and his horse-drawn carriages
project.
Mr. Hector is a profes-
sional plant engineer, who has
successfully transitioned to
mounting levels of excellence
in his career. In 1985, he was
on a three-month scholarship
in Poland attending the Pol-
ish Foundry Institute for in-
plant training in foundry tech-


nology. The Polish stagecoach
wedding convoy triggered
within him a flow of inge-
niousness that has driven him
into historical and technical
research, model designing
and recycling technology.
His exploration yielded the
construction of his first carriage
which he did in partnership with
a colleague for Easter 2002. Un
fortunately, a disagreement be-
tween Mr. Hector and his part-


-d re~t&
.As% HGL w





fP- k i
l


4t XW( OM rn pt ^ u it, Rf
tt is W WU, j ust tmt X *fi fQ^t Q s
GSeltuM phQot notmb w 3W,4mo ..0W
fQlQw*dt bM a spaw Ww^ ywr sift


Your rnwwic l Wifl rocetv the agw nt y"u
seat plus 4Hhfy kwbtasp Wi MsI Q4
r will include o yww nspe_. _I







I, 8 !

GlAh~IM


* -; .



From G2 i


ner robbed him of the cherished
dream of driving in a carriage for
his 2002 July wedding.
However, Hector, the sec-
ond child of a self-employed
gold smith, who owned J.C.
Hector and Sons Jewellery Es-
tablishment, remained unfazed.


EARLY
BEGINNINGS
He confessed that as a
youngster he was always ex-
ploring with technological and
engineering stuff, investigating
new materials and methods of
assembling things. One of his
Teachers, Ms. Hall, who taught
him at Foundation AME
School (Queenstown Commu-
nity High School), was a source
of great inspiration in his ex-
ploratory beginnings.
Architecture was Mr.
Hector's immediate inclina-
tion upon leaving school.
But when he went to enroll
at the Government Technical
Institute (GTI), he realized
that architecture was not in-
cluded in the curriculum.
Therefore, he opted for car-
pentry and joinery.
An advertisement for a
pattern-maker with Bookers
Limited, which was published
after his first year at GTI, was
the bait that captured and chan-
nelled his interest into pursu-
ing that specialist skill. He ex-
plained that pattern-making en-
tails the creation of diverse
wood mouldings that can be re-
produced in iron, brass, alu-
minium or other metals.
Prior to the required in-
terview and examination for
the selection as the pattern-
maker apprentice, Hector, 16
years old at the time, visited
the foundry where the ap-
prentice would work. He im-
pressed the interviewing
panel, sailed through the test
and qualified for a five-year
apprenticeship programme
with Bookers. The scheme
also entitled him to a schol-
arship to complete studies at
GTI, which led him to divert
from carpentry and joinery to
fitting and machining. Mean-
while, he did stints in all the
departments of Booker's
Demerara Foundry carpen-
try, drawing and planning,
moulding and machining.
Hector resigned as an ap-
prentice to take up a technician
post in the fitting and machin-
ing shop at GTI. Moving from
technician to Lecturer One to
Lecturer Two, he simultaneously
pursued the Technician One,
Two and Three programmes to-
wards the Full Technology Cer-
tificate in Plant Engineering.
which'he completed in England
through a fellowship from the
Government of Guyana.
From 1977 to 1979, Hector
was in England. On his return he
resumed as Lecturer Two Gen-
eral at GTI. At that time, he was
also acting head of the Mechani-


cal Departmenfi and acting
Deputy Principal.\In 1984, he
left GTI and returned to the
foundry where he had done his
apprenticeship in pattern-making
- as manager. The company was
then Guyana National Engineer-
ing Corporation and is now
called Guyana National Indus-
trial Company.

ENGINEERING
WISDOM
It was as if he was learning


/'



I-


and practising engineering
techniques all his life for what
that 1985 Poland stagecoach
wedding party aroused in him.
Visits to numerous engineering
exhibitions were worthwhile. He
was well equipped with the
knowledge and understanding for
realising his own dream of seeing
carriages on the streets of
Guyana.
He knew for a long time that
"development is not for today,"
and that "the trash of the rich is
the cash for the poor."
Hector is certainly not poor
in engineering wisdom.
During his years as service
manager at Guyana Tractor and
Equipment Company and tenure
at Dynamic Engineering and
General Engineering of Guyana
and into the era of his own
consultancy Plant Mainte-
nance and Equipment Systems
Incorporated Hector was do-
ing the research for the carriage
revival.
He told the Sunday
Chronicle that the ca:riage was


" : ,


I
I

I
I
-
l


,






icle MAY 14, 2006


ng






IM
the primary means
station in the Victoria
people used them to
tween towns. He no
elites owned private
Guyana, the elite
prised mainly estate
slave owners.
SDistinguishing
types of horse-drawn
Hector says that sta
are the ones used mai
eral transportation
carry up to six person
used for leisure ride


reality

can culture and African in ori-
gin," he declared.
Mr. Hector has an African
Heritage of his own. He is.a
descendant of Damon, an edu-
cated African slave who led a
slave rebellion in the county
of transpor- of Dednirara, Guyana in 1823.
n age when A status of Damon was cast in
rd travl he his memory and Mr. Hector
tea that the 'made a professional input to
coaches. In that venture. The statue stands
class com- on the Essequibo Coast.


owners anuu

between
n carriages,
igecoaches
nly for gen-
i; chariots
ons and are
s; and bug-


gies are usually private carriages
that accommodate two persons.
It is his belief that at least
Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago
and Barbados should have
maintained the stagecoach as
part of their historical heri-
tage.
Responding to probing about
the apparent European origin of
the stagecoach, which, if em-
braced to this day could serve as
a distasteful reminder of slavery
and colonial dominance in the
Caribbean, Mr. Hector revealed
that research indicates that the
stagecoach is an African inven-
tion.
"These are not all European
customs, but African customs,
which were utilised by African
kings and queens. This is Afri-


CARRIAGE
CONSTRUCTION
He uses his own inventions,
utilising recycling technology,
for the construction of the car-
riages. Old bed frames, refrigera-
tor parts, stove parts, motor car
parts and plywood are the
"trash of the rich" that he ex-
ploits to make the carriages,
each worth two to three million
Guyana dollars.
His skill in pattern-mak-
ing has been advantageously
fused with wheel-wrights
technology to successfully
create the majestic carriage
wheels. While a mini
foundry was set up for all
smelting, moulding, welding
and other foundry works.
'Since 2002, Hector has
made a few carriages for per-
sons: one was in the design of
Santa's sleigh. He is planning an
extravagant fourth wedding an-
niversary celebration in July
when he would be able to take
his wife on the long-desired
stagecoach parade.
He is currently working
on six designs to retain for a
business enterprise that
would involve their rental for
special events and private
hire. The Parisian Phaeton,
Sue Ann, Mini Skirt, Ameri-
can Carriage, Canoe Land
and Cinderella Pumpkin
Coach are all to be ready by
August 1, 2006 for an Eman-
cipation Day procession in
the National Park,
Georgetown.
Horses are being brought
from Guyana's Rupununi to be
trained by an expert of the
Guyana Police Force Mounted
Branch for their special carriage-
carrying role.
At least three carriages are to
be stationed at major hotels in
Georgetown to whip up interest
in the stagecoach experience. The
other counties Berbice and
Essequibo will later be targeted.
Hector says that the Cinderella
Pumpkin Coach is likely to be
special to the Cinderella county,
Essequibo, which he plans to in-
troduce by surprise for a wed-
ding.
"They can ride in it past
midnight," he said.
The carriage enterprise
will be conducted from 592
Tucville, Georgetown and
Hector can be contact on 592-
227-1068.


rl-


......i rl i r
-J I


us`
' 54- ;1" "


- a


By Raschid Osman

IT WAS Arrival Day 2006.
And at Kirkpatrick's
Catering establishment on
Jamoon Drive, the telling of
ancient Chinese stories was
underway.
Linda Fang was the story-
teller.


The select audience sat
beneath rafters from which gold
paper dragons and crimson
Chinese lanterns depended, and
in a chandelier, a brown dove had
built a nest, and Kirkpatrick's
avian tenant kept flying in and
out of its home as the story-
telling unfolded below.
Francis. Farrier introduced


the programme, and for openers
he performed his story of how
the once handsome baboon
became ugly, a bravura
performance, with all the stops
pulled out.
Then Linda Fang moved into
her story-telling.
It was delightful.
There were stories of the


Ch'i-lin Purse and how vinegar
became symptomatic of
jealousy, and a peculiar Chinese
version of the little boy who
cried 'Wolf!'
Her delivery was carefully
modulated, folksy and simple
and redolent of the Golden Rule.
They told of greed and
compassion, of jealousy and
gratitude, little gems sparkling
with humour.
In the pref-.ce to her book
The Ch'i-lin Purse, a collection
of Ancient Chinese Stories, Fang:
writes of her mother telling her'
stories as a child growing up in:
Shanghai.
"She was such a.onderful.
storyteller that all the'characters.:.
-heroes, villains, emperors, high
officials, beautiful niaidens, and:
handsome young ment, as well as
simple, honest folk--came to
life," she writes.
Fang's stories are taken from
her favourite Chinese novels and
Chinese opera.
She speaks of the Chinese
opera which started in the T'ang
Dynasty (618-907) and flourised
in the Yuan Dynasty. The Peking
Opera is 200 years old.
Fang takes her
storytelling performances to
audiences al over the world,
a cultural pilgrimage she
takes very seriously.
Her purpose is twofold: to
tell others about things Chinese
and to try to save the art of.
storytelling from the oblivion for
which it is headed.
Storytelling was important
to families and communities ages
ago, up until the advent of the
wireless and the gramophone
and all the amazing variations of
this technology that followed:
vinyl recordings and the wireless
and audio cassettes and compact
discs and television.
The stories handed down
traditions and kept alive oral
histories and entertained with its
sheer simplicity
The audience at the
Kirkpatrick happening was most
appreciative of the evening's
entertainment.
They gathered in groups at
performance end, reluctant to
leave after what they regarded as
time spent in an oasis in the
desert they must return to.
"It was so lovely," oie
woman gushed," so differ it
from the rauco: s
entertainment that is thrust
on us nowadays."
The audience was al: o
treated to tasty Chine e
finger-foods, and all the wh ie
the brown dove kept wingi g
to and from its abode nestii, g
in the chandelier above.


exI


Now at the Regional level



Enhancing social cohesion and deepening participatory democracy through dialogue


Sthe desert







Page XII Sul~~y. Qhojle May i~~4 2006


New show asks how do you


find a singer like Maria?


By Paul Majendie

LONDON (Reuters) Julie
Andrews wannabes queued
on Friday to audition for a
reality TV show with a new
twist the winner gets the
lead role in a new Andrew
Lloyd Webber stage produc-
tion of 'The Sound of Music'.
The hopefuls came in all
shapes. sizes and ages, limber-
ing up with impromptu cho-
ruses of "Edelweiss' before try-
ing to convince the judges they
would make the perfect young
nun.
A BBC spokeswoman for
the 'How Do I Solve A Prob-
lem Like Maria?' show said


more than 1,000 hopefuls had
applied for the London week-
end of auditions at the
Wembley conference center.
They will be gradually
whittled down to 10 finalists
with television viewers voting
for who should star in the Lon-
don West End production due
to open at the end of the year.
Lloyd Webber, composer of
'Cats' and 'Phantom of the Opera',
has pledged not to grill would-be
stars in the style of Simon Cowell.
the acerbic judge on the 'Pop Idol'
talent shows popular on both sides
of the Atlantic.
"It won't be everyone tak-
ing Simon Cowell pot-shots at
artists." he has promised.


Lloyd Webber has said that,
ideally, he wants a 20-year-old
unknown actress to play the
part made famous by Julie
Andrews in the classic film
about a nun sent to look after
the seven Von Trapp children in
Austria.
The name of Hollywood
star Scarlett Johansson had
originally been mooted as a pos-
sible choice for the role.
At Friday's auditions, some
ever optimistic contestants were
convinced that age was no barrier.
Clutching her Sound of
Music lyrics. 35-year-old
Rachel Cross said: "I think 1
could just push it at my age but
I know my chances are slim."


.: NATIONALAIDS PROGRAMME
.SECRETARIAT
| -' -{ "- ,

MINISTRY OF HEALTH





The National AIDS Programme Secretariat/Global Fund will be sponsoring an Art
Competition Contest to promote the fight in combating HIV/A!DS and to raise
awareness on the need of greater involvement of children in the primary school
settings. The Competition is opened to the following category:

Age range: 6 to 12 years old in all regions of Guyana

TOPIC

Living in a world with AIDS

RULES OF THE COMPETITION

Use crayons, markers, paint, coloured pencil, collage or other materials. Submit
entries on paper or cardboard within the following size limits:

No largerthan45 x 60cm (18"x24")
No smallerthan 21 x 28 cm (8%" x 11'")

The art works should be forwarded in sealed envelope and include a separate
sheet of paper with the following details and information:
Parental approval of the child's participation.
The child's age, name and address.
School attending
The technique employed (oil, crayons. water-colors, etc.).
Name and a brief explanation of the art work.
Measurements of work
Prizes will be awarded to winners and there will be consolation prizes
for special efforts.


The paintings must be sent to:
Art Competition
National AIDS Programme Secretariat
Hadfield Street& College Road
Georgetown
Entries Close on June 10, 2006 before 15:00 hrs (3 pm)


But she warned: "If the judges
are nasty, there could be tears."
Another pushing the age bar-
rier for the part was 32-year-old
American Amy Royle who hasjust
introduced her five-year-old son to
the film. "Hopefully the maternal
side will count in my favor at the
audition."
At 20, Alison Langer fits
the age bracket that Lloyd
Webber is considering.
"It is something my mum al-
ways wanted to do and so do 1. I
was always singing "The Hills Are
Alive' when I was tiny."
Rachel Cross, 30, hopes
show business history will re-
peat itself. "This is such a
great opportunity. That is
why I got up at two o'clock in
the morning to be first in the
queue. And I am from Walton-
on-Thames which is where
Julie Andrews came from
originally."


i .r i ic




O-~mpa


Ai,




*ftWI't


to carr out a capacity sel 'm :" i















The Leg'al and Reou:atory RarnaworI .
,h a.. ap-'a" P ..,- ,-s -Ia"k . -. .' "; '








h r .r. e .. ...To- Oi U s o






o.Tenm a fCrea.s s for o -





,C SA Proje, MrAar m n located at thw r
Prote '.o 4. -imarles i oenuet Sd pdi -
*j ,-.t *.. - . '- .







or t, ,, 'f li I fl












So"" m t e .t e"t rC. .'..ii. .s. ., -
'dc-- u Lut the 'e tc e a, e d -- .,rt .feor ;. '? ..' i at '

Sric d r ., .. Stabr-OE' ,
3heil O te...1 P r't : i s e... ..i...a A I, :

-rive i r p. .-. S-o-e t C S ro s- ;
SS .






-. O '; a s i '- .. /. . "' ".* "' "

-..-a~ld 'cun'i!Culu .vitae .to the lesiderit.Rfel :er'r-fe ]'. ., ., ",
'" *B rickciari 8 .t :,i? ,r,:?fir, ,: p -5c& r -! ve

i' .. ... ... : "." '.'i


icldividuals who .have responded T t*he previous adcvertis-mert ais. S
part of a team ace ai'te invited toind,;ate interest by way of a letter.,

Deadline for applications is Tuesday. 16 May, 2006 at 14.00 hrs.

Only short-listed candidates will be contacted.


- --~--~~ ~-----~~~


1~1


Page XH


s


\s


Suday, ChtronQle:May 14, 2006









I THE DELEGATION OF THE EUROPEAN
COMMISSION IN GUYANA
HAS A VACANCY FOR A




JOB DESCRIPTION:
The incumbent will carry out secretarial tasks which will include administrative functions
and accounting.

ROFILE: Working for a Diplomatic Mission, confidentiality is a must. We are
therefore looking for a trustworthy, experienced, dedicated and hardworking person with a
sense ofinitiative. TOs spirit is essential

F.Pll secondaryy Education. Secreari ctiertificates. Minimum 3 years experience in a
relevyit fieMld. o~aer literate (Wmidows; Word; .Exoel;:Access: Internet; E-mail).
Knowlede of Frnch will be an Advantage. Ability to work in an international team
essential.
CANDIDATURES: Candidates corresponding to the abovementioned profiles and
experience are invited to submit under confidential cover, by hand or post, their
Curriculum Vitae with employers' references, photograph and handwritten letter of
interest to the following address:
Deleatonm ofthe EurepfawnCeis wv
for heai* kei Mikbe, i..ad
nls ,.,. '.. -euilflie' ..,
or PO. Bax "47, Gemgew .
DEADLINEFOR SUBMISSION DOCUMENTS: 29May 2006
Onlyshorhtistedapplcants wall be cowaced.



GLOBAL FUND/GUYANA HIV/AIDS PROJECT
GRANT # GYA-304-G01-H
MINISTRY OF HEALTH
HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT UNIT



Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the following
vacancy existing at the Health Sector Development Unit, Ministry of
Health:
NUTRITIONIST / FOOD BANK MANAGER
Duties and Responsibilities:
The Nutritionist / Food Bank Manager will be responsible for soliciting
support for the food bank, the management and supervision of the
food bank, development of a data base for the food bank and provide
reports.
Qualifications and Experience:

Diploma in Social Work, Health Education or any other
relevant area from a recognized university.
*. Qualification in Nutrition from a recognized institution.
At least 2 years experience in a management / supervisory
level.
Experience in HIV/AIDS.
SGood organizing ability.
Computer Literate.
SGood lobbying skills.

Detailed Terms of Reference for this position can be obtained from,
and applications addressed to:

Health Sector Development Unit
Project Management Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Compound
East Street, Georgetown, Guyana
Tel. No.: 226-6222, 226-2425
Fax: No.: 225-6559
Email: mohqogq(networksgy.com

Deadline for submission of applications is Friday June 2, 2006 at
15:30 hrs.
Only short listed applications will be acknowledged.


il i.- MkI i 1i.ae A P P I 1 l 1


THE MINISTRY UOF HEALTH

HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA
INTERAMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK
LOAN # 1548/SF-GY



PRE-BID SITE MEETING LINDEN
HOSPITAL COMPLEX
Prospective bidders who have uplifted Tender Documents and those firms which
intend to bid for the construction of the new Linden Hospital Complex are hereby
notified that, the contracting agency (The Ministry of Health) will be conducting a pre-
bid site meeting on Wednesday May 24,2006.

Interested parties arerequired to be present atthe compound of the existing inden
Hospital Complex, Riverside Drive Watooka inden at 10:00hrs.Atourofthe site will
be conducted by the Civil Works Manager. Firms will also be given the opportunity to
clarify all issues pertaining to the bid. Clarifications made at this meeting will be
shared with all prospective bidders.

Firms which have already uplifted Bid Documents are encouraged to visit the site at
any time, with permissionfrom;

The Civil Works Manager
Health Sector DevelopmentUntit
Georgetown Public Hospital Compound :;
East Street, Georgetown.-
Guyana.
Tel No. 226-6222/226-2425
Fax 225-6559




GNCB is requesting the under-mentioned persons to kindly make contact
with its Office at 77 Croal Street & Winter Place, Stabroek, Georgetown or
at telephone numbers 226-7509 or 225-4346 in relation to judgements
awarded by the High Court against them and in favour of GNCB.


NAME
HANSRAJ DURGA
HARDAT SINGH


HEMWANT SINGH
SOROJINE SINGH &
SAROJINI
ABDOOL KASIM


ROSEMARIE SURUJMOHAN
GURSTON ROLLINS
GAITRIE KHAIRE

MORGAN & CICELY FRASER

SASENARINE SEEGOBIN
& BASMATTIE SEEGOBIN
KUNJI SINGH
ROBERT LAWRIE

GODFEY FRASER
PARSARAM BADAL

ROBERT CLAY
KOWSAL GOORDEEN &
DEONARINE
JOHN BROTHERSON
FRANK & LYNDON CLARKE


LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
Koerite Creek. Mahaicony, East Coast Demerara
176 Mibikuri. South Black Bush Polder
Corent.ne. Berbice

111 Rose Hall Town, Corent1ne,
Berbice

148 Rahaman Street, No. 78 Village
Corentyne, Berbice

No. 49 Village, Corentvne, Berbice
No. 51 Village, Corentvne, Berbice
11 Grant 1802, Crabwood Creek, Corentyne

57 Section B. No. 22 Bel Air. West Coast
Berbice
5 Anna Regina, Essequibo Coast

Ruby Back Dam, East Bank Essequibo
Better Hope/141 Devonshire Castle.
Esscquibo
Reliance, Essequibo Coast
61 Affiance. Essequibo Coast

Dartmouth. Essequibo Coast
Zorg. Essequibo/Ne\v Road Essequibo Coast

Parika Facadc. East Bank Essequibo
Moruca Mouth. North West District


sunday: < ronicle;May '4,200, .:.. ...... ................... ,...... ....








Pag D udyCrnceMy1,20


FOR SALE

Engines 3408 B Caterpillar. 425 HP --
Cummins 855 250 HP, Perkins 63544, .. ;
Detroit Diesel 8V92 Marine 350 HP,
Honda Pressure Washer 2500 PSI. : ~.A~


We import all
heavy-duty equipment such
as Log Skidders, Wheel
Loaders. Haulers and for all
your heavy-duty diesel
engines, overhauling.


Call us first on
623-1003, 218-3899, 218-1469


ATTENTION BERBICIANS
I a 0 K I"IT.,c" :

Our representative Mrs. Soraya Arjune will be
interviewing applicants who wish to migrate to
Canada legally.
Please contact her at Mr. Rajkumar's Law Office at
4-8 St. Ann Street, New Amsterdam, between the
hours of 10 am and 4 pm on Thursday, May 18,
2006.
For appointment call:
Balwant Persaud & Associates
Certified Canadian Immigration Consultants
58 Upper Robb & Oronoque Sts., Bourda
Tel: 225-1540.622-8308
www canadainmmigrat[iobpa.con o4


World Bank HIVIAIDS Prevention & Control Project
GRANT# H-079-GUA
MINISTRY OF HEALTH
HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT UNIT



1. The Co-operative Republic of Guyana has received financing from the World Bank towards
the fight against HIV/AIDS. It is intended that part of the proceeds of this financing will be
applied to eligible payments under the contract for the supply of Goods and Services.

2. The Government of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana now invites sealed bids from
eligible suppliers for the supply of:

(3) Three Enclosed Vehicles with Winch

3. Interested Bidders may obtain further information from and purchase a set of bidding
document by written communication addressed to:

Executive Director
Attention Procurement Officer: Prakash Sookdeo
Health Sector Development Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Cooperation Compound
East Street
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel. No.: 226-2425, 226-6222 / Fax: 225-6559
mohgoh@networksgy.coml psookdeo@hiv.hqov.gy

The documents will be available from May 30, 2006 and on payment of a non reimbursable amount
of G$15,000 (fifteen thousand Guyana dollars) via Company Cheque made out in the name of the
Health Sector Development Unit.

4. Bids must be deposited in the Tender Box, National Board of Procurement and Tender
Administration, Ministry of Finance, Main and Urquhart Streets, Georgetown, Guyana, no
later than 9 am on Tuesday, June 13, 2006. The bids must be addressed to the Chairman,
National Procurement and Tender Administration Board and marked on the top right-hand
corner of the envelope with the name of the programme, the goods supplied, including the
words 'do not open before Tuesday, June13, 2006.

The purchaser is not responsible for bids not received thereof on or before the time specified for the
reception of bids. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

5. Bids from local suppliers must be accompanied by valid Compliance Certificates from the
Inland Revenue Department (IRD) and the National Insurance Scheme (NIS), Guyana.

6. Bids must be accompanied by a Bid Security of 2% of the bid price made out in the name of
the Ministry of Health and in Guyana dollars.

7. Bids will be opened at a public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders' or their
representative who choose to attend, at 09:00 hours or shortly thereafter, on Tuesday, June
13, 2006 at the National Procurement and Tender Administration Board, Ministry of
Finance, Main and Urquhart Streets, Georgetown, Guyana.

Executive Director
Attention Procurement Officer: Prakash Sookdeo
Health Sector Development Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Cooperation Compound
East Street
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel. No.: 226-2425, 226-6222 / Fax: 225-6559
mohgoh@networksgy.com


VACANCY
Customs/ Acccounts Clerk
3 years relevant experience.
Must be Computer literate
Qualifications: 5 subjects CXC
including Mathematics,
English & Accounts.
16 Mud Lot Kin ston G/town





STOP THE SPREAD OF HIV:
RESPECT YOURSELF, PROTECT YOURSELF
TUNE IN TO NCN CHANNEL 11 FOR THE LAUNCHING OF

"LIVING IN A WORLD WITH AIDS"
TELEVISION DOCUMENTARIES
Tune in every night beginning from:
May 15 at 8 pm to 9pm HIV/AIDS epidemic in Guyana
May 16 at8pmto9pm- Everything you need to know
about condoms
May 17 at 8pm to 9pm Getting tested for HIV
May18 at8pmto9pm- Treatment and Care for HIV
positive persons
May 19 at 8 pm to 9 pm Stigma and Discrimination
For an in-depth look at the fight against the spread of HIV
in Guyana.
REAL PEOPLE, REAL STORIES
AIDS is not somebody's problem, it's everybody's
business!
Funded by:
The Ministry of Health
With support from The Global Fund


NATIONAL BANK
OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE LIMITED


EXECUTION SALE
Properties for Execution Sale at the
instance of the Registrar of the Supreme
Court, to be held on May 16, 2006 at the
State Warehouse, Kingston at 13:00 hrs on
behalf of National Bank of Industry &
Commerce Limited.


* A tract of land situated on the left bank of the
Bonasika Creek, in the county of Essequibo,
commencing at a paal about 185 rods above
Two Mouth Creek, containing 25 Rhyland acres.
(Agricultural)
* Lot 75 Triumph, East Coast Demerara. (Residential)

* Lot 63 Section 'A' Triumph, East Coast Demerara.
(Residential)
One (1) wooden two storey building situated at lot 55
Mibicuri Sout Black Bush Polder, Corentyne,
Berbice. (Res lential)
House Lot # 112 Johanna North Section of Black
Bush Polder, Berbice.(Residential)
House Lot or homestead Lot # 239 Mibicuri North
of Black Bush Polder. (Residential/Agricultural)
East halr of the West Half of Lot # 14, Section 'A' and
North half of the South half of Lot # 27 Section 'B'
Dun Robin, 'ast Coast Seabice. (Agricultural]

For f rch ar information kindly call
T.i: .26Fi-4. 1/5 Ext. 267


Sunday Chronicle May 14, 2006


Page D


pr.~F;'pjr
'






SudyChoil Ma 14 06PaeX


THE PASSAGE

In many cases, the villagers made the avalanche
problem worse. Before settlement, dense forests
covered many of the steep slopes above the
valleys. The forests inhibited large avalanches,
since catastrophic avalanches do not originate in a
heavy forest, and avalanches travelling into such a
forest will often slow as the snow encounters the
trees. A forest tends to diminish the speed of the
snow and break up the avalanche. However, the
villagers have cut down the forest for building and
heating purposes. In many areas the trees never
grew back, leaving the slopes bare and smooth a
perfect track for the run of a snow avalanche. A
prime example of deforestation is in the valley of
Ursental in Central Switzerland. Above the town of
Andermatt, there remains just a wedge of trees,
while the remainder of the steep slope is bare. Up
valley, near the Furka Pass, is the town of
Hospental, which also maintains its own protective
wedge of trees. Asthe story is told, the inhabitants
of the valley systematically cut down the forests that
covered the steep slopes on both sides. Almost
too late they realized their mistake: they saw that
on the bare, treeless slopes, huge avalanches
began descending to the valley floor, making travel
between towns extremely dangerous. All tree-
cutting stopped and the wedges of trees above the
towns were preserved. Reforestation, the
systematic planting of trees, continues today in the
Ursental, to thicken the wedges that are periodically
thinned by avalanches.

Betsy Armstrong & Knox Williams, The
Avalanche Book

Composition Writing
Reminder:
A topic sentence can be written as a statement, or
a question, or a command, or an exclamation. It
can be short or long (some authorities say between
3-13 words) in contrast with those coming before
or after it.

Try This
In each of the following paragraphs, the topic
sentence comes first. Read each of them, and then
write down the type (statement, question,
command, or exclamation), and the length (short,
average, or long) of each topic sentence.

Here they come!

1. Card sending is extinct. At our school nobody
turns out anymore to post cards or small gifts and
bring cheer to those who live in. So there are no
cards or gifts for anyone to share. With their wild
cheers and shrill pleasantries the school postmen
have gone the way of Christmas house-to-house
well-wishers, and good Samaritans.

2. Why talk-back? While most teenagers talk back
whenever chided, many soon discover that there
are countless benefits that they lose. They do not
get to know about people: how they think, how they
exert patience with youths in various situations, how
they behave at different ages,...

3. Always watch your performance. The aim in
debating is to get past the opposition that is, the
opposition team that is covering you. If you can do


this, you have a good chance to score. On the other
hand, if your opposing team gets past you, it may
score high points before you know what happened.
4. No one in the new housing scheme expects a
garden of flowers competition. Aflower contest in
this low-lying area behaves like a well-beloved but
absent-minded relative on an unexpected visit.
Betterhomes people are eager to see it, enjoy it as
long as it cares to stick around, and grumble a bit if
it goes away in July and doesn't come back until
November. But depend on it? Never!

Pay attention here
Paragraphs have signal words and phrases. The
list of signal words and phrases in Column A are
matched with their purpose in Column B.

next in importance shows order of importance
indeed emphasizes similar details
furthermore adds similar details
for instance signals an example
before shows time order
because shows cause-effect order
on the other hand shows comparison-contrast
order
in the front shows place order
for these reasons summarises details

Expository Writing: Writing to inform and explain

Expository writing is what you use to give directions,
explain a new term or idea, compare one thing to
another, or explain how to do something. In the
model; below, the writers in partnership, Mary Crow
Dog and Richard Erdoes, explain the importance
of the tiyospaye in Lake Sioux society.

At the centre of the old Sioux society was the
tiyospayel (t9' y6 shpa' ya) the extended family
group, the basic hunting band, which included
grandparents, uncles, aunts, in-laws, and cousins.
The tiyospaye was like a warm womb cradling all
within it. Children were never alone, always fussed
over by not one but several mothers, watched and
taught by several fathers. The real father, as a
matter-of- fact, selected a second father, some
well-thought-of relative with special skills as a hunter
or medicine man, to help him bring up a boy, and
such a person was called "Father" too. And the
same is true for the girls. Grandparents in our tribe
always held a special place in caring for the little
ones, because they had more time to devote to
them, when the father was out hunting, taking the
mother with him to help with the skinning and
butchering.

Mary Crow Dog & Richard Erdoes, Lakota
Women

If you look carefully at the paragraph once more,
you would note that the topic sentence defines
"tiyospaye," and that the supporting sentences use
comparison and several examples to explain the
specific qualities of a tiyospaye.

There are many kinds of expository writing; in fact,
there are six types. Namely:
1) Process Explanation: A step-by-step organization
to explain how something happens, works, or is
done. Examples are: How do you run a co-operative
society? How are computers built? How does the
human body repair itself?


2) Cause and Effect Identifies the causes and/or
effects of something and examines the relationship
between causes and effects. Examples are: What
causes hair breakage? What causes mildew on
cotton clothing? What are the effects of poverty on
children?
3) Comparison and Contrast: Examines similarities
and differences to find relationships and draw
conclusions. Examples are: Compare boiled
custard and baked custard or meat and vegetable
pies. Compare and contrast Rounders and
baseball.
4) Definition: Explains a term or concept by listing
and examining its qualities and characteristics.
Examples are: What is tiyospaye? What is
communication among insects? What is a dark
horse?
5) Classification: Organises subjects into
categories and examines qualities or characteristics
of those categories. Examples: What organisms
are considered fungi? How do you characterise
the writing of Stephen King?
6) Problem and solution: Examines aspects of a
complex problem and explores or proposes
possible solutions. Examples are: How can your
institution increase literacy in children? What can
be done to protect baby girls today from sexual
harassment?

Try this Writing
1. If you were asked to write about any aspect of
school life for your school's newspaper, what would
you write about? Choose a topic and tell which kind
of expository writing would help you meet your goal.
2. Read over the passage at the beginning of the
week's issue with a special eye to picking out the
specific kinds of expository writing used by the co-
authors. You will notice that to explore the qualities
and characteristics of the topic in hand, they have
used a combination of expository types. You will
find also that they begin by explaining how forests
tend to inhibit avalanches, and then they discuss
what happens when areas are deforested for
building or heating purposes. Finally, the authors
describe how reforestation can prevent avalanches.

Grammar Link
Make subjects and verbs agree in inverted
sentences.
Subjects and verbs must agree in sentences that
are inverted; in other words, in sentences in which
the subject follows the verb.

At the centre of the Sioux society was the
tiyospaye ...
Rewrite each sentence below, adding the verb that
agrees with the subject.

1. There (is, are) usually many people in an extended
family group.
2. Included in the extended family (is, are) in-laws
and grandparents.
3. Hovering behind the children in that window
(stands, stand) their large, stuffed toys.
4. Under the huge tree (rests, rest) two of Johnny's
second cousins.
5. Here (runs, run) a large iguana.
6. There (was, were) several musician *- carried
mandolins, and who are especially the sons of the
great ones.
7. In the African Blues (lives, live) a sense of hope,
strength, forgiveness and survival.


Page XIII


Sunday Chronicle May 14, 2006





Pitge'IrV Sunday Chronicle May'14, 2006


N E W ----------
f" --r I
,: .^. .... .. ..,;,'- : .

L xt - ',1" 'a
A.... ,,"


SPECIES


is more


unique than


thought


N


TIC


ANNUAL GENERAL


MEETING

The FIFTY FOURTH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING of Demerara Distillers
Limited (DDL) will be held at DDL's Diamond Complex, Plantation Diamond,
East Bank Demerara on FridayJune 02,2006 at4:30 p.m.

AGENDA
1) To receive and consider the Company's Accounts and Reports of the
Directors and Auditors for the year ended December 31, 2005.
2) To declare a Final Dividend of 26 cents per share free of Company
Taxes in respect of the year ended December 31, 2005.
3) To elect Directors.
4) To fix the Emoluments of the Directors.
5) To appoint Auditors and authorize the Directors to fix their remuneration.
6) To present long service awards to employees.
BY ORDER OF THE BOARD
S.U.. -- .4-- REGISTERED OFFICE
R. Vansluytman Ms.) 44B High Street
COMPANY SECRETARYILEGAL OFFICER Kingston
May 08, 2006 Georgetown
Every member entitled to attend and vote at the meeting is entitled to appoint a proxy to
attend and vote instead of him/her and such proxy need not also be a member of the
Company.
* A form of proxy for use at this meeting must be received at the registered office of the
Company statedabove, not less than 24 (twenty-four) hours before the date ofthe Meeting.
REGISTER OF MEMBERS
The register of members and Share Transfer Books of Demerara Distillers Limited
will b^ closed from May 10 June 02, 2006 both days inclusive for the purpose of
prepare -- rrants fiheFinal Dividend for the year ended December 31st, 2005.

NJ.. Gifts will be distrliuted only to shareholders present at the
Weeifti and not at any time or place thereafter


A new species of monkey in Tanzania (Lophocebus kipunji) is seen playing in a recent photo.
( Tim Davenport/WCS/Reuters)
By Maggie Fox, Health and The new monkey, at first the first new genus of a living
Science Correspondent called the highland mangabey primate from Africa to be iden-


WASHINGTON (Reuters) A
new species of monkey iden-
tified in Tanzania's high-
lands last year is an even
more remarkable find than
thought it is a new genus of
animal, scientists said on
Thursday.


but now known as kipunji, is
more closely related to baboons
than to mangabey monkeys, but
in fact deserves its own genus
and species classification, the
researchers reported in the jour-
nal Science.
So they have re-named it
Rungwecebus kipunji, and it is


tified in 83 years.
"This is exciting news
because it shows that the age
of discovery is by no means
over," said William Stanley,
mammal collection manager
at The Field Museum in
Please turn to page XVI


MINISTRY OF HEALTH
The Ministry of Health invites Tenders from suitably qualified Contractors to
submit bids for the execution of the following:-
Lot (A) Remodelling of Second Floor Ministry of Health Building, Brickdam
Georgetown.
Lot (B) Renovation of the Cheddi Jagan Dental Centre Building, Carmichael Street,
Georgetown.
Tender Document (s) can be obtained from the Administration Office, Ministry
of Health, Brickdam, during 09:00 hrs to 15:00 hrs Monday to Friday upon
payment of a non refundable sum of ten Thousand dollars ($10,000.00) each.
Tenders must be enclosed in a plain, sealed envelope, which does not in any way
identify the tenderer. On the top left hand corner of the envelope, the project
tendered for must be clearly written.
Tenders must be addressed to the Chairman, National Procurement and Tender
Administration Board and must be deposited in the Tender Box situated at the
NPTAB, Ministry of Finance, Northwestern Building, Main and Urquhart Streets,
Georgetown not later than Tuesday, May 23, 2006 at 09:00 hrs. Tenders will
be opened immediately thereafter.
Each tender must be accompanied by valid Certificates of Compliance from the
Commissioner-General, Guyana Revenue Authority and the General Manager,
National Insurance Scheme in the name of the individual if individual is tendering
of company if company is tendering. A Bid Security of 2% of the tendered sum is
required. Failure to do so will result in automatic disqualification of the Tender.
Tenders which do not meel the requirements stated above in the tender
document will be deemed non responsive.
Tenderers or their representatives are invited to be present at the opening of tenders
on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 at 09:00 hrs.
Sonya Roopnauth
Permanent Secretary Government ads can be viewed on http l/w',v gina govgy





Sunday Chronicle Me y 14, 20,06


- aPage X-v


NEW MONKEY Vintage US cars keep
chugging in Cuba...


SPECIES ...


From page
XIV


Chicago, which has a dead specimen of the grayish-brown monkey.
"Finding a new genus of the best-studied group of living mammals is a sobering reminder of how
much we have to learn about our planet's biodiversity," added Link Olson of the University of Alaska
Museum, who worked with Stanley and others on the report.
Scientific classification arranges plants and animals along a hierarchy meant to illustrate how closely
things are related to one another.
Swedish botanist Carl von Linne, often known as Linnaeus, devised the system used as the basis
for modem taxonomy class, order, family, genus, species. Humans, for instance, belong to the Mam-
malia class, the primate order, the hominid family, the genus Homo and the species sapiens Homo
sapiens for short.
The new African monkey, whose discovery was reported in Science almost precisely a year ago,
was originally placed in the genus Lophocebus, commonly known as mangabeys. Rare and shy, it was
identified only by photographs.
But then a farmer trapped one and it died and scientists could get a close look, including doing
some DNA testing.
Olson's genetic analysis showed the monkey is most closely related to baboons in the genus Papio,
and not to mangabeys.
"Had we gotten these surprising results based on a single gene, we'd have been pretty skeptical,
but each of the genes we analysed either firmly supported the grouping of Kipunji with baboons or
failed to support a close relationship between Kipunji and other mangabeys," Olson said in a state-
ment.
An adult Kipunji is about 3 feet tall with a long tail, long grayish-brown fur, a black face, hands
and feet.
Adults make a distinctive, loud, low-pitched "honk-bark" call. They live in mountainside trees at
elevations of up to 8,000 feet and eat leaves, shoots, flowers, bark, fruit, lichen, moss and inverte-
brates.
The last new genus of African monkey to be named was Allen's swamp monkey, discovered in
1907 but not recognized as a new genus until 1923.
"To find, in the 21st century, an entirely new species of large monkey living in the wild is surpris-
ing enough. To find one that can be placed in a new genus, and that sheds new light on the evolutionary
history of the monkeys of Africa and Eurasia as a whole is truly remarkable." said John Oates. a
professor of Anthropology at Hunter College in New York.
"This discovery also reinforces the view that mountains in southern Tanzania have played
an important and until recently unexpected role as a refuge for many species long extinct
elsewhere."





Office of the Prime Minister
UNSERVED AREAS ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAMME
SURVEYING SERVICES
The Government of Guyana, with support from the Inter-American Development Bank,
has developed an initial Hinterland Electrification Programme as part of its Hinterland
Electrification Strategy under the Unserved Areas Electrification Programme. Part of the
programme entails developing new electricity generation and distribution systems at
Madhia in Region 8 and Port Kaituma in Region 1.

Occupational / Detailed Engineering Surveys will be required for these areas,
and the survey plans are to be prepared in Digital format and plotted on material. which
should be of stable base film, at a scale of 1:1000. Liaison with Regional Authority
would be required.

Expressions of Interest are invited from Surveying Firms/Qualified Surveyors who
are desirous of being short-listed to provide the aforementioned services. In order to be
considered, the following information must be supplied with applicants' expressions of
interest:

E Details of Firm/Individual location, equipment and manpower resources.
E Details of similar contracts undertaken in the last five (5) years.
[ Certificates of Compliance from the Guyana Revenue Authority and the National
Insurance Scheme.

Firms/Qualified Survevors wishing to express an interest should send their application
to:

Office of the Project Implementation Unit
Unserved Areas Electrification Programme
Office of the Prime Minister
Wight's Lane, Kingston
GEORGETOWN.
Attn. SURVEYING SERVICES

Closing date for applications is 15:00 hrs on Friday. JuneL 02. 200).
Go,,ernm -rt socs car be vie':/ed on nit: i.,,," ; C-_ ,T o C;


From
page
IX


socl freely. So Cubans have dusted off their grandparents' jalopies in growing numbers and
ursec mechanical wizardry to get them going again. Changing the engine is often crucial.
'-ome of the finest models of their day are now powered by Soviet-era diesel engines that spew
;,..- iumes along Havana's hot streets.
-uoans bypass long lines for the overdue state-run buses and take an "almendron" (big almond), as
-.:- :,iaest of the huge gas-guzzlers are lovingly called for their rounded shape.
Despite the tropical heat, they have no air conditioning, at most a small fan on the dashboard.
"ne Fleetmaster's only original parts are its body and the chassis. Under the hood there is an
er.nzii from a GAZ-51 Soviet army truck. The gear box and transmission are also Russian.
"You can say what you like about these old cars, but they have resolved our transport problem
a_- ahow us to get about town," says Carlos Vidal, a hotel employee.
PLANNED OBSOLESCENCE?
Tne sturdy American-made "almendron" remains a vital means of transport for many Cubans.
"People need us because of the lack of public transport," says jitney driver Roberto Carmenate,
orouc owner of a 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air.
Cottage industry of black-market mechanics has developed to cobble together and tool parts
needed to keep the vintage cars on the road, from homemade piston rings to brake pads.
Their ability to improvise is astounding.
Larlos Castellanos owns an impeccable 1952 Buick Special. But raise the hood and you are in for a
su--ls. The engine is Romanian, the steering is from a Citroen, the gear box is Toyota, the pistons are
].-:cedes, the fuel pump Mitsubishi and the starter motor borrowed from a KIA.
private taxi driver in Cuba, driving 200-250 miles a day, cannot do better than a mid-'50s Chevrolet
seaa- converted to diesel to cut his fuel costs.
Tie Chevy is the car that needs least overhauling, says Roberto Diaz. "A 1955 or 1956 Chevrolet
most durable car. Some even have the original factory engine working."
"i. never thought these cars could last so long, a whole lifetime," said taxi driver Reinaldo
-,rmengot. "The makers must have made a mistake."


Guyana Power & Light (GPL) Inc. invites sealed bids from eliilrh
.ild :, for the SUPPLY OF ITEMS FOR 69KV TRANSMISSION LINE -
GPL-SPD-03 as follows:


* Lotl
* Lot2
* Lot3
* Lot4
* Lot5
* Lot6
Lot7
Lot 8


Bolts and Washers
S conductor and Accessories
Cross Arm and Accessories
Earthing Accessories
. GUY and Accessories
. Insulators and Accessories
miscellaneous
ole Step


A complete set of bid documents (including technical specifications for
the listed items) may be purchased for a fee of G$1,500 on submission of
a written application to:
THE CONTRACTS & SUPPLIES MANAGER
Guyana Power and Light Inc.
40 Main St., Georgetown.
Tenders must be accompanied by valid National Insurance (NIS) and
Inland Revenue (GRA) compliance certificates, and deposited in ti;a
Tender Box provided at the a:ldreps above. Deadline for submission is
13:00 hrs (1.00 pm) on Thursday 25th May, 2006.

Bid envelopes must be addressed as follows:
TENDER OF ITEMS FOR 69KV TRANSMISSION LINE GPL-SPD-03
The Secretary to the Tender Board
Guyana Power and Light Inc.
40 Main St., Georgetown.
Bids will be opened at 14:00hrs (2.00 pm) on Thursday 25th May. 2006
in GPL's Board Room 275/279'..I iolpe St. GorgIetoj..'rn in the presence of

GPL reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
I Pa,. ermqRye foi.'e!


~I_ ^_~






Page XVI ~Sun~day Chronicle May 14, 2006


Women attracted to

i I with higher testosterone
e -as short-term romantic m
en w ho Ike "The study provide
first direct evidence
women's attractiveness
cments specifically traci
c men's affinity for child.
Smen's hormone concentra
said Dario Maestripieri


LONDON (Reuters) Women
can pick up cues about how
men feel about children from
their faces and use the subtle
signs to rate them as poten-
tial partners, scientists said
on Wednesday.
The team of researchers
from the United States showed


that an affinity for children and
male hormone levels play a role
in determining how attractive
men are to women.
"Our data suggest that
men's interest in children pre-
dicts their long-term mate at-
tractiveness even after we ac-
count for how physically attrac-


tive the women rated the men,"
said James Roney of the Uni-
versity of California, Santa Bar-
bara.
In the study of nearly 70
men and women, an interest in
children was linked to long-term
partnership potential while
women were attracted to men


II


Republic of Guyana
The Global Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, Malaria & Tuberculosis
Supply and Delivery of Anti-Retroviral Drugs
GYA-304-GO1-H
National Initiative to Accelerate Access to Prevention, Treatment,
Care and Support for Persons Affected by HIV/AIDS
GF/GO/06/ICB/001
1. This invitation for bids follows the general procurement notice for this project
that appeared in Development Business, Issue No. 673 of 28 February, 2006.

2. The Republic of Guyana has received a Grant from the Global Fund toward the
cost of the National Initiative to Accelerate Access to Prevention, Treatment,
Care and Support for Persons Affected by HIV/AIDS and it intends to apply part
of the proceeds of this Grant to payments under the contract for the Supply and
Delivery of Anti-Retroviral Drugs
3. The Health Sector Development Unit, of the Ministry of Health now invites
sealed bids from eligible bidders for the Supply and Delivery of Anti-Retroviral
Drugs
4. Bidding will be conducted through the international competitive bidding
procedures specified in the World Bank's Guidelines: Procurement under
IBRD Loans and IDA Credits, and is open to all bidders from eligible source
countries as defined in the Guidelines.

5. Interested eligible bidders may obtain further information from The Health
Sector Development Unit and inspect the Bidding Documents at the address
given below:

Health Sector Development Unit
GPHC Compound
East Street
Georgetown, Guyana
From: 8.30am local time to 3.30pm local time.
Telephone No.: 592-226-6222 / 592-226-2425
Fax No.: 592-225-6995
Email: mohgog@networksgy.com, prakash sookdeo@(excite.com
shack@hiv.gov.gy

6. A complete set of Bidding Documents in English may be purchased by
interested bidders on the submission of a written application to the address
below and upon payment of a nonrefundable fee of seventy five United
Stated dollars (US$75) or Fifteen thousand two hundred and twenty five
Guyana dollars (GY$15,225). The method of payment will be in local
currency by managers cheque and in foreign currency by cheque drawn on
a local corresponding bank. The document may be uplifted at the above
address at time of payment, or sent by courier.

7. Bids must be delivered in a sealed envelope to the address below at or before
June 06, 2006 at 9 am local time. All bids must be accompanied by a bid
security of two percent (2%) of the bid price. Late bids will be rejected. Bids will
be opened in the presence of the bidders' representatives who choose to
attend at the address below at 9 am local time on June 06, 2006.

The Chairman
National Procurement and TenderAdministration Board
Ministry of Finance (North Western building)
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown
Guyana, South America
Tel: 592-223-7041 /592-227-2499


levels
nates.
es the
e that
judg-
k both
en and
.tions,"
of the


University of Chicago, and a co-
author of the study.
The scientists tested the
testosterone levels of 39 male
undergraduate students from sa-
liva samples. They also deter-
mined their affinity for children
by asking them to choose be-
tween photos of an adult or a
baby and to rate their interest.
The researchers photo-
graphed the men and showed
the photos to 29 female stu-
dents who were asked to rate
the men on whether they
thought they liked children,
their masculinity, physical at-
tractiveness and potential as
short and long-term partners.
The findings, published
online by the journal Pro-
ceedings of the Royal Society
B: Biological Sciences,
showed the women were able
to choose the men who had
expressed an interest in chil-
dren during the photo test.
They also described men who
had high testosterone levels
as being masculine.


HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA
INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK
LOAN # 1548/SF-GY



APPLICATIONS ARE INVITED FROM SUITABLY QUALIFIED PERSONS
TO FILL THE FOLLOWING VACANCY

CIVIL WORKS ENGINEER

Summary of Duties and Responsibilities:

The Civil Works Engineer will be directly responsible to and work under
the direction of the Civil Works Manager of the Health Sector
Development Unit.
The duties include site supervision of the day to day construction works
of health care facilities. H-e/She must ensure that works are being
executed in accordance with plans and specifications, provide quality
assurance, monitor the work programme and prepare minor reports on
work progress. Assist in the review of contractors valuations and liaise
with supervising consulting staff.

Qualifications and experience:
A Bachelor's Degree in Civil Engineering from a recognized
University.
A minimum of three years experience on building construction
sites in the capacity of Clerk ofWorks, Inspector or Engineer.
Familiarity with AutoCAD and Microsoft project will be an asset.

Details of the duties for this position could be obtained from. and
applications addressed to:

The Civil Works Manager
I-lealth Sector Development Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Compound
East Street. Georgetown.
Guyana.
Te.I No. 226-6222/226-2425

Deadline for submission of applications is May 22, 2006 at 3:30pm


Opus Dei,


Howard at


odds over 'Da


Vinci Code'
LOS ANGELES (Reuters) The director of the upcoming re-
ligious thriller "The Da Vinci Code" says he sees no need
for a disclaimer labeling the film a work of fiction pro-
voking a rebuke on Monday from Catholic group Opus Dei.
Filmmaker Ron Howard has acknowledged the controversy
renewed by his film of Dan Brown's best-selling novel, which
depicts Opus Dei as a shadowy sect at the heart of a murder-
ou" conspiracy to conceal dark secrets of the early Christian
Church.
But the Oscar-winning director of "A Beautiful Mind" re-
jected the-notion that his laiesi film should carry a disclaimer
- as requested by Opus Dei stating what he said was al-
ready obvious.
"This is a work of fiction that presents a set of charac-
ters that are affected by these conspiracy theories and
ideas," Howard told the Los Angeles Times on Sunday.
"Those characters in this work of fiction act and react on
that premise. It's not theology. It's not history. To start off
with a disclaimer ... spy thrillers don't start off with dis-
claimers."
Opus Dei. which urged movie dstributor Sony Pictures En-
tertainment in April o1 consider running a disclaimer, expressed
disappointment with Howard's stance.
"A disclaimer could have been a way for Sony to show that
the company wants to be fair and respectful in its treatment of
Christians and the Cathohc Church,' Opus Dei's U.S. spokes-
man Brian Finnerty said on Monday.
The film, which opens May 19, stars Tom Hanks as a
Harvard scholar who leams up with a French cryptologist
(played bN Audrey Taulou) to solve a murder mystery entwined
in the works of Leonardo Da Vinci and a supposed alternate
history of Christianity. ;,
A central premise of the story is that Jesus sired a child
by Mary Magdalene, and that a clandestine society has for
centuries protected the identity of their descendants from
agents of the Catholic Church.


Page XVI


' "Suhday ChronlicleI May 14;,2006 -






SnyChoicl a 406Pg XII


Mother's





Day and the




Environment


TODAY is Mother's Day and
now is the time to start think-
ing about treats for your
mum. But before you. race off
to the shops, don't forget to
spare a thought for Mother
Earth. There are plenty of
ways to bring a smile to your
Mum's face that won't cost
the earth.

One thing you can do to
bring a smile to her face is by
having a 'Mother Earth trade
off'. The rules are simple, for
every item your mother buys,
you must recycle an item. For
instance:

* If she buys something new
to wear, you can choose
some old clothing she has not
worn for years and give it to
charity.

Also, we have .to think
about all the extra waste we will


generate from this special day;
waste such as gift wrappings,
food scraps and leftovers, etc.
There are various ways we can
save the environment from that
cost. Here are a few tips that
can help in reducing waste for
this day.

FOOD AND DRINK
Place excess amounts
of oil and grease from holiday
cooking and cleaning in collec-
tion containers, scrape oil and
grease off of kitchen utensils and
equipment, and keep grease out
of wash water. Never pour oil
and grease down the drain as
this causes water pollution, and
avoid using hot water to wash
the grease away from sub-
stances.

Avoid placing food
scraps such as chicken bones,
potato peels and celery down


the drain. Potato peels swell
when wet, so this will block the
drain.
Plan meals wisely
and practice portion control.
If faced with leftovers, place
them in plastic containers or
bags and send them home
with guests or save them for
later.
Try to buy food and
drink packaged in materials that
can be reused e.g., plastic tubs
and glass containers where pos-
sible. These are good for stor-
age.

Buy drinks, like lem-
onade or juices, in large contain-
ers, rather than in a lot of small
ones. One large bottle means
less waste, rather than a lot of
small cans, and it's more eco-
nomical.
SNUB Say No to
Unwanted Bags! Always use a
reusable shopping bag or reuse
plastic bags. Don't accept bags
that you don't need.

WRAPPING PAPER
Use decorative reus-
able boxes and bags for gift giv-
ing instead of wrapping, paper.
If you must wrap, use comics,
old calendars, fabric or you can
buy recycled wrapping paper.


Foreign Exchange Market Activities
Summary Indicators
Monday, May 8, 2006 Thursday, May I 1, 2006
1. EXCHANGE RATES
Buying Rate Selling Rate
A. US Dollar NOTES. OTHER NOTES OTHER
Bank of Baroda 197.00 198.00 201.00 203.00
Bank of Nova Scotia 190.00 196.00 201.00 204.00
Citizens.Bank 192.00 199.00 203.00 204.25.
Demerata Bank .197.00 199.00 202.00 203.00
GBTI 190.00 195.00 201.00 201.00
NBIC 198.00 198.00 202.00 204.00
Bank A,4erage 194.00 19750 201.67 203.21


Nonbank Cambios Av. (5 largest) 199.85 202.35


BoG Average Market Exchange Rate: US$ 1.00 = GS200.00

B. Canadian Dollar
Bank Average 14000 153.83 162.83 16950

C. Pound Sterling


Bank ,Average 3/6.17 343.50 353.50 364 17

D. Euro
Bank Average 212.50 231.25 245.00 256.25
E. Selected Caricom Exchange F. LIBOR US$ G. Prime Rate
Rates London Interbank Offered
Rate for Thur., May. I 1, 2006
TTS= GS 28 77
BdosS= GS 91.78 3 months 5 16438%, US 8.00%
JS= GS 4.45 6 months 5.27000% Guyana 15.30%
ECS= GS 65.75
BelizeS = G$ 94.33
Source: International Department, Bank of Guyana.


Cut down on what
you buy. Home-made gift tags
can be made from old greetings
cards.
Use string, ribbon or
wool for wrapping gifts, rather
than using sticky tape. The
string can then be reused, and
the paper too.
If you want to host a party
for Mom, these are a few tips
you can keep in mind:
If you host a party,
set the table with cloth nap-
kins and reusable dishes,
glasses, and silverware. Con-
sider renting more formal
tableware that you might not
use very often.
Put leftovers in recy-
clable containers, and share
them with family, friends, or
others. Donate whole, un-
touched leftovers to homeless
shelters.
Wash and reuse
empty glass and plastic jars,


milk jugs, coffee cans, dairy
tubs, and other similar contain-
ers that would otherwise get
thrown away. These containers
can be used to store leftovers as
well as buttons, nails, or other
loose items.

COMPOST
Compost your
kitchen food scraps from the
party. Remember to compost
fruit and vegetable wastes only,
not meat or grease.
These are some suggestions
we have provided to you and
your family. It is now your re-
sponsibility to make good use
of this information. A Happy
Mother's Day to all the Moth-
ers in the world and remember
to continue to take care of
Mother Earth.

Remember that you can
send your comments, sugges-


tions and ideas on the articles
to "Our Environment," C/o
EIT Division, Environmental
Protection Agency, IAST
Building, UG Campus,
Turkeyen, Greater Georgetown.


GUYANA

HEALTH SECTOR PROGRAMME

HEALTH. SECTOR DEVELOPMENT UNIT
MINISTRY OF HEALTH
Organisational and Institutional Capacity Improvement Civil Works
Construction of the Linden Hospital Complex
Loan No. 1548/SF-GY
Project ID No. GY-0077

ICB No.: GY- HSP- ICB004

This Invitation for Bids follows the general procurement notice for this project that appeared in
the Development business no. GPN# IDB 322-659/05
The Government of Guyana has received a loan from the Inter-American Development Bank
toward part of the cost of the Health Sector Programme, and it intends to apply part of the proceeds
of this loan to payments under the contract for Organisational and Institutional Capacity
Improvement civil works construction. (GY-HSP-ICB004)
The Ministry of Health, through its executing agency, the Health Sector Development Unit (HSDU)
now invites sealed bids from eligible bidders for the construction of the Linden Hospital Complex.
This project entails the construction of a clinical and an administrative block of buildings with related
services and utilities. The construction period is 18 months.
Bidding will be conducted through the international competitive bidding procedures specified in the
Inter-American Development Bank's Policies For the Procurement of Works And Goods Financed
by the inter-American Development Bank January 2005, and is open to bidders from all countries as
defined in the guidelines.
Interested eligible bidders may obtain further information for, and inspect the Bidding Documents
at: the following address from 09:00 hrs to 15:00 hrs.
The Health Sector Development Unit
GPHC Compound
East Street
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel: (592)226-6222
Fax: (592) 225-6559
E-mai: cgarret@hiv;gov.gy
A complete set of Bidding Documents in English may be purchased by interested bidders on
submission of a written application to the address above and upon payment of a non refundable fee
of $G15, 000. The method of payment will be by Cashier's Cheque. The document may be uplifted
at the above address at time of payment, or sent by courier.
Bids must be delivered in envelopes to the following address and clearly marked:
Tender for
The construction of the Linden Hospital Complex
Attn: The Chairman
National Procurement and Tender Administration Board
Ministry of Finance
Main and Urquhart Sts.
Georgetown, Guyana
and placed in the Tender Box in the
Ministry of Finance Building
Main and Urquhart Streets
Georgetown
Guyana
All bids must be accompanied by a Bid security of minimum : of the bid price or an equivalent
amount in a freely convertible currency. Late bids will be rejected. Bids will be opened in the
presence of bidder's representatives and anyone who chooses to attend at Ministry of Finance on
June 15at 14:00hrs.

Firms which have already been prequalified will be advised on how/when to uplift
Bid Documents.


Sunday Chronicle May 14, 2006


Page XVII


C s


*....


'r
'3







I


GLOBAL FUND/ GUYANA HIV/AIDS PROJECT
GRANT# GYA-304-G01-H
MINISTRY OF HEALTH
HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT UNIT


Invitation for Bids

1. The Co-operative Republic of Guyana has received financing from the Global Fund
towards the fight against AIDS, Malaria and Tuberculosis. It is intended that part of the
proceeds of this financing will be applied to eligible payments under the contract for the
supply of Goods and Services.

2. The Government of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana now invites sealed bids from
eligible suppliers forthe supply of:

1) 19 Mid-BackExecutiveChairs
2) 6 TaskChairs
3) 48 Visitors Chairs
4) 27 Office Desks
5) 7 BookShelves
6) 30 Metal FilingCabinets
7) 29 Computers andAccessories
8) 1 MetallurgicalBrigthfieldlDarkfield Microscope
9) 3 LCD Projectors
10) 6 Refrigerators (Desktop)
11) 1 Refrigerator
12) .1 DVDPlayer
13) 1 20"Television
14) 20 MetalStandFans
15) 6 Metal CompactWork Stations
16) 15 Stethoscopes
17) 15 Sphygmomanometer(BloodPressureApparatus)
18) 2 Examination Tables
19) 4 X-ray Viewing Box 100V
20) 1 SplitTypeAirConditioner Unit
21) 7 HighCapacityScales


Interested Bidders may obtain further information from and uplift bidding documents at the
following address from 9:00 hrs to 15:30 hrs.

Procurement Department
Health Sector Development Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Cooperation Compound
East Street
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel. No.: (592)226-2425.226-6222
Fax: (592) 225-6559
Email: psookdeo@hiv.gov.gy / shack@hiv.gov.gy

3. Bidding Documents may be purchased and uplifted by interested bidders for items 1-09
upon payment of a non refundable fee of $G10, 000. The method of payment will be by
cashier's check. Specifications for items 10 21 can be uplifted free of cost.

4. Items 1-09 must be deposited in the Tender Box in sealed envelopes at the National
Procurement and Tender Administration Board, Ministry of Finance, Main and
Urquhart Streets, Georgetown, Guyana, no later than 9 am on Tuesday. May 30, 2006.
The bids must be addressed to the Chairman, National Procurement and Tender
Administration Board and marked on the top right-hand comer of the envelope "the name
of the programme and the description of the bid, including the words 'do not open before
Tuesday, May 30,2006'."

5. Bids for items 10-21 must be deposited in the tender box, in sealed envelopes, situated at
the Ministry of Health, Brickdam no later than 2 pm on May 30, 2006 and addressed to the
Chairman, Ministerial Tender Board, Ministry of Health, Brickdam and marked on the
top right-hand comer of the envelope the name of the programme and the description of
the bid, including the words'do notopen beforeTuesday, May 30,2006'."

6. Bids for items 1-09 will be opened at a public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders'
or their representative who choose to attend, at 09:00 hours or shortly thereafter, on May
30, 2006 at the National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration, Ministry of
Finance, Main and Urquhart Streets, Georgetown, Guyana.

7. Bids for items 10-21 will be opened at a public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders'
or their representative who choose to attend, at 2 pm or shortly thereafter, on May 30,
2006 atthe Ministry of Health, Brickdam.

8. Valid Compliance Certificates must accompany bids from local suppliers from the
Inland Revenue Department (IRD) and the National Insurance Scheme (NIS),
Guyana.

The purchaser is not responsible forbids not received thereof on or before the time specified
forthe reception of bids. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Procurement Department
Health Sector Development Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Cooperau.cn CoiipounL
East Street
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel. No.: 226-2425,226-6222
Fax:225-6559
Emaitpsoekdeo hN.gov.y I shack@hivg. y',. ..
"" _.... .. .. "' " . "


44Qk0SCOP6


S



/./Iii


U1 V












fe- -


' ^ft-1-'"


ARIES Throughout your day, observe everything that is going on around
you. Nonverbal communication is speaking louder than words, and you'll gain
a big advantage if you can decipher the underlying meaning. There are clear
signals flying around, and you're not fooled for one second. Do not act on
what you learn today there will be a much better time coming soon, so wait
until your insight can help everyone around you. Just collect information and
reserve your strength.

TAURUS It's not very easy to know what areas of your life need your atten-
tion right now you've been out of the thick of things and not feeling totally
in sync with the world for a while. What you need to do now is get yourself
more involved in the rhythms and activities of your favourite people. Tag along
when they run their errands or volunteer to help them with household chores.
When you get in the middle of things, you'll understand what to focus on.

GEMINI Where are you going in such a hurry? Kick off your shoes, sit down
and get comfortable you're not going anywhere today. You're going to be
in a bit of a holding pattern in life for a while. Whether that makes you happy
or not, the static nature of the day will teach you a few lessons about pa-
tience and accepting things you can't change. Look on the bright side and
enjoy a fairly stress-free day. Let your mind and body rest to work harder some
other day.

CANCER Explore an unfamiliar outdoor space today take a long hike, stroll
the city blocks or trek through a local campus where you go should be guided
strictly by your curiosity. Deep inside of you lurks a strong ability to soak up
and understand innovative ideas, so what you need more than anything else
is input free your mind and get a little exercise while you're at it. You need
to make your heart pump and your brain dance.

LEO Don't look now, but you have an admirer someone thinks you have
what it takes to make their life better, and they are about ready to let you
know that today. It could be romantic, or it could be more professionally
minded than that. Keep an open mind and look out for shy folks who don't
quite know how to get your attention. You'll have to take the initiative to get
them to spill, but if you're ready to be someone else's missing link, the extra
effort will be worth it.

VIRGO It's time to go back to the beginning to get the inspiration you
need today. Remember back when you were enthusiastic about where you
were going? The passion is still there, you just have to dig down deep enough
to find it! This process of digging will take your mind off of the work you're
doing right now and help you stay distracted enough to not worry worrying
is not going to help you one bit, so why bother? Call up a fun friend and get
back in touch with what really matters.

LIBRA Feel free to take things at a leisurely pace today, because time is on
your side! Unexpected delays will work in your favour, and they'll give you a
little extra time to put some polish on your best smile and better your chances
of improving someone very special. Make the most of this gift of time by
skipping the shortcuts take the scenic route and enjoy a lazy walk in the late
afternoon. It will give a great chance to relax and reflect on what a great day
you've had.

SCORPIO Every brick wall you encounter today is not meant to be climbed
over. Limits are important in every aspect of your life because they define where
you can go and who you are. Today an obstacle pops up and takes the shape
of an unexpected rejection. It may sting at first, but it's not necessarily some-
thing you have to get angry about. Obstacles aren't always meant to stop
you sometimes they serve as detours, showing you a more rewarding direc-
tion to explore.

SAGITTARIUS -- Everything's been so entertaining lately your friends, an es-
calating flirting situation, even work so living in the moment hasn't been
difficult for you at all. But if you want to keep the good times going, you
need to give a little consideration to what your plans are for the future. Every
good thing must come to an end, but that just gives you another opportu-
nity to make something happen. You're a catalyst in the action, so others are
looking to you to put together a plan.

CAPRICORN Opportunities will come in many forms today, although you
might not recognize every one of them. Not to worry the ones you're ready
for will be obvious. Keep in mind that nothing is a sure thing a friend's
promise may fall through, a work meeting may swerve off the planned agenda.
Just go with the flow and don't let these little detours bug you too much.
Everyone is trying their best, you have to remember (and appreciate) that.

AQUARIUS Confused? Don't be! Determining your next move is as simple
as pie all you have to do is sort the pros from the cons and the answer will
be clear. Apply this logical approach to your romantic life and you'll soon see
real results. Career-wise, logic is always your best friend it keeps things from
getting too personal, which is especially unwise right now. If the future is on
your mind, keep your social options as wide open as you can.

PISCES As vou put more responsibilities on your shoulders (and more suc-
cesses unaer your bell thie lOet d ol iakin uii new, projects is buiidinq UI an
addictive level. There's nothing wrong with pushing yourself, but make sure
that you maintain balance in your life. On that note, make strong efforts to
Sreconnect with two friends you haven't seen in a while. Try emails and phone
calls. They're easy to reach, but they might take a while to get back to you.
Be patient. They're excited to see you too!


Sunday Chronicle May 14, 2006


Page XVIII







Sunday Chronicle May 14, 2006


Biotechnology & Biosafety Column

Sponsored by the Guyana-UNEP-GEF National Biosafety
Framework Project

_'=: : I '.,-. -


Engineering an Organ

>tO -" 'i ", .C t f, .. A.. "-t ,l ioro.ess:>


.Q A s !,nii& -


.:.~.'? ..df


Exciting

advances in

medical

biotechnology

AS WE noted last week,
medical biotechnology through
the use of genetic engineering
and recombinant DNA and
other biotechnologies, is
unraveling several previously
less understood diseases at a
very rapid rate. We now have a
much better understanding of
how our "biological heritage,"
the genes we inherit form our
parents and generations of
ancestors, influence our
predisposition to diseases, the
interaction with, and impact of
nutrition on our health, among
others.

Today, we limit ourselves
to a few other exciting examples
of medical biotechnology for a
better appreciation of the role of
biotechnology in our modern
health care system.


More examples of medical
biotechnology

Protein-based drugs such as
cytokines drugs that regulate
the immune system have
profound importance in curing
some important diseases
affecting the immune system
and have many applications in
the treatment of diseases such
as anaemia, cancer and
rheumatoid arthritis. Cytokines
are proteins also known as


immune factors. Examples of
very important cytokine drugs
developed from recombinant
DNA include interferon,
colony stimulating factors
(CSFs mentioned in an earlier
article where attempts have
been used to genetically engineer
them from sugarcane and rice),
and erythropoietin.

As a specific example,
interferon is used in treatments
such as:
1. Stimulating activity in
other immune system cells,
2. Inhibiting growth in
some types of cancer cells,
3. Increasing immune cell
capacity to bind foreign
particles,
4. Modulating the
production of antibodies,.and

Another important aspect
of medical biotechnology is
the development of
genetically engineered mice,
transgenic mice and
knockout mice, used
extensively in current medical
research to test the potency
as well as safety of new drugs
for cancer and other diseases.
In transgenic mice, the gene
for specific human diseases
has been inserted into mice to
make them develop specific
human diseases for studies in
drug discovery among others.
Knockout mice have the
gene for blocking cancer
development called p53
"knocked out" so as to render
mice predisposed to cancer for
cancer research.
The biotechnology creation
of a human urinary bladder


At right is an illustration of
how genetic engineers "created"
a human bladder through
bioengineering An exciting
example of the power of
biotechnology. This is a unique
feat achieved by a team led by
Professor Anthony Atala of
Boston's Children Hospital.


Next week, we shall
continue with some
additional exciting examples
of Medical biotechnology.


Email address:
caesarbiosafety@yahoo.com
or coordinator@
biosafetyguyana.org

The National Biosafety
Framework Project is
executed under the auspices
of the
Environmental Protection
Agency


:ihe Ioyn n.r
s.~le-. 'rOwdes:
the lat growr
fuses withl
the iwscinig e'l:;
to gene?.'. B
larger w th imo'roved
,nction.


O Attcr about Ie'n wc-4ks.
ome c*a ? Uof e patic". -
cetl ;ecvie t>defr.


g Tqo CC';;S
;nw tiiv in
me la!b for
sevorni
weei?..


0 Doctors aidd h ltyps ,o
bia:o dr-shiapoi s!l'l ...cde
ron1 *^od .r;'a.1.'', e Poly^:l'.


- 4<


Aluminium'



Awning Windows.


Vent
3
3
4
4


ts Size : r- - j
White 24" x 48" $10,000.00 'r-
30" x 48" i-$13,0,00.00 -
24" 48": $12,000.00 The Name You Can Trust.
SS30" x 48" $15,000.00

*Available only at Houston Comhlex contact Mr Chand 223-8481


At HutnnoSopnhid.ays &'Saturdays 7ffifftoI, Sundays-lom i to fl


,,. .. . / i .
g /


p*.t .. ..

Welcome to the 3991" edition of
: "Champion Cookery Corner", a
weekly feature giving recipes and
'tips on cooking in Guyana.

.. . .., #. , . -. .
As Guyana celebrates its 4t .4 nniversary, will be featuring Guyanese recipes for the month of
May, thatincorporatequalityBeharryproducts.


INGREDIENTS:


4 oz flour or 3 oz flour and 1 oz
cornflour
1 tsp Champion Baking Powder
1 V oz margarine
1/8 tsp salt
1 oz sugar
Grated nutmeg
3-4 tbsp milk or water

Makes 8


DIRECTIONS:

Sift flour and Champion Baking Powder,
rub in margarine,. add salt, sugar and
nutmeg.

Mix with enough milk or water to make a
stiff dough. Knead lightly and form into
balls.

Place on top of mettagee and cook for
about 7 minutes. Don't allow to
overcook.


4- ; ..E.
L - --- ---"-"--- ~ ~~-'-n ^----~-~ ~ l-- - -- -- --- -~-


INGREDIENTS:


12 oz mixed meat and fresh fish or
about 1 lb saltfish,
1 dry coconut
3 lb root vegetables
1 onion, cut into rings
Pumpkin or okras
Pinch of Chico Black Pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:

Cover mixed meat with water and boil for 30
minutes. Put saltfish to soak in water.
SPONSORED BY THE ML

Baking Powder
Custard Powder AS1
Black Pepper


ANL


If fresh fish is used this may be fried or place
on top of vegetables about 10 minutes before
the end and add Chico Black Pepper.
Grate coconut. Pour over 1 pint of milk
from coconut. Squeeze well and strain, pour
liquid over mixed meat.

Peel root vegetables. Add to mixed meat to
cook in coconut milk and cook until almost
tender. Put saltfish with skin and bones
removed, fresh or fried fish on top of
vegetables. Add onions and pumpkin or
ochroes.
Cook until coconut is almost absorbed.
UFACTURERS OF

SCurry Powder
% -I asan pr*aila


Page XIX


-- ---r~------- pl~-- s ~


"i"~c~



i
LI~~; iZT~/









BAJAN
international


CARIBPR NEWSWIRE, KINGSTON, Jamaica: Young Barba-
dian singing sensation, Rihanna, will make her debut appear-
ance in Jamaica at the world's greatest reggae show, Red Stripe
Reggae Sumfest.
The beautiful and sultry eighteen-year-old will grace the reggae
stage on Saturday July 22, the final night of the festival, dubbed
'The Summit'.
The catchy mixture of hand clapshandclaps and drum rhythms.
on Rihanna's 'Pon de Replay,' was last summer's party anthem.
Already, her first hit off of her sophomore album, 'SOS' is being
touted as the song of this summer. It jumped 33 spots to claim the
top spot on the billboard Hot 100 this past week, fuelled in part
by the downloads of the track being purchased by the hip 18- 24-
year-old market.
Rihanna has collaborated with Jamaica's very own Elephant
Man, Vybz Cartel and Sean Paul. Besides ripping traditional reggae


By Bob Tourtellotte

LOS ANGELES (Reuters)
More than a labour of love,
new movie 'The Lost City'
was a labour of life for Cu-
ban-born actor Andy Garcia.
Garcia, 50, directed, pro-
duced, scored and starred in the
film about pre-communist Cuba
that began playing in theatres
around the United States on Fri-
day after a limited run in Los
Angeles, New York and Miami.
The actor, whose movies
include 'Ocean's Eleven' and
'Ocean's Twelve'. laboured 18
years to raise money and make
'Lost City', but he said the
seeds of his story go back to
when he was 5-1/2 and fled the
country and the communist re-
gime under leader Fidel Castro.
"From a very early age, I
was stimulated by the stories
and music of Cuba, and 1 con-
tinue that interest to this day,"
he told Reuters.
But the problem for Garcia
is that Hollywood was not as
excited about a 300-page movie
script for 'Lost City', written
by Cuban exile and novelist
Guillermo Cabrera-Infante. A
typical movie screenplay is
around 120 pages.
'Lost City' possessed an


epic scope, a lush setting, revo-
lution,' love and a family torn
apart by politics. Those ele-
ments looked good on paper,
but for Hollywood the idea ap-
peared too expensive to make
for a seemingly small audience
- Cuban Americas and Latinos.
But Garcia saw it differ-
ently, and said the movie has a
universal appeal. "They
marginalised the potential of the
film," he said. "Diversity is one
of the things people go to mov-
ies for."

HISTORY REPEATS?
'Lost City' revolves around
nightclub owner Fico Fellove
(Garcia), the oldest of three
brothers who are members of an
upper class family. Their father
is a well-respected university
professor, and their uncle is a
gentrified land owner.
Fico disdains the revolution-
ary politics of the day, but his
brothers take sides in the fight
to overthrow dictator Fulgencio
Batista. One joins a nationalist
group backing a new democracy;
the other takes up arms for the
communist revolutionaries led
by Castro and Ernesto 'Che'
Guevara.
As events unfold, audiences
are given a sort of tour of Cu-


Rihanna to




rock Red




Stripe




Reggae




Sumfest

tracks like a seasoned dancehall queen, the stunning Rihanna pos-
sesses a powerful singing voice that conjures up feelings and expe-
riences way beyond her years. It is no wonder that all it took was
a quick audition with Shawn 'Jay- Z' Carter, President and CEO of
Def Jam Recordings, for the green-eyed beauty to solidify a record-
ing contract with the multi-million dollar record company.
Rihanna has since been creating waves in the music in-
dustry with her combination of hip hop, jazz, R&B and reggae,
and is expected to deliver a smashing performance when she
hits the Red Stripe Reggae Sumfest stage in the Vibes City,
Montego Bay.
Jomo Cato, director of marketing for Summerfest Productions,
the promoters of the reggae festival, has been making no qualms
about this year's' show, saying that it would be the biggest and
best yet. He stands resolute that the inclusion of Rihanna in this
year's line up will contribute to achieving this.
"Red Stripe Reggae Sumfest has each year brought together the
very best and hottest that each genre of music has to offer; this
year is no different. Rihanna will add her Caribbean flavoured R&B
to the event and I am sure that the fans will enjoy every minute of
her performance," Mr. Cato said.
Endorsing Mr. Cato's comments, Carlo Redwood, Marketing
Manager of Red Stripe, added, "It is important when putting to-
gether a grand showcase of music such as this one that you have a
myriad of artistes that are talented, entertaining and capable of hold-
ing the attention of a predominantly Jamaican crowd. Red Stripe
believes that Rihanna falls in this category."
Red Stripe Reggae Sumfest will be held from July 16- 22,
2006.


ACTORS Andy Garcia (R) and Ines Sastre are shown in a
scene from 'The Lost City' in this undated publicity photo
released May 5, 2006. (CineSon Entertainment/Handout/
Reuters)


ban culture and history music,
dance, rural life and the wild
nights of pre-Castro Havana
with its clubs and casinos.
Of particular importance to
Garcia is the Cuban music. The
actor is an accomplished musi-
cian himself, and he used some
40 songs in the movie's
soundtrack.
Garcia has called 'Lost City'
homage to the generations of ex-
iles who emigrated to the United
States. Castro and Batista are


both seen as ruthless dictators.
The nationalists who try to re-
store democracy are heroes, and
Fico and his family are victims.
The actor noted that even
though the events in 'Lost City'
happened around 50 years ago.
the movie is relevant today as
leftist leaders such as
Venezuela's Hugo Chavez and
Bolivia's Evo Morales come
into power in South America.
"It's still happening," he
said.


WHOOPI Goldberg smiles during the lighting of the
Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center in New York City in
this November 30, 2005 file photo. (Seth Wenig/Reuters)


.' f

-..


CC)

~2~- .'


By Sue Zeidler

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) Actress and comedian Whoopi
Goldberg said last week that she would host a radio show
aimed at bringing back women listeners who have turned in-
creasingly to morning television.
The Oscar, Grammy and Emmy-winning star, who has also
hosted her own television show, said she reached a deal with radio
giant Clear Channel Communications Inc to host a live, morning
show to be called 'Wake Up With Whoopi'.
"Radio is an area I have always wanted to play in," Goldberg
told Reuters in an interview. "There aren't many women helming
their own shows. ..It's hard to compete with the big boys who
rule the morning airwaves, so our goal is to serve up something
very different.."
The show will blend music, talk on daily topics, comedy, call-
ins and guests. It will air during the morning drive-time slot and
will be syndicated nationally through Clear Channel Communica-
tions Inc's Premiere Radio Networks.
Terms of the deal were not disclosed.
Goldberg's decision to air on terrestrial radio comes at a time
when many big names are jumping to lucrative satellite radio gigs,
like Howard Stern's $500 million five-year deal with Sirius Satellite
Radio Inc..
She said she chose free, terrestrial radio because she was hop-
ing to have a "real impact" on people.
"I'm hopeful we can bring folks in. I don't think we can change
habits overnight, but we can offer an alternative. I'm hoping she
(the female listener) can even remember the radio is there. Maybe,
she'll turn the TV down," Goldberg said.
John Hogan, president and chief executive of Clear Channel's
radio division, said signing Goldberg offered the company a great
chance to spark interest among women who have been waking up
to morning television for the past 15 years.
When asked if she would have to curb her sometimes risque
comedy and political views to conform with broadcast regulations,
Goldberg, a grandmother, said she planned to make the show fam-
ily-friendly.
"The truth of the matter is when I'm doing my shows for HBO
and my own work, it's a different kind of show. This will be a way
to hang out with kids in the morning and get them going for school.
It's a different groove.," she said.
"It's not that 1 didn't want to do satellite or that it was not an
option: But Clear Channel felt like a better fit for what I'm inter-
ested in doing. There are so many jocks out there, but I have a
different way of being. I haven't heard someone quite like me in
the morning." she said.
"1 don't want to have to worry about doing the 'gossip mo-
ment.' I don't want to put anyone down or talk mean about people.
I think I'll have a different approach and there's a lot of interesting
stuff to talk about," she said.
"The thing I really want to know is where to get a great
hot dog. There's a lot of soundbites out there" but not a lot of
interesting 'everyday) information," she said.


Si







I Er I


NOTICE

TWINS MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS
wishes to advise all our customers
that we can be contacted on
TELEPHONE NUMBERS:

611-8138

61 1-8139

We apologise for the inconvenience caused.

TWINS MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS
36 Industrial Estate, Ruimveldt, Georgeotwn





GUYA A


LIST OF CASES for trial at the Session

of the High Court of the Supreme Court

of Judicature (Criminal Jurisdiction) for

the County of Essequibo commencing

the (Tuesday) 16h day of May, 2006.


................ ---........................................... . ...................... ----.... ...............................................................
NO. NAME OF ACCUSED OFFENCE
S Dineshwar Sooklall cid Buckman Murder
or Tall Boy,
Ahzarndin Khan c/d Rocky &
SKumar c'd Ratta


2. Deodal Narine c!d Northwest Murder
3. Rakesh Singh cd Rack Boy Murder i
4. Roy Frederick Bartholinew Manslaughtcr


5. Ignatius Benjamin cid Fat Head
6. PhillipCordis
7. Leonard John
A. Abiola Austin c'd Ab'nb



9. 1 Julius damss



10. Stiaiaw i-ranicc
1i. Nandalill c.'d Rohan


NMansl:aughter
........... ..........................................................
* Manslauighter (Re-Trial)
Manslaughter
FIRST COURT
Alicmpted Murder
SECOND COUNT
Wounding with innte
FIRST COURT
lndecen; assault
SECOND COUNT
Cuomnion assault
(arnal Knowledge
FIRST COURT
Rape
SECOND COUNT
Robbery under arms
THIRD COURT
Robbery with aggravation


DATE OF TRIAL
(Tuesday) the 16 day of
May, 2006 and the following
days.


......................................
Registrar
Supreme Court of Judicature


INVITATION FOR BIDS

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
BASIC EDUCATION ACCESS AND
MANAGEMENT SUPPORT ROGRAMME
Loan No. 1107/SF-GY
Code No. B1.1G.o95
SUPPLY OF GOODS AND RELATED SERVICES

1. The Government of the Co-operative Republic of Guyana has received
financing from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) towards
the cost of Basic Education Access and Management Support (BEAMS)
Programme. It is intended that part of the proceeds of this financing
will be applied to eligible payments under the contract for the Supply
of Goods and Related Services.
2. The Ministry of Education (herein after called the Purchaser) now invites
sealed bids from suppliers of Inter-American Development Bank Regional
and Non-Regional Member Countries for the Reprinting of RALP
READERS.
3. Interested eligible bidders may obtain further information and may
purchase a complete set of the bidding documents by written
communication addressed to the organization listed below or by applying
in person between 09:00 16:00 hours Mondays to Fridays except on
public holidays to:
Project Manager
BEAMS Programme
Project Implementation Unit
109 Barima Avenue
Bel Air Park
Georgetown
GUYANA
Tel. Nos.: (592) 226-3332 or 225-4626
Fax No.: (592) 225-2773
4 The cost of one set of bid documents shall be a non-refundable sum of
four thousand Guyana dollars (G$4,000.00) in the form of cash or
Manager's Cheque.
5. a Bids must be placed in an inner envelope bearing the name and address
of the bidder.
b. The sealed inner envelope must then be placed in an outer envelope
addressed to:
The Chairman
National Procurement & Tender Administration Board
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown
Bids must be clearly marked at the top left-hand corner of the outer envelope
BEAMS 'BID FORTHE REPRINTING OF RALP READERS'
6. A Bid Security covering 2% of the bid price must be submitted along with
the bid.
7. Bids must be placed in the Tender Box of the National procurement &
Tender Administration Board atthe abovementioned address on or
before 09:00hourson Tuesday, June 20, 2006. It will not be
necessarytosubmit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
However, the employer is not responsible for bids not r e c e i v e d
thereof on or before the time and date specified for receipt of bids.
Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.
8. Each bid must be accompanied by a valid NIS and IRD Compliance
Certificate for firms registered in Guyana.
9. Bids will be opened at a public ceremony in the presence of those bidders
or their representatives who choose to attend immediately after 09:00
hours on Tuesday June 20, 2006 in the Boardroom of the National
Procurement & Tender Administration, Ministry of Finance Compound,
Main & Urquhart Streets, Georgetown, Guyana.
10. Bids will be on sale beginning Wednesday May 17, 2006 until Friday June
9,2006.

PERMANENT SECRETARY
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
CO-OPERATIVE REPUBLIC OF GUYANA


--- -e U


Sunday Chronicle May 14, 2006


Page A


................ .......... .....
.................. .. .... ...........





S; unday Chronicle May .14,. 2006


GNCB is requesting the under-mentioned persons or anyone knowing their whereabouts
and of the vehicles below-mentioned, to kindly make contact with its Office situated at
77 Croal Street & Winter Place, Stabroek, Georgetown or at telephone numbers 225-4346
or 225-6971 as a matter of urgency.


Name

Claire Marks

Sewsarran Kadar


Vehicle

Bedford Truck

Massey Ferguson Tractor


Massey Ferguson Tractor


Last Known Address

230 South Ruimveldt Gardens, Greater Georgetown

22 Strathavon, Cane Grove, East Coast Demerara


Registration Number

GDD 9389

17224


12067


CAREER
OPPORTUNITY


* ,~(.4 P~*tI


AIR CARGO

BUSINESS

DEVELOPMENT

MANAGER


Interested candidates
should submit their applications to:


MANAGE
HUMAN RESO
LAPARKAN HOLI
C/O WILLIAM FOGAI
34-37 WATER S
GEORGETC


LAPARKAN, a Leader in Caribbean
and Worldwide Shipping, is looking for
an individual interested in building a
career in a fast paced, exciting and
challenging industry.

The successful candidate will take on
responsibility for working with industry
professionals in the local and
international markets to cultivate new
businesses.

The incumbent should have a University
level Business Degree and an
entrepreneurial drive to perform in a
leadership capacity; champion and
promote products and nurture new
initiatives in the development of the
business model.

The individual must be self-driven and
disciplined and at ease in a highly
regulated industry. Must be able to
function in a time flexible manner
dictated by vagaries of an
operations-based environment.

This position will evolve into a strong
profile for the Candidate and allow for
interaction at all levels of the society
and regulatory authorities.

ER,
URCES,
)INGS LTD,
RTY BUILDING,
STREET,
)WN. No later than May 20, 2006


GUYANA SUGAR CORPORATION INC.
SKELDON SUGAR MODERNISATION PROJECT


LINK CANAL MOLESON CREEK TO SKELDON ESTATE

Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc. (GUYSUCO) invites expressions of
interest from contractors for the bush clearing of the reserve, and
excavation of a navigation canal between the backlands at Moleson
Creek and SKeldon Estate.
The works comprise approximately; clearing of 25 hectares of mixed
bush and stripping of 35000 cubic metres of organic material on firm
land, excavation of 94000 cubic metres pegasse in swamp land, and
excavation of 220000 cubic metres of suitable soil as dams on both
sides of the canal and as an empolder dam.
The rates payable would be GUYSUCOs standard rates.
The works to be completed July 01 to October 31, 2006. *
Further information is available upon application in writing to the
address below.

Expressions of interest should be received by May 28, 2006 at the
address below and should include the equipment to be used, work
programme, and experience of the Contractor/Site Manager.

The Project Manager
Skeldon Sugar Modernisation Project
Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc.
Booker Tate Project Office
Skeldon Estate
Berbice

Tel: (592) 339 2214/3630 Fax: (592) 339 3632, e-mail: PeterL@guysuco.com


A








SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006 1A


YANA ELECTIONS COMMISSION


I GECOM



CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION 2006




LIST OF UNVERIFIED REGISTRANTS

The Elections Commission would like to advise that those persons whose names and addresses appear below
are required to visit the Offices at which they were registered to have their addresses verified between Monday
15h May, 2006 and Monday 29'" May, 2006 during the hours of 10:00 to 19:00 on Weekdays and 10:00 hrs and
04A-f) h S tnn d Sh di \ri c> '


I v 1 11rs on V aI ulrays anl lu un uays.





List of Unverified Registrants at CharitylPomeroon

.NAME ADDRESS
IENGH. RICARD) [TON FIELD. ESSEQU'IBOCOASl


.-... ....... ... ...... ...

List of Unverified Registrants at Parlk East Bank Essequbo_


NAME ADDRESS
(MOAM3ED.SHOUREEN : 72 BELLE PLAIN, WAKENAAM, ESSIEUIBO RIVER
BIOODHAN. PAUI. NANDALALL LOUISIANA LE('UAN, ESSE))IBO RIVER
S N. CHETLOUISIAN. LEGUAN. ESSEQUIBO RIVER


List of Unverified Registrants at Plantain Walk, West Bank Demerara


NAME ADDRESS
ALLIED. FAlZUEL N VREED. ENN-IOP.0 \BD)
iBAPTISTE. HERMAN BEST.'AREA. WCD
iBUDIO3). DEREK ID BEST VILLAGE E. (D |
IEOLALL. SATISH GOED FORTUIN IOLD ROAD. Wil)
I LHARAMPAIIL 13 SISTERS VILLAGE, WHO
iDYAL. MAHIINDRA 9 SCHOOL ST GOED FORTUI. WBD L
iFRANC). IR VIVE. LA- FOR(E. IVBI)
IFRANCE.OVID )VIVE. LA- FORCE. WH1I)
iGANPAT. PRIYA 6I SISTERS VILLAGE. BD
GILL. LOVERN NISIE.S 'LI BLIC ROAD. WB )
IGOMES. DENNIS11 12 IST.iNLEY1ITON, WBD
iGONSALSE. DAVID I, CRANE H SCHEME. WCO
iRRIFFITH. RAY BIST FORESHORL.W B.D
3JAIR9AM. JAINARINEI 7 PUBLIC RO.AD, LA G(.RANG() WBDi
IANMCR9K. SAMA1A M 3 ST.3(10 FO'N. ) WBD.
IKALLU. ROOPNARAIN 427 GOUl FORTIN 9S;AREA, WBD
IMAfEI-.0DARFAAN lAlEASTTFMPLES SWINVDSORIORLST. .C .
iM.sNGiAR. SUiRINA K POST S'IRET WINDS(R FORES'. W.'.I)

|MIENDONCA.AL'BREY 73 BELLA DAM. POUDEROYEN. WBD
MLETHLAND. IVAN BELLE WEST. CANAL No 2. tH BD
iPERSAUD. A)l I3. 1 A (.DAM(. Po)DEROYLN. Bi)D
ilERSA1IO. GANESH 13 0GOOD HOPE". CANAL No. ;1.-WBD

'... ... . ...... ... ..... ........ ...........
:PERSAUD, KAMINI 14 S5WANST, POI.DIFROYEN. WI .D

ERSAUiD."PARNANAND Itl 4, l)A(iO I'VIlT.A-, WBD
:P'liRSAU:. RAJLSII 541 I()3) 3RKii;1N 'i1LLA(2I}. )HD
...... ..... ................ ....... .... ........ .. .
PESAUD. I 4 (LAND CA'AL N' .3900
!PERSAUD-iNASII DEBRA 3 I)I: ST. P.)D?01DROYF)N. \LH. D
3RAHAMAN. SAI3 A tC 3Ol iNTRIY VILLA. R.IZEIll i. W.9 I
:RAJPAUL.ISHIlADE SARI.AVRIE:.LAN.BD ..
RAMLALL.AMGi .2.1 BOC B.BHl.I*1S SCIItM:. CANAL.; V11.D


ROClERS. ARY li BELLE' E':'l. iANAL 9No 2. kH B
:SALIMA 1SAM19,ROODA 9 POl I):[R(OYI:X.aB)
SIAR3X). RA:.L 17WIA ilI[RON'T. W) D "'A
^'3~AM ['4''3 '9. (3.. i3,.339l3I-.lR) 1 1.
'SANICHARA..TO1'ARAM IAHARLEM. (I
;SIE(HARRAN,fiMADAJ "C(A'(;LAND Di)A\!. Dul!)E.k()YEN \\.BI.D
3SE1(T)AEl, 3VADEO) 51 A JALO I,.')SI rST') '(T ') .3'
:SHARMA.YOG(:SHWAR !3-1 SINGII SISIERSVIi.Ar.W. .'
SI-GH.CAT.vANTIiE S. llHSLiOS.L ANALNo i B.UD :
3SINGHi'\\WAI TIL !67(.11Ail. B1ACK.W(1 ''
OIMAS. I)AVID (NS.RN.. DAM CANA \ i. .BD
WY (ONEY: O R 33 O.ROADI). \-Hip.tB ..
SW1HAl1 AllOl0' ,'-.' MARYH\RLitt<'l), -


-Commissioner of Registration.
Chief Election Ollicer
COMmISSIOuEBI o s0l(ESTRAT)IOi

List of Unverified Registrants at East Bank Demerara

NAMI ADDRESS
SAIiEEIR AZmEZE 243 FOURI)H SfrREl, CRAGL EBD
SKAMINI KUMAR I2 FRIENDSHIP EBD
ORLANDOIP VICTOR 247 FRIENDSII P.EBD
... ... .... .. .. .. ........ ......
)DEONARINE SOKW1IAH fRi3NDSHIP SQUA'llNG AREA. EBI)
.BHANMATIE SIMBOO |37 HARRY AVENVE. FRIENDSHIP, EBD

:........................................................
VAN)ESZA HIANIFF i656 SECTION A, DIAMOND HOUSING SCIEM3,. REBD
iTAVI, E GALSGOW i'5k NEW HOPE END. E B.D

IIIARLYNr 1( 0ODGE :26 (OVENT GARDEN ISLN ), fL)
INADII' GEORGE 0 2S PETER S HALL. EBD
iJNELA JOAQIN |4 rR IENDSHIIIIB. EBD
ICHRIS A CHAN 38S FIRST STREET. C(RaIGEBD
i.................................................... .............................. . ... ................................................................................
OLANDA T C\AMBRIDGE i33 KANEVILLE. GROVE. EBD
INARENDRA N SINOH {II20' R\ S01UAl' ING AREA, EBD
i ............... ... ......... ...... ...........- ........ ..... ........ ....... ....................... ... .. .......... ..................................... ..... .
:VINESHUAR DOOBAY 3 ECCLESOLDROAD.EBD
CAREY R LYKEN 211 NEW Sii'Fl ERS STREET, MOCHA. BD
:DWYTE I TROTMAN j59 SECOND STREET, MOC A. EBD
:(:INI)YA MOSES i31 VI PURLI( ROAO. EBD
ROY A HARRIS "244 SA\lA I'OA 'POI G(,ROVE. EBD
TRI('IA FRAN(COS I 5! lGROV)L HO3SISNG S('CH)IEM EBI)
'KENISHIA 1. CUSH BARNWI:LL NORTII. MOI3X'19 ARC'AI)A, iBD
1:E1IT E WILLIAM:LS i.3 NELSON STREET. MOCIHA.EBD)
'OUINCY R STOBY '23 NEW SETTLERS S1REEI. MOCIHAARCADIA. RBD
:MARK W GILKES 122 NELSON STREET. MOCH. EBD
IATON'.A SROSE S'3 MOCH'AR AI)IA HOUSING SCHEME, FRBD
IENDY P LL:PE 3 CEIMEr hRY ROAD. MOCIA, EBD

iRL'THAALL3EYN: BARNWEI.L, NORITI M(OC1AARCADIA. EBD
SAMPSON HAROLD i3," MOCHA HOUSING CHEME. EBD
)RODWIYN R BI|YRNEELON1( S RE IT MOHA .EBI)
NII,'.SA ND9'3Y ,1 3 0 fL& I 933RLL MOCIIA.33l)
(.LIVI9 D tIASKIN ?i 7 NEW 1'ETTI. ER STRBIE, ARCADIA, )IJ)
TENEFASARTI'liR 3CARRYL'S I'LACE. MOCHA VILLAGE. IFBD
S:LEROYA 'ICKHAN 22 BARNWELL. NORKIH MOCHA VILLAGE, EBU
DI).LBERT R HI3'SOsN NORTH BAItNWF.L.. MOCHA SQUAITINT AREA. EBI)
PILGRIMM BNRHlIANlll. 'KANEI-VI.ESQlATrINO.REA H. D
NEWTONN FRSER |illi K.AFVILEL. tiROVE E B O
:I(MESH I'EREBHO)WAN :,7' KANLVIILLE. GROVE. E.B.DtM
GAT"RAM P3HRAI 14CA31(\ i B.DtbM
:sHAIaMA.SARIR',
RA-HE J ALFRED) I KANV[ILLE..ROV)C.Ea B
.OSI3 l A]'.''i.()tR PI3BI. ROA). I''' 3033 9 i 3 D

R.1AMEKTHA! Si\,G 3"' il 3OR(l\ ilO \G1 S3.H3tI. 33 I
SIRES; IPA)IA[l.AD : A.iiREYl Y 'LL. 74 SECC. BLY GROE, EBD
IEON RA:MNAU1.1III U'93C.BlY ,GRoVI.EBD
AVID R AM30.A1,R 400 i HIR) S iBRlEI. (9R E HSC.' FHD
IAIMRAITI ,TlIURLID!iR 74 GROVc 1E'USIING SCIIEML..EB I)
LBROY iARI.EQtIN B (RANS.S'HEM".CRAIG Ei)D
.13 .. .9 . .. .. . ..3. ...... .................... .. ... ... .....
VASiI rALI IEDAR )b GlR.\NI( .iEIME CtRAI. E BD
.3ANESS3A ,;WIGINS 30 .SAMAn .i P'UINT. GROV(.EBit
) \CEAH P'RE1SC'113$ 11\' I 3 I 1 .. LOCK Y1 3 ,R, V ',EH
\ALRLt C MMiMNiS 4 47 A\IflAI'01 1T. RA0LL91] 3 )
VIDIlAW .i3 i.Lill.O, AT' :'; ] lrI) : \ES' t.ROVE BI)
II{',\MATTII .DANN.T A- lSTINCT ;A,. BLOCK Y GOLOI'N GROVI)'.l, )
SIlA. NDLU, G( I'Tl; f-KiTP K Rl't 'Rli.R.SOESDYKEI.IN Nliil AA :
CIRISil'tAPLE I.AKR0 LKLL'R.R" 'OiNSDYAMk ft\li)Nl\I Y
I liRIs [l 1RRiS (i..\30) 1 t 0.\'.\ i '!F 0 IF i).,)M 9) 333',3


NAME ADDRESS
BR'i: YA(RWOOi) B (illr213 ST. .OE IYKJ, F.B 11 V

WVINMN JO iSlFSDYK EBD IM

CHARLES lSHER iSO5ESDYE. E B.DEM
)DA 3 OL LAS TON II lAUARI! mVILLAGE,SOESD )YKE I3NDE(kN IGiHWAY

WAllIEDA MOH1AMID 1293 DIAMOND NE l SCIIEMF. LBD)
I'ARAD.V S.iHA.DEO :426( SET'.'ION B. Bi.()CK X DIAMONDD) NKW (CHIMEl, E.B) 0

SI3Ei KNI KlH'\.T ARO lIAM(i NI)SQI;ATI[N(', ARI-A.I :B3 I

sTEVE SI1NGH 202 SECTION C. DIAMOND, :BD
COLLINS WALDRON i982 SECTION C. DIAMOND. EBD
:CLER'EK ITORNHILL to SECTION B. BLOC( X. DIAMOND II. SCHEME. LBD

WAVINE DUNCAN 162 DIAMOND NEW SCHEME. EBD1
IAOBLEUR.SNAU 14 COV(NT GARDEN SOUAITING AREA .EBD
" kAS- ----- --------------------
iOXAN JAiKARRAN 2 COV-NI" (GARDEN SQOlTIN'(i AREA ,fD)

ERROLJORDAN "395 BLOCK .. DIAMOND, EBD

3iI MIIAMIoN ) E 48SEC(I)ON B ,LOCK Y. DIAMOND,.ED

NADEENTULSHI 1530 NEW SCHEME. DIAMOND. EBD
ADRnAN FORDYCE 4 DIAMOND NEW SCHEME. EBD
RYAN GOBIN IIS LITTLE DIAMONDEBD

RAJNIE SAR(IDEANr 7 rLTLE DIAMOND SQIATIING AREA, hiN)

ULIAN JOHNSON 1295MUNROE STREET. PUBLIC PARK. EBD

JAISHRE DEONARINE 2(5 PIROSI'PE(, EBD

JESSE GIBBS 57 BLOCK X. DIAMOND, EBD

FAZIL RAIIMAOA DIAMOND SQUATTING AREA.E B.D
PRAMDAI BETHUNE DIAMOND SQUATTING AREA, EB.D
AVINASHRAMCIIARRAN DIAMOND SQUA'TING AREA. E.B.D

FARIDA KHAYUM DIAMONDSQUATTING AREA., E.B.D
COLN IPRESCOD FRIENDSliP SQUATlI'NGAREA. EBD

SAVITRI RAMSINGH 277 GROVE SQlATlTNG AREA.EBD

OMESH RAMROUP 3. 4 KANEVIlE3 SQUATTING AREA, EBDD

ANDREA JOIN 475 KANEVILL~.GROVE, EBDI
HIIBERI JERRY DIIAMOND SQUArCING AREA. E.B.0

DESIREE PADMORE DIAMOND SQUATTING AREA. E.B.D
KAYCIA ANDRIES DIAMOND SQUATTING AREA. E.B.D
ASIIANTI MAY 34FRIENI)SHIP. EBD
MOHAN 2 NEY HOPEI.BD

LINDIN CARMICIHAEL 47 KANEVI.L E, Grove( IBD

RAYON POWLEY 140 KANEVILLE, GROVE. EBD
TENE1KAANVIELD 5503THIR) FIE.D), KANFVILLE. GROVE Elll)
ROBERT PHILLIPS 944 KANEVILLE.GROVE .EBD)

JANEL ARJINE 746 KANEVILLI. (.ROVE. EBD
1ESHANA WHARTON 1728 KA\NEVILLE, ROV:, EBD
TOM'ESIIIABISIHOPI pil KANEVILLE.( ROVE .EBD

CHRISHANA PRESCOTT ('52 KANEVILLE. EBD
ENELLARIDS i63t KANEVII.LY.GROVE.E.B.DI)

AFFRAZ IS1MIAIL 544 KANEVILLE. GROVE. EBD
ANDY KAllARUI 25 KANEVILLIE.GROVE .I EBD

RYAN FRIANCE 49 KANEVILLE. GROVE, FBD.

VIJAI BARLOW i710(lANI:Vl.I.EG (ROVEHI)
ROBERT THOMAS i'29 SAMATTi POINT. GROVE, EBD

AI.TIIIA I L)S 5I. S; M N A P(')['Il. ('Li{OVL' B H I)
PH'IILIP)JU\FS iI0( 0LDI:\(ROViEEl)

DROP.iECIIATRAM I24BBR ,E(CCLES .EBD

SIIAM CHAiRAM !I.;. BB. (ECCLS, LB))
YASHARDIA OLA 67 BB. IFc(IIS .3iBD

JERMAINE J)NES 174 ECCLES HOUSING SCilEM E. B.D
ROHINI AlAlt0 MAN C t(IC LES. 1E)

LYDIA Il'(ilS I62 PUBLIC' ROAD. FRIIENDI0ilP. Eil

ROMMEL DOLLIER STCI'THBERT1l !3SI(N liNh.ibc.a R:; i

)9D3 qrwil, Ri) 1 23, GROVE. IE B D

GEtiROR R3IC'ARRDS ? K.? L\kEVI1LLE., GROVE. EBD
RICIARD) 4TIIHO S 141FRIEn!iIP.EBi)
3H3A31TI KIN' I'"30 P'lRST ) STR T.6,RovQI \ SCHEM3,St'-lL.91. )
I''NIOR ',A\( F2'h3 A \lA.I A IP1Ui.. GRi(V 1:11l)
OFRP.\ TRi:\\( I 8 ( tIA 01.RC \U. HOI 01 ( 3HEMEl i3)
il3V( 3O(3 l 3|'l l (', 5 3l 3 ,HAl') SI3 S 3l I II. i i)

FRANKLIN C S.AMIT. i9 SXELSON TRFEMT. U( EBD :

IINOH. EAS IM N 213( GRO)\E S'ICAITIN(; ARI-A .E LB)

VTRITA JEFFEY 1451 SECOND FI LI). K.\NEVLLE. GROVE..CBI3l

R011OlNARI\F i5;XKAMNVI.L!.GiRO\ K 1B

3.IVTRIE PrRSAEI) 4SKA\NiVIlLE GROI E.B

HAI.R NARI\ "- S KAM\'I 1 i. .,ROVif. I" 31) I
JAMER J.RAMIPERS\IWD |,I;Et0'TiU 39.'(iROVl\ NF' 3SCHEMEr..rB1)
LORNI)ANIH.- .K.M A\[IL.! i GRO\t I l) |


ADOLI'lI li.lL


|.;"r \ !i i )\ 9! I i)3


3.3).1..9 3 3..3........ ............ -.7.(-3 32.991933.3 3R3, 3,33-)
( R'1;D,\'F E fO : A' M Il'. R Tk L .I . ..
P',,1) 0`4 \F R STkf F,










2A SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006


CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION 2006







LIST OF UNVERIFIED REGISTRANTS


NaME ADOPE4S


.aSm. I icand



l't'tar h,:aia


AIa I au IIlkrb.i R c.a a
4\l'. ,ao r Blrim k Gaja. .

46 Rox)\a;i Bumnl i Garden. (Ju rg e w(.o n


List of Unverified Registrants at South Georgetownflransfer)


NAME


ADORPEE


NAMEu

.JAIRA1 CIHALFLALL








'AI MATI 1

I1ILL4M ROISS

MI Hl l.\L iOD.(' Sl \

Lit l i.l'. ULPI"PPF R

CL. 'DE[11 Al 1 Sll






,ROOP.I. \LL ]Ntll


MARVA BAl.'M11


Sl\'il A .\I KKURD 1S

l .\ROL BAR.I-E.1

.ADR:AN II)PklINSON






J:'DEA PATILRSO"'

SA'IHAl.l .MOOREF

NAIM.11IA(Ai (Cm
1JOYL)1 \A'ILL'


:AI.'IN HENDRI KS





















IMKI'A;LL DLlt'OT.
A a 'D N a P








ALLEN DANIELS
Ff'.1')" 11iAM N


IADDRE iS

0, SLIt ION "C1 BL Y., (AGROil: IB




aa9 IRfA E NEW HIOLSiSIN SCIHEM\E, LBI)

'1.6 'l( I ION l !IL- ( ,K ('a I.1 A'< iROVh .All)

2 SO',NDYKLE. B.DI Al

PADA\MS ROA).D'. SOLtDYKL. L B.DEM

250 1'HIRD 'i f.lE I'. ('R\l(il 'IBD

:121'I A, BA C X 1)1 \\1IOND ,F B.DIEM
O5)1 'E( A. BLC X .DIAMD). EB.DI:IM

1.15 EC( A. Lt XDIAMOND. I h DEM
i i X. DIAMOND.I, E i i'AlM

20lIS1 S 'i ( BI.C X.DIA.M1 NI)D, 1. B DEM




.13" DaI.MOND NEW. S( IHEMI. I. B ni'M
Q6 BL' X. DIAMON\L NW SCIIlllt E II )!:l

S58 DiA' NIDNV, 11H'IF. I B D!EM

12 ITC (. LBL' X .DIAMOND. E.B DEM

!12 DIAMNMio NDNEW S(CIME. El B l["M

*.' i.. L a. .1 11 I I I


'1IER1TF! .LING Q, QIATTING AREA. 1: Bi D'l

33BIL ECCLES. E.B.DEM

1i 1. N.A. PA .RK .. DITEM

DIl M NO SF 'l 1DAM. E.B D

; ISTGIRiVE)I. B.DEM

I1O Sk1 B, BLC X. DIlAMiNDIL .i B.D.I
'2 K.\NEVII i" t(RUVI', l" DFM
o'0 K.NX''f.'i... GROVE f B.DFM
)8 47 11ILLD KAKRVILLE.1 ROVE, B DI.M

S7, LkAN.1ILLI' A.ROVE. 1.B DlIM
171 K,\1\'.1 LI1 F. GRO\IT. Eh D EM

878 KANEVILLE. GROVE, E.B DEM


11- KANEVILIE GROVE. E B.DF1M
341 KANEVILLE (.RO\1:1 .1B DIM

1'25 (aI\ifR ERIL S`R .I'T,.!( LI':. IE B !D M

.73 '.'al i1. 1. H a Df IL

i1 IfIRST1 STRI II .GRiV IE 1101 'SINGS( il L. I 111BD

.\) llBRDS.i :REE l.(RA]( LBlD
4-, I iR STRf'l" i. DIAUMOND Fl{ MNiG ''iffM-. I R.ll M
t'" Bit ( \ ft O:N DIAMOND). f I 11 M


List of Unverified Registrants at SOUTH GEORGETOWN


HAME
AlaK,',a" I:,:',,












ai],% 'A ll.l



L latl Rail:
Da>v aK k.:. r:

Jahna a, Ia


I'tadla', 11 Ro'.a:

Beri;:rd!'J fri:,






Hilc i A ;:.n-. ,






lay'o: 1,IBa I

kin. .l( '.,i a


A,]1 J FIpluh n




fl.,n a a,S A



F-.-'aa'. l 9'i,-'.-


ADOi-EL:

S[1 atQ 1 .,En,: l,,'aLt n'



'I A c '.,,, l t,,, L a a, ,atat,
22 ,,.d i : f'ia ; i.ihi .; io; ita


*\;br4e' Blrk:r !-.ad (i.:orgeltic






Re a 0e ,S!o.9h1 t ddt G I .alar, a,
( d,6.'nll M.i':' l. (ar ei. I



' iih h I S \\',;iA P,., ( .rgelo':tli
6:., a.H i:-i. , ';




300 Naa.1 I R Vll d Aa.' n

-. Ko:!u:, A8: -\ n -. isl Bt;I. )mca.lra


256at V .i "ii f (tVA' t: Sll

5 W ','! R 'it U ste. { wegal el


ai it.,n[." V :!s i y. t Y'lt







I 1,. ^ I. .I' .a ( lT ,.l ; : 'o t



. : c I ;.:; ork' r R, ,
1511 R l... R \ I. .orp h-,.


NAME ADORES

M\adi (e ouar., [l55 Sitelwdore 1I

Bc.on F R::doph [3Hon, &K.tdc i Sit
(' low',!l .(' t( C!.A, I

L -ea, 'Saauil 430Cul-de-Sac.l St

D nIh Ainm -,K K [.Ltfiild SI. \Vinman ilie,. (tergeilw n

(io M Rapil B rickidamn Stabiock. (a'rgetm wn

lm pt eItA h! oQ Ljamahl: Park. 1F:l.La Palat c;. ;c,. rlto

anl r .1 G(iisdl 4, [Ilda aL Sk Wcrk i: Ru,. (t oratoant

idrifam: KhlIir 6 .i"'S S[ Aihoml-.au;ivit.or lown |

O(lobcI EinFi Rt os.t lnd I I\ I ARe l St. Lac-ttl i. aOw-gton I


l
i Pllmimn Revli d a53 L; a St ,lei2 R \iSdt. ti;i'lRu, |

\k Ph crsS ('iil ;: Ia;, R 'eidl I IS. (air'-g.e: l

Jhl l n llcl. t 58 Bell i a l'eik -tI-IRiS ('i : c,- i

)a, A'la 4 A'>.tWNWVcl VtidillS.(kaa,l,:

I)un.lus P.ill1:a ,4k West R1. AdtI Ht S. (ior c-:w.


Deo itr a', Tetn, 3 N036 oihR. eilidt II G ','e"alato

f idc. K ,upiplll JR, Ea,>, St ( t i. 't 'or3 ctomwi

B.ean A.W\Vad. 12ChaI rkia S C falrn. .o It:iit:

it.ldi r'e (orih S9i t luS .Atrit. i Sa ,l ,i ai k D lmeli:rai

Na.In? Rockn ., 31 !ndd'peldoiucu Boiile.itd Geo'iiowi;

Ktl M.rd1n I44 Ru- ll C To-n (t;oi':iya

Bft hailat dila!t i lii,!:> IDi\ c.

D)I t. (L l d.i: .11. (!kor

"iin 'a'T \- i: 9C SlitrlI) tF it



]ltai r.Y' 'h hloni i. V \ ',St Albk ),to''i, (iG ta-c,;.'tu

r\'ii;.;i L i 19-' Cuimif o & .u

St, hurla, Geori goI'atn

IkM i liN ,1 i 3 Da3 l S,\ i l Metdo, B ati, '.G orgjlow

\iliham> Roa' : I'-l D'l t Wb. s \ ri :,ii'' Ge(Ir ietownI



Buli i R.l I 1 ril n -n:l Loi: (Gcrm cini I

Kli.:l m :m ed 41 R 'bb Si l:ic-)l.- aor, ~g i

l.' r M..ie1 i41'4 Cun, \ewe A u e. eG., .-.r, 'i

,\lh.Ac Sa;;!k a 2 illal I:n. aB'.t," ; v- r.a a,

' I ] tu i | fluST E!, 13 .--d :i

S 11 c I ... ..k l-n.( 'or u ,

ID, :R i75"Dtll ':: 6,: C7iic e a "!

1 ..b 9; A \t 9u |: .^. \6 lot S! L. ,v r. i',Geargtaai: -

1 SAnM12 \i ,id aBr k(ad, ,, (".'a26 tan



------------ 7 0 nmS torm-v l,,(w




11.
i C-'i r: 40 Pri, S R :man il". (irno- ovn

l\Aii^k L i:a i '4.' 1 seo:( a SI A\ ,: ', 1. i afgrlt af:







l R ;?,l'.:< )' .'t 1:'12 h Ml.'-t i .Ar at I :a




,l aanti' ',a i | Lz.l \ R t:l" Pi 6. ( ,fLa"t it
I-,-, '' Ul. i" R'bi '& :i.. K .:! .! .' _____..


l A, Stx,, 1. ,ita t ,o .

I L a:Ul l aRbb a ,','t





S ?A | Bo! p h.:k ________

nfe Ci. F iYcii!.":

n .k a S.,; 1Be.a6t. W5 :a:.en-Ri. ( r .t:: t



Iaa :-co ni B,, tn e quan A' i:. 0', A'n
i--...-------- -----............

K'. .ttta 11ANjt '. RL l kq Il U '-.'a,' I l ota ma

A I I






I-al t t ,,: / 1 'I la'.: a' ,. ite'a, .
I .li .R: id' .i azA l:a i
t





1-o :; Ih :.t R 1' ,. a a 'a.L a L 0 :<:
:i<,, t la..- --~-. T :pt \ -, -ka~t, ,,: , ,


H 9FYES EISTA(C.' 4 iNDEPENDIENC IIOULEVAtRD.GEORG(;EIOWN

iEFORiGE LA EREt:I;I s .3,S PRIN'.CE SI REE lT. WIORTMANVILLE

iOCIOBER StiERW\\IN .11 LASI LA I'tlENTfENCE GfEORGElOWN

uI1FMir ON I. DOI '11l 6 IIOWI.S & KETLI-Y STs .CHalRLFSTOWN. GEORGETOWN

KING RYAN F It)':RBAN STRIE1. \)WORI'M \AVILLI:, GEOR(IE I'OWN

1IBOBB TREVOR 23 DA SI.VA.STRBET. M ADOI\ BANK. GEORliE IOWV

ClI'MMINGS ROLYLI.AND 2530 LAYOUl SIREl1T NORII R;11 MVE:LDT. Il':ORGtIOWN

CARRRAWAY Cl IF'ION '542 lAST RUIMV'tFI.D)T H1OI SING SCHEME. (iI)ORiGETOWN

SPRO.)L\'LL AL, I('Kk 1I 7 IAMEIS S'TEIIl I ALBO(YSTIOWN. ()iERG.EiTO\tN

CLlARKE T'lfRAC.lEY 34 ENTUI S 'RE'T, WlRK.-EN-RISI'. lGEORGilE. I'O N

BOODR1AM KIIILAI 5' JAMLLS Sl'RI11"I'. .E B UAL1S I OWN. G(L(1OR(;: lWN

PERSAUD) TAIA a AlY'tIISl iEEI 'WERK.IN-RUIS'(. GEORG'ilOll\WN

DAZZELL DEXTER 3I BENIt STREEC' \EL\ RK-EN-RUS I. (IEOR(Ei LOWI'

I I:TZROY ( K. l1Zil 7 LAINi A'VEMiE. N lEO Ri'I Oa N

SHOPE1 SANDRA vw SECOND STREE'I. AGRIOl.'OlA. EAS 11 BANK tDEMERARA

BACCHiS SEAI.\ 274- MF ADO BROOK GARDENS, I'.lORI E'IOWN

HIKNDR1CKS DO)NR,'A 2 RUI\l\ ELDII I'STATI

'.RANDONII LI'HfR 11PII2 AST RVl:.DI.IT SQ! ATl'ING. RFA.. GIORGETOYWN

ROB1I-RISALTHEIA P'l:2 1AST RVEL0I) 1' SOt A1lTIN ARI:A. ((iR(;GIl'O\'N

GILL S MANTIIlA lF20 GUYHO" PARK

'MARKS VERNIIL LA P'EN I INCL PItBLI ROAD. aE'ORlGE( l'WN

DLE CAM\P 'WINSFORID I9' SI'NFLOWIER CIRCLE S.R P1' GORlaE'TOWN

WILLIAMS IARL 42; RIN SI R11KT. WELRK- VI- RFiS'I. (FORG'EI()N

IHEC1OR SHERWIN I?1) CAMPBELL S REE 111 ALBOUYSITOWN. GEORGE'O\'WN



List of Unverified Registrants at North Georgetown


NAME

E1TH111 INE HOPE

YOOGRAJ IlIKANANODAS

JASON ('. I 1-V

.I.OR.lENEY' I TALJI

(I\111 \MP:R1 ill

TA.M IY R. 1 R\ IIC1HA1.

KIVI\ /I BANNIM It

4VERY'D BiNBlRY



DIFZIlA.ARIMl'R

CLEAR I: NURSMl.

I IAVS (.C '.AI VA\

l.CORTI \AL I OP:-

M \1I.W\1 I'IE PI'RS\I11

(CHABRA[R1 A.1ARIB.\

JERI-.IA'X S \A\.O\(;

DEY1NI W. WPLLU

JOANB 1\ M.t1

KIMBRLYM. 'a llM111 IILL



N;I\ONU VAMI pDRE.S'.iU}P
I'%IIIN AI) 1 A l-\la '



A1)FI AG {L X,\G \MOOO

>[.\\-lRD)r ki-LLY

'IRV',.\ AI A l

L AL \.. C %\LM \

Ra\ R'C H \RMI)

C(OR\P C"\LDER
,11999' 91119N111'
Sll.iw +\l'R!

SU[LLN M M( K['Uill.

rIkXARAR.MSIRO(M,

ot'EOf'FRIt OARRA \"Y

ROlMaIl I 111 OR

falEEN ORFF'URD
ILRAO \ ai1'RSAI I;

Al i, t-lI I ( -\Rf.' l



. I \ i \ \1 II110


Lt L;i ., I O i \ P

\( 'ii R l:)l. \1 l i\l 1\

a 1111 \illnRR lI

RYl \ i (Gll.L.

'.1\ $1ilf\\'Ni[

'>l'" I RA\(L)ltWK .\l

f\vIELP l)t\\

iKNk MARS
1[f.'A19 L'.L' I l..


ADDRESS

;2 PATIRE N 1sN TURKI:YEN. <.REATiR tlEO)RlGTOWX

03 I. L;K1 "'.IREE 1 '. KINGS'TON. GEORG:.E IOWN

I. AMRAI SI R.:l'. 01. ENSTS.ON. ((RFOR.lGt)OWN

i: I'IR.4 I & I.inl S1. i'R91.111 A!.9ERT'1O\VN. GlUROal 1 "9'OWN

2 i11RS1i & IlH1 S IRLI. :.TS. ALBL-ERTIO 'N. (EOR(II. OWN



4Ill 0)lRI1II IRH LT. I'OL'NSI F)o\.F ]tORl'[1TOaWN

t'4 OURifi' l' RE1 1'.11 LBlRI't1n 9 1', l a(IlR l, F :OVN
'9, ILl 1,991 1111 1.1119,,11 10999



!i-lo ..MIA ll.TRI I'T 9 RT MM IB RG l OR(l o' N

I' I PIKE S 'R1EE kl I'YL Y 1EfORGf 1'1OW 1

,2 1DI PIKE Si RI El. KlI TY,' <:OR(lGI THt N

12, riNi.MAS Sl RLET, K!i'r.' (EORGLIEO\

;l l)OiWI)N (,SfR:N I iKITIY.
.:i BIS
:S 'lO(NlI\t :DPl'. BL19 j */.r].IIT .* i'al)t 1S.(,ii uR l1TOW(.N

')Si.4FOITit 'TRElEi L.AMPillLLI.l! L!'.il'(iRGI;-l ',.\

v.;1 ARNI 'If SIRiEll ,1.( AMPBl I l .A 11,1 1 I.I6[ ),R i i \'

' I ILLIAM ITR IEE9 [kI'i K ,f.l.ORt 'O'l.I I' ;

i, )! \( \\ TRI: I lt i t IP' \'il I 1 l l 1WNi


;4a !) \t A l 1 1 91: .1 I 911 )I \ la N tk!T IOV,\

ii A\R ; I i.', ;I \ l)f ] i i \



1)1Sr 1:1\1)4 A L \P9 1.'L S\ (\1..1l9! 1 R1' '
5? Bi (OUK )1 1 '1 \ Uj.RI *, R li. toiLRo < ; I" )',1',

SOPIll.\i '\ \ "IW% (GRI- R i[ R C(>,R(d.iiO ,\

2 11 ( B Ill I 1) 'l 11 i o' IPHIV'l RIL i R K ( R l lola .

;I HtFIELD y li!SUPHI.G\.({IREi:'l[ ; .E>R(;LiL l\'.L N

:1 IHOMASSIRi, T B FlI' ) DP I 19 K a RlI ,AI E R I (a \\ \

5I;2 (IfiON\DHELD5PAi', ILRK -U iL ,1,iI.RtL.L Rii Ho\'

t f ILLD. OPillA. (iRIAI G R f .EOR(ilK\

!27 SOPIIA LI.LlE\ I1ALSOUF.TM'H, iitN:L R GlORGE-Fl.O'

6, PI.I MP'\RK SOPill,GRiA'il;R',IO)RGLOWAN

5 0 11LLD Ut"iIA. {GRFl.Ni LR (,O IOW\N

i, U I !| \ ,t)PilA.',RFA I it R(A ORf(i 1'%\

!;41l.O(,k X i.t \ 1 11) I S1L) II.Ill. 11.i' 'L, 0Rl.1 tI 1

*, 1 ih (K'k X {A Z;" 1 :i 1 !) 1 L' -11 \ .I 1! \D ,\ i : Ni l R I f


:41ot Pili Mio M \ I 'I itr \ >r )Rii lWV

!" |! |1 !; ) 8 1 l SU!'ill \ (RI \ l R ,OR(.ll\', \
( 'A \M RIl ?SOP)['llA {d1';,\'il RdDR tG, l' \

il I )lCTU{RSOLAR'P.LRS


4s SI 'hi SMT R i.E f. l\\ l' i lL 1'.Il OtRU (,(I W!I',"


">B RA (IG iRI.f lSl t K, .\>MPBI I.!L lI' l OfRG! 1)-\

u5 t KIi,(, fRH.i L A\Ilitil f i L ILL LO lRe;i OLL 'L.\
*"*':, ll l il'\l ll \ l \ T 'RKf \f !r(l Tll Gl'; "Ml R(r I

t'_ Hil.LD i t Su ill it Rki "if \ G',RE A,\lf I .T


a. a'... 'a ..... ......


i
i


_ 5 \ -. ,- L i ,.T. ...... .....cr....







SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006 _____3A
----~~~ ~ ~---- ---- ----- -i-~--~~--~


(ONTINUOUS REGIST ON 2006






LIST1 F e.. lhNT"


NAME


NAME
SAkARI. NAL'CiE
DEOLALL BRiDGEMOHANi
HAROAT. DEONARiNE
MORRIS, TERRENCE
WILLS. RONALD ADRIAN
DA SILyA. O'NEIL OWEN
MC KENZIE. JOY
ANGEL. CAROL ANETTA
SUKHAN. HEERDAi
PERSAUD. ZOSH'IA
MASCOLL TENEISHA


ADDRESS


Lst of Unvenfied Registrants at Mal'aicony

ADDRESS
CE HOOP. MAHAICA. E C DEM
03 CHA.MPAGHE. MAHAiCONY ECOD
CHAMPAGN-E. MAHAiCO'NY E.C 0
03 BURMA. AHAICONY E C D
03 B ZESKENDREN. MAHAICONY. EC
'21 AIRY HALL, MAHAICONY. E C D
.07 AIRY HALL MAHAICONY, E. C.D
12 URMA. MAHAICONY. ECD
LOT 3 BROOM HALL, MAHACONY E C.O
MES DELICIES .MAHAICONY. E C D
68 ZESKENDREN. MAHAICONY, E.C.D


List of Unverified Registrants at Onverwagt



Walcott Miiton Hawa'd SBau.hot tilIage. West Coast Beqbi'ce


List of Unverified Registrants at New Amsterdam

*iiE 4000E

DEODAT KRISHNA EDINBURGH VILLAGEE E B.B
ROSS. ALESHAONELLA :41 STANLEYTOWN. N A
HALLLEY DANIEL LAWRENCE. R VRYHEiD VILLAGE W CB


List of Unverified Registrants at Cornvenon


NAME
STANFORD. NOTOYAB.
GR!MES ONICA
PERSAUD~, EJ ..
SEWCHAN. SAVITREE
SUKDEO, aHAIRO
PERSAUD.DHANESH1W'A




NAME
ABRAMS. MERViN
THOMAS ROENELLM.
BENN CAVEANAN
JOSEPH ANiEL R
i HO!HENKIRK. ASHBERT A
00\'I: NORMA J
SENJA'Mi'N. NICK L
04 FREEaS SYLVESTER A


M'AKcOO i\'ERDE" O


NAME


ADDRESS

6 HASSiM STS.LANDS
iB PRINfCETO'WN CORRiVERTON
48B NO 71 VILLAGE COR BCE
1441 LINE PATH. CORR.
31 A NO 57 VILL COR BCE
2' AND59 .ILCO. B CE


List of Unverified Registrants at Bartica

ADDRESS
176 TONGRIPPA HILL. BARTICA
KARRAU CREEK
:183.I ONGRIPPA HILL BARTICA
11 FOUR MILES H SCHEME B ARTiCA
.102 SECOND AVENUE SARTICA
KARRAU CREEK
B LDERABC ROAD
K, ACCON
S'2 AILE BART!CA POTARO ROAD
:': -CUR MILES BiCA H1SCHEME
s5Y-IERAB ROAD SARTICA


:.ist f Unverified Registrats at Wismar

ADDRESS


: HALF MILE. 'W'A
14 !I' E "ENY HL




E. ', / ILL



Ae "IA' '"o.,E E sTE:,. 3
: H&L: MLE I- 3'A
-'A '1RO 'OISN ''U- V


WL \IA IN]- WATCH

WIL.L e SETS




., ^ PHONES


CASH


FREE MINUTES


DVD PLA ERS


n- j7


i .


-Zn







ri E


Rii 'ii,--


i::I.; h:


::r:liii '.iliL;






4A SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1


s j *, i. . ,


The Berbice River Bridge will be a
1.55 km-long floating structure.
Construction is expected to take
18 months, at a cost of 38 million
US dollars. A project of such
magnitude requires much
planning, experience, expertise,
many studies, surveys, analysis
and much time to become a
reality. This was no current
election time consideration. It
was a promise long made, but as
the brief chronology indicates,
the required planning and
thought has preceded
implementation.

1992: Election promise by Dr.
CheddiJagan.
1993. President Jagan attempts
to secure funding for bridge
project during visitto India.
1994: President Jagan affirms
promise during Cabinet
outreach to Berbice.
July 1999: Government issues a
Request for Proposals for a Build,
Own and Transfer (BOT) project
forthe Berbice Bridge.
Feb2000: Ballast Nedam
International is selected from the
five bids received.
Sep 2000: Government and
Ballast Nedam sign a
Memorandum of Understanding
for design, construction,
operation and maintenance ofthe
bridge.
May 2001: The IDB contracts the
firm Development Ideas to


'~- ';' LA'C


conduct an initial feasibility study
based on a Willingness-to-Pay
Survey of ferry users.
Preliminary estimates of traffic
and toll revenues are generated
and economic benefits are
estimated at US $5.1 million per
annum.
:, 2 Ballast Nedam
withdraws from the bridge project
iA i, -0: The IDB invites firms
to bid for further feasibility
studies to review cost, revenues
and benefit estimates. All
economic and development
costs and benefits of the project
are to be evaluated. The study will
compare costs, benefits and the
environmental and social
impacts of different sites.
June 2003: The Louis Berger
Group is contracted to undertake
the study.
Oct2004: The completed study
deems the project feasible. A
decision is made to locate the
bridge at the most financially
viable site: from D'Edward Village
on the west to Crab Island on the
east bank. The estimated width of
the bndge is 1 55 km. It is Io be
connected to the Corentyne
Highway by 3.5 km of new
roadway, and to the Rosignol
Highway Dy an improved 0.8
km of roadway.
Oct2004- A dralt Preliminary
Terms Sneet is issued inviting
local investment in shares of a


proposed Berbice Bridge
Company.
:! 0i0: Berbice Bridge
Company Inc. (BBCI) is
incorporated. Institutional
investors are to own the bridge for
21 years. BBCI isto issue shares
and bonds to finance capital and
initial operating and financing
costs of the bridge.
The firm ND LEA is
hired to prepare tender
documents for the design and
construction of the bridge.
Ju Legal and financial
experts are hired.
uog20C5: The Berbice Bridge
Company Inc., at this point
ownedby CLICO and Hand-in-
Hand, is formally launched as a
private company.
Tender documents are issued
inviting bids for the
design/construction of the
bridge. A press release
explains that BBCI is
contracting NICIL to conduct
the tender process for
design/construction and to
complete the securing of
investors. NICIL is to oversee
tme construction of access
roads and to arrange for the
legal, fiscal and institutional
framework of me project. Final
approval ol key documents and
contracts will require the
approval of the Board of
Directors of BBCI
0 -.. c:".:


Pre-qualified bids are received
from a European consortium
Ukrainian firm and an Indian
firm.

The National Assembly passes
the Berbice River Bridge Bill.
The Bill establishes the Build.
Own, Transfer basis for the
bridge and its operations,
arranges for toll collection and
Sets out the powers of the
Minister of Public Works and
Communications.
The IDB indicates willingness
to put US$11m from bndge
and culverts projects into
building of access roads.

Bosch Rexroth and Mabey
Johnson, the European
consortium, is selected as
preferred contractor
JL-:Executio
Execution of contract.


4.' '.".A-1
~~:'"~a~1 *'~--; ~


'. .


~*'t .wS


A consortium of two reputable international
JOHNSONwas selected to build the bndge a
consortium agreed to reduce their original tent


THE BERBICE BRIDGE COMPANY INCORPORATED (BBCI1


The Berbice Bridge Company Incorporated (BBCI) was
incorporated as a company in August of 2005. It is a
special purpose company with institutional investors who
shall be the owners of the Berbice Bridge for approximately
21 years. The Company is governed by the provisions of
the Berbice River Bridge Act 2006.


The five current Investors/Shareholders include CLIC
Hand-in-Hand Insurance Company, Secure Internation
and the National Insurance Scheme..

The Chairman of the Board of Directors is CLICO's GEE
SINGH. Other Directors are KEITH EVELYN, PAUL CHEON
CECIL KENNARD and BERT CARTER.


0,
al,


TA
G,


-' -1 I


KEITH EVELYN


"The Beharry Group of
Companies is of the firm view
that Guyana, endowed with an
abundance of natural resources
and fertile agriculture lands and
an Indigenous Population, has a
bright future ahead. WE ARE
BULLISH ON GUYANA.
Testimony to this is the number
of companies and state-of-the-
art facilities we have invested in
over the years and our continued
investment in Guyana. Berbice,
we feel has a very important role
L _._._ _._


CECIL KENNARD


to play in Guyana's development
and the Berbice Bridge would
help in this cause. Indeed, it
would not only add value to
Berbice, but to Guyana as a
whole. For these reasons we are
one of the shareholders in the
Berbice Bridge."
PAULCHEONG

"The Hand-in-Hand Insurance
Companies are investors in the
Berbice Bridge Project. Since our
incorporation in 1865 we have


.- .BERT C
BERT CARTER


been involved in projects that
have brought great benefit to the
communities we serve: for
example, we were involved in the
early development of the Fire
Service in Guyana and the Water
Works.

We see the Berbice River Bridge
as such a project, and we have
diligently studied the feasibility
of the project and our ability to
undertake the risks involved in
this investment. We believe that


any investor who carefully
studied the planned Berbice
Bridge Project would come to a
similar conclusion It is an
excellent opportunity. There
would undoubtedly be challenges
and there is always risk involved
However, the acceptance and
management of financial risk is
ourrole, and I assure every reader
that we, as investors and
shareholders of the bridge
project, and though our presence
on the Board of Directors of the
Berbice Bridge Company Inc.
(BBCI), would throughout the
project be pursuing every aspect
of risk management and loss
mitigation that we can."
KEITH EVELYN

"The Investment Committee of
the NIS considered the whole
thing and agreed that the risks
were not great before giving their
approval. This is an investment in


which we will get returns, we
are not going out to build the
bridge. The size of the NIS's
stake will be capped at 20%."
PATRICK MARTINBOROUGH


"The NIS's $1.5 billion
investment in the Berbice
Bridge will not be placed in any
danger as government would
retain control of the toll-rate
setting."
Dr. Roger Luncheon

"CLICO (Guyana) is one of the
subsidiaries of CL Financial
Conglomerate, a well known
company in the Caribbean. This
is nothing new to us. We have
divested into so many different
areas energy, home
construction, forestry, you name
it.

The Chairman and Board of
Directors have sanctioned this
local investment. We've looked at
the numbers, the feasibility
studies and we feel confidentthis
is a project that can earn solid
investment returns for us."
GEETA SINGH

"The proposed type structure of
the Berbice River Bridge, as well
as its location, has generated
some healthy debate. The
Private Sector, however, has
shown its confidence by placing


its financial resources in support
of this venture. This timely
gesture, in the 40th year of our
independence, can only be of
significant benefitto the economic
well-being of the population."
BERTCARTER

"The Berbice River Bridge Project
is most welcome and is a dream
that will materialise. For a long
time now commuters have been
experiencing great difficulties and
inconvenience in crossing the
Berbice River. With the
construction of the bridge this
would no longer be the case as
persons can cross the river at any
time convenientto them.
For example, overseas visitors,
whether Guyanese or not can
travel straight from the airport to
areas east of the Berbice River and
vice versa with ease and without
enduring the long waiting periods
on either side of the Berbice River.
I urge everyone to support the
project. I can recall the Demerara
Harbour Bridge, which has made
travelling much easier for
commuters to cross the Demerara
River, and is indeed a success
story.
As a Berbician, I am indeed very
happy that the project will shortly
get off the ground and I am
delighted to serve as a member of
the Board of Directors of the
Berbice Bridge Company Inc.
(B.B.C.I.)"


- ----... .. ..........






4,2006 UM


..:. .,' -
.'t..


--- -. ---


The utmost care, thorough
research and transparent
engagement procedures were
brought to bear in the choice of
CONSULTANTS and ADVISORS
forthe project.



the first business to offer actuarial
services locally.

WD .. i a
Canadian consulting firm
providing a comprehensive range
of services in the transport
sector.

The LOUIS BERGER -'.;, one
of the world's leading soils
mechanics and foundations
engineering firms, conducted the


feasibility study for the project
and recommended the chosen
location. The Berger Group has
been involved in the planning,
design and construction of over
3,000 bridges, other
infrastructure and numerous
environmental mitigation
projects around the world.

i' a local firm
which has executed many IDB
contracts, including the
Environmental Impact
Assessment for the approach
roadstothe bridge.

WINSTON AND
S -:' '. '..'FORD CHANCE
a 150 year old American Law
Firm with experience in project
financing.


Hydraulic and
ImpactStudy.


prepared the
Sedimentation


a reputable local law firm,
responsible for preparing the
majority of the projects legal
documents.

SERVICES GR..' a
Division of the Ministry of Public
Works headed by Mr. Rickford
Lowe, formerly Manager of the
Demerara Harbour Bridge.

NICIL will oversee the legal and
financial aspects of the
construction of the bridge for
BBCI until June 2006.


firms with solid track recordsREXROTH BOSCH GROUP and MABEY AND
'ross the Berbice River. Prior to being deemed the Selected Contractor, the
er (US$37.9M) to bring itin line with BCCI's budget.
MABEY AND JOHNSON
The world leader in steel bridging
Over 150 years of experience
Id Engineering Morethan 15,000 bridges builtworldwide
s 1,000 bridges manufactured every year
iness State-of-the-art production facilities in the UK
; rehabilitation of the Holds the exclusive and perpetual licences over
ge the intellectual property rights of the company
that builtthe Demerara Harbour Bridge


Chairman of the Board of BBCI

Geeta Singh is the Chief Operations
Officer of CLICO, the first investor to
come on board the project. She was
nominated to the position of Chair of
the BCCI by the other Directors.
Geeta shares her perspective on the
process of developing the bridge
project so far, on the risk involved in
the investment, and her thoughts on
the impact of the bridge.

'This is the first of its kind in
Guyana. The Demerara Bridge was
funded totally by the Government.
I We are trying to fund the Berbice
Bridge totally by the private sector
After twenty years, we are going to
be handing the bridge back to the
Government so the investors are
going to be short-medium to long
term investors. We [the investors]
start getting our money back after
the bridge begins to operate."


'The choice of contractor was an
open process. We put the tender
out in the newspapers. We had
quite a number of interested
persons who came and asked.
However, when we got down to the
technical and financial bids--
because it was a two-tiered, two-
envelope process--it came down to
three firms: Rexroth, an Indian
consortium and a Ukrainian


consortium. I'm verypleasedbecause I
witnessed every aspect of the bid
opening...I think it's very
transparent...and Pm satisfied that the
contractor that we've chosen is really
the best."


'As an insurance company, you've got
to satisfy your shareholder that you are
able to give him a good return and the
bridge is a really good opportunity to
earn some real returns while giving
Berbicians some development.
Insurance is about pooling funds and
making the best investment decisions
for your stakeholders and policy-
holders. Compared to the rate of return
the commercial banks and treasury
bills offer the bridge returns are
good.. .Im satisfied and think they are
achievable."


"If we compare with the Demerara
Harbour Bridge--I was a child when
this was happening--but from what I
am told, people thought that Vreed-En
Hoop would have died and it hasn't. As
a matter o!fact, Vreed-En-Hoop is very
busy and :, 'idge is down the road.
So I don't' ; -why this is going to kill
the busine ;~cs r New Amsterdam. As
a matter :ct i think its going to
make it 's; -s. for people to do
business i. ew Amsterdam because
there is go., tc be accessibility and
with good rads, it is going to be very
easy. "


The area east of the Berbic: word,
River contains the most ;,. '/
productive agricultural land in
Guyana but the production of ... kS-
the region is hindered from A floating bridge similar but .
reaching Georgetown by the superior to the Demerara -
inefficiency of the current Harbour Bridge will be built "-. .
means of crossing the Berbice across the Berbice River. The ~ i-- -
River. Louis Berger Group


Georgetown is the centre of
consumer demand and the
transit point for most of
Guyana's exports. The Berbice
River acts as a brake on the
smooth flow of commodities
and people along the coastal
corridor, and is therefore a key
constraint on national
economic development.

A bridge over the Berbice River
will therefore serve to integrate
the national economy and will
also facilitate the social
integration of New Amsterdam
and Georgetown which are both
national hubs.





The international firm, The
Louis Berger Group, Inc. was
contracted in 2003 to carry out
an in-depth feasibility study to
determine whether a bridge is
necessary, what type of bridge
should be built, and what would
be the best location for the
bridge.

The firm carefully considered all
the relevant economic,
environmental and social
factors and submitted a six-
volume report in October of
2004.

The Louis Berger Group is
ranked among the top five
companies in the world in
bridges, marine and port
transport, and airports. It is one
of the leading infrastructure
engineering, environmental
science and economic
development operations in the


recommended that a floating
bridge as the most economically
feasible option for the Berbice
River. An additional
consideration is the fact that the
retractable span of a floating
bridge allows for free movement
of large ocean-going vessels.


The Bridge will be 1,550 metres
long and is primarily a pre-
fabricated structure which will
be completed in eighteen
months.


The Berbice River Bridge will be
located just north of New
Amsterdam and will stretch from
Crab Island on the eastern side of
the river to D'Edward village on
the western side. The Louis
Berger Group Inc. recommended
this site as the most
economically viable of the three
proposed locations for the
bridge.

This site will protect the urban
road system from the increased
industrial vehicular traffic that
will utilize the Bridge and avoids
the social impact of heavy bridge
traffic in densely populated
areas. The Canje River Bridge
which is currently utilized at or
near capacity will also be
protected from an increase in
industrial vehicles.



The Berbice River Bridge is being
built on a Build, Operate and
Transfer (BOT) basis which
utilizes the funds of private
sector investors. It is a


commercial investment, like a
bank or any other investment,
except that investors will operate
the bridge commercially only for
a period of twenty years. At that
time, it will be handed over to the
Government and people of
Guyana.


A total of 4.5 km of new roads
will be required to connect the
Bridge to the existing east-west
corridor highways. 3.5 km of
roadway will be built on the
eastern side and 1 km on the
west.
The new access roads will be
paid for by a grant from the Inter-
American Development Bank.





The Demerara Harbour Bridge
(DHB) was built more than thirty
years ago. Since then, bridge
design and construction has
benefited significantly from
technological advancements.

The DHB is 1,850 metres or 1.16
miles :ong while the Berbice
River Bridge will be 1,550 metres
or slightly less than 1 mile long.


The DHB floats upon 123
pontoons while the new BRB w';i
require only 39 pontoons due to
its improved design. The
pontoons will be 33% thicker
than those of the DHB and th::
smaller number will result i
significantly lower maintenance
costs and reduce the possibii
of collisions.

The high span of the DHB is 7.,
metres while that of the BRB v I
be more than 50% higher at 11 i
metres thus requiring le-:
frequent openings as vessels v
be able to pass under the hik
span.

The deck of the DHB consists
steel plates with girders. T,
deck superstructure of the BP
will utilize the Compact 2"
panel bridge system which is i
most modem steel panel bride
technology in the world.
incorporates enhanced qualh
strength, safety and durabit
The deck surface will be made
a revolutionary anti-skid surfs
consisting of a resin/aggreg -
compound bonded to steel.

The DHB is anchored by me :
of concrete blocks not suit:
for the high evel of siltation in
Berbice River, so a spec
riverbed penetration anchor
system will be used forth BRI


~----------------


- ---


,


"






6A SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006


" 40"t INDEPENDENT


'MUST-BE-WON' CROSS$




CLUES A I -


ACROSS:
1. Point on the compass that is
closer to West.
2. 1 submit to you that if a man has
not discovered something he will
die for, he is not to live".
(Martin Luther King Jr.)
8. 'When motherhood becomes the
fruit of a deep yearning, not the
result of ignorance or accident,
its children will become the
foundation of a __ race". (M.
Fuller)
11. Guyana's National Flag, familiarly
called the" Arrowhead"
bears five colors.
13. Order of Merit (Abbr.)
15. Physical Education (Abbr.).
16. Variant spelling for odour.
meaning a lingering quality or
impression.
17. Acronym for "Winning Eleven".
Term could be appropriate for the
current players of the 2006 West
Indies Cricket Series.
20. Mobile Genetic Elements (Abbr.).
22. Guyana's National Motto, "One
People, One One Destiny".
23. Telecommunication device for the
deaf. (Abbr.).
24. Geographical term.
27. Exclamation.
28. "If you lend an to someone,
you listen carefully and
sympathetically".
30. Village on the East Coast
Demerara, Guyana.
31. Television News channel.
33. Acronym for "Keep it Together".
34. Metric prefix, -.
DOWN:
3. Guyana celebrates its 40 __
Anniversary on 26'" May, 2006.
4. A mark aimed at in bowls, quoits,
curling, and other similar games.
5. First name of a former Political
Leader of Guyana.
6. Synonym for repair.
7. Exclamation.
9. Acronym for "Well Nourished".
10. Religious practice.
12. Limited Partnership (Abbr.).
14. TheIndependence
consisted of a metal disc which
depicted the National Coat of
Arms on one side and the Map of
Guyana on the other side.
18. Guyana's National Flag was
designed by Mr. W. _
1". Point on the compass that is
closer to North.
2 "Blessed is the Nation whose***
is the Lord and the people whom
he has chosen for his own
inheritance". Psalms 33:12.
2'- Preposition.
2' Synonym for the verb, search.
2 Preposition.
SHomophone, i.e, a word that is
pronounced in the same way as
another, spelt in a different way
and has a different meaning.
3. Bachelor of Divinity (Abbr.).


.,e to circumstances beyond our
jntrol the Official Solution of last
iday's 'S-B-W' Competition could not
3 published today Every effort will be
ade to have this Solution published on
Wednesday May 17, 2006 We
,,cerely regret the inconvenience this
:;ght have caused you
Sthe meanwhile two 40' Independence
anniversary Must-Be-Won" Crossword
.lies are presented to you Here are
e Rules governing this competition

Any number of different entries
ay be submitted, but each must
on the form published in either
a Sunday Chronicle, Monday or
wednesday Guyana Chronicle of
-ek-ending19 May,2006.
Each entry costs $20.00 for the
'OPEN' Competition however.
the 'CHILDREN'S' Competition
is'FREE
Cheques and stamps will not be
accepted. Consequently,
entries accompanied by any of
these will be declared invalid


N A M E: ....... ............................ ... .

A D D R E SS:........................ ... .. ........... ...... ... ..........

I .1 I wI 2 1 '5 M6 ,


NAM E:........... .. .. .. .....................................

ADDRESS:..... .............................. ...........


ABC, about, above. ah, along, as, at. Bay. BD.
bow, Cheddi. correct. Cove. Dan. dear, deca.
Sdeci, deer, ear. fit. Golden. GOD, ho. Hope.
improve. Independence. KIT, Linden, look.
PLP. Medal, MGE. Nation. NBC. new, NNE,
SNNW, odor. OM, PE. repress, seek. Smith, tee.
TDD, \ o, \\ E. \ NN, WN\\, wo, \'S\\, No.


and returned un-checked.
4. Each entry must be completed in
ink (not pencil) and be
accompanied by the name and
address of the sender also
written in ink, in the space
provided under each coupon.
Entries in red ink will be
disqualified.
5. Cash must not be remitted
through the mail or for the
Children's Competition. Entries
placed in available Chronicle
Crossword boxes should be
accompanied by notes to the
value of each entry or entries.
6. Judging will take place on 23'
May 2006.
7. Coupons of the puzzle will be
published on Sunday 14'".
Monday 15" and Wednesday 17"
May,2006.
8. Entries must reach the office of
Guyana National Newspapers
Limited, Lama Avenue, Bel Air,
Georgetown not later than i6:30
hrs or 4:30 p.m. on the Tuesday,
23'" May, 2006. Residents of
Essequibo, Berbice and Linden


must deposit their entries at
their respective locations not
later than 16:00 hrs or 4:00 p.m.
on Sunday, 21" May, 2006.
9.The official solutions will be
published on Friday, 26" May,
006 along with the winning
entry orentries.
10. In the event that a player
requests a recheck, he or she
must first lodge the sum of
$1,000 at the GNNL's office in
Georgetown, Linden or New
Amsterdam before the recheck
is done, and this NOT later than
9:00 hrs or 9:00 a.m. on
Saturday,27" May.2006.
11. The $1,000 lodged for the
rechec, will be refunded along
with the prizemoney if the player
requesting the recheck proves
to be correct. If the claims is not
correct, the sum lodged for the
recheck will be escheated.
12. Management reserves the right
to reject any entry or entries
which it considers mutilated,
illegibly written, or on which
these are erasures or evidence


CE ANNIVERSARY


SWORD COMPETITION


CLUES
ACROSS:
1. Surname of Prime Minister when
Guyana achieved full
Independence on May26.
1966.
7. Ofor relating tosound.
10. Guyana Landofmany_
12. Point onthe compass.
17. High School (Abbr.).
18. Guyana's largest County,
commonly referred to as the
'Cinderella County'.
21. Acronym for'OutsideAir'.
22. Guyana is divided into_
regions, commonly called
Administrative regions or
divisions.
23. Acronym for 'Telephone
Operator'.
24. Symbol for the chemical element
manganese.
25. Surname of Opposition Leader
when Guyana won
Independence on May26, 2006.
26. An irregular verb having the
same form in the past tense and
past participle as its
Infinitive.
28. PersonalName.
30. Ultra-violet (Abbr.).
31. Preposition.
32. Homophone.
33. Motor vehicle
34. A color of Guyana's National
Flag.
DOWN:
1. Acronym for'BestWishes'.
2. UnitedArab Emirates (Abbr.).
3. Room temperature (Abbr.).
4. Fireworks for Independence
celebrations should be carried
out to the National
Park.
5. Heart rate (Abbr.). The number of
heart beats per unit of time,
usually expressed as beats per
minute.
6. Acronym for'Ask Seek Knock'.
8. Local Government (Abbr.).
9. The Canje ______ is
Guyana'sNational Bird.
11. Abbreviation for a method of
Stock Valuation in Accounting.
13. The Independence Monument
commemorates Guyana's
Independence from Great
__. onthe26" May 1966.
14. Irregular verb with two past
tenses and two past participles
which are the same.
15. Microsoft Network (Abbr.).
16. Unlawfully occupy an uninhabited
building orarea of land.
17. Proverb 'Charitybeginsat*****.
19. Homnophone.
20. __ Voyage an organized
expression of goodwill at the start
of a trip or newventure.
25. A black enamel or lacquer used to
produce a durable glossy finish.
27. Estate of the right bank of the
Essequibo River in Guyana.
29. Denrio i- lime:of the day.


that more than one letter has
been written in each space
provided on the entry form.
13. The competition ends soon
after the publication of the
results.
14. All winners (suitably identified)
are asked to call at the
Chronicle's office on Lama
Avenue, Bel Air Park
Georgetown, prior to the
collection of their prize money.
i5. The Chronicle Crossword
Committee will not be
responsible for entrylentries
lost or displaced.
16. The age range for the
Children's competition is 8 16
years old. VWnners of this
competition must provide proof
of age and must also be duly
identified by their parent.
teacher or guardian when
uplifting payment.
17. The decision of the Chronicle
Crossword Committee
regarding a winner or winners of
the Crossword competition and
the interpretation of the Rules of


N A M E:.................................................... ...

A DDRESS:................................ ....

'B12 R 4NH M C L P


N A M E :............................................ .. ...................

ADDRESS:..................................................


A.m. ASK. A\ CO. bet, black, Bon. Britain.
Burnham, B\\, clap. clop, car. Essequibo,
FIFO. green. home. HR. HS, Hubu. in. Jagan.
japan, let, LIFO. L.G. meat, meet, ln. MISN
Nat. NE, near, next. OA. on. Pal, Pheasant.
p.m, Rub.h, R SE. sea, see, set, squat, ten.
TO[. I' AE. UV .an.eater:s, et,while.


the Competition shall be final.
18. The best entrylentries will win
this 40"' Independence
Anniversary "Must-Be-Won"
Competition.
Boxes have been placed at the GNNL
head office on Lama Avenue, Bel Air
Park, Georgetown (one at the front
and another at the back entrance of
the building). Elsewhere, one box
each has been placed at the
Chronicle's office at Vrymans Erven
Ave, New Amsterdirr New Graphic
Enterprise Cresce:i: Mackenzie,
Linden; Vreed-e,.-H1cco Police
Station, West Bank Jemerara;
Leonora Post Offi.e. V' .st Coast
Demerara: Mr C':f; '.arpen's
Store, Hampshiie antyne:
Suddie Anna Re:;1 .-tid Charity
PostOffices onthe :ts -.:,;o Coasf;
Cove & John, S"at .i'iaam and
Mahaica Police St;:.' on the East
Coast of Demer a ,.- Vincent
Mercurrius, D'Edt' a'd Village,
Rosignol, Berbice r,;' Ms L.
Mohabeer's business :'ia:.i at lot 6
Public Road, Cove & John, ECD.


The additional incentives of S1 000 00
and $2,000 00 for the 40+ and 80+
entries groupings are in effect
You will need coupons and clues so
ust purchase a copy of the Monday or
ednesdays Edition of the Guiana
Chronicle, this week and be a part of
this Year's independence Crossword
Competition
If you play smart you can win ithe
prizes The more you play te g's2'er Is
the possibiltv of winning For the
Open competition the amount of
entries subrmited must be cc,'e'ed by
the relevant sums of money ; e $2C 00
for each entry o, !the:,' .ilI not be ludged
Then place nose entries in a Chc'nicle
Crossword box a3 a location nearest to
you Note-well "e Ch!:drern'
competition is free cc thee n, neec
for these er''"es o 1b ?3c.co: anried wit'.
cash
This apart cu gener' "''? apply
Thanks
CrosswordCommittee
Hujapa Hvt1e'c4 D"_


- --- ---


" --- =


~-----I rr\ ;







SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006 7A


V
































Omi asatoi ma sadgm(iiiya,
tanlaso 'taa Ii r lo ri ,i,
In ;i.' iman a mritaln gnamaya.


) Lford, featd ts from untruth to tr(th. -In
/roin darkness Ito lithtll and
from death to illmmrtalitij.

e, lthe members of the Sawoh family, uw'old like to extend our
heartfelt H id' uHicoliditional tha ns to el:ery! single persn, I ,,, 1,,, W L
symplathized and empathized with s dMuring our recent oMI ,

W e tike this opportllitly to express our pl rticiil r a p ...t..... t iI,
1/ 1cPresident iBhl-arrmtl/deao and his co vlemoni for A l,,
Ireiendous sulort land assistance in our time ofIO mea, a iI \\ ",h ,-










1 1 t I I I 'I -ill, I l l I I I I iW, l l I II II, i ll I/1il, IW /. I I I I I I;
i fl:l 'l m ,' .t .8 .. i l l ,' h" I I 1 ,I ,] ,,itt r 1 1, i,,,h a . .. .. .




l I. i 1. . 1, ( .. 11. .
,,i , ,.. ,, ,,,. '. th e ,,t , .f t n,. 1I rl, ,, I ...
,", I. r ,,, .. ,h n. i J t t,, 'I,, ,l h l ,. ,- i, ,t .. .t,/. .
l" .,', ,, ,,^ -. t ,, ', ,,,, t "' .... 7. t... ll, .... , t' t ,
illfilore 1ll CtJanlese to follow suit, let us seek to forward our
poIsitiuve et'ffors Ian to dispel ;i...1 n.... and promote knowledge.


1 1, . . ,-ll i f ,l t1.. ..1 i ,I .i .,/11 I l l t,,, l ... .. ll .. , I
I f I ll r l ift,, /"












__.______... .


SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006


7A





8A SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 14, 2006










PRESIDENTIAL SUMMIT WAS HISTORIC EVENT!

Last Monday saw the culmination of the collaborative work which has taken place during the
past seven months to enrich the National Competitiveness Strategy a ground-breaking
partnership between the Government and private sector.

On Monday, more than 300 public and Private Sector Leaders came together to support this
ongoing process to create a more prosperous Guyana.

Nine Action Teams were formed and more than 50 new Action Initiatives were developed, to
enhance and evolve the National Competitiveness Strategy in key areas.

THANK-YOU TO ALL WHO TOOK PART

President Jagdeo opened the Summit calling upon Guyana's business and government
S . leaders to work together to implement actions that will increase Guyana's
B competitiveness and increase the standard of living of Guyana's people. "I feel the
potential of Guyana, and I am sure that if we get together and work in practical ways,
the promise of this country can be -realized."

Private Sector Commission Vice President Mike Correia called the agreement to
establish the National Competitiveness Council a historic event- "... historic in our view,
and ... a true recognition by the administration that, for the private sector to do its job
of wealth creation, it must take centre stage."

Leaders from nine Action Teams worked with participants to develop more than 50
Action Initiatives. Action Team leaders and "champions" of new action initiatives are now planning to act.

THESE INITIATIVES HAVE BEEN COVERED IN THE MEDIA OVER THE PAST WEEK BUT WILL BE
FORMALLY COMMUNICATED TO THE PUBLIC NEXT WEEK.

ALL THESE LEADERS ARE MAKING COMMITMENTS TO GUYANA'S FUTURE

Next Steps: To support follow-up of the Summit Action Teams and initiatives, the Summit Leadership Team was
formed on May 9th, led by Beni Sankar, Gerry Gouveia, Geoff Da Silva, Prem Misir, Elisabeth Harper, Dennis Morgan,
Nizam Hassan, Dennis Griffith, Nick Godfrey, Tejnarine Geer, Jared Kissoon, Tamara Whelan, Neromini Fagu, Neal
Persaud, Kamila Singh, Edward Humphrey, and Sean O'Leary. They agreed to coordinate follow-up activities from the
Summit and support Action Teams to take next steps in strengthening their action initiatives and implementing them.
Special Thanks to all involved in the summit: Joanna Homer and Derrick Cummings, our superb MCs; all the artists
and crafts people; all the ushers and those involved in registration. Special thanks to all the Facilitators of the Action
Teams: Felicia Forde (MINTIC), Joanna Homer (Banks-DIH), Ed Humphrey (MINFIN),
Sean O'Leary (MINAG), Neromini Fagu, Derise Williams (MINTIC), Clinton Urling
(Germans Restaurant), Tamara Whelan, Jared Kissoon (A.H.L Kissoon), Gjitanjali Singh
(PSC), Maurice Rebello (E-networks), Alicia Reed (GTIS), Jocelyn Williams (GTIS),
Samuel Braithwaite (UG, IDS), Elsie Croal (OP), and Shyam Nokta (EMC). Thanks to the
Enhancing National VideoMega team for the exciting video on the National Competitiveness Strategy and to
Competitithe team at GuyEnterprise for helping to organize the event. Special thanks to master
B Competitiveness facilitators, Dr. Eric and Myan Baker, Economic Transformations Group, for all they did.
A National Competitiveness Get Involved! You are encouraged to join this important effort, by joining an action
Strategy for Guyana team, developing an action initiative working to create a better and more prosperous
Guyana. Contact the website below.

www.Summit. orq. y
(frirrntlv linrlPr rnnctrinrtinn