Title: Guyana chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00036
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Alternate Title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown Guyana
Publication Date: October 2, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088915
Volume ID: VID00036
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text
The Chronicle is at http://www.guyanachronicle.com


SUNDAY


V m r mw -
...... ,, "Copyrighted Material -.
r - .Syndicated Content -
Available from Commercial News Providers
S. .. ... ......................... ... ...... ................ .......... ... .. ...........................


Caribbean Trade
Reference Centre
gets going
A RECENTLY established initiative is intended to
assist Guyana in the formulation of its trade strategy.
The Caribbean Trade Reference Centre (CTRC) for
Guyana was launched on Friday ... Page three


Page six


CH


CH


IN GUYANA
Testimony to the strong links between Guyana and
the United States Acting President Samuel Hinds Page two


Students from the National School of Dance perfoun amt the iuchig.


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2 SUNDAY CHRONICLE October 2, 2005



AMCHAM launches in Guyana


Testimony to the strong

links between Guyana and

the United States
Acting President Samuel Hinds


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By Ruel Johnson
BUSINESSMAN Deo Singh


cited crime, energy costs and
restrictive border laws as the
main deterrents to economic
growth in Guyana. Singh -
the Managing Director of
DIDCO, and franchise holder
for KFC and Pizza Hut out-
lets in Guyana was at the
time speaking at the launch
dinner of the American
Chamber of Commerce
(AMCHAM) in Guyana at Le
Meridien Pegasus, Friday
evening.
Singh, President of the
newly formed body, said that
crime is rampant not only in
Guyana but in other parts of the
Caribbean; it was only Guyana
that has so far, however, failed
to seek help from the law en-
forcement agencies of more de-
veloped countries, the United
Kingdom's Scotland Yard and
the United States' Federal Bu-
reau of Investigation (FBI) in
particular. Singh said that if the


The ligh Conuni&ion of India
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3. Gvuma Hindu Dhanic &sbh. 394-393, G'sge-s &feet. PruthadINktew.


Acting President Sam Hinds, left, shares a light moment wil
of AMCHAM Guyana, Deo Singh; Mrs. Bullen; Mrs. Singh; and


crime situation continues un-
checked, the economy is going
to shrink, spawning more crime.
He also cited high energy
costs as a stumbling block to'
business in Guyana, recom-
mending that Government ex-
plore hydroelectricity as a vi-
able option in providing the
country with a cheap source of
energy. He also posited that
Guyana needs to relax immigra-
tion arrangements with border
countries Suriname, Venezuela
and Brazil, as a way of stimu-
lating cross border trade and'
tourism.
AMCHAM Guyana was
formed, according to Singh, after
a discussion he had with two
other prominent businessmen,
Komal Samaroo and Yesu
Persaud, Managing Director and
Chairman of Demerara Distillers
Limited respectively. The


organisation was established,
Singh said, to help Guyanese
businesses find avenues for mar-
keting their products in the
United States, as well as distribu-
tors for products that they might
wish to import into Guyana.
Acting President Sam Hinds
welcomed the initiative, saying
that it was another example of
the strong links that exist be-
tween Guyana and the United
States. He, however, warned
that Guyana was not in a sound
enough position economically to
be able to sustain potential de-
mand for most of the "new,
fancy" things that could find
their way to the local market
through AMCHAM initiatives.
Hinds said a strong focus must
be made in stimulating growth.
in the local economy, so that it
would be strong enough to sup-
port new foreign products be-


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ing made available to local con-
sumers, something he envisions
happening over the next 30
years approximately.
On the issue of crime,
Hinds said that Government
was putting a strong effort into
combating it; he cited the recent
seizure of smuggled gasoline at
Buddy's Farm on the East Bank
as an example of this, but la-
mented the subsequent disap-
pearance of the trucks that were
in custody as part. of Police in-
vestigations.
Hinds said that Government
had previously explored the
purchase of hydroelectricity but
found the cost too prohibitive.
However, he said that if private
sector representatives were will-
ing to sit down with the Admin-
istration, and come up with a
commitment to exploring and
possibly adapting the use of
hydroelectricity as an ,alterna-
tive to petrol-based power gen-
eration, he would be willing to
meet them.
On the issue of freer move-
ment across Guyana's borders,
Hinds cited Guyana's trans-bor-
der initiatives with southern
neighbour Brazil. He noted that


the work, on the Takutu Bridge
should begin next month and
that the bridge would be com-
pleted by. Jtine next year. He
also said that stemming from re-
cent legislation passed in the
Brazilian Congress, the border
town of Bom Fin in Brazil
would soon be established as an
official exit/entry point between
the two countries.
Feature, speaker for the
launch, US Ambassador Roland
Bullen urged that AMCHAM
Guyana function not only'as a
force for the good of its mem-
bership, but for the country as
a whole. He stated that the
organisation can act as an apo-
litical voice in calling for in-
creased employment opportuni-
ties within the country; as well
as serving as a watchdog against
corruption and red tape which
threaten to stifle growth and
waste resources. Ambassador
Bullen said that in the United
States and other countries,
chambers of commerce -
through their initiatives have
often provided the crucial impe-
tus for development, and he
urged AMCHAM Guyana to
strive for this.
The AMCHAM Guyana
office is located in the DDL
SBuilding on High Street,
Kingston; Correia's Group of
Companies employee, Rita
Majeed, has been appointed
Secretary of the
Organisation.

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SUNDAY CHRONICLE October 2, 2005 3



Caribbean Trade Reference Centre launched


By Ruel Johnson

A RECENTLY established
initiative is intended to
assist Guyana in the
formulation of its trade
strategy. The Caribbean
Trade Reference Centre
(CTRC) for Guyana was
launched on Friday by the
Organisation of American
States (OAS), in collaboration
with the Ministry of Foreign
Trade, at the Foreign Service
Institute, Ramphal House.
Givimig.a background to the
jprojeci. Neville Totaram -
-Coordinator of the National
Advisory Committee on Exteral]
Negotration.s INACENI and
Chair of'the launching ceremony
said that at a 2003 FTAA trade
mirunisiers conference. a decision
*:as taken to the effect that
_small economies, lacking
adequate technical capacity m -
ldeailing with trade related'issuesi,
should each draw up a national
Trade Capacity Building
Strategy (TCBS) as a
prerequisite to accessing
-technical and capacity-building
assistance. This was undertaken
-by all the countries within the
FTAA classified as small or
developing economies, Guyana
finishing its TCBS by the end of
2003.
Totaram said that one
common element that came out
of the TCBSs done particularly
within CARICOM countries
was the need for readily
accessible up-to-date
information on trade,
information that would be useful
in the participation, negotiation
and implementation of trade
agreements.
Coming out of this, the OAS
- through funding from the
Canadian International
Development Agency -
embarked on the development of


(1-r) Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Foreign Trade and International Coopera-
tion, John Isaacs; Denise Goolsarran, OAS-CIDA Capacity Building Project Programme
Officer; and Dennis Moses OAS National Director in Guyana at the launch of the CTRC


Friday.
.ithe Caribbean Trade Reference
Centre (CTRC). A virtualinfor-
mation resource centre, the
project was developed by the
Foreign Trade Information Sys-
tem of the OAS Office for Trade,
Growth and Competitiveness.
The CTRC comprises 13
country specific Trade
Information Databases
(TIDS) covering Guyana;
Antigua and Barbuda; the
Bahamas; Barbados; Belize;
Dominica; Grenada; Jamaica;
St. Kitts and Nevis; Saint
Lucia; St. Vincent and the
Grenadines; Suriname; and
Trinidad and Tobago. It
covers several areas:
Integration; the WTO;
Reference Resources;
National Trade Policy;
Challenges and
Opportunities, all accessible
through a user-friendly vir-
tual library that features a
trade glossary, multimedia


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presentations, a search engine
and a detailed sitemap.
In his remarks at the launch-
ing, Permanent Secretary in the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
John Isaacs, said that small and
developing countries like


Guy ana continue to face tremen-
dous challenges when it comes
to tade.p6~oycdevelopment and
management, particularly since
the expansion of the interna-
tional multilateral trade agenda
post -GATT-Uriiguay in 1994


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and the establishment of the
WTO. Isaacs said that with in-
adequate human, financial and
technical resources, smaller
economies have found it increas-
ingly difficult to have their con-
cerns adequately represented
and continue to rely on regional,
and international organizations
for representation. The Perma-
nent Secretary cited Guyana's
non-resident.representative sta-
tus due to inadequate financial
resources in Geneva, the glo-
bal hub of UN negotiations, as a
key constraint in crafting strong,
substantial trade and general
foreign policy. Isaacs said the
CTRC would help in alleviating
some of the current problems the
country faces in the formulation
of its trade policy.
Three Trade Reference
Centre terminals will be
established in Guyana; one at the
Foreign Trade Division of the
Ministry of Foreign Trade and


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International Cooperation; one at
the NACEN Secretariat; and one
at the Institute of Development
Studies (IDS) at the University
of Guyana. On hand to collect
the IDS terminal was Institute
head Professor Clive Thomas,
who said that the CTRC would
come in useful for the Institute's
work and that he even intended
to use the terminal to research
some work he was presently
engaged in. Stand-alone 3-disc
CD copies of the CTRC were
also distributed to several
international, government and
private sector agencies.
Also at the ceremony were
Dennis Moses, OAS National
Director in Guyana; Denise
Goolsarran,Programme Officer
within the OAS-CIDA Capacity
Building Project; and OAS
Senior Trade Specialist, Barbara
Kotschwar.


i-





4 SUNDAY CHRONICLE October 2, 2005


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The public is hereby notified
that Mr. Clement De Abreau
former Inspector is no longer
employed by National
Insurance Scheme Guyana.
He is not authorized to
transact any business
on behalf of National
Insurance Scheme or
K J represent us in any way
whatsoever.
By Order of Management

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MACKENZIE, LINDEN, GUYANA
Tel. No. 592-444-6415/6382/6134/2626;
Fax Nos. 592-444-6103;
Mail: PO Box 32217, Mackenzie. Linden.






The LINDEN ELECTRICITY
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UNIVERSITY OF GUYANA
THE CENTRE FOR COMMUNICATION STL|IES
in collaboration with
IPDC/UNESCO
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from October to November 2005
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6 SUNDAY CHRONICLE October 2, 2005


Editorial)




HOEING




A HARD




ROW

FOR Guyana, as well as the countries of the
Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OEGS) and
Suriname, being part of the Caribbean Single Market and
Economy (CSME) without a Regional Development Fund
(RDF) in place, as originally envisaged, is a difficult
economic row to hoe.
The RDF, as outlined in the revised CARICOM
Treaty, is intended to .provide financial support for
disadvantaged economies of the Community to help
compensate for losses with the functioning of the single.
market component of the CSME.
Regrettably, for a variety of reasons, the region's


political directorate has failed to move the process
forward to have the RDF in place to coincide with the
proposed inauguration at the start of 2006 for the single
market, knowing that 2008 is the target date for all
member countries to be on board for the CSME.
Nevertheless, it is encouraging to know that for all
its own problems as one of the disadvantaged
economies of CARICOM, Guyana remains committed to
access the single market in 2006.
As President Bharrat Jagdeo recently observed, upon
learning of growing reservations of some OECS
countries about delaying their single market-readiness,
in the absence of the RDF: "Too much time and
resources have already been invested for us to step
aside from our commitment".
The Guyana Government's attitude to continue
moving the CSME process forward is all the more
positive when considered within the context of the
ongoing problems Guyanese face on arrival at regional
airports, including in particular Piarco International in
Trinidad and Tobago and Grantley Adams International
in Barbados.
As President Jagdeo said last week, it is "hard (for
us) to sell CARICOM" when Guyanese are treated better
in the United States than should be the case in an
economically integrated Community.
Evidently disheartened, as his Administration should
be, over the treatment of Guyanese, some quite hostile
and unnecessary, at a few regional airports, President
Jagdeo decided to discuss the problem with Dominica's
Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit.
He has asked Mr Skerrit, who has lead responsibility
for arrangements on intra-regional free movement to
provide CARICOM leaders with a tabular form of


deportation every six months as sonie governments
would not admit to the problems being complained
against by Guyanese and other affected West Indian
nationals.
Not just the Guyana Government, but also the
Caribbean Congress of Labour (CCL) has made known
its deep concerns to Prime Minister Skerrit over the
treatment of nationals at some airports and for there to
be a more positive approach by CARICOM on the issue
of free movement of labour.
Given recent assurance by Barbados' Prime Minister,
Owen Arthur (who has lead responsibility for CSME-
readiness), that strenuous efforts would be made to
pursue the creation of the proposed RDF, as well as
Prime Minister Skerrit's agreement to advance the free
movement agenda, we are left to hope that promises
would be translated to achievable objectives in the
shortest possible time.




CHRONICLE
Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Sunday Editor: Michelle Nurse
Editorial: 227-5216: 227-5204: 22-63243-9
Sports: 225-7174
After hours 226-3243-9
Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is at ww.guyanachronicle.com
e-mail address sunda3.editor@guyanachronicle.com
Lama Avenue. Bel Air Park. Georgetown. Gu ana.


BARBADOS' LONELY PLACE


IN PETROCARIBE


WITHIN the Caribbean
Community, Barbados
currently stands alone in its
decision not to be part of the
PetroCaribe project launched
in Caracas on June 29 and
approved at that time by all
invited participating states
other than Barbados and
-Trinidad and Tobago.


In the case of Trinidad and
Tobago, the only exporting
CARICOM member of oil and
petroleum products, it has been
remarkably silent publicly, while
quietly assessing its options on
timing and conditionalities to
enter a bilateral arrangement to
be part of PetroCaribe.
This could well include a deal
by which Venezuela exports
crude to Trinidad and Tobago's
state-owned PetroTrin to enable
its under-utilised refinery in
South Trinidad to be upgraded
to a capacity that makes it
possible to increase its share of
oil shipments to the Eastern
Caribbean.
For all the initial political
brouhaha, therefore, the
possibility of a meeting within
the near future between Prime
Minister Patrick Manning and
President Hugo Chavez of


Venezuela should not be ruled
out.
In contrast, Barbados, which
is the sole CARICOM state with
a special oil facility arrangement
with Trinidad and Tobago and
one with which it also has a
maritime boundary dispute -
remains on a defensive posture
on why it is not involved with
PetroCaribe.
Barbados recognizes
that countries that have
signed on to PetroCaribe
have shown a special
interest in its economic
assistance package that
includes a long-term
repayment dimension
for oil with fluctuating
terms, depending on the
prevailing OPEC-
approved world price per
barrel of the commodity.
On the basis of
reservations expressed
for staying out of
PetroCaribe including
its structure, governance
and economic disadvantages -
Barbados contends that it would
have chalked up debts
amounting to some US$68
million, calculated on the value
of petroleum imports of just
over US$171 million in 2004.
The Jamaican Government, on
the other hand seemingly the
biggest beneficiary among
CARICOM states of bilateral pacts
with Venezuela within the
framework of the Petro-Caribe
accord has been emphasising that
involvement with PetroCaribe was
consistent with its national interest
as well as trade and economic
cooperation with CARICOM
partners and. specifically, that
PetroCaribe was complementary
Jamaica's arrangements with
Trinidad and Tobago.

VENEZUELA'S INITIATIVE
Accessing PetroCaribe; or


ignoring it, is the sovereign right
of any member state of
CARICOM, the Greater
Caribbean, as well as those of
Latin America have already
signalled their positive interest.
In the circumstances, while
it might not wish to admit it,
in seeking to justify why
Barbados has decided to distance
itself from the Venezuela-
initiated PetroCaribe project -
unique in this hemisphere -
Prime Minister Owen Arthur's
Administration appears to be
more than implicitly questioning
the wisdom of its Caribbean
Community partners that have
entered into bilateral
arrangements to meet their
respective economic needs.
The jury remains out on the
ultimate benefits from
PetroCaribe, a project in
progress and for which there
could also have been inputs from
,v .


the proposed August 2004
Technical Commission that,
unfortunately, never met.
Since that commission,
approved at the Second Meeting
of Energy Ministers of the
Caribbean and Venezuela in
Montego Bay, was expected to
come up with a draft multilateral
agreement for the establishment
and functioning of PetroCaribe,


we are left to speculate on how
different in substance the
ultimate project would have been
for the June 2005 inauguration,
had there been such an input.
While the Barbados
Government was exercising its
sovereign right to be different by
referring the eye care offer to a
technical committee to satisfy
itself about the suitability of the
project for Barbadians,
Presidents Fidel Castro and
Hugo Chavez were announcing
in August in Montego Bay an
expanded programme of free
health care to benefit an
estimated six million nationals of
the Caribbean-Latin American
region over a ten-year period
starting in 2006.
It was the occasion when
countries across the Caribbean -
other than Barbados and
Trinidad and Tobago -
started the process of
signing bilateral
agreements to access
PetroCaribe.
I am not aware that
either ideological
consideration or covert
external pressures may
have influenced
Barbados' position,
which is quite different
from that of Trinidad
Sand Tobago's,
CARICOM's sole oil-
inning exporting state.
It is,
however, relevant to also note
that while it stays away from
PetroCaribe, and is yet to make
up its mind on the Cuba/
Venezuela free eye care project,
the Arthur
Administration maintains good
relations with both Cuba and
Venezuela.
In this context, and
considering earlier initiatives


Sove-gn6ight


in uniquenur


now superseded, like the San
Jose Accord and the Caracas
Energy Agreement; it is
surprising to find those
presumed to know better,
engaging in glib talk about
PetroCaribe masking a new form
of "colonialisation" in this
region.
It may well be asked: Whose
"colonialism" politics, Chavez
and Castro in 2005? Such critics
should get serious.

GUYANA'S MOVE
It is this kind of distortion
that was to result in the
confusion created by opponents
of PetroCaribe that it had


something to do with "cheap
fuel" or lower prices for
consumers at the pumps, when
this was NEVER the case.
Perhaps the "problem
resides in the fertile
imagination of those who
prefer to ignore the positions
articulated from the outset.
first in Caracas and later in
Montego Bay by various
CARICOM leaders, among
them Prime Ministers P.J.
Patterson; Grenada's Keith
Mitchell; Ralph Gonsalves of
St. Vincent and the
Grenadines; Antigua and
Barbuda's Baldwin Spencer
and St. Kitts and Nevis
Denzil Douglas.
Guyana, which is quietly
seeking a, more posi.tiye,
response from Venezuela for


economic development in the
disputed Essequibo region,
based on the Venezuelan claim
to some two thirds of
Guyanese territory, is
expected to operationalise its
own bilateral arrangement
with PetroCaribe later this
month.
This could involve a barter
arrangement by which Guyana
trade its sugar, and possibly rice,
as payment for oil and petroleum
products imported from
Venezuela.
Simply stated, in the same
way that Barbados has
exercised its sovereign right
to stay out of PetroCaribe,


and continues its local mediab
litz to justify its decision -
while Trinidad and Tobago
continues to weigh its options
- the overwhelming majority
of CARICOM countries have
equally demonstrated their
own right to access
PetroCaribe for the
reasons they have publicly
articulated.
Prime Minister Patterson
may well have spoken for
all Community signatory
states when he noted in his
August 28 national broadcast:
"The intent of the signatories
to the PetroCaribe Agreement
is to broaden the framework
of regional cooperation NOT
to weaken our efforts in
securing regional integration
within CARICOM..2'






SUNDAY CHRONICLE October 2, 2005



13 Years of democratic rule


W elvO.ie p
^H^^^^^^ by Robert Persaud I^^^^^^


OCTOBER 5 marks 13 years
since the return of
democracy to Guyana. This is
a landmark date in the
national calendar and an
equally important fact of our
history.
As we reflect on this
occasion, we all need to recall
the struggles of our ancestors
and celebrated freedom fighters.
The struggle for a return to
democracy, after the blatant
rigging of elections and the
institution of a repressive
dictatorship by the PNC
regime, was inspired by earlier
epochs of struggles. Our
ancestors' fight to end slavery
and indentureship and more
recently, to achieve
Independence steeled our people
for the freedom battles which
took place during the 1964-1992
period.
There are the apologists
who harp that we must not
recall the infamous dictatorship
period. I caution them that a
nation unaware of its past
cannot move forward firmly. On
Emancipation, Indian
Indentureship, Independence
and Republic Anniversaries, the
entire nation engages in an
exercise of recognition and deep
reflection of past struggles and
tribulations. We would annually
recall the contributions of our
ancestors and fore-parents and
their pernicious impact on
current development and
progress. Those who urge that
we must forget the past are
very selective; they only want
us to erase the PNC's 28 years
of dictatorship from our national
reflections. Our history cannot
be selective or rewritten. What
has happened cannot be erased
from our national consciousness,
especially as new generations


emerge.
These apologists want us to
forget the ballot box martyrs


who were gunned down at No.
63 Village, Corentyne while
objecting to the removal of the
ballot boxes in 1973. They want
us to forget the cold-blooded
slaughter of Fr. Bernard Darke,
Dr. Walter Rodney and
others and the tens of thousands
who were forced to flee this
land. They want us to forget the
hundreds who were tortured and
abused for speaking out against
the dictatorship. They want us
to forget the suffocation of the
private sector and destruction of
the national economy. They
want us to forget the squander-
mania and rampant corruption.
They want us to forget the


GUYANA SUGAR CORPORATION INC







3"-

The Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc. invites
Suppliers or Manufactures to tender for Fertilizers
for the year 2006.

Closing Date for Tenders will be Tuesday,
October 18,2005.

Please contact Material Management Department
to purchase and uplift Tender Package from
Wednesday, September 28, 2005 at:

Materials Management Department
Ogle Estate,
Ogle, East Coast Demerara.
Telephone: 592-222-2910. 3161 or 3162
Fax: 592-222-3322

NB: LOCATION FOR TENDER OPENING
WILL BE STATED ON TENDER
DOCUMENT." .. ..


ethnic and political
discrimination practised in that
by-gone era.
I have always advocated the
view that our people's full
appreciation of our newly-
found democracy is impaired by
the fact that we did not convene
a Truth Commission following


the return of democracy.
Notwithstanding, our past
should not be a burden on the
future.
'Many would urge that this


past should not be a millstone
as the nation moves forward.
The misdeeds of the main
opposition party do not mean
that its political influence should
be ignored nor its potential to
contribute to our society's
advancement. Our celebration of
democracy involves the painful
exercise as we must always
reflect on the journey covered.
This soul searching has
reinforced our people's
commitment to build and
strengthen our democracy.
Look at how far Guyana
has come since 1992. All
freedoms dre growing. Our
Constitution is the most
inclusive in this Hemisphere.
Our economic and financial
framework is one of the
most open in this part of the
world. Our people today are
free to criticise, object and
even protest against their
Government. Our people's
freedom is now safeguarded
by our Constitution and a
raft of international
conventions. Our human
rights record is world-rated.
Guyana as an emerging
democracy is a shining
example for countries which
shared that similar
destructive past. We are
constantly reminded of the
mantra development
requires democracy.
The month of October
provides for activities to reflect
and celebrate our freedom. This


month must strengthen our
resolve to defend our democracy,
and prevent the enemies of
freedom from retaking our
society.
The significance of
October 5 cannot be
underestimated. We build on


our national democratic
state, which the late
President Cheddi Jagan
articulated, will grow in the
coming years. With every
October 5, 1992, we must
heighten our defence of the
democracy.


QI WIRELESS CONNECTIONS
BOURDA MARKET STALL 'A"
TEL: 227-3404, 223-5262, and 622-8950









-.... ....








The Public is hereby notified that Mr. Kurt
Lewis is no longer employed by Wireless
Connections. He is not authorised to transact
any business on behalf of Wireless
Connections or represent us in any way
whatsoever.

By Order ofManagement


National Insurance Scheme is pleased to announce that employee's contribution statements
for theyear 2004 are available for the employers listed below. These statements are being
distributed by the various district inspectors or can be uplifted from the Compliance Division,
Brickdam (for employers in the Georgetown district) or from the Local Office in your area
(for out of town employers).

Persons whose statements have discrepancies are asked to make contact with the
nearest Local Office or the Records Department, Camp & Bent streets Georgetown.

Further, Employers who have not received statements for their employees
will have same at later date.

NO. REG. NA MC V IE NO. REG. N A VM ES
1 30 William Fogarty Limited 24 23539 Marcel Gaskin & Associates Ltd
2 56 Friendship Oxygen Limited 25 23682 Maurice Solomon & Co.
3 66 Guyana Telecommunication Corp. (GT&T) 26 23719 Inflight Duty Free Guyana
4 112 Guyana Electricity Corp. (GPL) 27 24933 Simbi Mining Enterprise
5 122 Colonial Life Insurance Co. 28 27058 R.F.T. Investments Inc.
6 202 Public & Police Service Commission 29 27066 I.C.M. Inc.
7 211 West Demerara Judicial District 30 27269 Hasief Yusuf
8 215 Booker-BDH Ltd. G.P.C. 31 931 Guyana Legion
9 220 Guyana Red Cross Society 32 9400 James A. Lewis
10 225 Correia's Jewellery Estb. Ltd. 33 16380 Gypsy Snackette
11 302 Director of Public Prosecutions 34 18666 Raymond Abdool Khalil
12 414 Corentyne Judicial District 35 18705 Bernadette Backreedy
13 1005 N & S Mattai & Co. 36 20607 Sumintra Dat
14 1047 The Demerara Mutual Life Assurance Soc. 37 21486 Salt & Pepper Ltd. (The Diner)
15 18297 Patricia Ann James 38 22936 Bhena's Footwear
16 18828 Sigma Labs Medical Supplies 39 23444 Single Seafoods Export
17 19048 Harry Persaud Sankar 40 26043 Thomas Wiggins
18 19568 Ailani Vijay 41 26080 Mahadai Lalu
19 19849 Beatrice Fernandes O.S.U 42 26206 L' Club Latino
20 19946 Chempro Co Ltd. 43 26315 Caribbean Fellowship
21 22475 Sase Narine Sankar 44 27064 Cecil Greene
22 23033 Krishna's College of Business 45 27065 David Mootoo/Jagdei Mootoo
23 23160 Multi Technology Vision Inc


MR. ROBERT PERSAUD





SUNDAY CHRONICLE October


BIOY & 2, 2000



BIOTECHNOLOGY & BIOSAFETY


Sponsored by the Guyana-UNEP-GEF National Biosafety Framework Project systematically harnessed as a
developmental tool.


TODAY the National
Biosafety Framework Project
of Guyana offers the first in
a weekly series of articles
designed to educate the
public and make Guyanese
aware of issues pertaining to
biotechnology and biosafety.
Biotechnology is a
developmental tool in the
quest for human progress.
However, like most
technologies, it has potential
risks if regulatory safeguards
biosafetyy) are not
systematically and
judiciously applied. Before
we go on further we need to
know what biotechnology and
biosafety are.

WHAT IS
BIOTECHNOLOGY?
There are several definitions
of-biotechnology, for example:
"It is the application of
scientific and engineering
principles to the processing of
materials by biological agents to
provide goods and services."
Biotechnology could also be
defined as "the use of various


techniques by humans to
modify plants, animals and their
products for desired traits or
'value."'
Simple everyday examples
of biotechnology include
fermentation, cheese-making,
brewing of beer and the distilling
of rum. These are considered
"low biotechnology" or
"traditional biotechnology." On
the other hand, "high
biotechnology" or modern
biotechnology involves genetic
engineering, for example,
isolation and insertion of the
human hereditary material
[=gene=portion of DNA]
responsible for insulin
production into bacteria which
then become "genetically
programmed" to produce insulin
outside the human body.
Organisms produced from
the application of "modern
biotechnology" methods are
called GMOs [=genetically
modified organisms] or LMOs
[=living modified organisms] or
GE organisms" [;,genetically
engineered organisms]. Foods
derived from GMOs are referred


The Guyana Herbal Business Association,
(GHBA) wishes- to invite members of the herbal
industry to its general meeting'at the conference
room of the IICA office located at 18 Brickdam,
Stabroek at 2pm on Friday, October 7, 2005.

The purpose of this meeting will be to:

Register all herbal stakeholders
Election of members to the GHBA Board.

If you have any queries please call 225-4482

AnnettA
GHBACountry Representative. '
h- ~ ~ ~ ~ "* **'


to as GM foods. For example
corn syrup made from
genetically modified corn with


inserted Bacillus thuringiensis
gene for the synthesis of
"biopesticide" (biologically-
derived, non-synthetic chemical
pesticides) to kill the corn stem
borer insect.
GMOs/LMOs are referred
to technically as
TRANSGENICS [=organisms
derived from the hightech
transfer of genes]
As we shall see later in
this series, biotechnology has
enormous benefits to
agriculture, food security,
industry, environment,
human and animal health
and, generally, ecosystem
health. Experts have
indicated biotechnology will
be the key driving force of
world trade and global.
development in the 21st
century. Developing
countries can be left behind
if biotechnology is not


WHAT IS BIOSAFETY?
Biosafety has been defined,
by international agreement, as
*' . s .'


the "efforts or mechanisms used
to reduce and eliminate the
potential risks/harmful effects
of biotechnology to the
environment and human health
while ensuring the
environmentally sound
application of biotechnology for
the benefit of human welfare."
In other words, any set of laws,
guidelines, rules and regulations,
import/export mechanisms,
farming/land use designed to
ensure that the products of
biotechnology are not harmful
to health, the environment and
biodiversity and the related
mechanisms to avert or manage
any risk derived are the set of
tools defined as biosafety.
Some transgenic food crops
under field trials in developing
countries today. These include
those that are under commercial
cultivation and found-in our
foods today.


Beans
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Chili
Maize
Melon
Mustard
Papaya [=pawpaw]
Peanut
Pepper


Potato
Rape [=Canola]
Rice
Soybean
Squash
Strawberry
Sugarcane
Sweet potato
Tomato
Wheat


US SOLDIERS have
embarked on a major assault
on al-Qaeda-linked militants
in western Iraq, the US
military says.
Some 1,000 ground troops
stormed Sadah, a town near the
Syrian border in Anbar
province, following earlier
helicopter strikes, officials say.
They say Operation Iron
, Fist the latest in a series of
assaults in the area will tackle
infiltration and destroy the
insurgents' haven.
Local doctors told the BBC
at least 10 civilians have died in
the operation:
The dead who include at
least three children were
reportedly travelling in two
vehicles carrying fleeing families.
Operation Iron Fist is the
first major assault in western
Iraq since US and Iraqi troops
struck the town of Talafar also
near the Syrian border in
September.
BBC Baghdad
correspondent Caroline Hawley
says the US offensives have
largely failed to stop a series of


deadly bombings blamed on the
insurgents.
Violence has spiralled as Iraqis
prepare to vote in a referendum on
a new constitution, scheduled for
15 October.
At least 10 people were
killed when a bomb exploded in
a market in the town of Hilla on
Friday.
On Thursday, blasts in
the town of Balad claimed 95
lives.
Meanwhile, 500- detainees
have been released from the US
prison at Abu Ghraib, near
Baghdad, bringing the total
number of prisoners released
this week to 1,000.
The US said the freed
prisoners were not guilty of
serious crimes.
Their release has been timed
with the Muslim holy month of
Ramadan, due to start in a few
days' time.
Abu Ghraib prison
became synonymous with the
mistreatment of detainees
after pictures emerged last
year of US soldiers abusing
Iraqi captives.


0 GREENHEART

MEDICAL UNIVERSITY 1


M A LSH AR.


ac m y(

- - -- - -


-


* Pre-Med, Mfedical Doctor (M;D.), Basic Science, M.D.
Clinicals & B.Sc. in Nursing
* One semester USMLE review availa l)e.

* Jodal Health Care Inc. guarantees nursing
employment overseas.,
* Experienced faculty and excellent facility ies
* Volunteerin Guyana hospitals and gain earl ha lnds-on
medical experience.
* Financial Assistance available for qual Ified students.
* North American curriculum


Contact: Ms. Lisa at (592) 621-0411
Sor 626-2334


View programs and apply online at:

www.greenheatamed.com


I This is a responsible position with a well-established
Company. Prospective candidates should
* demonstrate the ability to handle key staff issues,
have a positive attitude and proactive
I vision and show attention to detail. Familiarity with
the relevant laws of Guyana and payroll operations,
* including NIS and PAY1E is required.

SMiust have at( east 5 years _ianageial experience, of
which at least 2 should be in lthe Human Re.sources


ii .\ zji-,ec Itom a &c-x yc ^e- iii ersit) Ji reianagcement
S o1 it-evant ateat would be highly desirable
* Please submit applications and C.V.
to Thc Administ r.ativc laniager
|rarfan and Mendes Limited *
45 Urquhart Street, Georgetown,
" I
On or before OctobeLx0SO5 .

m imm umiam mm W Imm' mm


Next week we shall highlight the importance/relevance of
the National Biosafety Framework project and begin
discussions on some of the details of biotechnology applications
in the different sectors Agricultural Biotechnology, Medical
Biotechnology, Industrial Biotechnology, and Environmental
Biotechnology.


US launches assault

in west Iraq

Recent US offensives have focused
on Iraq's border with Syria


wf


U






SUNDAY CHRONICLE October 2, 2005


Teaching Service Commission


Ucaii-ci eJ


/f// lo:e


Vacancies at the Upper Corentyne Industrial Training Centre,
No. 79 Village, Corriverton, Region # 6.
Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the following
vacancies at the Upper Corentyne Industrial Training Centre, No. 79 Village,
Corriverton, Region # 6:

One (1) Chief Instructor
One (1 )Agricultural Mechanic Instructor
One (1) Electrical Installation Instructor
One (1) Fitting and Machining Instructor
One (1) Masonry Instructor
One (1) Motor Vehicle Mechanic Instructor
One (1) Welding Instructor
One (1) Information Technology Instructor

CHIEF INSTRUCTOR: UPPER CORENTYNE INDUSTRIAL TRAINING
CENTRE, NO. 79 VILLAGE, CORRIVERTON, REGION # 6.


JOB DESCRIPTION:

Under the direction and control of the Administrator, assists in the operation
and management of the Upper Corentyne Industrial Training Centre; assists
in formulating the long-term and short-term educational programme of the
Centre; assists in determining courses of study to be run at the Centre and in
the preparation of course syllabi; obtains from Government Ministries and
the Private Sector, reports on the performance of trainees during on-the-job
attachments during training, and of those who have graduated: evaluates
such reports as may be required by the classroom as the need arises;
prepares such reports as may be required by the Administrator, and
provides guidance to Instructors as necessary; and performs other related
duties.

JOB SPECIFICATION:

EITHER:

i. A recognized degree relevant to the disciplines taught at the Centre
i.e., Agricultural Mechanics; Carpentry and Joinery; Electrical
Installation, Fitting and Machining; Masonry; Motor Vehicle
Mechanics; Welding; Information Technology.

OR

ii. The H.T.D., H.N.D., the Diploma in Agriculture, or other equivalent
qualification.

OR

iii. The full Technological Certificate of the City and Guilds Institute
gained after a Technician's Course (In the case of a full Technician's
Certificate gained after a Craft course, the candidate must possess
relevant industrial experience).

OR

iv. Any other qualification considered equivalent to any of the above.

PLUS: A minimum of three (3) years relevant post-qualification
experience.

Possession of the Vocational Teacher's Certificate or a Diploma/Certificate
in Education, and also relevant industrial experience would be an
advantage.

INSTRUCTOR UPPER CORENTYNE INDUSTRIAL TRAINING
CENTRE, NO. 79 VILLAGE, CORRIVERTON, REGION # 6.

JOB DESCRIPTION:

Under the general direction and supervision of the Administrator and the
Chief Instructor, the incumbent instructs students in his/her class in the
practical and theoretical aspects of the appropriate trade, and in this regard,
prepares outlines and programmes and maintains up-to-date records on


students' attendance and evaluation of their performance; ensures the
economical utilisation of materials, the proper maintenance of machinery
and tools, and the establishment of safety procedures in the workshop;
liaises with personnel in Ministries, in industries and in other educational
agencies with the view to determining areas in which his/her
subjects/courses can be made more relevant to the needs of the country;
assists in placing students in on-the-job attachments during training and in
obtaining employment for them after graduation; obtains and evaluates
reports on students during attachments/employment; conducts aptitude
tests, interviews prospective students and advises students regarding their
courses; performs other related duties.

JOB SPECIFICATION:

EITHER:

i A recognized degree relevant to the disciplines taught at the Centre
i.e., Agricultural Mechanics; Carpentry and Joinery; Electrical
Installation, Fitting and Machining; Masonry; Motor Vehicle
Mechanics; Welding; Information Technology.

OR

ii The UG Diploma in Technology; HTD; the full Technological Certificate
of the City and Guilds Institute gained after a Technician's Course (In
the case of a full Technician's Certificate gained after a Craft course,
the candidate must possess relevant industrial experience).

OR

iii The GTEE Technician Certificate

OR

iv The GTEEAdvanced Craft Certificate

OR

v The GTEE Craft Certificate

OR

vi Any other qualification considered equivalent to any of the above.

DIRECTIONS:

1. Applications must be made in duplicate, using the prescribed form TSC
6A.

2. The ORIGINAL application must be sent to: The Chief Education
Officer, Ministry of Education, 26 Brickdam, Stabroek, Georgetown,
(through the normal official channel of communication if the applicant is
in governmental employ) for delivery there by Thursday, October
13,2005, the latest.

3. The DUPLICATE application must be sent DIRECT to: The Secretary,
Teaching Service Commission, 22 Brickdam and Sendall Place,
Stabroek, Georgetown, for delivery there by Thursday, October 13,
2005, the latest.


4. Late applications will NOT be considered.


5. Application Forms may be uplifted at:

(1) The Upper Corentyne Industrial Training Centre, No. 79 Village,
Corriverton, Region # 6.
(2) The Education Department, Region # 6, Philadelphia Street,
NewAmsterdam, Berbice.

(3) The Personnel Department, Ministry of Education, 21 Brickdam,
Stabroek, Georgetown.

(4) The Secretary, Teaching Service Commission, 22 Brickdam and
Sendall Place, Stabroek, Georgetown.


Francesca Vieira
Secretary
TEACHING SERVICE COMMISSION





10 SUNDAY CHRONICLE October 2, 2005


tools to fir t tUn


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Syndicated Conten


Available from Commercial News


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OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT


FOR SALE BY TENDER

"AS IS, WHERE IS '


The vehicles forsale are:


Toyota Motorcar
Nissan Motor car
Mazda Minibus
Hyundai Motorcar
Nissan Sentra Motor car
Nissan Sentra Motor car


PGGi111(
PHH8171
PFF 38111
PGG1429
PFF3381
PFF 3383


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The above-mentioned vehicles could be inspected daily from Monday, October
3, 2005 to Friday; October 7, 2005 between 09:30 h and 15:00 h in the
compound of the Presidential Office Complex, New Garden Street,
Georgetown.
The vehicle listed at No. 3 can be inspected at the Guyana Stores Limited
Workshop, Water Street.
Tenderers are requested to place their sealed Bids in separate envelopes in the
Tender Box located at the front of the Central Accounting Unit, Office of the
President on or before 15:00 hon Friday, October 7,2005.
Tenderers are hereby requested to address their ealed Bids to the:
CHAIRMAN
Standing Board of Survey Committee
Office of the President
New Garden Street
Georgetown.
Vehicles sold should be removed within fourteen (14) days, after which a
storage charge of 2% of the sale price will be levied.
The Office of the President reserves the right to reject the highest or any other
Bid.
Signed:
J. Webster
Chairman
Standing Board of Survey


*


MEDICAL COUNCIL OF GUYANA

TO: ALL MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS

Medical Practitioners are hereby informed that the Medical Council of
Guyana will be holding its 4"' Annual CME Session on Sunday, October 9,
2005 at the Hotel Tower, Main Street, Georgetown from 9 am.

TOPICS


1. Cancer of the Prostate
2. Colon and Rectal Cancer
3. Ano-Rectal Surgery
4. Heavy Vaginal Bleeding
5. National Strategy for the
Prevention of Suicidal
Behaviour
6. Current Advances and
Treatment Strategies for
HIV Management


Dr. Ravishekhar Purohit
Dr. Surendra Persaud
Dr. Dalgleish Joseph
Dr. Galton Roberts
Dr. Bhiro Harry


Dr. Chuka Anude


6 CREDITS


r


I


dlw dplqo






SUNDAY CHRONICLE October 2, 2005 .. ;


'Showcasing A Cultural Mix In 2006'


Mash 2006 launched at the


Umana Yana


THE Ministry of Culture,
Youth and Sport Friday night
officially launched
Mashramani 2006, under the
theme "Showcasing a Cul-
tural Mix in 2006".
The Minister of Culture,
Youth and Sport, Gail Teixeira,
also presented the prize of
$30.000 to 9-year-old Shamar
Mittelholzer from Mae's Un-


der- 12 School whose theme was
chosen for the Mnshramanin
2006.
The launching of Mash
2006 commenced with the tra-
ditional costume parade from
the Ministry of Culture, Youth
and Sport on Main Street, to
the Umana Yana, where the
launching ceremony took place.
The event was graced by


The Mash 2006 logo and theme shortly after it was
unveiled by Minister Gail Teixeira at Umana Yana.


Acting President Mr. Sam
Hinds, olher Governncnt offi-
cials and Mash 2006 Manage-
ment Committee Members.
Minister Gail Teixcira said
in her address that Mash in
2006 is special because of the
ongoing preparations taking
place, the hosting of the ICC
Cricket World Cup 2007 and the
nation's 40th Independence an-
niversary celebrations.
She observed that this
year's Mash celebrations were
cancelled due to the January
flood and some of the planned
activities were held in areas not
affected.
Ms. Teixeira said that the
Mash 2006 calendar of activities
can be described as a journey
through Guyana. The Private
Sector Brunch has been re-
scheduled for December and is
aimed at raising funds for
calypsonias.
All Regions vied for partici-
pation, and those taking part are
Two, Three, Four, Five, Six,
Seven, Nine, and Ten.
A new item has been added
to the Mash 2006 calendar of
activities, and this is a one-night
Chutney Competition to be held
in Wakenaam.
Speaking about the logo,
Minister Teixeira said it was


Minister Gail Teixeira and Mash 2006 theme winner, Shamar Mittelholzer at the unveiling
of the new logo.
decided to keep the logo and public was given a chance to theme competition. This was
change the theme and the send in their entries to the won by Shamar Mittelholzer.


Invitation for Bids

Field and Laboratory Equipment


GUYANA DEFENCE FORCE
A________ __ a


The Guyana Defence Force invites Tenders for the supply of the following C
Hardware:

a. 6 Desktop Computers (High Range)

b. 3 Uninterrupted Power Supplys (UP$)

c. 1 Local Area Network (LAN) Server

d. 2 Black & White Laser Printers (Heavy Duty)



TENDERSARE REQUIRED TO SUBMIT:


Computer


a. Each Tender must be accompanied by valid Certificate of Compliance from both the
Commissioner of' Inland Revenue Department and Manager, National Insurance
Scheme; and Bid Security equivalent to 2% of the cost of the items tendered for.

. B. A record of the. Firms'/Company's' performance in the supply of Computers and
Hardware with proven track records and expertise forthe past three years.

Tender documents may be uplifted from the office of the Staff Officer One General Four
(Finance), Camp Ayanganna during normal working hours from Monday 2005-10-03. Bidders will
be required to purchase tender documents at a non-refundable fee of twothousand five hundred.
dollars ($2,500).

All Tenders must be submitted in a sealed envelope,.bearing no identity of the Tender and clearly
indicatedon the top, left-hand corner, the category tendered for, (Computers & Hardware).
Addressed to:

Chairman of the National Procurement Tender Board.
Ministry of Finance
MainStreet
Georgetown

And deposited in the Tender Box Ministry of Finance not later than 09:00 hrs -Tuesday,
October 18, 2005.


Environmental Protection Agency has received financing from the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) for the of supply field and laboratory equipment. Bidding
will be conducted through the national competitive bidding procedures of the IDB
which includes that all related service and the said equipment must have as the country
of origin an eligible country of the IDB,

The Environmental Protection Agency invites sealed bids from interested
Bidders for the Supply of Field and Laboratory Equipment.

Interested Bidders may obtain further information and can collect bidding documents
at a non-refundable fee of one thousand dollars ($1,000) at the:
Executive Director Office
lAST Building
University of Guyana Campus
Greater Georgetown, Guyana
or visit EPA website at www.epaguyana.org

Bids must be delivered at the address below before 09:00 hrs on November 8"',
2005.All bids should be in a sealed envelope bearing no identification of the Tenderer
on the outside and must be clearly marked on the top left hand corner "Field and
Laboratory Equipment for the Environmental Protection Agency." The
envelopes should be addressedto:
The Chairman
National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main and Urquhart Streets
Georgetown

Tenders must be deposited in the Tender Box at the National Board of Procurement and
Tender Administration of the above address no later than 09:00hrs on Tuesday.
November 8"', 2005.

-Teiiid.ci v. il bc .'Ipcned at 09:00hrs on Tuesday, November 8"', 2005 and Tenderers or
their authorized representatives may be present to observe the opening of the Tenders
ai the Ministry of Finance.

The Ministry of Finance does not bind itself to accepting the lowest tender and
reserves the right to reject any tender without assigning reasons


Mr. Doorga Persaud
Executive Director
Environmental Protection Agency
U.G Campus, Turkeyen, Gr. Georgetown
Tel: 222-5784, 222-2277 Fax: 222-2442
Email: epa@epaguyana.org
Website: www.cpaguyana.org


.


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1\1' ,





12 SUNDAY CHRONIC October 2, ;20b


'Capote' one



Of yCpopyrig htedlMaterial

-Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


- -


LINDEN ECONOMIC ADVANCEMENT PROGRAMME

V (LEAP) M
FA IRe-Advertised
L E A P VACANCY CIVIL ENGINEER


The Linden EconomicAdvancement Programme (LEAP), a programme financed by
the European Union, is assisting the local private sector of Linden and Region 10 in
creating/expanding businesses, and will contribute to creating a more favourable
investment environment. The core activities of the programme include the provision
of business/advisory services to small and medium enterprises, the provision of a
managed business incubator for new businesses'and the promotion of the region for
new investment, both local and foreign. Accompanying measures include vocational
training, institutional strengthening, a revolving credit fund, and the rehabilitation of
the socio-economic infrastructure.
LEAP seeks an experienced Civil Engineer
Tasks and Responsibilities working under the supervision of LEAP's Senior
Engineer:
* In co-operation with the local authorities and community leaders, identify
and prioritize the physical infrastructure constraints to improve economic
development opportunities in Linden and Region 10
Prepare design and specifications for the agree works and invite tenders.
* Evaluate the tenders and make recommendations as to the appointment of
contractors.
Prepare and administer contracts for civil works.
* Supervise the works in progress by contractors
* Process payments as appropriate: and
* Prepare evaluation of technical, financial and comparative analysis reports
Key Qualifications:
S Degree in civil engineering or an equivalent professional qualification.
Minimum of three (3) years professional experience with the administration
of civil engineer contracts & works
Identification & monitoring of Community type projects
Good interpersonal and negotiating skills.
Fluency in written and spoken English and
Good computer skills including ability to use Word, Excel, Microsoft Project
and Auto Cad.
Knowledge of reporting contracting requirements for donors and
specifically the EC is an advantage.
Application including an up to date CV and two (2) references to be sent to:
The International Project Manager
Linden Economic Advancement Programme (LEAP)
97-98 Republic Avenue
Mackenzie
Linden
To reach no later than November 4, 2005
Successful applicants will be expected to live within the Linden Area
Terms: Salary will be commensurate with training and experience.
One (1) year renewable contract. Persons who applied before can re-apply.


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~'- n behalf of the Board of the National Insurance Scheme, I wish to extend recognition of the 36 years of existence of the Scheme and particularly the role it
|. continues to play in national life. Social Security is a permanent feature of state policies in most countries of the world providing support and assistance to
insured workers according to their legislation and under specified circumstances. Since its creation, the Scheme has extended itself in discharging its
mandate to its contributors past and present and its employees. Guyana has changed since 1969 and its social security system must reform to remain
relevant. The board plans to conduct a National Consultation among stake holders on further reform of the system. The Administration is continuing with its
S promise to make the benefits of computerising the Scheme's operations available to its contributorS'and pensioners The Scheme has just recently
adopted a Prudential Framework for investment whose objective is to maximize the contribution of Investment Income to the Fund with reasonable risk
averse portfolio management.

In that regard, a better mix of short/medium and long-term investments will be sought. Overall, the scheme is healthy but to remain healthy the scheme
must remain vigilantto avoid common pitfalls. Service to our clients is permanent. Criticisms have been publicity made of the way the Scheme operates
r." and action is being taken to remedy the recognized shortfalls.
Dr. Roger Luncheon




On this, the 36th anniversary of the National Insurance Scheme, it would be fitting to examine the experience of the Scheme during the course of the triennium 2001 to 2004 as it relates
to revenue and expenditure and also to make projections of the future of the Scheme in those areas.

2001 2002 2003 2004

Total Revenue 7,050 7,138 6,849 7,598
Contributions 5,096 5,544 5,747 6,470
Investment | 1,937 1,573 1,081 1,102
Others 17 21 21 26
TOTAL EXPENDITURE 4,780 5,106 5,594 5,898
Benefits 4,024 4,309 4,684 5,047
Administration 756 797 910 815
SURPLUS 2,269 2,031 1,255 1,700 Patrick Martin Borough


Taking an overall view of the experience, it could be seen from the above that the annual total revenue has increased from $7,050M in 2001 to $7,598M in 2004. There
was a decrease in 2003 relative to 2002 by 4% approximately which was caused by a sharp decline in investment income in that! year. Annual total expenditure has also shown an
increasing trend moving from $4,780M in 2001 to $5,898M in 2004. The annual surplus has exhibited a decreasing trend moving from $2,269M in 2001 to $1,700M in 2004. An in depth
examination of the figures shows that contribution income increased by 8.8% approximately between 2001 and 2002, by only3.6% between 2002 and 2003, and by 12.6 % between 2003
and 2004. The increase between 2003 and 2004 was influenced significantly by the increase in the contribution rate of 1% point from April 2004.

The investment income has decreased annually over the period. It moved from $1,936M in 2001 to $1,573M in 2002, that is, a decrease by approximately 18.8%. It decreased further to
$1,081 M in 2003, that is, by approximately 31.3% relative to 2002 and then increased marginally to $1,102M in 2004. Although therefore, the overall picture is one where revenue has
been increasing annually over the period, the under lying position is that one component of revenue, that is, the contributions income has decelerated over the period 2001 to 2003, but
was reviewed in 2004 as a result of the increase in the contribution rate.

The other component of the revenue, that is, the investment income has been decreasing over the period. On the other hand, the expenditure on benefits has shown steady increase,
.which ranged between 7% to 9% per year over the period. Benefit expenditure, which accounts for approximately 85 % of total expenditure moved steadily from $4,023M in 2001 to
$5,047M in 2004. Administrative expenditure has also increased over the period. It movedsteadily from $757M in 2001 to $91 OM in 2003, and then decreased by approximately 6.4% to
$852M in 2004. The overall picture, therefore, is one of the weak positive growth in revenue, and a strong positive growth in expenditure. One of the main reasons in the weak growth of
revenue is the decreasing number of contributors to the Scheme.

Over recent years there have been noticeable movements of persons form the employed population, which is reasonably well structured to the self-employed population, which is not
properly structured. Those movements resulted in drop-outs from the contributing population and have created a great degree of difficulty in the monitoring of those contributors.
Investment Income has been decreasing annually because of the lack of suitable lucrative investment opportunities in which the Scheme could invest its funds. The strong growth in
expenditure is due to the increases to the rates of benefits, especially pensions, which have been made over the years. The basic nature of a pension dictates that it should be adjusted
periodically to counter the effects of inflation. Any prediction of behaviour of expenditure in the near and distant future will be one of steady positive growth. In order, therefore, for the
Scheme to fulfill its objectives of payment of benefits, there would need to be in place a mechanism to ensure that the growth in revenue would match the growth in expenditure. The main
purpose of a social security is to ensure those persons are offered security during the course of their lives.
The persons to whom that promise of security is offered must have confidence that the Scheme could fulfill that promise in order for the Scheme to be meaningful to them.
It would, therefore, be necessary at various points in time for adjustments to be made either to the rate of contributions or to that of benefits. One such adjustment was made in 2004 when
the contribution rate was increased by 1 % point. While contribution increases may be necessary from time to time, it cannot be relied upon solely to maintain that balance between revenue
and expenditure, since at some point in time the cost of coverage may become prohibitive to the worker.

The increases in the contribution rate could become unbearable to workers in cases of a static on decreasing population of contributions. It may be necessary, therefore, for adjustments to
be made to the rate of future benefits, or the conditions governing the award of the benefits, and not only to the contribution rate. The health and longevity of the Scheme is of paramount
importance to its contributors and hence, a review of the parameters governing it must be done from time to time to ensure that they are still relevant. One such review is scheduled to be
conducted shortly. The review will most certainly result in changes to the existing Regulations and Procedures, since it would be influenced by the thinking of persons who represent a
broad spectrum of our public. It is hoped, therefore, that the reformation would be of such that both the present and the future generations would have the confidence that the system would
ensure their security during the course of their lives. As we, therefore, celebrate our 36th Anniversary let us look to the future with confidence that this Scheme would continue to discharge
the mandate, which itwas given at the inception. Happy 36th Anniversary to one and all!

General Manager.






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I l'/uing and caring our contmuinilies s natural resources
and unique landscapes is critical to creating .;
a lhealthlv ,andi more sustainable environment for the Jfiure .


Our young people are responding poditively to calls for
increased responsibiliiv ito ards the environment,
and as a salute to their efforts
Guyana Bank for Trade & Industry Limited
is inviting voung people to share with us. through word and art.
their activities at prescrring the qualir' of the environment,
for selection and presentation in GBT.4lhnanac 2006.


b- do -a

S"Copyrighted Material
S--- Syndicated Content - -
Available from Commercial News Providers"


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GPLJwards 6 better Quality OjCfZ e


RULES
* The Competition is open to young people between the ages of 8 15
* Draw and colour (paint or crayon) a scene depicting your involvement
in an environmentally friendly activity in your community
* Your drawing must be done on an 8V1/".x 11" sheet paper
* A short essay explaining the scene depicted and your role must
accompany your drawing.
* Entries must include your name, address, age, telephone number and
and the name of your school
* Entries remain the property of, GBTI

PRIZES ,
*The Bank will select six entries from among those 7
submitted. The selected pieces along with a /
photograph of the artist, will appear on the pages of
the GBTI 2006 Almanac .'
* Each of the six selected (entrants') will receive a
$15,000 cash prize in a GBTI Early Savers Account
*A selection of other notable entries will be displayed in the Bank

SUBMISSION
Send your entries to:.
GBTI ALMANAC 2006 MAKING A DIFFERENCE FOR OUR ENVIRONMENT"
Water Street, Georgetown Regent Street, Georgetown
Corriverton, Berbice Anna Regina, Essequibo *.Parika, Essequibo
Vreed-en-Hoop, West Bank Demerara :
P 0. Box 10280, Georgetown or Email to admin,'.,gbubank coni

Deadline for submission of entries is 31st October, 2005
Entries from immediate family members of GBTI employees
and the Advertising Agency are not eligible.


f


R" /


GBTI
Qt WwUQ4gwfWa


BRITISH HIGH COMMISSION
A A

The British High Commission has vacancies
for:-

A Full-time Office Cleaner
Daily Cleaning of the High
Commission offices.
Covering for Receptionist as required

A Full-time Gardener
Daily maintenance of gardens and
surrounding areas at the High
Commissioner's Residence
Pool cleaning and maintenance

Closing date for applications is Friday 7
October 2005

Please send your written applications, clearly
indicating on the envelope the job for which you
are applying, together with two recent
references and Police clearance to:

The Management Officer
British High Commission
44 Main St
Georgetown


.>






suN~eY CHRO!S )15


-0 t11' :ho bellive T1::tieq is fircsiribal to ifo Us ait wtas prcscrilicd tv those qurcif0111,11 J C Moll learn scli
rc~rat~~lut... jRaiv.abn Is the mnt/i Itn It'hich was sqnt down the L111qIi'l S 0a quidc to rniikind, aliv cLlear sqs1115 )or
qiiidaticc and mjluennt betiuen Miqht and wrtu; so ci~crit onc oj~jon piresent atL Shome~c~i durinai the ninth should


spcild it fstinq.

Ramadan is a month ;n which Muslims are experiencing the
pangs of hunger and thirst and naturally become -m.rnpathetic to
the poor and needy Ramadan is the month Zakaah is normally
paid as the means of purifying the wealth Thi- payment is
compulsory on those who are in possession of the
Nisaab$28,875 for 2005

The payment of Zakaah enables us to become aware of the
socio-economic problems of the poor and needy. It has often
been stated that should all Muslims pay what is due as Zakaah,
we would wipe out poverty in the Muslim Community.

Let us reflect during Ramadan on the situation in Guyana and
other countries with regards to the escalating violence, crime,
rape, racism, use of alcohol, narcotics and violence against
women and children This is indicative of a society becoming sick.
These ills have been successfully eradicated during the lifetime of
the Holy Prophet (SA) through the acceptance of Islam as a way
of life and solution to these problems

As Muslims we have not only been able o10 identify the problems
but to offer the solution which is the only means of saving the
world from disaster. The job of disseminating the teaching of
Islam is obligatory on every member of the Muslim community.
Ramadan.preparesus for this task by offering the ideal physical
and spiritual exercise -

Ma, Allah give us the strength and health to observe the Holy
monih of Ramadanrin true spirit May Allah accept our sacrifice.

The President and members of Ihe Central Eyecuilive Council of
the Central Islamic Organisation of Guyana (CIOG) wish to
extend sincere Ramadan greetings to all Imams, Presidents and
E *ecutive members of Jamaat and Muslim organizations as well
as our Muslim brothers and sisters throughout the country

Ramadan and lasting
Fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam It is an act of pure
submission to Allah's command given the Holy Ouran as follows.
O you who believe fasting is ordained for you as it was ordained
to those before you, so you may remain conscious of God (2:
183). The Holy Prophet Muhammad (SA) said: "0 people, there
comes upon you now a great month, a most blessed month, in
which lies a night greater in worth, than a thousand months. It is a
month which Allah has made. it compulsory that the fasting should
be observed by day. He has made the "TARAAWEEH" by night a
Sunnah. Whosoever tries drawing nearer to Allah by performing'
any virtuous deed in this month, for him shall be such reward as if
he had performed a 'Fard' in any other time of the year. And
whosoever performs a Fard for him shall be the reward of seventy
Fard in any other time of the year. This is indeed the month of
patience and the reward for true patience is Jannah (Paradise).
This is the month of sympathy with one's fellow men; it is the
month wherein the true believer's provision are increased.
Whosoever gives a fasting person food to break the fast (at
sunset) for him there shall be forgiveness of his sins and
emancipation from the fire of Hell and for him shall be the same
reward as for him (whom he feeds) .'ithoui ithe person's reward
'being diminished in the least .Ha i ith"


Importance oll Zakaah
Zakaah is a source Of spiritual tipliflment .JMosl cf our people are
living below the poverty ine-siruiiglnmg or food clean water.
health and a criance 1- li. e a productive life
Zakaah is established by Allah as a source ol purriicaiiun,
protection and enrichment Zakaah is mean sof bridging the gap
of disparity to build fraternal bond to increase mutual support
systems and to protect human dignity.
The parable of those who spend their substance in the way of
Allah is that of a grain of corn: "It grows seven ears and each ear
has a hundred grains.Allah gives many fold increase to whom he
pleases" (2:261)
In our wealth the poor has a right, which must be given to them,
their lives are a trust in our hand; if they die for want of food, the
fortunate will answer for this on the Day of Judgement. Let our
wealth be a source of reward for us in this life and in the hereafter
by giving a part tothosewho rightly deserve.

Distribution and Collection of Zakaah
CIOG has disbursed for 2005 forty three million, three hundred
thousand Guvana Dollars (G$43 3 million as Zalaah to 1066
recipients from 119 Jamaals and 392 orphans countrywide All
Zakaah collected is used for distribution to the poor and needy
Muslims are advised to channel the Zakaah through the CIOG
for distribution to the poor and needy It is the only organisation
that presents an Annual Auditled Financial Statement. Our
Auditors are Deloitte and Touche

Nisaab and the Rate of Zakaah
Zakaah is the Annual Obligatory duty of every sane Muslim,
male and female past the age of puberty ..ho owns completely
the stipulated minimum wealth (known as Nisaab) free from
debts Zakaah is due on money. merchandise, jewellery and
other items of gold and silver, livestock and agricultural produce.
The Nisaab of money and for merchandise fixed by the Holy
Prophet (S A) is the value of 10 o: 2.5 dwt of silver which is
equivalent to $26,875 in cash Any Muslim possessing the
Nisaab now and who possessed it one year ago has to pay
Zakaah at 2 '." percent of the current value of gold jewelry and 2.
1'Y percent of the present net value of all merchandise. For the
Nisaab etc on livestock and agricultural produce kindly consult
the ClOG's Zakaah Booklet. The Nisaab for 2005 is. $28,875 in
cash.

intention
The intention of fasting (Niyyah) should be conceived or given
utterance for each day, preferably before the break of dawn..If
not anytime before midday.

NA-WAI-TIU-AN-A SOO-MAL-YAWM-AMIN-SHAH-RI-
RAMADAN- LIL-LAA-HITA-AALA
I intend to fast today in the month of Ramadan for the pleasure of
Allah.

Duaforbreakingthe fast
AL-LAA-HUM-MA-LA-KASUM TO WA-ALAA RIZ 1Q-KA AF-
TAR-TU
0 Allah, for thy sake, I have fasted and now I break the fast with
food that comes from thee.


1A An, \. .i .1 ,














Timings for Fasting During the Month
of Ramadhan 1426

Date Finish Suhoor/ Breaking Fast
Fajr Maghrib

Mon 3 Oct 4.25 5.46
Tues 4 Oct 4.25 5.46
Wed 5 Oct 4.25 5.45
Thurs 6 Oct 4.25 5.45
Fri 7 Oct 4.25 5.44
Sat 8 Oct 4.25 5.44
Sun 9 Oct 4.25 5.44
Mon 10 Oct 4.25 5.44
Tues 11Oct 4.25 5.44
Wed 12 Oct 4.25 5.43
Thurs 13 Oct 4.25 5.42
Fri 14 Oct 4.25 5.42
Sat 15 Oct 4.25 5.41
Sun 16 Oct 4.25 5.41
Mon 17 Oct 4.25 5.40
Tues 18 Oct 4 25 540
Wed 19 Oct 4.25 5.40
Thurs 20 Oct 4.25 5.40
Fri 21 Oct 4.25 5.40
Sat 22 Oct 4.24 5.39
Sun 23 Oct 4.24 5.39
Mon 24 Oct 4.24 5.39
Tues 25 Oct 4.24 5.38
Wed 26 Oct 4.24 5.38
Thurs 27 Oct 4.24 5.37
Fri 28 Oct 4.24 5 37
Sat 29 Oct 4.24 5.37
Sun 30 Oct 4.24 5.37
Mon 31 Oct 4.24 5.37
Tues 1 Nov 4.24 5.36
Wed 2 Nov 4.24 5.36
Thurs 3 Nov 4.24 5.36
Fri 4 Nov 4.24 5.36
Sat 5 Nov 4.24 5.36
Sun 6 Nov 4.24 5.35
Mon 7 Nov 4.24 5.35


LOOK OUT FOR THE
RAMADAAN MOON ON
TUESDAY4th OCTOBER 2005


V I-
..... ... .





16 SUNDAY CHROI




NIS has earned its rites


of passage

"WE have a scheme that is worthy of being t
recognized, we've earned our rights of passage o-
cally, regionally and international, and we must .
congratulate ourselves for that," Chairman of "-the
National Insurance Scheme (NIS), Dr. Lanceim
declared last Thursday.
The Head of the Presidential Secnit was iinw the a "e .m
address at a reception and award ad bsamy iprFsemitai ta On- m
memorate the 36thAnniversary of ithe Sdame Imata wk. ,
Dr. Luncheon noted alt thee ane manm seamiA s dmbaie ges
facing the NIS, prominent among whidhais ithe ismOf lam da
He said the standards by which y as pefmm',by w 'ii'h dw 4
are judged, and which measmae how l w &E ey mandiA i ad me-
spond to the obligations of the sdchme amnd aimo ikme amf.en-
tion of the NIS and its opeabion the iimefdia, iifiai hat these
standards need to be improved.
The public perception of the sdhie neis wary mirmanmta vmk- '.._.. .
ers must strive to be pleasant and l at a times, D. Imdim
told the gathering of employees fiam ial of ate andhes offNI O S.
General Manager of the Sc heme, MN PnidkMai**=flli aimi


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e mFOROUi 0 S 2 B

SUNDAY OCTOBER 9, 2005
AND THE SECOND SWlAY I EVEr MONW
Pleasenote Uthatscambepaid=asWspeB wSWB
Monday to FddaYanadi!2sp (14W mSa-mulay
at GT&s Business Or"e,. 78 CthSBt Gmgftm
and at these Uomow igBEfessWLmcaoms:


J'sSupermake 131 Esse SAiRbpilbktlC.F
New Amsterdam, Bebice


S'RVdt Park

C & FSt~ennwrwtBago~smor. ___
10 13- BagotSbWn, EOD_


SA. Radariviy & Sanslyf
Mc Kenzie, Linden

32 Sisters Wbagp- Waes.BO


says Chairman Dr. Roger Luncheon


SIX of tIe seven empkopees who were presented with certificates for their twenty year
Chaman of cite Scheme, Dr. Roger Luncheon; and General Manager, Mr. Patrick Martinborou

7-3..


MS Bursary eS m_ I k. Roger Luncheonf ana Mr. PatricK Martinorougn.


rs of service with NIS, with
ugh.
his address, said the yearly gath-
ering serves to assess what the
Scheme has accomplished over
the past year and to look to see
if goals are met.
He stated that for 2005, the
Scheme had a projection of $7
billion and is so far coming in at
68%, with their surplus at $1.8
billion, adding that the aim of the
scheme is one of lower expendi-
ture and a higher surplus.
Martinborough disclosed
that the scheme is putting in
place a new system to allow
contributors, at an early point in
time, to check whether their em-
ployers are paying up their con-
tributions.
He stated the new system
will also allow persons to be
kept up to date on an annual ba-
sis.
He said as it relates to his-
torical contributions dating back
from 1989, the scheme is look-
ing to providing persons with
information on their contribu-
tions up to 2003.
The General Manager re-
vealed th e NIS will soon be
adapting the old numbering sys-
tem and getting rid of all tempo-
rary numbers issued over the
past few years.
Mr. Martinborough ex-
plained that the system the
scheme wants to reinstitute is
one in which all social security
numbers that do not start with
'A' or 'B' will have both a "suf-
fix and a prefix, which means
these numbers will have a letter
both at the beginning and the end
of them.
He noted that this eliminates
the chaos and confusion that
now reigns in the system.
After the official cer-
emony, seven employees from
various branches were
awarded with plaques for
twenty years of service, and
the children of ten staffers
were presented with grants.
Dr. Luncheon made the pre-
sentations.





ICLE October 2, 2005
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m43.


LE Meridien Pegasus in an effort to encourage Guyanese to start planning early for Christ-
mas and avoid the traditional last minute rush recently held what they dubbed "Christmas
Village".
The two day affair began last Thursday, September 29, and commenced at 11:00 h and ran until
19:00 h in the hotel's Oasis (near the poolside).
Several businesses, including Steve's Jewellery, The Gift Centre, Demerara Distillers Limited
(DDL), BB Floral, Marika Massey Floral and Avon displayed some of the products they have to
offer for the coming holiday season
A number of interested persons thronged the many displays which featured floral arrangements,
jewellery, gift items, beauty products and many Christmas knick knacks. while Santa Claus enter-
lained and amused.
The hotel offered fruits for sampling by the curious and advertised their yearly special
offers for organizations that wish to hold their Christmas lunches, dinners and staff parties
in any of the hotel's well appointed rooms.


A FORETASTE


OF CHRISTMAS


DELIGHTS


(1p


WINES and liqueurs too, very important to the celebrations.


*. ..9~
A
A


'I.


t CAKES and sweets, all splendid
- in the colours of Christmas
S.t=..'


smala Busie o tunitYe smak e -i..
Here's a mlidenl opportunltv to make monev..!


Broken tles in bags f 00-lbs-


O niy$1,200.00


Lavatory basin ::. Only 5,000.00
Damaged Plywood Extremely Chap
Bolts & Nts in 0-l s Bags
(mixed, se.' sizes i a bag, Price for
Prime Q.xaitiity:150. per Ub Only $70Opes lb

lm .- Shop ..: 7ese l.ins --




each .... .i..OneCar. One Sco..e., Tv etc.

-Parika or i^ore 337-4649
-Land of Canaan .a--: -0 O2604514
-Rose Hall : -226-1402
o "a


wiAhiot joininglong lines!
Use your phone to pay your phone bill with
the touch tone service of these banks:

4DEMERARA ITI
BANK Di
J6W L I M I T E D



Cnzs Bku NATIONAL BANK
0F WOUSTMANO COMKeRCE UMITO


Call your Bank & find out how


BE FOR SIlM N BUCES ON YOUR
AUGUST 2005 BILL IS
SUNDAY OCTOBER 9,2005
MA TH SECOND SUNIAR INEVERY MONTH

Q. .. w;3:, ^ -<4'. 3. -\ 4 .






F18,,,b .--SPIPAY PIIJPkl p2 0


DEMERARA DISTILLERS LIMITED
& SUBSIDIARIES


/


Chairman's Statement

The DDL group of companies has improved its fi-nirin,: performance when compared with the same period of last year. This improvement was achieved despite rising fuel and
raw material costs, including molasses. In addition to the above, increased competition in both local and international markets, as well as the continuing lack of real growth in the
Guyanese economy all had to be overcome before the :r,,.-th, albeit, very small, could be achieved.

Group revenues were GYD$5,183 million compared to GYD$4,727 million for the same period in 2004, an increase of 10%. Profit after tax increased by 2%, from ., D.4CO million
to GYD$411 million.

Based on the projections for the second half of the year we are confident that the results for 2005 will surpass those of the previous year.

I would like to express my appreciation to the customers, cih-rr.h il.. employees, partners, management, associates and the board of directors for hei contribution to the


r..uits for the period.

Consolidated Balance Sheet
As at June 30, 2005


Consolidated Profit and Loss Account
For the period January 1 June 30, 2005


Consolidated Cash Flow Statement (con't)
For the period January 1 to June 30, 2005


ASSETS
Non Current Assets
Property Plant and
Equipment
Investments
Deferred Expenditure
Retirement BenefitAsset


Un-audited Un-audited
June 2005 June 2004
(Restated)
G$000 G$000


5,949,420
336,022
282,914
44,717-


5,902,232
405,057
351,032
28,483


Audited
Dec 2004


5,9
3
2


G$000



93,839
60,150
98,308
44,717


6,613,073 6,686,804 6,697,014


Current Assets
Inventories
Trade and Other
Receivables
Taxes Recoverable
Prepayments
Cash in hand and at Bank


TOTAL ASSETS


5,523,309 5,173,887 5,476,072


1,589,203 1,392,355
225,072 86,404
101,673 37,064
201,992 180,315


1,081,993
211,387
70,566
182,428


7,641,249' 6,870,025 7,022,445

14,254,322 13,556,829 13,719,460


Equity attributable to equity holders of the parent


Issued Capital
Reserves
Other reserves
Accumulated Profits

Shareholders' funds

Minority interest

Total Equity


770,000
450,854
22,441
6,596,008


770,000
450,854
21,503
6,053,918


7,839,303 7,296,275

7,957 8,962

7,847,260 7,305,237


Non Current Liabilities
Loans due after one year 1,849,464
Deferred Tax 286,133
Retirement benefit obligation 62,240


Current Liabilities


Trade and otherpayables 2,363,971
Current portion of interest


-bearing borrowings
Taxes Payable
Bank overdraft lsecure.,T



Total Liabilities

TOTAL EQUITY AND
LIABILITIES

On *-,. iill i .r,-- Board:


Chairman Di


2,157,794
188,661
61,233


770,000
450,854
22,441
6,447,864

7,691,159

9,416

7,700,575


1,927,725
294,466
62,240


2,197,837 2,407,688 2,284,431


2,144,637 2,030,817


542,767
60,505
1,241,982


479,682

1,180,280


4,209,225 3,843,904

6,407,062 6,251,592


634,180
202,976
866,481

3,734,454

6,018,885


14,254,322 13,556,829 13,719,460


... ".. : *..................D director.
Chairman Audit Comm in-,-


Turnover
Cost of Sales

Gross Profit

Other Income
Share of profit/(loss)
in associated company
Selling and distribution
expenses
Administration expenses

Profit before interest.
and taxation
Net interest payable

Net.profit before
taxation
Taxation


Un-audited
June 2005
G$000


Un-audited Un-audited
June 2005 June 2004
Restated
G$000. G$000


Operating activities
Net profit before interest
and taxation
Adjustments for:
Depreciation
(Increase)/decrease in
deferred per1i'. ir
E ti'., a ,_ i,, i.',..s
on loans
(Increase)/decrease in
J i rlO ^ i 1.._ ii :1 : i-\
',, "i 5;:.,- 't 1,*._r, :.e)j in
defined _-i, l li t,.
Associated Cor= .J any -
Associated Company


Un-audited Un-audited Audited


Un-audited Audited
June 2004 Dec 2004:
G$000 G$000


5,183,004 4,727,488 9,869,961
(3,218,871) (2,913,409) (5,519,106)


1,964,133 1,814,079 4,3

32,247 38,292

(22,998) (12,931)


(683,005)
(571,998)


718,379
(161,289)


557,090
(146,107)


(638,178) (1,5
(510,176) (1,2


691,086 1,6
(146,844) (4


544,242 1,2
(141,566) (4


Net profit for the period 410,983 402,676 8


Attributable to:
Equity Holders of the
Parent
Minority interest

Net profit for the year

Earnings per share in
dollars


412,442
(1,459)


404,055 8
(1,379) -


410,983 402,676 8


0.53 0.52


350,855

95,600

(60,431)

i13,838)
44,309)


i27,877
412,873)


?15,004
411,411)

803,593



104,518
(925)

803,593


1.04


Consolidated Cash Flow Statement
For the period January 1 to June 30, 2005


Audited
Dec 2004

G$000


718,379 691,086 1,627,877.

215,632 165,677 382,958&


15,394


(37,231) 15,493


(3,344) (21,779) 47,456

(16,234)



24, 123 14,586 60,431


(Increase)idecrease in
External Deposit
Exchange difference on
consolidation


Dec 2004

G$000


5,869


(5,417) 59,504


806,922 2,184,361


(135,500) (437,684)


(92,578) 178,413

45,064.- (68,751)


623,908 1,856,339


(146,844) (413,821)
(369,085) (494,440)


107,979 948,078


948
(559,261) (909,973)
7,945- 49,767


S(551,316) (859,258)


518,731 736,295


(362,371)
(168,134) (239,572)


350,597 134,352


(79,282)


Operating profit before
working capital changes 890,907

(Increase)/decrease in
stocks (47,237)
(lncrease)!decrease in
debtors
and prepayments (538,317)
!ncrease/(decrease) in
creditors and accruals 333,154

Cash generated from
operations 638,507

Interest paid (161,289)
Taxes paid (310,596)

Net cash provided by
operating activities 166,622

Investing activities
Interest received
Purchase of fixed assets (172,292)
Sale of fixed assets 1,079

Net cash used in.
investing activities (171,213)

Financing activities
Loans drawn down
Loan repayments and
transfers (166,330)
Dividends paid (185,016)

Net cash provided by
(used in) financing
activities (351,346)


Net increasel(decrease)


in cash and cash
equivalents

Cash and cash
equivalents at
beginning of period,

Cash and cash
equivalents
at end of period


(355,937) (92,740) 223,172



(684,053) (907,225) (907,225)



(1,039,990) (999,965) (684,053)


June 2005 June 2004
Restated
G$000 G$000


I


~-'-~-- ------~ --


)


I
I









DEMERARA DISTILLERS LIMITED
& SUBSIDIARIES


INTERIM REPORT 2005


Statement of Changes in Equity
For the period Januaryl June 30, 2005


Share
Capital
G$000


Capital
Reserves
G$000


Other
'Reserves
G$000


Balance at 1 January 2004 (restated)
Profit for the period
Dividends Paid
Exchange difference on consolidation

Balance at 30 June 2004 (restated)

Profit for the period
Fair value adjustment on investment
Dividends
Exchange difference on consolidation

Balance at 31 December 2004

Profit for the period
Dividends Paid
Exchange difference on consolidation


Balance at 30 June 2005


770,000 450,854 21,503 5,823,414
404,055
(168,134)
(5,417)


770,000


770,000


450,854


450,854


7,065,771
404,055
(168,134)
(5,417)


21,503 6,053,918 7,296,275


22,441


400,463


(71,438)
64,921

6,447,864


412,442
(185,016)
(79,282)


770,000


450,854


22,441


400,463
938
(71,438)
64,921

7,691,159

412,442
(185,016)
(79,282)


6,596,008 7,839,303


10,341 7,076,112
(1,379) 402,676
(168,134)
(5,417)


8,962


7,305,237


454 400,917
938
(71,438)
64,921


9,416


7,700,575


(1,459) 410,983
(185,016)
(79,282)

7,957 7,847,260


Directors' Interest

The interests of directors holding office at June 30, 2005 in the ordinary shares of
Demerara Distillers Limited were as follows:

Demerara Distillers Limited ordinary shares at-No par value


Beneficial
Interest


Yesu Persaud
Komal Samaroo
Loris Nathoo
George Robinson
Chandraballi Bisheswar
Egbert Carter
Rudy Collins
Lalta Ramgopal
David Spence

December 31, 2004



Yesu Persaud
Komal Samaroo
Loris Nathoo
George Robinson
Chandraballi Bisheswar
Egbert Carter
Rudy Collins
Lalta Ramgopal
David Spence


4,654,578
908,312
500,000
339,124
87,884
14,000
84,000
23,334
70,000


Beneficial
Interest


4,654,578
908,312
Nil
339,124
87,884
14,000
84,000
23,334
70,000


Associates'
Interest


Nil
1,137,141
Nil
3,500
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
980,414


Associates'
Interest


Nil
1,137,141
Nil
3,500
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
980,414


Under the company's share Purchase Plan Number 7 shares are set aside for
employees. To date the full value of the shares in this plan has not been paid. -The
ownership of these shares is not transferred until the shares are fully paid up and they
cannot be utilized to transact any business using them as security or otherwise until
they are fully paid up. Under this plan, shares have been allotted to the following
directors: -

June 2005


Mr. Yesu Persaud
Mr. Komal Samaroo
Mr. George Robinson


23,334
23,334
23,334


There was no change in these amounts from the previous half year.

Substantial Shareholders

June 30, 2005


Demerara Distillers Ltd


Trust Company (Guyana) Limited
Secure International Finance Co Ltd
National Insurance Company

December 31, 2004
Demerara Distillers Ltd


Trust Company (Guyana) Limited
Secure International Finance Co Ltd
National Insurance Scheme


Number of
Shares


150,915,394
139,925,530
61,600,000


Number of
Shares


150,985,077
130,537,615
61,600,000


%
Shareholding


19.60
18.17
8.00



Shareholding


19.61
16.95
8.00


The associate's interest disclosed for Mr. Komal Samaroo is held beneficially. The
associate's interest for Mr. George Robinson and Mr. Spence are held non-beneficially.


A substantial shareholder is defined as a person who is entitled to exercise, or control the
exercise of five percent (5%) or more of the voting power at any general meeting of the
company.


.- 9.


4


Retained
Earnings
G$000


Total

G$000


Minority
Interest
G$000


Total
Equity
G$000
















DEMERARA TOBACCO


Unaudited Interim Report

For the Half Year Ended 30 June 2005


CHAIRMAN'S REVIEW

Tre un,ud,ted half yearly accounts of the Company for the period January 1, 2005 to June 30,
j-:5 -.re -approved by the Board of Directors on August 18, 2005.
.Salesi !.r thr,.- ir.t half of the year were $87 million or 5.45% above the corresponding period
last ,ar Thi- '-,-as driven primarily as a result of increase volumes of Bristol.
Despite the increase in sales, Operating Profits declined by $86 million as a result of the higher
opertring mart edng costs associated with the re-launch of the new Bristol packaging in the first
half cr the .iar. Additionally we have also re-introduced the Bristol packs of 10's.
Wer- arti:pate [his marketing investment in the Bristol Brand Family to enable us to maintain our
e,sinuy s.rr.-.nc market position over time,
'cour director hra./e approved and paid a first interim dividend of $3.50 per share to all shareholders
onr, t rre.AtIr as at June 3, 2005.




. ..... ..< . ......
Patrick Smith
Chairmar,

q September 2005


Balance Sheet


Thousands of Guyana Dollars

ASSETS
NON CURRENT ASSETS
Plant and equipment
Deferred taxanion


CURRENT ASSETS
Inerintories
Accounts. receivable and prepayments
Amounts due from related parties
Taxation
Cash and cash equivalents



TOTAL ASSETS

EQUITY AND LIABILITIES
EQUITY
Share capital
Retained earnings



NON-CURRENT LIABILITY

CURRENT LIABILITIES

TOTAL EQUITY AND LIABILITIES


On behalf of the Board:




PatricSmith
Director


Unaudited
As at
30-Jun-05


40,993
6,239

47,232


138,607
66,176
436,453
0
61,090

702,326

749,558


23,400
557,608

581,008

7,106

161,444

749,558


Unaudited
As at
30-Jun-04


22,048
2,933

24,981


65,229
49,731
402,798
0
182,014

699,772

724,753


23,400
574,105

597,505

1,806

125,442

724,753


Audited
As at
31-Dec-04


36,079
5,611
41,690


91,379
31,541
215,739
48,218
315,471

702,348

744,038



23,400
564,450

587,850

5,709

150,479

744,038


ChandraditChintamani
Director .


Cash Flow Statement

Thousands of Guyana Dollars


OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Profit before taxation
Adjusted for:
Depreciation
Interest received
(Gain)/loss on disposal of plant and equipment
Retirement benefit plan expense

Operating profit before
changes in working capital
Increase in inventories .
(Increase)/decrease in accounts
receivable and prepayments
(Increase)/decrease in net amounts
due from related parties
Decrease/(increase) in accounts
payable and accural

Cash generated from operations
Taxes paid

Net Cash Inflow Operating Activities

INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Proceeds from sale of plant and equipment
Payments to acquire plant and equipment
Interest received

Net Cash Inflow/(Outflow) Investing Activities

FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Dividends paid

Net Cash Outflow Financing Activities

NET MOVEMENT IN CASH AND
CASH EQUIVALENT

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
AS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
AS AT END OF YEAR


Statement of Changes in Equity

Thousands of Guyana Dollars


Half year ended 30 June 2004 Unaudited

As at the beginning of period
Net profit for the period
Dividend paid

As at the end of period

Year ended 31 December 2004 Audited

As at the at beginning of year
Net profit for the year
Dividend paid

As at the at end of year

Half year ended 30 June 2005 Unaudited

As at the beginning of period
Net profit for the period
Dividend paid

As at the end of period


Unaudited
Half year
ended
30-Jun-05
519,559

4,818
(1,326)
442
1,490


524,963
(47,228)

(34,635)

(220,714)

11,698

234,084
(208,197)

25,887


1,175
(11,329)
1,326

(8,828)


(271,440)

(271,440)


Unaudited
Half year
ended
30-3un-04
606,413

6,228
(4,937)
(291)
378


607,791
(16,127)

6,430

(54,604)

(7,631)

535,859
(351,789)

184,070


1,300
(841)
4,937

5,396


(307,710)

(307,710)


(254,381) (118,244)


Audited
Year ended

31-Dec-04

1,047,979

10,162
(10,933)
783
4,281


1,052,272
(42,277)

24,620

175,812

(8,862)

1,201,565
(629,975)

571,590


5,060
(23,640)
10,933

(7,647)


(548,740)

(548,730)


15,213


315,471 300,258 300,258


61,090


182,014


315,471


Share Retained Proposed
Capital Earnings Dividend Total


23,400
0
0

23,400



23,400
0
0

23,400



23,400
0
0

23,400


344,410
309,255
(79,560)

574,105



572,560
540,620
(548,730)

564,450



564,450
264,598
(271,440)

557,608


228,150
0
(228,150)

0



0
0
0

0


0
0

0


595,960
309,255
(307,710)

597,505



595,960
540,620
(548,730)

587,850



587,850
264,598
(271,440)

581,008


Profit and Loss


*1




A4'


Unaudited
Half year
ended
30-Jun-05


1,665,219

(852,925)

812,294

3,644

(134,155).

(157,406)

(4,818)

519,559

(254,961)

264,598

11.31 Dollars


Unaudited
Half year
ended
30-Jun-04


1,579,407

(761,928)

817,479

4,937

(67,398)

(142,377)

(6,228)

606,413

(297,158)

309,255

13.22 Dollars


Audited
Year ended

31-Dec-04


3,338,952

(1,616,792)

1,722,160

16,274

(317,119)

(363,174)

(10,162)

1,047,979

(507,359)

540,620

23.1 Dollars


Notes to the Interim Financial Report

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The Interim Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting
Standard 34, Interim Financial Reporting and the Security Industry Act.
The accounting policies used in the preparation of the interim financial statements are consistent
with those used in the preparation of the audited financial statements for the year ended 31
December 2004.


2. TAXATION
Taxation is based on the effective rate for the year ended 31 December 2004 and includes property
and deferred taxation.


3. DIRECTORS' INTEREST


BENEFICIAL INTEREST

lares held as at
30-Jun-05


Shares held as at
30-Jun-04


Charles Quintin 40,039 40,039

4. Related Party Transaction

A loan of $300 million equivalent of USD1.5 million has been extended to a related Company
Carisma Marketing Services Limited a fully owned ,bsidiary of British American Tobacco Limited.
Repayment is in full after 3 years with interest of 4 per annum, payable on a monthly basis.


Thousands of Guyana Dollars



SALES

COST OF SALES

GROSS PROFIT :

OTHER OPERATING INCOME

DISTRIBUTION, COSTS : ,

ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES..

OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES

PROFIT BEFORE TAXATION

TAXATION

PROFIT AFTER TAXATION

EARNINGS PER SHARE


;sE~~PA~;CYJas~slS~:~:JE~ ~F~E~9~ ~lf~c~j~f~






SMIAY CNliIUCE October 2, 2005 "


-. fl- -t -
(, ^S S ',S ^ .- ^ 1111 ,* : ..i
if <1* *,- 'n


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DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE CLOSURE TO ROAD
TRAFFIC FOR SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2,2005









For Ocean Going Vessels & Trawlers 14:30
For Ocean Going Vessels opening lasts about 1-1mhrs

PED STRANS-36 6:,,O
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07:00 h Ramroop's Furniture
Store Presents Religious
Teachings
07:30 h Kennav Holdings Ltd
Presents Krishna Bhajans
07:45 h A&S Enterprise
presents Krishna Bhajans
08:05 h Sa Re Ga Ma (Musical
Notes) A live call-in Program
09:30 h NTN Indian Musical
Interlude
10:00 h Sunday Morning
Services by Pt. Reepu Daman
Persaud
11:00 h Special Priti Paksh
Programme .
12:00 h Death
Announcements/In Memoriam


Weather




TODAY'S FORECAST: Mainly fair weather conditions are
expected to continue.
WINDS: Northeasterly to Southerly at 1 to 6m.p.s.
WAVES: Moderately high reaching about 2.0m high in open
waters.
HIGH TIDE: 03:03h at (2.90m) and 15:45h at (2.94m)
LOW TIDE: 09:28h at (0.74m) and 21:40h at (0.63m)
GITOWN
SUNRISE: 05:41 h
SUNSET: 17:43h
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE: 31.5-34.0C over coastal areas and
& 32.0-34.5C over inland and interior locations.
MINIMUM TEMPERATURE: 21.5 24.0C over coastal areas
and 22.0-25.0C over near inland and interior locations.
RAINFALL: Nil
RAINFALL ACCUMULATED: Nil
MARINE ADVISORY: Fishermen and other marine users
are advised not to damage or interfere with the ocean
platforms, whose data are vital to the provision of the
weather information and warnings for the safety of
the marine community.
HIGH TIDE ADVISORY: The above normal high tide flood
advisory is presently in effect. Residents of coastal,
riverine and low-lying areas are advised to take the
necessary precautions against flooding due to the
above normal tides.
SPRING TIDE ADVISORY: Nil

FOR WEATHER RELATED QUERIES
PLEASE CALL 261-2216, FAX 261-2284


GUIDE SUBJECT

TO CHANGE

WITHOUT NOTICE


SKi


iM. N c


SUNDAY OCTOBER 16, 2005. FROM 12:00 HRS.

UITVLUGT COMMUNITY CENTRE GROUND, WEST COAST DEM.

CASH PRIZES IN EACH EVENT: 1st Place $75,000 3rd Place $25,000 5th Place $10,000
2nd Place $50,000 4th Place $15,000
Plus Trophies, Certificates & Hampers
MUSIC BY: MELODY MAKERS BAND, STEREO SOUNDS, KING'S TASSA GROUP & LOCAL PERFORMERS.


"IK .i'


XatureRua ~ -~-nto STERLING


13:00 h DVD Movie:
Kalicharan
16:00 h Gurukula Sandesh
16:30 h Teaching of Islam
17:00 h IPA Presents...Shiv
Mahapuran
17:30 h Kishore Local Talent
18:00 h Mere Awaaz Suno...
Karaoke Live
19:00 h Birthday greetings/
Anniversary/Congratulations/
Death Announcements & In
Memoriam
20:00 h DVD Movie:
Matrubhoomi
23:00 h To be Announced
00:30 h Sign Off


CHANNEL 8

08:55 h- Sign On
09:00 h America at Worship
09:30 h This Week in India
10:00 h Showbiz India
11:00 h- Showbiz India Extreme
11:30 h Asian Variety Show
12:30 h English Music Videos
13:00 h- Echo
15:00 h-The Suite Life of Zack
15:30 h -That's So Raven
16:00 h Lizzie McGuire
16:30 h Even Stevens
17:00 h Supernatural
18:00 h News Channel 4 at 6


18:30 h NBC Nightly News
19:00 h Greetings and
Announcement
19:30 h Faith in Action A
Catholic Series
20:00 h Musical Interlude
20:30 h A Return to God's
Biblical Foundation
21:00 h- Desperate Housewives
22:00 h Reba
23:00 h Charmed
00:00 h- Sign Off


STVS CHANNEL 4

06:00 h Sign On
06:05 h Morning Melodies
(Old)
08:00 h Cartoons
09:00 h Patsanmjali
10:00 h Caribbean Massala
11:00 h Indian Movie
14:00 h Family Movie
16:00 h PG Movie
18:00 h Celebrity Inex
19:00 h Setting Things Right
According to the Scripture
20:00 h Ahmadiya Muslim
Jamat
21:00 h STVS Creole Gaff with
Jones
23:00 h Action Movie
00:03 h Action Movie
02:00 h Sign Off


O







22 ;SUtlAiGHC ONICLEEOotobeL2 2005 -


APARTMENTS in
Barbados. Magnificent view.
kitchenettes, private bathrooms,
fully furnished, seven minutes
to Bridgetown or beach. Single
US$28, double US$32
nightly. Telephone 1-246-
4243005.


BUILDING, renovating
any kind of construction
work? Free estimates.
Prompt, reasonable and
reliable service. Call
622-0267/629-2239.



INDRA'S Beauty Salon,
122 Oronoque Street, for cold
.wave, straightening, facial,
manicure, scalp treatment and
design on nails. Also Beauty
Culture available. Tel. 227-
1601.
S VIJAY'S HAIR SALON, 207
Almond Street, Queenstown.
specialises in hair cut, perm,
colour and straightening. Also
facial, manicure, pedicure and
waxing. Tel. 226-0205.
NAYELLI SCHOOL OF
COSMETOLOGY is now offering
,a special 3-month Cosmetology
package. Also evening courses in
Airbrushing, Acrylic Nails and
Barbering which begin on
September 26, 05. Tel. 226-2124
or visit at 211 New Market Street,
North Cummingsburg.


HAVE your computers
EXPERTLY SERVICED,
UPGRADED OR BUILT BY
GENIUS COMPUTERS. Tel.
231-7650, 626-8911, 24/7. Our
office is located where your
problem is!
FOR PROFESSIONAL
COMPUTER Repairs, Sales &
Services Call Kersting's
Computer Repairs & Sates
Centre 227-8361, 618-8283.
Home @& Office Services
available. 24 hrs.


K. SANKAR offers
Elementary, Intermediate &
Advance Dressmaking Classes.
Call 220-9532, Courbane Pk.,
Annandale, EtD.


EVENING Classes in
Eccles offers Basic Maths &
Eng. for Grades 5 & 6. Tel.
233-3103.
ELECTRICAL and
Electronics at City and Guilds
Technitron Institute. Re opening
shortly. Contact Carlyle
Benjamin for further details.
Tel. 645-7936.
CLASSES! CLASSES!
-CLASSES! English A, Eng. B,
Spanish, Maths, Forms 1 4.
.Also Primary Classes. Private
tutoring also available. 231-
.47.19, 615-3213.
ENROL now for Classes in
Indian Cookery at the Sanskritik
SKendra 392 393 Ganges
Street, Prashad Nagar. Classes
commence on Monday,
October 3, 2005. For further
.information, call 227-6181,
between. 8-30 am and;4:30 pm..
PRACTICAL Electronic
Course beginning October"11,
2005: Logical and Systematic
Training for repairs to televisions,
amplifiers, CD Players, DVD'
Players, etc. Taught by instructor
,with more, than 20 years
experience. For ,further
information, contact Abdul's
Electronics. 349 East Street, Tel
225-391 or 226-6551.
IMPERIAL COLLEGE -
Offers full-time, Evening &
Weekend CXC Classes for
adults and Forms 1 -5 students
iq all Business and Science.
subjects, Maths and English, A.
MONTHLY FEE $1 000 ,per
subject. Located at Croal &.
King Streets. Tel. # 227-7627,
227-3768, 626-4043 and 644-
5114.


PERSONAL English
Tutoring for foreign language
students (Adults) offered from
3:30 pm to 5:30 pm. Affordable
hourly rates. For more
information, call 644-4373 or
644-7075.


fAPLOMA in
COMPUTER STUDi ES


1' ', Yourself

Course Fees: $5000 each
Beginners: Win & Internmel
Advanced: -Word, Excel
c-s Po.J erFP. nl:F F
COMPUTER WORLD
64 Middle & Main Sts$lGtown


INTERNATIONAL
BUSINESS COLLEGE. Now
registering students for its (1)
Full-time secondary School;
(2) Pre Form 1.... Students
with SSEE marks 300 390;
(3) Afternoons lessons for
Public Schools Students, all
subjects; (4) Evening Classes
for School Leavers CXC
repeaters; (5) ABE Certificate
and Diplomas Courses; (6)
Computers Courses. Call
today of more information.
TEL. 225-2397, 225-5474
AND 223-7219 OR VISIT US
AT 262 THOMAS STREET, N/
C/B. IBC Student success is
our greatest concern.

GLOBAL IEC0HN0OLOGY
ACADEMIC YEAR 2005/2006


Register now!!
i225-3364 / 225-4657

INTERNATIONAL
BUSINESS COLLEGE. Register
for an International University
Degree ih Business
Administration (BA) or Travel,
Tourism and Hospitality (TTH)
from the Association of Business
Executive (ABE) London,
England. Courses are:
CERTIFICATE LEVEL. 1. Intro to
Business; 2. Intro to Accounting;
3. Intro to Bus. Comm.; 4. Intro
to Quantitative. Methods 5. Intro
to Travel, Tourism & Hospitality.
DIPLOMA PART: 2 1.
Economics; 2. Organisational
Behaviour; 3. Accounting; 4.
Business Comm.; 5. Travel,
Tourism & Hospitality, etc. All .
classes commence on 16t1'
October, 2005. Daily, Evening-
and Weekend classes. Register
today! 262 Thomas Street, North
Cummingsburg, G/town. Tel.
223-7219, 225-5474, 225-2357.
CITY UNIVERSITY.



COMING from overseas..
Check out Sunflower, Hotel also
other location, apartments'-'
furnished, AC, TV, cooking
facility. Rooms also 'available,: ..,
other location for bachelor, U.G
Students. Call 223-2173, 225-
3817, 226-1933.


ENROL now at Shalom
Driving Schoob. Lot 2 Croal
Street, Stabroek. You could
also obtain an International
Driving Permit. For more
information call -7 227-3869,
&22-8162.


ENROL now at Shalom
Driving School, Lot 2 Croal St.,
Stabroek. You could also obtain
an International Driving Permit.
Call 227-3869, 622-8162.



FOOD WARMERS. TEL.
226-0170.



We build low Income
homes for less than $10 000
er month. Please call 227-
494, 227-2479 after hours -
218-1957 for one month only
LOW Income Homes with
electricity. Only $14,514 per
month. Contact Everest
Construction Inc., Lot 3
Company Path, Church Street,
G/town. 223-6035. Realtor
needed.



MRS. SINGH'S'Massage
Hotel and Home Service
available by appointment. I also
work at my home. Tel. 220-4842,
615-6665.
MASSAGE Therapy
alleviates pain, stress and
tension. Certified 'Massage
Therapist, Ulelli Verbeke. 226-
2669, 615-8747.



CHEAP! CHEAP! CHEAP!
Business Cards, Flyers, Tickets,
Invitations, Receipt/Bills Books,
etc. Tel. 231-5381.



PHYSICAL Therapy to
physically handicapped
children. Call 231-9967
(Saturdays .9 am to 11 am).



REGISTER now and meet
that special someone in one
hour. Call The Junior/Senior
Singles Dating Service, 18 80
yrs. M. F. 8:30 am 6 pm, Sat.
10 am 4 pm. Tel. 223-8237.
SINGLE East Indian
Businessman age 40 years, 5 ft. 7
in., 180 Ibs., seeks attractive female
age 17 to 50 years, for pen friend.
Could lead to marriage, send
photo, telephone number along
with an address to GANESH SINGH,
P.O. Box 26016.



WEB DESIGNERS/
GRAPHIC Artists wanted. P.O.
Box 26030 or tel. 231-7331.
FREE Website advertising!
Advertising online is now easy,
and it's FREE Advertise your
products, services, or personal
items for sale. Start Today! Visit:
www.guybiz.com



'GET free survey .export
yurrgoods and services.
el. 6-4585.
EXPERIENCED and
trusted matron would like to
take care of your property
when you' are away. 226-9410.
FOR, all 'your crochet
needs,' from doilies, to bed
spread. Call 223-3423, 223-
6525, 22-4495. Also patterns
for sale. ;' '
FOR all your construction,
repairs renovations, as well as
masonry, varnishing, plumbing
and painting. Contact
Mohamed on 223-9710, 614-
6634. . .
TOWS R US. Fast,. reliable
24 hours towing service.
Hydraulic wheel, damage free
towing.. Driving instructor, also
available. 621-7312, 231-4633.


WELDING SERVICES for
grillwork on houses, aluminium,
cast iron, stainless steel, fishing
vessel and truck tray alterations.
Call at 233-2847, 610-6778 -
Khemraj.
.NO need to stress yourself
any further. If you have a place
to rent or sell we can -ir ,, i,l
expedite it. Also a vehicle to sell.
Call us NOW on 223-8175 & ask
for Bibi or Ann 618-1642.
FOR efficient service and
repairs washing machines,
refrigerators, microwave ovens,
gas stove, etc. Freezezone
Enterprises, 6 "A" Shell Road,
Kitty. Telephone 227-0060, 616-
5568.
WOULD you like to be free
from the stress of selling or
renting your property. We at
Meg's Realty & Information
Services can do it for you?
Contact us on tel. # 613-5735,
263-6043
EVERGREEN Agricultural
Services (Regions 1 10). Soil
Testing, organic farming,
technical advice, project
documentation, networking, etc.
Tel./Fax. 227-8259, 226-3090.
REPAIRS & Service to any
electrical appliances e.g. washing
machines, clothes dryers, air-
conditions, freezers, refrigerators,
computers, etc. ALL JOBS DONE
ON SITE WITH THREE MONTHS
LIMITED WARRANTY. Nazim
Khan. N. K. Electrical Services. Tel.
270-4595, 626-2847 (anytime).


VACANCY exists for
Salesgirl, at Shandel Exotic
Creations. Call 227-5536.
FOR Jack Hammer operator.
Interest persons can contact
Roraima Trust & Investment.
Pin. Versailles;, WBD. Tel. 264-
2946.
VACANCIES exist for the
following 2 trained/experienced
school teachers, 1 headmistress.
Tel. 220-4981, 4 to 8 pm, 256-
3812, Mon. to Fri., 9 am to 3
pm.
ONE experienced Salesgirl,
one Porter boy with Store
experience. Apply Sanjay Variety
Store, 9 America & Longden
Streets, Georgetown. Tel. # 226-
6137.
ONE Shop Assistance to
work in sewing Shop. Must have
an idea about sewing and one
experienced Seamstress. Mon.
to Sat. Call Roxie 622-4386,
227-8538 after 6 pm or visit 122
Merriman's Mall, Bourda.
VACANCIES exist for the
following: Two (2) Seamstresses.
Must be able to travel overseas.
One (1) Sewing Room Assistant.
Interested persons please send
applications along with two
references to Mariska's Designs,
35 'A' Arakaka Place, Bel Air
Park, Georgetown.
VACANCY exists for one
Driver/Salesman at Samaroo's
Investment, 30:1 Church and.
Thomas Streets, Georgetown.
Must have valid.Driver's Licence
for Van and Canter. Applicant
should be between 25 and 40
ears. Apply in person with
elieA .Clearance and
recommendation from' : ast
employer.. ..'.
MAJOR .Trading Company.
seeks OfficeAssistants. Minimum
qualification: CXC Maths and
English, Grade 111. Computer
knowledge desire but: not
compulsory. 'Application to
Personnel MAnager, Lot D Lama
Avenue, Bel Air Park,
Georgetown. Call # 225-9404,
225-4492.


KITTY (big), Public Road.-
$8M neg. Keyhomes 223-
4267.
SHERIFF / WILLIAM'
STREETS $30M NEG:
KEYHOMES 223-4267


KITTY 40 ft. x 190 ft.
length $7.5 million neg. Tel.
663-7874.
LARGE house lot. Dowding
St. $6M. Owner 231-7410,
609-0247.
80 ACRES of rice and farm
land. Contact Bob 236
Zeelugt, EBE. Tel. 613-6143.
1 DOUBLE front house lot
at Kuru Kururu, close to
Soesdyke Highway. Call 610-
7947.
HAPPY Acres $8M,
opposite Castle, Queenstown -
$8M neg. Keyhomes 223-
4267.
LARGE prime commercial
double lot, Charlotte St.- $25M.
Owner 231-7410, 609-0247.
LAND FOR SALE
OLEANDER Gardens 89 ft
by -152 ft. Price $25M.
Call: 612-0349;.
117 MARIGOLD St.,
Enterprise Gardens size 50 ft.
x 100 ft. Tel. # 626-3955, 222-
3610.
PRIME commercial land for
sale 115 ft x 31 ft, Charlotte
Street. Bourda. Contact
owner 226-068`3 (anytime).
LAND situate at east of
Windsor Forest Cricket Ground;
comprising an area of 2:422 of
an English acre. Call 220-9675.
TRANSPORTED house lot -
eight hundred thousand each
Best Village, WCD. Water & light
are available. Singh 254-
0101.
TWO transported adja-
cent lots in Eart's Court, LBI
18 080 sqft total. Please tele-
phone: 623-7438 between 6-8am
arid 8-10 Opm for details.
68 ACRES land at
Yarrawkabra Soesdyke
Linden Highway (Creek
side) access to power.
Details 223-5204, 621-
6209 anytime.'
LINDEN, Moblissa 30 acres.
Cheap $7M, Land of Canaan,
8 acres, Riverside.- $40M.neg.,
Charlotte Street $13M.
Keyhomes 223-4267.
SAILA PARK Vreed-en-
Hoop, Housing Scheme. House.
lot for sale, near the public road.'
Prime location, 2 miles from V/
Hoop Stalling. Tel. # 225-7670
or 254-0397.
TWO lots 80 x 113 ft. =
9040 sq. ft ea. $6M ea. LBI,
one lot 5900 sq. ft $5M,
Nandy Park, Lot in Crown' St. -
32 x 144 sq. ft. $12M. Wills
Realty 227-2612, 627-8314.
KITTY $2.9M, Industry -
$5.5M, Meadow Bank $5M,
Duncan Street $10M, Versailles
double lot, gated compound,
Le Ressouvenir, Atlantic
Gardens, Ogle, Oleander
Gardens. Tel. 226-8148.
GATED community with (24)
hours security. Exclusively
residential lots at PIn. Versailles,
West Bank Demerara size 6
000 12 000 sq. ft., priced from ..
$3.9M. Immediately,
Transportable. Contact:-
Seelaram -. 264-2946/7.
GIFT Huge double loi
almost. 11 000-sq. ft opposite
our star cricketer Ramanaresh
Sarwan, with 24hrs seCunt~ in
.highly residential ard gaicd
community of Versailles WBD '
Price $6 995, 000..Conact
227-4040, 628-0796. ..
VERSAILLES $4 million:
Oleander Gardens-- .t 15M LBI
GuySuCo (LBI Road) $3.
million; Elizabeth Hall (1. 112
acre) $6.5M, La Penitnp.e -
$3 million. ..More.. N.. P.
FINANCIAL SERVICES, 223-
4928,. 623-3751.
* Nepent2002@yahoo.corrf


SUBRYANVILLE -
US$800. Keyhomes 223-
4267.
PRASHAD Nagar -
US$700. Keyhomes 223-.
4267.


PRASHAD NAGAR -
US$600. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
ROOM FOR SINGLE
WORKING FEMALE. TELE-
PHONE: 227-0928.
LAMAHA GARDENS -
US$1 000. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
FULLY furnished 2-
bedroom house in Bel Air Park.
Call 225-8153.
BEL AIR PARK US$1 200.
DIAMONDS. KEYHOMES -
223-4267.
ONE three-bedroom flat
concrete house. Tel. 266-3075,
613-8710.
Q U E E N.S TO W N,
furnished two and three-
bedroom flats. Telephone
226-5650.
ONE Chinese restaurant
located at Pouderoyen, WBD.
Contact K. Chand 264-2283.
BE-L AIR PARK fur-
nished executive house on
double lot US$1 500. # 231-
2285/612-2766.
GREIA. Furnished two-
storey building in Lamaha
Gardens US$700. Tel. 225-
3737, 225-4398.
2 BEDROOM house (new)
at Corneila Ida, WCD. All
amenities. Water, etc. Tel. 227-
0490.
ONE two-bedroom
apartment in residential area.
Immediate rental. Telephone -
233-2600..
ONE 2-bedroom apartment
situated at Hugh. Ghanie Park,
Cummings Lodge. $28 000
rent. Tel. 222-6558/609-0606.
ROOMS for single working
females and Interior students -
$15 000 per month. Kitchen
facilities available. Call 226-
2833.
HOUSE for rent. One three-
bedroom, fully furnished house
at Lot 34 Owen. Street; Kitty.
Call Terry 622-4544.
FURNISHED ROOM DE-
CENT, SINGLE WORKING FE-
MALE. TEL: 226-5035 (08:00 -
17:00 HRS).
THE best in houses and
apartments well-furnished or
unfurnished, great locations.
Call Anthony 222-5330, 625-
7090.
ONE lower busiriess flat situated
at Lot 1 Non Pariel, Area A,
East Coast Demerara. Apply to
Jerome Fredericksi at same lo-
cation.
APTS. and: houses -
furnished and unfurnished for
short and long term. Call 226-
2372. (Central. G.T. business
place @ $70 000).
FURNISHED apartment for
overseas guest at 84Garnett St..
C/ville, G/town. Contact Ms. Dee
on 223-1061 or 612-2677.
FULLY furnished. 1' & 2-
bedroom apartments. Air
conditioned hot and cold, parking
space to rent. For overseas visitors.
Tel. 218-0392. .
FOR overseas visitors i- 2-
bedroom bottom flai. Fully
furnished, air-conditioned,
parking space, grilled. meshed.
Subryanville. Tel. 226-5369.
OVERSEAS visitors. TWo-
bedroom apts. US$50'US$60
daily with all modern
conveninces. Excellent
location. Call 227-3442,, 222-
69.96. :
FURNISHED American
styl.ed apts. Suitable for a
couple- or single person $4
0'00f$5 000 per day. Call 231-
6429, 622-5776.. :
EXECUTIVE type house at
65 Blygezight, Gardens -
Meshed, grilled, all modern
amenities. Rent neg. Tel. .226-
9573: ...,
ONE two-bedroom top flat
apartment. Location 26
Seaforth Street, Campbellville.
Tel.' 227-4008, for more-
information.


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u mr I&YAV CHRONCl F Ortoher 02. 2005


ULIP) I* -. --. -- -


FURNISHED flat to let.
Overseas visitors. Telephone -
226-0242.
COLONIAL-STYLED
building (3) bedrooms upper
and or lower flats, parking and
telephone, Queenstown. Call
624-4225.
1 2-BEDROOM spacious,
unfurnished bottom flat. 131
Alma Avenue, Prashad Nagar,
G/town $45 000. Tel. 225-
8088
SPACIOUS 3-bedroom
flat, Ogle Front. Excellent
location. Immediate
occupancy. Students
accepted. Phone 222-7516.
APARTMENT to let.
preferable decent working
couple at: Lot 51 Middle Road,
LA Penitence. Call 225-9144.
SHORT-TERM RENT-
ALS FOR OVERSEAS
VISITORS. PHONE 225-
9944
SPACIOUS fully furnished
3-bedroom flat available for
overseas/local rental. Call # -
226-0210.
2-BEDROOM cottage at
799 Westminster, Canal #1,
WBD. Contact # 615-2230,
FOUR-bedroom house at
47 Trotman St., Golden Grove,
ECD. Contact phone # 277-
3567.
SHERIFF ST., top flat
consists of three offices, can
used for any other type of
businesses. Call 227-8576.
BEL Air Park executive,
3-bedroom unfurnished
house, Jacuzzi, hot & cold, AI
C, garage, etc. US$1 500.
Tel. 231-4228-623-7742.
1-BEDROOM apt., self-
contained. Suitable for
working single person or a
couple, bottom flat. Call 225-
6184.
GROVE furnished 4-
bedroom $50 000 neg.,
Courida Park furnished 1-
bedroom $40 000, Light St,
commercial space $40 000.
More. N. P. FINANCIAL
SERVICES 223-4928, 623-
3751.
SEMI FURNISHED self-
contained apartments
available for single! working
individuals or married couples.
Call 225-0168. Monday,
Wednesday, Fridays,,between
9 am and2 pm.
NEW one-bedroom
apartment unfurnished $25
000, monthly. Single, couple,
students. Mr. Lall, 84 Craig St.,
Campbellville. Tel. 223-1410.
HOUSE by itself $70 000.
BAP furnished $80 000, $65
000, two-b/room $30 000 &
$25 000, daily US$30. Call
225-2709, 225-0987, 623-
2591.
TOP flat in prime
commercial area Camp Street
for Air Line, Salon, Real
Estate, Advertising Agency.
Office or any other business.
Contact Samad, tel. 225-
5026.
2-BEDROOM' bottom flat
apartment, 312 East
Ruimveldt, Housing Scheme.
Free from floodsT preferably
decent couple. Tel. 225-6163,
622-3697, 613-4117.
QUIET RESIDENTIAL.
House 4-bedroom includes ?
master rooms, 21 bath tubs,
grill, parking, A/C, new paint
and polished. R. Park $20M.
627-5550.
RESIDENTIAL anid
commercial properties.
Furnished and unfurnished.
Prices ranging from $40 000
up. Contact Carmen Greene's
Realty. Tel. 226-1192, 6203-
7742.
FOR overseas guests -
house, furnished flats, rooms,
house and apartment. Self -
contained and AC.! Contact; C
& S Night Club. Tel. 227-
3128, cell 622-7977.
QUEENSTOWN, fully
furnished 1 & 3'bedroom
apartment with parking
space to rent. Suitable for
overseas visitors on short
term basis. Tel. # 226-
5137/227-1843.
DUNCAN ST. (2-
bedroom) $25 000 & 1-
bedroom $18 000, (furnished)
$25 000, Kitty $25 000, Mc
Doom $30 000, Queenstown
(3-bedroom) '$60 000,
(furnished) $50 000,
Cummings Lodge $20 000.
$22 000, $25 00, $35 000,
Newtown (3-bedroom,
phone & parking upstairs) $40
000, Kingston (4-bedroom),
upstairs $50 000. Call 231-
6236.


2-BEDROOM bottom flat
situated at Lusignan West, ECD.
Tel. 220-7870, 225-5647.
ONE building top and
bottom flat for Office, Computer,
School,: Restaurant, etc.
Location 49 Hadfield Street,
Werk-en-Rust. G/town. Tel. No.
227-6156, 623-6579.
1 2-BEDROOM top flat, well-
grilled iSubryanville; 1 1-
bedroomi bottom, flat well-
grilled, Subryanville. Call 226-
7003 or 644-5195.
APARTMENTS, Houses/
Executive Houses, Office Space,
Business Places (Down town) -
Kitty. etc. Bond Space. Tel. 226-
8148, 625-1624.
NEW Mall opening. Offices!
showroom spaces available in
Middle and top floors. 190
Church Street (building before
Go-Invest in Church Street).
Contact Sandra 226-3264,
616-8280 for appointment.
ONE two-bedroom fully
furnished top flat, A/C in master
room, water heater in place,
washer, TV, telephone, enclosed
garage, etc. Queenstown -
US$400. Wills Realty, 227-2612,
627-8314.
FOR rent immediately -
spacious, clean and freshly
decorated unfurnished 2-
bedroori flat in quiet residential
neighbourbood. Ideal for the
professional couple,
international consultant or re-
migranlt. Call 218-4955,
between 4:30 pm and 8 pm.
ATLANTIC GARDENS -
LARGE!TWO-STOREY BUILDING,
THREE BEDROOMS, EACH
MASTER ROOMS, INCLUSIVE,
LAUNDRY ROOMS, LARGE
, KITCHENS. TEL. 227-0972.
ECCLES, 2-bedroom bottom
flat $35 000, Prashad Nagar,
furnished US$1000, South,
two-storey, 3-bedroom house,
furnished $80 000, unfurnished
$60 p00. Tel. 227-7627 office,
227-3768 home, 644-2099 Cell.
S FR immediate lease on
.Northern Hogg Island 200 acres
of cultivated rice land along with
rice rnill complete with drying
floor and dryer. Also tractor,
!combine, bulldozer for sale.
iContact:. 626-1506/225-2903.
Serious enquiries only.
TTY -$35000, C/ville $45
:000, Alberttown, executive
places, furnished US$1 000,
Bel Ar Park- US$1 200, Lamaha
:Gardens, Prashad Nagar -
US$ 00, AA Eccles, Turkeyen
lGardens, Subryanville, Bel Air
,Gardbns, Sheriff Street, Happy
'Acres, Office Spaces Middle
Street, Kingston, Church Street,
Busi ness places Sheriff Street,
Reg nt Street, Camp Street,
Bond spaces, many others.
Mentore/Singh Realty 225-
1017, 623-6136.
K. S. REALTORS The
Diplomatic Community Realtors
231-4916, 642-1738. We
provide the fastest rentals for
clients and property owners. Call
us today. EXECUTIVE RENTALS
Bel Air, Subryanville, Atlantic
Gdns, Republic Park, Lamaha
Gdns, Eccles & Prashad Nagar
ranging from US$400 to US$2
500. REGULAR RENTALS From
$30 000 $100 000 in Kitty,
Campbellville,' South,
Alberttown, East Coast and many
more. URGENTLY WANTED Our
foreign clients are in need of
executive rentals in G/town. Also
homeowners we desperately
need regular rentals on East
Coast & Georgetown. Call 231-
4916, 642-1738.
EXECUTIVE HOMES/
Apartments/Office space in
residential and commercial
areas: Furnished/unfurnished,
viz., Atlantic Gardens/
Queenstown/Republic Park/
Waterloo St./Courida Park/Bel
Air Gardens/Bel Air Park/
Kingston/Subryanville, etc.
APARTMENTS: Kitty/C/ville,
(bottom flat); Courida Park
(bottom flat); Subryanville
(bottom flat); Nandy Park,
(bottom flat); Bel Air Park (top
flat); Bel Air (top flat). OFFICE
SPACE: Church Street, (36 x 36)
top flat, North Road Bourda -
top flat, Water Street, (Brassonic
Building) top flat, Boyle Place
Stabroek, (now United Nation
Place) bottom flat. OFFICE
BUILDING: Queenstown, (entire
building). Email:
uptotheminuterealty@yahoo.co.uk
Telephone # 225-8097, Fax. #
226-5240, Cell # 611-6376.


BEL AIR PARK $23M.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
BEL AIR SPRINGS $45M.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
BEL AIR PARK $16M,
CONCRETE. KEYHOMES -223-
4267.
ONE wooden .and
concrete house 50E Sheriff
Street. Phone 223-1529.
PRIME location 1 3-storey
building in Carmichael St.
Phone 227-6805, 225-9127.
SELL or rent properties to
overseas or local clients. TeL.
661-4585.
1 HOUSE lot with 4
houses: Persons interested
please call 333-2420 Price ne-
gotiable,
CANAL NO. 2, North
Section 3-bedroom house
(concrete & wood). Tel. 263-
739
KITTY 2 properties $12M
neg., Lodge $4.5M and $2.5M
neg. Tel. 227-2256.
BUSINESS property at
South Road & Alexander Sts.
Contact 220-8145.
NEW concrete South
Gardens- Directly behind La
Familia Club $13.5M.
Keyhomes 223-4267.
CUMMINGS Lodge, 4-
bedroom. Wood/concrete -
$14M negotiable. Tel. # 613-
5735 or 263-6043.
DOUBLE-LOT 3-bedroom
property for sale in Amelia's
Ward, Linden. Price negotiable.
Call: 223-4938.
TRANSPORTED property at
S1/2 Lot 8 Richmond Public
Road, Essequibo Coast $5M.
Tel. 231-6508, 614-5706.
NEW concrete from -
$12.5M, guaranteed
Alberttown $8M, Kitty $17M,
150 x 50, 3-flat concrete.
Keyhomes 223-4267.
GREIA. Pike Street, Kitty/V
Lamaha Street, Kitty. Properties
in good condition $12M. $15M
neg. Tel. 225-4398, 641-8754.
GREIA. One large building
wood/concrete on two lots at
D'Abreu Street, Newtown, Kitty -
$18M neg. Tel. 225-4398, 641-
8754.
ONE spacious two-bedroom
concrete house. 40 x 25, top and
bottom flat. Two verandas at
South Turlfeyen. Phone 233-
2415.
ANNANDALE three-
bedroom house with 50 x 110
lot, three Blocks from Public Rd.,
one Block from Market. Call 225-
5591, 612-7304.
2-STOREY business/
residential property at 56
Section D Cumberland, East
Canje phone, electricity, etc.
Price neg. Tel. 628-5264,
339-2678. .
HOUSE & land in South R/
veldt. Excellent opportunity for
11 time buyers. House & land in
Stewartvi le, WCD. Tel. 226-
4177, 226-9029, 619-8225.
POPULAR Video Club in
very busy area in New
Amsterdam. Terms of Sale &
Occupancy can be negotiated.
Call 333-2990 or after hours -
333-3688.
GREIA- Bonesika St., C/
ville. Section 'K' one (1)
wooden/concrete structure on
lavish land overlooking Lamaha
Gardens. Price $10M. Tel. 225-
3737, 225-4398.
HOUSE for sale in beautiful
location. Toyota Hilux in good
condition. Going at a reasonable
price. For further information,
call 223-8175, 616-7803. No
reasonable offer refused.
GREIA Broad Street.
opposite Gafoor, Business -
$12M; Non Panel, ECD, large
flat concrete, four-bedroom -
14M; Mon Repos, ECD $10M,
$12M. Tel. 225-4398, 641-8754.
LAMAHA GARDENS -
$22M; Prashad Nagar $15M;
Queenstown $20M; Eccles
$19M; Meadow Brook Garden
$9M; Happy Acres 25M.
Call 223-1582 or 612-9785.
QUEENSTOWN $45M. 100
x 100 land, Bel Air Gardens -,
$45M, Bel Air Park $45M,
Oleander Gardens $40M.
Atlantic Gardens $40M.
Keyhomes 223-4267.
GREIA. Please gave us your
properties for sale or rental and
relax in the knowledge that your
business is in good hands. Tel.
225-3737, 225-4398. Cell 641-
8754.


PLAISANCE three-
bedroom, Ocean View corner lot
house. One Block from Public Rd.
Call 225-5591.
QUEENSTOWN $9.5M,
South $4.5M, $6M & $7M,
Cummings Street corner) -
$8.5M, BelAir Park $20M, LAND
- Diamond $350 000 & $450
000, Republic Park $5M & $6M.
Call 231-6236.
GREIA- C/ville. newly built
concrete, 3 rooms, all self-
contained, an office, on lavish
land space $35M, Quamina St.
- $11M. Tel. 225-4398, 225-
3737. ,
ONE two-storey wooden and
concrete 4- bedroom house,
South Ruimveldt Gardens .
Contact Ronald on 662-5033 or
Samantha on 624-1370. No
reasonable offer refused.
Vacant possession
4-BEDROOM concrete &
wooden house. Ketley St.,
Charlestown, formerly Rudy's
Liquor Restaurant (corner lot)
- $18M neg. Contact 227-
6204.
ONE 2-bedroom concrete
bungalow house with half
downstairs, Agriculture Road,
ECD.; Reduced $8.5M to $7.5M.
1 Nissan car as it is. Owner
leaving. Tel. 621-0004, 627-
5104; 625-6821.
QUEENSTOWN $12M,
Subryanville $10M, Kitty $9M,
Kitty $7M, Business Place -
$11 M, Industry $7M, Montrose -
$5M, Land $3M. K. S.
RAGHUBIR Agency, Office 225-
0545, Home 259-0019.
NORTH Ruimveldt $4.5M
& $6.5M; Diamond $3.5;
Republic Park $10M; Eccles -
$7M, $10M $12M; Grove,
Duncan St. $10M, $17M. MANY
MORE. N.P. FINANCIAL
SERVICES 223-4928, 623-
3751.
ENTERPRISE Gardens, East
Coast Demerara, upstairs 3-
bedroom residence includes
master room. Downstairs 2-
bedroom self-contained. Maid's
quarters, fully meshed and
grilled, with lots of parking. Call
628-4809 or after 6 pm 225-
7034.
HOUSE on Eccles Public Road
$8M; brand new 2-flat concrete
house, ,in excellent condition,
D'Urban St.; 3-bedroom house in
South R/veldt Gardens $8.5M;
one-flat-3-bedroom concrete
house,. East R/veldt.
Success Realty. 223-6524/
628-0747.
BEAUTIFUL and spacious
ranch style house, large enclosed
garage/bond, 4-bedroom, 2
inside toilets, 1 bath, 1980
square fept on land 91 by 107 ft.
Excellent road and4 utilities
supply. Bargain at $14M. Fully
transported, Cummings Lodge
neariUG. iffel. 222-6793.
KITT'i $10M, :C/ville -
$12M, Prashad Nagar $15M
neg., Bel Air Park;- $17M,
Lamaha !Gardens $23M,
Republic Park $15M,
Queenstown $16M, Oleander
Gdns. Land $13M neg.,
Regent St. $35M. Contact
Carmen Greene's Realty. Tel.
226-1192, 623-7742.
NIGEL'S WOODWORKING
ESTABLISHMENT, COLDINGEN,
ECD, TEL: 624-7023, PURPLE
HEART PANEL DOORS,
SQUARE .DOOR $16 000,
INNER ARCH WITH GLASS -$18
000, EXTERNAL ARCH WITH
FRAME $25 000, EXTERNAL
ARCH DOUBLE FRAME $45
000.
GREIA. SECTION 'K' C/ville
$2 ~M, Supply, EBD. large
concrete building on land with
access to Demerara River $20M.
Robin, St.,.Bourda business -
$35M, Meadow Bank $5M,
Triu ph, ECD $8M, Canal No.
2 Poluer $5M, $3M, Craig EBD
$5M. Liliendaal, ECD $12M.
Tel. 25-3737, 225-4398. Cell
641-8754.
CME and see your Dream
Home at William St., C/ville, two-
storeyed new concrete building -
modem design, building 32 ftby
48 ft. Land 50 ft by 10 Oft. Top
flat 3 self-contained bedrooms,
bottoM flat one-bedroom with
kitchen toilet, bath, etc. Parking
for about 5 vehicles. Don't miss
this offer. Price $35M neg. Tel.
226-6513, 227-0809
CUMMINGS Lodge -
$9.75M, Duncan St. 10M,
Industry $8.5M & $5.75M,
Blygezight $10.5M & $20M on
double [ot, Meadow Bank $5M,
Broad St. $7.5M, Leopold St. -
$5.5M, Kitty $7M, Triumph -
$8.5M, Subryanville, Eccles,
Prashad Nagar. Tel. 226-8148,
625-1624.


ONE five-bedroom concrete
house in excellent condition -
master room included study-
room additional, large kitchen,
dining room and sitting, water
heater in place, water in
unlimited supply. Wills Realty -
227-2612, 627-8314.
LARGE 5-bedroom property
on extra large lot of land. Parking
for 3 cars, air-conditioned rooms,
completely fenced. Large storage
bond. Immediate vacant
possession. Excellent property for
rental. Income for local overseas
Guyanese. Priced for quick sale
at $10M. Contact Ms.: Khan on
624-4839, 628-2768.
FOR SALE BY-OWNER -
2-storey fully concreted house
- 5 bedrooms, 2 full
bathrooms, American fixture
faucet, sink, toilet,, cabinet,
hot water tank, eating kitchen,
built-in wardrobe,: central air-
conditioner, car garage, front
view to Public Road. Lot 6
Nandy Park, EBD. Interested
person only to call,. Day 226-
7806; evening 225-8410.
BEL AI'R PARK $18M,
$22M, $23M, rice homes.
Queenstown $1 M, Prashad
Nagar $15M, New $12.5M,
Queenstown $12M. Meadow
Brook $14M. Republic Park -
$24M, Double lot, corner
concrete, Robb Street 100 x-
100 land/property $120M.
Sheriff Street $40M. America
Street, Lamaha Gardens $30M.
Keyhomes 223-4267.
ONE 2-storey concrete and
wooden building situate at Lot
88 Third Street, Uitvlugt Pasture,
W.C. Demerara. UPSTAIRS:
wooden 600 sq. ft. with 3
bedrooms and concrete toilet
and bath 48 sq. ft.
DOWNSTAIRS: concrete 480 sq.
ft. AREA OF LAND: 5 000 sq. ft.
Price 3 % million (negotiable).
Contact Victor Surajaballi. Tel.
# 227-2563.
COMMERCIAL & residential
Prashad Nagar $16.5M,
$18M, $22M, South Park,,
Double $16.5M', Republic Park
$15M, $40M, Regent Street -
$30M, Hutson Vine $7.5M,
Canal No. 2 10 acres land $8M,
Earl's Court, from $7.5M -
$100M. Roberts Realty, First
Federation Life Bid. 227-7627 -
Office; 227-3768 Home, 644-
2099.
ONE three-bedroom, two-
flat concrete and wooden
building in excellent condition -
$10M, North Ruimveldt; one
five-bedroom concrete and
wooden building, Aubrey Barker
St., S/R/veldt $9M; one four-
bedroom concrete and wooden
building, South R/veldt Park -
$7M; one four-bedroom concrete
and wooden building in
excellent condition $12M,
Tucville; one five-bedroom
house on double lot, Atlantic
Gardens $19M. Wills Realty -
227-2612. 627-8314.
ONE three-bedroom two-flat
concrete and wooden building
on land approx. 15 000.sq. ft-
with 1000 watt inverter and solar
water heater thrown in, one
master-room and 2 % baths, large
lawn area and unlimited water
supply available, LBl $20M
neg.; one three-bedroom two-
flat concrete building in
immaculate condition, master-
room with A/C, large study,
games room, garage with
automatic door, transformer
providing 110 and 220 watts,
unlimited filtered water supply,
etc., Happy Acres $33M neg.;
four-bedroom concrete building
on three lots, EBD -$22M; one
two-bedroom wooden building
with four feet walkway $3M,
Kitty; one two-bedroom wooden
cottage on transported land,
needs repairs, being sold as is -
$13M, Charlestown. Wills Realty
227-2612, 627-8314.



CLEAN DRY EARTH AND
ALSO SAND FOR SALE. TEL:
#611-0881.
FOOD Warmers and one
Mobile Canteen. Tel. 621-4310,
223-3024.
2 DISPLAY Coolers, 1 Cola
Cooler. Contact tel. 621-4310,
223-3024.
DOBERMAN pup,
Doberman mixed with
Rottweiler, 2 years old. Tel.
227-4584.
DISHWASHER (NEW). Price
$80 000 neg. Telephone 227-
0060, 227-0928.
ONE 75 KVA Generator in
excellent condition. Contact #
623-0957.


i


23




USA wholesale clothing
brand names. Tel. 624-7333.
FAIRBANKS Platform.
Scales 500 Kg. Call 226-0818.
ONE Exotic imported living
room suite and carpets. Call
225-8346, 660-4961.
Mix Loam 50:50. Ideal for
Road Construction. Large
Quantity Available. Call 227-
0207
PURE bred Doberman
pups fully vaccinated and
dewormed. Call 614-1105,
254-1109.
ONE Sony Handycam
Camcorder w/tripod and other
accessories. 628-8600
ONE Bedford 330 diesel
engine. Good working
condition. Contact 265-
3113 or 610-6686.
PLUCKING MACHINE- on
wheels large barrel, 54
fingers feather guard $75
000. Tel. 222-4482.
48 FT. wooden boat with
8000-lb ice box. 48 Hp
Yamaha engine 1600-lb of
rigged seine. Tel. 615-2398.
SHERWIN WILLIAMS
paint. All colours. Telephone
# 220-1014. Lot 6A
Courbane Park, Annandale.
ONE Fishing Boat, 30-ft.
with Mariner engine, good for
deep sea. Tel. 333-4141.

2 PURE Bred Pitbulls. One
2 yrs., one 1 % yr. Males. Tel.
266-2796. W. Brown.
1 COMPLETE Gym. 14
pieces equipment $700 000.
Call 623-8041, 270-4788 after
6 pm.
FILTERING Systems for
Drinking Water @$5 500 each.
Tel. 227-8259, 226-4634.
REFRIGERATOR, 220
volts. Price $58 000 (neg.).
Dishwasher, 110 volts (new).
Price $68 000. Telephone
227-0060, 227-0928.
DOBERMAN pups. 2
males, 3 months old, 2 adults,
(male) 1 year old. 233-2546,
623-0501.
LARGE Bookshelf, suitable
for office or business. 225-
7986.
GERMAN Shepherd
puppy female. 4 months old,
fully vaccinated, good linage.
Tel. 227-2510 Marc.
ARGON/Co2 mixed gas,
also shock treatment for
swimming pools. Phone 227-
4857 (8 am 4 pm). Mon. to
Fri.
ONE 50 Outboardi one 30
Yamaha engine, also Land
Rover chassis, engine and body
parts. Contact Tel. 442-0266.
MERCURY in wholesale
and retail quantity, lowest price
guaranteed. Contact 621-
8225.
HI FI JVC Music System for
home amplifier, equaliser, tape
deck, speaker boxes, new. 622-
0267, 629-2239.
ONE KEY CUTTING
MACHINE, BRAND NAME,
BRAND NEW. TEL. 621-8503,
328-7015.
6 18" BLAST King
Speakers, 600 watts each in
boxes. Contact 270-4156, 625-
5613.
ONE 3' x 4', Ergineer/
Architect drafting table,
hydraulically operated, with
matching chair. Tel.; 226-
7048.
AC UNITS brand new,
5 000 150 BTU, Kenmore
brand. Contact Juliana at
613-3319 or 226,-7973.
Going reasonable.
NEW Honda Generators
6000 watts. Key, manual start
4000 3500 2500 watts.
Pull Start. EU/UK standard. Call
233-5500.
ONE 360 Honda car, one
850 mini as it is ($120 000)
included lots of parts, one
double stall in Bourda Green's.
Tel. # 223-9710.
VICTORIA SECRET -
PANTIES $1 200, $1 500, $2
500, BRAS $2 500, $3 500.
TEL. 626-8055.
FOR sale on 19" TV Sony
and one Custom 250 Honda
Motorcycle, good condition,
any test. Call 233-2816, 626-
5864.









24 SUNDAY CHRONICLE October 02, 2005


FOR salc. Bushy Park,
Sawmill. Two double lot,
EBE. Large water front.
Perfect for Deep Harbour.
Contact # 592-223-5586.
Price neg.
BRAND new Split A/C,
System 9000, 12 000 & 18
000 BTU. Prices
unbelievable! Tel. 226-
4177, 619-8225, 226-
9029.
FREON GAS 11, 12,
22, 502, 134A & 404A,
also Nitrous Oxide, Argon
Gas & Helium for
balloons. Phone 227-
4857 (8 am 4 pm). Mon.
to Fri.
ONE (1) 65 back half,
one (1) front differential
for 4 WD, one (1) 48 HP
Out Board. Contact # 629-
4396.
PHOTOCOPIES
machine, Reso machine,
Computers, Binding
machine, Laminating,
Wood and Glass '/" show
cases, Printers,
Commercial rotisserie,
Uniwell cash register,
Printer cable 10'& 15'.
From 8 am to 2 pm, call
227-8576. From 2:30 to 7
pm 264-2263.
CARTRONICS Import &
Export Vehicles: 7 150-
Tundras, Tacomas, etc.
Tyres, rims, audio
equipment speakers, DVD
TV Plasma & all other
accessories from Miami.
Call Phillip Neranjan/
Blackie 227-5500, 227-
2027.
NEW Whirl pool
refrigerator, 22 cu. ft., 110
- 120 volt, double door
with ice making and water
filtration unit. Price $325
000. New Whirlpool
washer 9-cycle, 14-speed,
combo unit 110 120 volt
- $110000. New Frigidaire
floor model 4-burner
stove with oven, timer and
spit fire unit. Price $125
000. One husky 5 Hp 13-
gallon 125 PSI
compressor with complete
hose and spray painting
unit. Price $130 000.
Tel. 625-7326.
TRIPLE lots in
Alberttown, business &
mansion for sale front
building measuring 30
ft. x 60 ft. and back
building measuring 75
ft. x 33 ft. Front building
earns average US$
1000, back building
equipped with all modern
features, wall-to-wall
carpet, fully AC, (7 AC
Units) large verandah,
bar, fully grilled, lots
more. Must see to
appreciate. Price neg.
Space to park 12 cars.
Call 227-7677, 624-8402.
1 NEW 16 KVA
Generator in casing 4-
cylinder Yanmer diesel
engine complete with 12
volt battery, key start, fully
automatic, complete dash
board clocks, automatic
changer over switch,
name brand crown, 110 -
240 V silent noise $1.6M
neg. Beautiful piece,
must see, good for
residence or business
place all in one. 1 new
aluminum ladder in two
pieces, 16 feet long $25,
000. 1 new large General
Electric freezer stand up
type, 110V $110 000. 1
new large fiberglass Blue
bath tub $50 000. 1,new
4-draw filing cabinet in
box $40 000. 1 new
executive chair in box -
$30 000. 150 Medical
books, Cypodia, etc., all
for $100 000 or could be
sold separately. 1 new
Whirlpool dehumidifier.
110V in box $30 000. 6
new kits, %A inch drive
draper, 25-piece socket
set $12 000 each. 1 new
security system consists of
1 monitor, 2 cameras, 2 -
40 ft. cables, adaptor,
sound system, 110V $50
000. One 20 ft. container,
new medical supplies-for
hospital in general, for
operation theatre,
laboratory, etc., bargain
price $1.1M. 1 new tent
SA made $30 000. 1
new inverter 12V to 110V
- 400 800 watts, fan
cooled in box $35 000
with all connection.
Owner migrating. Call
621-4928 for information.


C O M P U T E R
Programme from $2 000.
Peach Tree, Doc Easy &
Quickbooks Accounting,
CorelDraw 12, Adobe
Photoshop 8, Print Master
Gold, Mc Kafee 2005,
Dreamweaver MX 2004,
typing games and much
more. 222-5330, 625-
7090.
WHERE you can find
very old Chinese
Paintings, Chinese
Thread work, Camoud
Victoria Chairs, Victoria
Tables, Victoria
Paintings, Two hundred
years old Bible, and
many more interesting
items NETRAM & SONS
ANTIQUE STORE, 383
Public Roa.d, Craig
Village, East Bank
Demerara. Tel. 266-
2515, 266-2207.
ONE Computer
Operating System:
WINDOWS XP
PROFESSIONAL. 40 GH
Hard Drive, 735 MHz, CD
Rewritable Drive, CD
Drive, Diskette Drive, 15"
Monitor, Keyboard,
Mouse, Workstation,
MSP56 MR MODEM,
INTERNET READY,
MEMORY 386. Price
$90 000. TELEPHONE
NO. 231-6314. ASK
FOR QUINCY/
NATASHA.
JUST arrived Honda
pressure washer 2500
SI, Bobcat tyres,
Caterpillar 3306 Di
engine, Cummins 6BT,
Perkins 6354.4 & 4108,
Detroit diesel 453 & 8V92
Marine. Also in stock lots
of engine spares for the
following: Cummins,
Caterpillar 3306 & 3304,
Detroit diesel, Twin disc
Marine & Borg Warner
Marine Transmission
Seal Kits. Call 218-
3899, 623-1003 or 218-
1469.
3 45-GALLON drums,
concrete hardener liquid -
$105 000, 10 5-gallon
buckets sealed 'carpet
paste $5 000 each, 4 new
16-feet aluminium ladders
- $25 000 each, 2 security
systems complete with
monitor, 22 cameras and
adaptor $50 000 each, 1
Xerox 50 28 Copier needs
servicing $160 000 -
manual, 1 40-gallon water
heater, only used for 4
months, 240V $25 000,
20 large electrical panels,
complete with circuit
breaker, main switches,
etc. all for $200 000, 1
Dayton vacuum cleaner
industrial and
commercial for cleaning
floor, carpet, etc. on
wheels, large dust bag,
110V $30 000, 200 new
truck tyre liners,
Goodyear size 20 $1
000 each, wholesale -
$800, 2 inverts 400 to
800 watts $25 000, used
complete split A/C Peak
Units, 240V working, 1 -
12 000 BTU $50 000, 4
- 18 000 BTU $65 000
each, 3 24 000 BTU -
$85 000 each, 1 large
18-inch heavy duty
industrial surface plane
3-phase about 2-ton in
weight $400 000, 1
Honda EB 1400 A/C D/
C generator $105 000,
1 ARK welding
transformer, 240V 225
AMPS with cable and
helmet $50 000, 1
heavy duty ARK welding
transformer 240 320 -
440V no cable with
shield $60 000, 1 lar e
bench grinder, 110V $25
000, 1 Rockwell band saw,
110V inch $65 000, 1
Skill Mitre adjustable saw,
110V inch $35 000, 1
edge and surface sander,
heavy duty, 110-220V- $45
000, 1 6-inch joiner, 110V
- $65000, 3 metal bench
lathes, English, 240V all
three $250 000, 2
crankshaft grinders, 240V
both $250 000, 1 large
tool shaper for grinder of
sharpening plane blade,
240V $200 000, 1 engine
head resurfacer, 240 -
$300 000, 1 Yale / ton
chain hoist $25 000, 3
oxygen bottles full,
private owned $20 000
each, 6 used 4-drawer
filing cabinets $20 000
each, 2 drawers $10 000,
1 complete new imported
Satellite Dish stand,
complete material is thick
galvanised angle with dish
turner $100 000. Owner
leaving 621-4928.


TWO five-dish and one
four-dish ploughs and one
trail harrow. Ideal for rice
work, for sale. Contact
623-0957
OXYGEN and acetylene
gases, fast and efficient
service. 10 11 Mc Doom
Public Road, EBD. Phone
227-4857 (8 am 4 pm)
Mon. to Fri. (Sat: 8 am -
12 noon).
EARTH and white sand
for sale. Delivered to spot.
Contact Mark Anthony
Trucking Service. 265-3113
or 610-6686.
ONE brand new
computer with CD
Burner, CD Walkmans,
car stereo and DVD
Player. Contact 225-
4112, 626-9264.
1 FLOOR model PLASTIC
SEALING machine, 1 POR-
TABLE ELECTRIC air com-
pressor in excellent condi-
ion. Tel: 222-4507/623-
7212.
1 200 HP Yamaha Out
Board Engine, (very
cheap), 1 3-cylinder Diesel
Engine, 1 25-cubic ft.
Kenmore fridge/freezer.
Call 624-3667 or 612-
6743.
SKY Universal,
authorised dealer for the
best offer in Phillips digital
dish. View up to 125
channels including Pay
Per View channels and
also Direct TV. Contact:
Gray on tel. 227-6397,
227-1151 (0), 616-9563.
CUMMINS 6 CTA 230
Hp diesel engine with twin
disc pto on bed, good
general conditi' on
$1.25M. 4H ft. steel
pontoon EX 12" diesel with
15 x 28 ft. purple heart
sluice $0.5M. Located
Middle Mazaruni. Call
223-5050.
CAUSTIC Soda 55 lbs
- $3 600, Alum 55 Ibs -
$4 000, Soda ash 50 lbs
- $5 000, Sulphuric Acid -
45 gals $45 000,
Granular Chlorine,
Chlorine gas. Phone 227-
4857 (8 am 4 pm). Mon.
to Fri.
. 2 NEW flat screen TVs -
$75 000 each, neg. 1
stainless steel bar-b-que
grill (big) $100 000 neg.
Owner leaving country.
Tel. 226-5136, 643-6997.
PARTS for dryers/
washers thermostats,
belts, pumps motors,
couplings, valves, etc.
Technicians available.
Call 231-6429, 622-5776.
1 HONDA pressure
washer, brand new; 2
drills; 1 saw; 1 Jialing
motorcycle, next to new; 1
amplifier; 1 truck pump; 1
battery charger; 1 bicycle.
Tel. 265-5876.
EVERYTHING must go
by October 31. Sale on
USA clothes and strong
Brazilian. Footwear. Give
us your reasonable offer
and go with your item. 122
Merriman's Mall, Bourda.
ATTENTION
CHEAPEST prices in Alloy
brand mag rims, spinner wire
wheels, wheels mufflers and
tips, wheel accessories,
steering wheels. Contact
persons Rudo #@627-4067,
Kim @ 641-0737.
ONE CANON Image
Class Laser Photocopier
and Printer Model D 760,
one Sharp Heavy Duty
Business Fax Machine, one
Char-Broil Quick-Set BBQ
Gas Grill, one BROAN 30"
Range Hood, one
Panasonic 1000 watts
micro-wave oven, two
atuminuim construction
ladders. All items brand
new never used. Phone -
226-7048A.



21 BEDFORD
MODEL M TRUCK. TEL:
455-2303.
BUY/SELLING used
vehicle. Call Lelon 644-
8645.
ONE AE 91 Corolla.
Price $475 000 neg. Tel.
611-6773, 627-0916.


1 NISSAN CARAVAN
E 24, EXCELLENT CONDI-
TION. TEL. # 220-4782.
TOYOTA Hiace
minibus 15 seats -
$1.7M neg. Tel. # 642-
5899.
TWO big
reconditioned Ford
Tractors for sale.
Contact 623-0957.
MODEL M Truck.
Excellent condition. Price
neg. Contact Shivo. Tel. #
220-7429.
ONE Toyota Camry,
back wheel drive $400
000 neg. Contact K. Chand
- 264-2283.
ONE RZ Long-base,
BGG series, EFI. "Good
working condition".
Contact # 641-1747.
ONE (1) ET 176 Toyota
Corona, automatic.
Contact tel. # 227-6048,
619-7225.
1 SILVER Toyota
Ipsum SUV 7-seater PHH
series. Contact 220-5699,
613-3487.
MODEL M Truck, GJJ
series. Contact Tanna -
623-4446, 226-6458.
AA 60 CARINA.
Excellent condition $400
000. Tel. 225-1103, 643-
6909, 612-4477.
AT 170 CORONA $950
000. PHH series. Tel. 225-
1103, 643-6909, 612-4477.
4 x 4 TOYOTA Pick Up,
stick gear (new), Single
Cab. 622-5836 or 227-
6328.
1 TOYOTA -Tundra
white). Going cheap.
uzuki Vitara, 4-door.
Call 227-5500, 227-2027.
1 DOUBLE Axle foden
container truck with trailer.
Contact 621-2671, 222-
2797, 611-2113.
1 ONE Toyota Land
Cruiser (diesel) 13
seater, manual $4.1
million. Please contact
623-7031.
ONE Nissan Civilian
bus. In excellent condition.
Owner leaving country.
Tel. 613-8219
4-WD RANGE Rover -
Land Rover with alloy
rims & Sony CD player.
Priced to go. # 621-7445.
AT 192 TOYOTA
Carina fully powered
mags, clean, clean car.
98 Sheriff St., C/ville.
223-9687
1 AT 170 TOYOTA
Corona, automatic,
excellent condition. Price
negotiable. Telephone -
223-1557.
3 NISSAN Pathfinders.
Going cheap. Contact 616-
7547 or 227-2933.
JAGUAR V-12 Sports
Coupe needs some work,
Sold as is. 624-8402, 227-
7677.
ONE Single Cab Pick
Up, right hand drive. Prize
- $390 000. Contact Kuybe
Hassan. Tel. number 623-
3534, 645-0423.
1 RZ MINIBUS, 1 AT
170 Corona, 1 AT 150
Carina. All in excellent
condition. Phone 268-.
3953.
1 NISSAN Stanzy, PCC
1101. In good working
condition. Price -0 $220
000 neg. Tel. 629-0634.
Must be sold.
AA 60 CARINA in
excellent condition.
Price $450 000 neg.
Contact Michael or
Lloyd. Tel. 618-7025 or
610-3141.
ONE Coaster bus in
Kood working condition.
contact 616-3736 or 660-
1564. No reasonable
offer refused.
BRAND new Toyota
Carina AT 192, 6 months
old. PJJ series. Owner
leaving country. Call 218-
3842, 621-5353.
GREIA Toyota
Tacoma. Excellent
condition, added features.
Price $3.5M negotiable.
Tel. 225-4398, 641-8754.
ONE AA 60 Carina, in
excellent working condi-
tion, needs body work ,
tape deck, AC etc. Tel.
617-4063/225-0236;


ONE TT 131 CORONA
in good condition mag
rims, stick gear. tape
deck. Tel: 626-6837 after
hours #-220-4316.
ONE RZ, Long base,
music set, maq rims.
Price $1M. Call Wazir
at 265-3989, 661-5024.
ONE Honda 250 motor
scooter in good working
condition, CD 1280. Price
$250 000 negotiable. Tel.
661-7015.
1 AT 170 Corona -
Spoiler, mags, music. Fully
automatic, never in hire.
229-6253 and 227-1845.
Calling price $800 000.
B 12 NISSAN Sunny,
Reg. # PFF 5388. Engine
recently overhauled. Price
$375 000 negotiable. Call
Lelon, 644-8645.
1 4-WD LAND Rover
Defender, long base 5-
door. Excellent condition,
late PHH series. Price to
o. Tel. # 616-6669, 618-
183.
TOYOTA Levin AE 101
4AGE engine, 2-door,
fully powered, 15" mags,
clean car. 98 Sheriff St.,
C/ville. 223-9687.
TOYOTA Corona station
.wagon T-130 back wheel
drive, PCC series. Price
$500 000 neg. Call 226-
2833 or 233-3122.
1 TOYOTA Corolla KE
70. Working co-ndition.
Terms can be arranged.
Contact Shameela Khan,
621-2472, 611-3887.
ONE RZ minibus, EFI
start, BJJ series, AC, music
set, etc. Price $1 650 000.
Tel. 265-3355, 642-4819.
ONE Toyota Carina car
in working condition, Model
AA 60. Contact by phone #
227-6156.
SAAB 900 Turbo, PJJ
5837,, fully powered,
automatic, excellent
condition. 1' owner $695
000. Call 624-8402, 227-
7677.
NISSAN Civilian -26-
seater bus, 5-speed, diesel,
55 000 Km only, never
worked commercially.
Immaculate condition.
Must see to appreciate.
Call 227-7677, 225-2503,
624-8402.
ONE Toyota 3Y Super
Custom, diesel engine,
automatic, original seats,
private. Price $1.2M.
Contact Rocky. Tel. 225-
1400, 621-5902.
ONE Honda CRV (4 x 4)
4-door automatic. Fully
powered, A/C, mags, CD
Player. Price $3.2M. One
Toyota Marino, fully
loaded, automatic. Price -
$1.3M. Contact Rocky -
621-5902, 225-1400.
MERCEDES Benz 190 E
2.6, V6 automatic, power
window, rocks, sunroof, CD
Player, good sound system,
fully flair kit, mag wheel,
air conditioner (very nice) -
$2.1 million. 227-7677,
624-8402, 225-2503.
ONE Nissan 812 Sunny
automatic, fully powered
with mag rims, new shocks,
new CV, solid engine. Price
$525 000. Contact Rocky
225-1400, 621-5902.
FORD 150 Pick Up, 3
doors, good condition, CD/
Tape player, bubble tray,
dual air bag, mag rims, etc.
$5.5M neg. Tel. 220-7416
AT 192 CARINA $1 200
000. Contact David or
Singh 225-1103, 643-
6909, 612-4477.
SV 40 CAMRY $2 000
000. Contact David or
Singh. Tel. 225-1103, 643-
6909, 612-4477.
ONE EP 91 4-door,
automatic, black Starlet.
Never registered in
Guyana. Contact 624-8805.
ONE AE 100 Corolla
motorcar, PHH 1804. Price
$1 100 000. Call 231-
4772, 227-3336, 644-4946.
1 TOYOTA RZ minibus,
BHH series, 50% down. Call
Aniesa 277-0660, 643-
5481.
ONE Honda Civic, PHH
series, and one .AT 190
Corona, PHH series. Tel.
629-3049, 227-6428.


TOYOTA Corona in
excellent condition.
Automatic transmission.
power window, new
battery, etc. Call 220-
9801, Mohan.
ONE Nissan Sunny,
PCC 5626. Owner
leaving. Call 225-8346,
660-4961, 231-9913.
1 TOYOTA 4-Runner -
PHH series with alarm,
remote start, crash 'bar,
etc. Price for quick sale.
Must be sold. Call 644-
8500.
TOYOTA Tacoma V6
1995 Model. Leather
interior $2 900 000.
Contact David 225-1103,
643-6909, 612-4477.
ONE Toyota Ipsun, 7-
seater, PJJ series, 1 year
old, low mileage $3
000 000. Tel. David -
225-1103, 231-3690,
643-6909, 612-4477.
1 DUMP truck, 1 -
water tender and 330
Timber Jack Skidder all
are in good working
condition. For more
information Contact:
264-2946.
2000 MODEL Toyota
Tacoma. Excellent
condition, A/C, etc. 1 125
Jialing Scooter. 5 months
old. Tel. 226-4177, 226-
9029, 619-8225.
ONE RZ Mini-bus long.
base in excellent
condition, magrims, music
set, BHH series. Owner
leaving country. Tel. 627-
6511.
1 TOYOTA T 100 Extra
Cab Pick Up 4 x 4 1998,
A+; 1 Toyota Tacoma
Extra Cab Pick Up, 2000
A+. Tel. # 629-4979, 220-
7430.
TOYOTA 3Y 15-seater
minibus in excellent
condition. 6th St.,
Cummings Lodge, Greater
G/town $450 000. Tel.,
222-2718 or 628-1124.
ONE Chappy
motorbike 50 CC, in
good working condition.
rice $90 000. Tel.
231-6144, 231-6142,
223-1599, Rohan.
ONE AT 192 CARINA
- $1.3M, one Toyota
Tercel $425 000. Call
629-6651.
1999 TOYOTA
Tacoma late GJJ
series, manual, A/C, TRD
Package, 4-wheel drive;
V6 power steering &
windows $2.9M. 641-
1131.
1 TOYOTA Double
cab (Diesel engine 2L
Turbo). Automatic,
magrims, crash bar,
(spring leve) clean.
rice $2.7M. Contact
Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma
Extra Cab. Excellent
condition $3.5M. 1
Hilux Surf Toyota Four
Runner $2.6M. 2
Mitsubishi Lancers -
$1.9M & $2M. Tel. 226-
8148, 625-1624.
1 TOYOTA RAV-4 (5-
door) came in new. 5-
speed gear, fully
powered, A/C, mag rims,-
roof rack, crash bar, step
bar, alarm, remote start.
Immaculate condition.
Hardly used. Price -
$2.7M. Contact Rocky -
# 225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 LITE Ace 9-seater,
minibus.. Never in hire,
130 Km, mint condition,
like new; 1 Hilux 4 x 4
Pick Up, very high wide
tyres, A/C, P.S $1
million; 1 Ford Escort
engine and gear box,
goin9 cheap, rebuilt in
Trinidad. 1 RZ, EFI
engine and gear box for
sale. Tel. 260-0112 or
cell 622-3595.
SUPER Custom
minibus RH 100 diesel
turbo, triple sunroof,
dual AC, ABS brakes,
digital dash, fully crystal
cat eye lights and fogs,
fully powered, DVD, TV
system, auto start alarm,
17" mag wheels, sport
suspension. Sonar
system, auto adjusts
steering, registered 1
week ago. Call 227-
7677, 624-8402.






25


ii, fnumitil /"r..- -.r 09


ONE (1) 1998 CC Hilux
Surf (Toyota), 4-wheel
drive Jeep, in good
working condition with
mag rims and other
accessories. Contact Mr.
Edwards, tel. # 225-0548.
1 TOYOTA Previa
minivan. A/C, DVD, etc.
& 1 Toyota Starlet EP
91, new model, 4-door -
PJJ series. Priced to
sell. Tel. 226-4177, 619-
8225, 226-9029.
(1) SMALL bus -
Master Surf Town Ace -
11-seater, luxury seats,
fully powered, mags -
$525 000. Excellent
condition. 614-3615,
626-5803. Automatic.
One 2003 Dodge
Ram, 4-wheel drive,
hardly driven, low Km,
sold with accessories.
Price $6 million neg.
Serious enquiries only.
Tel. # 227-5637, 614-
6672.
1 NISSAN Diesel
Canter Truck in good
working condition and 1
- 10-ton Bedford Lorry.
Dump in working
condition. Tel. 228-
2480, 228-5378, 613-
85,54.
1 TOYOTA Sera (2-
door Sports). Immaculate
condition. Automatic,
fully powered, A/C,
magrims, CD Player,
Price $1M. Contact
Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 NISSAN Presa (4-
door car). Round type,
automatic, fully
powered, A/C, private,
clean. Price $850 000.
Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA (15-
Seater) RZ EFI (Long
base). Manual, magrims,
crystal light, music,
clean. Price -- $1.5M.
Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 EP 71 TOYOTA
Starlet (2-door).
Automatic, magrims, A/
C, excellent cion.ition.
Price $750 000.
Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
TUNDRAS 4 X 4
Access Cab Pick Up,
colour red or black.
Limited Edition with
leather seat, 20" Chrome
mags, 6-Disc Changer,
crystal light, Bed Liner,
etc. Price $4.7M neg.
Contact 225-6574.
ONE 190 E Mercedes
Benz motorcar: Fully
Showered with DVD, CD,
MP3 Player, Sports,
Suspension, flares, etc.
Black and in mint
condition, PEE series.
Price $1M. Contact
225-6574.
1 AT 192 TOYOTA
Carina motorcar.
Excellent condition,
mags, AC, CD,
automatic, fully:
powered. One owner,
never in hire. Must see.
Woman driven. Price -
$1.4M neg. Call 628-
-7737.
1 GX 81 TOYOTA
Mark 11 .- (immaculate
condition), automatic,
fully powered, A/C,
alarm', remote start.
Credit available. Price -
$1M. (Hardly used).
Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 NISSAN
PATHFINDER (L/HAND
V6 EFI) AUTOMATIC,
FULLY POWERED, A/C,
MAG RI'MS, CRASH
BAR, CD PLAYER,
ROOF RACK.
CONDITION. PRICE -
$1.6M, NEG. CONTACT
ROCKY # 225-1400
OR 621-5902.
AT 192 CARINA, AE
100 COROLLA & 110
SPRINTER, G-
TOURING WAGON, EP
82 STARLET,. TOYOTA
EXTRA CAB PICK UP
& 4-DOOR TOYOTA
LAND CRUISER,
GRAND VITARA
(2000). AMAR 227-
2834, 621-6037.


TOYOTA Long-base RZ
minibus. EFI $1.4M;
Toyota 3Y Super Custom -
(executive) automatic,
power windows (diesel),
BHH series $1.2M; 3Y 12-
seater $595 000. 227-
4040, 618-7483, 628-0796.
1 TOYOTA (4 X 4) Extra
Cab (excellent
condition). Manual, crash
bar, step bar, roller bars,
CD. Price $1.6M. 1
Toyota (4 x 4) Single cab
(spring leve). Gear,
magrims, crash bar, roller
bar. Price $1.4M. Contact
Rocky # 225-1400, 621-
5902.
4-RUNNER $2 600 000,
RAV-4 $2 600 000, CRV -
$3 700 000, 1 Nissan
Pathfinder $1 800 000,
Tacoma $2 600 000, $3
000 000, Nissan Patrol $7
000 000, Land Cruiser $4
000 000, $7 500 000.
Contact Dave Auto Sales,
169 Lamaha and De Abreu
Streets, Newtown, Kitty. Tel.
225-1103, 643-6909, 612-
4477.
1 GX 81 TOYOTA Mark
11 (immaculate
condition), automatic, fully
powered, A/C, alarm,
remote start. Credit
available. Price $1M.
(Hardly used). Contact
Rocky # 225-1400 or 621-
5902.
CERES $950 000, AE
91 Corolla $550 000, AT
170 Corona and Carina -
$675 000, $750 000, AT
150 Carina $550 000, FB
12 Sunny $4-50 000, AA
60 Carina $375 000, $250
000. Contact David or
Singh. Tel. 225-1103, 643-
6909, 612-4477.
1, SV 40 TOYOTA
Camry (PHH) hardly
used. Automatic, fully
powered, A/C, chrome
magrims, CD Player,
alarm. Price $2.M (neg).
Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Super
Custom" (Diesel engine).
Automatic, fully powered,
A/C, magrims
Immaculate condition,
original seats. Price -
$1.4M. Contact Rocky -
# 225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA RAV 4 (3-
door). Immaculate
condition, automatic, fully
powered, A/C, chrome
magrims, roof rack, crash
bar, step bar, CD Player, low
mileage. Price $2.4M
(neg.). Contact Rocky #
225-1400 or 621,5902.
1 HONDA Integra (4-
door)'. Private manual, fully
powered, magrims,
excellent condition. Price
$475 000, 1 Nissan B12
(4-door), private (clean).
Automatic, fully powered,
megrims. Price $550 000.
Contact Rocky # 225-
1400, or 621-5902.
1 NISSAN Pathfinder (4
x 4,) EFI (5-door),
automatic, fully powered,
A/C, magrims, crash bar, CD
Player. Immaculate
condition. Price $1.5M.
Contact Rocky # 225-
.1400:or 621-5902.
TOYOTA.4-Runner for.
sale by owner. LHD 2-door
Sport. Model, 5 FWD Shift
4 WD, Lift Kit Crash Bars.
Toyota 4-Runner. Fully
,powered, RHD, automatic
4WD, A/C, mag rims, crash
bars. Tel. # 621-7556 or
227-6848.
AT 212 CA-RINA, music,
mags, A/C, 5-speed, manual,
PJJ series $1.7M. AE 100
Sprinter, music, mags,
automatic, A/C, blue.
excellent condition $1.2M
neg. AE 100 Marino,
automatic, music, fully
powered $1.2M neg. Jaime
222-4781/618-0046.
ONE Toyota Tundra
4x4 automatic, ash-grey
with extended cab & 4
doors. 'Excellent
co.:n djti 1- Ike -e.'. with
ice hitch power mirror,
CD & Casseite P3, er., AM
& FM stereo, Alloy
wheels, bed liner, etc.
'.Contact Mohamed
,Saheed. Tel. 233-5828,
227-4856.


TOYOTA G-Touring
Wagon. Chrome rims,
music. Excellent condition
- $1.6M neg. EE 98 Corolla
Wagon, white, music,
excellent condition, PGG
series $800 000 neg.
Nissan Sunny, automatic,
PGG, never in hire, music, A/C -
$550 000 neg. Jaime 222-
4781/618-0046.
AE 81 COROLLA, white,
mags, music, excellent
condition $550 000 neg.,
2 AT 150 Corona/Carina,
both in excellent condition
- $550 000 neg., AT 170
Carina $875 000, AT 170
Corona $775 000 neg.,
Mitsubishi Lancer $1.7M-
neg. Jaime 222-4781,
618-0046.
ONE Nissan 720 pick up
long tray along with spare
engine. Mint condition.
Privately used $625 000
neg. One Toyota Corona
station wagon ET 176 5-
door, power steering, front
wheel drive, 12 valve
engine, AC, adjustable seats,
5-seater fold down back
seat, mag rims, disc
brakes, PHH series.
Privately used, female
driven. Good for taxi
service or personal family
use. Excellent condition
- $800 000. Owner
leaving. 621-4928.
CANTER Truck, Nissan
Atlass 300, Hp 3000 CC -
$1M; Leyland Truck TL 11
Turbo $4M; Lincon Town
Car, HP 1998 CC $1.2M;
BMW 320 I $900 000;
Volks Wagon, year 1988 -
$1M; (2) 3500 R Fiat
Laverda Combines $5.5M
each; Audi 5000 S $900
000; Toyota Jeep $400
000; 2-door Chevrolet
Sports car $500 000; 8210
Ford Tractor $1.5M. All
prices negotiable. Contact
itin 644-3389.
HONDA Civic, 1997
Model $1.675 000;
Toyota GX 90 Mark 2, PJJ
series, original $2M; AT
212 Carina, PJJ series,
DVD Player, etc. $2M; AT
150 Corona (mint) $575
000; Toyota EP 82 Starlet -
(manual), PJJ series -
$1.1M; Nissan Sunny
(Diesel) $495 000; Honda
Prelude 1994 $1.8M; AT
170 Corona/Carina $900
000 neg.; AT 192 Carina -
$1.4M; AE 91 Sprinter -
$700 000; L-Touring
Wagon $1.3M. 227-4040,
628-0796, 618-7483.
CREDIT AVAILABLE 1
Four-runner $2.4 million;
1 Toyota IRZ, mags, music,
etc. $875 000; 1 600 XT
Scramble (brand new
condition) US$3 500; 1 AT
192 fully loaded, PHH
series, mags, spoiler, music,
air-conditioned $1.3
million neg.; 1 AT 170
Carina $675 000; 1 G-
Touring Wag on $1.1
million; 1 KE 74 Corolla
back-wheel drive, Wagon
$475 000; 1 AA 60
Carina, clean car $375
000; 1 AT 170, Corona,
PGG series, automatic,
air-conditioner, CD
Player, mags, never worked
hire before $875 000; 1
Mercedes Benz, top notch -
$1.5 million. Contact Mr.
Khan, 28 'BB' Eccles, New
Housing Scheme, EBD. Tel.
233-2336, 623-9972, 617-
8944.
TOYOTA Four Runner
(LHD) automatic, V6
engine $1.8M neg.;
Toyota 2 L diesel Turbo
Xtra Cab, 4x4 Pick-Up -
$3.4M; Toyota Land Cruiser
1993 Model, (manual),
PGG series $2.7M; Toyota
Tacoma manual and
automatic, not registered -
$2.6M; 5-door, Suzuki
Vitara, (manual) $1.2M;
Toyota 3Y Surf, auto and
fully powered $2.2M; 1997
Model, Mitsubishi Paje-ro,
leather interior $6.5M;
Toyota Single Cab 4x4 Pick-
Up, GHH series $1.4M;
RAV-4, PHH series $3.2M;
Toyota Tundra $5M; F150
Sports $5M; Toyota Land
Cruiser, 2002 Model
(Sequoia), leather interior,
LHD $15M; Jeep Wrangler
automatic, (diesel),
custom-built, (immaculate)
'$2.4M; Nissan 2 x 4 Pick
Up $850 000. K and N
Auto Sales 227-4040,
618-7483, 628-0796.


NOW IN STOCK.
Toyota Corolla NZE 121,
AE 110, EE 103, Honda
Civic EK3 & ESI, Toyota
Hilux Extra Cab LN 172,
LN 170, RZN 174, Toyota
Hilux Double Cab YN
107, LN 107, LN 165, 4 x
4, RZN 167, RZN 169,
Toyota, Hilux Single Cab -
LN 106, Toyota Hilux Surf
- RZN 185 YN 130, KZN 185,
Mitsubishi Canter FE 638E,
FE6387EV, Toyota Carina -
AT 192, AT 212, Toyota
Marino AE 100, Toyota Vista
AZV 50, Honda CRV RO1,
Toyota RAV 4, ZCA 26, ACA
21, SXA 11, Toyota Mark
IPSUM SXM 15, Toyota Mark
2 GX 100, Lancer CK 2A,
Toyota Corona Premio AT
210, Toyota Hiace Diesel
KZH110, Mitsubishi Cadia
Lancer SC2A, Toyota
Corolla G-Touring Wagon
AE 100. Contact Rose
Ramdehol Auto Sales,
226 South Rd., Bourda,
Georgetown. Tel. 226-
8953, 226-1973, 227-
3185, Fax. 227-3185.
We give you the best
cause you deserve the
best.
NOW AVAILABLE.
NEW SHIPMENT
RECONDITIONED
VEHICLES. CARS:
STARLET GLANZA
TURBO EP 91,
MITSUBISHI GALANT EA
1A TOYOTA CYNOS
CONVERTIBLE, TOYOTA
CYNOS SPORTS COUPE
EL 52. PICKUPS: (4WD)
TOYOTA HILUX LN170
EXTRA CAB (FULLY
LOADED), TOYOTA
HILUX LN100 (DIESEL)
SHORT BASE, HILUX
YN100 (GASOLINE)
TOYOTA HILUX LN10d
(DIESEL) LONG BASE.
TRUCKS: MITSUBISHI
CANTER 2-TON OPEN
TRAY. FULL AFTER
SALES SERVICE AND
FINANCING AVAILABLE.
DEO MARAJ AUTO
SALES. 207 SHERIFF
AND SIXTH STREETS,
CAMPBELLVILLE 226-
4939. A. NAME AND A
SERVICE YOU CAN
TRUST.




ONE LIVE-IN MAID.
TEL. 226-0170.
ONE LIVE-IN
DOMESTIC. CALL 227-
5665
LIVE-IN .Domestic.
Telephone 227-0060.
(Sheena).
MALE HELP, AGE 18-
35. CONTACT 645-3744.
ATTRACTIVE
Waitress. Contact Baby.
Lot 1 B Shell Rd.
HOMES! -WANTED!
$$$$. KEYHOMES #
223-4267-
1 LIVE-IN
DOMESTIC, 40-50
YEARS. TELEPHONE 642-
8781. .
ONE 22.RB Dragline
Operator urgently. Contact
# 623-0957.
ONE Cat. Excavator
Operai..r urgently Contact
# 623-0957
1 LIVE-IN Maid, 16
Public Road, Kitty. Call
226-1531.
3 MACHINISTS.
APPLY 18-23 ECCLES
INDUSTRIAL. SITE, E B
DEMERARA.
ONE Taxi Driver.
Contact Z. Khan, 11
Thomas St., Kitty. Tel.
226-7948.
1 SINGLE working
female room mate. Call
660-7054 or 231-2432
after 7 pm.
ONE Computer
Technician and Internet
Operator. Contact tel. 260-
4580, 260-4068.
HONEST, MATURE &
RELIABLE HIRE CAR
DRIVERS TO WORK IN
TAXI SERVICE. CONTACT
223-1682.
THREE-BEDROOM
apt. for working persons
in city or suburban with
moderate rental. 226-
94,10.


INDUSTRIOUS and
experienced country
lady needs a job as a
general domestic. Tel.
226-9410.
URGENTLY one
property to buy around
G/T (3 to 4) million
dollars. Tel. # 22-3-
9710.
One EXPERIENCED
Graphic Artist. Please
contact # 233-2725 or
233-2439.
URGENTLY wanted -
Diesel Mechanics.
Contact Mr. Jerome, tel.
# 644-7835, 641-8209.
ONE Live-in Maid
from country side. Age 18
to 24. Home 231-6982,
Cell 618-7151.
EXPERIENCED hire
car Driver. Call Alan.
Tel. No. 227-2238.
WELDER and
fabricator at 331
Cummings Street,
Cummingsburg. Tel. #
225-6834, 621-5310.
CONTRACT Car to
work in Taxi Service.
Also Driver wanted. Tel.
No. 227-6567, 226-
5609.
CONTRACT cars,
(Base Fees), free for
the .... Following from
the 5th wick ($2 500),
week. Call Plaza Taxi.
227-8576, 225-1710.
W A N T E D
immediately unfurnished
' house to rent in
Corentyne. Call tel. #
619-1761.
CARPENTER with
own tools. Contact
Guyana Variety Store, 68
Robb Street. 227-7677,
724-8402.
HAMID General Store,
one experienced Driver.
Must have valid Driver's
Licence, Police
Clearance, etc. Tel. # 225-
3811.
TRUCK Driver from
ECD. Contact P.
Ramroop & Sons, 1 C
Orange Walk Bourda,
Georgetown. Tel. 227-
1451.
PORTERS from ECD.
Contact P. Ramroop &
Sons, 1 C Orange Walk
Bourda, Georgetown.
Tel. 227-1451.
SALESBOYS & Girls.
Contact P. Ramroop &
Sons, 1 C Orange Walk
Bourda Georgetown.
Tel. 227-1451.
WANTED one Puri
Cook. Apply in person
wilh written application
to Spicy Dish, 53 David
St., Kitty.
ONE ARC AND ACETY-
LENE WELDER. MUST
KNOW GRILL WORK.
CONTACT: 21 BROAD
STREET, CHARLESTOWN.
TEL: 225-2835.
.S AL E S G IR L ,
I.itchen staff, live-in
girl from country area.
Nazeema Deli 318 East
St., N/C/ Burg. 2,26-
9654/618-2902.
:VACANCY exists at
Movie Town DVD Club,
Lot 5 Alexander St.,
Kill, (opposite Kitty
Police Station). .. Tel.
223-7245
WANTED urge rn.i1)
Driver and Porters to work
orn Beverage Canter
Truck. Tel. 222-3927,
222-4650, 623-6317.
Experienced Curry
Cooks. Apply in person,
Hack's Halaal
Restaurant. 5 Commerce
'St., G/town. 9 to 11 am.
PROFESSIONALS
Barbers to work at Hair
Masters Barber Shop, 47
Sheriff St.
Can-,pbeil.;lle Tel 259-
0076 610-50 5.:'
PUMP Aliendanis
Must hae ID 2 recenI
testimonials, Police
Clearance. Apply in
person with written
application to Esso, Mc
Doom, EBD.


1 FULL-TIME
Mechanic, for 10-ton
Bedford Lorry. Live-in
accommodation
provided. Tel. 228-2480,
228-5378, 613-8554.
COUNTER Clerks.
Apply in person with
written application to
BISH & SONS DISCOUNT
STORE, 38 Cummings
Street, Alberttown.
1 LIVE-IN Domestic,
between17 and 36 years
from country area required
to work in and out of
Guyana. 621-4928.
-ONE Live-in
Domestic to do General
Household work. No
cooking, no washing.
Wages $5 000 weekly.
Tel. 227-7677, 225-
2503.
HANDYMAN to work
in furniture store. Good
salary and conditions.
Bring application in
person to True Value
Store, 124 King St.,
Lacytown (opp. Esso)
GUARDS, Salesboys
& Porters. Apply -
Avinash Water Street,
Anand's Regent Street,
Athina's East Coast Bus
Park. Tel. # 226-3361,
227-7829.
TRINIDAD
Tradesman, e Mason,
Carpenter, Welder. All
round person. Photo
must be included. Mr.
Ramkissoon, P.O. Box
5866, TRINIDAD, W.I.
WANTED to buy. -
aluminium, Copper, Brass,
Lead, Stainless Steel,
Old batteries. Tel. 266-
2515, 266-2076, 266-
2202. Netram & Sons.
Craig Village.
ONE honest pleasant
Maid. Must know to
prepare Indian Dishes.
Two boys to work in
store to fix bicycles, etc.
Singh's Electronic World
& Variety Store, 136
Regent St., L/town.
CONTRACT cars
(base free). Free for the
first mth. Following from
the 5th week, ($2 500)
week. Call Plaza Taxi,
227-8576, 225-1710.
ACCOUNTS Clerk,
Sales Clerk, Baker for
Pastry and Cakes.
Abrams Snackette.
317 East St. 226-
5063, 231-4139, 226-
9654.
ONE experienced
Marketing person and one
Computer Operator with
great skills only.
Application to: Tony
Reid's Realty at 129
Duncan Street, Bel Air
Park. 231-2064, 225-
2626.
SHEER MAJIC -
wanted Hair Dresser. 1
year experience,
reference. Know to 'do
Manicure, pedicure
nails will be an asset.
Tel. 226-9448.
EXPERIENCED
Hairdresser. Must know to
do manicure, pedicure,
facial and hairstyles,
etc. Also chairs to rent.
Please contact. Tel. 223-
5252 or 628-3415.
TRINIDAD .
Manageress
Receptionist, Computer
literate, female, under
age 24, photo must be
included. Apply
Brahmabhuta Industries
Ltd. P.O. Box 5866
TRINIDAD, W.I.
BABYSITTER
Domestic. Trinidad
under 25 years. Recent
photo must be attached.
Must be able to cook
roti, etc. Reply to
DEOKIE SOOKLAL, P.O.
5866, TRINIDAD, W.I.
SALESCLERK. MUST
HAVE AT LEAST GRADE.
THREE IN MATHS AND
ENGLISH AT CXC LEVEL
OR EQUIVALENT.
P R E V I O U S
EXPERIENCE WOULD
BE AN ASSET. CALL
642-5899.


.I


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26




ON- experienced
Driver'' with valid
Licence for Lorry/
minibus. Must be able-
bodied and willing to
work flexible hours.
Apply in person with
written application.
May's Shopping Centre,
98 Regent St., G/town.
No phone calls.
EXPERIENCED
Salesgirls and
Porters. Apply in
person with written
application to
Queensway, 25 Water
St., Georgetown.
Only suitable
applicants will be
acknowledged. No
phone calls.
PERSONS twenty-
two years and older
with sound secondary
education to be
INSURANCE SALES
REPRESENTATIVES.
Send application
including telephone
n u m b e r ,
qualification, work
experience, etc. to:
The Sales Manager,
GCIS Inc., 47 Main
Street, Georgetown.
RELAX! Let us work
hard for you, so you
don't have to. We will
feature your properties
both locally and
internationally and
ensure that you get top
dollars in minimal time!
Let this top producing
company get the job
well done, our promise


is that we will get the
job done professionally.
Ask about. 1. Free
appraisal; 2. Free Market
Analysis. Call Up To The
Minute Realty.
Telephone # 225-8097,
Fax. # 226-5240. Cell #
611-6376. Email:
uptotheminuterealty@yahoo.co.uk
MAJOR Trading
Company seeks Office
Assistants. Minimum
qualification: CXC
Maths and English,
Grade 111. Computer
knowledge desire bu.t
not compulsory.
Application to
Personnel Manager, Lot
D Lama Avenue, Bel Air
Park, Georgetown. Call
# 225-9404, 225-4492.
RECEPTIONIST/
TYPIST. Qualifications:
(1) CXC English
Language or
equivalent, (2) Pitmans
Interm ediate
Typewriting or
equivalent. Applicants
with previous
experience would be at
an advantage. But must
have a good command
of English Language.
Apply in person with
written application.two
Testimonials and
Police Clearance to:
The Personnel
Manager, National
Hardware (Guyana)
Ltd., 17 19A Water
Street, South
Cummingsburg ,
Georgetown.


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"Copyrighted Material


WOODWORK Door
Store, panel doors,
cupboard doors [windows
and mouldings. Pitt Street
& Republic Road, NIA.



ONE popular business
place and 2 houses fully
grilled with parking space in
central New Amsterdam. Call
333-2500.
UPPER flat of two-
storeyed building for
business purpooses located
Sin Coburg Street (next to
Police Headouarters). Call
Telephone # 618-6634.


DANZIE'S: Brand
name footwear for all.
Stall # D 9 N/A Market.
Tel: 333-4685



USA Green Card
Lottery. Live & work in
the USA. Family
application $4 000.
Contact 227-3339.



CHURCH View Hotel,
Main and King Streets, NA.
Tel: 333-2880. Gift Flower
and Souvenir Shop, Main
& Vryheid Streets. # 333-
q n,' -


JAMAICAN & '3'1
African DVD movies.
Wholesale and retail
- $500 each. Phone

acetyee industrial gases CIRCUIT City Internet Cafe
580 Village Corentv ne and Computer School, Lot
Berbice. Phone 338-2221 2 D'Edward Village, W/C/B.
(David Subnauth). All Internet facilities,
One Ransom 3- photocopying, Scanning
Disc Plough, one pair and Fax Services. Tel. #
MF 35-cage wheel, one 330-2762/2830 or 625-
35 MF back blade, one 7189.
steel rake Call Tel:
333-3460 a
JUST arrived -
Caterpillar 312
Excavators (long & short 1 3-STOREYED
boom). A. .Sookram Auto building, newly built in the
ales. '330Edward, W heart of New Amsterdam.
91Tel. 330-2628, 623- Price reduced
9125. drastically. Call 333-
3 S T 0 R E Y E D 2457, 337-2348.
building located in
NewAmsterdam; pool (1) 2-BEDROOM house
tables, ice maker at Whim, Corentyne price
machine, 1 complete US$40 000. Phone: 220-
ymI, 1 Lister generator. 6115. Ideal for
Call: 333-2457/231- businessperson or lawyer.
5171.
1.. . 2-STOREY prime
1 L TTLE Giant residential property
dragline with 371 engine, situated in Canefel
1 48" x 36" pitch Public Rad.fPric
ro eller; (1x 33" dia x 13 Camne Public Road. Price
't ins'. propeller shaft; $20 million, negotiable.
1 Perkins marine with Contact Tel. 327-7164.
transmission' 1 Bedford HUS and- land
engine block with standard HOUSE.and. l.n
crank shaft and head; all (double lot). location: Lot F-
sizes of 3-phase motors: 10 Albion Front, Corentyne
cutting torch: one Berbice. Price $3.9
complete gas welding million negotiable.
-set; one- 3.7 1 G .M -Contact Liz 227-8366.
3226.


-- Syndicated Content .


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Please contact:


Mr. G. Wynter on 333-3154/333-6628


or Mr. Clifford Stanley on 618-6538/232-0065


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3q 3 10 .uI


ICC Women's Committee adopts



universal playing conditions


THE latest meeting of the
International Cricket
Council's (ICC) Women's
Committee has agreed every
women's international match
from November 2005 onwardis
will take place under
universal set of playing
conditions. .1
Previously, each country


operated under its own set of
conditions but .the eight-person
Committee that met this week
in Dubai decided on a change in
policy as part of a drive to-
wards standardisation through-
out the women's game.
The meeting also agreed a
universal code of conduct for
players and officials and discus-


sion took place on the possibil-
ity of replicating the policies of
the men's game concerning sus-
pect bowling actions and anti-
doping policy.
Commenting on the major
conclusions of the meeting, ICC
Women's Project Officer Megan
Smith said: "The idea behind
standardising playing conditions


and policy is to remove any
scope for confusion while at the
same time increasing the level of
professionalism in the women's
game."
Other items discussed dur-
ing the two-day meeting in-
cluded women gaining access to
national academies and the idea
of linking tours to ensure sides


Guyan aAIim~~ingJh foir clean'p


From back page


saves during the 16th
minute.
Two minutes later, left
midfielder Shawn Bishop made
a brilliant move down the left
and delivered the ideal cross at
the far post but midfielder
Kayode McKinnon's attempted
header went wide of the up-
right.
One minute from halftime
'Awo', from inside the box,
muffed a clear-cut chance
when his feeble shot went
straight to 19-year-old goal-
keeper Glenson Prince after
he would have reached a
well-calculated through'pass
from McKinnon.
On the resumption the Do-
minicans took the attack to the
homesters whose midfield play
was becoming disjointed and
lacked creativity. The Guyana
defence which included three
players from top club side Con-
querors right back Elroy
Parks, left back Walter Moore
and sweeper Neville Stanton -
soaked up the Dominicans'
raids with competence and au-
thority.
With no restrictions on
substitutions the changes
were being made in an effort
to level the score, but it was


the hosts who increased the
lead after 14 minutes of the
second period through a well-
executed direct free kick by
Parks from just outside the
area on the left.
Prince, in setting his four-
man wall, left just enough open-
ing for the defender to exploit
and give Guyana a 2-0 lead as
his right-booter rocked the nets
and the fans erupted.
Although the Guyanese
were in front it was evident that
changes had to be made and with
a certain section of the crowd
calling for captain Neil
Hernandez to be replaced the
coaching introduced a number of
debutants.
The first change
brought in the uncapped
midfielder Jerome
Richardson for Dirk Archer
in the 65th minute, but he
soon found himself in the
Referee's book for a vio-
lent tackle on the visiting
vice-captain who had to be
stretchered off. Richardson
was fortunate to get a yel-
low and not the deserved
red card.
After the crowd kept call-
ing for the dreadlocked Konatta
Manning he was eventually in-
troduced for 'Awo' with ten
minutes to go, and as if to show


SJn mfemoriam
WALTER PHAGO aka
WALTER RAMSARRAN
of P H A G O O -S ,
GENERAL STORE
BUSH LOT VILLAGE. '.
WE ST COAST .
BERBICE
Died Septen'berT 29 2'003
Ttv.,,. ear.: r e[..'a .; -.-e :j e -n
thal.s3ddd,
R4'het, out ebatbaoh e L3 n a a ,I




,c_ I u o ,2, m i e ," :l a ;
B ul in .-u i .',,n-I L h .i i ,ll'. ,i 1i t ,'




From children Vorriesh, Babo, Dro Bablo.
grandchildren and in-laws.


his gratitude, within a minute of
being on the field, he skilfully
worked his way into the area to
beat a hesitant Prince from near
for a Guyana 3-0 advantage.
Towards the end coach
'Wiggy' Dover introduced three
more debutants in Emrik Will-
iams, Eddie Gomes and Kelvin
McKenzie while there was play-
ing time for defender Gordon
Henry.
Coach Dover in a post-
match comment told Chronicle
Sport that while he was pleased
with the result he was a bit dis-
appointed with the execution of
the game plan, in particular at
midfield.
"In general it was a
good effort, but I look for-
ward to a much better per-
formance in the second
game. What I would like to
see and feel is more pa-
triotism." Dover said.
His opposite, Clifford
'Balla' Celaire, in summing
up his team's performance
told Chronicle Sport, "I think
we played reasonably well,


taking into account we had
six uncapped players. The
unevenness of the field was
also another factor worked
against us, not to take any-
thing away from Guyana who
I thought looked well
organised."
"Come Sunday, it's going to
be a different ball game having
seen what Guyana possess we
are going all out for a win."
Celaire promised.
Prior to tonight's game
the visiting Royal 95 club
team of Suriname will take on
Fruta Conquerors while
Georgetown will meet with
West Demerara in the final of
the GFF's Inter-Association
U-15.
Last Friday Royal 95 went
under to a Linden All Stars
selection in the supporting
game at the MSC ground.
Matthew 'Assassin' Pollard
(19th) and Javin Crawford
(35th) from the spot netted
for the winners and for the
losers it was Paaulus Silvano
in the 55th minute.


. ,* *-.




,
,,'^s.'. j; ,*


7[


9


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~( )j~


In loving and cherished memory of our parents,
grandparents and great grandparents MR. &
MRS. DHANAI, formerly of 104 Gandhi Street,
Enterprise, ECD, who have departed this world
on April 28, 1990 and Septemb-r 28 200an


'ii




1)


respectively.
Words cannot express the gre
feeling since you have gone,
Your presence is still greatly mis.-
Fondly remembered by their c
grandchildren. great grandchi
relatives


I, ,,.,
irV~
'I.,


i .T/ 'f7md e i -


.at /.- i , i 'i I'


children. in-law.
Idren and othel ..(.


.. . .
.- ":,.


can gain maximum opportuni-
ties to play at the highest level.
The latter policy has al-
ready been adopted successfully
by some countries with Austra-
lia visiting Ireland as well as En-
gland during the recent Ashes
series.
The meeting was the second
by the Women's Committee
since the ICC took over the run-
ning of the women's game from the
International Women's Cricket
Council (IWCC).inApril2005, fol-
lowing the Women's World Cup in
South Africa.
The Committee is made up
of Chairperson Betty Timmer


from the Netherlands, delegates
from the Americas (Ann
Browne-John), East Asia-Pacific
(Catherine Campbell), Europe
(Gill Conway), Africa (Joan
Edwards), Asia (Shubhangi
Kulkarni), a co-opted delegate
(recently retired Australia inter-
national Belinda Clark) and ICC
Global Development Manager
Matthew Kennedy.
The purpose of the
Women's Committee is to
provide governance and lead-
ership for women's cricket. It
first met in June 2005 and its
next meeting is scheduled to
take place in March 2006.


e ~


Eighteen years have passed:
Memories are treasures no one can steal
Death is a heartache no one can heal
The love we feel for you both
God grant you rest.
Sadly missed by your children Elaine, Bridget,
Edgar, Evadney; grandchildren Alexis, Kerwin,
Clifford, Dellano, Ackeen; great grand Kerion and
other relatives.


In loving memory of our
beloved mother and grand-
mother IRMA ELVA RIDLEY '
a/idk/a JEAN OMAR of 55 :
Gordon Street, Kitty, who t .
passed away on September
28,2004.
One year has passed since
thatsadday.
We thought of you with love .
today, yesterday and .
tomorrow
Bo rilO \I a .: II.: I IIIQ 1ni1r.
We call your name in silent prayer and speak of you with pride
andjoy.
Remembering allthe things you used to do and say even though
we cannot see you.
Yourlove is still our guide and protector .
Your love mom is the legacy with which


We al love you mom.
Inserted by your children Renna, Judy, Billy, Fay Ann,
Johnny & Andre; mother Volta, grands Shane, Niekosha,
Stacia, Felicia, Celene, Shante, Clyde, Nicholas, Saudia,
Jason, John & others; great grands Nickesha, Shontell,
Crystal, Shania; son-in-law Brian, relatives and friends.

Mcuj ,l,& ,dzi o e.4.' a4 tt M peace.


SIIDAY CHRONICLE October 2, 2005 27


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In loving memory of
our parents
PRINCESS
MARSHALL nee
PATTERSON and
E D G A R
";"? MARSHALL.


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28 SUDAY CHIROCLE October 2, 2005


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Let's reflect on 1 3 years since the
return of democracy to Guyana


JOIN THE PUBLIC SYMPOSIUMS
ON OCTOBER 5
GEORGETOWN
VENUE: UMANA YANA, KINGSTON
TIME: 17:00hrs
SPEAKERS INCLUDE:-
Head of the Presidential Secretariat, Dr. Roger Luncheon
Minister of Health, Dr. Leslie Ramsammy
Mrs. Indra Chandarpal

BERBICE
VENUE: UNIVERSITY OF GUYANA, TAIN CAMPUS
TIME: 16:00hrs
SPEAKERS INCLUDE:-
PPP General Secretary, Donald Ramotar
Information Liaison to the President, Robert Persaud
Member of Parliament, Zulficar Mustapha
ESSEQUIBO
VENUE: ANNA REGINA TOWN HALL
TIME: i0:00hrs



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SUNDAY CHRONICLE October 2, 2005 29


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El Dorado/Carib



tennis tournament ,



under way I


... sixty-four entries for Men's Singles


By Isaiah Chappelle
SOME 64 entries for the
Men's Singles Open compe-
tition highlighted the open-
ing of the El Dorado/Carib
tennis tournament at the Le
Meridien Pegasus courts on
Friday.
In the opening ceremony,
coordinator Phillips Squires dis-
closed that it was biggest meet
he has seen so far, doubling the
usual 32 entries.
Play will also be in Ladies'
Singles Open, Girls' and Boys'
18-&-Under Singles, Boys' 18-
&-Under Doubles, Men's
Doubles Open, Mixed Doubles
Open, Ladies' 30-&-Over
Singles, Men's 35-&-Over
Singles and Doubles, Men's 45-
&-Over Singles and Doubles,
Men's 55-&-Over Doubles and
Men's 65 & Over Doubles, the


latter added in memory of the
late Dr Makepeace Richmond,
former executive of the Guyana
Lawn Tennis Association
(GLTA).
The winner of the Men's
Singles will pocket $15 000
and the runner-up $8 000,
while the Ladies' Singles
winner will receive $10 000
and the runner-up $5 000.
In the Men's 35-&-Over,
the winner will get $8 000 and
the runner-up $5 000, and the
winner of the Ladies' 30-&-
Over will be $5 000 richer and
the runner $3 000.
Demerara Distillers Limited
(DDL) and Ansa McAl Trading
are jointly sponsoring the tour-
nament to the tune of $200 000,
according GLTA vice-president
Dr Joseph Haynes.
The official thanked the
two companies for their in-


jection into the sport, point-
ing out tennis was a game of
fitness and health, among
other positive attributes.
"We try to make each tour-
nament bigger than the one be-
fore."
GLTA secretary Grace
McCalman disclosed that the
national governing body was
trying to refill the junior ranks,
having lost some 40 players to
migration, among other reasons.
McCalman said the drive
was on to get tennis into the
school physical education (PE)
programme through the Schools
Tennis Initiative, sponsored by
the International Tennis Federa-
tion (IFT) with a start set for
January.
The secretary disclosed
that the GLTA visited and con-
ducted a clinic at Lichfield in
West Berbice where there was


AT the opening: From left, coordinator Phillip Squires, coach Debbie Bunbury, DDL's
Raveena Ramdatt and Dexter Seaton, Ansa McAl Trading's Nigel Worrell, GLTA secretary
Grace McCalman and vice-president Dr Joseph Haynes. (Winston Oudkerk photo)


a court, with another planned
for today, to be followed by one
at Onverwagt.
Coach Debbie Bunbury said
the development programme in-
cluded taking a team to the 14-
&-Under Caribbean Champion-
ships billed for Barbados, No-
vember 6-11, while a trip to
Suriname was on the drawing
boards.
Bunbury also disclosed that
sights were on the Orange Bowl
tournament for juniors in the
USA.
"We had players at that
level and we're working to
reach that level again. There
will be many tournaments on


a monthly basis."
Play in the tournament
began with Owen Lewis beat-
ing Andre Erskine 6-2, 6-2 in
the Men's Singles Open,
while Cord Lowe disposed of
Brian Johnson without drop-
ping a game in straight sets'
6-0, 6-0.
Adrian Wong got a walkover
from Leyland Leacock, while
two matches were put over to
yesterday morning because the
players got the time wrong.
Eventually Jason Andrews beat
Kemo Benjamin 6-2, 6-1.and
Imo Fox put away 14-year-old
Anthony Downes 6-0, 6-2.
In the Men's 35-&-Over


Singles, Feroze Khan beat
Rawle Sue-Ho 6-0, 6-1, and Gil-
bert Barkoi defeated Andre
Lopes, 6-4, 6-4.
Harry Panday disposed of
Albert Madgamootoo 6-1, 6-3
in the Men's 45-&-Over Singles,
and in the Doubles in that same di-
vision, Maxie Fox and Steve
Surujbally beat Roy Rampersaud
and Bobby Khan 7-6, 6-3. -
In the lone Boys' 18-&-
Under Singles, Fiaz Yamin
beat Nigel Johnson 6-0, 6-0.
The competition will run
for more than two weeks,
with play starting at 17:00 h
on weekdays and 16:00 h on
weekends.


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30 SUNDAY CHRONICLE October 2, 2005


Ea3esLcrT CHRI @


Greaves returns to


F, CLEU


National Park circuit



to reclaim top honours


By Isaiah Chappelle
AFTER a two-week rest,
Alonzo Greaves returned to
the National Park circuit,
yesterday, to reclaim the top
honours in the feature 35-lap
race of the 7th Annual
DeSinco Trading cycling
meet, but 14-year-old Geron
Williams was in the lime-
light of the event.
Greaves who turned 17
years on Friday, clocked one
hour 24 minutes and 35 seconds
and won five of the eight sprint
prizes, followed by veteran
Linden Blackman, Sherwin
Osboumrne and Williams.
-About half a lap later,
Albert Philander out-sprinted
Ossie Edwards for the fifth po-
sitioM-in the second bunch.
:The four top finishers
broke away very early in the
race, after about four laps, with
Blacknimaitaking the first sprint
prize and Osbourne the other.
Then Greaves signalled that he
was back in top condition to
take the ne't five, while'
Osbourne took the final one.
SEentually Grea\es' sprint-
ing prowess restored him at the
top of the National Park circuit.
He told Chronicle Sport
that the rest did him well and
he now had his cycle and should
there be no puncture he should
also cart off today's road race
to the Halfway Tree and back.
All the while Williams
tucked in with the more experi-
enced riders and even tussled


x-w.-- --- -
AT the front again: Alonzo Greaves reclaims the top place
in the feature 35-lap race, out-sprinting Linden Blackman
(right) and Sherwin Osbourne (centre). Fourteen-year-old
Geron Williams is fourth at left. (Photo: Quacy Sampson)


with Greaves for the sprint
prizes. He defied popular belief
that he should be rested for
about two weeks after his amaz-


ing finish in the top five in last
week's s60-lap race at the GCC
ground, Bourda, covering just 20
kilometres.
But Continental club president
Maxi Perreira who rode from a
young age, told Chronicle Sport that
Williams needed just two days rest,


contrary to the two weeks sug-
gested by other cycling buffs.
It was the first time that
Williams completed a 35-lap
race in the National Park and he
finished in the top four, a proud
moment for his sponsor
DeSinco Trading, the company
that also sponsored the meet.
Williams, as is now the rou-
tine, won the 12-14 three-lap
race in 7:04 minutes, along with
a sprint prize, followed by
Christopher Holder in second
and Enzo Matthews third. He
next took two sprint prizes in
the Juveniles event, winning the
ten-lap race in 25:35 minutes.
Royston Anderson was second
and Matthew again third.
Blackman rode away with
the Veterans Under-45 five-lap
race, claiming the sprint prize,
followed by Virgil Jones in sec-
ond and Kennard Lovell third,
while Clement Douglas took the
Veterans Over-45 top honours,
ahead of Aubrey Gravesande
and Neville Atwell.
The upright five-lap winner
was Darryl Peters, with Osafa
Matterson placing second and
Nigel Jacobs third.
In the BMX events, Hausani
Van Lewiri was alone to take the -
Boys 6-9 division, while Johnatan
Fagundes won the 12-14 division,
followed by Romel Hernandez
and Shivnarine Boodram.
The Open event over
three laps was taken by Tavel
Fowler, ahead of Travis
Glasgow and Mitchroy
George, and Ashley Ali won
the 6-9 Girls' race, with
Sherry Ann De Abreu second
and Christal Blackman third.


Brazilian Das Gracas breaks

female 100m record twice
... Accra finishes fifth in 100lm final
(From Leeron Brumell in Argentinal
BRAZILIAN sprinter Franciela Das Gracas tMice broke the
female 100m records on the opening day of the 361h South
American Junior Championships at the Jorge Newbery
Stadium, Rosario, Argentina.
The championship record %was first broken in semi-final one
with Das Gracas clocking 11.51 seconds, erasing the three-Near
mark set by Thatiana Regina Ignacio in 2001 in Belem. Brazil
She went on to win the final in 11 39 seconds for a new
area record
Under glaring sunhune. >et slightly chll%, Guyana's Goddis
Accra placed
fifth in the
100m final that
was comnested
at 16:15 h (Ar-
gentine tmune .
The race was d(s
won by Bra-
zilian Rafael
De Silva who2005 Pan-A can ronze medalist.
clocked 10for. olted for the fin33sh e metre ahead of the feld
The Guyanese regsered 10.90 seconds n he fnal.
equalling his
time set in Goddis Accra (right) battles with Galeano
July in Edgar of Paraguay (centre) and Morilla
Canada. Marcelo (Argentina).
Running
out of lane to. Accra started slow and was never in a position
to recover as De SHlva. the 2005 Pan-Amecan bronze medallist.
i lane four. bolted qualfor the finalshe metres ahead of the field
The Guyanese registered 10.90 seconds running romhe final.
Second place went to Andres Munrll of Colombia in 10.53
seconds while Eufraso Dos Santos fi shed thanrd min10. of theconds.
Accra clocked 10.81 seconds. a personal best record in the
se go Brg of Brazl won th m final in 4ifinal.
He will feature in the 200m spnnt today along y ith team
maf yeste Christopher Hall.
Hall failed to quahty for the final of the bo. s -400m after
placing fourth it 49.78 seconds running from lane seven
Mlanager/coach of the athleteN. Elhtn Snuth. expresed his
disappointment at the lane assignment for Hall. noting that Hall's
entrance timing for the eent %%as bener than many of the ath-
letes \ ho %%ere entered in the event.
Rodrngo Bargas of Brazil won the 400m final in 47 04 sec-
onds. Both Guyanese athletes %&ill feature in the 200m roday
at II 15 h and the team remains confident despite the setbacks
of yesterday.
Up to press time Brazil were ahead in the medal haul.
At the end of the morning period they had netted nine med-
als four gold. four silver and one bronze.


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CLICO Under-1 7 cricket at LBI...


TWO brilliant centuries.from
Demerara captain Steven
"Copyrighted Material Jacobs and vice-captain
Syndicated Content Rajendra Chandrika inspired
Content their team to a commanding
Available from Commercial News Providers" position after the completion
of the first day's play in the
first round of the CLICO-
sponsored 2005 Under-17 two-
day inter-county cricket com-
petition which started at the
LBI ground, yesterday.
The diminutive right-hander
Chandrikt slammed 128 which
included 11 fours, faced 179
balls and occupied the crease
for 223 minutes.
His colleague Jacobs hit 101
off 179 balls with 12 fours and
the pair featured in a third-
wicket stand of 172 that
spanned 216 balls as Demerara
hit a huge total of 320 for nine
when their 65 first-innings
stipulated overs ended.
Essequibo, who are 104 for
Three needing 216 more for tnitt
m ,nnin2. won Ihe.toss, and de-


cided to give the home team a
chance to bat first on a pitch
that is made for batting and in
absolutely glorious sunshine.
Demerara lost Naitram
Wilfred in the third over, caught
by David Wallace off the lively
Gordon for six.
Robin Bacchus came out
and immediately threatened the
'Cinderella' boys with an array
of powerful strokes, which in-
chided six boundaries before he
was comprehensively bowled
by Gordon for 28, leaving the
captain and vice-captain to do
all the batting.
Jacobs, who is one of the
national standbys for the re-
gional President's Cup, and
Chandrika from Everest were on
63 and 61 respectively at lunch
with their score progressing
nicely at 185 for iwo.
At the resumption Jacobs
was severe on all the opposing
boulers, biingthg up hi;, first
hundred at this level in the 46th


over His century came up from McDonald.
114 balls in 113 minutes. The Essequibians began
He reached the boundary 12 their innings after a promising
times, including an elegant cover start of 52 between Abdul Salim
drive off Wallace's innocuous and Anil Persaud, before Salim
medium pace before he was sent was smartly stumped by
back by Deon Heyliger, leaving Jacobs for seven.
his team in a comfortable posi- Persaud was in attacking
tion at 220 for three. mood striking five fours in his
Vishal Singh (12) and 39 before he was lbw to off-
Somnauth Bharrat (6) tried spinner Clive Andries with the
to build another partnership score on 87.
with the fluent Chandrika, Norwayne Fredericks and
but Essequibo's left-arm spin- skipper Wallace posted a third-
ner Suraj Sookdeo picked up wicket stand of 25, before
his first of his three wickets Wallace was dismissed for 17
having Bharrat trapped lbw. and the visitors closed at 104
Medium pacer Javier for 3 with Guyana Under-15
McDonald, bowling his second batsman Fredericks unbeaten on
spell with good control, removed 26 (3x4) and Heyliger on 6.
Demerara wicketkeeper Delroy National player Andries
Jacobs and pacer Leon Scott (0) ended the day with two for 33,
in quick succession to trigger a while Bishun collected one for
late order collapse. -17. ..
Sookdeo ended with im- Today is the second- and
pressive figures of three for 60 final day and is scheduled to
while there were t,.vo wick i. .. i"? U(ttidI "'tlO-h0b."-R #Mdra
piece for Heyliger .1nd *' r S! "ry l


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE October 2, 2005 31


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.... S


the West Indies Cricket Board
(WICB) and the West Indies
Players Association (WIPA)
reach a settlement in the im-
passe over contractual arrange-
ments for players.
Arthur said that the con-
tractual "squabbling" should be
settled once and for all, point-
ing out that the focus should
now be on preparing for the
2007 World Cup and the future
of West Indies Cricket.
"It should really be the com-
mon ground that commands the
attention of the two (WICB and
WIPA)," he said.
"West Indies cricket has
gone down because we have not
done what is needed to bring the
level of organisation to a higher
level."
He continued: "A few thou-
sands of dollars should not be
enough to stop us from seeing
a common purpose of the only
thing, really, that has effectively
held the Caribbean people not
only together, but the only thing
that has given us a global sense
of accomplishment for more
than 50 years."
"Obviously, the game has
been, in many respects,


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The Saint Lucia Local Organising
Committee (LOC), as part of its ongoing
preparations to have that country
fully prepared forth ICC Cricket World Cup
2007 PC CWC 2007), hosted a
two-day transportation workshop on
September ast and a d, zoo5. The
workshop included an assessment of the
existing transportation system, and
interactive discussions were held with
stakeholders, as all Intemest groups aim to
work closely together todevelopsuccessful
transportation management plans for the
Event.
The workshop was faclltated by Game Day
Management Group,whoseexperience includes
the development and implementation of
transportation plans and services for worldwide
sporting events such as the zoo2 Salt Lake City
Winter Olympics and the 2004 Athens Olympic
Games. .
Discussion topics included scheduling, traffic
routes, venue transport operations and
constituent system operations. Following the
workshops, site visits to strategic locations


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such as 8eausejour Cricket
Ground, proposed park-and-ride
centres, main hotels and the
airport were undertaken.
Saint Lucia will host 6 first round
matches In the Group Stage and
1 semi final. C




Another significant business opportunity in the
form of an open tender, for which
Caribbean companies can apply and benefit
from, is to provide services of a Security
Training Provider to the ICC CWCWI zoo.
This service is Integral to the achievement of
one of the company's key strategic objectives
and mandatory deliverables, which is to
provide a safe and secure environment for the
duration of the tournament. consistent with
international standards.
This will include ensuring the safety and
security for players, match and tour officials,
spectators, sponsorsVIP's and stakeholders.


Potential c
demonstrate
relevant expe
(but not Iii
training (es
training of
personnel;t
personnel;
crowd dynan
intervention
The complete
and download
The deadline


CARICOM Sub Committee Gets ICC Cricket World Cup Update
Chris Dehring, Managing Director and CEO of ICC CWC W1 zoo7, met with CARICOM's Sub Committee on
Cricket, September igth, zoos, to update regional government heads on the steady progress being
made by the organisation, in preparation for the world's greatest Cricket spectacle to be held In the
Caribbean.
Dehring updated the Committee on a number of mandatory host deliverables including: security updates; sunset
legislation; accommodation for the large influx of Cricket fans; Cricket operations and venue development.
He also presented a comprehensive overall assessment of how plans were developing for the much anticipated
cricketing showpiece.
The Sub Committee expressed appreciation for the presentation by Mr. Dehring and the progress being made by
the g LOC's, and reaffirmed its pledge to provide even greater support for ICC CWC 2oo7, as it moves into its key
operational phase.
The ICC Cricket World Cup takes place In March and April of zoo7.


"Copyrighted Material

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candidates must be able to
proven ability and previous
erience in various areas, Including
mited to): major event-specific
specially major sports events);
police forces/services or police
training of private security
crowd management (Induding
iks); threat assessment; physical
and stadium ejections.'
tender document can be viewed
tded at www.cricketwoddcup.om
for submissions is 7 October, 2005.











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The C Cricket World Cup trophy
which sixteen teamswil compete
for here in the Caribbean In a20


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Jason Lloyd makes cricket

debut in Guyana


JASON Lloyd, son of former Guyana and West Indies cricket
captain Clive Lloyd, made his debut in local club cricket when
he turned out for his father's former dub, Demerara Cricket

Fastest drag racer
back at South
Dakota today
THE country's fastest drag racer will be back on the South
Dakota Circuit, today, in the 'Greed For Speed' meet from
12:00 h
Vivek Joshi was the overall winner in last July's meet at
the same venue, sporting an unfancied Toyota four-door Star-
let.
He eliminated the impressive looking four-wheel drive
Mitsubishi Evolutions and Mazda RX7's on his way to drag-
ging supremacy.
Drivers were briefed yesterday and some have regis-
tered in advance, with a full complement of vehicles again
expected for today's showdown.


Club (DCC), in a division two game against Malteenoes yes-
terday.
The six-foot eight-inch right-handed all- rounder got a wicket
with his very first delivery in local cricket and ended with 1-23
from his five overs and smashed a quick-fire 44, inclusive of two
sixes and five fours.
The 24-year-old England-born Lloyd who bowls medium pace
and bats in the middle-order will be hoping to impress with the
aim of making the Guyana senior team.
Lloyd who was part of the England U- 15 Cricket training squad
in 1994 :says he is now focused on playing some serious cricket
after being attracted to baseball and basketball in recent years.
Today the lanky Lloyd will make his division one debut
against Lusignan at the DCC ground. (Allan La Rose)


GUYANA AIMING FOR ... Domnica
haEve other


CLEAN SWEEP TODAY ideas


Fe-I
Edward B. Kehnry
& Company Ltd.


By Allan La Rose

GUYANA'S senior footballers
are aiming to replicate
their last Friday night's
performance when they meet -;-
their counterparts from sister
Caricom country, Dominica,.
in the final game of the two-
match goodwill Series set for
the world-famous GCC
tonight at 20:00 h.
In their first encounter played
before a fair-sized crowd and on an
uneven pitch at the MSC ground in
Linden the far more experienced home
-team outclassed their younger
opponents despite a spirited and
commendable effort.
Guyana seized the initiative after
eleven minutes of play as the in-form
Anthony 'Awo' Abrams, on his second
attempt, blasted a right-booter into the roof
of the net from close up. It was a perfect
serve from striking partner Gregorn 'Jackie
Chan' Richardson whose run into the area on
the left culminated with a well measured
square to the boot of 'Awo' at the far post
for the 'Goaalden' touch.
The visitors, led by their captain
Delbert Daley, retaliated immediately with
forays of their own as Guyana's custodian An-
drew Durant was forced to make "back to back'
Please see page 24


PART of the action from Friday's opening game of the 2-
match series between Guyana (Green) and Dominica
(Blue).


Take in the sights and sounds of the I M IZOW Y
SUnder-17 Inter-County Cricket Competition, 2005!


Round 1: October1 &2- Demerara vs Essequibo, tLtGround

Round 2: October 4 & 5 Essequibo vs Berbice, Everest Cricket Club
S Round 3: October 21 & 22 Berbice vs Demerara at Albion Berbice.

't miss the chance to see young SUPERstars in action! See you there! -.
::--.: <- :-T-.-OM.:,._: -;-T


Printed and Published by Guyana National Nespape Limited, Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown. Telephone 226-3243-9 (General); Editorial: 227-5204, 227-5216.Far:227-S5208


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Sunday Chronicle October 2, 2005


I WAS born in Guyana on the north-east tip of
South America. My parents are teachers, and
our family lived on one of the Islands at the
mouth of one of Guyana's biggest rivers. It had


her children be tested and we were transferred to the top
class. We'd had an ex-colonial education in Guyana and it was
a very good one; we had learned to write beautifully.
I was quiet and quite academic and I lost my Guyanese
accent quickly. I enjoyed school and read voraciously. My sister,


a tiny population..

I had a love of education instilled in me from a young age by -When Clare Short resigned, I was asked to
my parents, and there were always people in the community be the Secretary of State for International
to say "Don't do that" If you were behaving badly. At the same Development in May 2003. This meant I
time, we had a great time playing in river creeks. Not that I becamethe first black female member of a
learned to swim properly I still flounder. ecame he i fe ition with
Dad came over to England in 1961, Intending to do a degree British Cabinet. I occupied this position with
in economics, but instead he took a job as a teacher in a an enormous sense of pride. I felt it was a
secondary school in Belvedere, Kent. I remember him leaving real acknowledgement of Britain's diversity.'
Guyana when I was seven; I was crying so much that I could
only see the tarmac. Of course, he missed his family and two
years later, when I was nine, we all came here and joined him. who is three years younger than me, always told me I was too
It was exciting coming to Britain. Not only would we all be much of a "goodie-goodie" because I never rebelled.
with my father again, but it was a new country. I remember Our parents were always incredibly supportive, so I grew
the houses seemed small and the streets were narrower than I up with a healthy amount of self-confidence. They also gave
had expected. We were one of the first black families in that me a strong- sense of family and community, and I was always
,rea-wo' Kent, and w w're the only bJack children at schooL -,,,, sure of'who ywas, I never fell odd or left out because I was a
When we first arrived;we were put in the bottom class. black child in a white school. That helped me get the self-belief
But ihe next day my mother marched ini an demanded that hlih would benefit me In the'fiturei


4I he caused quite a stir in Merry oi' N
England, and quite a few hearts here ,
to swell with pride, being a daughter .
of this soil and all that, when British Prime
Minister, Tony Blair, made her first
Secretary of State for International
Development and shortly thereafter
Leader of the House of Lords. Here,
Baroness Valerie Amos of Brondesbury,
known to close friends as just Valerie,
shares with the Evening Standard's Rose
Rouse how a bookish immigrant girl was
able to rise to the dizzying heights of
British politics.

M,\ secondary school %%as an all girls' grammar in
Bexlevhealh where I was involved in activities Including tennis,
athletics and the choir. But after A-levels, I had no idea what
to do I was interested in so many subjects, especially
languages, politics and sociology. We were a family who
debated current affairs a lot, and I always had a strong sense
Internationalism, as well as a belief In social justice and equality.
Finally, I decided to do a sociology degree at Warwick University.
I loved meeting people from varied backgrounds, and I was
always keen on music. I was an R 'n' B DJ for a while, and I
loved dancing. As for boyfriends, I had the same one for most
of my time at Warwick.
From there, I went on to do an MA in Contemporary Cultural
Studies at Birmingham University with the academic Stuart Hall.
At the time, I was thinking I might want to be an academic
and do research, but in Birmingham, I got Involved with
community education issues such as rehabilitation of
offenders, and encouraging young black people to benefit
from education. It became obvious that I liked being active in
this way. I wanted to be out there making a difference.
I applied for a job In race relations at Lambeth Council
hin 1961 just as the Brixton riots happened. My work was
about finding ways to make sure services like sports and
the library were accessible to ethnic minorities. I also looked
at thfmploiyment polices of thediffement deparmeqs ,


Pieaserum topage(Vi


Page II


.__ -. ... ___. ~~__._~___.. ~_______~~___________~~_________~~~_~~~~ _~____~___~___~_~~~~~__~___ ____ ______








. ..-


3 a


SI"


Frank


Mahabal


L3UDDA/~\ UE"^JEKJ1


by Petamber Persaud
FROM PILLAR to
Post: Indo-
Caribbean
Diaspora is a
groundbreaking study
capturing "a composite
multifaceted picture of
the ongoing search by a
people for definition and
voice, for recognition
and ultimately a home."*
This book was published in
1997, by which time its author,
Frank Birbalsingh, had moved
from the West Bank of
Demerara to the East Coast of
Demerara; from the countryside '-
to the top secondary school in
the city; then from Georgetown
to study in the West Indies be-
fore migrating, firstly to En-
gland (1962 1966), then to
Canada, where he has become
an authority on Indo-Caribbean
Literature.
It was a long journey up to
that point, starting way back in
1912 with the birth of his
mother on a ship crossing the
kala pani (black water) from In-
dia to the then British Guiana,
almost at the end of
indentureship period which
came officially in 1917. Frank
Birbalsingh was born at a time
when the potpourri that is
Guyanese society was still sort-
ing itself out one hundred years
after the birth of British Guiana
with the merging of the three
counties (Demerara, Essequibo
and Berbice) in 1831, growing
up when political awakening and
national consciousness were
surging through Guyana and the
West Indies.
Author, anthologist and
Professor Emeritus, Frank
Mahabal Birbalsingh was


born in 1938 at Sister's Vil-
lage, on the West Bank
Demerara, an area that pro-
duced other significant writ-
ers the likes of Kampta
Karran, Gokarran Sukhdeo
and Krishna Prashad.
Birbalsingh was born into an
intriguing set of circum-
stances. His father was Hindu
and his mother Moslem.
Both converted to Christian-
ity, thus paving the way for
his father to become a pri-
mary school headmaster.
This post caused the family
to relocate several times as
the breadwinner was shifted
from school to school.
Young Birbalsingh found
pillars of opportunity in each
relocation. From the Better
Hope Canadian Mission School,
he moved to Queen's College
(1949-1956), rubbing shoulders
with the cream of society's in-
tellect; men that would influence
the course of the country's de-
velopment. He taught at St
Stanislaus College for one year
before moving on to the Univer-
sity College, University of the
West Indies to pursue studies
there, then returning to Guyana
to serve as Assistant Master at
his alma mater, Queen's Col-
lege. He's been a teacher ever
since, all over the globe En-
gland, France, India, Nigeria,
New Zealand, moving up the
ladder all the time and now to
hold the revered post of Profes-
sor Emeritus at York Univer-
sity, Canada, in the Department
of English. For 33 years (1970
to 2003) he taught at York.
Many of his students are now
established writers, professors
and professionals, making their
mark on society, taking a page
or two out of the master's book.
And he finds time to
teach outside the classroom;
imparting knowledge had be-


come his forte. He is a pio-
neer in Indo-Caribbean Stud-
ies, and has authored and ed-
ited several seminal works in
that direction, including
Jahaji Bhai: An Anthology of
Indo-Caribbean Literature,
1988; Indenture and Exile:
The Indo-Caribbean Experi-
ence, 1989; Indo-Caribbean
Resistance, 1993; and Jahaji:
An Anthology of Indo-Carib-
bean Fiction, 2002.
But that's not the full extent
of his scholarship. Birbalsingh's
books, Passion and Exile: Es-
says in Caribbean Literature,
1988; and Frontiers of Carib-
bean Literature, 1996, are ex-
tremely valuable points of ref-
erence on literature of the re-
gion. The latter book provides
a comprehensive portrait of
Anglophone Caribbean litera-
ture, featuring two distinct gen-
erations of writers, one set with
Caribbean sensibilities, and the
other undergoing the Caribbean
Diaspora experience. What is
important is that "the connec-
tions that are established and
explored between these writers
illustrate the development of
Caribbean literature and illumi-
nate critical issues of colonial-
ism, colour, class and sexual-
ity."*
And there is a progression


(as in Diaspora movement) to
Birbalsingh's erudition. Follow-
ing on his scholarship on Indo-
Caribbean literature and Carib-
bean literature, he wrote about
Canadian literature in books like
Novels and the Nation: Essays
in CanadianmLiterature, 1995;
and Neil Bissoondath: The Indo-
Caribbean-Canadian Diaspora,
2005. This exceptional
academic's doctoral thesis was
on 'Nationality in the Canadian
Novel'.
Guyana and Caribbean: Re-
views, Essays and Interviews is
a recent addition to the
professor's amazing output
which, according to academi-
cian, Al Creighton, "reveals the
real range of the work of Frank
Birbalsingh" as the author ex-
pounded on literature, .politics
and cricket.
Cricket is part of the West
Indian psyche, debated in the
same breath with politics and
religion. In 1996, Birbalsingh
published The Rise of West In-
dian Cricket. Historian, Dr
Winston McGowan said the
book "will probably now be re-
garded as the finest general his-
tory of West Indian Test
cricket."
His writings, which gave
pride and identity to various
groups of West Indians with re-


ECLIPSE HACKSAW BLADES 18T & 24T
INDUSTRIAL ECLIPSE HACKSAWS
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gards to their literature, also
brought those different peoples
together in the name of cricket;
the mark of a remarkable
thinker.
Apart from the works cited,
the professor has done numer-
ous book reviews, has several
entries in the Dictionary of Lit-
erary Biography, has written
three monographs and has been
a contributor to major literary
journals around the world.
Frank Birbalsingh has
visited his ancestral home,
India, several times, lectur-


ing extensively at many of
the country's leading univer-
sities, maintaining links
from India to Guyana to
Canada.
Sources:
* Email interviews with Frank
Birbalsingh
* *quotations from the blurb
of books as they were cited
* Online information

Responses to this author by
telephone # 226-0065 or
email: oraltradition2002
@yahoo.com


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Tourism


Ho.


AaenaetUn aet ConeJs's!! ^I64

The Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG) is inviting all pet owners to enter
their pets in the Novelty Pet Show on Saturday 22"n ,c)er on the lawns of the Red House.


Interested persons can enter their pets in the follow g categories:

entry categories: 1) ,0ost exotic i)Applicants can enter all four categories
". ii) Pets being entre3i~l the competition must be manageable
( = .> 2) tBest dressed iii) Application forms can be uplifted from
S,-. tr ik THAG's officee at 157 Waterloo Street.
, 3:__ o) Biest trick For further information please call: Tel: 225-0807


at all times.


*: A


--I ~jb I al tI f'oI:l. I,


Sunday Chronicle October 2, 2005


Page IH


it =ep, 1 -- :7r-ol


]V






Page IV Sunday Chronicle October 2, 2005


HIGH


I am a 34-year-old single, college-educated
woman, but honestly, I feel clueless when it
comes to love. I've had lots of relationships that
last six months. That's the time men start profess-
ing their love, and I find a reason to run.
I had one relationship that lasted five years, mainly because
he was a professional athlete. I'm ashamed to admit I would
have stayed with him just because of what he did for a living,
and the exciting lifestyle he provided. Even then, I cheated
twice. No matter how great the guy is, I always feel I might
miss something better out there, or find someone who makes
more money, or is better looking.
SI, n some way, I
have to prove
myself to the
world by
Finding the
perfect


SOCIETY


man. My perfect man is incredibly good-looking, has a high-
power or high-paying job, is strong enough to protect me,
dresses hip, and has an amazing personality.
My friends and family would tell you I'm a sweet, loving
person, which I truly am. I'm very much the girl-next-door type.
I love the simple things in life, but for some reason, my priori-
ties become all messed up when it comes to relationships.
Recently, I met an amazing guy who wants to pursue a
relationship. Honestly, if this guy was a professional athlete,
lawyer, doctor, or even owned a highly successful business, I
would be completely into him. He tells me love is all that
matters in life. But when it comes to relationships, I don't know
what love is.
CAMI.
Cami, iniSQomerset Maugham's novel, 'The Razor's Edge', a
man named Elliot Templeton spends his life trying to secure a
place in elite society. Elliot lives in mortal fear of not being in-
vited to the best parties. In the end, he dies alone. As one char-
acter in the novel remarks: "I happen to think that we've set
our ideal on the wrong objects."
Like Elliot Templeton, you attribute value to yourself by the
value of those you are with. But, the problem with selling your-
self to the highest bidder is you can never be sure when you
have the highest bid. Something better may always come
alonog..
You're clever enough, polished enough, and at-
tradive enough to attract powerful men, but it
doesn't satisfy you. After six months, your goal
accomplished, you lack a reason to stay. Act-
t t ing solely to elicit a response from a man
ensures you will believe his feelings are no
more genuine than your own.
Now you're in love with the idea of be-
ing a simple girl who loves romance, but
that idea is no more substantial than want-
ing a'man for his looks or his money. A man's
looks, money, and fame can disappear overnight,
but a genuine connection to that man can endure
as long as life itself.
Elliot Templeton loved parties, and parties are wonder-
ful. But when the party's over and there are cigarettes jammed
into the potted plants and glass rings on every table, you deal
with that alone. Unless you're not alone, because you have
someone of your own.
WAYNE & TAMARA


r--- --- --------- -




-I




Associations,
y friend, Tina, and I had a falling out.
During the weeks leading up to our I
fight, Tina took advantage of me by
continually asking for rides home. She lives
in the complete opposite direction of my
house, and gas is not cheap.
She sent a letter saying she's sorry I felt taken
advantage of instead of saying sorry she took
advantage of me. We haven't spoken since. I think
she should have chosen her words more carefully.
Should I talk to her or mote on? We'll probably never
.see each other again.

AUTUMN
Autumn, it's hard not to think about someone
who once was part of your life, but, as with
cigarettes, it helps to break the association with
things which are not healthful for you. Move on.

WAYNE
L--- -------------- J
Send letters to: Direct Answers, PO Box 964,.
Springfield, MO 65801 or email:
DirectAnswers @ WayneAndTamara.com.


INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK
VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT
SYSTEMS ANALYST
'Objective: Manage and maintain the local computer network and Bank applications
and communications systems in Country Office Guyana and provide technical support
and training to users to ensure smooth systems operation.
REQUIREMENTS:
Education: University Degree in Computer Science, Electrical Engineering or, other
related fields.
Experience: Minimum of 6 years of relevant experience in the area of Information
Technology. Experience in a) Network administration: LAN, WAN, Internet/Intranet,
structured cabling, b) IT systems management, both in-house and standard software
packages i.e. MS Office c) Server technologies: Windows 2000, Windows NT, Linux,
Exchange Server, IIS, VMWare, d) Programming in the Windows environment, e) Web
Development: IIS, ASP/Java.
Languages: Proficiency in English and working knowledge of Spanish.
Interested candidates may uplift a detailed job description from the address below.
Interested applicants should send a cover letter and resume (in duplicate),
including salary history to:
The Representative
Inter-American Development Bank
47 High Street, Kingston
P.O. Box 10867,
Georgetown, Guyana
Please indicate on top right hand corner of envelope 'Application Systems
Analyst'
Applications close on October 14, 2005
Only applications which best match the requirements of the position will be
acknowledged.
The IADB encourages gender equality in its hiring practices.


M.V. SEABREAM
M.V. GILBACKER

MR. MAURICE PHILLIPS and all parties
concerned with the above stated derelicts are hereby
notified that the said derelicts are to be removed from
the Guyana Fisheries Limited (GFL) Compound,
Houston, East Bank Demerara, no later than the 1"
day of October, 2005 failing which the said derelicts
shall be removed and disposed of by GFL.

GFL shall not be responsible for any damage or loss
suffered due to their removal and disposal.

GFL reserves the right to levy and collect storage and
removal costs payable with respect to the said
derelicts.


By Order of Management
(GFL)


I NOTICE 1


Page IV


Sunday Chronicle October 2; 2005


RE:


.,q , ' ,-






QiUI~lahna Octohnr-205aeV


Clinical


VIOLENCE
WITHIN
families and
n intimate
relationships is now
recognized as a serious
rohlp.man.. Ahneu*"*. --
o recur and may
continue until the victim
"es as a result of his or
er injuries. Every
effort should be made
o intervene and stop
his chain of events so
hat the cycle of
violence will cease.
Though victims are
often reluctant to report
heir abuse, the fact
hat about 75% of
physical injuries are
"cted to the region of
he head, face, mouth,
nd neck places
dentists in a particularly
ood position to
ecognise the signs of
buse and take steps to


intervene.
Domestic violence is a
complex and pervasive problem
affecting a large proportion of
Guyanese society. The clinical
signs and symptoms of violence
in day-to-day practice become
understand what to look for and
appreciate the urgency of
identifying victims of abuse and
those at risk.
Domestic violence was once
believed to be relatively
uncommon. The problem is
now recognized as a pervasive
societal issue that affects
thousands of individuals.
Tragically, it is estimated
that 50% of the mothers of
abused children are victims of
abuse themselves. Domestic
violence issues including
battering and sexual abuse of
women, children, and elderly
people are receiving increased
attention as the public
recognizes the impact that these
problems have on social
programmes, health care, and the
family unit. Violence against
individuals who are unable to
defend themselves is attracting
new interest, not only because


sic


ins of


of the moral implications, but
because of the financial burden
inflicted on society. When one
considers just the costs of
treating injuries, the potential
impact on health care is
staggering.
physical injuries suffered at the
hands of an abuser are inflicted
on the head, face, mouth, and
neck. Even when persons
suffering in abusive
relationships avoid seeking
medical attention, they
often keep dental
appointments for routine
treatment. As a result, dentists
and allied dental personnel are
in an ideal position to identify
the injuries associated with
physical, emotional, and sexual
abuse.
In addition to expedient
judicial support, a major barrier
to dentists' reporting seems to
be lack of training and
experience in identifying abuse
and neglect. This problem is
apparent among other health
care professionals as well.
Studies have indicated that
many pediatric admissions to
hospitals may result from


abuse, but are treated as isolated
events without attention to
environmental circumstances.
The term domestic
violence refers to abuse that
takes place within the family,
in an intimate relationship
.. -i tuation o
dependency or trust. The
abuse may be physical,
emotional, or sexual. Neglect
and financial exploitation are
other types of abuse.
Domestic violence is the
abuse of power to control the
more vulnerable individuals
in relationships of kinship,
intimacy, dependency, or
trust. Women, children, older
adults, and people with
disabilities are most at risk
for abuse by family members
or trusted caregivers. We
must also remember,
however, that boys and men
are at risk, too.
Child abuse is mistreatment
or neglect that results in
physical or significant
psychological harm to the child
by a parent or guardian. Women
abuse include physical or sexual
assault, emotional or
psychological intimidation,


The Dentist Advises
I l.l....IMI..T.


degradation, deprivation or
exploitation of women by their
partner in an intimate
relationship. Elder abuse refers
to any action or inaction that
threatens the well-being of an
older- nir .- .- -- "- ~
-te defining Ryerson
Polytechnical University
Study in 2003, financial
abuse is the most prevalent
type of elder abuse.
Research shows that all
forms of domestic violence are
interrelated. Studies also
demonstrate that violence in the
family does not stop unless
there is outside intervention.
Prevention, identification, and.
subsequent intervention in
situations of domestic violence
must be part of the delivery of
all health care services.
Physical signs include
fractured teeth, oral lacerations;
fractures of the jaw, bruising,
and scarring of the face and lips.
should be carefully evaluated as
possible signs of physical abuse.
Bruises and cuts to the ears,
perforated tympanic
membranes, broken or bruised,
noses, and cigarettes or ligature,
burns to the face, neck, or arms


also may be clinical clues to
abuse.
Many injuries of physical
abuse are focused on the head
because this is a readily
accessible area. Additionally, the
mouth is often a target because
this is where communication
originates. Injuries from violence
perpetrated in an attempt to cut
off communication and keep the
individual quiet often involve
the teeth and oral structures.
Injuries may take many
forms including, but certainly
not limited to, traumatic bruises
and non-accidental abrasions,
lacerations, and contusions
from such sources as
cigarettes, lighters or
matches, heated objects, and
caustic chemicals.
In general, the nature of
the injury observed at the
time of examination does not
fit the reported history of the
injury. This contradictory
Information should serve as a
signal to the dentist that
something is wrong. In this
case, it is vital to follow up
with additional questions and
a comprehensive
examination in an attempt to
find the truth behind the
injury. Whenever possible,
try to question the patient
separately from the family
member or caregiver and
compare the explanations for
the injury. Is there a
discrepancy between
explanations for the injury?
Does one person seem to be
misrepresenting the facts?


REGIONAL DEMOCRATIC COUNCIL
REGION No. 3
SSEQUIBO ISLANDS/WEST DEMERARA



STenders are invited for suitably qualified Contractors to undertake
Contracting works with the CANALS POLDER NEIGHBOURHOOD
DEMOCRATIC COUNCIL as listed:
wirts


iTenders for the job must be enclosed in a sealed envelope bearing no
identity of the Tenderer and should clearly indicate on the top, left-hand
comer the work tendered for.
Tender Documents can be obtained from the NDC Office as stated
during normal working hours Monday Friday for a non-refundable fee of
five thousand dollars ($5 000). Tenders must be submitted in a sealed
envelope and addressed to:
The Chairman
Regional Tender Board
Regional Administration Office
Region No. 3
and deposited in the Tender Box provided not later than Tuesday,.
October 11,2005 at 08:00 h. Each Tender must be accompanied by valid
Income Tax and NIS Compliance Certificates.
Tenderers or their Representatives may be present at the opening of
Tenders.
M.I. KHAN
REGIONAL EXECUTIVE OFFICER
REGION No.3 3 ., ., ,,.. . .


IiJVA~A LUIV[NIJ[

MJT114 VET)


SECURITY ADVISORY

The Guyana Revenue Authority would like to notify the general public
that new security measures will be implemented at the following
locations with effect from Monday October 3, 2005.


These locations are: (a)GRA Secretariat (Lamaha & East Streets)
(b)Customs & Trade Administration (Main Street)
c)Licence Revenue Office (Smyth Street)

All persons entering these premises will be subjected to security checks
by personnel with metal detectors stationed at the entrances. Please note
persons with firearms will not be permitted to enter. Persons who do not
comply with these requirements will be denied access to said premises.

These security measures are necessary in view of the recent upsurge in
the number of armed robberies countrywide.

The Guyana Revenue Authority would like to apologise for any
inconvenience cause by these measures.


I"Mr. Khurshid Sattaur
Commissioner General


~ ...


Page V


Sundlav Chronicle October 2. 2005


9


OL







u Ce


'mI mser iou s, 'ut



a n sit e as,.we



Fro pae headhunted to be the chief organization, based In Nelson Mandela had been difference %
ro executive of the Equal Manchester, which was elected president and there been caml
makikam sure job adverts workinil to eliminate was optimism about how the outside. N(


were fair to everyone.
Soon, however, I went
on to be a women's adviser
for Camden' Council,
working with the housing
and social services
departments. During this
working for bhig
organizations, which
surprised me, and that I
was good at forming
alliances and networks.
I also learned how I,:I
identify who to influence -
and it wasn't always ine
people at the top. F r
example, people in charge .
of budgets are always
worth getting on ycur
side. A year later, I became
head of training and
development for Hackne\
council, which was a
management rather than
an advisory job. By this
time, I was sitting on lots of
committees, and in 1989, I was


Opportunities Commission.
This was a. national


sex discrimination
and promote equal
oppolunilies for
%omen and men.
Although I % \\as
funded b\ the
go\ernmenl te
lootk. them rt i:)iurt
instance oer
equality in pensions.
Thalt as rick\ I \\as
3' i and a black
\\oman ihe
spoiligni \\as on
me Buti I enr \ed
Ihe challenge oif ihe

, iIn j'n '-) I I co-
foiunded a
icon.ullan,- to i:,ik
in Souith rAf :a and
deal \ilIn the same
kind of issues I \\as
workingg \\ith the


*in government sei ices
there to make them more
accessible to the public.


The Caribbean Forum of the ACP States has received financing from -he European Commiseon
through a 24 million grant agreement Programme support involves actio-, at Canbbean
regional level and in its two exporting countries: Guyana and Suriname. The National component
stands to benefit from approximate 11.705 million and it will be implementedd by the Ministry
of griculure ',i f .

In the process of establishing awfully functional 3uyana Rice Project t.naanieni rt Unit "'RPUFI
which will manage the implementation of the Guyana component, the l',nmstry of Agriculture now
invite applications from suitable persons to fill the following positions:

1. Field Assistant
2. Confidential SecretarylReceptionist

The detailed job descriptions for these positions are available from the Office of the Permanenl
Secretary, Ministry of Agriculture during working hours.

Interested applicants are required to submit their applications, enclosing a recent Curriculum
Vitae and full contact details to:

Office of the Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Agriculture
Regent & Vlissengen Roads
Georgetown, Guyana

The closing time and date for the receipt of the applications is the close of business at 1 6 ?0hrs
on Monday 3rd October, 2005.

'^0?r~riCl d' y t':vl~li:fihlip.'i'tw mgrf qi- ,


country could change to
make it more equal.
Soon after the Labour


on the insi
In 200
a junior


Shave,


was that before I'd
ipaigning on the
low I was working
de.
1, I was appointed
minister at the


'It was exciting coming to Britain. Not only
would we all be with my father again, but it.
was a new country. I rememberthe h es
-Mllali dIIU UIC SUCC*(S were narrITv
than, I had expected. We were one of the first
black, families in that area of Kent, and we
were the only black children at school


Party had been elected in
1997, I had a phone call from
'Number 10' asking me to
become a Labour peer. I was
given the weekend to decide.
I found out what it entailed
and accepted. To be honest,
it was an honour. I hadn't
been a member of the Labour
Party, but, of course, I joined
then.
When, a year later, I
became a government whip
in the House of Lords, and
spokesperson on social
security, international
development and women's
issues, it seemed like a natural
extension of the work I'd
already been doing. The


Foreign Office, responsible
for a. number of areas,
including Africa and the
Commonwealth. I was also
consular minister, which
meant when 9/11 and the Bali
bombing happened, I had to
make sure British citizens
were looked after. I met
families who were involved,
and staff over there dealing
with these issues. After Bali,
there was criticism of the
slowness of our reaction, and
that led to an overhaul of our
services.
When Clare Short
resigned, I was asked to be
the Secretary of State for
International Development in


May 2003. This meant
became the first black femal
member of a British Cabine
I occupied this position wit
an enormous sense of pridi
I felt it was a re;
acknowledgement of Britain
diversity.
I've always been realistic
about what happens in politi
but I didn't expect to, be aske
to become Leader of the. House
is a privilege. There are differed
elements to this role: First,
represent the Government
interests, but I am also Leader
the whole House, so I stand
for the second chamber
anything undermines its capaci
to carry out its role properly.
I walk a tightrope in th
job; it's a balancing act th
requires a lot of diplomacy
But it's very enjoyable. I am
passionate believer in
second chamber.
The secrets of my succe.
are that I am down-to-earth,
good at anticipating difficulties
I like to feel I can chan,
things, but I don't have to t
at the front of everything.
which means I'm a teai
person. Mostly, I love workir
with different people. I'
serious, but I have a fun sic
as well.


SGUYANA REVENUE AUTHORITY



VACANCIES


i I


SI I


The Guyana Revenue Authority is seeking to recruit Tax Auditors (Inspectors of Taxes)
within the Audit and Verification Division of the Guyana Revenue Authority.

These persons will be required to perform audits on different categories of
taxpayers including self employed persons, large businesses and professionals
to ensure that these taxpayers are in compliance with the various Tax Acts administered by
the Guyana Revenue Authority.

The minimum qualification requirement for the position is as follows:

* A professional accounting designation from an internationally recognized professional
accounting body such as ACCA.
OR
* A Bachelor's Degree in Accounting, Business Management or Economics.

Computer literacy and experience in Auditing, Accounting and Taxation would be an asset.

Applications should be sent no later than Friday October 07, 2005 to:

The Commissioner General
Guyana Revenue Authority
357 Lamaha and East Streets
Georgetown


Sunday Chr'o'icle' Obtobef Z' 40


Page VI





II Ulr'tVhIr-, ageVI


lello boys and girls,
welcome to our English Language col-
mns. Let's hope that there has been a
rn around in your reading ability. You
ust have felt the joy of showing under-
tanding of what you read by safely an-
wering questions about its contents. In
e long run you'll get pleasure from read-
g, and you'll feel capable and self-confi-
ent.
eep those study groups humming with
leading sessions and discussions. Love
Ou.
ye.

LAST WEEK
ocabulary

solution to UseofContextClues to deter-
ineWordMeaning
Sammy served the juice undiluted instead
f adding three cans of water, a) full-strength
. When Josephine heard the blood-curdling
ry, she felt as if the blood in her veins had
rned to cement. b) thickening
. Jerome pounded and pounded the log until
e split it to flinders, a) fragments
. Because Katharine had not eaten for so long,
he made a gluttonous raid on the cooler. a)
reedy about one's food
. To be sure that the prisoner did not escape,
he guard kept a vigilant eye on her cell. d)
lert
. Even though human beings can die at any
ime, some people think that they have the
ower of immortality. d) the power of living
r ever.
. After not eating for days, Howard pushed ev-
rything in sight down his gullet. b) throat
. The three groups of police officers con-
erged on the troubled. spot from three differ-
nt directions. a) came together

solution to The Story
. Yes. A hare is a mammal. The passage tells
-bout the animal's "mammy" and daddy.
. Word meaning:
) understatement not to state enough
) gigantic giant-like
) hybrid cross-bred
) protest state against
.) solemnly with respect
) appropriate suited to
) horrendous frightening, horrible
. Its unusual parents' size was suggested for
he cause of the hare's unusual size.
.. The "I" narrator in the story is Clementine.
. The author's purpose in the story is to high-
ight the concept of hybrid.
. He achieves this goal by letting the reader
ee the hybrid had unusual characteristics which
ame from its mother and father who were hy-
rids themselves.
eminder: The author's purpose is the reason
n author has for writing a story or article.
sometimes an author has more than one pur-
ose. The author may wish to inform, entertain,
persuade, or teach a lesson. What purpose for
writingg have you mastered so far?


Solution to the Crossword Puzzle
-- -....... n 'e

St on e.












IN THIS WEEK

Synonyms
Use the clues below and the synonyms at the bottom
to solve the crossword puzzle.

Sentence Completion
In this sentence completion exercise is contained a mix-
ture of structures, that is, putting the right word together
(grammar) and vocabulary items (lexis). Remember, once
again, to pay close attention tothe instructions.

From the words or groups of words lettered A to D,
choose the word or group of words which best completes
each of the following sentences.
1. The airplane turned back because it had run out --
-fuel.
A. in; B. of;
C. for; D. with
2. This advertisement is extremely poor; it -.
A. isn't worth reading it
B.ture of structures, that is, pun'ing the right word togetherth to read
C. isn't worth reading
D. doesn't worth reading it
3. This is byrplane the best cartoon he has painted.
A. far
B. further
C. much
D. even
4. The Ferris wheel stopped -.
A. all suddenly
B. all sudden
C. all of a sudden
D. all with a sudden
5. Do you know what the is for calculating the area
of a cylinder?


Across
1. hesitation
3. negotiation
6. armaments
7. royal
8. invalidate
10. accumulate
15. lazy
16. oversee
17. foretell
18. rebirth


Down
1. misgivings
2. infamous
3. forgiveness
4. upheaval
5. bear witness
9. long for
11. artificial
12. amazement
13. refuge
14. suppose


Synonyms
absolution regal
amass reluctance
arbitration renaissance
haven reservations
indolent supervise
munitions synthetic
notorious testify
nullify turbulence
predict wonder
presume yearn


A. prescription
B. recipe
C. formula
D. model
6. Samuel will improve in time; it's only a of prac-
tice.
A. thought
B. question
C. work
D. need
7. I know that Mr. Simon said it was a hopeless case,
but I think it would be wise to get a second -
A. meaning
B. interpretation
C. advice
D. opinion
8. They have not arrived -any decision on the inci-
dent.
A. by
B. on
C. with
D. at
9. His first of the image was one of disbelief.
A. reaction
B. report
C sensation
D. intention
10. Sally found this thermometer in the basket; I don't
know it is.
A. what
B. to whom
C. whose
D. whose own
The Passage
A Poem
'Tis the early April lark,
Or the rocks with busy caw,
Foraging for the sticks and straw.
Thou shalt, at one glance, behold
The daisy and marigold;
White-plumed lilies and the first
Hedge-grown primrose that hath burst;
Shaded hyacinth, always
Sapphire queen of the mid-May;
And every leaf, and every flower
Pearled with the self-same shower.
Questions
1. Which bird builds its nest with sticks?
2. What is used for nest-building beside sticks?
3. Which flower grows in the Iedge?
4. Which two flowers are seemingly in abundance?
5. Which flower likes shade?
6. Which flower is blue?


Page VII


finrlmv rfiranicle Octdhher 2. 2005


u1Iuay vI IVI






Page viii Sunday Chronicle tober 2,5


MA


MATHEMATICS for Common Entrance for 2005-
10-02
Hello boys and girls,
Welcome to our Mathematics columns. We are
here to improve your skills, content, and atti-
tude. Be good to yourself by being regular at
your study, and by improving the big habit of
self-discipline. See how much you can do to-
day. Love you.
'Bye.
IN LAST WEEK
Keeping in Touch with Roman Numerals
M -1000
DCC 700
LXXI -71
CCCXLI means 341
CCCXLII = 343
CCCXLV = 345
Write the standard form:
XXI =21
DCCVII = 707
CMV = 905
MCDXCV= 1495
MDCCXXXIX = 1739
MDCLXI= 1661
What year was MCMXLIX? 1949
Write the Roman numeral for each (The first is done
for you):
1557 = MDLVII
1486 = MCDLXXXVI
1975 = MCMLXXV
2003= MMIII
Solve: Questions 1-4
1. If 41m = 492, what is the value of m? Answer:
(c) 12
2. How many multiples of 9 are there from 1 to 36?
Answer: (b) 4
3. IIll, IIll
We use this formation for showing numbers. An-
swer: (c) tallying
4. If represents 28 girls, how many girls does 2
represent?
Answer: (c) 56
Fractions: Questions -5-9
5. Some number minus 7 %.equals 10 %. An-
swer (b) 18
6. 9/25 (4/5 + 2 2/3) Answer: c ) 1 1/5
7. 4 1/3 of 1 % X 12 Answer: (d) 78
8. 3.5 X 3.05. Answer: 12.025
9. 25.215 + 0.03. Answer: (d) 840.5
Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication & Division:
Questions 10-14
10. 50 X 800 Answer: (a) 40,000
11. 3482 X 7 Answer: (d) 24,374
12. 394 X 32 corrected to the nearest thousand.
Answer: (b) 13,000
13. One hundred million dollars in $1000 bills An-
swer: (d) 100,000
14. The sum of the digits 9 and 8 in the number
496,801 Answer: (a) 90,800
Solve: Questions 15-20
15. Hinges are sold in packets of 4. The shop needs


750 hinges. How many packets should they buy?
Answer: (b) 188 packets
16. 18 hr 40 min
12 hr 5 min
Answer: (a) 6 hr 35 min
17. Simone lives 16 km from school. Kathleen lives
9 km from school. How much further from school
does Simone live than Kathleen? Answer: (d) 7
km
18. Siegfried bought a bird cage for $2,800. He sold
it for -$3,700. What was his gain? Answer: (c)
$900
19. What percent is 5 of 35? Answer: (c) 14 2/
7%
20. What is the average of $160,000, $23,000 and
$33,000? Answer: (b) $72,000
21. A car travels 250 km at an average speed of 25
km/h. How long does it take? Answer: (b) 10 hr
22. Find the cost of 2000 small articles at $10 each.
Answer: (b) $20,000
23. Mr. Plover had 650 cricket hats. Last week he
sold half of them. He then added 300 to his stock.
What was his stock at the end of that week? An-
swer: (b) 625
24. Peter bought 2 floor mats for $1,580 each. He
got a discount of $238 off each. How much did he
have to pay? Answer: (d) $ 2,684
IN THIS WEEK
Useful Definitions
Try to remember the definitions for the terms be-
low. They will help you to broaden concepts in work-
ing out your Mathematics problems.
(1) Area: Area is the number of square units in the
surface of a shape.
(2) Average: Average is the quotient found by di-
viding the sum of a group of numbers by the num-
ber of addends.
(3) Quotient: Quotient is the number found by do-
ing a division sum.
(4) Bar graph: A bar graph is a picture which uses
bars with space between them to show informa-
tion.
(5) Decimal: A decimal is a number which uses a
point to show tenths, hundredths, etc.
(6) A Decimal Point: A decimal point is a dot which
is used in a decimal number.
(7) Factor: A number to be multiplied is a factor.
(8) Fraction: A number that shows part of a whole
is a fraction.
(9) Roman Numerals: Numerals that stand for
numbers. Roman numerals are recognized for their
symbols M, C, X, L, V, D and I.

Some Examination Type Questions
Circle the letter that is beside the correct answer to
each question.
FRACTIONS: Questions 1-3
(1) The improper fraction is:
(a) 4 1/3 (b) 4
(c) 13/3 (d) 1/3


(2) 1 7/8 + 5 1/8 =
(a) 6 7/8 (b) 7
(c) 6 1/8 (d)8


(3) Increase 7/12 by 9/12
(a) 7/12 (b) 17/12
(c) 1 1/3 (d) 1/6
DECIMALS: Questions 4-6
(4) Put the set of decimals in order, the smallest to
the largest.
0.3; 3; 30; 0.03
(a) 0.03, 30, 3, 0.3 (b) 0.03, 3, 0.3, 30
(c) 0.3, 0.03, 3, 30 (d) 0.03, 0.3, 3, 30
(5) % is equal to this decimal:
(a) 0.25 (b) 0.05
(c) 0.5 (d) 0.025
(6) What is six hundredths as a decimal?
(a) 600 (b) 0.06
(c) 0.6 (d) 0.6
APPLICATIONS: Questions 7-10
(7) 3636 + 36 is equal to what number?
(a) 110 (b) 1.1
(c) 1.01 (d) 101
(8) 6 + 16 + 106=
(a) 182 (b) 326
(c) 128 (d) 766
(9) 1654 X 0.4 =
(a) 16.16 (b) 661.6
(c ) 6610.6 (d) 66.16
(10)5.36 -0.99 =
(a) 5.63 (b)4.37
(c) 6.37 (d) 5.37
ROUNDING NUMBERS: Questions 11-12
(11) Round 371 to the nearest 10.
(a)400 (b)370
(c)380 (d)360

(12) Round 3.74 to the nearest tenth.
(a) 3.7 (b)3.04
(c)3.8 (d)3.05

SOLVING THE PROBLEM: Questions 13-14
(13) I am thinking of a number. If you multiply it by
6.5, you get a product that is 10 times as great as
5.33. What is the number?
(a) 2.8 (b)5.1
(c) 1.5 (d) 8.2
(14) A cabinet maker was making a shelf. He had a
piece of board 6.0 metres long. He needed pieces
that were 1.5 metres long. How many whole pieces
can he get?
(a) 3 (b) 3.5
(c)4 (d) 4.5
PERIMETER & AREA: Questions 15 & 16
(15) Find the perimeter of a figure 2 cm by 3 cm.
(a) 8 cm (b) 6 cm
(c ) 10cm d) 7cm
(16) Find the area of a figure measuring 3 cm by
2.5 cm.
(a) 32.5 sq cm (b) 75 sq cm
c ) 35.2 sq cm (d) 11 sq cm


Page vul,~


Sunday Chronicle October,2,-20655


WK





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Jazz artiste of high exemplary qualities


E LIFE and music of
Sarah Vaughan -
easily one of the
greatest singers and jazz
vocalists the world has ever
known are some of the


best guides for anyone, any-
where, who desires a life of
mental strength, mental
health, and simple everyday
contentment. From the age
of seven, Vaughan became


focused on self-development,
learning piano, aiming at be-
ing a musician, before a vo-
calist, avoiding worthless
distractions and bad influ-
ences.


VAUGHNniknme 'asy'
drse in er ool- caual betni
re or f o- s in in i z-


By Terence Roberts


Born 1924 in New Jersey
to humble means, by age 19 her
artistic devotion began to pay
off when she made her singing
debut as a jazz vocalist for the
'big-band' 'swing music' of the
Earl Hines Orchestra. Soon
she was appearing with the up-
tempo innovative jazz bands of
Charlie Parker; Dizzy Gillespie,
Billy Eckstine, Count Basie,
Quincy Jones; all good jazz
artistes because of their devo-
tion to this art-form from an
early age.
Vaughan's career was
launched by the exciting,
'swing music' era when jazz
was pop music of non-stop
dance rhythms and mental
pleasure. She would never


relinquish this value, and
later, would reject a huge
company like Columbia
Records who wanted to mould
her into a conventional,
trendy singer with songs she
found stale. In the early 50s,
Vaughan left Columbia
Records and began to record
jazz vocals which expressed
her personality of wit, ca-
price, subtle sexuality, and
everyday pleasures. However,
Vaughan's style of singing
held high educational stan-
dards of language and com-
prehension, which were of so-
cial value far beyond North
America. Not surprisingly,
Vaughan would come to
Guyana and perform publicly


in the 1960s, since this was a
time when active cultural
and political figures, of every
colour and creed here, were
firmly agreed that all citi-
zens should be exposed to the
highest standards of world
culture. In other words,
though there were many lo-
cal ethnic grassroots forms of
culture, expressed in collo-
quial phrases like: 'Shatira
raise up she dress an wine...'
etc, or 'Fighta Fighta, na go
back a Dem-a-ra-ra...' etc, it
was not in the nation's best
educational and cultural in-
terest to decide that such lo-
cal achievements represented
Please turn to page X


NICILIPRIVATISATION UNIT

Invite Tenders for
Young Street, Eve Leary, Georgetown
(Formerly known as the Guystac Sports Club)

TENDER PROCEDURE
Interested persons must register with NICIL/Privatisation Unit for the individual property
they are interested in and obtain the tender package for that property at a cost of
$1000.00 each.
Each package includes
A Registration of Interest.
A Letter of Authority to visit the premises.
Draft Agreement of Sale and Purchase & Vesting Order
The Terms and Conditions'of the Tender
A Form of Tender that must be completed when submitting a bid.
Copy of Advertisement
Details of the property transport, photograph, and survey plan
Tenders must be received no later than Monday 101h OCTOBER 2005, at 14:00 hours.
Tenders for the purchase of this property should be placed in a sealed envelope and
titled ("Tender for [former Guystac Club] ). Tenders must be deposited in the Tender Box
located at the Privatisation Unit, 126 Barrack Stteet, Kingston, Georgetown and
addressed to:
The Executive Secretary & Head
Privatisation Unit
126 Barrack Street
Georgetown
Tel. 592-225-6339
Fax: 592-226-6426
Email: punit2@guyana.net.gy
Tenders will be evaluated on price and economic development plan.
The NICIL/PU are not bound to accept the Highest or any Bid.
Government ads can be viewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy


NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INVESTMENTS
LIMITED (NICIL)

The NICIL has a vacancy for the position of Administrative/Human Resources
Manager.


Under the direction of the Executive Director NICIL, the incumbent will head the
Administrative Section and is expected to carry out the following major functions:

1. Human Resources
2. Secretarial functions to the PU/NICIL at Board
3. Manage the General Office and Building Administration
4. Other duties that may be assigned


Requirements:

(a) Degree in Management or Administration or equivalent
(b) At least 5 years of experience in the field
(c) Must be competent in Microsoft Word, Excel and Power Point
,(d) Financial experience will be an asset

An attractive remuneration package is being offered.

Application togel er with two references should be addressed to:

The Execitive Director, NIGIL
126 Barrack Street, Kingston
Georgetown
Tel No: 226-0576, 225-6339
SFax No: 226-6426, 226-7417
Email: punit2@guyana.net.gy

Applications should clearly indicate on the top right hand corner "Vacancy for
Administrative/Human Resources Manager" and reach the above address not later
than October 7, 2005
Government ads can be viewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy


t 5L






- -e- -S-n- - -- --b--r-2,--2 -- -


C (


From page IX
the most genuine examples of national culture.
A singer like Vaughan had an expressive style, which was quite
helpful locally to increased skills of speech, writing, understanding,
and reasoning, and it was always hoped by Guyanese cultural and
political figures that every worker, cane-cutter, field-hand, vendor,
stevedore, etc, could at least offer their children the opportunity of
broad-based educational and personal development by exposing
them to the form and style of such outstanding entertainment. By
listening to the radio, selections from Vaughan's dozens of records
and hundreds of songs, from albums (CDs today) like 'Swingin'
E as ., 'Sarah Vaughan Diva'. 'Sassy
swings' and 'Sassy swings
S gain', "Vaughan in Paris'.
*Vere Jazz Ma.iers', 'You're
*ine You','Copacabana'.and
SSnumerous others. seduced lo-
cal listeners with her mas-
tery of language. her sense
of rhythm and ecstatic
.' moods. backed by the great-
S' est s ingmng jazz bands. She
S abo inspired honest success.
Vaughan earned
the nickname "Sassy' be-
E "=: cause of her lively re-
freshing spiru. her will-
ingness to explore the art
of singing. while keeping
it joyfully alive. 'You're
lMine You'. an album re-
corded with masterful
VAUGHAN as she looked as jazz arranger and composer
a jazz vocalist in 1940s Quincy Jones in 1962, is a
nightclubs, good example of such quali-
ties. Though the title song,
'You're Mine You'. is mostly about a woman's possessive
romantic feelings, Vaughan's slow, careful, and clear stretch-
ing out of each line and word turns the song into something


else. It is her possession of her listeners that claims: 'You're
Mine You'! We receive hope with her next tune, 'The Best is
Yet to Come'. which, like many jazz vocals, has been sung
by others. But when 'Sassy' sings the first line: 'Off the tree
of life, I just picked me a plum, you come along and every-
thing started to hum,' her tone makes the whole song brand
new. In a well known jazz song like 'Witchcraft', which has
nothing at all to do with evil, her eager mood suits the words:
'When you arouse the need in me, my heart says yes indeed to
me, proceed in what you're leading me to.' This style of cool,
calm, wit and playfulness, made Vaughan's voice perfect for
songs from wonderful 1960s movies like 'The Second Time
Around', the theme song of which she sings with beautiful
intimate and social care: 'Like a friendly home the second time
you call, who can say what led us to this miracle we found,
I'm so glad we met the second time around.'
In 'Moonglow' Vaughan oozes sensuality in the way she
sings: 'I heard you saying you wanted me fast, I started pray,
ing, Oh Lord, please let me last.' We never ignore Vaughan's
rhythm section, whose jazz instrumentals swing through vari-
ous moods, as in 'Invitation', which evokes a lazy, dreamy
Oriental mood. What makes her choice of songs easily rel-
evant beyond big cities or sophisticated settings, (hence her
visit to 1960s Guyana) is the simple everyday lifestyles that
are sung, as in 'Green Dolphin Street', a masterpiece, evoca-
tive of simple neighborhoods of wooden houses, made pre-
cious by her tender rendering of these lines: 'And through
these moments of calm, memories live in my heart, when I re-
call the love I found on, I could kiss the ground on Green
Dolphin Street.' Another similar tune is 'One Mint Julip'.
which opens with her melodious voice telling us: 'One early
morning as I was walking, I met a man, we went into a tav-
ern to get a few sips; I don't remember just how it started,
but all I know is we stole a kiss, and then another, one Mint
Julip was the start of it all.' The song is simply about mar-
riage, which started from enjoying a cool mint beverage in a
simple neighbourhood tavern.
With Sarah Vaughan, the time it takes to complete
each song, playing with, stretching, sharpening each word and
line, creates a world of personal possession, mental security,


and emotional strength in the listener. It is not just the mean-
ing of the words she sings, but the tone and various impres-
sions of her voice that inspire us, giving us strength, confi-
dence, and a sense of well-being. Obviously, this cool, calm
ability of Vaughan's to project human self-worth, made her a
shining example for people of culture everywhere. By draw-
ing on her inner human strength, without preaching or fol-
lowing doctrines, Sarah Vaughan alienated no one, and be-
came a beloved and precious jazz vocalist whose enrichment
of her race, and the human race, gained her friendships and
respect among all peoples around the world.


REHEARSING from sheet music with guitarist ana pianms
in 1950 in New York


---------- ---- a^C^^ -* I







QUESTION .
Whilst on holiday abroad, I took ill. Will I recejvel.
NIS sickness Benefit or have my Medical Bilfs
reimbursed? "


ANSWER


NIS sickness Benefit is only
loss of income due to the cc


V paid where there is
condition. You will be


MINISTRY OF HEALTH

The Ministry of Health invites Tenders from suitably qualified Contractors to submit bids
for the execution of the following works:-

Lot (A) Extension to Mabura Health Centre Region No. 10

Lot (B) Extension to Vivianne Parris Health Centre Region No. 10

Tender Documents for the above projects can be obtained from the Administrative
Office, Ministry of Health, Brickdam, during the hours of 9am to 3pm Monday to Friday
upon payment of the sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00) each.

Tenders must be enclosed in plain, sealed envelope, which does not in any way identify
the Tenderer. On the top left hand comer of the envelope, the Project tendered for
must be clearly written.


.able to get reimbursement for your medical '-
bplendito g re hrweivmr e hmie t is r yu t tm d thi l Tenders must be addressed to the Chairman, National Procurement and Tender
expenditure, however this is subject to the Administration Board and must be deposited in the Tender Box situated at the Ministry
consideration of the General Manager. Please I of Finance Compound, Main and Urquhart Streets, Georgetown not later than
submit your Medical Reports, Leave and Bills:---i Tuesday 11th October, 2005 at 9:00 am, Tenders will be opened immediately
thereafter.


I Do you have a question on N.I.S ? Then write/callq
NIS MAIL BAG I
I C/O Dianne Lewis Baxter I
I Publicity and Public Relations Officer (ag)
I National Insurance Scheme 1
Brickdam and Winter Place 1
P.O. Box. 101135
I E-mail: prnis@solution2000.net -.-
I Tel: 227-3461.
- -m - --- -_-_- -_-__ _ -- -- IN,


Each Tender must be accompanied by valid Certificates of Compliance from the
Commissioner, Guyana Revenue Authority and the General Manager, National
Insurance Scheme in the name of the individual if individual is tendering or company if
company is tendering. Failure to do so will result in automatic disqualification of the
Tender.

Tenders which do not meet the requirements stated above will be deemed non
responsive.


Sonya Roopnauth
PERMANENT SECRETARY
Government ads can be viewed on http.llwww.gina.gov.gy


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Page.XE


Sunday, u~nrwvclert::u~rc r 4 4uuo.;


CHANGE




YOUR LIFE

MOIDNOIA


By Sherry.
Bollers-Dixon
W OULDN"T
IT be great
if there were
simple, everyday things
you could do to make
your life much better?
There are! Here are
some tips from the ex-
perts which can help
you be a less stressed
and more fulfilled you.
Find more time in the day


Every minute for a month, get
up 15 minutes earlier to do one
household chore. That way,
you'll keep on top of those
niggly little jobs that can be-
come overwhelming if they're
left.

SEEA SURGE IN
YOUR ENERGY
LEVELS...
By following the nutrition-
ists' golden rules: Eat breakfast
every day, making sure it's low
on the glycaemic index low
sugar muesli or porridge is


ideal. Don't skip meals. Your
body appreciates regular intake.
Dump the junk biscuits,
sweets, sugary drinks, fatty
food.
Make sure you get at least
five portions of fruit and veg-
etables on to your plate every)
day.

WANT TO LOOK
SLIMMER AND
MORE
GORGEOUS?
First, always be seen with


a heavily pregnant woman. And
second, invest in a dimmer
switch it's the greatest sex and
beauty aid known to woman.

MAKE YOUR
MORTGAGE LESS
OFA BURDEN.
If you have not re-mort-
gaged recently, do it as soon as
you can. "It can easily save
you $$$$ a year," says finan-
cial journalist, Paul Lewis. "Use
what you save to overpay your
mortgage, so -you pay less and
less. And employ a mortgage
broker who doesn't charge a
fee."

DRINK PLENTY OF
WATER
It will keep your skin look-
ing plump and young. But don't
get obsessed about the two-li-


J/ 'I.-


* A
.V,


tre rule; just have a little glass
with you all day and keep it
topped up.
Stand taller; feel more in
control of your life The simplest
way to improve your posture is
with some floor exercises, says
Darcey Bussell, principal dancer
with the Royal Ballet, London.
"Lie on your back with
your knees up, feet flat on the
floor, neck straight, and your
arms by "your side. Pull your
stomach muscles in until
your navel feels as


_________- .-w ~ -.~!~I~UIf


(G=P-L


T /


I-"


I -%


Guyana Power & Light (GPL) Inc.invites applications from suitably
qualified persons to fill a vacancy for SUPERVISOR in the Commercial
Department at Anna Regina, Essequibo Coast. The incumbent will be
required to deliver a high quality of service to GPL's customers, and be
responsible mainly for:- -.. -


BILLING
Keeping accurate customer database
Completing audits and dispatching bills


COMMERCIAL
*Reconciling revenue collection, payments and balances for
disconnection
*Ensuring that cash is banked daily
*Overseeing accounts maintenance
*Monitoring meter viability and disconnected services from
the field.

ADMINISTRATIVE
*Requisitioning for materials and carrying our monthly audits.
*Monitoring staff attendance and submitting returns to
head office.

SPECIFICATIONS/QUALIFICATIONS
>Five (5) subjects CXC/GCE Ordinary Level including English
>Language and Mathematics
>C.A.T., A.A.T., Or A.C.C.A. Level 1 certification OR
Diploma in Accountancy

SKILLS AND COMPETENCE
Good Communications skills
Computer and numerical skills
Good interpersonal skills
Self Motivation

Applications and Resumes should be submitted before Wednesday
12 October 2005 to:
The Deputy Human Resources Manager
GUYANA POWER & LIGHT INC
257/9 Middle Street, Cummings burg
Georgetown


INVITATION FOR BIDS




The Social Impact Amelioration Programme (SIMAP) hrcugh thrie Government of Guyana
has received funding from the Inter-American Development BEyn IDB c,r LOW
INCOME HOUSING SCHEMES ELECTRIFICATION. It is intended that part of the proceeds
of this financing be applied to eligible payments for the. procurement of goods.
The Social Impact Amelioration Programme (SIMAP), mhe Purchaser") therefore invites sealed
bids for the supply of overhead line hardware:


* Insulators
* Aluminum conductors
* Insulated LV conductors
*Connectors


* Pre-form wraps
FCOs
* Arrestors
Fuses


Bidding is open to interested parties from eligible source countries of the IDB, and will be
conducted through the national competitive bidding process. Bidders may obtain further
information and inspect bidding documents at the office of the:
The Procurement Officer
UAEP Project Implementation Unit
232 Middle Street,
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel:592-225-7398, Fax 592-225-7923
A complete set of bidding documents may be purchased on submission
of a written application to the Contracts & Supplies Manager, GPL, 40 Main
Street, Georgetown, and a payment of a non-refundable fee of Seven
Thousand Guyana Dollars (7,000GYD). '

Bids must be delivered to the Tender Box at the location below and addressed
as follows:
LOW INCOME HOUSING SCHEMES ELECTRIFICATION (SIMAP)
National Board of Procurement & Tender Administration
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown, Guyana, South America.
BID FOR THE SUPPLY OF ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION
GOODS.
Bids will be opened at a public ceremony in the presence of bidders/representativi
at 09:00 h on Tuesday 11 October, 2005 at the address given above for submission
of bids
Bidders registered in Guyana must submit Inland Revenue (IRD) and National
Insurance (NIS) compliance certificates to indicate that income tax and insurance
obligations have been met.
Bids may be sent in by mail but the Purchaser would not be responsible for bids
. received after the time and date specified.


Late bids will be returned unopened.


rkrnni-la Ofnhor 90n-


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AS BIRM BH LABOURR BAY' CARNIVAL STME

Photographs by Linden Drakes


IT WAS 'Mas in Brooklyn' as usual this year as
Guyanese turned out in their numbers to join
their Caribbean brothers and sisters in
celebrating, in their own inimitably colourful and
gregarious fashion, the annual Labour Day
Parade, now in its 38th year and known officially
as the West Indian American Day Carnival.
According to well-placed sources, however, they were out-
done by far by the Bajans, who reportedly dominated the pa-
rade, their navy and yellow ochre outfits a tacit reminder, that
their loyalty was first and foremost to flag and country.
* Such was the spectacle the group presented, it is said,
that Guyanese radio personality, Bobby Vieira, who was
there on the scene doing live commentary, couldn't help but
remark that their's was one of the stronger bands out on
the 'Parkway' that day.
"Barbados' flag clearly dominated among the revellers on the
entire Parkway, and this was an impressive feat considering the
island's small size and the millions of others who came out to
participate in one way or the other," Vieira was quoted as say-
ing in a news item carried by the West Indian American Day
Carnival Association (WIADCA), the organisation responsible
for coordinating the parade all these years.
Those responsible for Barbados' having such a fine show-
ing this year were the Barbados Tourism Authority (BTA),
The National Cultural Foundation (of Barbados) and the
New-York-based 'Exodus Mas Camp', and among noted
lBajans to have helped keep their country's flag flying high
andl ven things up a bit were calypsonian, Red Plastic Bag;
soca queen, Allison Hinds; Edwin Yearwood and Krosfyah;
'Rupee' whose real name is Rupert Clarke; and Barbados
Cobsul General in New York, Ms Jessica Odle.


As has been the norm o\ er the years, people began to gather
from early morn so as to bag the best spots along Eastern Park-
way where the parade usually passes on its way to journey's
end at the Grand Army Plaza.
Most of the Guyanese spectators took up their position
at the junction of Nostrand Asenue. while another pocket
positioned themselves close to Washington Avenue where
the judging took place.
The New York Police Department (NYPD) was especially
cooperative with the media this year. allowing those with offi-
cial press credentials to work unhindered.
Leading the parade this year as grand marshals were New
York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Congresswoman Barbara Lee
who created guite a stir recently when she lobbied successfully
for the designation of a Caribbean American Heritage Month;
veteran calypsonian, Calypso Rose of Trinidad & Tobago,
whose real name is McArtha Linda Sandy-Lewis; and guberna-
torial hopeful, New York State Attorney General, Elliot Spitzer,
who, at the last minute, replaced Brooklyn Museum's director.
Arnold Lehman.
Among other New York 'big-wigs' to have participated in
the parade this year were mayoral candidates Fernando Ferrer,
C Virginia Fields, Gifford Miller and Anthony Weiner, Congress-
man Major R Owens; and City Councillors Frank Barron,
Yvette Clarke, and-Dr Kendall Stewart; Senators John Sampson
(who has Guyhnese roots), Kevin Parker and Carl Andrews;
and Assemblyman, Nick Perry.
This year's evept,'which occurred on Monday Septem-
ber 5 and traditionally marked the end of summer, report-
edly comprised more 'than 70 floats and myriads of mas-
queraders each addiikg their bit to the colourful drama un-
folding on Eastern Parkway where it all happens come ev-
ery first Monday in the month of September.


I
I
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S
I






XINI


iclArilnhm z 200t'5


I


I"~~


By Sacey Bess


HE POSSESSES the as-
tom ling aptitude for helping
students overcome their fear
and other challenges of
learning Mathematics, the
conventional definition of
which, according to the
An-ienHerfitage Dictionary
of the English Language, is
thesftswf.- .r...iprop-
erties, and relationships of
-Nifies and set, using num-
bersan-dsyms.bk
In keeping with his pioneer-
ing style of scholarly combat
with the subject, Mr Claude Lee
classifies Mathematics
aspndling everyday situ-
alons into mwnerical
terms and finding solu-
--s. .
He has tlnown out
the textbooks (he just
does not like to rely on
them), relinquishing
them for the timeless
anmmo of Immour and
understanding of social
relationships, as his
students' security for
success. He is making
maldmntaics fan!
It has been ac-
knowledged hat a cma-
cial qalie in the con-
wemporary job market
as well as traditionally,
for dhe advancement of
studies in de scientific
and comima cial realms
of professional life, is
qmlhfi-mmi in Math-
ematics. Fundamen-
tally. Mahntics and
Eng Langagehave
become ithe falernal twin quali-
fier for hig-levelacademia, and
are no doubx responsible for the
lae number eofstmales who sit
these exainnations at die sec
mndary and iiarlmy levels.
In Guyana, die celeatio aof
Educaion and Teachers month,
which began on September 1,
conctdes next Mnhday (Oct-
ber 10t, andWmridTeachersDay
will be commemorated on
Wednesday, October 5.- Mr
Claude Lee is a fine example of
a teacher dedicated to the pro-
fession and wielding powerful
inflocce of change in the intel-
ectani and professional coours
of thenation.
He describes himself as
lambide, sene, God-fearing and
private.
1 spend a lot of time with
my family, and I hardly like to
gop o It is the exposure to tele-
vision tdhat has cansedAt via-


tion (into the public eye)," he
confessed.
It is this same ostensible in-
trovert who is charged with dy-
namism when set before his stu-
dents. For the sake of their suc-
cess, he has reconfigured his
Campbellville home to make the
teaching of mathematics embed-
ded in his life. Beginning at
06:30 hrs, his work day, typi-
cally, ends at 20:00 hrs.
"I love children and I reveal
myself in teaching," he said.
Mr Lee eased into the inter-
view with the Sunday Chronicle
last week during a cameo gig
away from the chalkboard. He


presented a snapshot of his life,
beginning with his childhood at
Sisters Village, on the West Bank
Demerara. He is the eldest of six
and the only boy in the family.
His father was from mainland
China while his mother is
Guyanese of Chinese extract.'
SHis home village was a melting
pot of culture, thus his child-.
hood experience provides for his
insightful cultural balance upon
which he capitalises in his daily
interactions with the diversity of
students.
"Mathematics is God's im-
portant tool for life," Mr Lee de-
clares, adding: "God is a positive
God. He is never negative. He
only adds (+) and multiplies (X).
God either says 'yes' or 'no'.
There is no confusion w ith Him.
Minus (-) and divide (/) are a
part of the enemy's language."
For example, instead of tell-
ingghis students:"6 -4 =2," Mr


Lee will most likely say: "6 + -
4 = 2. as an illustration of
utilising a positive expression
rather than a negative one. and
amving at the equivalent answer.
Mr Lee prepares students
for every facet of mathematical
examinations Secondary
Schools Entrance Examination
(SSEE), Caribbean Secondary
Education Certificate (CSEC),
Caribbean Advanced Proficiency
Examination (CAPE), SAT
(Scholastic Aptitude Test), Gen-
eral Certificate of Education
(GCE) '0' and 'A' Levels and
University of Guyana examina-
tions. In-school students, ma-
tured and working students from
all over the country gravitate to
Mr. Lee's lessons.
At this year's CSEC Math-
ematics exam, Mr Lee's students
gained approximately 75 per
cent passes. He is a Bible believ-
ing Christian and names his es-
tablished pillars of success as
praying to God every May
prior to examina-
tions, and giving
Him thanks in
aude Lee September after
the results are in.
The 'Mr.
Lee' Maths phe-
nomenon began
to crystallise
nearly 10 years
ago, as he was
some 15 years
into the teaching
vocation. His
evolution started
at La Retraite
Primary School
Mr Lee, with
youthful vigour,
trotted on to the
Multilateral
Teachers' Train-
ing College [now
the Cyril Potter
College of Feua-
tion (CPCE)I.
Achieved sue-
cess at MulltlaS-
eral powered him
into St Andrews' Primary, West,
Demerara Secondary, North
Ruimveldt Multilateral, North
Georgetown Secondary, South
Georgetown Secondary, St
Stanislaus College, Critchlow
Labour College and St Joseph'ss
High.
S "It was that last school (St.
Joseph's) that really built me. I
was not restricted in teaching,"
Mr. Lee said with regard to his
rise to distinction in the coach-
ing of Mathematics.
It was at St Joseph's, also,
that Mr Lee was to suffer, per-
--haps, his deepest personal heart-
-break a signpost that induced
tears during our interview. He re-
signed from St. Joseph's in or-
der to help his family and to,
himself, cope.
Determined to stride on, he
launched a demure publicity
drive inviting students to his
'tnaths lessons. He began nat'S.t


Mary's School on Brickdam,
subsequently moving to his
home in Campbellville.
He admitted that it was stu-
dentse cry of "Sir, I still don't
understand" that propelled him
on a search for unique and in-
triguing strategies of delivering
Mathematical principles.
The exploration unearthed
students' appreciation for
humour; their interest in relation-
ships; and his ability to conjure
up, enduring models that connect
with Mathematical doctrine.
He would say something to
them like: "Fractions are vulgar
because there is always some-
thing (one number) on top of
something (another number).
And you all must not be vulgar;
concentrate on your school
worc"
Mr Lee also recognized that
"you have to open yourself; you
have'to like, appreciate who you
are teaching." He added, "I see
the innocence in these children
and I don't only teach them
Mathematics but also guide them


in lots of values."
A rather private man, Mr
Lee unveils himself with his stu-
dents by telling stories about his
life and reinforcing biblical eth-
ics. Mr Lee's youthful involve-
ment in drama, song and poetry
contributes to his current bold
and liberal stance in his matur-
ing era.
Mr. Lee's motivation is his
students' success.
"Each child I taught during
my last two years at St. Joseph's
has a degree. Some are doctors,
others attorneys. That is my sat-
isfaction; s being that students
who pass through my hands are
in every sector of ihe country
and excelling," he said.
In keeping with the theme of
Education Month in Guyana -
Parental Partnership for Educa-
tion Mr Lee. encourages parents
to help their children further
their education after High
School, rather than have them
seek immediate employment.
Happy Teachers' Day to
all teachers of Guyana!


r Happy tI'AnniversaryGreetingsaregoingoutto
Mr. & -Mrs. Kowlessar who have celebrated their
. special day on Monday, September 26, 2005. These
greetings are coming from their two daughters Priya
and'Ambika, asobrothers andsistersand otherrelatives
and friendsAlso Happy Birthday Greetings are going
out toMs. Jean Kowlessar who wll be celebrating her
rthday onMonday, October3,2005.
SS *? M 4 9 0A* 14 Q .t; q;- .


morqu %AAmMj--l C;.,


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.Suday, CSbronicle, Q~tpob9er,,225


CHANGE





YOUR LIFE


From page XI

for a few counts, and relax.
Then repeat. To avoid strain,
it's important you're relaxed.
Enjoy the feeling of holding
yourself straight. In turn, it
will make you look and seem
more confident.'

BECOME AN
IMPORTANT PART
OF A CHILD'S LIFE
Sponsor a child with the in-
ternational charity plan or fos-
'er a child to help a friend. A
friend of mine sponsored to help
a girl in India a year ago. I went
to visit her in her tribal village
and I had never seen such pov-


erty. If everyone who can af-
ford to sponsor a child did, it
would make such a difference.

ORGANISE YOUR
HOME
Sorting out your home is a
powerful way to inspire other
changes in your life. De-clutter-
ing expert, Dawna Walter, author
of De-junk Your Mind (Michael
Joseph Publishers) has this three
point plan:
ASSIGN A PLACE for ev-
erything and make sure all the
members of your family know
exactly where they are.
SET ASIDE at least a couple
of hours to start and finish each
area of your home. Begin with
an easy one that will have maxi-


mum impact, like the hallway.
TAKE A LOOK at the things
you've accumulated when you
begin each area.
If you haven't used some-
thing or even looked at it in the
last 12 months, let it go!

BE INSPIRED; BE
BRAVE.
If you don't have faith that
you can change your life. it will
stay the same. Focus on an
idea... push yourself towards
that goal and jump.

TREAT YOURSELF TO
A FREE HOME FACIAL
Prevent bags, sags and line
with tapotement. "After show-
ering, tap your head gently all


over with your fingers," says
Leeann St Aubyn, Beauty Lec-
turer. "The pressure promotes
blood circulation and improves
skin tone."

TURN THAT FROWN
UPSIDE DOWN
For down-turned lines at the
corners of your mouth, try the
following exercise. Imagine you
have four whiskers at each cor-
ner, one pointing down, one to
your ear, one to the outside cor-
ner of your eye, and one up be-


I jI YORAND COUNCILLORS OF THE CITYOF GEORGETOW


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION


The Mayor and Councillors of the City of Georgetown will be holding a Public Auction on
Thursday, October 13, 2005 for the sale of obsolete vehicles/equipment at 09:30 hours, at the
Mechanical Workshop Compound, Princes Street, Georgetown.

Item MNake/Type Tyre # Serial #
1 Kia Diesel Engine 6 233 1 22983
ZB-138983
2 Perkins Diesel Engine 4 LD-70196
U.480088R
3 Dutz Diesel (block) 1 6784132
4 -I-14 Half Engine 4 38542
5 Kia gear box 4 speed 8792
6 Kia gear box 5 speed 90520
7 Datsun Sunny gear box 4 speed
8 Dennis automatic gear box
9 Dennis Manual gear box 5 speed Y8873679
10 Niva Jeep PEE 7378
11 Bob Cat (with backhoe) 15884
12 Dennis Packer GEE 5031
13 Dennis Packer GEE 5032
14 Dennis Packer GEE 9860
15 ADK Crane 11590
16 Bedford crane truck GEE 9132
17 Chevy Lumina car PGG 9833 Operational
18 Datsun Pick up GFF 3872
19 Quantity of parts and components
20 Quantity of used tyres and. rims


The obsolete vehicles/equipment can be inspected at the Mechanical Workshop Compound between
the hours of 08:00 and 15:00 hours on Thursday, October 6 and Friday, October 7, 2005.
The successful bidder is required to make an initial payment of 50% and the remaining within twenty-

four (24) hours.

Items paid for must be removed from the location within seven (7) days. Articles not removed within
the specified time would attract a 2% surcharge daily thereafter.
Items not removed would be duly disposed of by the administration.
k -*j


side your nose. With mouth
slightly open, draw the right cor-
ner of your mouth towards the
far end of the lowest whisker,
hold, then relax.
Repeat on the left side, then
the next whisker up on you right
and-so on.

TAKE UP
GARDENING
Chelsea gold winner, Kim
Wilde says you can never start
too late or too small. Plant some
hardy herbs such as rosemary or
mint, or a medium-size tree.

STAND UP TO
SOMEBODY
Each week for a month, make
a point of standing up to some-
one who regularly gets the bet-
ter of you. Sebastian Bailey and
Octavius Black, authors of The
Mind Gym (Time Warner
Books) give this confidence-
boosting advice. "Think about
your natural body space, then
imagine it fills the whole room
or street. Hold that thought and
your body language will increase
your presence automatically."

GET MORE OF THE
RIGHT KIND OF
ATTENTION
Next time you're in a social
situation, practice novelist Jackie
Collins's three rules of engage-
ment. "A self-deprecating sense
of humour helps break the ice.
Straight-forwardness is always
a winner.
And eye contact is essen-
tial."

BORED WITH
YOUR WARDROBE
Hire a fashion specialist who
will help you to put your
favourite pieces together in
ways you hadn't considered.
Sometimes, they will even go
shopping with you for an excit-
ing new look. Or ask a friend
who has a good sense of dress to
help you. out. Most people
would take it As a compliment
that you consider them a snazzy
dresser. Remember! We are not
all good at everything. You may


be good at cooking, and she may
be good at dressing.

FEEL GREAT ABOUT
WHO YOU ARE
Astrid Longhurst, author of
Body Confidence (Penguin) rec-
ommends these three steps to
boosting your body image:
WHENEVER YOU'RE
TEMPTED to start on the lat-
est crazy diet or exercise regime,
stop and ask yourself: Does this
action show my body I like it'?

IF IT DOESN'T,
DON'T DO IT.
NEVER USE NEGATIVE
CRITICISM to motivate your-
self. Telling yourself that you
have huge thighs is counterpro-
ductive. Eat for energy, rest
when you're tired and exercise
because you love it.
WRITE DOWN 10
THINGS you like about your-
self that have nothing to do with
the way you look. Remind your-
self often that you are so much
more than your appearance.

TRICK YOUR BODY
INTO FEELING HAPPIER
Just the action of smiling,
even if you're feeling low, can
help bump up your feel-good
levels. Suzi Godson, author of
The Body Bible (Michael Jo-
seph) says: "The world's a mir-
ror what we put out is reflected
back. Smile and the world smiles
with you."

BRING THE
PASSION BACK
INTO YOUR LIFE
Couples counsellor and au-
thor of The Real Sex Kitten's
Handbook (Quadrille), Val
Sampson, has the following ad-
vice for pepping things up.
"Start thinking about sex
more often -read an erotic novel
or watch a sexy movie. Make
love in the afternoon when your
body's sex hormones are at
their peak. And, if you find it
hard to relax fully because
you're worrying the children
will come bursting in at any
moment, put a lock on your
bedroom door!"


AVAILABLE!









AT GUYANA POST OFFICE
CORPORATION

(MAIN BUILDING ROBB STREET
G/TOWN)


Dimension ofspaces:


260 square feet
120 square feet
741 square feet


For more information, please
contact Ms. A. Ferguson on Tel. No.
226-1311 or 225-0211-2 Ext. 227.


Page XIV


- - - - - - - - . . . .


-----'------------ --------- ----------- ------ ~'~~- --'~-^--~'~'~' ~~~










Plaintiff swears to lower purchase price and loses action



ACTION AMOUNTS



TO FRAUD UPON


REVENUE


BACK IN 1962,
Dr Meer Safdar
Alli-Shaw and
Postmaster, Mr J
Wailoo entered into an
agreement of sale and
purchase of certain
immovable property for
a consideration of $18,
000, but the deal went
sour when they
amended the receipt
so as to reflect a
purchase price of $15,
000.
As part.of the agreement, a
sum of $2500 was paid, and a
receipt, which embodied certain
terms, issued in the defendant's
wife's name.
It was expressly stipulated
that the defendant would pay
a further sum of $3500 by the
end of December, 1962 and that
the balance of $12, 000 on his
obtaining a mortgage within six
months of the date of the re-
ceipt.
Some time later, the defen-
dant intimated to the plaintiff
that he could only raise a mort-
gage of $10, 000 and did not
have enough money to pay the


whole of the remainder of the
purchase price.
At the defendant's request,
the plaintiff amended the re-
ceipt so as to.reflect a purchase
price of $15, 000 and accepted
a 'good' from the defendant for
$3, 000.
Of this latter sum, the
defendant's wife paid the plain-
tiff $300 before transport was
passed on April 14, 1964. Since
then, the plaintiff had made
several abortive requests for the
payment of the sum of $2, 700
due on the 'good'.. He, accord-
ingly, filed the present action.
Justice Frank Vieira, who
heard the matter, held that:
(i) Under Section 46 of the
Deeds Registry Ordinance, Cap.
32, a duty is imposed on both
vendors and purchasers of im-
movable property to make and
file with the Registrar of Deeds,
affidavit setting forth the full
and true consideration to be
paid or payable for the transfer;
(ii) In swearing falsely,
both the plaintiff and the defen-
dant opened themselves to the
sanction of the criminal law for
making false declarations, which
is a misdemeanor under Section
4 of the Statutory Declarations


Ordinance, Chapter 36.
(iii) Whatever may have
been the motive for swearing to
a lower purchase price, it
amounted to a fraud upon the
revenue and was clearly illegal
and offending against public
policy and accordingly the
plaintiff could not recover.
As a consequence, Justice
Vieira dismissed the action with
costs to the defendant.
At the hearing of the trial,
Queens Counsel Mr J 0 F
Haynes represented the appel-
lant, while Mr R L Millington,
appeared for the respondent.
In his judgment, Justice
Vieira noted that the plaintiff
was a man of many parts. He
was a registered medical prac-
titioner and ran his own private
hospital. In addition, he owned
a business concern known as the
Farm Fresh Inn, and also dabbled
in real estate. The defendant
was a postmaster. Both parties
had known each other for some
30 years, and were not only
good friends, but also members
of the former British Guiana
East Indian Cricket Club, of
which the witness, 'Bridg
Bahadhur was also a member.
Said the judge: "As regards


Foreign Exchange NW rkgt Activifis
Summary Inicator,
_____ .Friday September 23,2005 -Thursday September 29,2005
1. FXC-LANGL RATES
Buying Rate Selling Rate
A. US Dollar NOTES OTHER NOTES OTHER
BJnk ol RJrKilda 197.00 198.00 201.00 203.00
Bank ot Nova Scont i0 00 196.00 201 tal 204.00
Ciizens Hnt 192 00 199.00 03 00 204.25
Demeraia Bark 197.00 199.00 202.00 203.00
G;BTI 190.00 195.00 201.00 201.00
NBIC 190.00 198.00 200.00 204.00
Bank Average 192.67 197.30 201.33 203.21

Nonbank Cambios Av. (5 largest) 198.80 202.04

BoG Average Markrt L \J'harie Rate; US$1.00 = G$200.00
B. Canadian Dollar
Ban7/ .11 eraf e I 3'o00 146.03 153.37 160.87
C. Pound Sitrfing
Bank Average 319.17 347.10 357.20 368.70

1). Euro
Bank Average 218.75 240.00 246.25 259.75
E. Selected Caricom Exchange F. LIBOR US$ G. Prime Rate
Rates London Interbank Offered
Rate for Thur,, Sep. 29, 2005
TTr= G$ 28.76
Bdos$ = G$ 91.56 3 months 4.05438% US 6.75%
J$= G$ 4.45 6 months 4.21625% Guyana 16.33%
EC$= G$ 65.46
Belize$ = G$ 93.21
Source: International Department, Bank of Guyana.


the facts of this case, I accept,
on the balance of probabilities,
the evidence of the plaintiff and
his witness, Bridg Bahadhur, in
preference to that of the defen-
dant, his wife and son-in-law.
"I am satisfied from the evi-
dence as a whole, that during the
latter part of 1962, Bahadhur


negotiated with the defendant
concerning the sale of a house
and land situate at Sub-lot 'E'
215 Camp Street, Georgetown,
the property of the plaintiff. As
a result of these negotiations,
the parties and their witnesses
met at Bahadhur's house in
Camp Street, which is obliquely
opposite the said property, on
September 18, 1962 between
4.30 to 5.30 pm.
Continuing, the judge said:
"I accept that the plaintiff
agreed to sell, and the defendant
agreed to buy -the property in
question for the sum of $18,
000 as stated by the defendant
and his witnesses.
"The defendant paid down
the sum of $2, 500. in cash, for
which the plaintiff issued a re-
ceipt in the name of the
defendant's wife, Helen Wailoo.


It is expressly stipulated therein
that the sum of $3, 500 was to
be paid by the end of Decem-
ber 1962, and the balance of
$12,000 to be paid on the ob-
taining of a mortgage from the
Demerara Mutual Life Assur-
ance Society within six months
from date thereof.
"I accept that the defen-
dant told the plaintiff that he
could not get a mortgage for
$10, 000 from the Demerara
Life( which in fact he did ob-
tain later from the Insurance
Company) and that he did not
have enough cash to pay off
for the property. The plain-
tiff then amended the receipt
at the defendant's request by
changing 'eighteen' in words
and figures, and by deleting

Please turn to page XIX


INVITATION FOR BIDS

The Government of Guyana has received a loan from the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) towards the execution of SIMAP IIt Operations. It is
intended that such funds be applied for payment of contracts for projects undertaken
by SIMAP Agency.

1. SIMAP Agency, now invites sealed bids for furnishing the necessary labour,
materials, equipment and services for the construction and completion of the
following projects:-
i) Rehabilitation of Sarah Johanna Road Region 4
ii) Rehabilitation of Sparendaam New Housing Scheme Roads Region 4
iii) Rehabilitation of Old Grove Roads Region 4
iv) Rehabilitation of Kiltern Nursery School Region 6
v) Rehabilitation of Courtland/Gibralta Road Region 6
vi) Rehabilitation of Clifton Village Residential Drainage Region 6

2. Interested bidders can obtain further information and inspect the bidding
documents at: SIMAP Agency, 237 Camp Street, Georgetown, Telephone
227-3554 (Contracts Dept).

3. Bids from a Firm/Company must include a copy of their business registration.
Mandatory submissions include valid Tax and NIS Compliance Certificates of
which only the original will be accepted. Careful attention must be paid to the
Evaluation Criteria in the tender documents (Page 3-3).

4. The cost of the Bidding Document for items i & iv above is G$5,000 and items
ii, iii, v & vi is $10,000 each. Payment can be in cash or by Manager's Cheque
in favour of SIMAP Agency. Purchasing of the document can be done between
the hours of 08:00 hours to 12:00 hours and 13:00 hours to 15:30 hours from
Monday to Thursday and from 08:00 hours to 12:00 hours and 13:00 hours to
14:30 hours on Friday.

9. Bids must be accompanied by a Bid Bond of not less that 2% of the bid sum.
The Bid Bond/Guarantee must be in the form of a Manager's Cheque in favour
of SIMAP Agency from a Commercial Bank/Financial House/Insurance
Company, using the form supplied by SIMAR Personal cheques wit not be
accepted.

6. Bids must be appropriately marked and delivered to SIMAP Agency Tender Box,
at SIMAP Agency, 237 Camp Street, Cummingsburg, Georgetown on or
before 14:00 hrs on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 at which time they will be
opened in the presence of the bidders/representatives.

7. SIMAP reserves the right to reject the lowest or any bid and is not obligated to
give any reasonss.

Executive Director
SIMAP Agency


P:a&KVr~


II GEORGE
SBARCLAY


;Lftftfyvil vilul vvuuv c-


1


M AoI~







rages I ~unuay Ijnrornwe uciover ~, ~uuo


SHORT TERM CONSULTANT (3 months)

GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA

FISCAL AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAM (FFMP)

The Government of Guyana (GOG) has recently concluded a Loan Contract
# 1551 SF/GY (US529 5 million) with the 'nter- American Development
Bank (IDB), This loan will be used to finance the implementation of the
Fiscal and Financial Management Program which is aimed at improving the
management of public finances and providing a strong fiscal oasis for
sustained growth in Guyana. The FF MP consists of three sub-components,
namely

(i) Tax and Policy Administration
(ii) Public Sector Financial Management; and
(iii) Fiscal and Fiduciary Oversight.

Under sub-component 2 Public Sector Financial Management -the GOG
is seeking, the services of a consultant to prepare a unified law on public
debt management.

Requirements:

(i) Master's degree or equivalent professional certification by
examination in finance, economics, accounting, business or law;
(ii) Minimum ten (10) years of experience as a financial or
accounting manager, preferably in a Ministry of Finance;
(iii)- Specific experience in drafting of laws, regulations and standard
forms;
(iv) Knowledge of the process involved in effective debt
management.

'Detailed.-Toem of Reference for the post can be obtained from:

Og.' ra i g .. ... :
%b-Co nt 2,
'Fiscal arid Financial Management Program
ir.o Miniy$y ,of Finance,
'Main & Urquhart streets,
,Georgetown,
Guyana Tel/Fax: 225-0742
Email: pcuffmp@bbgy.com

Closing date for all applications is 14h October, 2005.
Government ads can be viewed on inp w 'i. r,:. ,, g.


Let us today, look at some words pertaining to
Professional and Business Communication. Have Fun.

C A N B S C D R A F T R D B A
I 0 G 0 R A S D T P E T U F D
H .K R A I N L N I S 0 S I L D
J N E R I T E U S R I I A D R
D L 0 G E I A E T .NE N N M E
C E R I P S N C E A 0 C E T S
H A T I T T P S I I T M T A S
M E C A P A S 0 S N 0 I V L P
S E A M L R N S N R U I 0 R Y
R E 0 D E U E G A D N M E N N
Y R I T I F C W I G E C M O R
P D T P 0 N D R R S I N T O S
L E 0 R 0 U G A I S E E C P. C


L M P B M C M N E C S D


0 E X


SUNDAY' IISSUE. .l I


ADDRESS
BODY
BUSINESS/
LETTERS
CIRCULATED/
COPIES
COMMUNICATION
CORRESPONDENCE


DESIGNATION
DIRECTLY/POINT
DRAFT
EDIT
HEADING
MARGINS
MEMORANDUM
NOTES


PRECISE
PROFESSIONAL
PROMPTNESS
RECIPIENT
SALUTATION
SAVINGRAM
TELEPHONE
TYPING


NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INVESTMENTS
LIMITED (NICIL)

The NICIL has a vacancy for the position of Driver/Office Assistant
The applicant must possess the following:
Minimum O'Level requirements in English and Mathematics
Must have a valid Driver's Licence, a recent Police Clearance and an identification
card
Must have at least 5 years working experience
Be willing to work long hours
Appliants should preferably be between the ages of 35 and 50 years
The office bearer will work directly with the Executive! Director.
iuneration: Commensurate with qualifications a experience.
Aplication together with two references and police qle arance should be addressed to:
The Executive Director, NICIL
126 Barrack Street. Kingston
Georgetown
Tel No: 226-0576, 225-6339
Fax No. 226-6426, 226-7417
Email: punit2@guyana.net.gy
Applications should clearly indicate on the top right hand corner "Vacancy for
Driver/Office Assistant" and reach the above addr-ss not later than October 7, 2005
Government is can be viewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy


rage A I


ounuay knronicie uciouer 4, /-uuo


IM I






Suhday Chronicle October 2; -2005


Page XVII
pq Here are the answers to last week's questions.


Hello boys and girls,
It's good to meet again with you today. Today
we'll be looking at last week's question and
there answers, then we'll look at a new topic
The Flower (reproductive parts)

The Flower

The flower is the reproductive organ of a flowering
plant, it is important as it has a strong (high) smell
(scent) and a bright colour to attract the insects.

The flower has both female and male reproductive
parts. The female parts are the stigma which is
sticky. This enables it to collect the pollen from the
bee's body.


body. When the bee visits another flower the pollen
rubs off onto the sticky stigma and pollination has
occurred.


Fertilization


Fertilization is when the pollen meets the ovule
and joins together. This occurs when the pollen
grows a tube which passes down the middle of the
style to the ovary where it joins with the ovule.

Following fertilization the ovule and the pollen be-
come the seed. The ovary becomes the fruit which
protects the seed. Once the seed has been dis-
persed and the fruit has decayed the seed begins
to germinate.


1. The Green color in the leave is called Chloro-
phyll.

2. What is necessary for photosynthesis? Water,
chlorophyll, sunlight and carbon dioxide.

3. The gas which is given off in the air during the
process of photosynthesis is called? Oxygen.

4. Do all plants produce their own food? Yes.

5. What is transpiration? Transpiration is the pro-
cess by which plants give off excess water through
the stomata of the leaves.


6. The tiny
Stomata.


holes found on the leaves are called


The style which holds the stigma up


The ovary is at the base of the style which con-
tains the ovule.

The ovule is like the human egg

The male parts are the stamens which make the
pollen. The stamen is pollen. The stamen is made
up of two parts. These are the anther at the top
and the filament which supports the anther.


Anther
(contains pollen,
the male
reproductive cel)

Filament
(holds the anther)


Pollination petal -' \ U O // t(female reproductive organ) -
QO 3 / Ovule
Pollination is the transfer of pollen from the anther T (reproduc ive cell 0s ich
to the stigma. It can occur on the same flower, this I(a the sepas) hen ferHzed by pollen
is self-pollination or between two flowers of the (all the sepals1l
same type, which is cross-pollination. The in-
sects are attracted to the flower by the petals and Sepal Peduncle Flower Anatomy
try to get the nectar from the flower as they do so (smalI leaves under | (stem)
they brush against the anther getting pollen on their the flovier)


Hello boys and girls,
Welcome to this Social Studies input. What do you
want to do for a livelihood? Tell it to your mother,
father or a trusted friend. Be realistic in your plan,
though. Some time in your secondary school years
you'll be asked to indicate the answer to your
teacher. You may however want to have a change
of heart at that time after considering a better and
wider range of career paths. Anyhow, study hard
nowl Love you.
'Bye.

IN LAST WEEK
More about Animals (continued)
Instinct and Knowledge
S. Some animals need to be taught to swim like the
otter, or hunt, like the cat. Manatees are bom swimmers.
/ Lions and tigers teach their cubs to hunt so that they
will not starve in the wild; also to be obedient to their
parents especially when they are being taught to hunt.
Staying Alive,
Still on: Guess what each of the following animals needs
to have to survive (Take your time on this one.)? ante-
lope, elephant, gorilla, deer, horse, squirrel, mouse, turtle,
whale, kangaroo, penguin, opossum, dolphin, sea lion,
beaver, bat, owl, lion, wolf, anteater, rabbit, porcupine,
raccoon, giraffe, bear, zebra. tiger, frog. manatee, otter
Hand and Brain
Some mammals use their front paws like hands:
"/ A dog holds down a bone while gnawing it, and so
do lions and tigers.
V A kangaroo uses its forefeet to hold down leaves it
is eating, or to scratch its stomach.
V A monkey uses its hands and feet all the time.
" Animals like monkeys and apes are called primates.
They are among the top order of such mammals. Man is
found in this top order of all mammals.


Guyana's national animal (the jaguar (Felis onca), which
appears on the national coat of arms) is never found in
packs or companies; it lives a solitary life in the hinter-
land forested areas. It is swift and agile and can see in
semi-dark places. The jaguar, it is said, does not nor-
mally bother human beings.


IN THIS WEEK
Hinterland Clippings


This week we will be able to see
some clippings of Guyana's hin-
terland where species of both
flora and fauna are precious, so
much precious. They tell some-
thing of the animals' natural habi-
tats and what we are missing by
not sight-seeing hinterland areas.
Here is a jaguar in a tree. Jag-
uar climbs trees. Do you remem-
ber the jaguar on our coat of
arms? Well, here you have him
in his natural habitat.


Here is a frog in its natural surround-
ings among the swamp grass. It is
one of our rare species of frogs found
in the Iwokrama area.

The brilliant scarlet ibis roost and
breed in abundance in the green
mangrove trees along the river banks
in the Waini area. See how they live
in abundance!


This is one of the four species of sea turtles that nest at


Shell Beach which stretches 100
miles from the mouth of the
Moruca River in the east to the
Waini River in the west. This
stretch is a natural nursery for
turtle eggs. This turtle is called
the Leatherback.


Iwokrama
Canopy
Walkway
(It is really a series of suspension
bridges). There are strategic walk-
ways across some valleys in the
interior. You mighty be privileged
to walk upon one soon. Look at
the trees and strong vines.
,canopy
This young jaguar has certainly
learned to swim.








The otter is found in the Rupununi.
Here is one having a swim and
bath.
Here is a thatched roof surrounded
by species of flora
Yes. Guyana has fish that grows
that big! Tarpon, snapper, dewfish
and the giant catfish are among the great lot of big fishes
found in Guyana's hinterland. This one came from the
Waini River.
Were you able to deduce that most of the pictures have
trees and shrubs and water? Well, they take up most of
our unbroken hinterland.






Page XVIII Sunday Chronicle October 2, 2005


,Ths Passage
Read the following passage and then answer (a)
and (b):
It would be salutary, if difficult, to calculate the total
expenditure on school and travel since the close of
the last century. The sum would be worth doing
because it would raise the interesting question of
how much value we were getting for our money.
Nothing is easier, of course, than to pour scorn. For
many children the Kaieteur Falls seems to be the
most impressive memory of their tour across
Guyana's hinterland. This might be held to set the
cultural value of such trips in a queer light. School
heads again will be found to say that the linguistic
results of their tours are usually negligible. Their
usefulness, however, is almost certainly of a differ-
ent order. Travel is a pleasure and the imagination
is quickened by novel scenes and circumstances.
if the tour has been carefully prepared during term,
it may even be educational in a direct sense.
Slightly adapted from: "Comment in Brief'

Questions
(a) Choose five of the following words, which are
taken from the above passage, and give for each
another word, or phrase, of similar meaning, which
might be used to replace the word in the passage:

salutary calculate
negligible impressive
cultural stay

(b) Explain concisely the meaning of all of the fol-
lowing phrases, which are taken from the above
passage:
(i) value for our money
(ii) in a queer light
(iii) linguistic results of their tours
(iv) of a different order
(v) quickened by novel scenes

An Excerpt for your Reading Pleasure

After a while my way was stopped by a creek or
inlet of the sea, which seemed to run pretty deep
into the land.; and as I had no means to get across,
I must needs change my direction to go about the
end of it. It was still the roughest kind of walking;
indeed the whole, not only of Earraid, but of the
neighboring part of Mull (which they call the Ross)
is nothing but a jumble of granite rocks with heather
in among. At first the creek kept narrowing as I had
looked to see; but presently to my surprise it began
to widen out again. At this I scratched my head, but
had still no notion of the truth; until at last I came to
a rising ground, and it burst upon me all in a mo-
menit that I was cast upon a little, barren island, and
cut off on every side by the salt seas.

Instead of the sun rising to dry me, it came on to
rain, with a thick mist; so that my case was lamen-
table.

I stood in the rain, and shivered, and wondered what
to do, till it occurred to me that perhaps the creek
was fordable. Back I went to the narrowest point
and waded in. But not three yards from shore, I
plunged in head over ears; and if ever I was heard
of more it was rather by God's grace than my own
prudence. I was no wetter (for that could hardly be)
but I was all the colder for this mishap; and having
lost another hope, was the more unhappy.
And now, all at once, the yard came in my head.
What had carried me through the roost, would surely
serve me to cross this little quiet creek in safety.
With that I set off, undaunted, across the top of the
isle, to fetch and carry it back. It was a weary tamp


in a!! ways, and if hope had not buoyed me up, I
must have cast myself down and given up. Whether
with the sea salt, or because I was growing fevered,
I was distressed with thirst, and had to stop, as I
went, and drink the peaty water out of the hags.
Taken from R.L. Stephenson's KIDNAPPED


THE LETTER
Let us begin a series of letter writing today. We will
start with the letter of apology or explanation today.

The Letter of Apology or Explanation

When or why is a letter of apology or explanation
done? Here is the answer.

At some time or the other you might have done
something that turned out to be wrong, unfair, care-
less, or hurtful to another person. Any of these ac-
tions deserves a note of apology from you. Per-
haps you thought of such a note but found it difficult
to put your honourable intention down on paper. Or
perhaps you found it hard to admit to yourself that
you had done something wrong, that you had for-
gotten the correct approach that you had not been
careful, that you had been at fault' .... Put such
unwilling thoughts and actions behind you. Bring
out that strong hidden character in you and coin a
gracious letter of apology to the person you have
wronged. Remember that a strong character re-
flects a strong personality. Let the person know
that you are aware of what happened and that you
are willing to own up in writing.

Here are some guidelines for writing the note of
apology or explanation.

1. Be prompt in sending the note of apology if you
know that your actions) deserve one.
2. Believe that what you have said was the best
thing under the prevailing circumstance.
3. Offer payment of some kind or replacement if
you have damaged anything.
4. Do not make excuses especially that could irri-
tate.
5. Make your letter brief.

Remember that there must be sincerity and prompt-
ness in your letter of apology or explanation, which
is sometimes called an apology note.

Here is an Example of a Letter of Apology.

1752 Savannah Lane
Bushy Park Road Side
Hunting Ground Town
October 2nd, 2005


Dear Mrs. George,

Yesterday afternoon I kissed my teeth when you
asked me not to pick your fluffy red roses that were
hanging over into my mother's yard. Please ac-
cept my apology for my rudeness. [ could not see
then to whom the flowers belonged. You were right
to speak to me when and how you did for whether
the flowers were hanging in your yard or over into
ours, they were still yours, (though my friends tell
me a different reasoning). There is no excuse for
my behaviour, and I am truly sorry. After all, we are
long standing neighbours and you are a kind and
courteous person always.

Yours truly,
Gregory Simon
Learning Activities


1. Look at the letter above, and then read over the
guidelines to writing a letter of apology. Discuss
each guide in relation to Gregory's letter with your
study partnerss.

2. Your parrot has ruined this season's crop from
her red cashew tree the best since the young
tree has begun to yield fruit. Write a note of apol-
ogy offering a proper solution to the problem. State
what steps you .can promise to implement to pre-
vent repetition of the parrot's behaviour. Go over
your work with a study partner.

3. Write a letter to a friend, explaining why you will
be unable to go to the Ogle Air Strip to meet him or
her next weekend.


The Letter of Excuse
Most institutions require that students bring along
written excuses for absences. Some others even
require that the note be handed in before a time of
absence. Not only schools, but also clubs and other
organizations require excuses before or after the
period of absence.

Try the following suggestions in writing the letter of
excuse.

1. Be courteous.
2. Be exact in stating the time of the absence.
3. Give a reason for the absence.
4. Be brief.

Here is an example of an acceptable excuse.
Your home has not been doing so well in the rain so
some improvement has to be done right now. Your
mother has to write the letter of excuse. You have
to overlook her style and presentation if it is neces-
sary. She eventually ends up sending in this letter
on your behalf. You are pleased about how it is
written.


2896 Mosquito Lane
Bushy Road Side
Savannah Land
October 2nd, 2005

Dear Mrs. Salsa,

Please excuse my son Randal Gibson from the
morning's sessions tomorrow, 19th January. There
is to be a ripping down of one section of our house.
Randal has to take care of his belongings during
this process. The shed in the yard will be com-
pleted by noon so that his things can be properly
stored, after which he will proceed to school.

He has prepared tomorrow morning's Grammar
lesson aids in advance. Please receive this home-
work in English Language.

Yours Truly,
Cynthia Gibson

Learning Activities
1. Read and then use the suggested points to evalu-
ate the letter that Cynthia Gibson and her son have
produced together. Tell your study partners) about
your observationss.
2. You have to see the dentist at a prescribed time
for your yearly dental checkup. Draft the kind of
letter that you think your parent would forward to
your form teacher. Discuss it and then rewrite it
-properly.-


Sunday- Chronicle October 2, 2005


Pagee XVMI







Sohd-V' Chro-~ii-t- Ocobr2:05 ae


ACTION


AMOUNTS TO ...
From page XV
the words 'twelve thousand'. The plaintiff then proceeded to make out a 'good' for the balance
of $3, 000 on one of his letterheads which the defendant signed.
"On January 17, 1964, the plaintiff swore to an affidavit that he sold the property to the defen-
dant for the sum of $15, 000 and on January 22, 1964 the defendant swore to an affidavit that the
'full and true consideration paid by him for the property was the sum of fifteen thousand dollars and
no more. On this basis, transport was passed to the defendant on April 1, 1964.
"The plaintiff made several demands for the balance of $2, 700 outstanding on the 'good',
but the defendant kept putting him off, by always promising to pay but never in fact doing so.
Finally, on January 13, 1967, the plaintiff filed this present action claiming the said balance
of $2,700.".
Having regard to the law and the facts in the matter, Justice Vieira said he was
satisfied that the contention of the plaintiff could not be sustained, and that in his considered
opinion, the entire transaction was tainted with illegality.
Said he: "It seems to me that the acknowledgement sued upon by the plaintiff cannot be severed
from the oral contract as embodied in the receipt, as it forms part and parcel of it. Bowmakers case is
clearly inapplicable, in that the plaintiff cannot recover the balance of $2, 700, since he has clearly
cdoci the iple~ iJitv of the transaction on his own admission and, in point of fact. his whole claim is
based upon the l.la, l tcntU.
"Both parties have clearly not complied with the provisions of Section 46 of the
Deeds Registry Ordinance, Chapter 32, which, for the purpose of ascertaining the correct duty
payable under any future Tax Ordinance which imposes a duty of transports of immovable
property, imposes a mandatory duty for both vendors and purchasers to make and file with the
Registrar, affidavits setting forth the full and true consideration paid or payable for such trans-
ports.
"Further, both parties have laid themselves open to the sanction of the criminal law for mak-
ing false declarations which is a misdemeanor contrary to section 4 of the Statutory Declarations
Ordinance, Chapter 36.
"Whatever may be the reason for the plaintiff acquiescing to the defendant's request to amend
the receipt to show a lower price than that agreed upon, whether because of friendship, or out of
sympathy that the defendant could not find the whole balance of the purchase price, it is nevertheless,
not open to him to say now that he did not mean to offend the law of this country by swearing to a
false affidavit for a lesser consideration than that agreed upon, which amounts to nothing less than a
fraud upon the revenue and therefore be clearly illegal on the ground of public policy 'Ignorantia juris
neminem excusat'.
"This case should not only serve as an example, but be a warning to all vendors and purchas-
ers of immovable property that, not only will the courts not countenance illegal transactions of this
nature, but there also remains the grave danger that they lay themselves wide open to the sanctions of
the criminal law.
"For these reasons this action must necessarily fail and hereby stands dismissed; as
the parties are in pari delicto in relation to a patently illegal transaction, each of them; will
bear his own coasts, except that the plaintiff will pay the costs granted to defendant in any
event on the 10"'t of April, 1967, which was fixed in the sum of $20.









The Guyana Revenue A uhcrit:, Customs & Trade ,'o.imri'stra', n invites bidso r tie sale of 496
cases of seized polar beer.

Bid forms may be upifteri from Customs & Trade Administration, Main & Hope Streets,
Georgetown. Co.nmple'ed bids must be placed in the tender box located a' Cus l'ims Main Lobby on
or before the closing date of October 7, 2005 at 14:00 hours.

Further information can be obtained from the Enforcement, Intelligenc. & Oualiry Re'..ie,' Di vision n
Customs & Trade Adrministration Euildirn at telephone No. 226-2060.

Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes bearing no identiftat3lon of the bidder and must be
accompanied by a 'aid Income Tax compliance certificate

Bids must be clearly marked on the top right-hand comer of the sealed envelope as follows:
The Commissiner-General
Guyana Revenue Authority
357 Lamaha & East Streets
Georgetown.
"Bids for The sale of 496 cases of seized polar beer"

The winning bidder will be informed via mail and telephone.

The Guyanra R~e. enue Au t onty reserves the right to accept or reject any or all of the bids vithoJut
as s'gnirg any reason whatsoever, and not necessarily, to make an award to the lowest bidder.

Expiration date of the item is December 2005.

K. Sattaur
Commissioner-General Govemment ads.can be viewed on rhip' 'wwv *yn gi ,e,'


Ministry of Education
21 Brickdam, Georgetown


The Ministry of Education 'hereby invites pre-qualified contractors to tender for the
under-mentioned maintenance of Water, Environmental and Sanitation (WES)ifacilities.

1. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities Jacklow Primary School (Pomeroon)
.2. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities Meten Meer Zorg Primary School
3. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities Friendship Primary School (Pomeroon)
4. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities Malgre Tout Primary School
5. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities Diamond Special School
6. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities Craig Primary and Nursery schools
7. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities St. Andrew's Primary school
8. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities Diamond Primary School
9. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities Buxton Community High School
10. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities De Hoop Primary School
11. Rehabilitation of Wes Fa:cih--es Lusignan Practical Instruction Centre
12. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities Paradise Primary School
13. 1 ~ l-,1,irh:ti:,-r of Wes Fa:l_ ',i Haslington Nursery School
S .- 'tt,, 4.'r, ,.,:v F, ;-iiies St. Andrew's Primary School ,' ..I',geloni,)
.r- P c' "ljl. ,.lI T i ...' ,, 0 0 ...... ... n , ,
16. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities St. George's Secondary School
17. F'-,i'Liiir,1i of Wes F._, iii-. Beterverwagting Practical Instruction Centre
18. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities Montrose Primary School
19. Rehabilitation of Wes F3 'iitiL-cs Sc'utl Fuin',.ei'lit Primary School
20. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities St. Stephen's Primary School
21. Rehabilitation of Wes F. ',:iiies- Smith's Memorial Primary School
22. Rehabilitation of Wes -a,'l,-.:, New C 'i..i::,' iie Secondary School
23. qilittior, of Wes Facilities P1 hi-. r- : Community High School
24. =,, -bli. oorn of '".'V Facilities Graham's Hall.Primary School
25. Rehabilitation of Wes Facilities F.E. Pollard Primary School
26. F,-iLa-.iit'!.,on of Wes Facilities Winfer Gardens Primary School
27. --en.~~3,:Iaiion of Wes Facilities Christ Church Secondary School
28. Fendi:iabjiOr of Wes Facilities New Comenius Primary School
29. Pe.habilitbioi of Wes F.: iin. Swami Purnanda Primary
30. F-ieihilt'i'ii of Wes F iiiii-., Victoria Primary School
31. Rehabilitation of Wes F : .,,n:, Company Road Primary School
32. Rehabilitation of Wes F l,:,',i :,- St. T-, '-, i .:loo.re Primary School
33. Carpentry and masonry St. George's Secondary
34. Plumbing works CPCE


Tender documents can be uplifted from:

Mr, T. Persaud
Ministry of Education
21 Brickdam
Georgetown

during normal working hours upon payment of a non-refundable fee of two thousand
dollars ($2,000) each.

Tenders shall be submitted in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identification of the
tenderer and shall clearly mark on the top, left-hand corner, the job for which tendering is
made.
All tenders must be accompanied by valid NIS and GRA compliances. All submissions
must be original or certified copies.

Tenders shall be addressed to:

Chairman
Ministry of Education, Tender Board
21 Brickdam
Georgetown

and deposited in the tender box at 21 Brickdam no later than 6* October, 2005 on o
before 9:00hrs.

Tenderers or their representative may be present at the opening, which takes place at th,
Ministry of Education at 9:00 hrs on 6th October, 2005.

The Ministry of Education does not bind itself to accept the lowest tender and reserves th
right to reject any tender without assigning reasons.


P. Kandhi
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Education


0


SUh~aaYC~hrowida Ootober--2,'2005


Page XIX









Sunday Chronicle October 2, 2005


G UY AN A LIST OF CASES for trial at the Session of the High Court of the Supreme Court of Judicature (Criminal

G UYA NA Jurisdiction) for the County ofDemerara commencing the (Tuesday) 4d" day of October, 2005.


NO. NAME OF ACCUSED OFFENCE DATE OF TRIAL
1. Sajredeen All and Ray Sheoraj Murder (Tuesday) the 4 day of
October, 2005 and the
following days.
2-. Gerald Alonzo Murder
3. Peter Bess Murder 4'
4. Troy Anthony Dick FIRST INDICTMENT
Murder
SECOND INDICTMENT
Unlawful possession of firearm
5. Hollie Glen Murder
6. Shawn Hinds Murder ,
7. Edward Hintzen c/d Dougla Murder
i. Robert Holder Murder
9. Richard Isaacs
Lesile Isaacs
Perberry Kerfume Murder
Emille Thomas
Lucius Williams and
Mallien Stanislaus
10. Sandra James Murder
t1. Paul Johnson Murder
12. Rawle Johnson Murder tt
and
James Andrews .. ur

14. Harry Lall Murder
15. Stranit Lall Murder t
16. Maxwell Melville cd l. nkie Murder
- 17. Hazihidin Mohamed Murder
and
Gaitree radar
18. Rajendranauth Nathu- Murder
4-9. Joel Niles cld Curry Donald Murder
And
Devon Bailey
20. Niranjan Rattan Murder |
21. Vanessa Schroeder Murder |
22. Desmond Shameerdeen Murder
23. Wilbert Stephens Murder _
24. Denise Stewart Murder (Tuesday) the 4 a day of
October. 2005 mand the
following days.
25. Kenneth Sydney c/d Ringo FIRST INDICTMEIfNT
Murder
SECOND xNp)CTrMFNT
Wounding with intent
26. Keita Yearwood Murder
27. Brian Vandeyar Murder
28. Raymond Azad Ati Manslaughter a
29. Renison Atwell Count I Manslaughter
Count 2 Manslaughter
Count 3 Manslaughter
Count 4 Manslaughter
30: Robert Bereford Manslaughtler a
31. Devon Caesar Manslaughter "t
and
Aubrey Young
32. Gregory Charles Manslaughter _
33. Barnabas Francis Mansluughter
34. Gaindawattie Hardat Manslaughter .4
35. Travis Hardy Manslaugnter a
36. Brian Heywood Manslaughter t
37. Hardat Ketwaru Manslaughter
I 38. Martin Me Lennon Manslaughter
39. Kumnar Parsran I Manslaughter 4
40. Ranrdat Persaud Manslaughter
41. Sherwin Reid Manslaughter
42. Clayton Reman Manslaughter
and
Dexter Reman
43 Anthony Robertson Manslaglhter "
44. Joseph Thomas FIRST CGOUNT
Manslaughter
SECOND CO1NT
UnlanI sl possession o'f irearnt
45. Leyland Thorne Manslaughter
46 Anthony Williams Manslauhliter
47. Terry Wilson and Nicholas Wilson Manslaughter

48. Quacy Lewis FIRST COUNT
Wounding with intent to murder
SECOND COUNT
Wounding with intent
49. Anthony Charles FIRST COUNT
Causing grievous bodily harm
with intent
SECOND COUNT
Wounding with intent


50. Raymond Charles







51. Terrence Hawker


52. Jermain Fingal






.. . .. ..v.'_ a .


FIRST COUNT
Causing grievous bodily harm
with intent to murder
SECOND COUNT
Causing grievous bodily hann
with intent to murder
Causing grievous bodily harm
with intent to mnurdcr

) IR'S i (OL1
Throwing a destructive
substance with intent
SECOND COUNT
Assault causing actual bodily


(Tuesday) tl
October, 20
following d


NAME OF ACCUSED


OFFENCE


DATE OF TRIAL


53. Cledwyn Hopkinson FIRST COUNT I ,
Throwing a destructive
substance with intent
COUNT 2
Causing grievous bodily harm
with intent
54. Mohanned Sheriff FIRST COUNT
Throwing noxious substance
with intent
s'iCOiD COUNT
Throwing noxious substance
with intent '

55. 7 Colin Bacchus FIRST CO"NT :":
Royston Bacchus a Causing grievous bodily harm -
and S wth intern to murder
Rayon Hoyte SECOND COUVT
Wounding uh inotcnt

-,6 --. orge Warde Indecent Assault
57. Anhur Cggis. FIRST COUNT
Carnally knowing a girl
between* the age of twelve and
thirteent years-. . .
SECOND COURT ,;. .
Carnally knowing a girl
between the age of twelve : .


FOURTH COUNT
Indecent assault

58. Paul Boodhoo Carnally knowing a girl under
twelve years.





59. Lisson Boston COUNT A (Tesday) the 4 day of
Carnal Knowledge lda girl October. 2005 and the
under twelve ycars. following days.

Carnal Knowledge of a gir
under twelve years.

Indecent assault
60. Rayston Charles i FIRST COUNT
SCarnal Knowledge of a girl
under twelve yeas.
I SECOND COUNT
Buggery


61. Mark Graham 'FIRST COUNT ..
Carnal Knowledge of a girl
between the age of twelve and
thirteen years.
SECOND COUNT
Carnal Knowledge of a girl
between the age of twelve and
thirteen years.
62. Tyron James Carnal Knowledge of a girl
and under twelve years.
Winston Jones cid Fatboy
63. Rueben Khan ced Gabar Carnal Knowledge of a girl
under twelve years.
64. Edward Lewis c/d Water Works Carnal Knowledge of a girl-


65. 1 Sookdeo Singh Carnal Knowledge of a girl
5. Between twelve and thirteen ,
years. .....

66. Colin Smith Carnal Knowledge of a girl
under twelve years.
67. Rufus Stephens Carnal Knowledge of a girl
under twelve years.
68. Gordon Branch Carnal Knowledge of a girl
between twelve and thirteen
years.

69. Mukesh Jairaj Buggery
70. Devon Richards Buggery -
71. Paul Trim Buggery (Re-trial)
72. Lennie Abrams c/d Dinga Rape
73. Roy Armstrong Rape


74. Gerard Brown FIRST COUNT
Samora Boyd Rape
and SECOND COUNT
Laurice Gittens Buggery


75. Lyttleton Caesar


lhe 4 i" day of
05 and the
ays.

76. Lennox Cameron







77. Samuel Cozier
78. Rocky Chung
and
: t o'-nii r'h''n


FIRST COUNT
Rape
SECOND COUNT"
Robbery with violence


(Tuesday) the 4 day of
October, 2005 and the
following days.


FIRST COUNT
Rape
SECOND COUNT
Rape
THIRD COUNT
. .Rape
Rape
Rape


Page XX


r~


-~ -----------









UIwm %ol l VI 11v _m_ -m- r. ....


Cases (Cont'd)

NO NAME OF ACCUSED




St. NMses OcDy






and
Rc-lford Sk-etc
SWilli-an I Si 1., t]. .l.. il f

[ 1 1 .1 Lh .s.' -, ,I 41,. tllu l *




8X. Nicholas Monkhot.se

1 -..twrect ICtrrie"
89. Phillip Murray
90. iRawle .Me Phov

92. Kenrick Persaud c/d Arvin
Raiesh Singh c/d Toast Rabbit
aid
.ohn Bowcn c/d Derc-ck
93. David RaT- Paker-



94*. Calvitn ShawiT Phillips .



95. Orlando Princ
96. Brian Shanks



S97. .Castel keetc
98. K-aran R-mpersatdi
i99. Water Thona
o100. cdric Willitns-
101. Augustus Wilson




102. Rayon Wilson cid Jeff




" 103. Lawrence Adiminr
104. ; Shawn Simpson

105. Harrilall Mottilall
and
Seenarine Persaud




106. Rodwell Simon
107. Basil Balgobin
108. Garfield Hoyte
and
Eight Alphanso


109. Lloyd Wilson
Mahaicia Btdhrll-ndu
and
Afzal Kussain


:11Q. Eva Rawana-Scott





I1 A .bubjkitr \I,th 1 i11 Ii
and
Atta Sankar
112. Aisha -Lavaughlu Besson,

113. Vickram Seubarran

114. Dion Stanley
Clive George
Roy Cox
and
Kim Marks
1 1 lA clcIa: \S teil.i.


116. Molutmed Ayubc
and
Keith Ferreira






119- i .ivor obe c.rto.s
I19. Isor Rohert.


OFFENCE

Rap'.
SECX0ND C.oUN 'T
_~cgee
.. . .. . .. .
SIC()us (ol
RieRv.Pdq ut

Robb -W

Iap


C u I' ( i'.




Rape









.. .. ....... ....................
Rape



RI ape




CSND CO.U2'NT



SEfICOND C,0UN'r
Indecent assault,

FIRS T COUNT
Rape
SETCONI) COlUN'r

Rape


Rape
FIRST (>COI' NT
Rape
SECOND COUNT









intent
Rape

FIRST COUtNT

SECOND COUNT
ap












SECOND COUNT

Possession of atimult lition
without licence
Break and Enter and Larceny
Robber under arms
COUNT ONEI
Robbery under arms
COUNT TWO
Common assault
FI RST COU NT
Larceny of cate
SECOND COUNT
Larceny of cattle
TCIR D COUNT
Larceny of cattle


FIRST COUNT
Uttering Forged Power of
Attorney
SECOND COUNT

(" ni't.i i l -, y to I .,'l. Il



Possession for the purpose of
trafficking
Trafficking ii a narcotic
substance
Trafticking in narcotic





I' Il t t M)1 l II
Causing death by dangerous driving
SECOND COUNT
Causiag death by dangerous driving
MHeRah OUNT
Causing death by dangerous driving

Causing death by dangerous driving

Causing death by dangerous driving


DATE OF TRIAL


mGem 0







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(.)eitob- 2005 arnI Ih.
Ittlis... og cday..


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JaI Syndicated Content -


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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October. 2005 and the
following days.

*


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40 -- .




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FIRS! CO(JN'
tcausiutg tcalh by dantgteruus
.dt sing

SECOND)COUJNT
C'atstttg death by daisgerous

dliv tug

.......trea.son..
Murder

Sita Ramlal Registrar & Attotrtey-at-Iaw Supremte Court of.Jttdicatitre


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Q C~nr (hronicle. OcThtober 2.2005


Page XXI


i


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(0






Page XXII


$40,000.00 "SHOULD-BE-WON"

CHROMCLE CROSSWORD COMPETITION


Sunday Chronicle October 2, 2005


MT -T9C-~m
w^rr w1^1^B^^^^
999W9! lWW


NAME-
ADDRESS'


NAME-
ADDRESS'


A-no t di- *
am bw MI mdp w4wW


ACROSS:

1. Synonym for the verb,
ooze.
3 Antonym for advance.
5. Soybeans are the seeds
of the*** plant 'Glycine
max'. It is nature's best
source of proteins.
8 In networking, it's the
Country code of Israel.
10. RFlight Attendant (Abbr.).
* 11 The past tense of this
irregular verb does not
end with ed and has the
same form as the past
participle.
13. Antonym for achieve.
17. A western South
American country that
achieved full
Independence from
Spain in 1824.


HI FANS!
Another simple
"Should-Be-Won"
puzzle for $40,000.00
is presented to you.
You should win this
"S-B-W" competition
that is schedule to be
drawn on Friday,
October 07, 2005.
The rules for this
competition remain
the same, except, that
where there is one
error, the prize money
Sis $25,000.00 and for
two errors the prize
money is $15,000.00.
If there is more than
* one winner the prize
money will be shared
among the winners.

So get involved. Play
smart and win!
it~iH~i*m g m~!eSk%


20. Preposition.
21. Term used in computing
for random-access
memory.
22. International Maritime
Organisation (Abbr.).
23. "Let us therefore follow
after the things which
make for ***** and things
wherewith one may edify
another". Romans 14:19.
24. Point on the compass
closest to SW.
25. Point on the compass
closest to NE.
27. Family support is very
___ when one goes
through stressful life
changes.

DOWN:
2. Eliminate.
3. Creek on the Left Bank of
the Essequibo River in
Guyana.
4. Abbreviation for "Election


The additional
incentives of
$1,000.00 and
$2,000.00 for the 40+
and 80+ entries
groupings are in effect.

If you play smart you
can win this grand offer
of $40,000.00. The
more you play the
greater is the
possibility of winning.
The amount of entries
submitted must be
covered by the relevant
sums of money or they
will not be judged.
Then place those
entries in a Chronicle
Crossword box at a
location nearest to you.

Residents of Cove and
John and its environ
a AT A A Mb


Year".
6. Point on the compass
opposite to NE.
7. Irregular verb having the
form of its past tense and
past participle similar to its
infinitive,
8. Conjunction.
9. Lip.
12. Local brand of curry
powder.
14. Dance.
15 Hand washing is one of the


most important things you can
do to keep from getting sick
and from spreading to
others.
16. Number.
18. Regular Army, the permanent
standing army of a nation or
state.
19. Cloak wom by a Bishop on
ceremonial occasions.
26. Point on the compass
opposite to SE.


Bet, cope, cut, eject, ENE, essential, expel, EY, FA, five,
germs, get, if, IL, IMO, important, in, Indi, labium,
labrum, leak, lose, miss, necessary, nine, NNE, NW,
peace, Peru. RA, RAM, retreat, reverse, Rock, Rosa,
salsa, samba, Sari, seep, sit, Soy, SSW, SW, WSW.


can place their entries
in the Chronicle.
Crossword box at Ms.
Gladys Geer's (L.
Mohabir) Business
Place, Lot 6, Public
Road, Cove and John,
East Coast Demerara.

If you need coupons
and clues for this
competition, just
purchase a copy of the
Sunday or
Wednesday
Chronicle. For extra
coupons, purchases
can be made at our
offices in Linden,
New Amsterdam and
Georgetown. You
can also obtain extra
coupons from Mr.
Vincent Mercurius of
D'Edward Village,
Rosignol, Berbice.
.*- -. ..


They cost $20.00 each
or $40.00 for two as
they appear in the
Sunday or Wednesday
Chronicle.

Players are reminded
that no entry is opened
before 12.30 pm on
the day the puzzle is
drawn and that
judging does not begin
before 4.30 pm when
the last entry is
opened. The solution
to the puzzle is not
known before that
time.

This apart, our
general rules apply.


Thanks
Cr os sw ord
Committee
KI T'JIfJ \ i'- w ,uitioi nti -wi.


* - -
-. .

* __


- -


- -. 0 -


"Copyrighted Material -
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"








-

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0 -


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nII


-continued!


THE T

ADL Li L-


PHYSIOLOGICAL T

LAST WEEK we dealt with the normal values relative to your dog's/cat's body temperature.
Let's look today at the normal pulse rates and respiration (breathing).


PULSE
The pulse is actually a reflection of the heartbeat rate. As
the heart contracts and.sends the blood careening through
the arteries, you can actually feel the blood flow through
the artery as the heart contracts and relaxes.
The pulse is easily detected by feeling the artery located in
the groin (femoral artery). With your dog standing or lying on
his side or back, feel along the inside of 11. ii, 1 where his leg
joins his body. Press with your fingers until you locate the
pulsation. Alternately, take the pulse by pressing against the
rib cage over the heart. With the dog standing, feel the chest
pulse just below the elbow joint. If the heart is enlarged or,
diseased, you may be able to detect a *.-- or vibration over
the chest wall.
The pulse rate. which is the same as the heart rate, can be


determined by counting the number of beats in a minute. Most
dogs run a rate of 70 to 130 beats per minutes at rest. In large
dogs, it is somewhat slower, while in small dogs it is somewhat
faster. It is faster in puppies. Well-conditioned, athletic dogs
run a slower pulse.
The pulse should be strong, steady and regular. A slight
alteration in rate as your dog breathes in and out is normal. An
exceedingly fast pulse indicates fever, anemia, blood loss,
dehydration, shock, infection, heat stroke, or heart (and lung)
disease. A very slow pulse can indicate heart disease, pressure
on the brain, or an advanced morbid condition causing collapse
of the circulation. An erratic, irregular or disordered pulse
suggests an arrhythmia, which is a serious condition. When
untreated, it can cause the heart to fail.
Various'drugs your dog might be taking can i., I the


THE owner of 'Barne,' man mains that ihis dog just ioves
to Iiszen Io music from tn. radico.



- "- -. -, '
-- .


rate and rhythm of the heart.


BREATHING RATE (RESPIRATION)
A dog normally breathes about 10 to 30 times a minute
while relaxing. Actually, it takes about twice as long for a
dog to exhale as it does for him to inhale. The breathing
motion should be smooth and unrestrained.
If there is a sustained increase in the breathing rate while
the dog is lying down and at rest, that would suggest that
something is amiss. But, be careful at jumping to the conclusion
that the pet is suffering from some great ailment. For example,
right now during'lhis excruciatingly hot season, a dog might be
panting to get rid of the increased body heat caused by the
increased environmental temperature. That does not mean that
the dog is. suffering from a respiratory distress' due to soe
disease or the other. Remember, dogs do not have sweat glands.
qnd io ,Th iho main way of getting rid of accumulated body

Si ,. l.i nd, a sustained and laborious breathing a.c
.. ... .i while the animal is at rest would suggest
i i il11 .i r with the animal. Similarly, the presence of
.... i vheezing, risping, coughing and a bubb'ing
.1 V i. quite audible, coming from the chest caviy)
:.,i 1. .,bnormai state of health.
.i r... i.r time, the discussion will centre more
..i i.... ,r ... .irious specific types of really abnormal

.,. i .,.:. 11 iin the context of documenting normal values.
-II il. '. I, average gestation (pregnancy) time for a dog/

ri-ci' noite hat the World Animal Week begins on
Oci.. m .dad nds on October 10. Please support the
!eii' it-- ia i Ht GSPCA will be carrying out during this


Pla.e its;'.itiaent disease preventati'-e m7ea res
ntaccinatiorv-, routine dewormings, r annti-
liea:'t-.wmorM n ication, etc) and adopt 'pet ..
the GSPC A. Animal Clinic and She a: b
Sti-eel a;ii(l O%-range Walk, if you have '.he
whereilthai to care well for the animals. not
Clinic a.d Shelter instead. Also, find ot m-.'ore
;abu i the society'ss free spay and e ering
prograumme. if you see anyone being cr:ei to an
animal. get in touch with the Clinic a; by
calling 226-4237.


C CHAMPION


l:Cookery Corner

S('*. .--' Welcome to the 367"' edition of
.J "Champion Cookery Corner", a
S }weekly feature giving recipes and
tips on cooking in Guyana.



Curry Powder is a mixture of many spices, including turmeric, ground cumin, and cardamom.
It adds a sweet, distinctive flavor and yellow colour to the breads and dishes in which it is used.
Here are two curry recipes which are little unusual to temptyour taste buds!


I Country Captain Curry


60g flour
Salt & Chico Black Pepper
4 Chicken pieces
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
I tablespoon butter
1 chopped onion
I garlic clove (minced)
I chopped red pepper
3 tomatoes
V2 teaspoon sugar
\1V teaspoon INDI Curry
Powder


Mix flour, -.alt, teaspoon Chici Black Pepper and
coat the chicken pieces. Heat butter and oil in a large
pan on medium heat. Fry the chicken pieces on both
sides until golden brown for about 10 minutes. Put
chicken aside on aplate.
Pour away the oil until only 2 teaspoons remain. Add
onion, garlic, red pepper and brown on low heat for
about 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, INDI Curry Powder,
sugar and thyme. Mix well and add the chicken -
pieces. Return to boil, then reduce heat and simmer
for about 30 minutes until chicken is tender.


Ingredients: Method: 1. /4 teaspoon thyme
4 chicken pieces Mix flour, salt and INDI Curry Powder and coat the 60graisins If necessary, increase the temperature so that most of
2 tablespoons flour chicken with it. Fry the chicken in the oil until golden Minced parsley the fluid evaporates. Stir in raisins and garnish with
1 teaspoon salt brown and then reduce the heat. cover and cook for Chopped roasted peanuts peanuts and parsley.
4 teaspoons INDI Curry Powder further 15 minutes, until tender.
SPONSORED B F THE MI NF4CTU'RERS OF
Oil for frying Slice bananas and add them to cook for 5 minutes.
2 bananas END.

2 -.3 limes about 20 minutes tintitIendi.Efddinig ',a lime. l. C ad er V'..*..-. ..,-- .
'1"cpdc.-'~''"" ''<'" Men~"hle oo thnce n bilig slted~~'er or uutad ~r (7A~AJ,


DR. STEVE URU:jBALL-,-'- -


a


Page XXIII


Sunday Chronicle October 2, 2005


''


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By Neil Marks y

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F rom catching and preparing caimans and
snakes for the export market to gracing
the catwalk for top designers, jasmine
Herzog seems to be a young woman of many
contrasts.
This is what the hazel-eved, 510" beauty is taking with
her to Sanya, China In early December when she vies fox
the Miss World title, in the hope that it will make an
impression hopefully, a very big one at that.
At just 18, the Libran beauty has already completed two
years of studies in Biology at the University of Guiana, and
%hen she resumes, will be making the switch to Veterinary
Science.
She-just loves animals dogs preferably, having had 10
once. Unfortunately, that numberls-now-down to four-
owing to illness5and dealh. --
Actuallyv, jasmine grew up around animals.
Her father, Kurt Herzog, a Swiss, came to Guiana some
30 years ago, fell in love with the country and jasmine's
mother and decided to gel into the wildlife export
business.
As a result, jasmine is no stranger to the interior and
its wild creatures.
Be it caimans, snakes, cockroaches, or spiders, jasmine
has come up close and personal, and, as mentioned at the
outset, would even jump into the caiman pond, collect the
animals, and prepare them for export.
"My father trained me to handle them," she said. She
grew up at Annandale on the East Coast of Demerara, under
a very strict upbringing. -
"I was never a fussy person. I don't go to dubs. I can
probably count the number of times I've been to a dub,,"
she says.
Being raised under a strict environment meant receiving
corporal punishment
She remembers having to select her own cherry whip
and not being "allowed" to sneak in.
Today's all too familiar cliched story of dreaming of
growing up and becoming a beauty queen is not Jasmine's
line.
"I was content dreaming of becoming a princess, not a
queen," she laughs.
However, pageantry was foreseeable.
At age 14, she started modeling for today's top
designer, Michelle Cole.
Cole was apparently looking for a tall, fair-skinned, skinny
model. Someone passed on jasmine's name and number-
From then on she started modeling and has graced the
catwalk for the likes of Derek Moore, Roger Gary, and most
of the local designers you can think of.
So how did the pageant thing happen?
"I sat down, thought a lot about it and decided I was
going to enter Miss Guyana World 2005," she said.
In fact, she was the first girl to enter the pageant, and
remained the only one for a long time to come before
others began to show up.
'I knew I could do it," she insists. "I'm not a vain person.
I just felt I was beautiful and smart enough to compete
and win, and it worked out for me. However, I never took
the other girls for granted. I knew they wanted to win this
thing just as badly as I wanted to."
She is confident she won the pageant fair and square,
despite the many innuendos being thrown around to the
contrary.
She, it seems, stepped right into the interview with this
newspaper, prepared to tell us off about what was written
in a gossip column in our weekend entertainment guide,
Weekend Confidential.
lumping to conclusions, perhaps?
"People are not stupid. I am not stupid, I know what
was written was about me," she snapped, obviously not
taking too kindly to the rumour.


'Winning the Miss World pageant or |
placing has absolutely nothing to do with
intelligence. It all has to do with luck.'

People say she talks too much, and is much too
confident for her own good. She calls it being assertive.
"1 think I'm assertive and I have the drive to compete.
I'm beautiful and smart. I need to believe that, and make
others know that," she says.
She feels it's the right attitude to have heading into
the Miss World competition.
"I'm not just going to Miss World II s my job to go out
--there and shine," she posits.
But whatever negative energy she's had thrown her way
just after being crowned was erased when she visited -
GLi EXPO.
The public's acceptance of her is what fuels her drive
as she takes on the international stage.
Guana's best showing at Miss World in
modern times was Olive Gopaul who
received extensive acclaim from the
international media.
"Olive didn't win, bul she
certainly did turn a lot of heads.
I plan to turn a few heads s
more," Jasmine said. -
She leaves for the Miss World -'
competition the last week -
October. She will spend Jus-t
under two weeks in London and'?
then move on to Sanya for the.
competition.
"This is a once in a lifetime -.
opportunity. Even if I don't win, I
plan on making an Impression,"
she sais.
She believes winning the
Miss World pageant or placing
has absolutely nothing to do
with intelligence. She feels ii has
to do with luck.
"iou just have to go out V
there and gel noticed. If \ou
gei picked, you're in," she
reasons.
'Of course, iou have to be
smart. If you're dumb, it will
show. But what counts is the
wa\ \ou look, and making sure
common sense comes out of
your mouth when iou speak,"
she adds.
There are a number of
competitions that can fast-track -
deleaies of Miss World into the
finals. These include athletics,
talent, modeling and swimwear. -i
jasmine sas she vill
concentrate on the modeling.
I-ler i\adrobe to China is being
put c',oetiner tN\ Derek 'Moore and
Michelle ol:,le
Th'e rii. \world ndpaQ ani s : .
sch-,edule,] r..,! l m' -l: 10. _.' l fi
f '. n S-i- inc ,ilus5 .
Gu,, a at I '.'.il 'I'i i ,- arnt j -ri rc 1 ol; ,n ..
t le 1h e'n;jiscr3! ;orp'iwnO s
anGi'.ief r.ager ir pier ":aiV'enlure"
life and ri ie -in e,'s ", or.r'e" .'
It fuir-!




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