Title: Guyana chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00032
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Alternate Title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown Guyana
Publication Date: September 4, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088915
Volume ID: VID00032
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text
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11M Cmirolc i.s at hit; wwguyanachfonicle.com


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GOVERNMENT PURSUING

ASSLE-FREE TRAVEL
F R The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, along with the
SMinistry of Home Affairs, will be continuing further
internal consultations to resolve the issue of
Guyanese being denied entry at certain countries'
ports. Page two
!lll~l-a mu"


MR RUDYINSANALLY

- ',:,r
,; .


.. .. . .... ....


~'J !


II J J 5 AMERINDIAN art and craft ,-
at the Umana Yana
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2 SUNDAY CHRONICLE September.4, 2005


Government pursuing



'hass e-free' travel for


(GINA) The Ministry of
Foreign Affairs, along with
the Ministry of Home Affairs,
will be continuing further


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internal
resolve th
being den
countries'
A re
response
Ministry o
shed some
resulted in
being of
Guyanese
some ports
Ministc
Rudy Insan
received si
certain imn
of both Ba
and Tobagc
visitors.
He sa
immigration
sent to Ba
issue.


Guyanese
consultations to "They came up with a very being foll
e issue of Guyanese good report that has provided respective G(
ied entry at certain measures that could be taken to
ports. obviate the risk of denial and
-cently circulated deportation."
to calls from the Further studies will be
>f Foreign Affairs to undertaken with records
light on the issue has provided by the Ministry of
a number of reasons Home Affairs of persons who
fered as to why were prohibited from entering
were refused entry at CARICOM countries. "We
S. will be pursuing- enquiries on
er of Foreign Affairs the basis of that information."
ally said the response Minister Insanally suggests
suggests that there are that persons desirous of
migration requirements travelling to those two MR RUD
arbados and Trinidad destinations have all the
o that must be met by required documentation to "We feel
minimise the chance of being the Caribb<
aid two Guyanese refused entry. (CARICOM)
)n officers were also He said the responses by to ask the mei
rbados to pursue the the Governments of Trinidad travel restr
and Tobago and Barbados are nationals," 1M


owed with
governments.


Y INSANALL


that in the spirit of
ean Community
, we have a duty,
mber States to ease
actions on our
minister Insanally


emphasised.
"Guyana has a very liberal
policy that accommodates other
Caribbean peoples, and while we
want our citizens to respect the
laws and insist that they have to
respect the laws of all countries,
we also expect that they would
be treated with courtesy and
afforded dignity at all ports of
entry in the region."




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"Some individuals have been
obviously guilty of bad
practices and that has resulted'
perhaps in hardened attitudes,
closer inspections and eventual
the denial of some persons," the
Foreign Affairs Minister said.
Dialogue with related
ministries in the two countries
to ascertain whether greater
cooperation could be achieved
accompanied by an exchange of
information, will equip the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs to
institute the necessary
machinery to facilitate travel by
Guyanese.
"I was very pleased with
the slant taken by the Prime
Minister of Barbados Owen
y Arthur. He made it clear that


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While immigration laws are not
Sto be .flouted, the dignity of
peoples within Caribbean have
to be respected, as he reminded
Barbados of the role Guyana
played in its development."
Minister Insanally said that
with the dialogue and the
cooperation of everyone,
including the travelling public;
progress will be had in this
regard.
Contrary to what is
portrayed in the press by
various aggrieved individuals
alleging mistreatment, Minster
Insanally said from
consultations with the Office of
the Director General of the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, it
was revealed that only one
person has come to the
Ministry in search of redress.
"Unless we have concrete
details of these cases we
cannot act on them. I would
urge the public not just to
give press reports without any
follow-up. I think it is in their
interest to inform us as to
what their grievances are."


Amerindian groups

making use of Heritage

Month to sell products


(GINA) A number of
Amerindian craft and other
groups are making use of the
opportunity during
Amerindian Heritage Month
celebrations to exhibit and
sell their products at the
Umana Yana, Kingston.
This was evident during the
launching of the occasion at the
Umana Yana on Thursday,
when several groups displayed
their products, including
handicraft, jewellery,
Amerindian food and ornaments.
Janet Patterson, a member
of an Amerindian group from
Santa Mission, Region Three
(Essequibo Islands/ West
Demerara) said that her group
members usually make the
products to sell to assist with
income-generation.
Another participant,
Colette Melville of the Central
Rupununi Artisans Guild group,
Region Nine (Upper Takutu/
Upper Essequibo) said that the


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group identified the Umana
Yana as the appropriate place to
exhibit and sell their products,
the demand for which is
growing.
She said that the group
comprises members of eight
communities.
Melville, of St. Ignatius
Village, pointed out that this is
the first year that the group has
taken part in Heritage Month
activities.
"We encourage young
people to do craft, and do it
often so that they will become
good at it," she continued.
The group's aim is to be
able to produce quality craft,
Melville said. Their work
includes wood-craft, leather-
craft and mukru (weaving).
Attendees at the launching
ceremony at the Umana Yana
were served with Amerindian
dishes and beverages, including
piwari.
The exhibition and sale
of Amerindian craft-and
other items at the Umana
Yana continues until
September 7.


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misinforr
THE Committee of Deans and
Senior Administrators of the
University of Guyana (UG), in
a press release, have ex-
pressed concerns over the re-
cent "misinformation appear-
ing in the media relating to
the Vice-Chancellor."
According to the release, the
contractofthe Vice-Chancellorcame
to an end on August 7, 2005, when
both theAcademic Board and Com-
mittee of Deans confirmed their
support for the reappointment of
the incumbent
It added that, on August 7, a
Council meeting was convened and
eight of the 20 appointed members
representing the basic quorum were
present, including Dr. Mark Kirton,
in his capacity as representative of
the Committee of Deans.
"On the issue of the Vice-
Chancellorship, the position of
the Academic Board was tabled.
However, council decided by a
majority vote, not to offer a new
contract to the incumbent and to
select from among those present
a sub-committee of three mem-
bers to deliberate and recommend






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action on Vice-Chaceel-or issue disability survey
on the process o, identifying an cellor. Dr. Kirton's selection and appoint-


acting Vice-Chancellor, and to
establish at a later date, a Search


A letter of appointment was
issued to him on the same day
and the University community
was informed.
The release pointed out, 'The
sub-committee, however, subse-
quently recognized that it had ex-
ceeded its mandate in making the
offer of appointment and on Au-
gust 29, corrected its actionby with-
drawing the offer. Contrary to the
statements appearing in the media,


ment have not been put to the Coun-
cil for approval."
The Committee of Deans and
Senior Administrators recognizes
and appreciates that Dr. Kirton, a
senior and respected member of the
university community, acted in good
faith in accepting the appointment.
The Committee stressed
that the misrepresentations of
the facts that have appeared
in the media are regrettable.


DR. MARK KIRTON


Committee to implement the
process of selecting a substan-
tive Vice-Chancellor," the release
explained.
On August 22, at a meeting,
the Committee of Deans and Se-
nior Administrators were in-
formed that the sub-committee
was tasked with recommending
a process to the Council for the
identification of an acting Vice-
Chancellor, and was not man-
dated to make an appointment.
However, two days later, Dr.
Kirton was invited to a meeting of
the sub-committee and informed that
it had agreed to appoint him to act
as Vice-Chancellor until the appoint-
ment of a substantive Vice-Chan-


THE LEARNING AN

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CHEMISTRY
PHYSICS
GEOGRAPHY
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NEW Director General of the
World Trade Organisation
(WTO), Mr. Pascal Lamy, as-
sumed office at the Geneva-
based Secretariat on Septem-
ber, 1, 2005.
Guyana's Minister of Foreign
Trade and International Coopera-
tion, Mr. Clement Rohee, in a con-
gratulatory message, said that Mr.
Lamy has assumed office at a criti-
cal juncture in the WTO, and the
multilateral trading system for which
"he will no doubt, need to draw
upon his special skills and experi-
ence to give durable leadership to
the current Doha Development
Round of Negotiations."


Mr. Lamy, who succeeds Dr.
Supachai Panitchpakdi, is ex-
pected to immediately focus on
the negotiations in Geneva and
the upcoming strategic WTO
Ministerial conference to be held
in Hong Kong in December.
Guyana and other member states
ofCARICOMarecunentlyengagedin
the talksaridare expected to participate
in thatmeeting, aimedat advancing de-
velopment and small economies of the
CaribbeanConinunity.
,- In Maiy last, Mr. Lamy,
former EU;Trade Commissioner,
met CARICOM Trade Ministers
in a special session of COTED
in Georgetown.


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THE National Commission
on Disability (NCD) has be-
gun interviewing persons
with disabilities in Regions
Four (Demerara/Mahaica),
Six (East Berbice/
Corentyne), Seven (Cuyuni/
Mazaruni) and Nine (Upper
Takutu/Upper Essequibo) as
part of a survey.
A press release said local re-
searchers will carry out inter-
views with friends, relatives and
care givers of disabled persons
above four-years-old. The data
collection process will last until
October 31, 2005.
Researchers have already
been dispatched to some areas
between Industry to Mahaica,
Agricola to Cummings Lodge,
Eccles to Soesdyke, New
Amsterdam, Rose Hall,
Corriverton, Bartica, Upper
Mazaruni, South, South Central


and North Rupununi, the release
noted.
Researchers will be ap-
proaching health and educa-
tion establishments and reli-
gious and community groups
to help identify persons with
disabilities.
The survey is to gain in-
formation that will inform
policy making and planning,
and will be used to ensure
persons with disabilities are
included, have equal opportu-
nities and access to services,
so that they can fully partici-
pate in society.
Findings of the project,
which is supported by the
United Nation's Children
Fund (UNICEF), the Govern-
ment of Guyana, the World
Bank and the Voluntary Ser-
vices Overseas (VSO), will be
launched early next year.


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Licapaniese [141 101i onirme]'l [ i


DOCTORS say two bodies
found in southern
Afghanistan on Thursday
are those of missing
Japanese tourists.
They said dental records
have confirmed the identities of
Jun Fukusho, 44, and Shinobu
Hasegawa, 30, both teachers
from Hiroshima.
The head of the pathology
department at Kabul
University, where autopsies
took place, said they had been
shot dead.
The bodies were found near
the main road between
Kandahar and Pakistan. The
tourists went missing on
August 8.
They had apparently
entered the country from
Pakistan to go sightseeing,
Japanese diplomatic sources
said.
Hassan Halemi, head of
pathology at Kabul University,
said: "After four hours of
testing, we realized that both


The body of one tourist i
autopsy in Kabul
bodies are those two Japanese.
Both were shot dead."
He said it appeared they had
been dead for three weeks at
least, killed by bullets to the
head.
TALEBAN DENIAL
The Japanese foreign
ministry has confirmed the


notified the
families.
The junior high
school teachers had
travelled to
1 Pakistan on
August 6 and were
expected to return
to Japan on
( August 19.
Tourists are
rare in Afghanistan,
ST particularly in the
south and east,
j where armed
s carried to criminal gangs and
Taleban fighters are
active.
However, two Taleban
commanders told Associated
Press the group had- not
kidnapped or killed the two.
Kandahar provincial
governor Asadullah Khalid
said he thought the killings
may have been carried out by
a criminal gang.


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE September 4, 2005 5


Solid Waste Authority raps 'dirty'


JAMAICA Gleaner The
National Solid Waste
Management Authority
(NSWMA) is militantly
moving to stop business
people who are breaking the
law by indiscriminately
dumping their garbage in
non-designated areas.
Errol Greene, executive
director of the NSWMA, told The
Gleaner that his administration was
extremely concerned about the


manner in which many members of
corporate Jamaica across the island
are disposing of their waste. Mr.
Greene revealed that several
proprietors are acting in
contravention to the National Solid
Waste Act. "They (some business
people) just pay a cart man to
dump it somewhere," he revealed.
Mr. Greene added that
several municipal councils have
also expressed concern about the
situation. Mayor of Portmore,


George Lee,.who has witnessed
the unclean and unsightly
practice in his municipality,
corroborated the executive
director's claim. "Some pay a
little man to move their garbage
and don't care where they
dump it," he said. Mayor Lee
said he staunchly supports the
militant move by the NSWMA
to regularise the disposal of
refuse from the commercial
sector and that his


administration has already been
on the offensive to remedy the
matter. "I strongly support this
move (and) we have been moving
after some of them," stressed
Mayor Lee who highlighted that
the lawbreakers are the minority.
Mr. Greene emphasised that
the collection of commercial
garbage was not a part of the
mandate of the NSWMA. "They


1*..


c~gartpo:

csi '


should make their own
arrangements ...," he insisted.
However, Mr. Greene said his
administration is not averse to
ironing out an agreement with
the proprietors for the
collection and dumping of their
waste, as it would be an
additional source of revenue for
the NSWMA. "We are looking
at that and you will hear


GREENHEART

MEDICAL UNIVERSITY


something shortly," he said.
Already, Mr. Greene has
had discussions with one
Chamber of Commerce in St.
Catherine and is gearing up
to speak to others. "We will
be relaying our concerns to
other Chambers of
Commerce and (individual)
business people," he'
revealed.


i


JAMAICA Gleaner.- Chair-
man of the CARICOM Re-
gional Organisation for Stan-
dards and Quality (CROSQ),
Dr. Omer Thomas, has ex-
pressed concern about what
he considers the large num-
ber of institutions not ac-
credited to meet the require-
ments of the CARICOM
Single Market and Economy
(CSME).
Dr. Thomas, who is also
the executive director of the
Bureau of Standards Jamaica,
was speaking at the second
annual general meeting of
CROSQ at the Courtleigh
Hotel, New Kingston on
Wednesday.
He said the lack of
accreditation could lead to
confusion within the regional
market
The CROSQ chairman said
several organizations, including
educational institutions were
unaware that, in order to have
their goods and services
exported throughout the region,
they must be accredited.
"We are going to have a lot
of confused people who believe
that goods and services can be
traded without accreditation,
and that once they are institu-
tions then their services become
automatically accredited," he


said.
Dr. Thomas said the
organisation would this year
host an educational campaign to
inform the region about Trans-
boundary movement of goods
and services.
He said the campaign would
also highlight the minimum
requirements for trade within
the regional market.
According to Dr. Thomas,


most of the laboratories within
the region are also not
accredited and, as such, the
results of the goods and services
being produced from these tests
are inaccurate.
In addition, he said the
island's government
ministries are unauthorised
to accredit goods or services
for the regional market.


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Medical Officers with at least one year post registration experience
who are interested in the Surgical Postgraduate Diploma Prograrmto
be undertaken at the Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation are
invited to a meeting with Dr. Madan Rambaran, Director of Medical &
Professional Services, GPHC on:

DATE:. Wednesday September 7, 2005
TIME: 1800 hrs
VENUE: Multipurpose Hall Ground Floor
of the Libray, GPHC Compound


To discuss and clarify issues pertaining to the Program.

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i






6 SUNDAY CHRONICLE-September 4, 2005'


Editorial)




AMERICA'S



NIGHTMARE





AS THE United States of America grapples
with the aftermath of its worst natural disas-
ter in living memory to have resulted from
the mind-boggling batterings from "Hurri-
cane Katrina" in the Gulf Coast, the' Carib-
bean region has been quick to reach out
with expressions of sympathy and offers of
aid.
The expressed concerns and offers of .assistance,
variously identified.within the Caribbean, including
Guyana, are as they should be towards the peopleof a
nation renowned for their generosity in responding to
calamities suffered by nations around the world.
A mixture of pride and politics may prevent the
George Bush administration from accepting any relief aid
from Caribbean nations as offered by Cuba and Venezu-
ela. Or, for that matter, a so-called 'enemy' state like Iran
in the Middle East.


The heartening reality is that from small and poor na-
tions to the big and wealthy ones, there continues to be
a reaching out to suffering humanity in those devastated
states in the Gulf Coast with which the Caribbean region
can also identify historical cultural roots, family ties and
the warm friendship established over years of visitations.
Guyanese, Jamaicans, Haitians, Grenadians and Ba-
hamians for sure would still have fresh memories of
America's helping hand during recent natural disasters
resulting from floods and hurricanes. .
Today, they may share a sense of impotence in not
being able to contribute any help of significance amid
the anguish cries of survivors while the body count con-
tinues, with the thousands dead or missing from the un-
precedented destruction wreaked by "Katrina".
But in telling President George Bush in a sympathy
message about how "extremely saddened" he and his
Government were by the destruction inflicted by "Katrina",
President Bharrat Jagdeo would have expressed senti-
ments shared across this region and around'the world.
The Caribbean Community Secretariat, in a mes-
sage conveyed through the U.S. Ambassador to Guyana,
Roland Bullen, has noted: "CARICOM is confident that
the resilience of the government and people of the
United States of America will allow them to confront the
current situation with courage; and that this resilience will
serve them in good stead in facing the challenges of re-
lief and rehabilitation..."
For all the political troubles that so often reveal them-
selves in U.S.-Cuba or Venezuela-U.S. relations, it is re-
freshing to know that there are among,nations of the
Greater Caribbean governments in Havana and Caracas
that have moved with alacrity in extending both sympa-
thy and practical offers of relief aid to help victims of
'Katrina".
Cuban President Fidel Castro stood among the more
than 500 members of the Cuban National Assembly last
Thursday to mark a minute of silence as an expression
of solidarity with the victims of "Katrina", most of who are


poor Blacks and Hispanic Americans.
Then followed an offer to make available about 1,000
Cuban doctors and supplies of medicine if the govern-
ment in Washington would permit such aid at a time of
monumental crisis.
Guyana's border neighbour, Venezuela, which ex-
ports most of its oil to the USA, announced that its state-
owned CITGO Petroleum would donate US$1 million in
immediate relief aid.
At the same time, President Hugo Chavez chose to
criticise the Bush administration for having been more
focused on Iraq than paying heed to the threatened per-
ils in America's Gulf Coast.
As we are already Witnessing from 'the traumatic tele-
vised scenes, post-hurricane criticism's ,may abound
within and out of the USA. But now is the time when, in
the words of the solidarity resolution passed by the Cu-
ban Parliament last week, "the entire world should feel
this (American) tragedy as if it were their own...".
This is a sentiment with which we can all readily
empathise in this hour of America's nightmare of horren-
dous tragedies.





CHRONICLE
Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Sunday Editor: Michelle Nurse
Editorial: 227-5216; 227-5204; 22-63243-9
Sports: 225-7174
After hours 226-3243-9
Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is at www.guyanach'ronicle.com
e-mail address sundayeditor@guyanachronicle.com
Lama A'enue, Bel Air Park. Georgetown, Guyana.


By Rickey Singh

WITH President Ken Gordon
the only new face of signifi-
cance among current execu-
tive members of West Indies
Cricket Board Inc., it may be
largely of academic interest if
they decide at today's meet-
ing to officially make public
the already widely
discussed "Lucky Commit-
tee" report into the contro-
versial WICB/Digicel spon-
sorship contract.
Given regional media cover-
age, including by the
"Chronicle", of various aspects
of the report, obtained from
credible sources, it is perhaps
now more relevant to know:
First, what action would be
taken, by Gordon and his execu-
tive colleagues at today's meet-
ing in St. John's, Antigua, to re-
store some measure of public
confidence in the credibility of
the WICB in view of
the secretive negotiations that
resulted in the July 2004 WICB/
Digicel five-year sponsorship
contract?
Secondly, what disciplinary
measures, if any, are to be pur-
sued against those WICB offi-
cials, including current Chief Ex-
ecutive Officer, Roger
Brathwaite, for failing to con-
firm to the WICB's Memoran-
dum and Articles of Association
in the conduct of the negotia-
tions that led to what has
emerged as "ambush marketing"
in the replacement of Cable and
Wireless by Digicel?
Thirdly, since the three-
member committee, chaired by
Justice Anthony Lucky and in-
cluding Avondale Thomas and
Gregory Thomas, to review the
sponsorship negotiations were


deprived of the oppor
have the contract inc
their report, what doe
dent Gordon intend to
that controversial docu
Surely, for all the se
sues raised by the revi
mittee in general, plus
informative personal d
"declaration" by Cl
Lucky, it cannot be bu
usual between the W
Digicel.
Not with so much
to secure the full coope


PRESIDENT KEN G
PRESIDENT KEN GO


tunity to
luded in
es Presi-


changes in management policies
and personnel?


do about CLEAN SLATE?
iment? Indeed, to what extent is
serious is- Gordon himself committed to
ew com- promoting significant changes,
the very including suggested restructur-
issenting ing of the Board, even if
chairman not necessarily going after
siness as a clean slate?
ICB and If, for example, CEO
Brathwaite is not ready at
at stake today's meeting to offer his res-
-ration of ignation, will he be requested to
do so? Further, will the Board
be disposed to create the new
post of Executive Corporate
Secretary with specific author-
ity, as recommended by the
'Lucky committee'?
Is it not also reasonable to
expect at least an apology by
past WICB President, Teddy
Griffith, for his own identified
administrative lapses that have
b been associated with the "legally
flawed" contract signed with
Digicel, after C&W was unfairly
treated in the negotiating pro-
cess?


)RDON


the West Indies Players Asso-
ciation (WIPA) in time for the
proposed West Indies tour of
Australia, and, generally, to plan
for the future development of
what remains the region's most
popular sport and so integrally
linked to our social and eco-
nomic integration.
Having succeeded in the re-
cent defeat, by two votes, of
Clive Lloyd, viewed as the
greatest West Indies cricket cap-
tain, for the post of Vice-Presi-
dent of the WICB, another ques-
tion of relevance is whether the
"old guards" of WICB Inc. and
their allies are in the mood for


It is felt by some stakehold-
ers of West Indies cricket, not
to mention passionate lovers of
the game across the region, that
instead of spending valuable
time quibbling over media leaks
of aspects of the review
committee's report, or why
Chairman Lucky gave a copy,
conditionally, to Prime Minister
Keith Mitchell of Grenada, the
Executive Board should be more
focused on why WICB
Inc. trapped itself into a con-
tract with binding confidential
clauses that seemingly gives
Digicel the last laugh?
If the much-needed healing
between the WICB and WIPA
is to take place, as Mr Gordon


INS FOR




MEETING


himself seems anxious to
achieve, and which is most de-
sirable in the interest of West
Indies cricket beyond Cricket
World Cup 2007 then the
legacy of secrecy that has been
at the root of the still
secret WICB/Digicel sponsor-
ship contract, must be decently
terminated.
The strange procedures,
lack of transparency and failure
to confirm to the WICB's Ar-
ticles of Association that con-
tributed to "ambush marketing"
tactics, as identified by the
three-member review commit-
tee, were to eventually result in
Digicel "unfairly" replacing
Cable and Wireless as new
sponsor of West Indies
cricket.

LUCKY'S DECLARATION
Let it be assumed, for the
sake of argument, that commit-
tee members Georges and Tho-
mas had a plausible reason to
differ from the personal dissent-
ing "Declaration" of Chairman
Lucky that was presented to
President Gordon on August
15, along with signed copies of
the committee's report.
This, however, would still
NOT diminish from the gravity
of the findings that led all three
members to conclude, on the ba-
sis of legal opinion sought, that
failure by WICB officials to
confirm to the Board's Memo-
randum and Articles and the
Companies Act 1995, "would,
in all probability, render the
sponsorship agreement between
the WICB and Digicel 'null and
void'..."
In his personal "declara-
tion", Chairman Lucky went
even further by stating that
"the "WICB/Digicel sponsor-


ship agreement is legally flawed
and may be null and void...
Therefore, the agreement should
be renegotiated in accordance
with the Memorandum and Ar-
ticles of Association and that all
the stakeholders are given an
opportunity to make an in-
put..."
Clearly discouraged by their
findings, the three


committee members have rec-
ommended, among other things,
that: "There must be strict ad-
herence to the provisions set
out in the Memorandum and
Articles of Association of the
WICB Inc. (the management or
business arm of the WICB)".
Having earlier expressed
dismay over the absence of cru-
cial records of minutes pertain-
ing to the negotiating process by
which Digicel replaced Cable
and Wireless as sponsor, the
committee also called for "mi-
nutest and resolutions of the
Board at meetings to be kept in
accordance with the Articles of
Association of the WICB..."
The committee made a
critical assessment of the spon-
sorship agreement as it impacts
on the WICB's relationship
with WIPA, which had made
clear when interviewed, that it
was "in the dark" about the na-
ture of the secretly signed con-
tract and, consequently, it was
difficult in the circumstances to
achieve the required coopera-


tion.
In the section of the report
that addresses whether the
sponsorship arrangement made
with Digicel "is in the best in-
terest of the WICB and contin-
ued cricket development", the
following view was offered:
"Our review revealed that
the Board gave commitments
which would be difficult to de-


liver in the absence of players
contracts. We have seen no
evidence that the Board acted in
bad faith; but the consequences
of Clause 5 of the new agree-
ment is evident by the failure of
the Board and Digicel to get
members of WIPA to conform
and agree to new match con-
tracts....
"The committee found that
the negotiations were con-
ducted in secret. So-called con-
fidentiality agreements were
mentioned but not produced. It
seems to us that the CEO and,
to a lesser extent, the
(then) President were privy to
discussions and arrangements
which the Board members were
not aware of and did not ques-
tion or query..."
What a pathetic picture
of WICB Inc's management
of West Indies cricket. For
now we await the outcome of
today's meeting of the Execu-
tive Board in St. John's. Of
course, so too will be Digicel
and WIPA.


KEY QUEST(




TODAY'S WICB





SUNDAY .HRONICLESeptb'ter'4','2M35" 7


CELEBRATING




AMERINDIAN HERITAGE


THE month of September is an important
time in our national calendar. Septem-
ber was declared Amerindian Heritage
Month and September 10 designated
Amerindian Heritage Day by the late Presi-
dent Cheddi Jagan in 1994. This gesture was
a clear signal by the PPP/Civic administra-
tion that the decades of governmental neglect
and second-class status of our first people
would end.


The PPP/C in 1992 cam-
paigned on a platform to ensure
that all citizens are treated fairly,
those marginalised integrated
into the mainstream of our soci-
ety and opportunities are pro-
vided not on the basis of
ethnicity or political affiliation,
but on needs and equality.
The PPP/C has not only
been interested in symbolism.
Amerindians have seen and ex-
perienced positive changes to
their lives in all areas cultural,
social, economic and political.
Every single Amerindian com-
munity, despite its remoteness,
has benefited from the national
development drive.
Amerindians are today get-
ting their fair and equal share of
development. Unlike under the
PNCR regime, they are no longer
denied basic services like pri-
mary and secondary schools,
health care and even basic eco-
nomic opportunities.
The main, but certainly not
the only areas of concern to
Amerindian welfare are: the
Amerindian Act; Amerindian land
demarcation; village democracy;
education; health care; water;


forestry; mining; protected areas;
tourism in Amerindian commu-


prosperity has increased in the
various Amerindian communi-
ties. In all areas of life, we see
Amerindians holding prominent
positions as more educational
and training opportunities are
made available.
Guyana's record of attention
and even special programmes to
reverse the neglect of its indig-
enous population is. unprec-
edented in this region. In certain
societies, the indigenous people
have to riot and even declare civil
war before they get basic social
services and are allowed to have
a small input in the national de-


9O jE




MR. ROBERT PERSAUD


nities and cultural development.
There has been tangible
progress in each of these sectors.
Poverty has been reduced and


cisions and issues that affect
their way of life.
The ruling Party while even
in opposition has been strident


NOTICE
The following persons
are in possession of
Motor Scooters owned
by Courts (Guy) Inc. .

Anyone knowing the 6.
whereabouts of these
persons and / Bikes
Please call 225-2814.
A reward is offered


!;i.~T4




--: Iui ___f IqF


in its advocacy, and representa-
tion of Amerindian issues. To-
day it is the Party which gets
the single most votes from
Amerindian communities. And
this has been growing. But the
PPP/C administration's
programme is less about getting
votes and more about ensuring
that this category of citizen is
treated no different from Indo-
Guyanese, Afro-Guyanese or
any other group.
The advances by our
Amerindian brothers and sisters
have destroyed stereotypes and
even disrespect they have had
to endure as a result of a State
structure which was unsympa-
thetic to their basic needs and
concerns.
There is now an Amerindian
Affairs Ministry. This ministry
is the first to get its own original
building with the necessary in-
frastructure to betterserve the
needs of Amerindians, and they
get support from other sectors


by Robert Persaud


and ministries enhancing its ser-
vice to Amerindians and even
other communities in the Hin-
terland.
The month of September is
also important for it allows our
other groups to learn more about
the rich and interesting
Amerindian culture. In a diverse
society such as ours, there is no
room for misunderstandings or
misconceptions about our di-
verse people. It also provides an
opportunity for all Amerindian
communities to celebrate their
achievements and continue to
make representation for more
development as other areas have
done.
Sadly, in our midst there are
those with their own agenda who
seek to misrepresent Amerindian
development issues. The recent
campaign by a few misled ele-
ments to thwart government of
efforts to revise the outdated
Amerindian Act of 1951 is an
example. The Minister of
Amerindian Affairs and GINA
have been working overtime to
clear the air on this matter and


debunk the many misrepresen-
tations.
For a few misguided groups,
it seems as if funding and poli-
ticking are more important than
real, genuine representation of
Amerindians. Fortunately, ordi-
nary Amerindians have been
paying little attention to these
plots. But organizations and agen-
cies which dole out funding to
these groups and individuals
should look carefully at their true
agenda. Again in September we
would see these groups (and I
must add there are those which
genuinely work with the Minis-
try of Amerindian Affairs to ad-
vance Amerindian development)
working to slow and even inhibit
real Amerindian progress.
They cannot undermine the
spirit of Amerindian Heritage
Month.. The celebration of
Amerindian Heritage is not only
for Amerindians but for
Guyanese. Amerindian Heritage
is an important attribute of the
Guyanese Heritage as we foster
unity in diversity and cultural
tolerance and understanding.


The Guyana National Cooperative Bank is requesting the undermentioned persons, or any one
knowing their whereabouts, to kindly make contact with our office situated at
77 Croal Street & Winter Place, Stabroek, Georgetown
or at telephone numbers 225-4346, 225-6971 or 225-9486, as a matter of urgency.


Name


Last known address


GEORGETOWN
Alpine Grant
Anthony Bookie
Clement Cumberbatch
David R Bacchus
Del's Restaurants
E.W.L. Adams
D. Tappin c/o Eldorado
Advertisers & Printery
Gerald Bradford.
Gwenneth King and I or
Stanford Jackson c/o
Jackson Engineering Ent.
Nelson Das c/o
Nelda Enterprises
PPDM Construction
Ramchand Jewan
Prince Warwick

LINDEN
Maxie lan Chung
Patnomike Steel and
Erection Co.Ltd
Patnomike Steel Fabrication
and Creation Co. Ltd
c/io Patrick Haynes
Patnricl Williams
Juliet Ann Smith


215 Cross & Fifth Streets, Alexander Village, Georgetown
102 Carmichael Street, North Cummingsburg, Georgetown
11 North Road & Light Streets, Bourda, Georgetown
10 Sheriff Street, Campbellville, Georgetown
232 Middle Street, South Cummingsburg, Georgetown
100 Sugar Cane Street, South Ruimveldt, Georgetown

Lot 147 Garnett Street, Kitty, Georgetown
309 Rohintal Street, Prashad Nagar, Georgetown


138 Crown Street, Queenstown, Georgetown

686 Woodpecker Avenue, South Ruimveldt Gardens
29 Mai, & Holmes Street, Georgetown
85 Roxanne Burnham Gardens, Georgetown
240 South Road. Bourda, Georgetown


209 Silver Hills, Moblissa, Soesdyke/Linden Highway

630-632 Industrial Area, Linden



38 Kuru Kururu, Newton, Soesdyke
141 Fraser Road, Kara Kara, Linden


EAST COAST I EAST BANK DEMERARA
Patrick Carrington 219 Melanie Damishana, East Coast Demerara
Farida & Abdin Hoosain 6 Providence Park, East Bank Demerara
L Pellew 59 Samantha Point, Grove, East Bank Demerara
Waylin Enterprise c/o
Wayne Parker 570 571 Peters HIii-, East Bank Demerara
Wesley r 11: 382-384 Republic Park, East Bank Demerara


C Solomnan & A


22 Seafield' I -i. West Coast Berbice


IWlflv "Q% U.M. vvv


Ulr





8 'SUNDAY CHRONICLE) Sspte~MbeA, '"2 j$.:



International Conference



Centre to be ready by year-end


(GINA) The construction of
the Guyana International
Conference Centre currently
ongoing at Turkeyen, East
Coast Demerara, is expected
to be completed and handed
over to the Government by
year-end.
Technical Advisor to the
Minister of Transport and
Hydraulics, Walter Willis,
said the major super-structure
is 100 percent completed, but
there are 'finishing touches'
left to be done. These, he said,


account for about 20-25 per-
cent of the total project. In-
stalling electrical and air- con-
ditioning ducts, locks and
date ducts and tiling are yet
to be completed.
At present, work has started
on the fence and the access road,
and landscaping of the area is
expected to start soon.
The project that started in
September 2004 was given a
14-month duration, but due to
the flood in January/Febru-
ary, which severely affected


MALE/FEMALE SUPERVISOR TO WORK IN HARDWARE STORE
'Must have knowledge ol Hardware Items 'Must be 25 years and over
MALE/FEMALE RECEPTIONIST FOR HOTEL PENTHOUSE
*Must have secondary school education and knowledge of cerical work *Age 35 years and over
ONE ABLE BODY PORTER TO WORK IN HARDWARE STORE
Aae 45 years and over


the East Coast Demerara, the
contractor, China Civil.Engi-
neering Construction Corpo-
ration, requested a two-month
extension.
Following consultations
with the contractor and the
representatives of the Chi-
nese consultants, it was de-
cided that a reasonable exten-
sion period of one-month
would be granted.
The project is being
funded through grant aid
provided by the Chinese
Government at a total cost
of US$7M, and the contrac-
tor has assured that the De-
cember deadline will be
met.
The multi-functional
building will boast a main
conference hall that can ac-
commodate 355 persons,
five meeting rooms, an ex-
hibition hall, training
classrooms, and dining
rooms.


THE GUYANA AND TRINIDAD MUTUAL

FIRE & LIFE GROUP OF INSURANCE COMPANIES




The GTM Fire & Life Group of Insurance Companies hereby invites applications to fill the position
of ACCOUNTANT.

SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITY

The Accountant should have the following capabilities:- -
* Preparation of financial statements in accordance with International Accountant Standards

* Preparation of budgets and performance reporting for management

* Preparation, and filing of statutory returns

* Ability to institute and improvise systems to maintain and improve integrity

* Ability to work in a computerized environment

* Must be self-motivated, and forward-thinking


Either:-


Qualifications


The Association of Chartered and Certified Accountants. (ACCA) or equivalent qualification
with a minimum of'three (3) years experience in a similar capacity; OR

ACCA Level 2 or equivalent with a minimum of five (5) years experience in a similar capacity.

Experience in insurance accounting would be an asset.

COMPENSATION
The remuneration package will be dependent upon qualification and relevant experience. The Company
offers other benefits including Pension Scheme, Medical Scheme and Vacation Allowance.

Applications should be addressed to the Company Secretary/Human Resources Manager either
by post or e-mail to reach him'not later than 9th September, 2005.


THE COMPANY SECRETARY/
HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER
GTM Fire & Life Group of Insurance Companies
27-29 Robb & Hincks Street, Georgetown
E-mail: coysecty@gtm-gy.comi


'TM
SOUND, SOLID
& RELIABLE
!%emwm"qm"


W.,

,' .'. *' .




Back view of the Guyana International Conference Centre at Turkeyen, East Coast
Demerara. (A GINA/ Ameer Khan)


S LIVE UP TO THE Etfcah u IGE &
k-m- CHALLENGE OF BEING A
unicef YOUTH PARLIAMENTARIAN


If you've got what it takes, then apply to be part of:
National Youth Parliament 2005
Monday, October 24, 2005, at Ocean View International
Convention Centre


* Individuals 15-30 years old must submit
more than 1000 words on:"THE ROLE
CONSOLIDATION OF DEMOCRACY
GOVERNANCE IN GUYANA."


an essay of no
OF YOUTH IN
AND GOOD


On the top left-hand corner of the essay, write your name,
address, telephone number and or email address,


Successful applicants will
screening at which they
presentation.


be selected for preliminary
are required to do an oral


Selected Parliamentarians will be required to attend all
workshops and two (2) weeks of intense training.

Entries must reach the NYP Secretariat, on or before
Monday, September 12, 2005. Entries must be mailed to:

NYP Secretariat, P.O. Box 12368, Georgetown, Guyana
OR 122 Oronoque Street, Georgetown
OR email: guydaguyana@yahoo.com
QUERIES: 225-9420

A PROJECT OF GUYDA

SUPPORTED BY
SAID


,- --dWAM&o





SUNDAY CHRONICliESeitemit eri "iGt, '20



Things have changed drastically and for the better


Minister Rodrigues notes at Amerindian Heritage Month launching


(GINA) Minister of
Amerindian Affairs, Carolyn
Rodrigues, has stated that in-
digenous people here are now
very proud to be Amerindians,
pointing out that this was not
the case for a very long time.
She explained that in this
sense, the theme for
Amerindian Heritage Month,
"Overcoming Challenges as
we Progress" is appropriate.
The Minister noted that the
progress made by Amerindians
and the decline of negative ste-
reotyping of the indigenous
people over the past years was
aided by Government's in-
creased focus on Amerindians.
She said this to the large crowd
of Amerindians. Government
officials and members of the
Diplomatic Corps at the Umana
Yana during the launching of
Amerindian Heritage Month
2005 last Thursday evening.
"Amerindian Heritage
Month serves several purposes
-for some it is a time to think
deeply about our history, the
present, the future; for some it
is a time to retrieve and share
aspects of our culture with oth-
ers, for some it is a time to be
merry for a whole month, and
for others it is a perfect time to
put Government's efforts under
the microscope," she con-
tended.
Minister Rodrigues referred
to some of the advances made
by her ministry over the past
years, including the new build-
ing that now houses the minis-
try, constructed at a cost of ap-
proximately $50M, and the Re-
vision of the Amerindian Act.
"We are now close to the
end of the long, tiring some-
times frustrating, but worth-
while process which, to date,
has lasted more than three years


and cost in excess of $30M.
The Bill has been tabled in the
National Assembly and will be
considered at the next session of
the Parliament," the Amerindian
Affairs Minister explained.


CAROLYN RODRIGUES
She stated that there has
never been more consultation on
a piece of similar legislation as
has been the case with the new


Amerindian Bill.
The progress made by
Amerindians in the education
sector as well as the completion
of training of Village Councils
and developments in the health
and social services sec-
tors were also included
in the Minister's recap
of Amerindian develop-
ment over the years.
Regarding land de-
marcation issues, Minis-.
ter Rodrigues said, "I
know the next nine
months or so will be
very challenging and
some may want to con-
vert this issue into a
weapon of mass de-
struction." She however
posited that she is en-
couraged since in her es-
timation, communities
have had enough of the
misinformation and con-
fusion and are now making their
own decisions.
"I am pleased to let you
know that 14 additional commu-


I,_


, ., ....... .
- j
___"_i


NIS advises that

Invalidity Benefit is paid

only if there is

permanent incapacity

for work.


APEX EDUCATION ,
CELEBRATES 8TH ANNIVERSARY IN ROYAL STYLE (CSEC RESULTS 2005).
Apex Education has an overall CSEC pass rate of 95.5% for Full-time Students,
98.5% for Evening Students and 99% for 4" Form Candidates.

121 Students wrote CSEC 5 Distinctions in Mathematics, English A, English B,
Office Procedures and Information Technology.

Congratulations (Students who achieved A
Distinctions and Grades 1, 2 and 3) -


NAME AMO

Nasir Khan
Thelisha DeSouza
Parsram Singh
Sangeeta Lalcha
Reshma Boucher
Ryan Affonso
Satya Pamnaryan
Intiaz Subharl
Arvindo Samaroo
Arvindo Singh
Ramnauth Khemraj
Carmelle Dey
Shawn Clarke
David Bacchus
Jordanna Scott
Dennis Persaud
Sharon McLoud
Rebeena Jaikarran
Mahendra
Jackline Budhram
, -.. -, '.. ::-. '


UNT OF SUBJECTS


10
9
9
8
8 '

8
7
7
7
7
7
7
7

6
6
6
6
6
6


Top 4' Form Candidates
Rudy Balgobin -
Jevon Rocke Grades 1, 2 & 3
Anthony Durga--


,1


o



0 &


3 Campuses (Expanding by hundreds)
o Main Campus -
11 Vryheid's Lust Public Road, ECD
"1 a Annex (CSEC Centre) -
22 Atlantic Gardens, ECD
New Campus -
21 Kissoon Street, Better Hope North, ECD.


nitics have agreed to demarca-
tion, two have received ap-
proval for the extensions of
their lands and four conummnuni-
ties will be receiving absolute
grants for the lands they use
and occupy before the end of
the month."
The Amerindian Affairs
Minister disclosed that Cabi-
net has approved the titling
of an additional four commu-
nities and the necessary pa-
perwork is now being com-
pleted.
This year marks the elev-
enth year that Amerindian
Heritage Month is being cel-
ebrated. The celebration will
continue throughout the


month with the exhibition
and sale of Amerindian craft
at the Umana Yana continu-
ing until September 7. There
will be a church service on


September 04, followed by
Heritage Day celebrations ia
Moraikobai Village, Region
Five (Mahaica/ Berbice), on
September 10.


The Guyana Teachers' Union seeks a

with at least five (5)years experience.
Application must reach the
General Secretary
Guyana Teachers' Union
Woolford Avenue, Georgetown
Or
PO Box # 10996
Iso j 1 V1I I Pt


PERSONAL PROTECTIVE

CLOTHING/UNIFORMS

Suppliers are invited to bid for the supply of PROTECTIVE CLOTHING for use in
GPL's operations.


Pants Denim 1000
Khaki pants Drill 250
Navy blue pants Tetrex 100
Navy' Blue skirts Denim/TetrexKhaki/ drill 4
Light blue polo shirts 250
Light grey polu shirts 250
Jade green polo shirts 50
White shirt jacs Cotton,'poi ester 100
Light grey shirt jacs Cotton/polyester 200
Blue &n1s shool sleeved C.ltonlpolyester 150
Blue shirts long sleeved Cotton/polyester 350
Cream shirts long sleeved Ccttonipov'esler 350
Navy blue overcoats short sleeved Drill 150
t.'y blue overcoats long sleeedi Dill 20
White overcoats short sleeved Drill 150
White overcoats long sleeved Drill 10
White overalls short sleeved Drill 150
White overalls long sleeved Drill 20
Navy blue overalls short sleeved Drill 350
Na tvy blue overall, lofnqi "leev'ed Drill 20
RA'r' CoIu.i fiyell '.,',' ,Si-O
Rami its uiyellov.) 400


/ Every piece must carry the GPL logo embroidered.
Each bidder will be supplied illth measurements and other specifications,
and will be expected to present samples of each item before the final
contract is awarded.
/ Further information may be obtained from the office of the Contracts and
Supplies Manager, Guyana Power & Light Inc., 40 Main St., Georgetown.
/ Bids must be accompanied by swatches and submitted in plain Manila
envelopes marked:
TENDER FOR PERSONAL PROTECTIVE
CLOTHING/UNIFORMS
Secretary to the Tender Board
257/259 Middle St., Georgetown, -.. ...
Guyana.
Bids must be delivered to the GPL Tender Box at 257/259 Middle St.,
v Georieto''n before 13:00 h on Friday 30 September, 2005.
Bids will be opened at 13:30 h at the same location on Friday 30 September,
v 2005 in the presence of bidders/representatives who choose to attend.
GP resrvs te igh tIrjet n Ioral ids


I


,220-9303
in ongoing at Main =Cwn4pus


S I


i


-


~~~~~ ~~~-~~ `~~~-~ ~ ---~~


3










The closed season on sea bob


THE Guyana Association of
Trawler Owners and Seafood
Processors has advised the
Chief Fisheries Officer (Ag),
that the members of the
association has suspended all
fishing operations for sea bob
until October 15, 2005.
According to a press
release from Public
Communications Consultants
Limited, the industry has
traditionally closed its
operations annually for six
weeks. It will be requesting the
Ministry .to treat this
suspension of operations as the
closed season for 2005.
President of the
association, Mr. Bruce Vieira,
said the shrimp industry remains
in very serious trouble and the
decision to close now is for
economic reasons as well as to
rest the grounds.
Mr. Vieira noted that a


number of trawler owners had
already tied up much of their
fleet as early as two weeks ago
because of fuel cost.
He explained, "While
improved prices for shrimp on
the international market had


helped cushion the earlier
increases in the price of fuel,
with the cost of diesel fuel in
Guyana now averaging $600 per
gallon, it is no longer viable to
operate."
He pointed out that the


two ShSdead


JAMAICA Observer A
Kingston shopkeeper, who
residents claimed had
ignored a warning from


gunmen to lock down her
business after allegedly
witnessing a double murder
last week, was Friday gunned


sea bob industry has so far
been able to continue its
operations, partly because of
the government's decision to
recognize fuel obtained by
trawlers outside of Guyana's
twelve miles limit as "ships


down along the volatile
Maxfield Avenue in the
nation's capital. One of her
employees was also shot
dead.
At the same time, police
said gunmen, who they believe
had killed shopkeeper Kerdel
Salmon, 52, and her employee
Warren Newby, later engaged
cops in a shoot-out, injuring a
constable from the Hunt's Bay
station.
"This is another chapter in
the saga of violence in the area
where young men with guns go
around and kill innocent
people," said Deputy


V1~.- C--= --=~C


ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY


COA(SVLTRAICES


With funding under the IDB EMP-Phase 11, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) invites full proposals fi-om
suitably qualified FIRMS for the following consultancies
(1) To Review the Management Practices/Procedures and Development of National Standards for
Biological Collection.
(2) To Build Capacity in Environmental Management Skills (Environmental Planning, EMS,
Environmental Auditing, Negotiation, Mediation and Facilitation)

Qualifications for #1: To Review the Management Practices/Procedures and Development of National
Standards for Biological Collections
The firm shall comprise a team of consultants each possessing at least a Master's Degree in 1) Plant Taxonomy and at
least five (5) years experience in Tropical Herbaria Management. 2) Animal Taxonomy and at least five (5) years
experience in Tropical Animal Collection Management. Consultants should demonstrate fluency in English. Previous
experience in developing similar types of guidelines will be an asset.

Duration
The consultancy will last for a period of eighteen (18) days with twelve (12) days undertaken in Guyana. Four (4)
days to submit first draft to the EPA for review and comments and two (2) days to submit final report.

Qualifications for #2: To Build Capacity in Environmental Management Skills (Environmental Planning, EMS,


EnvironmentalAuditing, Negotiation, Mediation and Facilitation.


SThe firmshall comprise a team of consultants each possessing at least Master's degree qualifications in an appropriate
environmental field with experience in developing countries. The firm should meet a minimum of fifteen (15) years
experience in the respective environmental fields and at least five (5) years working in developing countries in the areas U
indicated in the Terms of Reference. Consultants should possess a minimum of five (5) years demonstrated
negotiation, mediation and facilitation (local, national and international). Consultants shall also demonstrate
competence specific to training in the respective fields and should be fluent in English.

Duration
The consultancy will last for a period of fifty (50) days.

Copies of the detailed Terms of Reference can be uplifted from the Administrative Director, Environmental Protection
Agency. lAST Building., UG Campus. Turkeyen or downloaded from EPA's website: litp wwwp. t...a...na .,g I

Instructions to Tenderers
(1) All tenders must be accompanied by valid certificates of compliance from the Manager of the National
Insurance Scheme and the Commissioner ofthe Guyana Revenue Authority.
(2) Tenders must be placed in scaled envelopes bearing no identification of the Tenderer on the outside and must
be clearly marked on the top left hand corner: "To Review the Management Practices/Procedures and
Development of National Standards for Biological Collection EPA". OR "To Build Capacity in
Environmental Management Skills (Environmental Planning, I- 1is Environmental Auditing,
Negotiation, Mediation and Facilitation) -EPA". Technical and Financial Proposals must be placed in two
separate sealed envelopes identifying "Technical Proposal for..." and "Financial Proposal for...".
(3) Tenders must be deposited in the Tender Box at the National Board of Procurement and Tender
Administration address below no later than 09:00hrs on Tuesday, October 4, 2005

Tenders will be opened at 09:00hrs on Tuesday. October 4, 2005 and Tenderers or their authorized representatives may
be present to observe the opening of the Tenders at the Ministry of Finance.

Full Proposals including Curriculum Vita, Technical Proposal and Financial Proposal should be addressed to:

The Chairman
National Board of Procurement and TenderAdministration
Ministry of Finance
Main and Urquhart streets
Georgetown
I-----------........-"----------- I IIq


stores", making it not subject to
the consumption tax.
Some owners had been
able to access small amounts of
fuel from Trinidad and Tobago
at the international price, free of
the consumption tax and local
oil company mark-ups which
add to the cost of fuel when
purchased in Guyana.
However, he went on,
even these prices were too high


Superintendent Delroy Hewitt,
commanding officer for the
Kingston West Police Division.
According to the police,
officers were responding to a
mid-afternoon report of gunfire
in the Maxfield Avenue area and
when they went into the
community two armed men
engaged them in a gunfight on
Raphael Road, during which the
constable was shot in the arm.
The two, the police said, then
ran from the scene, but left a
12-gauge shotgun and six two-
gauge cartridges during their
escape.
The police said they then
discovered Salmon and Newby
were shot dead in a room at the
back of her shop.
It was the same area where
two men, 31 year-old Sean
Wright, also called "Sean Paul",
and Anthony Edwards, also
called "Matterhorn", were killed
last week Friday morning.
Wright was shot at the
entrance of the shop and
Edwards was killed in the
middle of Maxfield Avenue,
about 25 yards away.
Police, however, could not
confirm a report that Salmon
was ordered by gunmen to close
her shop as she was suspected
by them to be a witness in last
week's double murder.
"The motive at this time is
unknown," Hewitt said.


:SUNDAY CHRONICLE ,Septemb"er 4,A;2005


. _


ALL ROAD USERS MABURA TO LETHEM

All above road users are asked to note
that the bridge at 55 km between
Mabura and Lethem will be under
repairs and -will be closed on Monday,
September 5, 2005 for two days.


We regret any inconvenience.


' Management
D.T.L.


FORESTRY TRAINING

CENTRE INCORPORATED
Tree Identification Course
September 12 30, 2005
The Forestry Training Centre Incorporated will
be conducting a course on Tree Identification at
its primary training site near Manaka,
Essequibo River, during period September 12-
30, 2005.

At the end of the course, participants may be
able to identify about fifty commercial tree
species.

Anyone interested in doing this course is asked
to Call: 223-5061 or 223-5062 for further
details.

Individuals engaged in forest inventory or
ecotourism are encouraged to apply.

The closing date for applications is September
8. 2005.


I


tor the industry to operate
profitably.
"Given the seemingly
endless increases in the cost
of fuel which contributed to
some 70 per cent of the
industry's operational cost, the
association's members will be
reviewing the situation of the
industry before the
resumption of fishing on
October 15, 2005," Vieira said.

The gun-slaying of the two
yesterday has brought to six the
number of persons who have
been killed as a result of a gang
feud which has been re-ignited
in the Maxfield Avenue area.
Other victims of the
conflict were 48 year-old Henry
James and Nakkiesha
McLaughlin.
James was beaten with a
hammer, stabbed all over his
upper body and shot in the side.
He died' with $20,000 in his
pocket.
McLaughlin was shot a few
hours later outside a bar on
Wellington Road by one of two
men travelling in a Toyota
Corolla motor car. One of the
men exited the car with a gun
and chased McLaughlin before
shooting her several times. She
died in the Kingston Public
Hospital.
The sight at the death scene
yesterday was stomach-
churning. Both seemed to have
tried to escape their killers by
running into a small room but
were apparently cornered and
slaughtered. Salmon lay across
a bed with several shots to her
upper body. Newby's brain lay
splattered about the floor of the
small room. His right eye was
shot out.
The police said 11 9-mm
spent shells were taken from
the scene.









GUYANA'S OIL


POTENTIAL
AFTER conducting geological surveys in the Corentyne area,
in Region Six, a team of specialists identified areas where hy-
drocarbon reserves may have been concentrated.
On May 26, 2005 CGX's ON Energy, a subsidiary of Cambior,
a Canadian Company, commenced prospecting in four identified ar-
eas: Yakusari, Hermitage, Albion and Palymra with the hope of
finding commercial quantities.
Following the departure of CXGC claims of wasted investment
surfaced in the local media, with one newspaper article stating that
Guyanese have lost $800M in an oil quest that yielded no results.
Contrary to the claims, the exercise has actually facilitated an
elimination phase, which makes it easier to identify target areas that
may exist in that area.
Less than two weeks following CGX's departure, officials of
several companies met the Prime Minister revealing their interest
in oil exploration. Among these are Consolidated Contractors Com-
pany, (CCC) a Lebanese-based construction firm, which specialises
in oil and gas exploration and a Middle-East based Company.
CCC currently operates in over 30 countries including Niger,
Saudi Arabia, Ecuador and Yemen. .
Yet another company, Petro-Brass, has expressed an interest
and is scheduled to commence negotiations with government next
week.
Two companies, Ground-star Resources of Canada and
SADHNA Petroleum of Trinidad and Tobago have already ac-
quired prospecting licences and are due to commence drilling
operations soon.




THE Kaieteur News in a recent article, stated that the city is
being over run by vagrants, and that the development results
from incompetence on the part of the Ministry of Human Ser-
vices and Social Security.
According to Minister within the Ministry, Bibi Shadick,
though there may be a number of vagrants in the city, some of them
are beyond the control of the Ministry.
The Minister noted that, many of the persons who wander the
streets are not necessarily homeless but, may simply lead lives,
which are unsuitable for those they live with. These include per-
petual drunkards, drug addicts and victims of abuse.
She said that even though the Government has established the
Night Shelter, some persons refuse to utilise the services offered at
the East La Penitence facility for their own reasons.
Some persons are reluctant to go to the shelter, Minister Shadick
said, because they would not be able to conduct undesirable activi-
ties such as drinking alcohol and smoking illicit substances.
She added that the institution has. obtained a vehicle, which
transports persons from specific locations on a daily basis to the
shelter.
She pointed out that the Ministry's responsibility is to pro-
vide services, and it cannot compel persons to make use of it.
However, the Police have the authority to remove wander-
ers or vagrants who occupy various locations, in spite of the
provisions made.



T U- "

'are extended to Mrs. Rajkumarie *
/ Sawak a/k Rajkumarie Chitlall
on being conferred the ALL-
AMERICAN COLLEGIATE
SCHOLAR AWARD for
YORK COLLEGE by the;
UNITED STATES
ACHIEVEMENT T
ACADEMY
from her parents Mr. Yatendralall and Mrs
Shukumarie Chitlall; sisters Rajdai and
Yineeta; grandparents Mrs. S. Chitlall of De
Willem and Mr. and Mrs. Arjun Rambarak of
Tuschen; husband Ravichan Sawak; in-laws
Mr. and Mrs. Sawak of Met-en-Meerzorg and
her many other relatives and friends.

She is a former student and teacher of
Zcclburgi Secondu School.

( )o\ RK It L 1l/ \5S ( 16/I l0\ I/fi
I II ll/ RL /l I CHIL I .1l/ "
H iPP) BIRT 0.-l .


Guyana Trade Show

(New York)
CONTRARY to allegations made by Capitol News anchor,
Enrico Woolford that the Guyana Trade Show was poorly
organised and publicised, participants are reporting tremen-
dous success following the event.
Chief Executive Officer of GO Invest, Geoff Da Silva noted
that the event was well advertised utilising all forms of the media
including the Internet. He added that "responses were overwhelm-
ing and several companies established linkages for continued sup-
ply with the United States markets."
A number of companies including Edward Beharry, has noted
that several connections were made to export products to whole-
salers in the U.S.
General Manager of the New Guyana Marketing Corporation,
(NGMC) Nizam Hassan, said that since 2001, the endeavours of
the company through the Trade Shows have yielded much success
in the areas of export as well as attracting investment.
Da Silva has described the Trade Show as a huge success
and a great window through which Guyanese manufacturers
can display and secure markets for their produce.


T ill110:ill" A C,


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CO-OPERATIVE REPUBLIC OF GUYANA
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
BASIC EDUCATION ACCESS AND MANAGEMENT SUPPORT ROGRAMME
Loan No. 1107/SF-GY
SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF CHILDREN COMPUTERS WITH ACCESSORIES AND BOOKS

1. The Government of the Co-operative Republic of Guyana has received financing from the Inter-
American Development Bank (IDB) towards the cost of Basic Education Access and Management
Support (BEAMS) Programme. It is intended that part of the proceeds of this financing will be applied
to eligible payments under the contract for the Supply of Goods and Services.
2. The Ministry of Education (herein after called the Purchaser) now invites sealed bids from suppliers of
Inter-American Development Bank regional and non-regional member countries for the Supply and
Installation of Children Computers with Accessories and Books.
3. The BEAMS Project Implementation Unit has the undertaking of facilitating this process and all
relevant information for this bid can be had by contacting:
The Project Manager
BEAMS Programme
Project Implementation Unit
109 Barima Avenue
Bel Air Park
Georgetown.
Tel. Nos.: (592) 226-3332 or 225-4626
Fax No.: (592) 225-2773
4. a. Bids must be placed in an inner envelope bearing the name and address of the bidder.
b. The sealed inner envelope must then be placed in an outer envelope addressed to:
The Chairman
National Procurement & TenderAdministration Board
Former Central Tender Board
Ministry of Finance Back Building
Main & Urquhart Streets
GEORGETOWN.
Bids must be clearly marked at the top left-hand corner ofthe outer envelope BEAMS 'BID FOR THE SUPPLY
AND INSTALLATION OF CHILDREN COMPUTERS WITH ACCESSORIESAND BOOKS.
5. Bids must be placed in the Tender Box of the National Procurement & Tender Administration Board
former Central Tender Board at the above-mentioned address on or before 09:00 hours on Tuesday
October 4, 2005. It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since they may be sent by mail.
However, the employer is not responsible for bids not received thereof on or before the time and date
specified for receipt of bids. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.
6. Each bid must be accompanied by a valid NIS and IRD Compliance Certificate for firms registered in
Guyana.
7. Bids will be opened at a public ceremony in the presence of those bidders or their representatives who
choose to attend immediately after 09:00 hours on Tuesday October 4, 2005 in the Boardroom of the
National Procurement & Tender Administration Board former Central Tender Board, Ministry of
Finance Back Building, Main & Urquhart Streets, Georgetown.
8. Bids will be on sale from Monday, September 5, 2005 through Friday September 23, 2005 at a cost of
four thousand Guyana dollars (GS4,000.00) at the BEAMS Project Implementation Unit, 109 Barima
Avenue, Bel Air Park, between the hours of 8:00 am 3:30 pm.

PERMANENT SECRETARY
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
COOPERATIVE REPUBLIC OF GUYANA


FJO .' One wooden cargo vessel built in 2003
S ale Cummins Engine 6BTA5.9-M 315Hp
Sale Overhauled August 2005 in Trinidad



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'.SUNDU'CHRDNlnYIICI 94bt6Mbi~h r,4J-"2005r


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I






12 SUNDAY CHRONICLE September 4, 2005


,: -. -





...1. .


Acting Commissioner of Police Bertie Hinds (third left) receiving equipment for underwater
detection from United States Ambassador Mary Kramer, while looking on are (from right)
Acting Deputy Commissioner Seymour Cumberbatch, Sergeant Adrian Broomes, Sergeant
Glenville Alleyne, Sergeant Victor Brewster and Constable Glenroy Brome.


Underwater



tools for cops


BARBADOS Nation -
UNITED STATES
AMBASSADOR MARP.Y
KR.AMER Frida) presented
BDS$28 000 i orlh of
underwater equipment to the
Ro al Barbados Police Force.
a donation Actling
,ummnnii%-ioner Berlie Hinds
termed particularly timnel".
Four pt'lice ol ticer, recent
i11 TI-'.' B.hLn, '. hi0 1 h irtained
them to detect underwater
explosive devices, were also on
hand to collect the equipment


&MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
Basic Education Access & Management Support Progranme
LOAN:1107/SF-GY
National Consultations on theNew Education Bill
The Government of the Co-operative Republic of Guvana has received financing from the,Inter
American Development Bank (IDB) towards to cost of Basic Education Access & Management
Support (BEAMS) Programme.
The Ministry of Education in collaboration with the IDB is seeking to review the current Legislation
and Regulatory Framework for the Governance and Management of Education in Guyana.
Consequently, a task force has been established for the drafting of new Legislation and Regulatory
Educational Framework that will address and respond to changes within our society and the current
needs in the area of Education.
The Task Group will be conducting a nation-wide Consultation Exercise within the next few months to
solicit the views of the public. Interested parties may make written submissions and forward same to:
The Chairman
Task Group for New Legislation
Ministry of Education
21 Brickdam
Stabroek
Georgetown
Guyana.
The Consultation Exercise is scheduled to commence in Georgetown on Friday September 16,2005 at
the following venues:


DATE


TIME


16/09/2005 17:00 hrs.


18/09/2005


16:oo hrs.


THE DATES FOR
THESE AREAS WILL
BE ANNOUNCED
LATER


AREA VENUE

NORTH GEORGETOWN QUEENS COLLEGE


NORTH GEORGETOWN

EAST GEORGETOWN


SOUTH GEORGETOWN


that ill help thei m in their u trk.
HindJ said iit a_ the first
such training .curse offered for
Bjrbjdw.s 'or the English-
spe Jang Caribbean
"'\\e wanted t improve our
nimaimne cap.bilities anrd to
prteci! e:i-b i'rni ral t .n ming
init,, the cunilr he 'aid
He added ihat the training
and equipment \. would also help


enhance capabilities in
detecting drugs transported
underwater attached to the
hulls of boats.
Kramer also pointed out
that for 2005 already "over
half-million visitors have
come into Barbados by ship"
and the training and donated
equipment "will help protect
visitors".


.--.x -,- :
-e-c. i in G,


O --e -w-


-"Copyrighted Material
1 ~ Syndicated Content *
Available from Commercial News Providers"







O Ww .---Ono- --

eQ


ST. STANISLAUS COLLEGE

a. ST. JOSEPH HIGH SCHOOL
b. CAMPBELLVILLE SECONDARY
SCHOOL


EAST RUIMVELDT SECONDARY
SCHOOL


For additional information or clarification please contact:

Ms. Natasha Singh
Secretary
Task Group for New Education Legislation

Telephone Nos. 223 7900,227-115.227 -5087(ext.251)or
Visit our Web Site (a w.w.w.mined.org.gy/education bill)


PERMANENT SECRETARY
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
CO OPERATIVE REPUBl !:? OF GUYANA


Interested persons are asked to submit bids to:
The Receiver
c/o P.O Box 10631,
Georgetown
For inspection please contact Tel: Nos. (592) 226-4141


I






SUNDAY3-ck


TNE 10



-


'00


AP rail


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers.'


.... crir ^




National Insurance Scheme is pleased to announce that employee's contribution statements for the
year 2004 are available for the employers listed below. These statements are being distributed by the
various district inspectors or can be uplifted from the Compliance Division, Brickdam (for employers
in the Georgetown district) or from the Local Office in your area (for out of town employers).
Persons whose statements have discrepancies are asked to make contact with the nearest Local
Office or the Records Department, Camp & Bent streets Georgetown.


We Care


AV C I
. ii, ,


Applications are being invited from suitably qualified
persons to fill the following vacancies within the
Corporation.

MANAGER, PLANT OPERATIONS
AND MAINTENANCE
Applicants should possess the following:

Degree in Civil, Mechanical or Electrical
Engineering
Plus
Three (3) years work experience.

RADIOGRAPHER
Applicants should possess the following:

Associate Degree/Diploma in Radiography
obtained from a recognized University.

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST
Applicants should possess the following:

Associate Degree or Diploma in Medical
Technology obtained from a recognized University.

PHARMACIST-
Applicants should possess the following:
Associate Degree/Diploma in Pharmacy or
equivalent from a recognized University.
Experience in related field would be an asset.

Applications, along with two (2) references and a
recent police clearance can be sent to:

Director, Administrative Services
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation
New Market Street
North Cummingsburg
Georgetown


Deadline for applications is
Friday 16th September, 2005.


REG.


.19812
19912
19959
19986
19987
20012
20151
20420
20457
21032
21037
21078
21178
21396
21476
21566
21600
21623
21642
21657
21681
21735
21798
21806
21851
21898
21916
21923
22071
22151
22154
22251
22305
22331
22423
22472
22474
22505
22508
22569
22624
22648
22657
22658
22775
22798
22800
22821
22983
23046
23089
23124
23126
23214
23276
23317
23340
23345


MAI MNE I


Tucville Assembly of God Church
Merry Makers Day Care & Playgroup
Guyana Police Co-op Credit Union
Central S.D.A Church
Helena Best Day Care Centre
Sirpaul Singh
Karren I. Persram
Nidera (Guyana) Ltd.
Terrence 0. Joseph
Wilderness Explorers.
Mohamed Shaw Jahan
Stephen Henry
The City's Pharmacy
Everychild
Youth Challenge Guyana
Partners in Community Dev. Ltd.
John Lee
Fay I. Housty
Dennis Griffith Construction
Universal Travel & Tour Company
Connection Travel Company
Desmond Agard
Glowing Star Day Care Centre
Auto Mobile Power Products
Drubahadur
Ahbin Dyal Sing
Zaiboon N. Gafoor
Augustus Ferreira
Rae's One Stop Auto Parts
Guyana Cricket Board
Solutions 2000 Inc.
Dr. Jennifer Basdeo/Green
Satyadeow Sawh
Gobin Dwarka
Maurice Evans
Secondary School Reform Project
Maximilliam W. Pereira
Richard Allen
Omechand Deonarain
Ministry of Finance
Wood N' Furniture
Brazilian Military Attache
Derick Ramotar
Love and Faith World Outreach
The Gift Centre
Khemraj Brijial
Jillian Power
Guyana Co-op Financial Service
Dask Enterprise
Plaisance Dorcas Club
The Medicine Chest
New Era Business Enterprise
Solomon Shipping Inc.
Ernest Gonsalves
Woodlands Diagnostic & Imaging Centre
Global : 7 -.h,-,:~.'
Dr. Janice Imhoff
Ro'xanne George


REG.


23353
23387
23390
23396
23430
23435
23436
23491
23525
23553
23721
23823
23916
23919
23924
23928
23952
24024
24071
24099
24141
24193
24273
24289
24506
24507
24524
24525
24537,
24552
24598
24612
24687
24794
24771
24827
25159
25167
25349
25378
25420
25492
25528
25621
25650
25658
25685
25781
25799
25821
25937
26032
26041
26042
26051
26057
26064


"4 AIkU .


Aon International
Early Pregnancy Advisory Service
El Shaddai Pentecostal Church
Teresa Stuart
Ramsaywack Arjune Printing Service
Yodhama Boodhu
Dr. Dionne Fries
Anne Simpson
A &S International
Sureway Shipping
Grace Assembly of God
Benjamin Business Machine
Lilawattie Lutchman
Raj Singh Insurance & Risk Mgt.
Georgetown Japan Karate Association
Christian Mission Church
Vidya's Enterprise
St. Ignatius Parish
Home Hardware General Store
Apex Insurance Brokers Inc.
Ceramin Ltd.
Marlin Inc.
National Trust of Guyana
Tropical Engineering Group Inc.
Guyana Bible Society
La Mes Co. Inc.
Sawh's Health Care Pharmacy
Choice Cuts Inc.
Hulda Sargeant
Dr. Prema Mootoo
Philippa Arno-Jones
lan Wilson
I-Net Communications Inc.
Glad Enterprises
Rohit Lall
Guyana Net Internet Services Inc.
Kampta Persaud
Beyond 2000 Printing Inc.
Habitat for Humanity-E.C.
Plane Advantage Travel Inc.
Guyana Nurses Association
Lisa Thompson
Carol Forsythe
Liang Yun Feng
Abdul Wahab
Jack C. Bharat
Donna's Travel Consultancy
Keith Giddings/Monty Proffitt
Antertic Maintainance and Repairs
hinterland Tours Limited
Kamla Samlall
Square Deal Shipping
Indian High Commission
Steven Archer
Wilson De Oliveria
Mohammad Housain Bacchus
Norman Hesskamp





1I a


Construction of approach

road to Parika/Hydronie

market ongoing
(GINA) Work has commenced and is progressing well on the construction of the approach
road from the Parika selling to the market at Hydronie, East Bank Essequibo, Region
Three (Essequibo Islands/West Demerara).
Technical Advisor to the Minister of Transport and Hydraulics, Walter Willis, said the project
commenced three weeks ago and so far about 1.5 kilometres of pipelines have been laid.
age units and is a% maung 1the remo al or r.i 'inalln ,, ,.p. ducuion fprc-c..._n
graph Company (GT&T).
The approach road is being constructed at a cost of $383.9M and is part of the plan to trans-
form Parika, East Bank Essequibo into a secondary town.
Meanwhile, vendors are soon to occupy the new market at Hydronie, which was con-
structed at a cost of approximately $58NM by the Social Impact Amelioration Programme
(SIMAP).




GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA
INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK
MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE
POOR RURAL COMMUNITIES SUPPORT SERVICES PROJECT

Date: 2005.09.04
Contract No: 6/2005, 7/2005 & 8/2005

-- (Ques {n zB A pGOG_)tJhe International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD),
approximately US$16.5 M to fund the Poor Rural Communities Support ServiesProjec
(PRCSSP), which is working to alleviate poverty in Regions 2 & 3 by increasing rural household
incomes through the expansion of on farm production and fostering the promotion of rural
micro-enterprises. Part of the proceeds of the loan will be used for eligible expenditures under
which this invitation for bids is made.

The project is executed by the Ministry of Agriculture (MOA) through the PRCSSP, and has 5 major
components, viz D&I Rehabilitation, Technical Support Services, Credit Services, Community
Investment Initiatives and Project Coordination. It will utilize a demand driven approach and will
involve full beneficiary participation in all aspects of the Project Cycle.

The MOA, through the PRCSSP invites sealed bids from eligible bidders for undertaking the
following works in Regions No. 2 & 3

6/2005 Rehabilitation and Excavation of Channels, Construction of Structures, Western Hogg
Island Water Users Association (WUA), Essequibo River, Region No. 3

7/2005 Construction of Water Control Structures, Cullen WUA, Essequibo Coast, Region No. 2

8/2005 Construction of Store Room/Shed. Unu Creek Fisherman Development Association,
Essequibo Coast, Region 2.

Bidding Document (and any additional copies) may be purchased from the Project Manager's
Office, at Den Amstel, West Coast Demerara from 51, September, 2005 for a non-refundable fee
of eight thousand dollars ($8,000) for Nos. 6/2005, 7/2005 & 8/2005 or its equivalent in a freely
convertible currency. Interested bidders may obtain further information at the same office.

Bids must be enclosed in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identity of the Bidder and must be
clearly marked on the top, left hand comer "Tender for the........... PRCSSP -...........1. 2005.
Do not open before 9.00 hrs, October 04, 2005." Each tender must be placed in a separate
envelope.

Bids shall be valid for a period of 90 days after Bid opening and must be accompanied! by a
Security of no less than Two Hundred Thousand Guyana Dollars (G$200,000.) for Nos. 6\2005,
7/2005 & 8/2005 or its equivalent in a convertible currency, valid IRD and NIS Compliance
Certificates and must be addressed to:

The Chairman
National Board of Procurement and Tendering Administration,
Ministry of Finance
Main and Urquhart Streets
Georgetown.

All bids are to be deposited in the Tender Box located in the Ministry of Finance building, Main and
Urquhart Streets, Georgetown, before 9:00 hrs. on Tuesday October 04, 2005. Bids will be
opened in the presence of the bidders who choose to attend immediately after 9:00 hrs. on
Tuesday October 04, 2005.

The Employer reserves the right to accept or reject any or all Bids without assigning any reason
whatsoever, and not necessarily to make an award to the lowest Bidder.


Permanent Secretary,
Ministry of Agriculture


This ad can be viewed on
http://www.gina.gov.gy


THE winners with family members and Western Union staff pose with their prizes.


Western Union delivers


"Back to School" prizes


SEVEN school children
recently won bicycles and

Western Union "Back To
School" Promotion.
School vouchers valued
$40,000 each were won by Colin
Matthews, Kemla Budhram,
Shellon Wayne and Johananthan
Kanhai, while Petrula
Gonsalves, Gary Gibson Jr. and
Whitney Inniss received
bicycles. All seven of them also
got bag sets.
The presentation ceremony
last Wednesday marked the end
of a seven week promotion
which benefited some 34
students in its five public


drawings. Princess John, Nadine
According to a Western Thomas, Kaisha Harbin,
pn reMlease, the Q-o.ha.n Matthew
year, is aimed at rewarding Shana Greene, Muaz Khan,
customers for service usage Pawan Kumar Singh, Kevin
and to contribute to school Ordonez, Tytia McPherson,
requirements for children Nazam Sahadeo, Kevin
living in communities where Gonsalves, Sudarshanie
company branches are Manichand, Melita Latoya
situated. Belle, Joel Sukhdai,
The company recently held Latchmin Khandhai,
"Customers Appreciation Day" Tiffany Braithwaite, Alina
at its 39 locations across Williams, Sahodra Joseph,
Guyana, and customers and Jodah McIntyre, Shalamar
residents were given a chance to Solomon, Cassandra
spin the Western Union Wheel, Sukhram, Michelle Henry,
winning school items. Sherwyn Smith, Deodat
Winners from the Persaud and Odonna
previous four drawing were Griffith.


S. ETHNICRELATIONS COMMISSION



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

A vacancy exists at the Ethnic Relations Commission for a
mature Administrative Assistant.

Applicants should have at least five (5) years experience in
the field, with passes in English Language and Mathematics
at the CXC or GCE '0' Level and must be computer literate
with proficiency in:

Microsoft Word
Microsoft Excel
Microsoft PowerPoint
Microsoft Publisher.

Applications accompanied by curriculum vitae and names of
two (2) referees should be sent to:

Ethnic Relations Commission
66 Peter Rose and Anira Streets
Queenstown
GEORGETOWN

The closing date for applications is September 30, 2005.


' 1.1.........~................... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - ------ -------


SUNDAYTOOMOM~~~et~e ~PpI2 IS





NDAY CHRONICLE Se tember 4. 2005




n loving memory of a
ear father, Grand-father,
ather-in-law, mentor and
S'- "riend.
S, Two years has passed since
4__ you have gone
"Copyrighted Material hati ese0oe
Y ou departed from our lives
Syndicated Content leaving a void that can never
e..if. ..|...., be filled
Available from Commercial News Providers" |en omerna osoer '
Mr Bl1rmn B6hai](handven Tihe memory becomes a
Born 2. i ni June, 1913 reasure
Died nn lih -oved onos are always close
3rd SeppivTmb-i 20103 o the heart
-Rest in Peace'
,.i. ]in ii b l l-\: C110 1,'l pli' ll. nm iv *i -lan liil,
1 (it 0111' ( n -L l/i.L 7 V IE,1111., h i iti.o .. D ,in








BRITISH HIGH COMMISSION
44 MAIN STREET GEORGETOWN



S Application forms and information are provided free of charge

Application Forms are available to uplift from ConsularNisa Entrance Security Office, Monday tc
Friday from 07.30 to 14.30. Applicants need only fill in one of the forms according to the type o
application made. Guidance Notes accompany each type of form. Read these carefully to ensun
you are applying for the correct Visa.
Afee, payable in Guyanese Dollars is charged to pay for the cost of processing your application
.. and for that reason it is not refundable. An up-to-date table of fees is displayed in the Securit,
without joining long lies! r Office and Visa Section waiting room.
e y o py b'i with The British High Commission does not recognize agents, and.applicants who use them
USe yOur phone to pay your phone bill with do so entirely at their own risk. Applicants need only pay the relevant visa fee, for which
the touch tone service Of these banks: an official receipt will be issued. No other charges are authorised or necessary.

J .DEMERAARA T Entry Clearance Officers work to strict rules and procedures,
B RBA RK V B T I ONLYthey can decide if applicants qualify for entry before travelling to the United Kingdom.
I M I T D Further assistance is available from Visa Section staff either in person (except Wednesdays) front
07.30:to 14.30 or by telephone between 10.00 and 14.30, Monday to Friday or visit our Web'site
(www.britishhighcommission.gov.uk/guyana). Assistance sought from other British Higl
Com,. mission staff, orfrom any other source could be misleading or incorrect.
C.0n B, E NATIONAL BANK
OF INDUY AND CONMERCE LIMTED Bf yu intend travelling a long distance to the Visa Section-, contact them before you start yourjourne,
fou! ". for any important information that may affect you.
Call your Bank & find out how Pleaemakes
Please make sure that:
you have answered clearly all of the required questions on the form
s i signed and dated the form where asked
-* any supporting documents you show are originals or attested copies
you make your application in good time
you should not pay for any travel tickets until a decision has been made on your visa
DATE FOR OUTSTANDING BALANCES ON YOUR application, but you may want to send evidence that you have reserved flights.
JULY 2005 BILL IS
SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 11, 2005 British High Commission
IND THE SECOND SUNDAY IN EVERY MONTH 44 Main Street, Georgetown
STelephone: 226 5881-4 Fax: 225 3555
Website: www.britishhighcommission.gov.uklguyana


I



Lf
e












I


y




- "UNDAY CH


ICC Cricket World Cup








The offcial CC Cricket World Cup
West Indies 20o70logo (seen above) and


The spirit ofCricke and tife in the Caribbme n are rep resented
through the leasscation of the core Cicket symbo of bat
ball and stumps, with vibrant colours and shapes ofsymbols
from the Cari tbbean.
The rhytoffic energy ofdanceand refebrltion is cpturedn
the sed ,eoping f C ure, and the uique f eeof Caribepresented
captured in the vibrant green of the crown of the palm tree
and the azure blue of the surrounding skyand seas.

I'm fun andffriendy, m on the o
S' as rcol as they come...fn Mello.
.Outgoing and energetic i'm always
up for a game ofCricket.
Vit C OUR WEB SITE SPASH PAGEK AT WWW.CRICK3TWORLDCta.CPM

aTb OFFICIAL GLOBAL PART ES


ANm weu am tuiar S and opVt wa aof
lC IluDwmtqwp l IfntCtwwiat I ImtWI ( oas,.
An~y upiwUdOnw dM .ateMdWU;]fthW
mark wihtt ttw pir written ocrni of
INW Dvfwe Wi ant pntunatouuaQ ietud,
is0ctly pwoBhgand and punishbit bry law.


*LG


OffICIAL SPoMsoRs
OIndianOil







NIMCE September 4, 2005



Aurora girl does Anna




Regina Multilateral prou


By Michelle Outridge

SHE WAS overwhelmed with
joy at first when she received
her Caribbean Secondary
Education Certificate
(CSEC) results and saw
she'd gotten six Grade Ones
(two of them with
Distinction), four Grade
Twos and a Grade Three.
She'd written 11 subjects in
all, three of which she had to
study on her own, with the
help of a few teachers from
time to time, since they were
neither taught nor offered at her
school.
Seventeen-year-old
VadewattieRamnarine, hails
from Aurora Estate, on the
Essequibo Coast and attended
the Anna Regina Multilateral


School. She obtained a
Distinction in Office Procedures
and Social Studies; a Grade One
in English A and B, Agriculture
Science and Integrated Science;
a Grade Two in Mathematics,
Biology, Chemistry and
Physics; and a Grade Three in
Spanish.
Speaking with the Sunday
Chronicle late Friday, an excited
Vadewattie said:
"I knew I did well because
it entailed long hours into the
nights studying when others
were watching television and
doing other fun stuff. But I
endured to the end, with the
help and support of my
parents, who even exempted me
from doing certain chores."
Recalling the tough time she
had staying ahead of her


classmates, Vadewattie, who
was beaten into second place
by archrival Malini Narine,
who scored nine Grade Ones,
said:
"I was in the Science
stream among 28 of the best
students, and it was tough
vying for the top spot. But
the facilities at school were
very conducive to learning,
because our school was
recently rehabilitated."
This being the case, she
had no need for private
lessons. She attended classes
regularly and was encouraged
every step of the way by her
parents, whom she says were
very much involved in her
studies.
She also had a little
motto of her own by which


she was guided throughout the
period she was preparing for the
examinations, and this was: Aim for
the moon. And if you should fall,
you will be among the stars.
"It gave me the inspiration I
needed to make it happen, and I
did not regret trusting this silly
motto I made up and repeated to
myself endless times," Vadewattie
said.
Now that she's done with
'CXC', her next goal is to work
part-time for about a year before
going off to university, where she
hopes to pursue studies in
medicine.
The fourth of five children,
Vadewattie, who is an avid
debater and sportswoman, has
her sights set on becoming a
heart surgeon.


Vadewattie Ramnarne


BANKS DIH Limited
recently presented bursary
awards to 20 successful
students at the recent
secondary school
examinations.
Heading the employee's
children list was Savitree Shennan,
whose father runs the Distribution
Warehouse, followed by Mavis
Julien, Shaquelle Rowe, Jheryl
Nero, Tiffany Archer, Marissa
Moonsammy, Timothy Jaikarran,
RolandaLa Roche, Renaldo Paton
and Darshan Tulsi.
Leading the list of
shareholders children is Daniel
J. Balgrim followed by Alexis
Maharaj, Adunni Robinson,
Maryann Keren Bacchus,
Christine King, Christopher
Martin France, Michael
Adams, Rovin Scarce, Shamela
John and Jason Linton.
Each recipient was
given a token of appreciation
and a cheque valued $10,000,
which they will continue to
receive annually over the next
five years.
The company's
Human Resource Director, Mr.
Andy Carto, congratulated the
students and spoke to them on
the importance of a sound
education.
"If you want
something that you've never


Jeffrey appalled


at text book


situation in


Region One


THE Bursary recipients with three
Clifford Reis and Mr. Azam Khan.


had before, then you must do
something"fhat you've never
done before," he told them, and
praised their parents for their
involvement in the children's


S Directors, in back row, from left, Mr. Andy Carlo, Mr.


success.
Mr. Carto said
many of BANKS bursary
recipients have gone on to
achieve academic success


at the secondary and university
levels, adding that two of those
recipients, Carlton Joao and
Ghansham Ramroop, are now
executives at the company.


Caribbean Vision Edu-culture project


opens to schools Tuesday,


BOTH the Caricom
Secretariat and the
Commonwealth Youth
Programme (CYP) have
overwhelmingly endorsed
the Caribbean Vision Edu-
culture Project in Guyana.
The project which %as
launched on Jul) 1 at rhe
Umana Yana will be officially
opened to schools and students
on Tuesday at the National
Cultural Centre, and runs until
September 29.


Edu-culture is the
creative use of cultural arts that
motivates and inspires students
to achieve both academic and
artistic success, developing a
relationship between education
and culture. All messages are
transmitted 'ia dance. drama.
music, storytelling poetry, arts
and craft.
The production
addresses effectively multiple
issues such as .HIV/AIDS,
teenage pregnancy, West Indies


Cricket. Caribbean Tourism.
Agriculture, CSME and the
dangers of drugs and alcohol.
The project has
twice been successfully
staged in St Lucia. St Vincent
and the Grenadines and St
Kilts and Net s. and
supported by their
respective Prime Ministers.
Chief Execuriie
Officer of the organization.
Choc' late Allen. is the star
feature in the cast made up


of youths from Barbados, St-
Vincent and the Grenadines,
Trinidad and Tobago, St Kitts and
Nevis, Guyana and St Lucia.
At the end of the school
tour, Caribbean Vision will
stage a grand finale concert,
entitled "Youth for CSME," on
Saturday October 29. This
event will feature both local
and regional artistes as well as
Choc' late and her new music
group. "Hott Bakes N Choc'
late".


(GINA) Education
Minister Dr. Henry Jeffrey
is appalled that some
schools in the Mabaruma
Sub-District, Region One
(Barima/Waini) do nothave
enough textbooks.
The Minister yesterday
concluded a four-day visit to
the Region to inspect schools,
and to meet teachers, parents
and other 'education
stakeholders.
During a meeting with
teachers of Hosooro Primary
School, they reported that
there are not enough
textbooks for the children.
'"I think that without the
children reading from the text,
when they go for
examinations and they have
to read for themselves, it's a
problem, "one teacher
explained.
"But why? We spent
$650 million buying text
books and mainly for the
Primary schools. Where are
they going?" the Minister
asked.
He was upset that the
Regional Education Officer
does not have a text book
inventory for the Region.
"You must have a book
register to say these are the
books we are short ofand the
Region must have a register
to say at any point in time,
what it has," Minister Jeffrey
told him.
Earlier, when he met with
students of the Mabaruma
Primary School, the Minister


DR.HENRYJEFFREY
asked what the Ministry or
the Region could do to ensure
they are more comfortable and
improve their performance
levels.
The students pointed out
that they need computers and
text books, and the Ministe
promised to investigate why
there are still not enough
textbooks in the system.
'I know that we are going
to buy some books to put in
the school library because yoi
cannot only read the texts.
You have to get accustomed
to lots of reading because you
would not be able to write
properly if you don't read.
But more than that, you must
be able to navigate the world
and an important way to do
this is the computer,"
Minister Jeffrey told the
students.
To this end, he said that
the Ministry will b
working with the region,
administration to provide
computers for the school.


Banks! DIH presents bursary awards
. i 17





18 SUNDAY CHRONICLE September 4,,.205


SUGAR WOES SHUT

DOWN SM JALEEL


TRINIDAD Express -
Operations at local soft drink
giant, SM Jaleel & Company
have grounded to a halt, ow-
ing to a shortage of sugar.
This was confirmed by the
company's chief operations of-
ficer Martin Battersby, yester-
day.
Battersby said the com-
pany depended directly on the
Sugar Manufacturing Company
Ltd (SMCL) for refined sugar
and for the past week have not
received their regular supply. -
However, Battersby was
quick to add that there was
enough soft drink produced in
the past month to supply the
local market, but he was uncer-


vG UYANA LANDS AND


SURVEYS COMMISSION

22 UPPER HADFIELD STREET, D'URBAN BACKLANDS, GEORGETOWN




CORRECTIONS AND OBJECTIONS TO LAND CLAIMS
Claimants of agricultural Public lands situate on the Right Bank, Bonasika River and its
environs, Region No. 3 are hereby notified that a Preliminary List & Draft Plans of land
claims submitted for the areas specified in the Schedule below during the Land Tenure
Regularisation claims registration exercise are posted at:

Guyana Lands and Surveys Commission's Field Office on the Right Bank,
Bonasika River
Guyana Lands and Surveys Commission's Sub-Office at Crane Village, West Coast,
Demerara
Bibi's Shop and Mahindranauth's aka Black Boy's Shop, Bonasika River
Lower Bonasika Primary School.

Claimants are-encouraged to visit the above stated venues to ensure that their claims) is/are
correctly listed and annotated on the Draft Plans and Preliminary List. Claimants may then
submit any correction to the list in relation to errors in their Names, ID number, etc. and/or their
land parcels. Objections to the land claims listed and/or counter claims may also be made
on the prescribed forms provided,

Submissions for corrections, objections and'or counter claims to the Preliminary List will
be accepted as scheduled below:
Guyana Lands and Surveys Commission's Field Office on the Right Bank, Bonasika
River from Monday, September 5, 2005 to Tuesday, October 4, 2005 during the
hours of 8.30 am 4.30 pm daily (except on National Holidays).
Guyana Lands & Surveys Commission Sub-Office at Crane. West Coast Demerara,
Monday, September 5, 2005 to Tuesday, October 4, 2005 during Office hours on
Monday to Fridays.

Areas Scheduled for this exercise are:

Left Bank, Bonasika River
Plot 353 Right Bank, Bonasika River.



ANDREWR. BISHOP
COMMISSIONER OF LANDS AND SURVEYS
DATED: August 29,2005.


tain as to whether the company
could fulfil its export demands.
"Whatever we have will be
enough for the local market, but
I am not too sure if we can sup-
ply all our customers abroad...
some but not all," he said
The production depart-
ment of the factory has been
closed for the past two days
and Battersby said he was not
sure when operations will re-
sume.
An official at the KC Con-
fectionery Factory in Couva,
said that while they, too, were
experiencing a shortage of sugar,
there was enough to continue
its operations.
A highly-placed source at
the SMCL admitted yesterday
that there was a shortage of
sugar but that the basic supply
would be delivered to factories
and groceries today.
The source said the problem
began several months ago when
Guyana and Belize could not


deliver its regular supply to the
SMC.
Due to the SMCL's inabil-
ity to meet local demand, Cabi-
net has approved the importa-
tion of 10,000 tonnes of duty-
free sugar from September 1 to
December 31.
"Natural disasters in those
countries have caused the short-
age and we now have to buy
from Colombia and Brazil. Get-
ting the refined sugar here from
those countries take about 22
days and therein lies the prob-
lem," the source said.
"There is a sugar crunch
worldwide, but we are trying to
do the best we can. Last year's
hurricanes also brought on the
shortage. SM Jaleel is our big-
gest customer and we are try-
ing to assist," the source said.
The source assured that
refined sugar arrived at the
port yesterday and would be
distributed early today to ab-
sorb replenished stocks.


DATE FOR OUTSTANDING BALANCES
ON YOUR JULY 2005 BILL IS
SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 1 1,2005
AND THE SECOND SUNDAY IN EVERY MONTH
Please note that bills can be paid until 6:00 pm (1800 hrs)
Monday to Friday and until 2:00 pm (1400 hrs) on Saturday
at GT& T's Business Office, 78 Church Street, Georgetown
and at these following Bill Express Locations:

R & S Shopping Centre. Belvedere Public Road. Corentyne

J's Supermarket, 131 Essex St. & Republic Road,
New Amsterdam, Berbice

Neighborhood Pharmacy, 54 Second Avenue, Bartica

Nigel's Supermarket, 44-45 Robb & Light Sts., Bourda

Johnny P Supermarket, 1571 Aubrey Barker Road,
S/RNdt Park

C & F Supermarket Bagotstown,
10 'B' Bagotstown, EBD

S 8 J Cambio & Variety Store,
141 Dageraad Avenue,
Mc Kenzie, Linden

A. Ramdhanny & Sons, [ j
32 Sisters Village, Wales, WBD'


i:U.- i .-. ..." d -





~su hif luMi- -t---ti---'o --19


BOA CONSTRICTOR

FOUND IN BEDROOM


URBAN DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
Ministry of Local Goyernment and Regional Development

Lot 4 Rehabilitation of Bush Lot Market, Anna Regina


Date:.
Loan No:
Invitation for Bids No:


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
.mf a- "- a-


r 4CIYANA REVENUE

"Nr AUTHORITY


Vacancy

PATROL OFFICERS

The Guyana Revenue Authority is seeking experienced and qualified persons to
serve as Patrol Officers.

Requirements
Education & Experience:
GCE '0' Level or CXC passes in at least three (3) subjects, one of which must
be English Language.

Applications with detailed CV should be submitted not later than Friday
September 16, 2005 to the:

Commissioner-General
Guyana Revenue Authority
357 Lamaha & East Streets
Georgetown


September 4, 2005
1021/SF-GY
8/2005 No. 1


1. The Government of Guyana has received financing from the Inter-American Development
Bank towards the cost of the Urban Development Programme. It is intended that part of the
.Rehabiltato f annlied.to eligible payments under the contract for the

2. The Government of Guyana acting through the Ministry of Local Government and Regional
Development, Fort Street, Kingston, Georgetown, Guyana, (hereinafter called "Employer")
now invites sealed bids from eligible bidders for the Rehabilitation of Bush Lot Market.
The major components of the works are as follows:
Demolition and relocation of stalls within the existing main building.
Construction of mini stalls (types A 7 nr., B 6 nr. and C -15 nr.).
Paving of the areas between the stalls.
Construction of surface water drains.
Relocation of parts of the existing fence.
Electrical and rainwater installations to stalls.
Rehabilitation of the existing washroom facility.
3. Eligible bidders may obtain further information, including eligibility to participate and may
inspect the Bidding Documents at the address below as of September 5, 2005 and may
purchase a set of bidding documents by a written application or applying in person between
08:30 and 16:00 hours, Monday to Thursday and between 08:30 and 15-00 hours on Friday,
~ P^^n,,,o./,S^. ,d.W_, aQonD-Mbursab fee of seven thousand
payable to the "Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Local Govemrnient &- Regional
Development". It will not be necessary to make the request in person to receive a complete
set of bidding documents, since these can be sent by mail to:
Project Coordinator
Urban Development Programme
7 Broad and Charies Streets,
Charlestown,
Georgetown, Guyana
Tele #: 225-2062
Fax #: 225-0506
Email: udp@networksgy.com
4. Bids must be accompanied by a Bid Security of not less than one percent (1 %) of the bid
price.
5. Bids must be placed in an envelope, and marked on the outside at the top right-hand comer
"Rehabilitation of Bush Lot Market Bid No.8/2005 No 1".
The envelope should be sealed and addressed to:
Chairman
National Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown, Guyana
Bids must be placed in the Tender Box of the Ministry of Finance at the address mentioned
above before 09:00 hours on Tuesday October 4, 2005. It will not be necessary to submit
bids in person since they may be sent by mail. However, the Employer is not responsible for
bids not received thereof before the time and date specified for reception of Bids. Late bids
will be rejected and returned unopened. However, it is advisable that these bids be sent early
to avoid transportation delays.
6. Bids will be opened at a public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders' representatives
who choose to attend immediately after 09:00 hours on Tuesday October 4, 2005 in the
conference room of the National Procurement and Tender Administration, Ministry of
Finance, Main & Urquhart Streets, Georgetown, Guyana.
7. Bidders registered in Guyana must submit an GRA certificate of compliance indicating that
the Bidder has met his/her Income Tax obligations for the three years preceding the closing
date of bid, and a NIS Certificate of Compliance indicating that the bidder has met his/her NIS
obligations for the month immediately preceding the month of tender.
8. Interested bidders may attend a site visit and a pre-bid meeting. The site visit is scheduled to
be held on September 12, 2005, commencing at 11:00 hours at the Anna Regina Town Hall.
The pre-bid meeting is scheduled to be held on September 14, 2005, at 11:20 hours at the
office of the Urban Development Programme, 7 Broad and Charles Streets, Charlestown,
Georgetown.


Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Local Government & Regional Development


This ad can be viewed on
http://www.gina.gov.gy


o.









Urban Development Programme
Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development
PHASE 2 CIVIL WORKS
LOT 3- REHABILITATION OF WISMAR MARKET AND LINDEN TOWN HALL
Date: September 4, 2005
Loan: N: 1021/SF-GY
Invitation for Bids.N0: 09/2005 No. 1
1. The Government of the Co-operative Republic of Guyana has received financing from the
Inter-American Development Bank towards the cost of Urban Development Programme. It is
intended that part of therocee. s,

2. The Government of Guyana acting through the Ministry of Local Government and Regional
Development (hereinafter called "Employer") now invites sealed bids from eligible bidders for
the Rehabilitation of Wismar Market and Linden Town Hall. The works will comprise among
other things:
(a) Wismar Market:
Construction of new timber stalls
Electrical Installations to stalls
Construction of new fence and gate
(b) Linden Town Hall:
Rehabilitation of windows, doors, walls, floors, ceiling, electrical works and
washroom facilities
Exterminators including but not limited to paving, fencing and gate etc.
3. Eligible bidders may obtain further information, including eligibility to participate and may
inspect the Tender Documents at the address below as of September 5, 2005 and may
purchase a set of bidding documents by a written application or appling nrer
except on public holidays and upon payment of a non-reimbursable fee of seven thousand
Guyana dollars (G$7,000). The method of payment will be by cash or manager's cheque
payable to the "Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Local Government & Regional
Development". It will not be necessary to make the request in person to receive a complete
set of bidding documents, since these can be sent by mail to:
Project Coordinator
Urban Development Programme
7 Broad & Charles Streets,
Charleston Georgetown,Guyana
Tele #: 592-225-2062
Fax. #: 592-225-0506
E-mail: udp@networksgy.com
-4. Bids must be accompanied by a Bid Security of not less that one percent (I %) of the bid price
5. Bids must be placed in a sealed envelope, and marked on the outside at the top right-hand comer
"Lot 3 Rehabilitation of Wismar Market and Unden Town Hall Bid No. 912005 No.1".
The envelope should be sealed and addressed to:
Chairman
National Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown, Guyana
Bids must be placed in the Tender Box of the Ministry of Finance at the address mentioned
above before 09:00 hours on Tuesday October 4, 2005. It will not be necessary to submit
bids in person since they may be sent by mail. However, the Employer is not responsible for
bids not received thereof before the time and date specified for reception of bids. Late bids will
be rejected and returned unopened. However, it is advisable that these bids be sent early to
avoid transportation delays.
6. Bids will be opened at a public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders' representatives
who choose to attend immediately after 09:00 hours on Tuesday October 4, 2005 at the
National Procurement and Tender Administration, Ministry of Finance, Main & Urquhart
Streets, Georgetown, Guyana.
7. Bidders registered in Guyana must submit a Guyana Revenue Authority compliance
certificate indicating that the Bidder has met his/her Income Tax obligations for the three (3)
years preceding the closing date of bid, and a NIS compliance certificate indicating that the
Bidder has met his/her NIS obligations for the month immediately preceding the month of
tender.
8. Interested Bidders may attend a site visit and a pre-bid meeting. The site visit is scheduled to
be held on September 13, 2005 commencing at 10:00 hours at the Linden Town Hall. The
pre-bid meeting is scheduled to be held on September 14, 2005 at 11:00 hours at the office
of the Urban Development Programme, 7 Broad & Charles Streets, Charlestown,
Georgetown, Guyana.


SNDY-'GHiRA ICtESptembe'4 2005


SIXTEEN IRAQI


SECURITY


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GUYANA NATIONAL CO-OPERATIVE BANK


Property situated at lot numbered 31, (thirty one) and the north half
of lot numbered 32 (thirty-two) or 'A' High Street, Charlestown, in
the city of Georgetown, in the county of Demerara, with the building
and erections thereon.
Tenders must be submitted in writing, sealed and addressed to
THE GENERAL MANAGER, GU 'ANA NATIONAL
CO-OPERATIVE BANK, 77 CRUAL STREET & WINTER
PLACE, STABROEK, GEORGETOWN, not later than
September 12, 2005.
The word "TENDER" must be writi at the top, left-hand corner
of the envelope containing the tender.
Request for permission to inspect the buildingg can be made through
the Administrative Office at telephone 225-9486.


Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Local Government & Regional Development


This ad can be viewed on
http://www.gina.gov.gy


Management reserves the right to refu. any bid.


INVITTION-FOR B-D






SUNDAY. CHRONICLE September 4, 2005 21


(i'~-~.tt 1111 IL-~i)I~

I _


MTV CHANNEL 14
CABLE 65


06:45 h Sign On With Bhajan
Melodies
07:00 h Dabi's Musical Hour
07:30 h Bhakti Bhajans
08:00 h Christ For The Nation
(Live)
08:30 h I.Q. Show
09:30 h Indian Movie
12:15 h Religious Melodies
12:30 h Avon Video & DVD
Musical Melodies
13:00 h -Asian Variety Show
14:00 h Ramayan .
15:00 h English Movie
17:30 h MTV Music Break
18:00 h Birthday & Other
Greetings
18:15 h Death
Announcements/In Memoriam
19:00 h Current Affairs
19:30 h IBE Highlights Live
20:30 h Indian Movie
23:00 h English Movie
00:00 h Sign Off


NCN INC. CHANNEL 11

02:00 h NCN 6 O'clock New
Magazine (R/B)
02:30 h Late Nite with GINA
03:00 h Movie: Elektra
05:00 h Inspiration
05:30 h Newtown Gospel
Hour
06:00 h NCN 6 O'clock
News Magazine (R/B)
07:00 h Victory of Victory
07:30 h New Life Ministries
08:00 h Lifting Guyana to
Greatness
08:30 h The Fact
09:00 h Anmol Geet
10:00 h National Geographic
11:00 h Homestretch
Magazine
12:00 h Press Conference
with Cabinet Secretary
13:00 h Info for Nation
Building
13:30 h Breaking The Silence
(Live)
14:30 h Catholic Magazine
15:00 h Growing With IPED
16:00 h Local Indian
Performers
16:30 h Family Forum
17:00 h Lutheran Men's
Fellowship
17:30 h Guysuco Roundup
18:00 h NCN 6 0' clock
News Magazine
18:30 h Kala Milan
19:00 h One On One
19:30 h Close Up
20:00 h 60 Minutes


21:00 h Between the Lines -
Cricket Lovely Cricket?
21:30 h Caribbean Passport
22:00 h Movie: Mr & Mrs
Smith


WRHM CHANNEL 7

06:30 h BBC News
07:00 h NBC Today
09:00 h CBS Sunday
10:30 h Meet the Press
11:30 h Tennis: US Open
18:00 h Eye On The Issues
18:30 h NBC New
19:00 h 60 Minutes
20:00 h Cold Case
21:00 h Extreme Makeover
23:00 h NBC News


VTV CHANNEL 46
CABLE 102

07:00 h Sitcom
07:30 h Indian Music Video
08:00 h Ram's Happy Hour
09:00 h Igloo Quiz Time
10:00 h Memory Lane
11:00 h Movie
13:00 h Movie
15:00 h Movie
17:00 h Travelers Extreme
(Live)
18:00 h Entertainment.Com
(Live)
19:00 h Majesty 1 Music
Lesson (Live)
20:00 h Sports
20:30 h Quran & Sunnah
21:00 h Khans Watch Repair
Center Family Time (Sanford &
Sons)
22:00 h Movie
23:50 h Sign Off


CHANNEL

08:55 h-Sign On
09:00 h -America at Worship
S09:30 h This Week in India
10:00 h Showbiz India
11:00 h Showbiz India
Extreme
11:30 h -Asian Variety Show
12:30 h Naturally, Sadie
13:00 h-The Suite Life of Zack
13:30 h Phil of the Future
14:00 h Pizza My Heart
16:00 h Brandy & Mr
Whiskers
16:30 h- Smallville
18:00 h News Channel 4 at 6
18:30 h NBC Nightly News-
19:00 h Greetings and
Announcements
19:30 h Faith in Action A
Catholic Series


DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE CLOSURE TO ROAD
TRAFFIC FOR SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,2005






- SS --. .- ., '


..... .




For Ocean Going Vessels & Trawlers 14:30
For Ocean Going Vessels opening lasts about 1-1mhrs


20:00 h What I like About
You
20:30 h A Return of God's
Biblical Foundation
21:00 h-Indian Movie
00:00 h Sign Off


CHANNEL 13

09:00 h Hope for Today
10:00 h Revival Crusaders
10:30 h TBN
12:00 h CNN
14:00 h Charlotte Street
Wesleyan Church
14:30 h Methodist Church
15:00 h Today's Living with
Don Clower
15:30 h Faith & Truth
16:00 h- CNN
18:00 h Biography
19:00 h Dateline
20:00 h Extreme Makeover
21-:00 h CNN

CHANNEL 18

05:00 h- Sign On
05:10 h Meditation
05:30 h Quran This Morning
06:00 h R. Gossai General
Store presents Krishna Bhajans
06:15 h Jetto's Lumber Yard
presents Krishna Bhajans
06:45 h Timehri Maha Kali
Shakti Mandir presents
Ramayan
07:00 h Ramroop's Furnitute
Store presents Religious
Teachings
07:30 h Kennav Holdings Ltd
presents Krishna Bhajans
07:45 h A&S Enterprise
presents Krishna Bhajans
08:05 h Sa Re Ga Ma
(Musical Notes)
09:30 h Animated Ramayan
for Children
10:00 h Sunday Morning
Services by Pt. Reepu Daman
Persaud
11:00 h To be Announced
12:00 h Death
Announcements & In
Memoriam
13:00 h DVD Movie: Umrao


Jaan
16:00 h Gurukula Sandesh
16:30 h -Teaching of Islam
17:00 h IPA Presents Shiv
Mahapuran
17:30 h Kishore Local Talent
18:00 h Mere Awaaz
Suno...Karaoke Live
19:00 h Birthday greetings/
Anniversary/Congratulations/
Death Announcements & In
Memoriam
20:00 h DVD Movie: Yahaan
23:00 h Action Movie: The
Rundown
00:30 h Sign Off


CHANNEL 6

05:00 h Inspiration Time
06:30 h Deaths and In
Memoriam
06:50 h Arya Samaj
Programme
07:00 h GYO Religious
Programme
07:15 h Om Namah Shiva
08:00 h Geetmala
09:00 h Indian Movie
12:00 h Deaths and In
Memoriam
12:30 h Radha Krishna
Mandir Satsang
13:30 h Cartoons
14:30 h Sanatan Sharma
15:00 h- End Times
15:30 h- Maximum Vibes
16:30 h Gins: The Diary
17:00 h-Greetings
17:50 h Viewpoint by Vibert
Parvatan
18:00 h Indian Cultural Time
18:30 h Eye on the Issues
19:00 h Deaths and In
Memoriam
20:00 h- Voice of the People
20:30 h Keishar'sKomfort
Krib Draw
21:00 h Heartland Music
21:30 h Deaths and In
Memoriam
22:30 h Viewers Choice
English Movie
00:30 h English Movie.
02:30 h English Movie
04:30 h Documentary


REGIONAL DEMOCRATIC COUNCIL
REGION NO.5 (MAHAICA/BERBICE)

Tenders are invited from suitably qualified Contractors to undertake
the following works:-

A. EDUCATION BUILDINGS

1. Ceiling of Floor over lower flat, Ithaca Primary.
2. General Rehabilitation of Bath Primary and Nursery.
3. Rehabilitation of #29 Primary.
4. Extension to Lichileid Nursery.
5. Rehabilitation of Seafleld Primary.
6. Rehabilitation of Calcutta Primary.
7. Painting of Mahaicony Primary.

B. HEALTH BUILINGS (Capital)
Completion of Fort Wellington Dental Department

CURRENT:-

8. Rehabilitation of Medex Living Quarters, Fort Wellington.
9. Rehabilitation of Doctors Living Quarters, Fort Wellington.
10. Rehabilitation of Fort Wellington Hospital.
11. Repairs to No. 28 Health Centre.

C. LAND DEVELOPMENT:

12. Construction of 1st Cross Street, Hope Housing Area, West
Coast Berbice.

D. COMMUNITY ROAD

13. Construction of Foot Path, Crazy Town.

E MISCELLANEOUS ROADS:

14. Construction of Foot Path opposite Sookram's residence, De-
Edward, West Bank Berbice.
15. Construction of Good Faith Cremation Site Road.

F. DRAINAGE & IRRIGATION (Capital)

16. Construction of R.C Aquaduct, Perth Biaboo Canal/Broomlands.

G. DRAINAGE & IRRIGATION (Current)

17. Maintenance of Drains within Mahaicony/Abary N.D.C.
18. Maintenance of Drains within Woodlands/Farm N.D.C.

H- HEALTH EQUIPMENT:


19. Fracture Bed with overhead trapeze.
20. Spring Bed (institutional) manual/electric.
21. Infant ncubator(1)
22. Dental Chair (complete) (1)

Tenders are requited to submit the following:-


(1) A VALID Certificate of Compliance from the Commissioner of
Inland Revenue.
(2) A VAUD Certiicate of Compliance from the General Manager,
N.I.S (Employer).
(3) Records of previous performance in areas tendered for (2-3
years).
(4) List of Equipment where applicable.
(5) List of Human and Financial resources.
(6) Triplicate copies of Tenders (original and duplicate)

Tender documents can be obtained from the Regional Administrative
Office, Fort Wellington, West Coast Berbice for a nonrefundable fee
of ffteen hundred dollars ($1,500.00) each.

Tenders for each Job must be separately enclosed in sealed
envelopes clearly indicating the job applied for and addressed to:-

Chairman
Regional Tender Board
Fort Wellington, West Coast Berbice.

Tenders must be deposited in Tender Box, Regional Democratic
Council, Fort Wellington, West Coast Berbice not later than 9:00a.m
on Monday 5th September, 2005.

Tenders or their representative may be present on Monday 5th
September, 2005 when the bids would be opened.

J. MARINE
REGIONAL EXECUTIVE OFFICER
REGION NO. 5. (MA-HACA/BERBICE)

Government ads can be viewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy


GUIDE SUBJECT


TO CHANGE,

WITHOUT NOTICE







"SUNDAY CHRONICLE September 4, 2005


COUNSELLING
WANTED 01- or co into uS at
LAND FOR SALE FOR HIRE Lamna AvCeInue
LEGALS BEAUTY SALON PROPERTY FOR SALE EDUCATIONAL B3l Air Park
TO LET LEARN TO DRIVE HERBAL MEDICINE AUTO SALES (;oretown.
SERVICES DRESSMAKING HEALTH MASSAGE
- fl- -I I ij^ ii


APARTMENTS in
Barbados. Magnificent view,
kitchenettes, private
bathrooms, fully furnished,
seven minutes to Bridgetown
or beach. Single US$28,
double US$32 nightly.
Telephone 1-246-4243005.



BUILDING, renovating
,any kind of construction
work? Free estimates.
Prompt, reasonable and
reliable service. Call
622-0267/629-2239.



INDRA'S Beauty Salon, 122
Oronoque Street, for cold wave,
straightening, facial,
manicure, scalp treatment and
design on nails. Also Beauty
Culture available. Tel. 227-
1601.
NAYELLI SCHOOL OF
COSMETOLOGY is now offering
a special 3-month Cosmetology
package, that begins on
September 19, 2005 &finishes
December 15, 2005. Also evening
courses in.Airbrushing, Acrylic Nails
and Barbering which begin on
September 12, 05. Tel. 226-2124
or visit at 211 New Market Street,
North Cummingsburg.




BUSINESS

)PPORiUNITY
Looking for a buyer for a
small but growing'business
Specialises in recruitment
for both local and overseas
companies. The oalv type
in Guvan.Ideal tor
entrepreneurs/investors
LiabilityFree!
Contact:
641-8808 or email:
!pp.uri q i i hl .1 *F I A 0.1n




ARE you, thinking of an
ambitious career? Welf here is
an opportunity for you. Penny's
Creative Nails and Styles, is
offering a full course in Nails
Technology. Learn on the job
manicure, pedicure, nail
extension, silk rap, sculpture
nails, air brush design, etc.
(Only two individuals well be
allowed per session for
individual attention). For more
information, contact Ms. Scott
on 225-2636 or 629-7405.
Classes commence on
September 19, 2005. Also
vacancies exist for qualified
and experienced persons in this
field.


FOR PROFESSIONAL
COMPUTER Repairs, Sales &
Services Call Kersting's
Computer Repairs & Sales
Centre @ 227-8361/618-8283.
Home & Office services
available. 24 hrs.



PHONICS Classes for
children 8 years and up. Call
227-8143. Mon. Friday 10 -
5 pm. Sat. 8:30 am 1:30
pm. Sun. 8 am 10 am.
NAIL Tipping, Nail
aDesigning, Silk Wrapping &
Manicure courses. Register now
at $4 000 per course. Call
Michelle. Tel # 227-7342, 222-
.3263.
S PETER Pan Play School
& Child Care. 27 Albert Street,
Queenstown. Tel. 226-2416. 16
years experience, mature, care
givers, small groups. Enrol
early.


ACADEMIC','E.R 2005 o00o












225-., 225-- .
s~- ,







ENROL at Samaroo's
Institute, Maraj Building. We
offer classes for school children'
and adults. Enter for Pre-CXC,
CXC, '0' Levels, the new SAT,
CAPE and 'A' Level Maths.. 223-
1971.
TECHNICAL Studies
Institute, 136 Shell Road, Kitty.
Tel. 225-9587. Electrical
installation and wiring.
Television repairs and
electronics, air conditioning
and refrigeration, computer
repairs.
PORTUGUESE CLASSES.
The Centre of Brazilian Studies,
309 Church Street, Queenstown,
G/town, invites you to ENROL
NOW for Portuguese classes
beginning Sept. 12, 2005. Call
for more info. 226-8054 or 226-
2573.
EARN a certificate in nail
technology, manicures,
pedicures, sculptured nails,
tips with acrylic/silk wraps, air
brush arts bonus facials, all
at an affordable cost. Contact
Jem at Hair Locker Barber Shop,
140 Camp St., opposite Quality
or Call 227-2898, 616-8005.
Enrol now.
ENROL now at XENON
ACADEMY for part-time and full-
time classes. Nursery. to
secondary. We have qualified
and experienced teachers.
Xenon Academy, Tank St., Grove
Public Rd. Tel. 624-4659 or 266-
2238.




COMPUTER ANINO CENTRE

Tel. 25.-154
I :. ,-rr- n Trei, on
.. 1 ,I T l .-


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1 ,i,, - ., P1 N.a..
L .,'eeond Cljsse..i

EVERGREEN Nature Study
classes, natural products and
services. Register now (Regions
1 10). Tel. 227-8259, 226-
4634 Fax. 226-3090
www.sdnp.or visit at g.gy/evergeen
DESPAT'S Creative Craft,
311 Rohinital St., P/ Nagar.
Enrol now for classes in Chinese
Cookery, Vegetarian & Indian
Cookery, FoodvAnd Nutrition,
Fabric, Designs, Cakes and
Pastries, bedroom elegance,
Soft furnishings and more. Call
Pat Helwig on 227-0646, 645-
7758 or visit at .the above
address.
PRACTICAL Electronic
Course beginning September
19, 2005. Learn to repair
televisions, amplifiers,
microwave overns, combination,
CD Players, radio & tapes, etc.
Course suitable for technicians,
hobbyists and school dropouts.
Earn while you learn. Call
Abdul's Electronic Servicing. For
further information, Tel. 225-
0391, 226-6551.


ENROL now. Pitman's
English, Reading, Writing,
Shorthand, Typewriting. Full
and crash courses office practice
& Computer Classes. Individual
attention. School reopens 5th
September, 2005. Tel. 226-0708
or 619-4401
HELLO, Early School
Leavers, would-you like to
become a Goldsmith? Please
contact Joseph Narine and Sons
at 207 West Lusignan, ECD.
Classes start early in Sept. For
further details call Tel. No. 220-
6399, ask for Joseph Narine. I
can teach you to design all
types of jewellery, from a baby
ring to a hollow bangle,
including filigree work. Anyone
is welcome.



FOOD WARMERS. TEL.
226-0170.



Le RICH Guest House, 25
Princes Street offers you great
rates $25 000 $30 000
monthly. Light &'water included,
T.V. & refrigerator. Luxury with
you in mind. Tel. 233-2175, 623-
1562, 227-3067.



WIDE selection novels,
mystery, etc. 223-8237.
WIDE selection of Novels,
Romance, Mystery, Horrors,
Magazines, Enid Blyton, Fairy
Tales and other children
books, comics, informative
and educational books. Free
iveaways. Register now.
uliette's Book Library 223-
8237.



ENROL now at Soman &
Sons Driving School, First
Federation Building, Manget
Place & Croal Street. Manual &
automatic. Phone # 225-4858/
622-2872.
ENROL now at Shalom
Driving School. Lot 2 Croal
Street, Stabroek. You could also
obtain an International Driving
Permit. For more information
call 227-3869, 622-8162.
R.K.'S Institute of Motoring
is Guyana's only recognized
driving school operating since
1979. We have experience,
vehicles and infrastructure to
make you MASTER THE ART
OF DRIVING. You and your loved
ones security and safety are
assured. Contact us at R.K.'s
Institute of Motoring, 125
Regent Road, Bourda. Tel. 226-
7541, 227-5072



MASSAGE Therapy
alleviates stress and tension.
Certified Massage Therapist, Ulelli
Verbeke. 226-2669, 615-8747.
MRS. SINGH'S Massage
Hotel and Home Service
available by appointment. I also
work at my home. Tel. 220-4842,
615-6665.



"BLESSED is the Nation
whose God is the Lord." Psalm
128:1. Guyana is Blessed. For
a blessing study this website:
http://www.geocities.com/
elderwil58.
CENTRE OF BRAZILIAN'
STUDIES of the Brazilian
Embassy invites the general
public to the showing of the
movie. Lisbela and the Prisoner
(comedy with English subtitles)
on big screen. Date: Friday,
August 12, 2005. Time 19:00-
21:00 hrs. Venue: 309-Church
St., Q/town. Admission free. Call
to reserve a seat. Tel. # 226-
2573 or 226-8054.


MAGAZINE Worldwide Pen
Friend. Information? Send
stamped envelope CFI, PO
Box 12154 Georgetown,
Guyana.
FOR Friendship or serious
relationship call The Junior/
Senior Singles Dating Service
18 80 yrs. and join it in
celebrating its' 2'1d Anniversary
Grand After Lunch, Lime &
Dance on Sat. 15t" October,
2005 at the Buccaneer Cove
(Woodbine Hotel Int.) New
Market St., G/town. For tickets
call tel. 223-8237. Mon. Fri. -
8:30 am 6 pm. Sat. 10 am 4
pm.



EXPERIENCED and trusted
matron would like to take care of
your property when you are away.
226-9410.
USA GREEN CARD
LOTTERY. Live & work in the
USA. Family application $4
000. Contact 225-9020.
FOR professional repairs to
crashed vehicles, change nose
cut, front half, etc. Call 642-
.1375.
NEED AN EMPLOYEE OR
A JOB? We find a job or
employee for you. Kindly Call
227-3339 or 225-9020.
TECHNICIANS available for
appliances repairs- washers, dryers,
microwaves, stoves, deep fryers, etc.
Call 622-4521, 263-0050.
FOR all your construction,
repairs renovations, as well as
masonry, varnishing plumbing and
painting, contact Mohamed on
223-9710/614-6634.
WELDING SERVICES for
grillwork on houses, aluminium,
cast iron, stainless steel, fishing
vessel and truck tray alterations.
Call at 233-2847, 610-6778 -
Khemraj.
CANADIAN IMMIGRATION
PAPERWORK. We assist with the
paperwork. Cost $4500 for full
package. Consultation is FREE!
Contact 225-9020.
FOR efficient service and
repairs washing machines,
refrigerators, microwave ovens, gas
stoves, etc. Freezezone Enterprises,
6 "A" Shell Road, Kitty. Telephone
227-0060, 616-5568.
REPAIRS & Service to any
electrical appliances e.g. washing
machines, clothes dryers, air-
conditions, freezers, refrigerators,
computers, etc. ALL JOBS DONE
ON SITE WITH THREE MONTHS
LIMITED WARRANTY. Nazim Khan.
N. K. Electrical Services. Tel. 270-
4595, 626-2847 (anytime).
PROFESSIONAL repairs to
your televisions, CDs and DVD
Players, amplifiers and stereo
systems, microwave ovens, etc.
Call Abdul's Electronic
Servicing. Tel. 225-0391 or 226-
6551. (23 years in the business
of repairs). Technicians call us
for giveaway deals (huge
discounts) on service manuals.



TEMPORARY Counter
Help for Guy. Exp 2005.
Call 225-9553 for info.
1 LIVE-IN Baby-sitter.
Goldfield Inc. Lot C Eccles,
EBD. Tel. # 233-2423.
VACANCIES exist for
experienced Bodywork men,
spray painters and mechanic. For
further information call 225-
3160.
ONE Caretaker. Must have
family. Apply to CIOG. 225-
8654.
MATURE experienced
Dispatcher. Contact Bassant's
Taxi Service on Tel. # 227-8056.
TRUCK Drivers. Apply in
person with written application
to Lens, Sheriff & Fourth
Sts,, C/ville.


ONE Gardener & Handyman
(Day shift) on the East Coast, LBI
residential. Tel. 220-2695 for
information.
ONE Day Shift Handyman,
one Security and Sales
Attendant and Waitress. Tel.
226-6527. Tennessee
Entertainment Centre.
KITCHEN Assistant, Cashier,
Bill boy. Apply in person to
Kamboat Restaurant, 51 Sheriff
St. or 17 Vryheid's Lust, ECD.
One Driver. Apply in person
to CIOG. Valid Driver's Licence
and two references required.
225-8654.
ONE Accounts Clerk 5
subjects Accounts, Maths,
English, Computer experience,
(Accounting package). Call 610-
7632 Email:
jraccountant@gmail.com
SALES Clerks must have
knowledge of Maths and
English, 2 yrs working
experience. Apply in person with
written application to Lens,
Sheriff & Fourth Streets, C/ville.
XENON ACADEMY- Now has
vacancies for qualified and
experienced teachers at all levels.
Apply in person with written
application to The Principal, Tank
St., Grove Public Rd., EBD.
FEMALE Clerical
Assistants. Apply in person
with a written application.
Must have knowledge of
Maths & English, Computer
literate. Horseshoe Racing
Service. Interview between 1
pm and 3 pm. Mon. to Fri.
PORTERS apply in person
to Manager, Shell Gas
Distributor. 9 Dowding Street,
Kitty, Georgetown with written
application and references
between the hrs of 9 am and 4
pm., Mon. Sat. Tel. No. 227-
7350.
APEX EDUCATION -
Rewarding career opportunities
available for teachers in all
subject areas and levels. Must
be trained and experienced.
Apply with written application to
the Director of Studies 11
Vryheid's Lust, Public Road,
ECD. Tel. 220-6139.
SALESBOYS WITH
MINIMUM 1 YEAR
EXPERIENCE IN HARDWARE
SALES. PORTER BOYS
BETWEEN THE AGES OF 16
AND 22 YEARS. APPLY IN
PERSON PARSRAM
DISCOUNT STORE, 21 WATER
& AMERICA STS.
IMMEDIATE VACANCIES -
exist for the following positions.
Handyman, Washer, Security
Guards. Apply in person with the
following documents Police
Clearance, Food Handler's
Certificate, 2 recent references,
1 Passport photo to K&VC Hotel,
233- South Rd., Lacytown.
ONE Female Office Assistant,
with knowledge of NIS and PAYE
Roll. Must be Computer literate,
must be between ages 18 and 30,
knowledge of Maths and English.
Apply in person with written
application and 2 references to
Lens, Sheriff and Fourth Streets,
Campbellville, G/town.
VACANCY exists for one
computer Operator. Must have a
sound secondary education,
Computer literate, willing to work
in the evening. Apply to:
UNITECH Computer School,
and Internet Cafe, 24 Mon
Repos North, East Coast
Demerara. Tel. 220-0866, 619-
2326. Email.
Unicomp03@yahoo.com
GEORGETOWN READING &
RESEARCH CENTRE needs two
male and two female full-time
assistants, between the ages of
18 and 30. Duties (Males) -
Assisting in transporting books
and tables to and from exhibition
sites. Females Displaying
books for exhibition and assisting
in sales, monitoring exhibitions.
Call 225-5899 for enquiries.


LOT 294 ATLANTIC
GARDENS. TEL. # 621-12,43.
40 FT. x 140 FT. $7.5
million neg. Phone 663-7874.
SHERIFF/WILLIAM
STREETS $30M NEG.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
LAND FOR SALE
OLEANDER Gardens 89 ft
by 152 ft. Price $25M.
Call: 612-0349.
TRANSPORTED house lot
eight hundred thousand
dollars. Best, WCD, light, water,
phone are available. Singh -
254-0101.
PRIME commercial land.
for sale 115 ft x 31 ft,
Charlotte Street, Bourda.
Contact owner 226-0683
(anytime).

DEMERARA River -
Versailles, West Bank 24 acres,
road and river frontage 65
000 US Dollars. Call 592-226-
2803.
LAND situate at east of
Windsor Forest Cricket Ground,
comprising an area of 2.422 of
an English acre. Call 220-9675.
NUMBER 2 Canal Polder,
24 acres of agricultural land -
15 thousand US dollars. Call
592-226-2803.
LAND at Triumph, ECD,
facing the Atlantic Ocean,
0.1585 acres. $2.4M neg. Tel.
270-6105, 226-8775.
DEMERARA River 250
acres, 1 800/8 000. Ideal wharf
-or sea port, access Essequibo
River $100 000 per acre.
Ederson's 226-5496.
DEMERARA River 200
acres, river frontage for dry
dock, poultry, sawmill
agriculture, housing, etc. US$1
500 per acre. Call 592-226-
2803.
TWO transported adja-
cent lots in Earl's Court, LBI
18 080 sq ft total. Please tele-
phone 623-7438 between 6-
8am and 8-1Opm for details.
GUYSUCO Gardens (west
of UG road). Le Ressouvenir,
Atlantic Gardens, Ogle,
Versailles double lot, gated
compound. Tel. 226-8148,
625-1624.
DUNCAN St. $10M,
GuySuCo Gardens, Versailles
(double lot), East Bank.,
Atlantic Gardens. Tel. 226-
8148, 625-1624.
LINDEN, Moblissa 30
acres. Cheap $7M, Land of
Canaan, 8 acres, Riverside -
$40M neg., Charlotte Street -
$13M. Keyhomes 223-4267.
SAILA PARK Vreed-en-
Hoop, Housing Scheme. House
lot for sale, near the public
road. Prime location, 2 miles
from V/Hoop Stelling. Tel. #
225-7670 or 254-0397.
(17) ACRES prime land at
Yarrawkabra with 50 years
lease. Private creek (30 ft.), GPL
& GWI services available, less
than one minute turn off the
highway. Telephone R.
Bacchus 226-1903.
BETTER HOPE PUBLIC RD.,
ECD PRIME COMMERICAL
LAND, FULLY FENCED. Three-
comer lot suitable for any type of
business. Tel. 222-2628, 645-
4749, 645-0257.
GATED community with
(24) hours security. Exclusively
residential lots at Pin.
Versailles, West Bank Demerara
size 6 000 12 000 sq. ft.,
priced from $3.9M.
Immediately Transportable.
Contact Seetaram # 264-
2946/7.
GIFT: Huge double lot
almost 11 000 sq. ft. opposite
our star cricketer Ramanaresh
Sarwan, with 24hrs. security in
highly residential and gated
community of Versailles, WBD.
Price $6 995 000. Contact #
227-4040, 628-0796.


I


'~mrrY~ I






SUNDAY CHRONICLE September 4, 2005


MAKE your own decision,
buy land now in LBI $4.5M,
Continental Avenue $5.5M,
Meadow Brook $6.9M, Ogle
50 x 100 $4.2M, Atlantic
Gdns $5.7M, Belt Air Gardens,
Oleander Gardens. Phone Ms.
Tucker # 225-2626, Ms
Laundry # 231-2064. Email
tonyreidsrealty@hotmail.com



ROOM FOR SINGLE
WORKING FEMALE. TELE-
PHONE: 227-0928.
BEL Air Park. Unfurnished.
Price neg. Call 226-1769, 612-
3607.
LAMAHA GARDENS -
US$1 000. KEYHOMES -
223-4267.
SUBRYANVILLE
US$800. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
PRASHAD NAGAR -
US$700. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
BEL AIR PARK US$700.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
PRASHAD NAGAR -
US$700. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
BEL AIR PARK US$1
200. DIAMONDS.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
QUEENSTOWN,
furnished two and three-
bedroom flats. Telephone
226-5650.
SHORT-TERM RENT-
ALS FOR OVERSEAS
VISITORS. PHONE 225-
9944.
ONE 2-bedroom semi
furnished house, Prashad
Nagar. 227-3128, 223-7919.
ONE two-bedroom
apartment in Garnett Street,
Campbellville. Price $38
000. Contact 225-6574.
ONE top flat suitable for
living quarter or office at Mc
Doom Public Rd., EBD. Tel.
226-1903. R. Bacchus.
JAP Real Estate has
properties/apartments to rent
or sell. Contact Karen. Tel.
231-1425.
ONE two-bedroom
apartment in Cumming's
Lodge. Rent $30 000. Tel.
222-6558. Preferably student/
couple.
THREE-BEDROOM apt.
(new) Good Hope, Housing
Scheme, ECD, all amenities,
etc. Call 645-6409.
BEL AIR PARK fur-
nished executive house on
double lot US$1 500. #
231-2285/612-2766.
1 3-bedroom concrete
top flat at Golden Grove
Village. Contact Tel. # 623-
5318, for more info.
THREE-bedroom
bottom flathouse. Lot 50
Russell Street. Charlestown.
Call # 622-1225.
SPACIOUS & secure 2-
bedroom apartment, UG
Road $50 000 neg. Tel.
613-0918.
SPACIOUS 2-bedroom
apartment rent $30 000. Call
222-4045, 222-2465.
FURNISHED flats for
overseas visitors. Phone 227-
2995, Kitty.
ONE apartment for rent in
Thomas St., Kitty. Call 226-
3268.
FURNISHED flat to let
overseas visitors.
Telephone 226-0242.
NEW one-bedroom self-
contained apartment. Bel Air
Park, facing Duncan Street.
Tel. 226-2675.
ROOMS for single working
females and Interior students
- $15 000 per month. Kitchen
facilities available. Call 226-
2833.
SPACIOUS 3-bedroom
flat, Ogle Front. All
conveniences. Immediate
occupancy. Phone 222-7516.
1 UPSTAIRS 2-bedroom -
$45 000 monthly. 189
D'Urban Backlands. Call 233-
2175, 623-1562, 227-3067.
1 2-BEDROOM
spacious, unfurnished
bottom flat. 131 Alma
Avenue, Prashad Nagar, G/
town $45 000. Tel. 225-
8088.


2-BEDROOM self-
contained apartment, fully
grilled. Decent family. Contact
88 Middle Rd., La Penitence.
225-4345.
APARTMENTS to rent with
in toilet and bath. One-
bedroom, 2 and 3-bedroom.
Mon Repos & Kersaint Park, LBI,
ECD. Tel. 220-0979.
1 3-BEDROOM bottom flat
situated at Lot 18 Providence
Park, EBD with all
conveniences. Contact 233-
5510, 226-4312.
FURNISHED ROOM DE-
CENT, SINGLE WORKING FE-
MALE. TEL: 226-5035 (08:00 -
17:00 HRS).
COLONIAL-STYLED
building (3) bedrooms upper
and or lower flats, parking and
telephone, Queenstown. Call
624-4225.
FURNISHED rooms and one
unfurnished two-bedroom
apartment at Bachelor's
Adventure, ECD. Tel. 270-1214.
Gloria.
ONE two-bedroom
apartment located at 2 E 21
Cummings Lodge H/Scheme.
Contact Dolly on tel. # 617-
3632.
FURNISHED American
styled apts. Suitable for a
couple or single person $4
000/ $5 000 per day. Call 231-
6429, 622-5776.
ONE lower business flat situated
at Lot 1 Non Pariel, Area A,
East Coast Demerara. Apply to
Jerome Fredericks at same lo-
cation.
FURNISHED two-bedroom
apt. Ideal for a couple or single
person US$500 per mth. and
US$25 per day. CIlI 227-3546 or
624-1881.
RESIDENTIAL and
commercial properties.
Furnished and unfurnished.
Prices ranging from $40 000
upwards. Tel. 226-1192, 623-
7742.
APTS. and houses -
furnished and unfurnished for
short and long term. Call 226-
2372. (Central G.T. business
place @ $70 000).
FULLY furnished 1 & 2-
bedroom apartments. Air
conditioned hot and cold, parking
space to rent. For overseas visitors.
Tel. 218-0392.
ONE Business bottom flat
located at Plantain Walk, Vreed-
en-Hoop area. Tel. 227-3431 or
264-2650. Mon. Sat. 10 am -
6 pm.
1 3-BEDROOM furnished
apartment Kitty $80 000.
Apartments/houses and business
space. Tel. 226-8148, 625-
1624.
1 2-BEDROOM spacious,
unfurnished bottom flat. 131
Alma Avenue, Prashad Nagar,
G/town $45 000. Tel. 225-
8088.
DUNCAN ST. $18 000 &
$25 000, Eocles $25 000 &
$35 000, South $40 000.
Bourda $25 000, Subryanville
- $45 000, Ogle $20 000 &
$25 000, self-contained/rooms
- $12 000. Call 231-6236.
1 1-BEDROOM bottom flat
apt. inside toilet and bath, 6t'
St, Cummings Lodge, Greater
G/town $15 000 per month.
Tel. 222-2718 or 628-1124.
GEORGETOWN Central -
Store your general merchandise
in 10 or more 40-ft. containers,
as safety bond $150 000 neg.
monthly. Ederson's 226-
5496.
3-BEDROOM apt. or
separate as rooms for single
female in Cumming's Lodge.
Tel. 225-7673, 642-2651.
GREATER Diamond
residential 2-storey concrete
mansion, 4 luxurious bedrooms,
or offices, % acres land US$1
500 monthly. Ederson's 226-
5496.
SPACIOUS, fully
furnished 3-bedroom flat
available for overseas/local
rental. Apartments 2-
bedroom best suited for
single working persons. Call
- 226-0210.
QUEENSTOWN, fully
furnished 1 & 3-bedroom
apartment with parking
space to rent. Suitable for
overseas visitors on short
term basis. Tel. # 226-5137/
227-1843.


BY owner. Business
place in Barr St. Tel. No.
231-7903
3-BEDROOM bottom flat.
Working married couple
preferred. No more than 2 family
members. No Agents please.
Rental per month $35 000. Call
627-9973.
1 TWO-BEDROOM house
by itself located at Good Hope
Gds., East Coast Dem. Tel.
642-6398.
FOR overseas guests -
house, furnished flats, rooms,
house and apartment. Self -
contained and AC. Contact C &
S Night Club. Tel. 227-3128.,
cell 622-7977.
LAMAHA GDNS. US$1
000, US$1 500, Bel Air Park -
US$1 800, G$60 000, South
Gdns G$60 000, $15 000,
Newtown $50 000. Sonja -
225-7197, 623-2537.
SEMI-FURNISHED. self-
contained. rooms and
apartments available for single,
working individuals or married
couples. Call 225-0168,
Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
between 9 am and 2 pm.
ATLANTIC GARDENS -
LARGE TWO-STOREY
BUILDING, THREE BEDROOMS,
EACH MASTER ROOMS,
INCLUSIVE, LAUNDRY ROOMS,
LARGE KITCHENS. TEL. 227-
0972.
1 LARGE 2-bedroom
apartment with inside toilet and
bath, overhead water, grill,
telephone, etc. at 4th Street,
Cummings Lodge, Greater
Georgetown. Price $35 000.
Contact Tel. # 222-3573.
ECCLES, 2-bedroom
bottom flat $35 000, Prashad
Nagar, furnished US$1000,
South, two-storey, 3-bedroom
house, furnished $80 000,
unfurnished $60 000. Tel.
227-7627 office, 227-3768
home, 644-2099 Cell.
HOUSE by itself $80 000
upwards; executive house from
US$900; apts. with A/C -
US$400. Phone Ms. Tucker- #
225-2626, Ms Laundry # 231-
2064. Email
tonyreidsrealty@hotmail.com
FOR immediate lease on
Northern Hogg Island 200 acres
of cultivated rice land along with
rice mill complete with drying
floor and dryer. Also tractor,
combine, bulldozer for sale.
Contact: 626-1506/225-2903.
Serious enquiries only.
LAMAHA GARDENS: 2-
bedroom cottage, a/c, fully
furnished, for overseas tenants
only US$500. SUBRYANVILLE:
US$900 and US$1200. BEL AIR
SPRINGS: US$2000.
UNIVERSITY GARDENS: 3-
bedroom US$2500. KITTY:
Bottom flat $35,000 and lots
more all over including offices,
bonds, etc. Call 226-7128, 615-
6124 ABSOLUTE REALTY.
KITTY $35 000, C/VILLE -
$45 000, South Ruimveldt $50
000, Bel Air Park US$1 000,
Subryanville, Prashad Nagar,
Lamaha Gardens, Queenstown,
Bel Air Gardens, Bel Air New
Haven, KINGSTON, ECCLES
'AA', Courida Park, UNIVERSITY
GARDENS, Happy Acres, Office
flat/building, MIDDLE STREET,
Main Street, High Street. Church
Street, Brickdam, Croal Street.
Others. Mentore/Singh Realty -
225-1017, 623-6136.
JEWANRAM'S REALTY
"Have Faith in Christ, Today"
Tel. 227-1988. 623-6431, 270-
4470. Email:
jewanalrealty@yahoo.com
EXECUTIVE RENTAL Bel Air
Gardens Le Ressouvenir
(with pool) US$2 -500;
Campbellville Section 'K':
Republic Park/Bel Air Park -
US$2 000; Queenstown -
US$1 600; Atlantic Gardens -
US$1 500, US$1 000,
US$800; Happy Acres -
US$500, US$1 000, US$500;
Caricom Gardens/Queenstown
- US$1 000; Eccles AA- US$1
200; Bel Air Park/Subryanville/
Green Field Park US$1 000,
Bagotstown 6-bedroom, 1
self-contained US$1 000.
OTHERS Providence/Imax
Gardens $30 000: Eccles/Bel
Air $35 000; Kitty $45 000/
$70 000; Alberttown (3 offices)
- $65 000; Non Pariel/Industry
- $25 000. BUSINESS 4-
storey building (Central
Georgetown) $450 000.
PLUS properties/land for sale
- $3.6M to $125M.


FOUR-bedroom fur. house
with swimming pool, servants
quarters, generator, two-car
garage, large fore court and back
lawns. ECD US$2 500; office
space 1 600 sq. ft approx.,
Hadfield St., Stabroek $100
000. Wills Realty. 227-2612,
223-1877.



BEL AIR PARK $23M.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
BEL AIR PARK $16M,
CONCRETE. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
ONE wooden and concrete
house 50E Sheriff Street.
Phone 223-1529.
NEW concrete bids. Foulis.
ECD. Price negotiable. Tel. 612-
5661.
MINI Super Market. 69
Hadfield St. & Louisa Row,
Werk-en-Rust, G/town. Call
226-5210.
CANAL NO. 2, North
Section 3-bedroom house
(concrete & wood). Tel. 263-
5739.
1 HOUSE lot with 4
houses: Persons interested
please call 333-2420 Price ne-
gotiable.
KITTY 2 properties .
$12M neg.; Lodge $2.5M; C/
ville $14M. Tel. 227-2256.
CUMMINGS Lodge, 4-
bedroom. Wood/concrete -
$14M negotiable. Tel. # 613-
5735 or 263-6043.
DOUBLE-LOT 3-bedroom
property for sale in Amelia's
Ward, Linden. Price negotiable.
Call: 223-4938.
VARIETY Store &
Restaurant. 22 Lyng & Evans
Streets, Charlestown, G/
town. Call 227-7818, Cell
610-5606.
GOING bakery with 4-
bedroom house, 2 toilets, 2
baths, land 41 1 300. 39 Best
Village, WCD. Tel. 254-0123.
1 3-BEDROOM wooden
house on wide space land LBI
H/Scheme. For more
information, please call tel. #
220-2920 after 5 pm daily.
CANAL No. 1 Polder new
2-storey, 4-bedroom concrete
building 15 acres bearing citrus,
other fruit trees $14M.
Ederson's 226-5496.
REGENT/Alexander Sts.
corner property/land. Ideal 3
4-storey general store.
Ederson's 226-5496.
HOUSE & land at 53
Bagotville Village. WBD. Length
1 acre arable land $14M neg.
Contact 614-9423.
NEWTOWN, Kitty front
concrete/wooden, 6 bedrooms,
back 4 bedrooms with toilet and
bath, kitchen $9M. Ederson's
- 226-5496.
SHERIFF/Garnett Sts. 2-
storey, 4-bedroom house, back
lot build your dream mansion,
area tennis/pool $25M.
Ederson's 226-5496.
TURKEYEN near Caricom -
2-storey residence/business
property, land 50'/150'. Ideal 4
5-storey hotel $15M. Ederson's
- 226-5496.
QUEENSTOWN 2-storey, 5-
bedroom, 2 A/Cs, 2 toilets and
baths, bottom modern
conveniences. 3-car p3 ,l ;-,) -
$16M. Ederson's '--'..' 4'-;.
2-STOREY business/
residential property at 56
Section D Cumberland, East
Canje phone, electricity, etc.
Price neg. Tel, 628-5264.
339-2678.
BY Owner Turkeyen Rd./
Railway Embankment, corner 2-
storey property on double lot.
Ideal for business, etc.
(Transported). Contact Savitri -
642-4703.
BEL AIR PARK $14M,
$22M, $25M, $30M, $50M;
Prashad Nagar $15M, $13M,
$20M; Subryanville $20M,
$15M; Queenstown -$9M, $12M,
$20M, $45M; Charlotte Street -
$12M, $7M; Robb Street- $14M,
$20M, $10M; Church Street -
$25M, $18M; Alberttown $12M,
$16M, $13M; Republic Park -
$20M, $16M, $15M, $10M;
Nandy Park $30M; Eccles -
$14M. $18M. Call us at 218-
2086 or 628-7605. Also land/
commercial and residential.


ATLANTIC Gardens 2-
storey ranch type 4-bedroom
house, 2 lots, area swimming/
tennis, 8 cars parking $30M.
Ederson's 226-5496.
CROAL St./Brickdam -
vacant 2-storey, 6-bedroom
building. Ideal foreign offices,
insurance, internet caf6 $30M.
Ederson's 226-5496.
QUEENSTOWN $45M,
100 x 100 land, Bel Air Gardens
$45M, Bel Air Park $45M,
Oleander Gardens $40M,
Atlantic Gardens $40M.
Keyhomes 223-4267.
NEW concrete from -
$12.5M, guaranteed Alberttown
$8M, Kitty $17M, 150 x 50,
3-flat concrete. Keyhomes -
223-4267.
POPULAR Video Club in
very busy area in New
Amsterdam. Terms of Sale &
Occupancy can be negotiated.
Call 333-2990 or after hours -
333-3688.
4-BEDROOM concrete &
wooden house. Ketley St.,
Charlestown. formerly Rudy's
Liquor Restaurant (corner lot)
$18M neg. Contact 227-
6204.
OLEANDER GDNS. $24M,
Courida Park $60M, Sheriff St.
$38M, Robb St. $7M,
Charlestown $6M, etc, etc.
Sonja 225-7197, 623-2537.
1 2-storey wooden and
concrete property in North
Ruimveldt. No repairs needed -
$7.8M neg. Contact 627-4754,
218-4019 after 6:45 pm. No
agents please.
CAMPBELLVILLE 6
bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 2
kitchens, suit (2) families
property investor, land 48' x
141' worth viewing. Mrs. Y.
Wilson. 226-2650, 229-2566.
LAMAHA GARDENS -
$22M; Prashad Nagar
$15M; Queenstown $20M;
Eccles $19M; Meadow Brook
Garden $9M; Happy Acres -
25M. Call 223-1582 or 612-
9785.
GIFT: Madewini 2 yrs old,
2-storey, 2-bedrooms 18' x 25'
house, land 0.1385 of an acre -
$1.5M neg. Ederson's 226-
5496.
GEORGETOWN Central/
Overseas/Local Investors invest
wisely, new 33 luxurious suite
hotel. Ederson's 226-5496.
SOUTH Ruimveldt Gardens
- vacant 2-storey concrete/
wooden 3-bedroom mansion,
fully grilled, garage $8M neg.
Ederson's 226-5496.
URGENTLY needed -
Commercial residential
buildings for sale or rent.
Atlantic Gardens, Happy Acres,
Queenstown. Ederson's 226-
5496.
PRASHAD Nagar vacant
2-storey, 5-bedroom property.
Fully grilled, parking $18M.
Ederson's 226-5496.
GARDEN of Eden 7 'A
acres cultivated land, 4-
bedroom residence, workers
house $13.5M. Ederson's -
226-5496.
CAMPBELLVILLE/Sheriff
St. vacant new concrete
building. 6-bedroom with tubs.
Jacuzzi, parking $16M.
Ederson's 226-5496.
HOPE, East Bank Demerara
- 2-storey property, land road
to river, Ideal large ships, beer
garden/restaurant $12M neg.
Ederson's 226-5496.
FRIENDSHIP riverside 4-
house lots, 2-storey residential
building, chicken farm with all
equipment $15M neg.
Ederson's 226-5496.
INDUSTRIAL property for
sale. Friendship, East Bank
Dmerarara, western side of Public
Road. Suitable for sawmilling,
Fishing, Trawlers, Gas Station
or other business. Call 626-9087
anytime after 10 am daily.
FLAT 2-bedroom concrete
property in Diamond $3.5M
neg.; beautiful 2-flat concrete
property in Grove $12.5M neg.
(giveaway); 2-flat business and
residence in Melanie, ECD -
$11M neg. 615-1793.
ATLANTIC Gardens, ECD
(front) two-storey concrete
building, 3-bedroom. All self-
contained. Servant quarters.
Very spacious. New construction
on two lots. You must see. 220-
5699, 613-3487.


390 REPUBLIC Park, first
half near to Play School. Tel. 225-
5426, 621-3727
ONE two-storey wooden
and concrete 4- bedroom
house, South Ruimveldt
Gardens Contact Ronald on
662-5033 or Samantha on
624-1370. No reasonable
offer refused. Vacant
possession.
BEAUTIFUL ranch type
house in Earl's Court, four-
bedroom, vacant, owner
migrated. Price reduced from
$22M to $15M. Must go,
others ranging from $7.5M -
$100M. Contact Roberts
Realty 227-7627 Office, 227-
3768. Cell 644-2099.
FIRST STREET,
ALBERTTOWN $7 500 000,
Second Street, Alberttown $8
000 000 negotiable. Call 226-
9700. Business property,
Georgetown 80 million
Guyana dollars, going business
Russell Street $10 million
negotiable.
HOUSE on Eccles Public
Road $8M; brand new 2-flat
concrete houses in excellent
condition, D'Urban St.; 3-
bedroom house in South R/
veldt Gardens $8.5M; one-
flat 3-bedroom concrete
house, East R/veldt.
Success Realty. 223-
6524/628-0747.
ONE three-storey
building 33.000 sq. at
Parika. Ideal for hotel, store,
hospital or any other type of
business, etc. Any
reasonable price would be
considered. Contact Len's at
Sheriff St. For further
information, Tel. 227-1511.
N.B.: Extra land to extend
building or new one.
OLEANDER GDS.
MODERN EXECUTIVE FOUR-
BEDROOM CONCRETE
RESIDENCE. 3 self-contained
bedrooms Maid's quarter, fully
grilled, A/C, hot & cold, pressurised
water filtration system, large
parking space. Ideal for Tennis
Court. Tel. 222-2628, 645-4749,
645-0257.
CUMMINGS Lodge -
$9.75M, Duncan St $10M,
Industry $8.5M, Blygezight -
$11M & $20M, on double lot,
Meadow Bank $5M. Broad
St. $7.5M, Leopold St. -
$5.5M, Kitty $7.5M, Triumph
- $8.5M, Subryanville, Eccles
& Prashad Nagar $17.5M. Tel.
226-1848, 625-1624.
BEL AIR PARK $18M,
$22M, $23M, nice homes.
Queenstown $18M, Prashad
Nagar $15M, New $12.5M,
Queenstown $12M, Meadow
Brook $14M, Republic Park -
$24M, Double lot, corner
concrete, Robb Street 100 x
100 land/property $120M,
Sheriff Street $40M, America
Street. Lamaha Gardens -
$30M. Keyhomes 223-4267.
ONE house on lot size e
(50 x 150) and 7 acres of
pasture land (fenced) situated
at lot 14 Charity Amazon,
Essequibo Coast and Bamboo
Dam respectively. Price
negotiable. Contact No. 227-
4938 ( 6 pm 6 am) and (612-
9588) anytime. Must go.
Owner leaving country.
KITTY $7M, C/ville -
$11M, Bel Air Park $18M &
$24M, Prashad Nagar $16M
neg, Queenstown $13.5M,
Lamaha Gdns. $19M,
Continental Park $25M neg..
Eccles 'AA S19M, Regent St. -
$45M, Robb St. $30M. Contact
Carmen Greene's. Realty. Tel.
226-1192, 623-7742.
LARGE 5-bedroom
property on extra large lot of
land. Parking for 3 cars, air-
conditioned rooms,
completely fenced. Large
storage bond. Immediate
vacant possession. Excellent
property for rental. Income for
local overseas Guyanese. 4
Priced for quick sale at $10M.
Contact Ms. Khan on 624- .
4839, 628-2768.
ONE 2-storey concrete
and wooden building situate
at Lot 88 Third Street, Uitvlugt
Pasture, W.C. Demerara.
UPSTAIRS: wooden 600 sq. ft. I
with 3 bedrooms and concrete
toilet and bath 48 sq. ft.
DOWNSTAIRS: concrete 480
sq. ft. AREA OF LAND: 5 000
sq. ft. Price 3 % million
(negotiable). Contact Victor
Surajaballi. Tel. # 227-2563.







24 SUNDAY CHRONICLE September4, 2005,GC
- - - - - . . . .


AUG 31 %, 31%,
Discount South Park $8.9M;
Meadow Brook $13M and
$11M; Garnett Street $11M;
Kitty $9M; Q/town $11M;
Bel Air Spring $38M; Bel Air
Gdns $39M; Subryanville
with swimming pool; New
Providence or 3 lots Prashad
Nagar- $19M; Sec'K' ranch
style $14M. Phone Mrs
Tucker 225-22626 or 231-
2064.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
- 2-storey fully concreted
house 5 bedrooms, 2 full
bathrooms, American
fixture faucet, sink, toilet,
cabinet, hot water tank,
eating kitchen, built-in
wardrobe, central air-
conditioner, car garage,
front view to Public Road.
Lot 6 Nandy Park, EBD.
Interested person only to
call. Day 226-7806;
evening 225-8410.
ONE five-bedroom
concrete building, three-tier
concrete trestle, hot and cold
bath $19M, Prashad Nagar;
one two-bedroom wooden
cottage, St. Stephen's Street,
Charlestown $3.5M; five-
bedroom concrete and
wooden building on double
lot, Atlantic Gdns. $20M;
four-bedroom concrete and
wooden building, North
Ruimveldt $9.5M. Wills
Realty 227-2612, 223-1877
QUEENSTOWN: Large 4-
bedroom three-storey, on land
110 by 90ft $52M, will
accept nearest or best offer.
BEL AIR SPRINGS: Large 3-
bedroom with extensive lawns
- US$250 000. HAPPY
ACRES: Really beautiful.
modern 4-bedroom home, 2
living rooms, lock up garage,
play room, benab, a gift at
$29M and lots more all over.
Call 226-7128. 615-6124
ABSOLUTE REALTY.
(a) LARGE 2-flat
wooden, English, colonial
building 34' x 32', 16 x 14 &
10' x 8', land size% acre-81'
x 368', situated at 184 Parika,
EBE, close to new market.
Good for business, tourism
and residence. Cast iron water
tanks 15 000 gal. capacity,
water pump, potable rain
water, bearing fruit trees,
flower trees. Access to beach
front. (b) 5 acres plot of land
situated at Block 5, Sections
-1 and 2 Farm, EBE, land size
- 350'x 700', close to main
road. Good for housing
scheme, business and
residence. Contact owner. Tel.
223-7434, 231-2834.


EARTH for sale.
Delivery to spot. Tel. 618-
5192.
CLEAN DRY EARTH FOR
SALE. CONTACT 623-0957.
CLEAN dry earth and
also sand for sale. Tel:
#611-0881.
ALL remaining
household items must go.
Call 225-9020 or 226-8800.
1 HONDA PRELUDE
MOTOR CAR, SOLD AS
SCRAP $100 000. TEL. 226-
0945.
KEEP offices open via
blackout, new manual
typewriter. Tel. 225-
4937.
DOBERMAN pup,
Doberman mixed with
Rottweiler, 2 years old. Tel.
227-45.84.
'1 25 Yamaha engine,
new model. 1 8 Johnson
engine. Call 268-2244.
Road Master.
DIESEL water pumps
- 2 and 3 inch, brand new
from UK. Call 261-5403 for
details.
ORIGINAL Indian
DVD, CD and Stardust
Magazines. Call 231-
4208.
ONE Jeep Wrangler
(Shell) with documents.
Tel. # 625-1188 (cell).
.. ONE Honda Night Hawk
650cc, solid engine $280
000 neg. Tel. 642-2178.
1 2-CYLINDER Diesel
generator. Key start $275
000. Call Rocky 645-
3596.


2 IMPORTED Pool tables
(Slate), in working condition.
Tel. # 232-9167.
LIMITED Household
appliances and articles. Phone -
225-0056.
1 CBR F2 motorcycle.
Legal documents. Excellent
condition $525 000. Tel.
612-6315.
TWO five-dish and one
four-dish ploughs and one
trail harrow. Ideal for rice
work, for sale. Contact 623-
0957.
HIGH quality boutique
clothes, less than half price.
Must see. Tel. 233-6079, 223-
0352, 624-0878.
EARTH for gardens,
parapets or land. Good quality.
Call 265-3113 or 610-6686.
Delivered to spot.
1 NEW Panasonic DVD,
5-disc changer, audio/video
playpeck. Price neg. Contact
Mark 621-8522.
ONE Bedford 330 diesel
engine. Good working
condition. Contact 265-3113
or 610-6686.
USED corrugated sheets.
Ideal for fences and sheds.
Telephone (working hours) -
226-7054.
PLUCKING MACHINE- on
wheels large barrel, 54 fingers
feather guard $75 000. Tel.
222-4482.
EARTH for sale. Delivery
to spot. Excavating, grading
and levelling of land. Contact
621-2160, 229-2520.
48 FT. wooden boat with
8000-lb ice box. 48 Hp
Yamaha engine 1600-lb of
rigged seine. Tel. 615-2398.
SHERWIN WILLIAMS
paint. All colours. Telephone
# 220-1014. Lot 6A Courbane
Park, Annandale.
BEAUTIFUL Dachshund
Terrier pups. 4 mths. Fully
vaccinated and dewormed.
Call 220-5681.
ONE KEY CUTTING
MACHINE. BRAND NAME,
BRAND NEW. TEL. 621-8503,
328-7015.
AMPLIFIER Equaliser CD/
DVD Player cassette player,
with speaker boxes $125 000.
622-0267, 629-2239.
ONE brand new
computer with CD Burner,
CD Walkmans, car stereo
and DVD Player. Contact
225-4112, 626-9264.
AC UNITS brand new, 5
000 150 BTU, Kenmore
brand. Contact Juliana at
613-3319 or 226-7973. Going
reasonable.
1 HYDRAULIC Platform for
goods trucks. Contact Alabama
Trading, Georgetown Ferry
Selling. Tel. 225-5800, 225-
3809.
1 FLOOR model PLASTIC SEAL-
ING machine, 1 PORTABLE ELEC-
TRIC air compressor in excel-
lent condition. Tel: 222-4507/
623-7212.
PUPPIES for sale. Rottweiler
and German Shepherd, mixed,
vaccinated. Contact Doctor
McLean. Tel. 226-3592, 227-0116,
223-0754.
2 20-TON Bedford lorry
dumps. In good working
condition. Call 228-5378 or 613-
8554.
PARTS for dryers/washers
thermostats, belts, pumps
motors, couplings, valves, etc.
Technicians available. Call
231-6429, 622-5776.
ONE 360 Honda car, one
850 mini as it is ($120 000)
included lots of parts, one
double stall in Bourda Green's.
Tel. # 223-9710.
HONDA 15 Hp outboard
engine parts from 2 engines with
many new spares in original
parking..Gears, rods, bearings,
etc. Sold only as a lot. Call 223-
5050.
1 4-HEAD Moulder, 3 cross
cut saws, 2 sharpeners, 2 band
saws, 1 surface. 1 broomstick
machine, 2 routers, JCB 3C II
Spare parts. 1 wood lathe, 2 drill
presses. Tel. 270-6460, 644-
0150.
FIBREGLASS mat, resin, Jel
Hardware 8 x 4 sheet, trawler life
boat, 8 to 14 ft. We also do repairs.
233-5207, 614-8095. 97 Parker St.,
Providence. Opp. Stadium.


2 NEW flat screen TVs $75
000 each, neg. I stainless steel bar-
b-que grill (big) $100 000 neg.
Owner leaving country. Tel. 226-
5136, 643-6997.
ONE 150 HP & one 250 HP
Yamaha Outboard engines.
Price $700,000 & $1,200,000. Also
parts for 150 HP & 250 HR Call
629-6651 anytime.
1 HONDA pressure washer,
brand new; 2 drills; 1 saw; 1
Jialing motorcycle, next to new;
1 amplifier; 1 truck pump; 1
battery charger; 1 bicycle. Tel.
265-5876.
1 NEW Computer system 1.3
GHZ CPU, 40 GB hard drive, 128
MB RAM, DVD & CD ROM Drive,
Floppy Drive, Keyboard,
Speakers, Mouse, Office 2003.
Tel. 629-7875.
DRINKING Water Filters,
Mosquito Repellent Oil,
Organic Agro-insecticide, Hair
Growth Jel, Nature Study
Booklets, etc. Tel./Fax. 227-
8259, 226-3090.
4 TVs, 3 VCRs, 3 DVDs, 1 CD
Player, 2 music sets, 2
microwaves, 1 chain saw, 4 mag
rims, 1 Ryobi saw, 1 movie
camera, 1 camera, 1 Honda
pressure, 1 Singer sewing
machine, washer. 265-5876.
NEW Computer systems
built to your requirement. Very
affordable also any computer
programme from $2 000.
Windows, Graphics,
Accounting, Point-of-Sale,
Games and more. 222-5330,
625-7090 (Anthony).
CARTRONICS Import & Export
- Vehicles: 7 150-Tundras,
Tacomas, etc. Tyres, rims, audio
equipment speakers, DVD TV -
Plasma & all other accessories from
Miami. Call Phillip Neranjan/
Blackie 227-5500, 227-2027.
SKY Universal. authorised
dealer for the best offer in Phillips
digital dish. View up to 125 chan-
nels including Pay Per View
channels and also Direct TV.
Contact: Gray on Tel. 227-
6397/227-1151 (0), 616-9563.
CUMMINS 6 CTA 230 Hp
diesel engine withtwth twin disc pto
on bed, good general
conditi' on $1.25M. 4H ft. steel
pontoon EX 12" diesel with 15 x
8 ft. purple heart sluice -
$0.5M. Located Middle
Mazaruni. Call 223-5050.
WHERE you can find very old
Chinese Paintings, Chinese Thread
work, Camoud Victoria Chairs,
Victoria Tables, Victoria Paintings,
Two hundred years old Bible, and
mahy more interesting items.
NETRAM & SONS ANTIQUE
STORE, 383 Public Road, Craig
Village, East Bank Demerara. Tel.
266-2515, 266-2207.
ONE Computer Operating
System: WINDOWS XP
PROFESSIONAL. 40 GH Hard
Drive, 735 MHz, CD Rewritable
Drive, CD Drive, Diskette Drive, 15"
Monitor, Keyboard, Mouse,
Workstation, MSP56 MR
MODEM, INTERNET READY,
MEMORY 386. Price $90 000.
TELEPHONE NO. 231-6314.
ASK FOR QUINCY/NATASHA.
ONE 6-Cylinder Perkins
engine on bed with radiator and
8 x 6 Berkley pump, one 4-
cylinder Deutz engine 86Hp, one
4-cylinder Perkins Power Plant
85Kw 440v 220v 3-Phase, one
215 excavator swing table gear,
one 6 Hp water cool Lister with
4Kw generator, three 160 amps
star Delta contactor switch 440-
220v with ten (10) spare 160
amps contactor and timer, one
complete dragline drive clutch,
one pair used 22RB dragline
walking chain and other parts.
Contact, ,J.,eit.tTl a 771-4187,
624-2561. ....
LARGE QUANTITY OF USED
BOOKS FOR SALE $1 000 OR
LESS. English for Life Bk. 1 -
4, STP Math Bk. 2 3,
Introduction to Biology, People
Who Came Bk. 1 3, Avantage
(French) 1 3, Hexagone
French) 1 2, First Lessons
physical Geography, General
Geography in Diagrams,
Complete English Course Bk. 4,
CXC English A Study Guide,
Oxford Math Books 2 and 4, Int.
Science For Caribbean School
Bk. 1 and 2, Caribbean
Agricultural Science Bk. 1 & 2,
Vamos Ami os Bk. 1 & 2,
Fundamenta? Mathematics for
the Caribbean Bk. 1 & 2, Science
to 14, Espanol De Primero,
School Spanish Course,
Practical Skills in Carib
Geography Bk. 1 2. Call Fiona
- 226-7870.


BRAND new foreign
electronic pool tables including
slates, balls, rubber pockets, also
local tables new and used.
Reduced price on all items.
Contact Naka 220-4298, 617-
6100.
ATTENTION CHEAPEST
prices in Alloy brand mag rims,
spinner wire wheels, wheels
mufflers and tips, wheel accessories,
steering wheels. Contact persons
Rudo #@627-4067, Kim @ 641-
0737.
VEHICLE & Machinery
Maintenance. Job requirements.
Must be able to overhaul diesel/
gas engines and to weld (gas &
arc), must have a Driver's
Licence, must be able to follow
service manuals on machines,
must be over the age of 27 years
with 3 years experience in
industry. Production Supervisor
Job requirements. Must have
a certified Health Card, must be
able to lead a production team.
must be accurate in measuring
and recording production data,
must be over 25 years. Office
Supervisor must be
knowledgeable and versatile re:
Microsoft Excel & Word, must be
customer focused, must be able
to handle various office functions
at a supervisory level, must be
able to organise files and follow
through on office functions, must
be over 25 years, must have a
valid Driver's Licence. It would
be an advantage if a University/
Technical College certificate/
degree is available. Apply in
writing: Viking Traders Ltd. P.O.
Box 691, Castries St., Lucia. Tel.
# 758-450-1520 Fax # 758-450-
1188. Email: Viking@candw.lc
3 45-GALLON drums,
concrete hardener liquid $105
000, 10 5-gallon buckets sealed
carpet paste $5 000 each, 4
new 16-feet aluminium ladders,
2 security systems complete with
monitor, 2 cameras and adaptor
- $50 000 each, 1 Xerox 50 28
Copier needs servicing $160
000 manual, 1 40-gallon water
heater, only used for 4 months,
240V $25' 000, 20 large
electrical panels, complete with
circuit breaker main switches,
etc. all or $200 000, 1 Dayton
vacuum cleaner industrial and
commercial for cleaning floor,
carpet, etc. on wheels large
dust bag, 110V $30 000, 200
new truck tyre liners, Goodyear
size 20 $1 000 each, wholesale
- $800, 2 inverts 400 to 800
watts $25 000, used complete
split A/C Peak Units, 240V
working 1 12 000 BTU $50
000, 4 18 000 BTU $65 000
each, 3 24 000 BTU $85 000
each, 1 large 18-inch heavy
duty industrial surface plane 3-
phase, about 2-ton in weight -
$400 000, 1 Honda EB 1400 A/
C D/C generator $105 000, 1
40 KVA Alternator generator 3-
Phase 50/60 Hz, 1800 RPM,
English $200 000, 1 ARK
welding transformer, 240V 225
AMPS with cable and helmet -
$50 000, 1 heavy duty ARK
welding transformer 240 320
- 440V, no cable with shield -
$60 000, 1 large bench grinder,
110V-$25 000, 1 Rockwell band
saw, 110V, inch $65 000, 1 Skill
Mitre adjustable saw, 110V inch
- $35 000, 1 edge and surface
sander, heavy duty, 110-240V -
$45 000, 1 6-inch joiner, 110V -
$65 000, 3 metal bench lathes,
English, 240V all three $250
000, 2 crankshaft grinders, 240V
both $250 000, 1 large tool
shaper for grinder of sharpening
plane blade, 240V $200 000,
1 engine head resurfacer, 240V
- $300 000, 1 Yale V2 ton chain
hoist $25 000, 3 oxygen
bottles, full, private owned $20
000 each, 6 used 4-drawer filing
cabinet $20 000 each, 2
drawers $10 000, 1 complete
new imported Satellite Dish
stand, complete material is thick
galvanised angle with dish
turner $100 000. Owner
leaving 621-4928.



GO CART. TEL. 220-1574,
616-4396 CELL.
21 BEDFORD MODEL
M TRUCK. TEL: 455-2303.
ONE Jeep Wrangler.
Excellent condition. Call 629-
8490.
ONE Toyota Corona AT
170, PGG 3549. Call 222-
3215.
ONE AE 91 Corolla. Price
$475 000 neg. Tel. 611-6773,
627-0916.


1 NISSAN CARAVAN E
24, EXCELLENT CONDITION.
TEL. # 220-4782.
TOYOTA Hiace minibus
- 15 seats $1.7M neg. Tel.
# 642-5899.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter 3-
ton, enclosed. Tel. 621-2584,
259-3064.
AT 170 TOYOTA Corona
with alarm, mags, A/C, in perfect
condition $825 000. Phone
225-0056.
ONE Mitsubishi Canter
truck with 15 ft. box., fully
wooden with refrigeration
system. Call 225-5591.
NISSAN Sentra B13.
Excellent condition. Price
negotiable. Contact 644-
6681.
GOLD Pathfinder -
good as new $3.2M neg.
Contact 227-1511, 227-
2486.
1 SILVER Toyota Ipsum
SUV 7-seater PHH series.
Contact 220-5699, 613-
3487.
ONE Toyota AT 192. Fully
powered in excellent
condition. Contact Tel. No.
265-3694.
1 TOYOTA 4-Runner -
PHH series with alarm,
remote start, crash bar, etc.
Call 644-8500.
HONDA Accord 1986 2-
litre CA 5 Auto. 2 owners from
new. Used every day. Call
223-5050.
ONE AT 212 Toyota Carina,
PHH 2495. Fully powered,
mags. Contact Naka 220-
4298, 617-6100.
1 TOYOTA -Tundra
(white). Going cheap. Suzuki
Vitara, 4-door. Call 227-
5500, 227-2027.
1 DOUBLE Axle foden
container truck with trailer.
Contact 621-2671, 222-2797,
611-2113.
RZ minibus, mags, music,
late BGG. Al condition. Price
($1.2M neg.) Raj 275-
0208, 626-0350.
1 ONE Toyota Land
Cruiser (diesel) 13 seater,
manual $4.1 million. Please
contact 623-7031.
4-WD RANGE Rover -
Land Rover with alloy rims &
Sony CD player. Priced to go.
# 621-7445.
AT 192 TOYOTA Carina
- fully powered mags,
clean, clean car. 98 Sheriff
St., C/ville. 223-9687
ONE Kawasaki ZX 9R
900cc motorcycle. Going
cheap. Call Richard 623-
2984.
TWO big reconditioned
Ford Tractors for sale. Contact
623-0957.
DIPLOMAT leaving. One
(1) Mitsubishi RVR fully
powered, Diesel Turbo.
Priced to go. Tel. 626-5617,
641-8647, 622-6565.
ONE AT 170 Corona,
excellent condition. Owner
leaving $850 000 neg. Tel.
622-6565, 626-5617, 641-
8647.
TOYOTA SP 150
CORONA, PDD series $400
000 neg. Tel. # 222-5331,
612-7198.
1 JD 90 motorcycle in
excellent condition $105
000 neg. Call 615-4223 ,
222-5979 (H).
ST 190 CORONA 4S,
fully powered, mags, like
new. Must be seen. 98 Sheriff
St., C/ville. 223-9687.
SV 42 CAMRY fully
powered, mags, 3S, power
seat, like new. Must be seen.
98 Sheriff St., C/ville. 223-
9687.
LEVIN AE 101 4 AGE -
fully powered, mags. Must be
seen. Like new. 98 Sheriff St..
C/ville. 223-9687.
AE 91 TOYOTA Corolla -
automatic, being kept in very
good working condition -
650 000 neg. Tel. 222-
3459, 621-5606.
TOYOTA Hilux Single
Cab Pick up mags, etc. Very
good condition $750 000
neg. Tel. 222-3459, 621-
5606. Ideal for small business
owner.


TOYOTA LHD Single
Cab Pick up. Tel. 225-9412,
227-3580, 225-7332.
ONE Toyota Corolla AE
81 in excellent, mint
condition. PJJ series. Neg.
$725 000. Tel. 220-4103.
AT 150 CARINA fully
powered, PFF series, never
in hire, one owner $550
000. 641-0953, 222-4781.
1 NISSAN Sunny HB 12.
Excellent condition. Price
neg. Tel: # 616-3739, 621-
3526, after 8 pm 220-7151.
1 TOYOTA Corolla KE
70. Working condition.
Terms can be arranged.
Contact Shameela Khan,
621-2472, 611-3887.,
1 NISSAN Stanzy, PCC
1101. In good working
condition. Price $220 000
neg. Tel. 629-0634. Must be
sold.
AA 60 CARINA in
excellent condition. Price -
$450 000 neg. Contact
Michael or Lloyd. Tel. 618-
7025 or 610-3141..
ONE Coaster bus in
good working condition.
Contact 616-3736 or 660-
1564. No reasonable offer
refused.
GREIA Toyota Tacoma.
Excellent condition, added
features. Price $3.5M
negotiable. Tel. 225-4398,
641-8754.
TOYOTA AT 192 Carina.
Excellent condition, fully
powered. Contact Leonard.
Phone 226-9316, 617-1505.
TOYOTA Marino PHH
9106, F/P, CD, Amp, mags.
Price 1 million neg. Call
624-2730, Junior.
TOYOTA AT 150 Carina,
body complete $40 000; 2
VHF base antennas. 226-
3883, 619-6863.
AT 170 CARINA -
automatic, fully loaded, A/C,
mags, excellent cond. Tel.
612-2258.
TOYOTA Starlet EP 82,
manual, PHH series. Good
condition, new shocks and
tyres. Call 660-3150. Price
negotiable.
NISSAN Laurel gear
model C33 1 800cc (PS, PM,
PW) $100 000 music system.
Price $700 000 neg. Call #
629-7419 Monty.
TOYOTA Levin AE 101 -
mags, 4AGE, 20V, manual
(1600 cc), PHH 95 + series
(black) $2 280 000 neg.
Phone 645-3036, 226-3660.
ONE Toyota Ipsum, 1997
model with 4WD, 17" wheels,
TV/DVD/CD in excellent
condition. Contact 641-1386,
623-4554.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter
with 4-stage crane, 1989
model, not registered on the
wharf. Contact 641-1386, 623-
4554.
1 AT 151 CARINA, 1
Wrangler Jeep, 1 Honda
Prelude. Tel. 263-7166, 621-
7200.
ONE AA 60 Carina, in
excellent working condi-
tion, needs body work ,
tape deck, AC etc. Tel. 617-
4063/225-0236.
ONE TT 131 CORONA
in good condition mag
rims, stick gear, tape deck.
Tel: 626-6837 after hours -
# 220-4316.
TOYOTA Levin AE 101
4AGE engine, 2-door, fully
powered, 15" mags, clean
car. 98 Sheriff St., C/ville.
223-9687.
TYPE of vehicle Suzuki
Vitara, 2-door PGG series.
Condition good. Price $800
000 negotiable. Contact No.
642-4152.
TOYOTA Corona station
wagon T-130 back wheel
drive, PCC series. Price $500
000 neg. Call 226-2833 or
233-3122.
FORD 150 Pick Up, 3
doors, good condition, CD/
Tape player, bubble tray, dual
air bag, mag rims, etc. $5.5M
neg. Tel. 220-7416
ONE Nissan Civilian
bus. In excellent condition.
Owner leaving country. Tel.
613-8219.







UNDAYCHRONICLE Septemrber4,2005.


1 AT 170 CARINA,
,omatic; 1 ET 176 Carina
gon, stick gear car. Jeffrey
22-8350.
TOYOTA RZ buses,
ort Base. Pete's Auto
ale, 10 Croal Street,
tabroek, and 2 George
street. Tel. 223-6218, 226-
951, 226-5546.
TOYOTA AT 192, Toyota
\T 170, Toyota AE 110,
oyota AT 140. All in good
condition, mag rims, A/C,
ully powered. Tel. 613-
6666, 645-6545.
JEEP Wrangler 4 x 4 -
automatic with side tray
bars, Straight 6 engine,
top of the line music
system, air brush and mag
rims. Price $2.8M neg.
Contact # 223-5878.
1 2-TON Toyota Dyna,
ouble back wheel, just
verhauled. Price
negotiation on inspection of
vehicle. Tel. 623-3257, 227-
216, before 8 am and after
pm.
1 GREY nine-seater
oyota Town Ace Custom.
oing. cheap. Contact
hrifty Shopping Centre,
29 Regent St., Lacytown,
between King & Wellington
streets G/t. # 225-0080,
'26-1992.
1 NISSAN Laurel PFF
;330, 4-cylinder 5-forward,
ully powered window, mag,
/C, music, etc. Clean car,
excellentt condition, original
aint, lady driven. Price -
550 000 neg. Must see.
'all 628-7737, 641-3958.
NISSAN March motor
'ar 4-door, 1000cc
engine (good on gas),
automatic, power steering,
;ool A/C, mag rims,
finished 36,000 KM only,
,id PHH series, in
excellent condition. Price
negotiable. Tel. 269-062-4
)r 623-3178.
AT 170 CARINA. Price -
775 000 (neg.), CK2A MX-
ouring Lancer, fully loaded,
16" rims, music system,
crystal lights, full flair kit and
spoilers. 7 months old. Auto/
Tip Tronic. Price $2M (neg.).
Raj 275-0208 or 626-0350.
MITSUBISHI Lancer,
automatic, PJJ now for
nly $1.5M; 91 Sprinter -
_FI, PGG, fully automatic;
AE 100 Coro la PHH for
only'- $1.2M and many
other used *vehicles. Ca l
Pete's Auto Sales, Lot 10
Croal Street, Stabroek.
223-6218 or Lot 2 George
& Hadfield Streets, W/Rust
- 226-9951, 226-5546.
1 TOYOTA Sera (Sports
car) 2-door (PHH series),
automatic, fully powered, A/
C, Chrome mag rims, CD
Player. Immaculate
condition. Price $1.2M
(neg.). Contact Rocky #
225-1400, 621-5902.
1 HONDA Integra (4-door
car) private manual, fully
powered, mag rims.
Excellent condition. Price -
$475 000. Contact Rocky -
# 225-1400, 621-5902.
1 NISSAN Presea (4-
door car) private
automatic, fully powered,
A/C. Immaculate
condition. Price $875
000. Contact Rocky #
225-1400, 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA RAV 4 (3-
door). Immaculate
condition. Automatic, fully
powered, A/C, chrome mag
rims, roof rack, CD Player,
crash bar, side bars. Hardly
used. Price $2.3M. Contact
Rocky # 225-1400, 621-
5902.
1 NISSAN Pathfinder -
(4-wheel drive) 5-door,
automatic, fully powered,
mag rims, crash bar, roof
rack, CD Player. Immaculate
condition. Price $1.6M
(neg.). Contact Rocky- #
225-1400, 621-5902.
1 HONDA Vigor
(Executive type) car -
automatic, fully loaded, A/
C, mag rims, CD Player,
alarm, spoiler. Immaculate
condition. Hardly used. Price
- $1,3M. Contact Rocky #
225-1400, 621-5902.


1 EP 82 TOYOTA (GT
Turbo) Advance Starlet. Contact
Rocky #225-1400, 621-5902.
1 DUMP truck, 1 water
tender and 330 Timber Jack
Skidder all are in good working
condition. For more
information Contact: 264-
2946.
1 TOYOTA RZ (EFI) 15-
seater Long Base manual,
mag rims, crystal light, music
set. Hardly used. Price $1.5M.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400,
621-5902.
1 GX 81 TOYOTA Mark 2.
(Immaculate condition).
Automatic, fully powered, A/C,
alarm, remote start. Credit
available. Price- $1.1M (Hardly
used). Contact Rocky # 225-
1400, 621-5902.
1 CHEVY GeoMetro (4-
door, 3-cylinder car) PJJ
series, automatic, A/C.
Immaculate condition. Price -
$900 000. Contact Rocky #
225-1400, 621-5902.
SAAB 900 Turbo, PJJ
5237. Registered 2 months
ago, fully powered,
automatic. Excellent
condition. 1st owner $750
000. Call 624-8402, 225-
2503.
1 NISSAN CIVILIAN 26-
seater bus BJJ series, 5-speed
diesel, never work commercially,
very clean $2 million cash.
Tel. 227-7677, 624-8402.
1 TOYOTA (4x4) Single
Cab Pick up Stick gear, mag
rims, roller bar, crash bars,
spring lever (back and front).
Excellent condition. Price -
$1.4M. Contact Rocky # 225-
1400, 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Hilux Surf (4-
Runner) 3Y engine -
automatic, fully powered, A/C,
mag rims. Excellent condition.
Price $2.3M. (Hardly used.).
Contact Rocky # 225-1400,
621-5902.
1 EP 71 TOYOTA Starlet (2-
door). Real nice. Automatic, A/
C, mag rims. Excellent
condition. Price $750 000.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400,
621-5902.
1 AT 212 TOYOTA Carina.
(Immaculate condition).
Automatic, fully powered, A/C,
chrome mag rims, fog lamp
crystal light, CD Player. Price -
$1 650 000. Contact Rocky #
225-1400, 621-5902. (PJJ
series).
1 2A LAND Rover (3-door) -
4-wheel drive, manual, wagon
type, solid engine and gear box.
Price $600 000. Contact Rocky
- # 225-1400, 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Extra Cab (4x4).
Excellent condition. Manual,
CD Player, roller bar, crash bar,
mag rims, step bar, spring lever
(back) and independent (front).
Price $1.6M. Contact Rocky -
# 225-1400, 621-5902.
1 AT 150 TOYOTA Carina -
(private), low mileage, hardly
used, 5-speed gear, tape and
radio, clean. Price $550 000.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400,
621-5902.
1 SV 40 TOYOTA Camry -
(PHH series), low mileage,
automatic, fully powered, A/C,
chrome mag rims, CD, alarm,
etc. Price -$2.1M. Contact
Rocky # 225-1400, 621-
5902.
1 NISSAN Pathfinder (L/
hand V6 EFI) automatic, fully
powered, A/C, mag rims, crash
bar, CD Player, roof rack.
Immaculate condition. Price -
$1.6M, neg. Contact Rocky -
# 225-1400 or 621-5902.
NISSAN Caravan Bus,
15-seater, size, power
steering, automatic, air-
conditioned ever register,
will register at no cost to
buyer. Cash $1.6 million.
Perfect for family. Call 624-
8402, 227-7677, 225-
2503.
DEAL-OF-THE-WEEK:
TOYOTA HILUX J-LN 170 EXTRA
CAB FULLY LOADED,
AUTOMATIC, AIR
CONDITIONED, POWER
STEERING, POWER
WINDOWS, TURBO TIMER, 16
INCHES, ALLOY WHEELS,
ETC. FINANCING AVAILABLE.
DEO MARAJ AUTO SALES.
207 SHERIFF & SIXTH
STREETS, CAMPBELLVILLE.
226-4939.


ONE Mitsubishi Lancer
1998 Model fully powered,
never registered (owner will
register) $1 900 000. One
Toyota Corolla EE 111 fully
powered, never registered
(owner will register) $1 800
000. Tel. 276-0245, 628-4179.
AT 192 CARINA, AE 100
Corolla & 110 Sprinter, G-
Touring Wagon, EP 82 Starlet,
Toyota extra cab Pick Up & 4-
door Toyota Land Cruiser,
Grand Vitara (2000). Amar
227-2834, 621-6037.
TOYOTA Tundra 2001
Model, Limited Edition, Access
Cab, leather seats, brand new
20" chrome mags, 5-disc CD
changer, bed liner, Burgundy in
colour. No reasonable offer
refused. Contact 225-6574.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma 4 x 4.
Excellent condition, 1998
Model, GJJ series, fully
loaded; 1 Toyota Sprinter AE
101. Excellent condition. 17"
chrome rims, stereo system.
Must see. Call 254-0662, 616-
2517. 7 am 6 pm.
LONG Base 3Y excellent
order $500 000; 3Y Super
Custom $425 000; Toyota
Town Ace $280 000; Nissan
Vannette $550 000. Contact
Dave Auto Sales, Lot 169
Lamaha and De Abreu Streets,
Newtown, Kitty. Tel. 225-1103,
643-6909, 612-4477.
AT 192 Carina (2) PJJ series
$1 375 000 and $1 300 000,
$1 200 000; AE 100 Corolla and
Sprinter $1 100 000 and $1200
000; AT 170 Carina $900 000;
AT 170 Corona $775 000, $850
000; AE 91 Sprinter $675 000,
AT 150 Corona $700 000.
Contact Dave Auto Sales, 169
Lamaha and De Abreu Streets,
Newtown, Kitty. Tel. 225-1103,
643-6909, 612-4477.
SV 40 CAMRY $2 100
000, $1 800 000; Grande Mark
II $1 800 000; SV 30 Camry -
$1200 000, $1 350 000; 212
Carina $1 700 000. Contact
Dave Auto Sales, 169 Lamaha
and De Abreu Streets, Newtown,
Kitty. Tel. 225-1103, 643-6909,
612-4477. After 5 pm 231-3690.
TOYOTA RZ buses $500
000, $850 000, $1 200 000; PFF
series, EFI, Super Custom, Long
Base, EFI, BHH $1 350 000,
$1 250 000. All prices are neg.
Contact Dave Auto Sales, 169
Lamaha and De Abreu Streets,
Newtown, Kitty. Tel. 225-1103,
643-6909, 612-4477. After 5 pm
231-3690.
ONE Nissan 720 pick up
long tray along with spare
engine. Mint condition.
Privately used $625 000 neg.
One Toyota Corona station.
wagon ET 176 5-door, power
steering, front wheel drive, 12
valve engine, AC, adjustable
seats, 5-seater fold down back
seat, mag rims, disc brakes,
PHH series. Privately used,
female driven. Good for taxi
service or personal family use.
Excellent condition $800
000. Owner leaving. 621-
4928.
TOYOTA Starlet EP 82;
TAoyota Carina/Corona AT 170,
AT 192, AT 212, AA 60; Toyota
Corolla Sprinter AE 110, AE 111,
AE 100, AE 81; Nissan Sunny
FB 14, B 13, B 12; Toyota Hi-
Lux 4 x 4, 2 x 4 enclose & open
tray; Datsun Pick up 2 x 4; Toyota
Hi Ace RZ 3Y; Nissan Vanette 9-
seater; Toyota Mark II GX 100;
Toyota Camry SV '40; SV 20.
Anita Auto Sale 227-8550,
628-2833, 645-3596. Lot 43
Croal & Alexander Sts.
4 X 4 HILUX Surf fully
powered, black, 2-door
enclosed. Excellent
condition $1.3M neg. AT
170 Carina $875 000. 3 -
AT 192 Carinas $1.3M -
$1.6M. 212 Carina $1 650
000 neg. AE 100 Maririo -
$1.1M neg. AE 81 Corolla -
$450 000. Nissan Sunny -
$450 000. 641-0953, 222-
4781.
.AT 192 CARINA $1.4M
neg.; SV 40 Camry $1.7M
neg.; AE 100 Sprinter $1.3M
neg.; G-Touring Wagon -
$1.4M neg.; AT 170 Corona -
$775 000 neg.; AE 91 Sprinter
$700 000 neg.; B12 Sunny
Nissan $450 000 neg.; SV
21 Camry $450 000 neg.;
Mark 11 GX 71 $4510 000
neg.; AT 150 Carina $550
000 neg. DEXTER 226-
0176, 623-5926.


ONE Toyota RAV 4. Fully
powered, with Alpine CD
Player, mag rims, roof rack,
wheel cover, roller bars, etc.
Vehicle hardly used and in
mint condition, PHH series.
Contact 621-8225.
CREDIT AVAILABLE 1
Four-runner $2.4 million; 1
Toyota IRZ, mags, music, etc.
- $875 000; 1 600 XT
Scramble (brand new
condition) US$3 500; 1 AT
192 fully loaded, PHH series,
mags, spoiler, music, air-
conditioned $1.3 million
neg.; 1 AT 170 Carina -
$675 000; 1 G-Touring
Wagon $1.1 million; 1 KE
74 Corolla back-wheel
drive, Wagon $475 000;
1 AA 60 Carina, clean car -
$375 000; 1 AT 170
Corona, PGG series,
automatic, air-conditioner,
CD Player, mags, never
worked hire before $875
000; 1 Mercedes Benz, top
notch $1.5 million. Contact
Mr. Khan, 28 'BB' Eccles,
New Housing Scheme, EBD.
Tel. 233-2336, 623-9972,
617-8944.
NOW AVAILABLE. NEW
S H I P M E N T
RECONDITIONED
VEHICLES. CARS: STARLET
GLANZA TURBO EP 91,
MITSUBISHI GALANT EA 1A
TOYOTA CYNOS
CONVERTIBLE, TOYOTA
CYNOS SPORTS COUPE EL
52. PICKUPS: (4WD)
TOYOTA HILUX LN170
EXTRA CAB (FULLY
LOADED), TOYOTA HILUX
LN100 (DIESEL) SHORT
BASE, HILUX YN100
(GASOLINE), TOYOTA HILUX
LN106 (DIESEL) LONG
BASE. TRUCKS: MITSUBISHI
CANTER 2-TON OPEN
TRAY. FULL AFTER SALES
SERVICE AND FINANCING
AVAILABLE. DEO MARAJ
AUTO SALES. 207 SHERIFF
AND SIXTH STREETS,
CAMPBELLVILLE 226-
4939. A NAME AND A
SERVICE YOU CAN TRUST.
NOW IN STOCK.
Toyota Corolla NZE 121,
AE 110, EE 103, Honda
Civic EK3 & ES1, Toyota
Hilux Extra Cab LN 172,
LN 170, RZN 174, Toyota
Hilux Double Cab YN
107, LN 107, LN 165, 4 x
4, RZN 167, RZN 169,
Toyota Hilux Single Cab -
LN 106, Toyota Hilux Surf -
RZN 185 YN 130, KZN 185,
Mitsubishi Canter FE 638E,
FE6387EV, Toyota Carina -
AT 192, AT 212, Toyota
Marino AE 100, Toyota Vista
AZV 50, Honda CRV RO1,
Toyota RAV 4, ZCA 26, ACA
21, SXA 11, Toyota Mark
IPSUM SXM 15, Toyota Mark
2 GX 100, Lancer CK 2A,
Toyota Corona Premio AT
210, Toyota Hiace Diesel
KZHI10, Mitsubishi Cadia
Lancer SC2A, Toyota
Corolla G-Touring Wagon
AE 100. Contact Rose
Ramdehol Auto Sales, 226
South Rd., Bourda,
Georgetown. Tel. 226-
8953, 226-1973, 227-
3185, Fax. 227-3185. We
give you the best cause
you deserve the best.

I I

ATTRACTIVE Waitress.
Contact Baby. Lot 1 B Shell
Rd.
HOMES WANTED
$$$$. KEYHOMES #
223-4267
1 LIVE-IN DOMESTIC,'.
40-50 YEARS. TELEPHONE
642-8781.
ONE Taxi Driver.
Contact Z. Khan, 11
Thomas St., Kitty. Tel.
226-7948.
3 MACHINISTS. APPLY
18-23 ECCLES
INDUSTRIAL SITE, E B
DEMERARA. -
ONE lie-in Maid from
Country area. 30 to 45 yrs.
for family of two. Call 645-
6409.
ONE live-in Domestic.
For more information,.
call 220-3515, after 5
pm.
Drivers and Porters.
Apply at 16 Duncan St. and
Vlissengen Road. Survival.


ONE Labour/lorry truck
Driver for Diamond Estate.
228-2480, 228-5378, 613-
8554.
ONE person to work
In shop. Must live on
ECD. Call 220-6586.
HONEST, MATURE &
RELIABLE HIRE CAR DRIVERS
TO WORK IN TAXI SERVICE.
CONTACT 223-1682.
THREE-BEDROOM apt.
for working persons in city
or suburban with moderate
rental. 226-9410.
INDUSTRIOUS and
experienced country lady
needs a job as a general
domestic. Tel. 226-9410.
URGENTLY, Waitresses,
18 to 30 yrs. at Vee Bee's
Bar, Sandy Babb St., Kitty.
Attractive salary and
benefits.
ONE ARC AND ACETYLENE
WELDER. MUST KNOW GRILL
WORK. CONTACT: 21 BROAD
STREET, CHARLESTOWN. TEL:
225-2835.
SALESGIRL, kitchen
staff, live-in girl from
country area. Nazeema Deli
- 318 East St., N/C/ Burg.
226-9654/618-2902.




COMPUTER TECHNICIANS
* Must have at least 2 years
experience in this field.

Duties include sales

Bring written application/
recommendations to:

CENTRAL ELECTRONICS
67 Robb St., Lacytown
Georgetown.

MALE & Female Counter
Clerks. Apply in person, with
written application to: Spicy
Dish, 53 David St., Kitty.
EXPERIENCED Cooks.
Apply in person with written
application to: Spicy Dish, 53
David Street, Kitty.
WAITRESS, Bartender.
Apply in person to Night
Bird, 189 Barr St., Kitty.
Tel. 225-1923, 626-1006.
URGENTLY one
property to buy around G/T
(3 to million dollars. Tel.
#223-9710.
GIRLS to work. Must
have Food Handler's
Certificate. Call 227-0646
- Pat.
WANTED 2
carpenters. Contact
Alabama Trading,
Georgetown Ferry Stelling.
Tel. 225-5800 or 225-3809.
EXPERIENCED Cook to
work at Night Club, Waitress
and -Cleaner. Apply at
Chilly's Nite and Beer
Garden. Ask for Manager -
Anil.
HONEST.& attractive
Waitresses. Apply in erson
at the Green House
Restaurant U.G. Road. Tel.
# 222-6516.
ONE female Cook to make
Puri and Eggball. Contact
Lee's Snackette at Thomas
Street, (opposite)
Georgetown Hospital. # 231-
1272.
TWO Porters to work in a
wholesale outlet in the
Market. Must know to read and
write. Starting salary $6 500
per week. Tel. 225-1837.
ONE Male to work in
radiator repair shop.
Starting salary $5 000
weekly. Call 227-2844.
ONE General Domestic.
Must know to cook. Apply in
.person to Bheir at 337,
Cummings St., South C/burg.
ABLE-BODIED Porters.
APPLY IN PERSON to
Thrifty Shopping Centre, 129
Regent St., between King and
Wellington Sts., Lacytown, G/
T.
Wanted Salesman, must
know to assemble bicycle parts.
Ex perience would be an asset.
Sa ary plus commission. Apply
to 68 Robb Street, Guyana
Variety Store, Nut Centre
Building.


HIRE car Drivers (24
hrs). Contact 227-0018.
EXPERIENCED
Hairdresser. Must know to
do manicure, pedicure,
facial and hairstyles,
etc. Also chairs to rent.
Please contact. Tel. 223-
5252 or 628-3415.
2 SALESMEN with own
transportation (Motorcycle),
to work. Kishan Aluminium
Window Factory, Courbane
Park Annandale, ECD. Tel.
220-0979.
WHOLE Day Domestic for
3 days per week for start.
Preferably not older than 35
yrs. Serious enquiries only. Call
223-1647.
EXPERIENCED Salesgirls.
Very good salary. Bring (or)
send application stating
experience in selling and
contact number to: The
Manager True Value Store,
124 King St., Lacytown (opp
Esso). P.S. only those with
selling experience need apply.
SALESBOYS WITH
MINIMUM 1 YEAR
EXPERIENCE IN HARDWARE
SALES. PORTER BOYS
BETWEEN THE AGES OF 16
AND 22 YEARS. APPLY IN
PERSON PARSRAM
DISCOUNT STOIE, 21 WATER
& AMERICA STS:
DRIVER with valid Lorry
Licence. Send application with
2 recommendations to: The
Manager, Imperial Home
Comfort 11 Strand, New
Amsterdam, Berbice.
EXPERIENCED Sales
Clerk & Porters & Security
guard. Apply with written
application at Hamrson
General Store. 116 Regent
Road, Bourda.
1 CLEANER, Salesgirls
and 1 Accountant with
Computer knowledge. Apply
at Survival, 16 Duncan St.
Vlissengen Road.
1 WHOLE day
Domestic. Must know to
cook all dishes preferably
from G/town area. Tel.
225-7700.
EXPERIENCED sewing
Machine Operators. (1)
surgers, (2) straight stitch.
Apply at 170 Charlotte and
Camp Streets, Lacytown,
Georgetown.
1 experienced Bodywork
man. Must be able to weld
and fill properly and 1
Handyman must have
experience around workshop.
Tel. 227-8659.
URGENTLY NEEDED.
Diesel Mechanic with at
least 10 yrs. experience to
repair Mac truck engine and
tractor engine. Contact Mr.
Jerome. Tel. # 644-7835 or
641-8209.
YOUNG able-bodied
Bond Clerks. Must be able
to work well in a team.
Send application with 2
recommendations to: The
Manager, Keishar's, 5
Camp & Hadfield Sts., G/
town.
TWO workers, young and
energetic intelligent and
computer literate who lived
in the City. Apply with
application to Manager,
Pete's Video Club, Lot 2
George & Hadfield Streets,
W/Rust.
RECEPTIONISTS. Apply
in person at Dawn Carl Int I
from 11 am to 2 prm, Mon. -
Fri. with valid Police
Clearance & recent
reference. English & Maths
a must. Must be able to work
shift. Tel. 227-3571, 225-
5029.
ONE professional
seamstress to work Mon. -
Sat. 7:30 am to 5 pm,
.overtime when necessary
(must know to cut). Great
wages and incentive. Visit
Roxie's, 123 Merriman's
Mall, Bourda. Also one
person to clean thread, etc.
WANTED at Survival
Supermarket: Cashiers,
Drivers. Cashiers: should
have a sound secondary
school education. Apply with
an Application and a
passport size picture.
RIVERS: should have at
least two years driving
experience. Apply with an
application and a passport
size picture.






26 SUNDAY CHRONICLE September 4, 2005j


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Ministry of Public works and Communication
Aerodromes Division

Suitably qualified and experienced Contractors are invited to tender for the construction of a
perimeter fence at the Paramakatoi Aerodrome, North Pakaraimas, Region # 8.

Tenders Documents can be obtained from the Accounts Office of the Ministry of Public Works &
Communication, Fort Street, Kingston at a non-refundable cost of two thousand dollars
($2,000.00)

A valid compliance certificate from the Commissioner General of the Guyana Revenue Authority
and a valid N.I.S compliance certificate must be submitted with each Tender.

The completed tender must be placed in the Tender Box located on the first floor, Ministry of Public
Works and Communication, Wight's Lane, Kingston, with the words "Construction of perimeter
fence at Paramakatoi Aerodrome" written at the top left-hand comer of the envelope, and
addressed to:

The Chairman
Departmental Tender Board
Ministry of Public Works and Communication
Wight's Lane, Kingston,
Georgetown.

Not later than 14:00 hrs on 20th September 2005.

Tenders will be opened immediately thereafter, in the presence of Tenderers or their
representatives who choose to attend.

The Ministry of Public Works & communication reserves the right to accept or reject any or all of
the Tenders without assigning reasons) for such rejection and not to necessarily award to the
lowest Tender.

B.Balram
Permanent Secretary


ft 0 4.OW
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Mr. G. Wyntei on 333-3154/333-6628
or Mr. Clifford Stanley on 618-6538/232 I0065G


WOODWORK Door
Store, panel doors,
cupboard doors, windows
and mouldings. Pitt Street
& Republic Road, N/A.
Tel.333-2558.


UPPER flat of two-
storeyed building for
business purposes -
located in Coburg Street
(next to Police
Headquarters). Call
Telephone # 618-6634.



JAMAICAN &
African DVD movies.
Wholesale and retail
- $500 each. Phone
232-0510.
One Ransom 3-
Disc Plough, one pair
MF 35-cage wheel, one
35 MF back blade, one
steel rake Call Tel: 333-
3460 .
JUST arrived -
Caterpillar 312
Excavators (long & short
boom). A. Sookram Auto
Sales, D'Edward, WCB.
Tel. 330-2628, 623-9125.
3-STOREYED
building located in
New Amsterdam; pool
tables, ice maker
machine, 1 complete
gym, 1 Lister
generator. Call: 333-
457/231-5171.
1 LITTLE Giant
dragline with 371
engine; 1 48" x 36"
pitch propeller; (1) 3'"
dia. x 13 ft 6 ins.
S ro seller shaft; 1 -
erKins marine with
transmission; 1 Bedford
engine block with
standard crank shaft
and head; all sizes of
3 ohase motors:
cutting torch; one
complete gas
welding set; one
371 GM eng ine .
Tel : 333 3 2 2 6


DANZIE'S: Brand
name footwear for all.
Stall # D 9 N/A Market.
Tel: 333-4685



USA Green Card
Lottery. Live & work in the
USA. Family application -
$4 000. Contact 227-3339.


CHURCH View Hotel,
Main and King Streets, NA.
Tel: 333-2880. Gift Flower
and Souvenir Shop, Main &
Vryheid Streets. # 333-
3927



CIRCUIT City Internet Cafe
and Computer School, Lot
2 D'Edward Village, W/C/B.
All Internet facilities,
photocopying, Scanning
and Fax Services. Tel. #
330-2762/2830 or 625-
7189.


1 3-STOREYED
building, newly built in the
heart of New Amsterdam.
Price reduced
drastically. Call 333-
2457, 337-2348.
(1) 2-BEDROOM house
at Whim, Corentyne price
- US$40 000. Phone: 220-
6115. Ideal for
businessperson or lawyer.
2-STOREY prime
residential property
situated in Canefield
Canje Public Road. Price
- $20 million, negotiable.
Contact Tel. 327-7164.
1 HOUSE and land
(double lot), location: Lot F-
0 Albion Front, Corentyne,
Berbice. Price $3.9
million negotiable. Contact
Liz 227-8366.


O ntmiso
Post:
Reports to:
Organisation Level:


ETHNIC RELATIONS COMMISSION





Head, Legal and Investigative
ChiefExecutive Officer
Senior Professional


PURPOSE:
Providing legal, investigative and dispute resolution services to the ERC.

,QUALIFICATION:
L. L. B. Degree (Practising Attorney-at-law)

RESPONSIBILITIES:
Provides legal service to the Ethnic Relations Commission, supporting it across its
range of activities and responsibilities.

In relation to the Commission's constitutional functions, he/she:

1. Intervenes in conjunction with the Commission to discourage and prohibit
persons, institutions, political parties and associations from indulging in,
advocating or promoting discrimination or discriminatory practices on the
ground of ethnicity.

2. Promotes arbitration, conciliation, mediation and like forms of dispute
resolution in order to secure ethnic harmony and peace.
3. Establishes mechanism and procedures for arbitration, conciliation,
mediation and like forms of dispute resolution that would insure ethnic
harmony and peace.

4. Investigates complaints of racial discrimination and makes
recommendations on the measures to be taken if such complaints are valid.

5. Monitors and reviews all legislation and all administrative acts or omissions
relating to or having implications for ethnic relations and equal
opportunities.

6. Appears before the bench of the Ethnic Relations Commission Tribunal on
behalf ofthe Ethnic Relations Commission.

7. Must be prepared to travel to various Regions to promote the work of the
ERC.

Applications should be submitted in a sealed envelope to:

The Chief Executive Officer
Ethnic Relations Commission
BIDCO Buildinh
66 Peter Rose &Anira Streets
Queenstownm, Georgetown.

Closing date is Thursday, September 15.2005.

For further infirniation visit the Ethnic Relations Commission Secretariat at the
. above address.








K : INMEMORIAM
NAME: RAMJIE BENERAM
DIED: SEPTEMBER 5, 2005






tLovingly remembered by hisi
daughters, grand children, '
great-grand children and other;.'
____ ~ relatives.



In loving memory of
SLESLIE JAMES DUNDAS.
Depart: September 4, 2004.

I give thanks unto the. Lord
I was glad when they..said unto me
Let us go into the House of the Lord.

We all miss you -

sisters, brothers and his loving mother. !
.a- .-I


IN MEMORIAL

JAGNANDAN: In loving and cherished
memory of our dear one, the late
JUSTICE RAMRAJ JAGNANDAN, of 121
Laluni Street, Queenstown, Georgetown and
formerly of Clonbrook, East Coast
Demerara, who departed this life on
September 1999.


. '.. ".,'i
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This daY is remembered and quietly kept,
Afemories of our beloved we will never forbget
Memories are precious and will never grow old
Though we cannot see you, you are always at our sid
For iwe and you know that the soul never dies
May Lord Krishna always keep you in his heavenly' abode.

Sadly missed by his dear wife Chandra, two loving daughters
Vijaya and Kavita; sisters and brothers, nieces and nephews,
other relatives and friends.

SfK


/':


Watch your business GROW!
Advertise in the Guyana Chronicle.
Tel: 226-3243-9 or 225-4475


t -e'l.iL C pJ'.d sincetIlm:i s idda A
Wtciour bolt) ed Rock a'c. cll:d a%%ay
But ,,,)udid noit -iui lone
F-or pnn 01 us '.~em %iI W1b .01
R frneniiheringn VOL ,'JN. t'%%.i'e do 11' u \ d~l
\\theULt ', 011 ie hoile -- .ill iv-', ci bo ilic m /il
hi ilom d2ie and aid Lt.31 IIflC...
\\ e .. i .o' r absence w I' I1.,iui 'r 2a

11111110li11 pr \d v \ Uldn't brinm,. n acL

\\C ki h..bcA d-'At '.t l it.'d
OLI :ar' nol' Iiner iin -aIi' e 10' '.Iiae 'Ur lwipc'. and drcminit,.
131i1 11C.11i11i Lt4010 'hcgm; i~nti eimcl'."!I In", 0=12111 Idi'\i01.1it.
And :; tu .an [Tvenwmo'.i np-i ii, .)Ic'. er~lihin:j%%'e d
~ But f22 i ,:i'l'r, -%iilltl, \% i u oill d i, d

,..N a. Loid 'liv. a hle".' L-1.1


I mnettd by 3 our In% i ng lahcir RaniCOIi.murllicir Cohn~. %isIin
""lice~na, hriirh'r Rajt-sh, ntpht' s Ist% in and S-ijmii.,
brumlhti-in -Ia%% Hirdi'. auint-_
uncle,,~. coJusin-,anid frie'nds.


S SINCERE THANKS
,Mr. & Nlrs Rudolph Aicop.1. tp.u'en[t of the late .
N.ALLISSA ~ A (OOB .kA. "ANI)\"" o tishl .,
shared our i.''lo-,,al grnel. "al 'A 11
S11 .'


To the Doctors .nd Nuirse of St Jo.iseph
MIerc. Hopital Dr )Na\ -lanoman. Di
Suiindra Pers.-id. Di. NI .I...'oo. .and Dr.
A.stuLi of NeNI, NIu ket Street, a t ,e ll as, Dr
l'% n w10ho hbal l e(rtC hl\l b lut t u lel l
jamunst the Gods to a\e our beloved
daughter. k\ e thank o'

To all those hbein olent people. ;ho
ti, OLLh imm1 easuable \',. s te\.I ied a
pletlihora of i olac and t1'rnqutL I It upon1 1 our i
,,h.bte tcd and bleeding hc.irti. e thank \ ou.

A special "Th.ank You" o. to a ll of oui
relae,, C, and friends. from l t.e and afar. hose
presence. noble acts.. .ords. phone call s,
gestures. cards,\\ l rhs. and imere thoughts.
placated our gric% iu._ K-a',
S .1D) OOIS -1.SDT
/10'l M I. i l / It / I If 'it l,' 1 / .111h1 t.,lt it t i L
l /*IL I /lt / .. 't I I O .l !!/ l/i1i. ,' I /'/I l'l .
D r, t ,'.I i t. HA l h` .' i' IL ,, ,I' S 'cl,\. Ic San r.
If l It hIte i."t" j l itl ilts i h imh/ to i ']. ,l/,"
H I' 11 l i 0 1 lkL 111 ,,1fl1/ lilt' \/I/ \11 t lc h '
S,',t/l !,.iho l ll .r j't,: 1'. ,t '" et ih'1i,, t II1 i, lll/ It, ./ il 'W,,,'til th /

I t- /ll /i]tI ',tO l I ','It' d L I L I
Fi


Fro t OtL'h PJt CI ii'l Of1)\ilii.%Ialtc~aoob aka SANDI)
lI'Wit LM Pet1 ii 1i lo


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28 SUNDAY CHRONICLE September 4, 2


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I MINISTRY OF HEALTH


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Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the consultancy of:
Information Technology Specialist
He/she will be responsible for reviewing the existing information and develop database or
other software programmes to capture and analyse Maternal and Child Health data. Train
Data Entry Clerk, Coordinator, Maternal and Child Health and Statistical Supervisor in
use of package:-


Duration:
Qualification(s):


Four (4) months
BSc Degree in Computer Science/Computer Engineering or equivalent
qualification in addition to three (3) years experience in programming
and database management.


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Applications should be accompanied by two (2) reference letters and be forwarded to the
office of the:
Permanent Secretary,
Ministry of Health,
Lot 1, Brickdam,
Georgetown.
no later that September 16,2005.
For more information, please contact the Personnel Division of the Ministry of
Health on telephone Nos. 226-2934 or 227-0215 This ad can be viewed on
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GEORGETOWN PUBLIC HOSPITAL CORPORATION

PATIENT CARE ASSISTANT
TRAINING PROGRAMME'


Applications are being invited from suitably qualified persons
to be trained as Patient Care Assistants for a period of six (6)
months.
SPECIFICATION/REQUIREMENTS
* Attended Secondary School, up to fourth form level.
* Previous patient care experience in a health care
environment or health related community work would
be an asset.
Upon completion of the programme, successful candidates
will be appointed to the position of Patient Care Assistant.
Applications, along with two (2) recent references and a
recent police clearance can be sentto:
Director, Administrative Services
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation
New Market Street
North Cummingsburg
Georgetown
NOTE: Persons who had previously submitted applications
should reapply.
Deadline for applications is Friday, September 16. 2005.


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE September 4, 2005 31


.*,:
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5


President's Cup


remaining semifinalists


to be decided today


THE two remaining semifinalists in the Georgetown
Football League (GFL) President's Cup knockout football
competition will be" decided at the GFC ground, Bourda,
today.
In the quarterfinals from 18:00 h, Georgetown Football Club
(GFC) meet Western Tigers, followed by a clash between Pele
and the Guyana Defence Force (GDF).
The President's Club quarterfinals will be preceded by a
match in the Premier League, which pits Fruta Conquerors
against Beacon from 16:00 h. Both teams are unbeaten to date.
Pele's formidable lineup will be led by strikers Norris Carter
and Konata Mannings, ably assisted by midfielders Sean Bishop
and Travis Grant. Supporting in the defence will be Sheik Kamal
and Mervyn Liverpool, with Shemroy Arthur continuing to per-
form duties between the uprights.
Keith Fraser will form the last line of defence for the Army
with defenders Steve Brewley and Shawn Hector providing use-
ful support.
Seon Brewley and Defford Wiliams are the upfront combi-


nation to lead their challenge.
bolstered by midfielders Gre-
gory Tappin and MNarion
Maxius.
Devon Millington, Dal id
Britton, Dane Kendall and
Clayton McLeod for the core of
GFC's challenge.
Responding for the Tigers
are Edinson Gomes. Sherman
and Stellon David, and Dillon
Fraser.
In the Premier League, Con-
querors stand on nine points af-
ter three matches and Beacon
have eight, also from three
matches. KONATAMANNINGS
A win will produce three KONATAMANNINGS
points, a draw with goals two and a draw without goals one.


Haslim spurs GCC

to softball win

over Floodlight

Invitational XI


-8. .- -


By Ravendra Madholall
A flamboyant 101 from left-
hander opening batsman
Wasim Haslim spurred
Georgetown Cricket Club
(GCC) to an emphatic eight-
wicket victory over a Flood-
light Invitational XI in their
first Guyana Floodlight
Cricket Association 30 overs
Softball Cricket match


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


WASIM HASLIM

played on Friday night at the
Georgetown -Cricket Club
ground, Bourda.
Haslim, who hammered
eight massive sixes and a simii-
lar number of fours, featured in
a second-wicket partnership of
121 with Vickie Sooknanad.
who was left not out on 36. His
innings was decorated with two
sixes and three fours as their
team hit off the required 151 set
by visiting team in the 18th
over.


Earlier, the home team ,. on
the ioss and asked the In ila-
tional XI to take first mrnke in
absolutely cool condition- and
they were bowled out for 153;'
in 28 overs despite a solid ,open-
ing stand of 59 bet- een % eiecan
softball player Ro stioi
Ramsarran 30 (3x:4. Il'.. and
Ramjit Singh 15 11 1-1 i Ryan
Boodhoo hit a top scoie ,of 43
(5x4, 1x6) and Harr nirine
Dilchan chipped in with a quick
fire 25 (2x4,1x6) unbeaten to-
wards the end.
Captain Reyaz Husein col.
elected two for 19 from four
overs and Wasim Haslim picked:
up two for 16 in three overs,
bowling for the home team.
Watch by a handful of spec-
tators, including the president
and one of the vice-presidents
of the Guyana Cricket Board
(GCB), Chetram Singh and
Malcolmhn Peters respectively.
GCC got off to a flying start.:,
from Satesh Singh and the ag-
gressive Haslim as they put to-
gether 21 in the first three overs
before Satesh Singh was caught
for five.
At the simple presentation
ceremony after the the conclu-
sion of the match at 22:30 h,
Haslim was named best player
for the winning team, v.hiie
Ryan Boodhoo was rewarded
with a trophy for his effort for
the losing team.
(GCC) skipper ~R. az
Husein received the wi',;ing
trophy from GCB vice-. si-
dent MN-lcolm Peters.


...-.,,:)SUNDAY, SE-: E.-.E BER ,B 200P
,. cl' 60'_o PETITION T; TEA '
S-- Special 16:00h Fruta Conquerors vs Beacons
,, ,, ",= r:


T, w i % Cup 1 ?-, 0, IDh
QUali-tei- Finals)
T'vresident's ~20:00 h
i are' I't ;.1e .


Western Tigers us GEC
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ROSE October-Edun,
Malini Shah and Vema
Walcott-White do a
dance item.


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MAN WITH CANOE AND SEEDS
Crabwood seeds are collected from the forest floor by men an children
and are then processed into crabwood odi by women. There are mr-any
traditional beliefs associated with ths prom-s and the crabw'od oi: i
produced by the Waini River community is of the hi:hes1 ouai"-lty..
manilim ium as-m s-* m -. e naw


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"Stff~iaiChronicle September 4, 2005


BNO" TORET?

IN THE W








)Sherry Bollers-Dixon

The biggest problem with going frog-kissing
in search of a prince is that the terrain is
swampy. As you go about looking for magic,
it is far too easy to get pulled into a quicksand pit
and spend a lot of time mucking around with a lot
of frogs.
Last year, I wrote an article called 'If I'm o iwonderfid. why
am I still single?' which was based on a book %' ntren b) the au-
thor Susan Page, titled: 'If We're So In Love, Wh.\ Aren't lti Happi'
That article, one year later, is still a big conversation piece every-
-where I go, and there is one particular area that needs a bit of clan-
fication the consequences of failing to say no to BTNs Better
Than Nothing relationships.

BTNs
When you aren't able to say no at the right moment. Nou end
tip in a relationship or a series of relationships that are nice but
not great, or great in some ways but mediocre in others
Most singles have the experience of falling in \loe \\%h the
wrong person, a common topic of discussion. Often, people at-
tribute their propensity for being attracted to inappropriate people
to a deep inner flaw that can be traced back to their childhood. Oc-
casionally, personal pathology may be involved. But most often,
falling in love with the wrong person is simply a natural, normal
event. The world is brimming over with appealing, sexy, compe-
tent, attractive, wonderful men and women.. Most of them aren't
appropriate life-long mates for.you for one reason or another, but
that does not.meari you might not be very attracted to any number
of them. Falling in love with someone who is an inappropriate
life-long mate is the easiestthing in the world! The problem is not
falling in love with them. The problem is staying in love with them!
Just because there is good chemistry between the two of you, don't
feel enslaved to each other. 'No!' is still an option.
A BTN is a 'nice' relationship with the wrong person. It's a
relationship that drags on and on, even though it is only partially
satisfying, and the partners know it has a low probability of sur-
vival.
BTNs are all those partners who don't love you back the
way you want to be loved. They are the commitment phobes
you stay with anyway; the old lovers who have simply become
a habit; the intimacy-avoiders who feel better than no sex at
all.
If you are in a transition period and a 'treading water' relation-
ship is all you want, then a BTN is better than nothing. But if a
life-long, intimate connection is what you seek, then BTNs are dan-
gerous; they present a major roadblock to finding true love.
In the first place, BTNs consume time and energy that would
otherwise be available for meeting new people, Night after night,
you curl up next to this person
you've become very used to and
watch TV. If a BTN doesn't tke'
you out of circulation all together. ,
at least it slows you dowi n For '
you have to save evenings :o -pend
with your BTN, and you ha'.e t
save energy to interact with him.
however unsatisfying that rna-i be
What's worse is that probhim- k.n
solving with a BTN takes moi e n c n
ergy than Usual, because, he n ih.:
commitment between two pepl.:
limited, their willingness it nc ,
changes in order to improi e tli,- i -
lationship will also be ImniLd l
Rather than thinking: "E..rb.,i '.
probably right. I could tell her 1 love
her more often. I know she really wants this," the thinking is more
likely to be: "I resent that Barbara doesn't like me the way I am.
She's awfully demanding." BTNs drain away your good, positive
energy in endless, repetitive hassles. They can actually add stress
to your life rather than help to reduce it. But an even worse prob-
lem with BTNs is that they chip away, slowly but steadily, at your
self-esteem and sense of well-being. They make you doubt your-
,elf.

BTNS AND SELF ESTEEM
Self-esieem ultimately comes from within. But it must be rein-
forced by positive messages from the environment, and can be 'te-
stroyed without them. If1 your primary relationship is with some-


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one who doesn't fully appreciate and love you for exactly who you
really are, but instead criticises you; or tries to change you; or picks
fights with you; or fails to cooperate, with you; then you will begin
to see yourself, not as who you are, but as the other person sees
you. Since you don't have the opportunity to experience yourself
in any other intimate type of relationship, you will begin to accept
as real the other person's view of you.
People choose to stay in BTN relationships because they
seem to be better than nothing. But they aren't Even if they
have positive qualities to offset the negative ones, when you
spend a lot of time with a person who does not value your posi-
tive attributes, or who actually turns them into something
negative, you may have a hard time keeping your self esteem
intact. If you never have a chance to experience yourself in a
setting where the real you is fully appreciated, you'll lose the
ability to appreciate yourself.
The fact that you are willing to be part of a BTN relationship
bespeaks a lack of self-confidence, because if you felt strongly within
yourself that you deserve more, you would not easily settle for a
BTN, only your second best qualities get reinforced. Daily, the
evidence mounts up that make unwise choices for yourself, that
you lack personal power and control over your life, that your taste
in partners is not so great.

WHY DO WE STAY IN BTNS?
M BTN relationships actually waste precious time and
they are deadening.
y- Yet, virtually all of us have had the experience of stay-
ing in a relationship longer than we knew that was good
for us. Why? We stay in BTNs because we are hooked
on security, and we hold on to the illusion of it, even when
we can clearly see. that the relationship is degenerating.
We feel safer staying in a known situation, however
troubled, than venturing into an unknown situation, how-
ever freeing it might be. We stay in BTNs because we
are more concerned about meeting our short-term intimacy
needs than our long-range life goals. We stay in BTNs
because we have brought the misguided idea that you can't
have what you really want in a relationship, and we be-
lieve we have to compromise. We stay in BTNs because
we misinterpret our feelings.
When we feel a deep longing for more intimacy or
more commitment or closer sex with a partner, we think that is
love. It isn't love. It's pain: Pain caused by some deficiency in the
relationship. But longing makes us feel attached, and makes us think
we are in love.
We stay in BTNs because w e !ind it simply too hard to get
out of them.
We love the other person (not sufficient reason to stay in a
partnership with big problems); we think about the pleasant as-
pects of the relationship, and the shared history, and know it will
be painful to give these up. The problems of the BTN seems more
appealing than the pain of loneliness.
But mostly, we stay in BTNs love relationships with the
wrong person because we didn't say no when it would have
been easy and then, we lose track of the option of getting out.


, ~


^"'Copyrighted Material )
Syndicated Content 4d
Available from Commercial News Providers"


-b ..... .....


Page II


C. ..


m









Worker injured on job granted compensation


for foot injury and brain damage


But, Full Court sets aside compensation for brain damage


THE GUYANA Court of Ap-
peal found in 1968 that the
Full Court had acted cor-
rectly when it set aside part
of a magistrate's judgment
calling on the Bookers Sugar
Estates Ltd to compensate
one of its apprentices for
brain damages resulting
from a foot injury he sus-
tained while on the job.
The Court of Appeal, com-
prised of Chancellor of the Ju-
diciary, Sir Kenneth Stoby and
Justices of Appeal Messrs Ed-
ward Luckhoo and Guya
Persaud, took into account evi-
dence relating to perception and


evaluation, and the principles on
which an appellate court would
intervene.
The facts revealed that the
appellant, Ralph Hansraj, an
apprenticed electrician, was se-
verely burnt when his foot came
into contact with an exposed
high voltage electrical wire. He
was hospitalized and after being
treated, two of the doctors who
attended to him pronounced him
as having been fully recovered.
A third, however, concluded that
he had suffered "a ten per
centum permanent partial dis-
ability to his foot, and a fifty
per centum permanent partial


il


LL~


I, I otil I I 1 l .r a t1he I i












1 Caterpillar wtoea
B n in i ,o io-













Excavator ^^
Dredge Engines s s
SPump sL etcss .











for details.


disability to his brain."
The magistrate accepted
this evidence and awarded the
appropriate measure of com-
pensation to the appellant. On
appeal to the Full Court, the
decision was varied and the
compensation for brain damage
was set aside.
Hansraj duly appealed the
matter and the Appellate Court
held that what the Full Court
had to consider was not so
much a conflict of facts, but a
conflict of conclusions based on
given facts. It was also pointed
out that where the points in
dispute were the proper inter-,


-li


\V


ONE (1) RECEPTIONIST/

ACCOUNTS CLERK_


EXPERIENCE WILL

BE AN ASSET .


WIN :


ence to be drawn from proved
facts, an appellate court is gen-
erally in a good position to
evaluate the evidence as the
court of trial. As such, the ap-
peal was dismissed and the Full
Court's decision affirmed, with
costs to the respondents.
At the Appellate Court
hearing, Senior Counsel Mr
Ashton Chase and Ms S
Doobay appeared for the appel-
lant while Mr'G M Farnum,
QC, represented the respon-
dents .. Jus
In his judenent, Jus-
tice Luckhoo noted that ihe ap-
pellant. %tuhil[ in the employ of


GEORGE

BARCLAY


rigger, was running electric wires
at the Albion Estate on Febru-
ary 4, 1965, when he had the
misfortune of having his foot
come into contact with an ex-
posed 440v wire.
This caused him to sustain
severe burns to the foot which
necessitated prolonged medical
treatment due to an ulcer, which
resulted in the necrosis (death)
of a bone in the ankle.
According to Luckhoo,
Hansraj was at first hospitalized


New Amsterdam Hospital in
Berbice, following which he was
a patient of one Dr C R
Subryan, who took care of him
until January the following year.
He was subsequently sent to the
St. Joseph's Mercy Hospital
here in the city for an operation
to remove the offending "piece
of bone which had become un-
healthy."
On being discharged from
Please turn to page V


1. One 2001 Toyota Hilux D/Cab Pick Up
2. One 125 CC Jialing Motor Cycle

Tender forms may be uplifted upon viewing
between 09:00 and 15:00 hrs from IICA Office in
Guyana, 18 Brickdam, Stabroek, Georgetown
on September 01, 02 and 05, 2005

Tenders close September 05 at 15:00 hrs
S IICA reserves the right to refuse any tender without assigning reasons.


MINISTRY OF EDUCATION





WANT TO ACQUIRE A SKILL?

Then apply for a one (1) year of full-time training at
the:-
UPPER CORENTYNE
INDUSTRIAL TRAINING CENTRE
Kingston, No 79 Village
Corriverton,
Region No 6

Courses Offered:-
/ AGRICULTURAL MECHANIC
/ CARPENTRY
/ ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
/ FITTING AND MACHINING
/ INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
v MASONRY
/ MOTOR MECHANIC
/ WELDING

You must be 15 years of age and over. Application
forms can be uplifted at the institution.


Chief Education Officer
Ministry of Education


Government ads can be viewed on
,IIP l .. .. , V :vgy


TH IUYAN FU T ION TRUST COLLEGE


TK4 WAIN a iA






PaeIY~udyCrnil etme ,05


THE COMPAI

WE KEEP


I have a male friend
I've known several
years. He's a
player. Always has
been, and, I fear, he
always will be. I gave his
number to a friend, Gloria,
who was interested in
him. I warned her he's a
player. She said she
didn't mind.
A month later, I learnt that
another close friend, Cindy, was
involved with him, but that it
was nothing serious. He ex-
pressed interest in both of them
and said they both knew he
didn't want anything serious.
One did not know about the
other. Then Gloria found a boy-
friend and stopped seeing him.
Cindy continued to see him,
and it got serious, although he
never admitted it. In the past
few months, Gloria contacted
him, and he decided he wanted
to be with her, but he told


Cindy he wasn't see
else. I felt something
on but wasn't sure
fronted him.
I was stuck in ti
told him I would
women. He didn't te
I did. He got mad at
now, neither wanted
do with him. He I
didn't want to be f
me anymore.
My two friends
ful, or so I thought
them know what wa
Now, one friend
should have told her
says I betrayed he
have nothing to do w
difficult, as we hav
group of friends. A
wrong?


Summer, let's tal
approach to your qi
you think a woman


should be used as a plaything
by a man?
What is a player? A man
who plays with women's affec-
tions. What are the elements of
play in this game? There are
two: Being involved with mul-
M y tiple women, while concealing
that fact, and giving each the il-
lusion there could be more for
them, in order to get more for
himself.
being anyone Both you and this man
g was going know a player uses a woman's
until I con- nature against her. The player
says he's not offering a relation-
he middle. I ship, but once he is intimate
J tell both with a woman, she feels it must
ll them; so be a relationship. No woman
Sme because wants to be a party girl. It's not
anything to in a woman's nature to want to
told me he be used.
friends with You're around a man you
know uses women. We are
were grate- known by the company we
, for letting keep. You kept company with
is going on. a man who uses and abuses
decides I women. Whether you wanted to
sooner.She or not, you vouched for him
r. She will with your friends. You helped
with me. It's them believe he was all right,
'e the same because he was your friend.
km I in the It's as if you introduced a
burglar to your girlfriends,
and he burglarized their
SUMMER houses. Where's the sur-
prise? You knew his nature.
ke a broader Apologize.


question. Do
's sexuality


SOMEDAY

MY

PRINCE...
Im a woman, 25,
who's never had
a boyfriend. I'm
educated; from a
good family; with
friends both male
and female. And I'm
not ugly either.
I feel I've been over-
looked, sornehow. fin be-
ainnin(l to wonder if it's (o-
in, to happen. Should I
leave it to rate, or niake an
effort at oettin(, a boyfriend"
But then, there isn't anyone
IMMMM"'TcT MT17_11t now.
BOBBI
Bobbi, T.S. Eliot wrote:
"I said to rny SOLIL be still,
and wait without hope. For
hope would be hope for the
wron- thing; wait without
love, For love would be
love, of the wrong thing;
there is yet f itl But faith,
al 11 the hope
and the love an
are all in the waiging."
Yom said yo rself there
is no one of intlest to you
currenily. Untid there is,
wait without hope....
WhLn.sornecine of' njer-
est appears, be yoursElf,
because the Nay to 1ind
sorneone who genuiniLly
loves you is to be yourWJf.
Now, be fully engaged in We.
Follow your interests; exf c-
rience all you can; be with
.your friends and famidy.
Until he appears.
WAYNE & TAMARA
Send letters to: Direct
Answers, PO Box
964, Springfield, MO
65801 or email:
DirectAnswers @
WayneAndTanuwa.com.


BREAST



GENE FIND



RAISES



CANCER



HOPE


- "Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


WAYNE & TAMARA


GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA/INTER AMERICAN
DEVELOPMENT BANK
PROJECT- LOAN# GY-T1006
INCREASING ACCESS TO PRIMARY HEALTH CARE
FOR AMERINDIAN COMMUNITIES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the following
vacancy:

PROJECT COORDINATOR

Duties and Responsibilities:
SPlan, coordinate, implement and supervise all activities involved with the development,
execution, delivery and evaluation of all activities related to the technical cooperation
project, "Increasing Access to Primary Health Care for Amerindian Communities'.

Qualifications and Experience:
A Bachelor's of Sciences Degree in Health Sciences, Economics, Public Administration,
Business or relevant discipline. i
A minimum of four years professional experience in project management and finance
Knowledge of computer applications relevant for project management.

Additional Qualifications and Experience:
knowledge and experience with Amerindian populations
experience in management of Health Sector Programs
knowledge of procurement rules and guidelines of the Bank

Terms of Reference for this position could be obtained from, and applications addressed to:

Health Sctor Development Unit
Project Management Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Compound
East Street, Georgetown
Guyana
Tel. No: 226-6222, 226-2425
Fax. No: 225-6559,
Email: mohgog@networksgy.com

Deadline for submission of applications is Monday 1211 September, 2005 at 4:00 p.m. Only
short-listed applicants will be acknowledged.
This ad can be viewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy


EDUCATION/TRAINING
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Fax:00 44 1534 485071
Vl Ilk Name & Address:

CAREER SUCCESS: ACCREDITED BRITISH TRAINING


- -
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- a -


~ -~ ~





-



-
___ -
- -
- - ~

-


Page IV


w5un~y dh';ro'n-6 1.-Sept'ember 4,.2005-.






Suda Choil Stebe 4,_00 Pae


The merits of e

n n _


BELIEVE IT or
not, the dental
profession and
the public have two
different perceptions
when it comes to oral
hygiene. Most patients
that consult me state
that they "brush daily,"
yet they consult me for
a myriad of dental
problems. The profession
has oral health as its main
objective whereas the
public is more concerned
with personal cleanliness
and social acceptability.
Nevertheless, the desired
outcome is the same,
namely the removal of
dental plaque.
The concept of using a
mouthrinse as an adjunct to
brushing with a dentrifice
(toothpaste) is a sound one. In
recent years, there has been a
rapid increase in the use of
mouthrinses and this review
considers the relative merits of
those currently on the market.
The accumulation of plaque
and the inflammatory response
it induces in the gum tissues


favours colonisation of the
pockets by bacteria, many of
which have been implicated in
periodontal destruction. But
despite this process being so
serious, of course, it is even less


effects of plaque. Basically there
are three classes of mouthrinses,
fluorides for the prevention of
dental caries, agents for the
prevention of tartar and the
antibacterial agents for the
prevention of plaque and
gingivitis.
Fluorides are highly
effective inhibitors of caries.
The intrinsic activity of fluoride
is its ability to enhance or
accelerate mineral deposition in
tooth enamel and to prevent the
softening process. It has been
also proven that fluoride may
act by blocking the digestive
activity of bacteria, apart from


inhibiting acid production in the
plaque.
Calculus is an oral hygiene
problem worldwide. Most
dental professionals realise the
value of calculus removal and
the potentially adverse effects
of it on gingival (gum) health.
Calculus occurs due to the
precipitation of calcium
phosphate salts in the dental
plaque. A major ingredient of
mouth rinses and some
toothpastes which prevents the
formation of tartar is called
phosphate. This drug's activity
is made more efficient in the
presence of fluoride.


We Care


significant than the role that
plaque plays when it is allowed
to collect and remain on the
tooth's surface; it may harden
and become tartar or calculus.
Because of these three
major disease conditions,
mouthrinses are designed to
combat the multiple harmful


1. Tenders are invited from suitably i!i;i-'.l persons to provide the il'ii.- services at the Georgetown Fu.bI,
Hospital Corporation.


Provision of Pest Control Services
Provision of Sanitact Disposal Services
Provision of Maintenance and Repair Services for Fire -- ,iriii.h-i"
Provision of Maintenance Services for Perkins Generators
Provision of Maintenance Services for Bed-Lift Elevators
*Provision of Janitorial, Floor Care, Waste Collection and Disposal Services
*Provision of Maintenance and Repair Services for X-Ray Equipment
*Provision of Maintenance and Repair Services for Laboratory Equipment
*Provision of Dietary Supplies


The Dentist Advises
r --r:] = i;ii iL i;ii]i}1


Mouthrinses, which target
existing calculus, cannot actually
remove the deposit but only
prevent it from increasing in
quantity.
Chlorhexidine is the most
thoroughly investigated and
effective antiplaque agent
available. Indeed with two rinses
per day, there is no need to
brush at all, and yet maintain
good oral hygiene. Listerine, a
mixture of essential oils, has
been commercially available for
over a century. Promoted at first
as a cosmetic to combat bad
breath, it is only recently that
its beneficial effects on plaque
and gingivitis have been
documented.
Throughout Europe since
1988, the mouthrinse market
has displayed strong growth
due mainly to the successful
launching of Plax. Positioned as
a pre-brush rinse, the action of
Plax is primarily detersive.
Although it is certainly the most


commercially successful
according to studies done by
Grossman and published in
Clinical Preventive Dentistry,
when used at home prior to
brushing, Plax is virtually
useless. Acti-brush and Colgate-
Plamolive contain as their active
ingredient triclosan/co-polymer.
These mouthrinses
concentrate on areas generally
neglected by ordinary
toothbrushing. This equals Steri/Sol
which contains the potent
hexetidine. Finally, evidence suggests
that the efficacy of Lander and
PerioGard are equivocal.
Whenever buying a
mouthrinses, check to see if it
contains chlorhexidine. If it
does not contain this drug, I
would not recommend its use if
the maximum effect is desired.
Remember that a
mouthrinse should remain in
the oral cavity for at least 60
seconds before significant
benefit is accrued.


Tenderers can bid on any or all of the above-mentioned works separately.

2. Tender Documents can be obtained from the Cashier, Finance Department of the Georgetown Public Hospital
Corporation, New Market Street, from 09:00 hrs to 15:00 hrs, '.lnd1 to Friday upon payment of a non-refundable
fee of $1000 each.

3. Each Tender must be enclosed in a sealed envelope which does not in any way 1rEtnl the Tenderer and should be
clearly marked on the top left-hand corner "Tender for (specific ti,i) .

4. Tenders for items A, B, C, D and E must be addressed to The Chairperson, Georgetown Public Hospital
Corporation Tenders Committee and must be placed in the Tender Box situated in the Administrative eBiii'dii.1,
GPHC not U.-ii lit,;r. 09:00 hrs., Tuesday 6th September 2005.

*Tenders for items F, G, H and I must be addressed to The Chairman, National Procurement & Tender
Administration Board, Ministry of Finance, and must be placed in the Tender Box situated at1,i, lv'In.. I, of
Finance, Main & Urquhart Streets, Georgetown not later than 09:00 hrs., Tuesday 6th September 2005.

Tenders will be opened immediately ili tin- closing periods. Tenderers or their t:'l'.innt-i':. are invited to
attend the p'-I-',iiii

5. Each Tender must be accompanied by a valid Certificate of Compliance from the Commissioner of Inland Revenue
Aiilhoiry (IRD) and from 'It- General "J. ,- National Insurance Scheme (NIS) in the name of the individual if
individual is tendering or company if company is tendering.

6. The Cr":, *.I ... Public '' .il 1 Corporation does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any Tender.

Michael H. Khan .
Chief Executive Officer


GEORGETOWN PUBLIC

HOSPITAL CORPORATION


Page V


Sunday Chronicle September 4, 2005






Sunday Chronicle September 4, 2005


From page III
the 'Mercy Hospital' !on
January 6, 1966,, Luckhoo
said Hansraj continued to re-
ceive treatment as an outmpa,
tient for the next three
months until he was again
seen by Dr Subryan who lis-
charged him on April 18, de-
claring him fit to work.
But Hansraj did not resume
work because of pains in his left
foot, which carried the scars
from his injury. On April 21, he
consulted with Mr H.C Hugh,
a Fellow of the Royal College
of Surgeons (FRCS), who it was
that had diagnosed that he was
partially brain damaged as a re-
sult of his injuries. It was as a
result of the his findings that a
claim was filed for compensa-
tion.
The magistrate had ac-
cepted this claim and awarded
compensation in the sum of $3,
282.20. Dissatisfied with this
decision, Bookers took the mat-
ter to the Full Court, which var-
ied the magistrate's order, set-
ting aside the award relating to
incapacity arising from damage
to the brain.
Hansraj, in turn, ap-
proached the Court of Appeal
asking that it restore that part
of the magistrate's decision de-
nied by the Full Court.
The Appellate Court
found, however, that the mag-
istrate had had before him the


evidence of three medical opin-
ions in deciding the question of
incapacity, namely that of Mr
Hugh, a witness for the appel-
lant, and Mr John George, him-
self an FRCS, and Dr Subryan,
who appeared on behalf of the
respondents.
It held that the fact that the
injury was caused by the acci-
dent to the workman's foot was
not the issue here, but rather
whether any incapacity existed
after April 18, 1966 was ever
disputed, and whether any in-
jury was ever caused to his
brain so as to give rise to any
permanent partial incapacity.
A physical examination con-
ducted by Mr Hugh on the ap-
pellant on April 21, 1966,
found:
(1) a healed scar on the
outer side of the left knee;
(2) a large depressed scar
incompletely healed in the
middle and
outer side of the left leg
[with] much muscles and soft
tissue missing
at the side of the burn ow-
ing to tubular necrosis;
(3) a partly healed scar
on the outer side of the left ankle
with
keloid formation and adhe-
sion to underlying structures;
and
(4) palpation showing
the absence of the left lower
half of the fibula
bone presumably lost owing


to the necrosis of the bone as a
result of the bums.,
Hugh's findings, it is said,
were also based on the man's re-
count of the incident and of the
headaches he had since been ex-
periencing. He was of the opin-
ion that the headaches at refer-
ence were likely to be perma-
nent owing to "damage to the
brain tissue from the electric
charge," and would cause perma-
nent partial disability affecting
the workman's earning capacity
as a porter by as much as 50 per
cent.
According to Luckhoo, the
good doctor "quite naturally
thought that whatever brain
damage there was, would de-
pend on the severity of the
shock and the amount [of elec-
tricity] which passed through
the brain."
What was significant, he
noted, was that contrary to the
norm with this type of injury,
the headaches in this case
did not commence within the
usual month after the acci-
dent but rather almost three
months later.
It was noted also that Dr
Subryan had treated the appli-
cant for the first time on April
21, 1965 (presumably after he
left the New Amsterdam Hos-
pital), for an ulcer which had
manifested itself on the injured
leg. He next saw him some days
later, on April 28, which is
when he first began to complain


about the headaches, for which
he was given aspirin, codeine
and phenacetin and some vita-
min tablets.
The next and only other oc-
casion Hansraj ever complained
of a headache was on May 7,
1965, and since it was mild, the
treatment was significantly re-
duced. At the time, it was said,
Dr Subryan had attributed these
headaches to general worry and
depression as the patient had
not been working for some
time.
Dr Subryan said that from
May 7, 1965, until the appel-
lant was discharged as fit for
work on April 19, 1966, no
other complaint was made to
him of any headache. He, there-
fore thought that if the head-
aches were the result of damage
to the brain, he would expect
these to be continuous if the
damage remained uncured.
Dr Subryan was quoted as
saying that before he dis-
charged the appellant, he had
put him on light duty for 14
days in order to rehabilitate
his muscles through exer-
cise, and that when he dis-
charged him, he was satisfied
that he was fit for his usual
work. He ascertained that
both the man's papillary and
muscular reflexes were nor-
mal.
He further opined that the
central nervous system could
only be affected if the charge
was received on the head or
backbone and the current had
passed through the body. In this
case, he said, the current did not
pass through the body. His ex-
amination of the papillary re-
flexes was to ascertain if there


was any gross damage to the
brain.,
He was also 'of the opin-
ion that had the electric
shock and burning resulted
in the disturbance of the cen-
tral nervous system, then the
headaches woold have been
immediate if he [were con-
scious, or soon after he had
regained consciousness, and
not several months'after; and
that if there was any injury
to the central nervous sys-
tem, his tests would have re-
vealed that.
According to Luckhoo, Mr
George, who was a senior sur-
geon at the St. Joseph's Mercy
Hospital had operated on the
appellant on the January 28,
1966, and "had removed four to
five inches of bone from about
the level of the ankle joint." The
wound had not healed com-
pletely when he discharged him
on February 26.
Continuing, the Judge
said that when Mr George
saw him again on April 15,
the wound was healed. and
advised that he be put for
normal duties. His opinion
was that the removal of that
portion of the tibia would
cause no functional disabil-
ity, and he would be able to
use is leg in the normal way.
The appellant only once
complained to him of head-
aches and that was on Janu-
ary 24 when he referred him
to Dr BS Roy, the eye spe-
cialist, who did not find
anything wrong with his
eyes. He did not think that
the appellant was suffering
from any brain injury and
there was no injury to the


central nervous system as far
as he knew.
Referring to the decision of
the Full Court, Justice Luckhoo
in his judgment added: "As was
pointed out in the decisioOr of
the Full Court, Mr. Hugh only
saw the appellant two or three
times, and that was aboutione
year after Dr. Subryah saw him.
And, whereas Dr Subryan con-
ducted tests for ascertaining
whether there was gross damage
to the brain and central nervous
system by examining papillary
and muscular reflexes, it does
not appear that Mr. Hugh :con-
ducted any such examination,
which admittedly was very im-
portant and ought to have been
done", the judge said.
Mr. Luckhoo, who later be-
came Chancellor of the Judiciary
, concluded: "This Court has no
choice in concluding that the
Full Court did not violate any
principle of law in reversing, in
part, the decision of the magis-
trate.
"What was there done was
well within the category of the
ground of appeal taken. This
Court can only interfere where
a question of law arises, which
is well founded. To ask for a
restoration of the magistrate's
finding, without the existence of
some legal basis for so doing, is
to ask for the exercise of juris-
diction in the area of facts,
which this court does not pos-
sess. This Court is only to de-
cide whether the Full Court
acted within the ambit of its le-
gal authority.
"The appeal is therefore
dismissed and the decision of
the Full Court affirmed with
costs to the respondents".


Forei-n l .tc'wlu.it \ ,L \.i i ili.
Suminmarv Indicators
Friday Augiust 26, 2005 -, Thui'sday September 1, 2005
1 XCI'A)KNGk RATES


Suitably motivated and disciplined young men and women are invited to
fill vacancies in a newly established elite Security Enterprise in the position
\of: Security Officers

The applicant must:
* must be between the ages of 18 to 45, with valid identification documents
(Identification number, passport, driver's licence).
f* be of good mental and physical health as evidence by a licensed medical
practitioner.
+ be in possession of three GCE/CXC passes, one of which! must be English
Language or equivalent.
Be prepared to, complete a written entrance examination'
possess a clean criminal record and, if selected for training, provide a
Certificate of Good Character issued by the Police in the last three months.
be prepared to undergo a programme of training, if selected, to equip
himself/herself with the necessary expertise to allow effective job
performance.
provide two testimonials with telephone numbers of referees.

Benefits:
The best remuneration package.
Professional development in ardii.r disciplines.
Finest law enforcement and developmental training.
Medical & Pension Schemes.

Applicants are requested to submit documents to: .
The Security Manager 4
P.O. Box 10530 or Telephone 223-1001-3 ^<
Georgetown A Menber of CL Financial Ltd.
Previous service in the military or in law enforcement, and a valid driver's permit
will be a definite asset.


Buying Rate Selling Rate
A. US Dollar NOTtS OTIH [R NOTES OTHER
Bank of Baroda 197,Q0 198.00 201.00 203.00
Bank of Nova Scotia 190.00 196.00 201.00 204.00
Citizens Bank 192.00 199.00 203 00 204.25
Demerara Bank 195.80 197-80 201.00 202.00
GBTI 190.00 195.00 20).00 201.00
NBIC 194.00 198.00 200.00 204.00

fRank A e,,rage 193,11i. 197.30 201./7 203.04


Nonbank Cambios Av. (5 largest) 198.08 201.76


BoG Average Market Exchange Rate: USS 1.00 = G$199 60

B. Canalian Dolliar

.... ... . .

C. Pound Sterling

Bank A average 31/5.00 434.67 54. 17 360.00

nIw 1o'


E. Selected Caricom Exch.: nge
Rates


TTS
BdrrsS
JS -


F. LIBOR-USS
L.odILIonr linternllk OItered
Rate For Thir., Sep. !.2005


G$ 28.77
G$ 91.74
0$ 4.45
G$ (,5 60
UG$ o 60


3 liontlhl'
6 mllontihs


(. Prime Rate


3.85500 '
? 0 i9()'.


14, 4


Paae VI


.'c __


4V.
.1~
',1


pnllmcnt Bank ol'(Itlvalla


us
{.J


Worker injured on job granted compensation




for foot injury and brain damage






Sunday Chronicle September 4, 2005 Page Vii


~ COM


Hello boys and girls,
Welcome to our English Language col-
umns. It is a very good thing to make a list
of things that distract you when you are
studying and then work out how you can
reduce these distractions over a period of
time. Keep in focus! Enjoy this issue. Love
you.
'Bye.

IN LAST WEEK
Vocabulary

A. Solution to "Word Meaning from Context"
1. a wispy curl of thread (tendril)
2. a thick, lightweight cloth (gauze)
3. an instrument for holding back the edges of a
wound (retractor)
4. carried away by strong feeling (touched)
5. touching (poignant)
6. fear of what may occur; anxiety (apprehension)
7. dark or sun tanned (swarthy)
8. an indication (preview)
9. tiring (arduous)
10. the place at which two things are joined (junc-
ture )
11. allow light to pass through, but not completely
clear (translucent)
12. thickened and hardened in spots (calloused)
13. not possessing; lacking (devoid)
14. in a manner that shows no feelings;
unemotionally (impassively)

B.

Solution to "Word Meaning from Word Part"
1. The suffix -al means "relating to"; -ist means
"one who does."
A conversationalist is: a) a good talker.

2. The prefix re- means "again; back"; the Latin root
-laps means fall; slip."
If a child relapses into bad behaviour, she: b) is
bad once more.

3. A pigeonhole is a small desk compartment for
filing papers. If you are put in a pigeon hole, you
are: c) classified as routine or ordinary.

4. Solicit means "to seek to get"; -or means "one
who."
A solicitor probably is: b) a lawyer.

5. The Latin quibus, a form of "who," often appear
in legal documents.
To quibble must mean: a) to argue over small
points.

6. In Hindi, a bangla is a small house in Bengal,
India.
A bungalow colony must be: c) a resort in which
individual cottages are rented.

7. The suffix -ive means "tending to."
A productive imagination is: c) creative or colourful.

8. A bradere is Latin fofto scrape."
Someone with am abrasive personality: c) gets on
other people's nerves.

9. Candor is Latin for "whiteness; purity" and con-
tains the root -cand-, "shine."
A person who speaks with great candour: a) is
very honest.

10. The French sentinelle is from the Italian
sentinella; both words mean "a soldier on guard


ENGLIS-L0


duty."
A person who stands like a sentinel stands: a)
erectly.


IN THIS WEEK

Reading for Meaning

The traveler told us some funny stories about the
days when his father went to this village school.
The room in which the scholars met was school,
kitchen, bedroom for the boarders and family, din-
ing-room, chicken-run, and even piggery, for some-
times the pigs came trotting in in search of a crust
of bread, or a piece of coconut from the pockets
of the children.

Questions

1. What did the scholars give the pigs from their
pockets?
2. Did the scholars (boarders) sleep in the school-
room?
3. What creatures other than pigs came into the
schoolroom?
4. Did the scholars and the family sleep in the
same room?
5. Was the food cooked in the schoolroom?


Syllabication

Look at the words below that end in y. Pronounce
each of them and decide on the number of syl-
lables each has.
Write the word by syllables and add the accent
mark. The first one is done for you.
1. copy cop' y
2. happy
3. plenty
4. twenty
5. army
6. baby

Look at these other words.

century family

How many syllables are in each word? Now write
each word by syllables as you hear it divided. A dd
each accent mark. Check your dictionary to make
sure that you divided each word correctly. Then
write each entire word.

Remember that syllabication is an aid to the im-
provement of spelling and pronunciation.


Review: Punctuation of Direct Quotation

In a sentence, the exact words spoken by some-
one are enclosed in quotation marks and are called
a quotation. Look at the two conversation pieces
below. Read them until you are very familiar with
what they are about. Copy them in your notebook.

"Can't you run faster?" asked John.
John answered, "I'll try."

Sally called impatiently, "A re you ready"?
"I'll be there in a minute," replied James.

Points to remember:
Y ou need to look again at the sentences above to
be able to follow the points with understanding.
Work alongside a study partner. Find out exactly
what each reminder is saying and discuss it with


the partner.

1. A quotation at the beginning of a sentence ends
with a comma, question mark, or exclamation
mark.
2. A quotation at the end of a sentence ends witt
a period, question mark, or exclamation mark.
3. The punctuation mark at the end of a quotation
is placed before the last quotation mark.
4. If a reference to a speaker comes at the end of
a sentence, a comma is placed after those words.
5. Each direct quotation begins with a capital let-
ter.


Punctuate the sentences below carefully and circle
the letters that should be capitalized. This will help
you practise writing the direct quotation.

1. what time is it whispered sam
2. the teacher said please close your pens
3. what a fine dancer she is exclaimed manny
4. he has your book announced silvern grey

Enrichment

Here is a puzzle for you. Complete it. Each word
will contain the letters ar.


Across
2. Land where crops and
animals are raised.
5. One of long ago who
sang his own poems
7. Automobile
8. To damage
9. To box
11. To delay progress
13. A person's clothing
14. A point coming
backward from another
point
16. Drawing and painting
17. A swamp
20. Late
21. Something to smoke,
made of rolled tobacco
leaves
22. A doorway with a
curved top


Down
1. To injure
3. A part of a circle
4. A large stringed
instrument, played
by plucking the
strings
6. Opposite of light
9. The right side of a
ship
10. A shady place
12. Slender, pointed
weapons that are
thrown
15. The region near
the North Pole
18. Severe
19. Average
- 20. A product of coal
that is very sticky


Page VII


Sunday Chronicle September 4, 2005_








ONM


MCatbi:


Hello boys and girls,
Welcome to our Mathematics columns. Some-
thing you can do at this time of study is to look
into ways you can organise the notebooks you
are preparing so that the information relates
to everyday life. For instance, if you are study-
ing fractions at present, try to use fractional
terms in the real life situations you find your-
self. Love you.
'Bye.
IN LAST WEEK
Multiplication of Fractions Using Cancellation
Reminder:
1. % of 1/3
1 X 1 = 1/12
4X3
2. 1/9 times 18/25
1 X 48-2 = 2/25
9, X 25
3. Multiply 1 3/8 by 4/33
4-1X 4_ = 1/6
-2 X -3-3
4. What is the product of 5/7 and 2/9?
5 X 2 = 10/63
7 X 9
5. Find 1 2/7 times 2 4/5
9 X 44 2= 18/5=33/5
-7X 5
6. What is the product of 1 3/15, 2 1/3, and 2 7/
10?
4-iX 51 X
.45-31X -1 X 4-G5
27/5 = 5 2/5
7. Find 5 times the product of 5 2/5 and 2 5/15
51iX -2-7X 3-5 = 63
1 X6-1 X 145-.1

Solution to "Stretch Y ourself"
1. 610 litres; 2. 3,000 litres; 3. 45 marbles; 4. 10
hours; 5, 85 years
Division of Fractions
Reminders:
When you multiply 6 by 2, your answer is 12. (6
X2)
When you divide 6 by , your answer is 12. (6 +
2)
6 + 1/2
6X2 =12
1 X 1

Rule: To divide by a fraction you must upturn
that fraction and multiply.
12 + = 12 X 2
1
24
Here is another.
20 + 1/5


20 X 5
1
100


Solutions to Division by Fractions


--. I ,


w -wait~f YS-~^ -~K


Write
terms
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.


12 + 4/5 = 15
64 + 8/9 = 72
20 + 5/7 = 28
300 15/18 = 360
456 + 22/5 = 190
2 1/10 + 7/15 = 42
645 6/35 (Sorry; not to be included)
your answer as a mixed number in lowest
or as a whole number.
5 % + 7/8 = 6
25 Y2 3 2/5 = 7
52 + 2 3/5 = 20
68 + 9 5/7 = 7
68 + 12/9 = 55 7/11
33/5 27/10 = 1 1/3
9.75 + 3/7 = 22 3/4


Fractions
Maintaining Skills
Write each fraction as a mixed number in simplest
form.
13.9/4 16.12/8 19.13/5 22. 8/3
=2% = 1% =23/5 =22/3
14.11/5 17. 6/4 20.14/8 23.16/6
=21/5 = 1 % = 1 % =22/3
15.12/9 18.15/4 21.18/8 24.46/8
=11/3 =33/4 =2% =5%
Write the sum in simplest form.
25. 2/8 + 3/8 = 5/8
26. 4/7 + 5/7 = 1 2/7
27. 3/6 + 5/6 = 1 1/3
Write the difference in simplest form.
28. 6/7 2/7 = 4/7
29. 7/8- 1/8 = 6/8 = 3/4
30. 5/9-4/9= 1/9
IN THIS WEEK
Fractions
Comparing Fractions
Do you know how to find out if a fraction is greater
than, or less than, or equal to another fraction by
comparing them? Let us try that again today.
Compare 4/10 and 5/10
When the denominators are the same, you need
to compare the numerators.
4/10
22 22 00
22 22

5/10
22 22 22
22 22


Since the numerator 4 is
5 we can conclude that
hence 4/10 < 5/10.


less than the numerator
4/10 is less than 5/10;


A gain. Compare 5/8 and 3/8
We need to look at the numerators and observe
that numerator 5 is greater than numerator 3.
We can then say that 5/8 is greater than 3/8.
Hence 5/8 > 3/8.

Suppose the denominators are not the same.
We can make the fractions have common de-


2 1
5 2


Since 4/10 is lesser than 5/10, we must


conclude that 2/5 < %.
Exercises
A
Compare the fractions.


4 ? 2/4 6.
4/5 '? 2/5 7.
3/9 ? 5/8 8.
6/10 ? 1/10 9.
3/8 ? 7/8 10.


B.
Write the fractions in order from least to greatest.
11. 3/8, 1/8, 5/8
12. 7/9, 4/9, 1/9
13. Y4, , 1/3
14. 4/5, 2/5,115
15. 2/3, %, 1/2


Shoot


askets


Johnny, Jenny and Rani take an equal number of
turns shooting baskets. Johnny makes 2/3 of his
shots. Jenny makes % of her shots.
1. Who makes more baskets? Johnny or Jenny?
2. Rani then made twice as many baskets as
Jenny. How many baskets did Rani make?

Remember A rea?
1. A box measured 45 m by 45 m by 45 m. What
was the area of the bottom? (Remember that area
is always square measure.)
2. A another box measured 35 cm by 35cm by 35
cm. What was the area of any one of its sides?
3. Y et another box measured 12 cm by 12 cm by
26 cm. What was the area of a tall side of the
box?
4. A another box measured 30 m by 30 m with an
unknown height. IF the volume was discovered to
be 31.500 cubic metres, what was the height of the
box'Y


Write < or >.


% ? 1/8
3/8 ? 1/4
3/8 ? 3/4
3/5 ? 2/2
1/9 ? 2/3


__ ___


6m


nominators. Just make them equivalent fractions.

Compare 215 and .
We can write equivalent fractions with common
denominators.
Multiply both numerator and denominator in
fraction 2/5 with 2 in this present case.

2=2X2 = 4
5 5X2 10
Multiply both numerator and denominator in
fraction %/ with 5 as in this present case.
1=1X5 = 5
2 2X5 10
Now compare:






Sunday Chronicle SeDtember 4; 2005 Page IX


* 'U 'V .1l~ B!A "T : :1


in1&vyd i--


by Petamber Persaud


T HE GUYANA ANNUAL is ninety ye
Founded in December 1915, this mn
has outlived many other such publ:
undergoing numerous modifications to m


need of its readership
and to carry out its
mandate, which is, to
preserve our identity
and cultural integrity.
The main noticeable change
to the book over the years was
its name. Started as The
Chronicle Christmas Annual, it
was renamed The Guyana
Christmas Annual and pres-
ently, in the new millennium, it
nual, becoming a perennial maga-
zine instead of a year-end,
Christmas-oriented publication.
The main rival of The An-
nual was the Christmas Tides,
produced by The Argosy news-
paper. The 'Tides' went out in
1950. The Caribia and The
Pepperpot, produced by BG
Lithographic, have had short
life-spans. However, we cannot
S diminish the significant contri-
bution these magazines made to
Guyanese literature, where a na-
tion needs a literature for self-
identity, self-expression and
self-propagation. More impor-
.tantly, those magazines served
to preserve our literary heritage.
It is amazing the quality of writ-
ing and quantity of information
ears old. to be found in their pages, not-
iagazine withstanding, the authors of
ications, those pieces who were or who
eet the eventually became prominent
mieet the members of society.


QUESTION
I have been robbed by N.LS! I was advised that I would get the highest
paid Pension because I was paying contributions in the highest bracket.
I have paid N.I.S for six (6) years and now I have only received a Grant. ',
I deserve a Pension.

ANSWER ..
I am indeed sorry to hear that you have been misled into believing that six ,, I
(6) years contributions would enable you to get a Pension. You have not
been robbed by N.I.S! You have been misled or misinformed by someone. '

That person was either unaware of N.I.S Regulations or did not know exactly I
how many contributions you had or were likely to have at the age of 60, .

To qualify for Old Age Pension, you need a minimum of fifteen:(15) years or
approximately 750 contributions. Anything less would entitle you to a Grant "|


whllich is what you received.

N.I.S is not in the business of robbing contributors We exist to offer you
social protection and guaranteed benefits once all qualifying conditions
are met.


I


j If or when we make a wrong decision based on inadequate or inaccurate 1
information we allow for same to be corrected through an appeal process.
Do you have a question on N.I.S ? Then write/call. |
NIS MAIL BAG ..I
C/O Ms. Dianne Lewis Baxter
Publicity and Public Relations Officer (ag) "i\
National Insurance Scheme
I Bickdam and Winter Place
P.O. Box. 101135 .
Tel:227-3461
rn-mail: pr. nis@solution2000.net A


1915


A sampling reveals articles
on the local history of flying,
shipping, fire, fashion, religion,
radio, newspaper and poetry.
There were also stimulating es-
says by A R F Webber, Vincent
Roth, George Giglioli, Pat Dial,
Harry Harewood, Vere T Daly,
A J Seymour and Ian
McDonald, among others. Basil
Hinds did Art and Jazz reviews.
Fiction and poetry came from
the pen of K H Cregan, Edgar
Mittelholzer, Guy De Weever,
Walter McArthur Lawrence,
James Rodway, Wilson Harris
and Basil Balgobin. Women


THE GUYANA ANNUAL


-2005

writers like Zorina Ishmail,
Connie Teoball, Ena Luckhoo,
Marjorie Broodhagen, Celeste
Dolphin, Sheila King and
Claudette Earl held their own
alongside their male counter-
parts.
David Granger, writing on
'Guyanese Magazine' in The
Guyana Annual 2004-2005,
stated: "In over two centuries of
publishing in Guyana, maga-
zines have occupied a precari-
ous place in the press and in
the imagination of the mass of
people. The mortality rate has
been high.. .almost all of the 130


THE GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA has received a loan from the InterAmerican Development
Bank (IDB) towards the execution of SIMAP III Operations. It is intended that such funds
be applied for payment of contracts for projects undertaken by SIMAP Agency.

1. SIMAP Agency, now invites sealed bids for furnishing the necessary labour, materials,
equipment and services for the construction and completion of the following projects:-

I) New Hope Residential Drains Region 4

li) Phoenix Residential Drains Region 3

lii) Riverstown Sands Water Supply Project Region 2

Iv) Free Yard "Area V" Drainage Region 6

V) Success Residential Drainage-Region 3

Vi) Salton Residential Drainage-Region 6

Vii) Anna Catherina Block X Water Supply Region 3

Viii) Triumph Section A Water Supply Region 4

2. Interested bidders can obtain further information and inspect the. bidding documents
at: SIMAP Agency, 237 Camp St, Georgetown,
Tel: 227-3554 (Contracts Dept.)

3. Bids from a Firm/Company must attach a copy of the business registration. Mandatory
submissions include valid Tax and NIS Compliance Certificates., Careful attention must
be paid to the Evaluation Criteria in the tender documents.

4. The cost of the Bidding Document for item i,ii,iii,v,vi,vii, viii above is G$5,000.00 each
and item iv is S10,000 Payment can be made in cash or by manager's cheque in:
favour of SIMAP Agency.

5. Bids must be accompanied by a Bid Bond of not less than 2% of the bid sum. The Bid
Bond .' Guarantee must be in the form of a Manager's Cheque in favour of SIMAP :
Agency from a Commercial Bank/Financial House/Insurance Company, using the form
supplied by SIMAP Personal cheques will not be accepted.

6. Bids must be appropriately marked and delivered to SIMAP Agency Tender Box, at
SIMAP Agency, 237 Camp Street, Cummingsburg, Georgetown. Bids for Items i, ii, iii,
iv must be submitted on or before 14:00 hrs on Tuesday, September 13th 2005 and
items v, vi, vii, viii on or before 14:00 hrs on Wednesday 14th.September, 2005 at
which time they will be opened in the presence of the bidders/representatives.

7. SIMAP reserves the right to reject the lowest or any bid and is not obligated to give
any reasonss.

For Executive Director
SIMAP Agency


ever published in Guyana died."
From its inception, there
was a good run of The Annual
until 1962 to 1965 when no
publication came out. There
were four issues between
1966 and 1992, one each in
1966, 1967, 1981 and 1992. It
Please turn to page
XVIII


I


- - - - - - - - - - - -


-Pge IX.


S~inriv :C~onil ptpeD~mi ber 4,` 2005.


I


. -'. r ,T- '






Sunday Chroni


CTI Recordings. CD 2002. Featuring Stanley Turrentine,

Ron Carter, Freddie Hubbard, and George Benson.


WHEN STAN Turrentine's LP,
'Sugar', his first record with Creed
Taylor Inc, appeared in 1970,
modern Jazz asserted its lyrical roots in
Swing, Bop, and Soul Pop like never before.
This first record carried three tracks, each
over 10 minutes long. They were titled
'Sugar', 'Sunshine Alley' and 'Impressions'.
Like all great art, this record set high
standards without trying to be safely
conventional. 'Sugar' simply does not grow
old or ever sound stale. So everfresh is this
record that in 2002, it was re-released on
CD, adding a bonus fourth track of 'Sugar'
performed live in concert in 1971.
The beauty of this record's music, which any music lover
would probably respond to favourably, also lay in its specific
display of black artistry, since all its musicians are Afro-
Americans, except for the mestizo Brazilian percussionist,
Airto Moreira, who perfonns on the live recordings of
'Sugar'. The line-up of black jazz artistes on this record is
no doubt the key to its 'hip' artistry. Turrentine on tenor
sax; Ron Carter on bass; Freddie Hubbard on trumpet; George
Benson on guitar; Hubert Laws on flute; Billy Kaye & Bil2'


Cobham on drums; Butch Cornell and Johnny Hammond on
organ; Lonnie Liston Smith Jr on electric piano; Pablo
Landrum on congas; and Airto on percussion.
The quiet civilised artistry of black jazz musicians such
as these is part of a huge creative group whose dedication to
positive social inspiration to anyone, anywhere, is mostly
ignored, even denied, in favour of emphasis on
disturbing and aggressive behaviour patterns which
misguided, or impulsive members of their race and
communities might commit.
The term 'sugar' is an affectionate slang for
females who appear pleasant, or sexy; and this record
implies such a mood with its music from the start. But
the term 'sugar' here also implies the sweet texture of
the record's stunning musical compositions. When the


late Stan Tur rentine.. a man of few words, puts his sax
to his lips and starts to play the clean unfolding loops
of the title track 'Sugar', he is speaking with an amazing
struchtral sound that leaves no space for contention,
misgueidanee. or misinterpretation, like the words of
songs can. Ron Carter, for so long the essence of the
hip. coal, black gentleman and jazz artiste ever since
his brilliant early LP 'Uptown Conversation', is the
bassist whose sound bounces gracefully through all these
tunes, keeping them buoyantly in good spirits. Freddie
Hubbard. one of jazz's best lyrically expressive
trumrpeiers too often ignored in favour of others less
sensidibe, matches Turrentine's vibrant drawings of
sound. What Hubbard does with his trumpet, especially
on 'the live version of 'Sugar', is nothing less than
remarkable. like an incredibly encouraging human
vrace.
TrL CT-e ,: .'-uni and a.:eri.im-en of this CD, like all true
art, is its simplicity and clarity of arrangements and structure,
despite an abstract intention. Each musician gets to solo
cleary, with Carter's supporting bass, and Billy Kaye and
Cobham's echoing drums and cymbals, producing cohesive
emotional flourishes of sound- Guitarist George Benson is a
major player on this CD because he has always excelled at
She acoustic jazz guitar on many records, long before be
ben, po iul Disco Soul-man in the mid 50s. Benson
brings a cool abstract romantic mood to
this CD. and it is no surprise he is
chosen as one of the main guest
artistes, since he adds a sweet relaxed
flavour to each tune. It is the same
appealing flavour and mood he would
later sing on his famous dance hit:
'Gimme the Night', with words like:
"So come on out tonight and we
can be lovers" and "Cause there's music
in the air and lots of loving everywhere,
So gimme the night. ginme the night."
For Benson, nighttime is not a time
menaced by trouble or danger, but a
time for social pleasures, indoor or
outdoor. It is the same mood his guitar
brings to 'Sugar'. Organist Butch
Cornell excels on 'Sunshine Alley', a
tune he wrote, and also on the brilliant
track, 'Impressions' creating steady
rhythms with conga player Pablo

if anyone would like to hear what
constitutes a great Jazz composition
they should listen to how Turrentine
seductively plays John Coltrane's
'impressions', first written and
performed by Coltrane in the 1960s
This is an instrumental that
de-monstraes he beauty of abstract
jazz compositions, as Coltrane evokes
: itrasve definition of the word and mood known
a -. :.:-'. The tune is a flowing compact blend of
:. seasuaL and spiritual qualities. Turrentine's sax
'and HIbard's trampet swing with unforgettable beauty on
L.ire-..rL.', as though in the best homage that Coltrane
should aiwaas. receive.
Every minute of this CD's 50 minutes is so perfect that
-ime goes by unnioiced. This is jazz of magical creative
qualities which exist like a natural human demonstration of
Eife's fertile powers of creation. 'Sugar' is an expression of
the ability of jazz instrumentals to be messengers of
perpetual joyful beginnings and moments in life.
Turrentine's sax, Hubbard's trumpet, Benson's
guitar, Carter's bass, and other instrumentalists on the
CD, uphold high positive standards of black artistry and
culture as a shining example to -2.


r rj


A


op


BY TANGERINE CLARKE

IT WA.S an evening of
nostalgia Wednes
day as tributes,
praise and a great feel-
ing of being Guyanese
filled the courtroom of
Brooklyn's Borough
Hall in New York where
hundreds of expatriates
gathered for the annual
Folk Feitival awards
ceremony. The event,
which saw 39 Guyanese
being awarded for their
sterling contribution to
dance, kick-started the
fifth such event to be
held to date which hap-
pens to coincide with
the much-anticipated
Labor Day weekend fes-
tivities.
One of the pioneers of inter-
pretive dance. DBoris Harper
Wills, was emotional as she ac-
cepted the Wordsworth
McAndrew LifetimeAchievement
Award, and a proclamation from
Deputy Borough President,
Yvonne Graham. for her work
that continues to be an inspira-


tion to audiences around the
world. In addition, an Exem-
plary Award was named for the
late founder of the National
Dance School, Lavinia Will-
iams.
Community activist, Colin
Moore, in turn, was presented
with a proclamation from Sena-
tor John Sampson, as well as an
award from the folk festival
committee.
The awardees looked on in
awe as their life's work was
beamed onto a screen during a
computer-generated presenta-
tion, and Co-Chair of the awards
committee, Ronald H Lammy,
narrated their stellar work.
Awardees included Bonny
Alves of the famed Yoruba
Singers; Sonja Valz-Abbott;
Dr W Lloyd Andries; Dr.
Vibert Cambridge; Godfrey
Chin; Andrea Douglas;
Vivienne Douglas Daniels;
John 'Slingshot' Drepaul; Dr
Juliet Emanuel; John
Fredricks; Neil Chan; Dudley
Charles; Trenton Mack; the
late Phillip McClintock; Rose
October-Edun; Margaret
Lawrence; The Woodside
Choir; Beryl Perreira;
Sandra Primus; James Rich-
mond; Akoyah Rudder; Ray
Seals; Malini Bose-Shaw; the
late Helen Taitt; the late Gora


MR.. Cohtn lvloore receres nis proclamation Irt:m Sepnalor .iJo-
Samnsor" Looking on are Councilwoman Evette Clark and
Unr. .ark.


zprri;






XI


19V7Ni


\/r


- a portrait of Guyanese immigrant life in the metropolis


Zoo

~r vr v r~


4d


X5


Singh; Pritha Singh; Sandra
Stuart-Shaw; Verna Walcott
White; and Ras Camo Will-
iams.
In his keynote address, Am-
bassador Bayney Karran of the
Guyana Mission in Washington,
congratulated the Guyana Cul-
tural Association (GCA) for its
outstanding tribute on the award


GCA President, Malcolm
Hall, said: "We are here to
teach and to educate each
other on the aspects of
Guyanese heritage that
will let us put into per- Al
spective our national trea-
sures, [these being] our
human resources, our beautiful
music, our bold canvases, our


VERNA Walcott-White receives her award from Guyana's
Consul General, Mr Brentnot Evans.


recipients, and commended the
team for hosting an event, for the
first time, in the Indo-Guyanese
community of Richmond Hill, in
Queens. He said the initiative is
a great move, and one which is
evidently aimed at promoting
greater unity within the
Guyanese community in New
York.
Noting that the festival
has developed in scope and
impact, and that it has grown
to become one of the biggest
annual Guyanese cultural
events outside of Guyana,
Karran said it serves to accord
due recognition to those
whose labors have made a con-
tribution to "our wonderful
cultural heritage, [and that] it
is only by standing firmly and
united together, that we will
be able to maintain our tradi-
tional ways and values in
communities overseas.".
And, in the spirit of dance,


flirtatious dances and complex
rhythms and beats, and our
unique dialogue and sense of
humour."
Emceed by popular radio


AMBASSADOR Bayney Karran


personality, Franklin 'Bobby'
Vieira, the evening resonated
with rhythms and outpourings
of cultural expression. Winston
'Jeggae' Hoppie, one of the
award recipients, brought the au-
dience alive with drumbeats that
were carried through to an in-
spiring collage of Indian, modern
and African dance movements by
Malini Bose-Shaw, Rose Octo-
ber-Edun and Verna Walcott-
White.
Presenting Wordsworth
McAndrew with a substantial
monetary contribution on be-
half of the committee, GCA
Financial Director, Claire
Patterson-Mohan thanked the
folklorist for his sterling con-
tribution to 'Folk' that con-
tinues to inspire a new gen-
eration of Guyanese.
The evening culminated
with a cocktail reception in
the Rotunda, where the au-
dience sang folk songs and
danced to the spirited
drumming of 'Queh-Queh'
music.


.' s.






DORIS Harper-Wills receives her 'Lifetime Acheivement
Award' from Woodsworth Mc Andrew.


By Sandra Seeraj

Take a story of girlhood friend-
ship add the trials and triumphs
of their coming of age- thro" in
some dark family) secreLts some
Iome. passion and infidelity : sea-
son with generous helpings of
Guyanese folk wisdom; serve it
with rich, colorful Guyanese ver-
nacular and you'll have one
compelling novel.
This is the recipe for Dr
Brenda Chester DoHarris' new
book, 'Calabash Parkway', the
much-anticipated sequel to her
first novel, 'The Coloured Girl
in the Ring'.
According to the author, af-
ter 'The Coloured Girl', there
were many questions about the
characters. It was as if readers
knew the women, and were con-
cerned about what had happened
to them. "There was an unwrit-
ten text waiting to unfold."
And so was born 'Calabash
Parkway'. In this work,
DoHarris delves further into the
lives of 'Gatha', 'Evadne',
'Gwennie' and 'Drupattie', girl-
hood friends and acquaintances
from the little Georgetown vil-
lage of Kitty, who had populated
the first novel. She follows all
these characters after they emi-
grate from Guyana to the me-
tropolis.
'Calabash Park-
way' is set in Brook-
lyn, New York in the
1980s. It continues
the story of the lives
of these female
'Kitticians'. It is nar-
rated by a fifth, un-
named, woman who is
also a 'Kittician', and
who is well acquainted
with each of the
friends. It is she who :-.A
tells the story and
draws the characters
together again, after
the women had each
gone their separate
ways in adulthood.
There is some-
thing hauntingly famil-
iar about the charac-
ters. It is as if we
know these people.
They are our mothers,
our sisters, aunts,
cousins, friends. Their
stories are our stories.
Therein lies the uni-
versal appeal of this
novel.
Their struggles are
all too well known. The key is-
sues dealt with are uncomfort-
ably close to the collective
Guyanese heart. It is as if
DoHarris is holding a mirror be-
fore us and saying to us: "Here!
Look!"
Many hard truths are
brought out of the shadows and
given life through the f. i -
dom and earthy dialogue of the
main characters. The novel coun-
terbalances tragedy with triumph
and expectation, enough to keep
us wondering as we do in real
life:
"What next?"
"Will she?"
"What happen to ....?"
Readers will again look for-
ward to the answers.


Like its precursor. the title
of this new noel ceicus images
of the Gu anese-'Aest Indian
ethos. The calabah. Irn
A.kiromEric Gupane.'e and %est
indian erms. is representari e ot
women oi Arnean descent being
the bearers. or mother figures,
holding. carrn-g. nurtunne. and
containing the very essence of
the society.
The parkway conjures up
metropolitan arteries teeming
with tife. colour and dcti ,t. ,- e *r
ebbing and flowing as does the
lives of the characters of the
novel. Taken together. 'Cala-
bash Parkway' represents that
place where Guyanese immi-
grant life is found and has taken
root, however tenuous.
Having been part of the
black feminist struggle in
Guyana in the 1970s, DoHarris
sees the tide of her new work as
an appropriate symbolic repre-
sentation of its very theme-
Sh_ iae alr-cad\ beaun to %ork
on the third novel in the series,
which wir be a prequel to 'The
Coomured G ir i te: Ring'.
'Sonny and Selina', as it
will be tited- wilt be set in Brit-
ish GuianaM in the late 1930s and
early 1940s, and will tell of the
hardships m a coonial environ-


ment during the Second World
War. It is tie love story of a pov-
erty-stricken couple living in the
capital city during that time, and
it will pu into context many of
the events which evolved in
'Colourred Girl' and subse-
quentlys. in Calabash Park-
way".
Do3,Harris first came to the
U-ited States in 1966, returning
to Guyana in 1973 and becom-
ing involved in the Guyanese
political movement for demod-
racy. in 1979. she returned to
New York :n.d lived in Brook-
ixn. va.i.an. Long Island, and
aVes :-', n 1-;. S She attended gradu-
ate sch c- .:: C:olombia Univer-
sixy oi;, t.* ner West Side of
Mr'nir:s':. Duirng her years in


New York, .she grew to know
the city very well and came into
contact with many Guyanese
and West Indian immigrants like
herself. She also heard many
stories of the experiences of
some of these immigrants, many
of whom were not 'straight'. In
1986, she moved to the Wash-
ington metropolitan area where
she has lived ever since.
"In their quest for better-
ment, people of colour often
have to resort to measures which
are not countenanced by the sta-
tus quo. It is easy to judge them
harshly, without being in 'heir
shoes," DoHarris said.
She feels, however, th;' the
persistence and strength of 0hese
people must be admired, and
she wants it known that mhere
are heroes among us, heroes
who do not necessarily c:me
from the pages of Shakesp are.
"Our people have a cuict
heroism, which must be recog-
nized and celebra:cd."
She feels wrongly that as a
writer, it wouldlbe a waste of
her talents if she did no- pay
tribute to that heroism.
'Calabash Parkway,', is
written in Guyana's creole dia-
lect, deftly interspersed with
Standard English. DoHEarris,
who holds a PhD degree in En-
glish from Howard University,
feels passionately that
Guyana's vernacular is the very
essence of its linguistic culture.
"Creolese is a very mi.scu-
lar, highly descriptive language,
\ ery succinct and apt linguistic
mode. It says, in few words,
%\hat it takes Standard Enrglish
to convey in many more."
'Calabash Parkwam was
launched at the 2005 Bia ops
High School Reunion, hId at
the Wardman Marriott -i'Ie in
Washington DC, on Augv.,i 18.
The response was very : art-
ening. Since then, lo. of
Guyanese and West Indian '.;ra-
ture have been quietly :;izz
about it.
The book is being .. sat
S15.00 per copy and can or-
dered from Tantaria Pre<,' )01-
262-8638: "-. vul
culudevurl@aol.com; or .:-ine
at www.amazon.co:r. )r.
DoHarris will be present ; gn
copies at activities he
Guyana Folk Festival, bei.i. A:.ld
in New York between S.:, -.mn-
ber 2 and 4.
She will also launc the
novel in Guyana in lat.: o-
vember this year. "It is .-en-
tial to launch the book i tihe
country which was its insjitra-
tion," she says.







P~IGp Xli Stiflday Chrotiicle .September-4,~2005.


Sindu and Muslim places of worship:


The pean-alr MHsque at




L.--


Presented by Mr Lennox Julian Hernandez, Senior Lecturer, Department
of Architecture, University of Gu3yana, for the National Trust of Guyana.


IN THIS our fourth
article in this
series, we will
examine the late 19th
Century open-air
mosque at Cumberland,
Canje, Berbice.
In his book, Temples and
Mosques: An Illustrated Study
of East Indian Places of Wor-
ship in Guyana (1980) Karna
Bahadur Singh notes that this
structure seems to be the old-
est Muslin religious structure


surviving in Guyana. Built in
the last quarter of the 19'" Cen-
tury by Muslin immigrants, this
mosque, like the Hindu
Shivalas built at about the same
time, exhibit what Singh calls
'India style'. That is, it has ar-
chitectural characteristics simi-
lar to those in India and con-
trasts with later mosques in the
colony.
This land was given by
the Bookers' Company for
the Muslims of that village to
have an area demarcated for
prayers, especially for the


two festivals of Eid-ul-Fitr
and Eid-ul-Azah. Apparently,
the structure was originally
of bricks, provided by the es-
tate, and, in 1932, the mosque
was demolished and rebuilt
in reinforced concrete.
The Cumberland mosque is
open-air, that is, there are no
full-height walls or roof struc-
ture-low wall 'to demarcate the
interior space from the external.
The structure is approximately
40 ft wide and 80 ft long with
the longer axis placed north-
south. The. main distinguishing


AUDIT OFFICE OF GUYANA
IDB/GOG INSTITUTIONAL STRENGTHENING ATN/SF 8184

The Audit Office has received financing from the Inter-American Bank for the Institutional
Strengthening of the Office. Modernizing and improving the Human Resource Management
Systems, and upgrading the Office's Information Technology and Information Systems are major
components of the program. Part of the proceeds will be used for the recruitment of a Human
Resource Manager (HRM), and an Information Systems Manager, both of whom will be employed
initially for a period of one year on contract.

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER (HRM)

The incumbent will be an experienced Human Resource Practitioner with change management
experience, as well as on-the-job training expertise, who will be responsible and accountable for
planning and strategic direction with regard to the recruitment, selection, development,
deployment and utilization of staff of the Audit Office. The HRM will also assist with the
implementation of the overall transition strategy. Interested persons should have at least a
Bachelor's Degree in Human Resource Management, Public Administration, Sociology or related
discipline. Post-graduate qualification and certification in Human Resource Management will be an
advantage.

INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGER (IS. MANAGER)

This position requires a systems administrator possessing at least six years experience in the
creation/expansion, operation and maintenance of Management Information Systems (MIS). The
applicant should be a highly skilled Network Administrator accustomed to the implementation of
network policies and overall IT good practice. Applicants with formal degrees in Computer Science
or a related field and/or professional certification such as MCSE, will have a distinct advantage.
Demonstrated ability to work alongside senior management, perform systems analysis and other
planning tasks, train end users, manage databases especially MS SQL Server, and good writing
skills will be: significant assets.

INVITATION

The Audit Office now. invites eligible individuals from Guyana or any IDB member country to submit
their applications, which must include a detailed curriculum vitae or resume, salary history,
expected cost and details of work in similar disciplines within the last three years.

Selection will be based on qualifications, relevant applicable experience and availability.

Electronic or hard copies of the Terms of References can be obtained on request from the Project
Execution Unit, Audit Office.

Applications must be addressed to The Auditor General, Audit Office of Guyana, 63 High
Street, Kingston, Georgetown, and should be received on or before 16:30 hours on Friday 9th
September 2005.


Further information may be obtained from:
The Project Co-ordinator,
Audit Office of Guyana,
63 High Street, Kingston Georgetown,
GUYANA,
Tele: 592 227-1061, Fax; 592-227-1075,
e-mail: peuoag@solytions2000.net


Government ads can be viewed on
http://',ww.gina.gov.gy


(Part 4)

features are the courtyard, the
minarets and the mihrab. The
courtyard is entered from the
west via a centrally placed con-
crete arched gateway decorated
on the surface with bosses, and
the top of the arch with a num-
ber of bulbous forms. Directly

-
01,V


across the courtyard from this
entrance, set into a niche in the
eastern wall, is the mihrab. The
worshipers face this mihrab
to ensure they face Mecca
when praying, and the Imam,
or leader in the prayers,
would stand nearby.. The
four corners of the structure
are accentuated with mina-
rets another important ele-
ment in mosque.architecture.
The minarets here are ap-
proximately 30 ft high, are
of concrete construction,
square and slender, and ta-
pering from bottom to top.
They are finished with a
bulbous structure, atop
which are concrete figures -.
the half moon and a star. The
western wall (with the en-
trance) is three feet tall and is
solid with surface decorations
only. The western walls are five
feet tall, are pierced with dia-
mond-shaped and other forms,
have bulbous decorations on
top, as %ell a- -urface decora-
ntons

,


Karna Bahadur Singh
cites the Cumberland open-
air mosque as the. Muslim
way of exhibiting continuity
rather than dislocation in the
genuine and authentic ren,
during of ancestral architec-
ture. Though, without the
monumental proportions and
elaborate complexity of the
open-air mosques they would
have left behind in India, the
structure expresses the im-
migrants' remembrance of
'India style' cultural forms.
The National Trust of
Guyana is mandated to pre-
serve the nation's heritage. To
this end, we invite members of
the community to take an active
role in ensuring the survival of
the country's rich legacy for the
benefit of our future generations
to enjoy.
Do join us next week
when we will look at the early
20th Century Albouystown
Hindu Temple, our best ar-
chitectural example of the fu-
sion of t!wo cultures.


Ministry of Health
All Programs

The Ministry of Health wishes to invites tenders for the supply of the following items:


Project No.
Project No.26
Project No.27
Project No.28


Project Name
Breast Milk Substitute (Over 6 Months
1 x UV VIS Spectrophotometer
4 x Motorcycle


Departments
) Ministry of Health
Ministry of Health
Ministry of Health


1. Tender documents MUST be uplifted from the Ministry's Materials Management Unit,
Government Pharmacy Bond Building, Kingston (Sabeita/Angela, 226 9351) between 9am to
3pm, Monday to Friday.

2. Each Tender (on document as at # 2 above) must be enclosed in a sealed envelope which
does not in any way identify the Tenderer, and which should be clearly marked on the top
left-hand comer,
> 'Project No._: Tender for the Supply of 'name of item' where the Grey areas will be filled'
in with the relevant Project Number and name of item tendered for

For example. ',
> 'Proj6 ; No._26_: Tender for the Supply of Breast Milk Substitute (Over 6 Months)

3. Tenders should be addressed to the Chairman, National Board of Procurement and Tender
Administration, Ministry of Finance and be deposited in the Tender Box (including tenders
sent by courier) situated on the Ground Floor of the National Board of Procurement and
Tender Administration, (North Western Building), Ministry of Finance, Main & Urquhart
Sts., Georgetown not later than Tuesday 13th September 2005 at 9am at which time they will
be opened and to which the public, Tenderers and/or representatives are invited.

4. Each local Tender (applicable to Companies/Individuals with local office in Guyana) must be
accompanied by valid certificates of compliance from both Guyana Revenue Authority and
National Insurance Scheme in the name of the individual if individual is tendering or company
if company is tendering. Failure to do so will result in automatic disqualification of the Tender

5. Tenders failing to meet the above requirements will be deemed non responsive.


Sonya Roopnauth
Permanent Secretary


Government ads can be viewed on
http://www.gina.gov.gy


~I`-s"


~ehdaiiC~~oriiClel S'epte~!~ntiei~;:4,;;2Q05:.:


Pano XIi


i





Sunday Chronicle September 4, 2005


jr i, ,ifr kI -


IScieniwq
Hello boys and girls,
It's good to meet again with you t
day we'll continue looking pla
Plants Make Food) then we'll have
last week's questions.

Plants

How Plants Make Food? Cont'd

When oxygen is given off they are the
by animals and other non-green pla
their process of respiration. The sunli
the day is necessary in order for the
Photosynthesis. The essentials of wa
rophyll and carbon dioxide must t
in order for photosynthesis to be ca
Foods made during the photosynthe
then travels from the leaves to the
plants. The stems then carry the food
of the plants. Do we really know tl
make food for the entire plant? Well le
how.

An experiment that can be condu

Here is a list of things you will need
experiment, are as follows:-
* water iodine
* green leaves test tube
* containers alcohol
* heat source

1. Pick the leaves from a plant or pl.
have been out in the sunlight for a few


Hello boys and girls,
Welcome to this Social Studies input. If you want to
study effectively and efficiently, you should try mak-
ing a list of things that you find easy to remember
and then another list of things that you find hard to
remember. Go through both lists to find out how
you can improve the way you remember things. Be
careful now! Love you.

'Bye.
IN THIS WEEK
Animals (Continued)
Pointers: Claws and Teeth
1. There is a large family of mammals called the carni-
vores.
2. They are mainly meat eaters.
3. They are also hunters; and their weapons are their claws
and teeth.
4. These mammals have a special kind of claw, called
retractile, which can be withdrawn or put out at will.
5. Carnivores all have very good teeth, with a pair of sharp,
pointed ones on each jaw called canines which are espe-
cially designed for biting and tearing.
6. The cat family is an important branch of the carnivores.
7. This family includes, with others, the lion, tiger, leop-
ard, jaguar, puma, lynx and both wild and domesticated
cat.
8. Some of this group live right here in Guyana such as
the tiger, jaguar, and puma.
9 Remember that animals with hooves are called ungu-
ates.
Something to do
':. Wildlife is also concerned with non-domesticated ani-
mals and plants in a particular area.
2. Some animals that live in Guyana are gorilla deer
norse. mouse. turtle, whale. opossum, dolphin, beaver


2. Put one of the leaves into boiled water
oday. To- 3. Pour some water into a container and heat
nts (How the water at a boiling point.
e a look at 4. Half fill the test tube with alcohol and place it
in the container containing boiled water. Place
the leaf in the test tube with the alcohol.
5. Take the leaf out and wash it in cold water
then place a drop of iodine solution onto it.
6. Now what do you observe

an used up
nts during
ight during
process of
water, chlo- .
be present
arrived out. Answer to last weeks questions
asis period 1) Y our body waste is gotten rid of by which two
D stems of organ systems? The two organ systems are
d to all part the Respiratory System and the Excretory
hat leaves System.
at's find out 2) Which one of the six organs you think the
human body can do with out? The Digestive
System
cted 3) Which system involves communication?The
systems which involve communication are
during the the Digestive system and the Circulatory
System.
4) The main organ of respiration is theRespi-
ratory System.
5) With the combination of water and urea is
equal to Urine.
6) Which one of the major organs you will find
ants which the large intestine and the liver? The Digestive
v hours, system.


bat, owl, anteater, porcupine, raccoon, tiger, frog, mana-
tee.

IN THIS WEEK
The Environment
Let us look at the concept of environment. This term
should be seen as that which surrounds us wherever we
are, whether at the bottom of the sea, in the forest, in a
new residential area, in a hospital, or wherever we find
ourselves at any time.

When we look at the place in which we live (and we are
supposing that you know the word, community) we can
see the place physically first of all.

Our physical environment in the case of a newly built-up
housing area is vastly manmade. We see houses, shops,
gardens, roads, and such things. We see beauty in the
designs of buildings especially the recently built ones.
We see evidence of plants, tiny creatures in.soil and air,
pests and diseases that bother crops; pollen and dust
that cause hay fever and those others that trigger sinus
problems. These are all part of our physical environment.
Our physical environment makes us decide what type of
crops, plants both for kitchen and flower gardens, can be
grown in the soil we live on. It dictates the kind of ani-
mals that we can rear.
Nature also plays its part in our physical environment.
We may be living beside a river, the ocean, or a creek;
mudflat or forest. In the.creek there may be millions of
living things that our eyes cannot see because they are
so far away or too tiny for our eyes to see. When we look
up we see the sun and clouds, and we can imleasure the
r 'i. ii when it comes with suitable instruments.

There is another aspect to our environment called the social


'_.___


The Excretory System


The Respiratory System


environment We cannot see or touch the objects in the
natural environment as we can in the physical environ-
ment. We note our social environment through our family
traditions and values, through the way people in the com-
munity relate to one another. There are rules and cus-
toms agreed upon to follow when someone gets married
or is to be buried. Can you think up other items that can
be stated as social environment of where you live?

Something to Do
1. Write a list of objects found in your physical environ-
ment. Look at weather, vegetation, and resources. Is
there protection for your environment in terms of groynes,
and such structures? List everything.
2. What crops grow well in the area that you live? Have
you ever seen the fields irrigated and drained? How are
these things done? Write carefully about them.
3. What animals (both wild and domesticated) are found
in your area? Have you ever seen a wild horse being
tamed? Tell a friend about it in a friendly letter.


Page XIII

7) Match the following organs with their-organ
systems:

Skull e Respiratory
Excretory Nervous
Lungs Brain
Kidneys > Skeletal


RENAL VEIN -,LEFT FC'.1-Fk'


47













The Excerpt A prize-bunch of bananas on his back;
The Christmas holidays had passed uneventfully A nd Georgie- none could ever dive like him -
for Bita, who on account ofA nty Nommy condition Throwing his scanty clothes for a swim;
could not participate in any of the village A ndschool-boysfromBridge-tunnelgoinghome,
amusements. A nd so she had not been prompted Watching the waters downward dash and foam.
by tea-meetings this time. This is a daytime dream, there's something in it,
Now at last A nty Nommy was convalescent Oh something's happening there this very
enough to sit on the veranda to take the morning minute!
sun. It did not seem to her she had been ill so long,
from the beginning of the coffee-picking season all Question:
through the hot December holidays until now the 1. How do you know that the poet is away from
time of the annual Harvest Festival, the place he is remembering?
Of all the celebrations that Christmas observance 2. Why has he not mentioned any of the
had established among the people there was none unpleasant memories? Is he being romantic and
that seemed so significantly and simply beautiful sentimental?
(as if it were a spontaneous outgrowth of their own 3. What do the words do to give pleasure in
social instincts) as the Harvest Festival. Certainly this poem?
it was not such a formal affair as the annual
missionary meeting, when many preachers were
brought together to orate over the virtues and the Writing: Let the poem above help you in your
necessity of subscribing to foreign and domestic writing of a story on the topic, "Saul sat on the shore
missions; when the Negroes, praising God for their and wondered".
redemption from savagery, brought in their
envelopes to the Salvation Fund for the conversion
of heathen souls who had not had their good fortune Our Reading for Today
to escape from pagan and savage lands.
The Harvest Festival possessed something of When the enemy machine-guns had been
the spirit that prompted the peasants to lend discharged, our patrols would go out with bombs to
working-days to one another for the clearing of claim possession of No Man's Land. A t dawn next
ground and the planting of crops and also for the morning came the struggle for sniping ascendancy.
time of heavy reaping. The only difference was that The Germans had a special regimental sniper, who
the church was the centre of the Festival. A nd it had been sniping all day from a shell-hole between
was for the benefit of the resident minister all the the lines. He wore a sort of cape made of imitation
people bringing their gifts together into the church grass, his; face was painted green and brown, and
to make a glorious love offering. It seemed fitting his rifle was also green-fringed. A number of empty
that the Harvest Festival should come in the early cartridges lay beside him, and his cap bore the
year after the heavy gathering and sale of grain, special. oak-leaf badge. Few of our battalions
mainly coffee and cocoa, and at the time of full fruit. attempted to get control of the sniping situation. The
The Banana Bottom Harvest Festival was akin to Germans had the advantage of having many times
an agricultural show except that no prizes were more telescopic sights than we did, and bullet-proof
given for the exhibitions. Y et how keen was the steel loop-holes. A Iso a system by which snipers
rivalry between the village folk to give of the best of were kept for months in the same sector until they
their first fruits. knew all the loop-holes and shallow places in our
T aken from BANANA BOT T OM by C/audTenches, and the tracks that our ration parties used
McKay above-ground by night, and where our traverses
1. What is the meaning of each word/phrase occurred, and so on, better than most of us did
as it is used in the passage? ourselves. British snipers changed their trenches,
a. observance with their battalions, every week or two, and never
b. formal affair, had time to study the German trench-geography.
c. peasants, But at least we counted on- getting rid of the
d. love offering unprofessional sniper. Later we secured an
2. What does the writer make you think of the elephant-gun that could send a bullet through enemy
activities in preparation for the Harvest Festival, and loop-holes; and if we fail to locate the loop-hole of a
the purpose of the other two named church persistent sniper, we tried to dislodge him with a
activities? volley of rifle-grenades, or even by ringing up the
3. Write a composition in which you describe artillery.
any church festival that has caught your attention.
The situation can contain some imaginary points. It puzzled us that as soon as a sniper had
A s you write, communicate to your reader some been killed, another sniper would often begin
dominant impression, such as the frenzy and operations next day from the same position.
willingness of the village folk. Y our flow of language The Germans probably undeterred by us, and
should include appropriate adjectives and adverbs regarded their loss as an accident. The
as well as verbs that reinforce the description of willingness of other battalions to allow the
the situation you are attempting to portray. Germans sniping ascendancy helped us; enemy
L1__ -CA- - - --


The Poem
Home Thoughts

Oh something just now must be happening
there!
That suddenly and quiveringly here,
A mid the city noises, I must think
Of mangoes leaning to the river's brink,
A nd dexterous Davie climbing high above,
The gold fruits ebon-speckled to remove,
A nd toss them quickly in the tangled mass
Of wis-wis twisted round the guinea grass.
A nd Cyril coming through the bramble-track


snipers, even the professionals, often exposed
themselves unnecessarily. There was one
advantage of which no progress or retreat of
the enemy could rob us, namely we always more
or less faced east. Dawn broke behind the
German lines, and they did not realize that for
several minutes every morning we could see
them, while still invisible ourselves. German
night-wiring parties often stayed out too long,
and we could get a man or two as they went
back; sunsets went against us, of course; but
sunset was a less critical time. At night our
sentries had orders to stand with their heads
and shoulders above the parapet, and their


rifles in position. This surprised me at first, but
it implied greater vigilance and self-confidence
in the sentry, and also put the top of his head
above the level of the parapet. Enemy
machine-guns were trained on this level, and
it would be safer to be hit in the chest ....


Something to Do
Write a letter to a friend telling him or her about
what you gathered about fighting in the battle field
some decades ago. Can you tell whether fighting
is different to-day? If it is, what are the new ways
they do it?


GRAMMAR
Vocabulary and Spelling

A. The following are words that should be in your
working speaking and writing vocabularies. Read
through the list, and give the meaning from the way
in which you would have used each of them. Check
the meaning of the word in a dictionary. Then use
each word in a sentence of your own.


1. device
2. functioning
3. interpret
4. homicidal
5. disastrous
6. dividends


7. attentively
8. relation
9. reinforce
10. indifferent
11. immune
12. inundate


B. In each of the following sentences, choose
the word in brackets that correctly expresses the
meaning.

1. In the next (addition, edition) the publishers
will make changes.
2. (Immortal, Immoral) films should be in every
lending library.
3. Mr. Jerrick's attitude could test anyone's
(patients, patience).
4. A II agreed that the distribution arm of the
organization is (affective, effective) .


Agreement

Look at agreement of subject and verb in the
following sentences. The verbs are made bold for
you. From knowing the verb you can find the
subject. Look at the special make up of sentence
7. What can you tell your study partner about this
sentence?


1.
A frica.
2.
3.
quickly.
4.
of bologna


5.
cash
6.
7.


No one knows exactly the population of

I have used enough flour in this batter.
She wants to make her purchases

Her husband has grabbed two pieces


A long line of peoplevas waiting at the
register.
Man knows the real danger of the night.
Man thought illness was caused by bad


8. They f
tool shed across
9. I shalh
10. Sam a,
red peas cook-up
11. Halfo


baby.
12.
sister.


ive found their stolen bags in a
e way.
neet the problem bravely.
J Pam like jambalaya more than

he property belongs to the new


Half o; the goats belong to his bigger





Sunday Chronicle Seotember 4. 2005


Today we will be travelling by air to another destination. Have fun

/F B A C L E W R C S T N N L A S
D L F I T A E T A I H A A D E
F H IR 'U R "H N E R B P N G U L C
G F OP G T P W D A C D T 0 I O1 P
T R O A H A O C E I W L A C L A
WO E E R T M RN' D COK II F
I W L D K R A G T E U' P D S N R
N S E I O A T T E C I T L N W I
G S T F P A T N T T C E I O I F
S T I L R E E E S E N I Y T Li W
SN S A E L G EM R NN V S L Y
U G M A U B N A O O E D E R A A
J AU B C I T B G T C LA WE K
C R R L G R R AS G A L N NO S
N U A N P I O A E G A U E Q T S
T M E E A R F F E S RB L W T S

AIRBORNE ENGINE RUNWAY
AIRPORT FASTEN YOUR SERVICE
AISLE SEAT BELTS STEWARDESS
ALTITUDE FLIGHT/ TAKE OFF
BAGGAGE ATTENDANTS TARAMAC
CABIN FLIGHT PLAN TURBULENCE
CAPTAIN FUSELAGE UNIFORM
CLOUDS LANDING WEATHER/
COCKPIT LANDED FORECAST
CREW PILOT WINDOWS
EARPLUGS ROUTE WINGS


MINISTRY OF CULTURE, YOUTH & SPORT




Identify a "Theme" and you and you can win $30,000.00

Rules of Competition:

1) Entrant must be Guyanese
2) The Theme must reflective of the Spirit of Mash Festival
3) The Theme can be less but no more that eight words and accompanied
by a brief explanation.
4) The competition closes on Friday 16th September 2005 at 16:00 hrs.
5) Judging will be done by a panel chosen by the Central Mashramani
Committee.
6) The wining entry will become the property of the Mash Secretariat,
Ministry of Culture and Sport.
7) The prize for the winner will be handed over at the Launching of Mash
2006.
8) Entries must be addressed to Mash Co-ordinator, Mashramani
Secretariat, Ministry of Culture, Youth and Sport, 91 Middle Street,
South Cummingsburg.

NB: Forms for the competition can be uplifted at the Ministry of Culture, Youth and Sports,
Main Street, Georgetown; Mash Secretariat, 91 Middle Street, South Cummingsburg or at
any Regional Democratic Office.
This ad can be viewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy


S D R A C S G N I R E F F. O J


We 'Care


GEORGETOWN PUBLIC
HOSPITAL CORPORATION


.FLFIr .r-TK.Fi

1. Tenders are invited from suitably qualified persons to provide the following items to the
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation.

,A) Autoclave/Sterilization Tapes and Bowie Dick Sheets
B) Gleaning Supplies
C) Laboratory Supplies
D) Pathology Supplies
E) Printed Forms
) Pr',inrnij Cartridges
G) Stationery Supplies
H) Sterilization Wraps
I) Sterilization Pouches
J) X-ray Processing Chemicals

Tenderers can bid on any or all of the above-mentioned works
:separately.

2. Tender Documents can be obtained from the Cashier, Finance Department of the
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation,. New Market Street, from 09:00 hrs to
15:00 hrs, Monday to Friday upon payment of a non-refundable fee of $1000 each.

3. Each Tender must be enclosed in a sealed envelope which does not in any way identify
the Tenderer and should be clearly marked on the top left-hand corner "Tender for
(specific item(s))".

4. Tenders must be addressed to The Chairman, National Procurement & Tender
Administration Board, Ministry of Finance, and must be placed in the Tender Box
situti:r at the MlVinir~:i of Finance, Main & Urquhart Streets, Georgetown not later
than 09:00 hrs., Tuesday 20th September 2005.

Tenders will be opened immediately after the closing periods. Tenderers or their
representatives are invited to attend the openings.

5. Each Tender must be accompanied by a valid Certificate of Coinmpli.ift from the
Commissioner of Inland Revenue Authority (IRD) and from the General '.limirjer,
National Insurance Scheme (NIS) in the name of the individual if individual is
tendering or company if company is tendering.

6. The G, .ni,'-own Public Hospital Corporation does not bind itself to accept the lowest
or any Tender.

Michael H. Khan
Chief Executive Officer


Page


I i ~I





PaeXISna hoil etme ,20


MINISTRY OF LABOR, HUMAN SERVICES
AND SOCIAL SECURITY

TENDER FOR PRINTING OLD AGE PENSION
AND PUBLIC ASSISTANCE COUPON BOOKLETS
Tender documents can be uplifted from the Ministry of Labour, Human Services and Social Security, 1
Water and Cornhill Streets at the cost of $2,000.00 each, during working hours.
Tenders must be enclosed in sealed envelopes bearing no identity of the tenderer on the outside. The
envelope must be dearly marked.

PRINTING OF 2006 OLD AGE PENSION AND
PUBLIC ASSISTANCE COUPON BOOKLETS
At the top left-hand comer
Valid certificate of Compliance from the Commissioner General of the Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA) and
the National Insurance Scheme must be submitted with the tender
Tenderers must be addressed to:
The Chairman
Central Tender Board
Ministry of Finance
Main and Urquhart Streets
Georgetown.
The Tenders must be deposited in the Tender Box at the above address, no later than 9:00hrs on Tuesday
13h September, 2005.
Tenders will be opened at 09:00 hrs on Tuesday 1311 September, 2005
g Trevor Thomas
Permanent Secretary
Min. LHS&SS

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST
(CONSULTANT SERVICES)
Co-operative Republic of Guyana
Public Sector Technical Assistance Credit
Ministry of Labour, Human Services and Social Security (MLHSSS)
CONSULTING SERVICES
Credit No. 3726-GY. Project ID No. MLHSSS!EOI-0508001
Expressions of interest
The Government of Guyana has received financing from the World Bank toward the cost of the Public Sector
Technical Assistance Credit (PSTAC), and intends to apply part of the proceeds for consultant services.
The Ministry of Labour, Human Services and Social Security (MLHSSS) wishes to undertake an indebt study
of the management, operation and delivery of services of the Old Age Pension, Public Assistance and Difficult
Circumstances Programs. This study will comprise of two major components, the objectives of which are:-
a) To diagnose the current Old Age Pension, Public Assistance and Difficult Circumstances payment
delivery options to verify cost, efficiency and cost effectiveness of the existing system and
alternative feasible delivery options and make recommendations regarding desirable reform of
payment options in the hinterland,
b) Conduct and operational audit of the Old Age Pension, Public Assistance and Difficult
Circumstances programs, the objective of which is to verify if the targeted programs are operating
in an efficient, cost effective manner and according to guidelines set out in the operational manuals
and governed by extent legislation or regulations.
The services will be conducted under the Social Safety Nets component of the PSTAC project from the World
&3nk.
The consultant will work under the direction of the MLHSSS, with input and review from the Policy
Coordination and Program Management Unit (PCPMU) of the Office of the President.
The Policy Coordination and Program Management Unit now invite eligible consultants to indicate their interest
in providing the services. Interested consultants are asked to submit a detailed Curriculum Vitae to the address
below.
A consultant will be selected in accordance with the procedures set out in the World Bank's Guidelines: Selection
and Employment of Consultants by World Bank Borrowers (current edition).
Interested consultants may obtain further information at the address below during office hours 0800 to 1700
hours.
Expressions of interest must be delivered to the Policy Coordination and Program Management Unnr i si P.CPr.lU
Tender Box, at the Office of the President at the address below by 9:00 am, September 9, 2005.
Policy Coordination and Program Management Unit
Office of the President
New Garden St, Bourda, Georgetown, Guyana.
ThI: 592-223-0917 (ext. 30)
Fax: 592-223-5231
E-mail: mking@inetguyana.net
This ad can be viewed on http://www.gina gov.gy


m


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Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
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Sunday Chronicle September 4, 2005


Page XVI


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___






Sunday Chronicle September 4, 2005



Gvr [f/Tr G riP-& Armn Y[iF


-Pane :X-Vl


Hello Readers,
this week's
article begins
a 'series in looking of at
Climate Change and
other related
environmental issues.
These articles center
on the fact that in the
month of September
they are two equally
important international
environmental days.
On Friday September
16th there will be an
observance of 'World
Ozone Day' and on
Saturday September
17th
the focus will be on
'International coastal Clean up
Day'. Through this series of
articles we tell you how you can
be involved in expressing your
concern for climate change and
related issues.
Today's article would help
you to appreciate what is the
global climate that is being
talked about and how the
'Global Warming' phenomenon
could affect your life by the
changes it could have on the
environment. As an example, we
bring you information on
Laboratory research on the
effects of changes in climatic
factors on the rice we eat, and
cultivate here in Guyana.


UNDERSTANDING
THE GLOBAL
CLIMATE SYSTEM
o The weather we
experience is as a result of the
exchanges of energy from the
sun's and the atmosphere.
Although it changes frequently,
the annual pattern of weather in
a particular area is remarkably
constant over time. As such the
term 'climate' refers to long term


pattern of weather which is
observed at a particular location.
o The Global Climate
system is therefore a complex
interactive network of Natural
and or physical processes,
which are influenced by the:
Interactions of solar
Energy


The Earth's atmosphere
thus plays a vital role in the
regulation of global
temperatures. It is important to
note that the balance between
incoming and outgoing energy
represents the Earth's energy
budget, and in the long term,
this must be balanced for life to






:. .


*-~-~


Earth Surface
Earth's atmosphere


WHAT IS GLOBAL
WARMING?
In the natural Climate, only
a tiny percentage of the sun's
energy reaches the earth. Of this
small percentage reaching the
earth about 30% is scattered
back into space, but the rest
passes through the earth's
atmosphere to warm the surface.
The earth acts like other Black
bodies in space and absorbs the
solar energy reaching its surface.
The Earth then emits this'
absorbed energy back into the
atmosphere. This energy is
then:

transferred around the
globe by winds and oceans
Lost into space
trapped by atmospheric
gasses


be sustained as we know it.

o The ability of some
gasses in the Earth's atmosphere
to 'trap' heat ensures that the
temperature fluctuations are far
less compared to other planets
in the solar system. These
gases which trap the heat in the
earth's atmosphere and bring
stability to the global
temperature are called
greenhouse gases. Heat is
trapped by atmospheric-gasses
in the same way the glass in a
greenhouse traps heat. This is
known as the "Greenhouse
Effect", and it enables life as we
know it to exist. The main
Greenhouse gasses are water,
carbon dioxide, ozone, methane,
nitrous oxide and
chlorofluorocarbons
Without the Greenhouse
Effect, the average temperature
on Earth would be cooler by
about 30?C.
Increased levels of


VACANCY

DRIVER




The Guyana Revenue Authority is seeking experienced and qualified persons
to serve as Drivers.

Requirements (Education & Experience)

*Sound Primary Education with a valid Driver's Licence to Drive car/van.
*Must have knowledge of mechanics, general maintenance and minor
repairs to motor vehicles, with no less than three (3) years as a
Driver/Mechanic.


Applications with detailed CV should be submitted not later than
Friday September 9, 2005 to the:

Commissioner-General
Guyana Revenue Authority
357 Lamaha & East Streets
Georgetown


greenhouse gasses will lead to an
enhancement of the greenhouse
effect and the trapping of more
heat energy by the earth .This.
will disturb the Earth's energy
budget and will result in Global
Warming, a phenomenon that is
likely to affect the entire world.

Global warming is a term
used to describe the increase
over time of the average
temperature of the Earth's
atmosphere and oceans and is
caused by a combination of
natural Climate and what is
known-as the Green House
Effect.

Due to the rapid increase in
human activities such as burning
of fossil fuels, scientists believe
that Global Climate Change is


occurring at a faster rate.
Greenhouse warming is
expected to lead in future years
to even more intense and
frequent extreme weather
events, and to greater losses
from diseases and from pests
that may multiply. more rapidly
and expand their ranges.

EXPECTED
CHANGES:
How will Climate Change?
As a consequence of global
warming, the climate is expected
to change significantly in the
21st Century. Temperature, e.g.,
is projected to increase by 1.4 -
5.8?C by 2100


' ; ^:'.V, :.,












SEA-LEVEL RISE
One major consequence
of global warming is a major
rise in the mean sea level by
the thermal expansion of the
upper layers of ocean. Sea-
level is expected to rise from
9cm- 88cm by 2100.


TO BE~U CKONTINHI~UEDPI


GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA/CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK
BASIC NEEDS TRUST FUND FIFTH PROGRAMME


The Government of Guyana (GOG), Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the
Government of Canada through the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)
has recently signed an agreement to finance several projects under the Basic Needs Trust
Fund (BNTF) Fifth Programme. Construction of the sub-projects is expected to be
implemented in 2005/2006. The sub-projects consist primarily of buildings and other civil
works aimed at improving the social and economic infrastructure.

The Basic Needs Trust Fund invites tenders for the following sub-projects:


LOT A

1. Anna Regina Multilateral School Dormitory Rehab.

12. Manarwain Primary School Construction.

13. Annandale North Nursery School Construction
LOT B

1. Guru Housing Scheme Street Upgrading

2. Queenstown Bus Shed Street Upgrading

3. Mandir Street Upgrading

4. Hackney Health Centre Constructionr

5. Queenstown Nursery School Rehabilitation

6. Albouystown Skills Training Centre Expansion

7. South Vryheid's Lust Nursery School -xpansion

8. Woolford Avenue Skills Training C entre

9. Retrieve Drains and Culverts Upgradiing


10. Hill Side Drive Road Upgrading


- Reg. #2

- Reg. #2

- Reg. #4


- Reg. # 2

- Reg. # 2

- Reg. # 2

- Reg. # 2

- Reg, # 2

- Reg. # 4

-: Reg. # 4

- Reg. # 4

- Reg. # 10

- Reg. # 10


Tender Documents for these sub-projects can. be purchased from the-office of the Basic
Needs Trust Fund at 237 Camp Street, G\towniin the form of a MANAGER'S CHEQUE
payable to the BASIC NEEDS TRUST FUND. Tender Documents for LotA can be
purchased for anon-refundable fee of G$10;000 per sub-project. Tender Documents


for Ldt B can be purchased for a n .


Sealed tenders accompanied by valid N.I.S. anid Tax Compliance Certificates (both of
which should be in the name of individual or firm submitting the bid) should be
addressed to the Project Manager, and deposited in the Tender Box of the Basic Needs
Trust Fund at 237 Camp Street, SIMAP's Building, Georgetown, on or before 10:00 a.m.
on Friday, September 9,2005.
Each tender must'be placed in a separate envelope with the name of the sub-project
clearly marked on the top left hand corner. The envelope should in no way identify
the tenderer.
The Basic NeedsTrust Fund does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any other tender.
Tenderers or their representatives may be present at the opening of the tenders at 10:00
a.m. on Friday, September 9,2005

Project Manager
August 15, 2005


-*SIII~B~lsBB*Y~~R1%IBAICVIPIE~PI~L) '


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$40,000.00 ALL-CORRECT

CHRONICLE CROSSWORD COMPETITION.

'A'K E R A N AK E R A N
RE IDIY G GRE D Y G
s1 R I E I I R I S MRE H R


- - -


.t qw ft D400


.- "Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


4bumq M00 0 40
-OW 4 mm - 4 mo -


mar
nam
27. A
esti
ACROSS: 28. The
1. Tremble. 30. Try
6. Acquiring something. wor
9. "And while they went to buy,
the bridegroom came; and DOWN:
they that were went in
with him to the marriage: and 2. Hon
the door was shutU' Matt. 3. Kine
25:10. 4. Acr<
12. Religious education (Abbr.). Acc
13. Antonym for the noun, 5. Rail
treatment. 7. Syn
14. Frequently Asked Questions cult
(Abbr.). 8. Poir
16. Masculine name. 10. Disf
17. Absent, or absence without 11. -
leave. (Abbr.). react
18. An irregular verb with a press
regular past tense form and some
two possible past participles, but n
one of which is regular. same
21. Old-fashioned person. can
25. The skill and sensitivity in sym|
dealing with others or with storn
difficult issues. prob
26. Word used in citing a person's e m o
former name, especially a (depr

S co
the

An All-Correct puzzle for su
$40,000.00 is now presented co,
to you. This "A-C" competition sui
will be drawn on Friday, wil
September 09, 2005. Note- pla
well, an all-correct entry is the Ch
requirement here. If there is at2
more than one winner the prize
money will be shared among Re
the winners. So get in the an
action and win! en'
en
The additional incentives of Cn
$1,000.00 and $2,000.00 for GI
the 40+ and 80+ entries Mc
groupings are in effect. at
Co
If you play smart you can win De
this grand offer of $40,000.00.
The more ,,uit play the greater If )
Is the posD3sibillty of .'innirigq uIJ
Once again Mr R Samai has -:u
demonstrated this in our last Ch


ried woman's maiden irritability). Stress may also play a 21.
e. role in the development of heart
person's sense of self- disease and other seriousi22.
eemorself importance. disorders. :23.
e falling crate damaged his 13. Head-quarters (Abbr.).
o a 15. Many people become stressed
to gain the love of (a when they are involved
man). conflicts, worried about
problems or pressed for time. 24.
The body interprets these 25,
pressures as a -r rai i:i life. 27.
mophone. 17. It lowers cholesterol and fights
eticenergy(Abbr.). anemia. 29.
nym for "Equal 19. Preposition.
essibility Requirements. 20 Preposition


way (Abbr.).
onym for the noun,
ure.
iton the compass.
figure.
is the body's normal
on to any danger or
ure. Everyone faces
sort of stress each day,
not everyone reacts the
way. Excessive stress
cause both physical
ptoms (headaches,
nach upsets, sleep
lems, fatigue) and
tional problems,
session, jittery nerves,


In music, the fourth tone on the
diatonic scale in solfeggio.
Great (Abbr.).
An irregular verb with its past
tense and past participle being
different from each other and
different from its infinitive.
Preposition.
Water-bird.
Creek on the Left Bank of the
Essequibo River in Guyana.
Comb.form Biology relating to or
denoting an egg or ovum.


WIS SE
SAcross, agrolog). agri.nomm. arc, ark. avocado
AWOL, beyond, boot, deface, deform, EAR,
earn, ego. Enu, E% a. FA, FAQ, fogy, foot, gain,
i grow, I. harm, hurt, HQ, in, into, KE, know,:
SNE, nee. N\, .f, on, onto, oo-, quake, Ravi,
ready, RE, Ry, Ryan, shake, show, stress, tact,
teal, tern, i oo.


petition. Note-well, be made at our offices in


amount of entries
bmitted must be
vered with the relevant
ms of money or they
I not be judged: Then
ice those entries in a
chronicle Crossword box
a location near to you.

,sidents of Cove & John
d it's surrounding
viron can place their
tries in the Chronicle
ossword box at Ms.
adys Geer's (L.
Ihabir) business place
' .t .. ...- 1 -" "
o r 1 .11- 2cu.L
yve & John, East Coast
merara.

'iu re, d .:ci up ns just
rchas, .5 ::p. of 'he
ndav or VVWednesdcay
ronicle For e'tra
upons, pur-.: .-'h -s- ,:,.an


Linden, New Amsterdam
and Georgetown. You can
also obtain extra coupons
from Mr. Vincent Mercurius
of D'Edward Village,
Rosignol, Berbice. They
cost $20.00 each or $40.00
for two as they appear in
the Sunday or Wednesday
Chronicle.

Players are reminded that
no entry is opened before


12:30 pm on the day the
puzzle is drawn and that
judging does not begin
before 4:30 pm when the
last entry is opened. The
solution to the puzzle is
not known before that
time.

This apart, our general
rules apply.

Thanks
Crossword Committee


THE GUYANA

ANNUAL
From page IX
should be noted that the literal journal. Kaie, the official
organ of the National Histor. and Arts Council,
appropriated the role of The .Annual from 1965 to 1985. So
it was a lean three decades for The Annual until Dr. Tulsi
D al Singh intervened. This Texas-based Berbician-born
Guianese resuscitated the publication of The Annual in
1998, at a lime when books "ere being jostled out b% the
television: %hen reading for pleasure was far from a
desirable slate: and results in English examinations were
poor.
Dr. Sineh \as abl\ assisted bh Vi Innanally and editor-
like Alan Fenrx. Ch:trles; De Flonmonte, Ruel Johnson. Kojo
McPherson and myself in the quest to keep the resusciiared
njgazine active
Depite ius up, and downs, The .Anmoi/ hd- made tremen-
do-,us contribution to our literary hentage and cultural pammion..
launching ithe L.rcer of renters and arnits ,.ho e\enuall\ be-
came well-kno, n. -lOe tnternational- dcknio pledged. In the
words of Ian NMcDonald "Eery outlet for cultural creation,
like this one i. a dream co'ime true for onme young person some-
where in this country yearning to express himself or herself and
make a difference in our minds and imaginations."
David Granger echoed this sentiment. "A ma-gazine uich a.,
this," he said, "does more than comfort the old. It encourage'
and enlightens the young and inspires the talented." A] Creighton.
in a review of the 20(0-1 21U5 issue of Th. Amniial affirmed "The
outlets and opportunities that it proide-, %ithin the counn',
ren-min imnmej:surable." Ye-' It is one of a handful of blerar',
competition that puhlishes umning entne' that in self is an
honour. e-,peci.Ill, for emerging rulerss Nigel \Vestrmaas. Mni-
rig in the i 1'ed 1 .9 issue S :cf the magazine. declared that
"from the evidence and hindsight ...the verdict is clear. It is so
valuable that if it did not exist, it would have had to be in-
vented!" -
This is a proud tradition of which we should all be a part.
Tlu, .ear the current i'sue under production is offering a
ne\\ completion. The Ralkiinarn Sni"hl,' tifting Poem .i'r Chil-
,riCn. complemenina Thc Henr. JtsiahI tarntng Short Sroryfor
Children both u ith the :amnie objecti\ es. which are, to discover
and encourage those \\ho ha',e that special skill to \rite for
children and 10 provide suitable reading material tor the young.
Thai apart, Tihe Annual continues to offer its regular com-
pentions' Open and youth poetry; open and youth short story;
art and phoiogr~aph'. The theme for the last two categories is
literacy. In fact, the theme for this issue of the magazine is lit-
eracy.
The closing date for submission is Monday, September 12,
2005.
For further information, please call the editor at 226-0065
or e-mail him at: oraltradition2002@yahoo.com and be a part
of this amazing literary and artistic tradition spanning some
ninety years.

Sources:
* Available copies of The Annual, Caribia and Christmas
Tides.
. Responses to this author may be done by way of
telephone on # 226-0065 or by e-mail at;,
oraltradition2'002@yahoo.com


NAME-
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Sunday Chronicle September 4, 2005


The use/mi




abuse of an


.,LJ I U, I


WHY ANTIBIOTICS MAY NOT BE
EFFECTIVE.
There are several reasons why antibiotics do not seem to work.
Let's look at some of these today:

MISDIAGNOSIS OF INFECTION
At times, signs of inflammation (such as heat, redness and swell-
ing) can exist without infection. Sunburn is one example. Infection
can be presumed to exist when one actually observes inflamma-
tion and purulent discharge (pus). Usually, there will be an offen-
sive odour. Other signs are fever and elevated white cell-count.

INAPPROPRIATE SELECTION
An antibiotic must be effective against the microorganisms.
Sometimes, a choice can be made on the-basis of the character of
the. illness. The best way to determine susceptibility is to recover
the organism, culture it, and identify it by colony appearance and
microscopic characteristics. Antibiotics are graded according to
whether the microorganism is sensitive, indifferent, or insensi-
tive. Unfortunately, laboratory findings do not always coincide with
results in the hosts. Nevertheless, antibiotic culture and sensitivity
testing is the surest way of selecting the best antibacterial agent.

INADEQUATE WOUND CARE
Antibiotics enter the bloodstream and are carried to the source
of the infection. Abscesses, wounds containing devitalised tissue,
and wounds with foreign bodies (dirt, splinters that have been en-
capsulated, etc), are resistant areas. Under such circumstances, an-
tibiotics can't get into the wound. Accordingly, it is important to
drain, abscesses, clean dirty wounds, and remove foreign bodies.

ROUTE OF ADMINISTRATION
An important medical decision rests in selecting the best route
for adnuni'tration. Some annbioucs have to be given on any empty
stomach uhile others hate to be given with a meal. Insufficient
absorption from the gastromtestinal tract is one cause of inadequate
blood levels of the annbioic.
Some antibiotics are not absorbed when taken with antacids or
milk Alcohol based drugs can react with antibiotics, thus reducing
the functiionanht
In seere infections, antibiotics are given intravenously, or by
intramuscular injection, to circumvent the problems associated with
oral administration.


THE VET


In the treatment of urinary track infections, other substances
may have to be given by mouth to change the pH of the urine and
assure that the antibiotics won't precipitate.
Please implement disease preventative measures
(vaccinations, routine dewormings, monthly anti-Heartworm
medication, etc) and adopt-a-pet from the GSPCA's Animal
Clinic and Shelter at Robb Street and Orange Walk, if you
have the wherewithal to care well for the animals. Do not
stray your unwanted pets. Take them to the GSPCA Clinic
and Shelter instead. Also, find out more about the Society's
free spay and neutering programme. If you see anyone being
cruel to an animal, get in touch with the Clinic and Shelter
by calling 226-4237.


English Cocker Spaniels


"Copyrighted Material
-4 ~ Syndicated Content Wa
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Q -., *m--.
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S CHAMPION


S Cookery Corner
Welcome to the 363rd edition of
"Champion Cookery Corner", a
weekly feature giving recipes and
tips on cooking in Guyana.
Ca6 I.e ipancakes

Pancakes come in a huge variety of flavors and textures., ere are two one sweet, one savoutry
for you to tty.
Ingredients: Mix together liquid ingredients and beat into dry mixture
I 14cup flour until smooth. Fold in the chocolate chips. Pour 1/4 cup
I tablespoon sugar batter lb- each pancake onto hot griddle or skillet. Cook
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon until the bubbles that lbrmi on top begin to pop. before
I tablespoon Chiampion BakingPowder flipping, then cook a minute or so more. Serve
1/4 teaspoon salt immediately topped with your favorite syrup.
2 eggs /
I cup milk Makes 14 16 pancakes.
4 tablespoons melted buller ,
3/4 teaspoons vanilla essence
3/4 cup chocolate chips
Directions: r--- -'
Preheat uriddIle or skillet. Combine flour. ---'- '-
suar, cinnamon, Chalpion Baking Powder --o --_
iand salt in a large bowl.


I Barbecue Chicken on Corn Bread Pancakes


ChnicKcn roast
Salt and Chico Black Pepper
1 cup your favorite barbecue sauce
3 cup shredded lettuce
Corn Bread Pancakes:'
I cup cornmeal (white ; yellow)
1/4 cup stigar
3 teaspoon Champion Baking Powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup soft shortening
1 cup milk
2 eggs. beaten
Season chicken roast with salt and Chico Black
Pepper. Bake in 325 degree oven or on outside
grill until


ica thermomlieter iLadsu 1 /0 F. .ShrC rouastL wit
knife or food processor and mix with barbecue sauce.
Keep warm until ready to serve.
Corn Bread Pancakes: Put cornmeal, flour,. sugar.
Champion Baking Powi'der and salt in bowl. Cut in
shortening. Mix eggs and milk together and add dry
ingredients until batter is smooth. Pour aboom 3
tablespoons on hot greased griddled for each
pancake. Bake until bubbles break over surface, turn
and brown other side.
Serve shredded chicken between pancakes with
lettuce and additional barbecue sauce.


SPON\SORIEDI) ;) T1HE l. I E I'7 CT RIERS OF

Csti n Powder PASTA Curry Powder
Black Pepper Garam Masala


----- 1--L- ~ r---


Page XIX


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WEEKLY
$300
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$7,999


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$9,999


THE LOWEST PRICE
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M E 0i WORK STATION
FULL WORI STATION
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COMPUTER NOT INCLUDED
WEEKLY
:$170
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$14,999


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S740
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$66,999N



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WEEKLY
$740
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HAPPY SLEEPER $ 9,999
BUNK MATTRESS BL009
HAPPY SLEEPER
75X54X6 MATTRESS BL007 $14,999 $170
QUEEN SIZE
HAPPY SLEEPER BL0!0 $22,999 $255



















Cash Price Weekly
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Cash Price Weekly
SERTA TO3?AZ $3,
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SERTA-\ TOAZ
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Cash Price


Weekly


COMFORT $29,999 $ 335
QUEEN MATTRESS B1028
COMFORT
KINGSIZE MATTRESS BL031 $36,999 $410
COMFORT
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Cash Price Weekly
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SERTA DIAMOND
.QUEEN P/T R001 27',999 $3,090


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$4, 195


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COMFORT $ 76,999 $ 850
ORTHOPAEDIC KING BLOO2


COMFORT
ORTHOPAEDIC QUEEN BL029
COMFORT
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BACK SUPPORT
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BACK SUPPORT
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P T KING DIVAN BR022 $229,999 S2,540



















Cash Plice Weekly
SERTA TOPAZ
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SERTA TOPAZ
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SERTA DIAMOND
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Cash Price Weekly
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$74,999 $995

$44,999 $500
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NEW AMSTERDAM Tel: 333-5265 CORRIVERTON Tel: 339-2301 De WILLEM Tel: 277-0598
RICHMOND Tel: 771-4184 BARTICA Tel:455-3150 LINDEN Tel: 444-4303
-Printed by: F & H Printing Establishment. Tel:225-7114 Fax: 225-8929


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