Title: Guyana chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00020
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Alternate Title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown Guyana
Publication Date: June 12, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088915
Volume ID: VID00020
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text

The Chronicle is at http://www.guyanachronicle.com


V


S"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
P Available from Commercial News Providers"








GUYANA is among countries which will benefit from a historic deal clinched yesterday by the world's wealthiest nations,
to wipe out more than $40B of poor nations' debt to International Financial Institutions.


S(Third to fifthfrom left, front row) The Rodney children, Shaka, Asha
and Kanini at the formal launching of Groundings on Friday night.
(Quacy Sampson photos)


- Gonsalves at Walter
Rodney Groundings


- .. . ...


BANDITS KILL

SOPHIA

RESIDENT
A SOPHIA resident was
shio dead when fiv e armcd
bandits invaded a shop ... Page two


Canon
Latest in!
-~ ~ -'-- a-


Move to house
artefacts at NCC a
'provisional' step
- Ministry of Culture,
Youth and Sport


Page three


PIYMAA COMPUTERS
OFFICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES DIVISION SCANNERS
.," ., -" -" ; .....' -"-"--' .: ;- "-- ".. -"-,- C A R T R ID G E S
-::;: : ...... ... : : i : -:; i. i : c a 'pG s ..


'iv
it


B'*
F.,.
/ _


~.-,
- A;


'K?,'


launch


Centre


;I


I


A TICKET TO YOUR
DREAMS!
RESULTS HOTUNE 225-8902


h


;I


n






2 SUNDAYCHRONICLE June 12, 2005


BANDITS KILL


SOPHIA


RESIDENT


A SOPHIA resident was shot
dead when five armed bandits


invaded a shop last Friday
night around.10.15 hrs at 'E'


MINISTRY OF HEALTH
SKILLS TRAINING FOR PERSONS WITH
DISABILITIES
The Ministry of Health has established a National Vocational,
Training Centre'for Persons with Disabilities in Georgetown.
The Centre is geared to provide persons with disabilities with
vocational training which will allow them to be competitive and
secure employment in the Open Labour Market or to be
Self-employed.
Applications are invited for entry into Open Doors Centre
for the following courses:-
Garment Construction and Decorations
> Electronics / Electrical Installation
> Carpentry / Joinery
> Information Technology
All courses are full-time and of two years duration.
CONDITIONS FOR ENTRY
Age Range:
16 45 years
Target Group:
Persons with the following disabilities
Speech
Hearing
Physical
Learning
Persons in Wheelchairs
Entry Requirements:
Disability
Ability to communicate
Finger dexterity
Primary / Secondary Education
S(special or other schools) .
Application forms for admission can be uplifted from the Open
Doors Centre. .
Closing Date:
Friday, July 29, 2005.
The new Academic Year begins on Monday, September 5,
2005.en Doors Centre
Open Doors Centre


National Vocational Training Centre
Mildred Mansfield Youth Club Building,
D'Urban Street
Werk-en-Rust
Georgetown Govern"
htt


lent ads can be viewed on
p://www.gina.gov.gy


Field Sophia.
According to
eyewitnesses, the victim
Brentnon Figueira, 35, and
other customers were looking
at video and playing dominoes
- regular Friday night
activities in the area when
the gang barged into Nicky's
Players Club. and ordered
them to lie on the ground.
Figueira of 'D' Field
Sophia was shot in his chest


t V I


The shop 'Nicky's' where the Incident occurred


because he resisted the order.
The bandits then robbed


N tCamp elthnoloqies5
www.netcomonline.net


LL Dimension 3000

PROCESSOR INTEL PENTIUM
(2.8 Ghz, 1 BM L2 Cache, 800MHz FSB)
OPERATING Microsoft Windows XP
SYSTEM Home Edition*
MEMORY 256MB DDR2 SDRAM
HARD DRIVE 80GB 7200 RPM Hard Drive
MONITOR 17 (160'vi, 270p)E773 Morilor
GRAPHICS Integrated Jntel Graphics
CARD Media Accelerator 900
OPTICAL DRIVE 48x CD-RW/DVD COMBO DRIVE
SOUND CARD integrated 5.1 Channel Audio
SPEAKERS 380watts DELL speakers-
WARRANTY 3 Year Limited Warranly
SERVICE & 1 Year At-Home Service
SUPPORT 1 Year Technical Support
FREE 64 MB USB FLASH DRIVE
S up grade to
s 15" Flat Panel
I $25us


customers of their valuables
and cash before fleeing.
One eyewitness told


ROSE BUD
DAILY MENU
SSweet & Sour

SChickenBallsu

m Seasoned Rice




$395


the Chronicle that it was
difficult to see the bandits
because they had switched off
the power generating set,
leaving the place in darkness.
The sister of the dead
man, Rochelle Figueira, said
her brother, who was
employed as a contractor 'at
Guyana Telephone and
Telegraph Company, was a
friendly and pleasant person,
always trying to make
everyone around him happy.
In wake of the
incident, residents are
appealing for proper roads and
electricity in the area, noting
that the lack of these facilities
make it easier for criminals
to attack them.
When this newspaper
visited the scene, police were
still questioning witnesses.


THE CENTRAL ISLAMIC
ORGANISATION OF GUYANA


The Central Islamic Organisation of
Guyana in collaboration with the
Muslim Youth Organisation of Guyana
will be hosting a Public Lecture Ali
Mazrui.

Topic: Islam and the United
States of America.
Date: Monday, June 13, 2005
Venue: Central Islamic
Organisation of Guyana
Time: 7pm

All are invited.


RESULTS


BIG-D MID-D LITTLE-
313 330 973


D


25

MONEY


1iniionSP os
MONDAY 2005-06-06
TUESDAY 2005-06-07
WEDNESDAYoo5-o6-os
THURSDAY 2005-06-09
FRIDAY 2005-06-10
SATURDAY 2005-06-11


RESULTS
25- 170 1 0 26 ,

148 1011 07 22
03 -0608'Ir 21

15 20-23 24 0?7-


I


F .


~L~IL~L






SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005


THE "provisional" step to
house sections of the
National Archives at the
National Cultural Centre
was taken in an effort to
protect artefacts in the face
of construction work being
undertaken in a building
neighboring the Archives
on Main Street. the Ministry
of Culture, Youth and Sport
said.
"This is a precautionary
move and will be done in stages.
The newspaper collection
which is hosed at the Annex
will continue to operate from
that location and our National
Archives will not be closed,"
the Ministry said.
The National Archives
Advisory Committee of the
Ministry of Culture has been
aggressively searching for a
permanent home for the
artefacts, resulting in an offer
being made to the government
by an investor to build a new
home for the archives close by
the National Cultural Centre.
This proposal and the
finalisation of the design and
related matters are under
discussion, the Ministry said in
a press statement.
Ministry and Archives
staffers are concerned about the
doubts about their intentions
and competence with regards to
the National Archives, stating
that this should not be since
they have-invested much in the
past six years.
"...the removal of the
National Archives to a new
home should be applauded as
it is a dream which will finally
be coming through, after 30
years. The collections will
therefore have to be moved and
moved under the supervision of
the National Archives Advisory
Board...," the release said.
The Chairman of the board,



HONDA CBR 600
F2 & F3 PARTS
CAJLL:
220-7098


ALL HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
Due to owner moving
Kindly call:
226-8800; 623-1195

WANTED


Apply: Anand's Regent Street,
Athina's & Avinash Water Eir.--i
Call: 226-3361/227-7829.J


1 d ,' -


2 .,. ~ tj


a provision a' steh


- Ministry of Culture. Youth and S ort


Dr. James Rose, is a well re-
spected historian and Vice-Chan-
cellor of the University of'
Guyana. and the move will also
be supervised by other notable
and highly competent members
of that body, the National Trust
and the Ministry of Culture.
Youth and Sport, the statement
said.
The National Archives of
Guyana has had a "torpid
history" according to the
Ministry, with collections of
various public records scattered
in various places for centuries.
Many valuable documents are
overseas and many were also lost
due to fire, water damage and
termite infestation. Many were
stolen from the collection and are
now reposed in what are called
private collection, the Ministry
added.
The National Archives Act
was passed in 1982, which
provided for an advisory
committee on which many
humanitarians of Guyanese
society historians, history
enthusiasts and businessmen
have participated. Prior to 1981,
the collection was housed above
the police station near the
Stabroek Market (now Guyana
Fire Service). There were no
windows, rain would inundate
the place and the papers were in
chaos. It is speculated that it is
in this phase of the archives
history that many valuable
documents- were lost -and
pillaged. Staff was not trained
and any level of staff could


access or handle the material.
The newspaper collection
was transferred to the annex of
the Nationall Museum in 1976
while in 1976 while the
remaining collection was moved
to its present location in Main
Street in 1981.
The real changes to
improving the status of the
collections began in earnest in
1996 when experts were
brought in to advise on the'
collection. The need for a new
building was further
emphasised as the present
facility was outgrowing its
present location. In the interim,
it was recognized that until a
new and permanent home was
found, renovation and
improvements could be made
to the present facilities.
The European Union was
approached and the
government of Guyana agreed
to a project under the EU/GOG
IP 11 which would renovate the
building and improve the
present facilities with new
modern sliding stages, air-
conditioning, generator etc. to
the tune of G$5M foreign
funds and G$7M local
counterpart funds. This was
completed in 1998.
Another intervention in
1997 was to invest in a modem
micrographic unit which
Guysuco agreed to assist in
funding. The project included
not only.the acquisition of the
most modern microfiche
equipment in the region and


only of its kind in Guyana. but
also training for staff as well as
the physical preparation for its
location and sustainability.
In 1998, with the creation
of the Ministry of Culture,
Youth and Sport, the Gov-
ernment of Guyana was ap-
proached for an additional
$12M from the lotto funds
to complete the project. The
equipment, training and in-
stallation were completed to-
talling $20M. The commis-
sioning was held in March
2000.
The staff of the National
Archives was trained along with
all museum staff with reference
to establishing record-keeping
systems, conservation and
preservation of artefacts, collec-
tions management and new poli-
cies for accessioning and de-
accessioning documents. This
was implemented over the years
2000 and 2001 with some
assistance from the IDB
Cultural Centre and a VSO
museum professional. The
Archival Inspecting Officer
completed a course on Records
Management at the University
of the West Indies in 1998. She
also benefited from attachment
at the Department of Archives
in Barbados in 1996


Move to houst iartefactsat HCC


These developments, the
MNinistryv said. have been
publicized with full press
coverage as well as reported
in the Budget debates in the
National Assembly.
The storage of documents in
acid-t'rec boxes was introduced
as a standard in 1998 and this is
a constant practice and recurrent
aspect in the budget. as well. as
chemicals and films, etc. required
for the Micrographic unit: Staff
also handle documents with
gloves, masks and lab coats and
are checked twice a year
medically.
"There is a constant
search and rescue operation
on to find artefacts which be-
longed to the National Ar-
chives and were illegally re-
moved. Slowly we are finding
some of these as occurred dur-
ing the preparations for the
Schomburgk anniversary ex-
hibition. Constant action is
also being taken to obtain
microfiche records of
vulnerable public records with
reference to Guyana in
colonial times from other
countries and sister
institutions and to bring into
the Archives records available
in Guyana from various state
entities and copies from
private collections. It should
also be noted that public
records are also housed in the
parliament, Lands and
Surveys, Deeds Registry,
Central Housing and
Planning Authority, City
Councils, etc., the Ministry
said.


An Hotel in the Caribbean
is looking for staff, previous
experience will be an asset.
Wf: P t-4YIml4'-FO'-I
:{ iwAl


0 4
b 0


Oamly


I..


OWNER LEAVING COUNTRY
Extensive family house
The former Bel Air home of Attorney
General Doodnauth Singh
Can be used as guest house. Nursing home.
Educational Institution
Approximately 1 acre of land
Comprising award winning garden and
numerous well maintained out buildings
Price negotiable
.',.- serious enquiries
Tl': 226-5379 between 10 amn
to noon and 2 p m to 6 pm /


InternMationally Heognuzed
SDiploma in Comiputeir Studies
Certificate Courses ($5000 each)
1.Windows 2000/XP & Internet Operations (Beginners).
2. Word 3. Excel 4. Access 5. PowerPoint 2000/XP

Diploma in Computerized Accounting
1. Service Business Acct. 2. Merchandise Acct. $5000 ea.
3. QuickBooks Acct. $7000 4. Peachtree $7000
Diploma in Computer Repairs & Networking
1. Hardware 2. Software & Networking S12000 each.
Diploma in Desktop Publishing & Webpage Design.
PowerPoint-$5000 2.CorelDrav,-S7000
3.Webpage Design $7000 4. Adobe Photoshop (S7.000)
-iplomat in Computerized Office Admin & Accounting
1. Word 2. Excel 3. Outlook 4. QuickBooks or Peachtree


Courses Begin


June 13, 15, 1, 18 & 21 **
... ~. .. .. ..7:;7


vELT


i F: ICE i ;Tz.; IC- ';


,, ( ," ~7 .. . .

's n o-w 4 in// .... ..b m ^ ..... ...,. .". .' .. ." --* ..;.^... .... 3 ^ . ,:


UOMMIRCIAfl il PRINTIING Call Cards, Greeting Cards and Posters or BLACK 4 DLiu.
q q. :, :, .-7i. w-m m


A' *Y~siii-c


SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005


,, i








make something great!






v-A




.* nSSv ~S-^.' 1^.^


~1


. yome-lClil




SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005


Vt
~


China

flooded


school

lsasteol


toll rises to 64


c .


"Copyrighted Material


km Syndicated Content. "

Available from Commercial News Providers"


kpbI~
- S -
a--a.~ -


N 0 T I C E
Available in large quantities


in sizes 1 litre, 2 litres, 3.5 litres, 4 litres,
18-litre pails and 45-gallon drums.
Prices are greatly reduced.
Also special prices on large purchases.
Call 223-5273 or 223-5274 to place orders


Auto Electricians are
urgently required for
positions at our
operations at
Butukari and Anarika.


Candidates must have at least three (3) years
practical experience in the Auto Electrical
field with a reputable Company or Organisation.
Training at a re, ogni ied Technical Institute,
Trade School or Workshop is very essential.
City & Guilds or equivalent qualifications will
be a definite advantage.
Conditions include:
Free accommodation, iianslporia'iion,
electricity and other basic amenities at our
interior locations.
P u rini irjlihOrn a- .1jig is attractive and will be
based upon experience and quaiih :iiinii

Appir.,: tiln'; must reach
The Human Resource Cfl onil 'ii
TOOLSIE PERSAUD iJ'OM
10-12 Lombard Street, Georgetown.


. -09- ~l u- mm um D t --qm
om- m tam 4 m odw o tm-
ftw dq Mm wq- dobd mmdbo


-~ ~
. -
~- - a-. ~
-
- - -
* -
0 0 -
~~0


MI


.,.NO LATER'THAN MONDAY 20TH .JUNE. 2005.


q


I


-


AFWr


0-






M f.....lMII June.1. 20 ...


JlE


43 Brickdam, Stabroek, Georgetown. Tel: 226-8906/225-5261 Fax: 226-2319 e-mail: infoS@busineschool.com Web: www.bushieschool.co
2005 Sunshine Summer. Programme


paocfe,'tel( gaatt~e CI(a t#4aa ~ ai4a, lpi 4 z, 4 !r6A kror aj oa,-6 eA~ a i'aarar& rta
aa~ea' l" w av4!ar4 alw~,eewdA'.' d 1' eta#coa'ame jeed' ceea,'a1'2 a,(' aeaad'c.iYa 0owrfew / 6 /, 6,2


COMPUTER PROGRAMMES
UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL DIPLOMAS
The Cambridge University International Diploma in Computer Studies is provided by the Cambridge University International
one of the leading providers of Examinations.


Diploma in Information, and Communication Technology (ICT) -Starters
ICT Starters are designed for children aged 4 to 14 years in either primary and secondary education.


~

(


The Diplomas are available at three levels:


Next Steps .
(2 Stages)


On Track
stagese)

B yii^r|E


'ii
-


moo


Initial Steps
.(2 stages)-
$5,000


What is Cambridge ICT, Starters?
Cambridge ICT Starters teach
Students how to use ICT to "
-communicate -handle information
-model -measure


What are the benefits?
(i) Cambridge ICT Starter meet universally recognized standards
(ii) The qualifications are software independent, so students learn
techniques'and skills transferable to a range of software programs.


Inforsnmation Technology Skills (IT Skills)
Who is the Diploma in Information Technology Skills for?
I_T Skills is ideal for all types of candidates.
If you are a student or an employee, it can help you improve your current skills.
IT is also for persons with no computer experience and who want a solid foundation for further IT career development.
IT is also suitable for those who wish to receive recognition for IT competence they already possess.

The Diplomas are available at two levels; Foundation and Standard


What is the Cambridge International Diploma in IT Skills?
IT Skills are available in
-electronic communications
-spreadsheets
-using computer and managing files
-word processing
-data
-presentation


What are the Benefits?
The Cambridge Diploma in IT Skills is valued and accepted throughout the world for it high
standards of assessment.
The holders of these diplomas will enhance their employment/promotional opportunities both
locally and internationally.


Diploma in Information, and Communication Technology (CT)


The Cambridge International Diploma in ICT is ideal for both students
and employees. It will benefit anyone who needs to use computers at
work, home or during education.


What is the ICT Diploma?
These diplomas equip student with the ability to apply a range of
software in realistic and practical work-related situations.


The Diploma is available at three levels: Foundation, Standard and Advance
-What are the benefits?
Because ICT impacts on the way we live, this course will give participants the confidence and skills to use ICT, thereby enhancing their fulfillment in life.
-The courses are short and flexible.
Provides International recognition of proof of -knowledge and skills.
Academic Proarammes


Sunshine Summer Day Camp
Axffeivie?? *Tours *Computer Training *Puppetry
Workshop *Games *Drama *Art & Craft *TA for Kids
Cost$ 12,000

Art & Craft Summer Camp


S,'A- "A t~it~i; *Collage & Mosaic Making *Drawing *Print
Making *Painting *Fabric Dying *Fabric Techniques
*Weaving Cost $ 7,000


Forms 1&2
Mathematics
English
Social Studies
Spanish


I


Form 3
Mathematics
English
Social Studies
Principles of Accounts
Principles of Business
Office Administration


COST Il *


Forms 4&5
Mathematics.
English
Social Studies
Principles of Accounts
Principles of Business
Office Administration
Typing
Information Technology
Physics
Biology
Chemistry


r &l iU-,


7 190h,


I" I -111k


.5


SUNAY HEROIC Jne 2,2005


I


I


=pop-






-6 SitiAt(fAhOIRML.E June 12, 200


Edtorial .
----^ --d '* ** 7 "


Viewpoint


By RICKEY SiNGH


SUGAR-THE



'DARK TIME'
FRIDAY'S picket demonstration mounted by stake-
holders of the country's vital sugar industry outside
the office of the European Union Delegation in
Georgetown, was a most welcome and timely devel-
opment.
It is 'onre that could only fortify the ongoing efforts by
the Caribbean Community's governments and their al-
-lies in the African Caribbeah and Pacific (ACP) countries
to forestall the EU from cuts in sugar import prices .that
could ruin vulnerable economies like, Guyana's and
deepen social problems..
.In thepfashion of Minister of International Trade, Clem-
ent -Rohee, who had much earlier staged his own picket
protest 'to warn of the economic calamity facing the indus-
try, Director of the Sugar Association of the Caribbean
(SAC), lan McDonald, joined Friday's protest by top offi-
cials of the Guyana Sugar Corporation; Guyana Agricul-
tural Workers Union and the National Association of Agri-
cultural, Commercial and Industrial Emplpyees. They re-
ceived solidarity support also from the Clerical and Com-
.mercial Workers Union.


As CARICOM continues with initiatives at various lev-
els including quiet diplomacy at ministerial and also,
heads of government protest action like that'of the local
sugar industry's stakeholders, could; only help in! signal-;
ling to the EU the gravity of the problem ahdadof a meet
ing in ten days time at which the stubborn and callous
seem bent on. implementing a proposed 42 pier cent re-
duction in price, over two years, starting in 2006: .
The entire labour movement as well as the leading
private sector agencies and civil society groups must now
exercise their own initiativesito demonstrate,.opposition
to the planned price cut by the EU. .' ..
At the same 'time, the Community leaders need not
wait until they meet for their regular summit in St.,Lucia
next month to pursue a new negotiating strategy';to at
least win some more time before the EU formally reads
what has been properly described as a "death threat".
It is the 'dark time' for our sugar industry and, by ex-.
tension, Guyana.


THE HAITIAN


CRISIS

AT A time when it is most anxious for a compromise on
the European Union's planned cut in the price of sugar
imported for the European market, CARICOM remains
frustrated and bewildered by the.ongoing governance
crisis in Haiti.
Even the creator and primary backer of the interim
regime in Port-au-Prince, the administration of President
George W Bush, seems to have run out of reassurances.
It has recently resorted to alerting non-essential staffers
at its embassy in Haiti and American nationals in general


to beat a retreat hack to their homeland.
The International Crisis Group (ICG), a 'Brussels-based
think tank, has warned of a "deep, political and social cri-
Sis" with: "explosive" consequences in its latest' assess-
S rent of the situation in what remains the oldest indepen-
Sdent and poorest nation in this hemisphere.
Such a warning is all the more worrying when it is
considered that the killings, violent clashes between war-
ring factions an'd' the fear and general suffering among
the people,.are occurring despite thepresence of a 7 ,400-
strong United Nations peace-keepling force.
Following their own recent meeting in The Bahamas
at which they discussed the deteriorating situation in Haiti,
iCARICOM Foreign Ministers expressed deep concern
over "the iragility and volatility of the security environ-
ment", especially in Port-au-Prince.
In accordance with heroic spirit and international per-
spective of Walter Rodney, it is good to know that the
organizers of the 25th Commemoration Anniversary of
the slain philosopher, historian and political activist, have
included a session, scheduled for yesterday, on the situ-
ation in Haiti to appropriately express solidarity with the
suffering masses in that Caribbean nation.



CHRONICLE
Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Sunday Editor: Michelle Nurse
Editorial: 227-5216; 227-5204: 22-63243-9
Sports:. 225-7174
After hours 226-3243-9
Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is at w Hj.gu)anachronicle.com
e-mail address sunda)editor@ guyanachronicle.com
Lama Avenue. Bel Air Park. Georgetown. Guyana.


THEM' POLITICS


Battling killing spree

in Jamaica and T&T


THE escalating crime wave
in Jamaica and Trinidad and
Tobago, with traumatic mur-
der rates of crisis proportion,
has sent governments in both
States to once again lull
the public into thinking that
popping the necks of con-,
victed murderers is an appro-
priate response.
Well meaning as they are in
going on the offensive against
armed criminals, and in.
p a r t i c dl r
murderer. both
Jamaica's Jusi ice Min-
ister, A.J. N ihol-in
and Trinidad and
Tobago's -Aiiorne\
General, John Jerenuc.
would be hard pres-ed
to offer any cmptric.d
evidence tc ,uge'.r
that the deaih pendir-,
is a deterrent to inur-
der.
While tie',
.were sendirg .: ,
signals to expr-tiie trhe
hanging pr'..- ,. ir
death r,,v.
prisoners, an interni-
tional conifci nce cn
the d... i -.l, a
taking pIl.ce
in Barbado,. i ',:'.-
end.
The three-day
event, jointly spon-
sored b'y the European Union,
. United Kingdom and Penal Re-
form International, involved
leading lawyers. human rights
advocates and penal reform
specialists,, incJuding.fron-llihe-
Caribbean, Africa. Europe and
the- biited Sates-eftAmerica
The Commonwealth Carib-


bean, among the first 12 of some swinging from idle gallows is did in parliament last week, to
40 countries with the highest the London-based Judicial "resist with every resources of
rates of imprisonment, also has Committee of the Privy Coun- the State", decisions of the
the unflattering reputation of cil,. which still remains (except Privy Council to commute to
constitutional empowerment for Guyana and as of last life imprisonment the sentence
to enforce the death penalty for month, Barbados) their court of death row inmates, he must
murder. of last resort. know that it smacks of political
With more than 700 murder In talking tough about seek- bravado, or of someone fearfully
cases in Jamaica for 2005 and ing ways to circumvent a Privy whistling in the dark.
over 150 in Trinidad and Tobago Council ruling in the Pratt and He announced the resump-
- where kidnapping also remain Morgan case of some 12 years tion of hanging, after an absence
a nightmare the governments ago, Justice Minister Nicholson of some eight years, starting
should be mindful with a death warrant read last
against playing into Wednesday for the planned ex-
. the hand of his ecution tomorrow of death row
government's political prisoner Lester Pitman
o.pp,:nrint, who re- (At the time of writing on
main opposed to scut- Friday, lawyers for Pitman were
Iling lidnk, with the arguing in Court for a stay of ex-
Pri vy Council in ecution).
lfavour of accessing But Jeremie runs the danger
ST't t(he Caribbean Court of repeating the
of Jluii-.c (CCJ) as outrageous precedent set by a
. n a Jama.a'i timal appel- former Trinidad and Tobago At-
..,.i' late m.nulmtion. torney General, Keith Sobian,
-' Aiioi iey General on July 14, 1994.
,.". Jerem!e ,. in an even
S-. nmoie prec.-Lrious situ- DANGEROUS PRECEDENT
S. ,-,in F-.i. while, like That was- a..'red .letter'
Ihi, Jamaican day in the history of judicial ex-
B' couniei-p.rt. he has ecutions in this region when
supporii Fti:in a parlia- death row inmate Glen Ashby
me ni i ,-pposition was executed even as an appeal
i hi ... en more against the dismissal of a consti-
S, u,. 2-_1 h o tutional motion was before the
.... i ,l..1 '.rcing the Trinidad and Tob'ago Court of
BASDEO PANDAY death penalty, he is Appeal.
aware that Basdeo It was a dangerous precc-
Panday and his dent: an atrocity that became
are desperately shopping United National Congress MPs the subject of an independent
around for effective responses to are in no mood at this time to inquiry, organised by the then
the armed killers. enable any constitutional Barbados-headquartered Carib-
amendment to overcome restric- bean Human Rights Network
THE PRIVY COUNCIL tions from Privy Council rulings (Caribbean Rights).
NWhat has been the major for the execution of death row,' The report on the.findings
barrier for the region's prisoners. was made public and should be
government.sagainst-having-- ..-.. C o-n-s e- q-ttu.e.n-.t 1 y, ... -visited, by-the current Attorney.
death row prisoners when Jeremie threatened, as he General in Port-of-Spain. It may


temper his anger and help him
to better appreciate that two
wrongs do not make a right.
The State cannot expedi-
ently suspend the constitution-'
ally guaranteed fundamental
right of even a death row inmate
to a fair trial as happened in
the now oft referenced Glen
Ashby case without
being justly accused of an act
of grave injustice, driven by a


desire of a life for a life. .
Caught' up in the emotit
alism of 'hang them' from. i, ,
pro-death penalty advocates, in
the face of incidents of murder
minimal compared with Ja-
maica, Trinidad and Tobago, and
to a lesser extent Guyana Bar-
bados recently enacted legisla-
tion to constitutionally over-
come a Privy Council ruling to
make the death penalty manda-
tory.
It was one of the issues ex-
amined at the recently held con-
ference on the death penalty at
which participants strategised
on how best to continue the
battle for abolition of the death
penalty in this and other regions
of the world.
They also examined
', *. .. ii flu nc,- h .. i i i' .
prison management and offer
- guidance in dealing-.with over-
crowded prisons where de-


grading and inhuman
treatment prevails; as well
as to encourage new ap-
proaches to legal aid consis-
tent with the constitutionally
enshrined right to a fair hear-
ing in both civil and criminal
cases.
In the final analysis, it
would be a shame if enforce-
ment of the death penalty
should become the norm in our


Caribbean region since it has
<".T served as a deterrent to
i'.c crime of murder. 'Hang
them' politics may be emotion-
ally appealing. But it is not a
way of escape from the crimi-
.-.nal .jaws in which ourcomnmu-.
nities are gripped.
Ours remain a region where
governments continue to des-
perately grope for policies and
programmes to ensure better
anti-crime performances by law
enforcement agencies
with precious little success
against killers and kidnappers.
I n t h e
meantime, overcrowded pris-
ons continue to be a chronic
problem for most countries of
the Caribbean Community
amid all the rhetoric about
alternate es to epstodial-sen-
tencing and a terrihl over-
burdened justice administra-
tion system.


'HANG


- NO SOLUTION






SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005 7


By Luis Carpio


FOR too long there has been a
hemispheric debate on the
shape that integration in a
globalising world would take
as various talking heads argued
whether global integration
would take the form of an
intricate web of bilateral
agreements or, instead,
become the stuff of legend
where regional "fortresses"
would call the shots.
Fortunately, this debate
can now be put on the back burner
as an academic one as, though
some countries continue to aspire
to bilateral arrangements,
particularly with the U.S.,-the
increasing impetus towards the
creation of blocks has taken wing
in our region with the
establishment of new
arrangements and the
reawakening of existing ones.
What is more significant,
however, is that not only are
these blocks increasingly defined
as more than mere trade
arrangements in the Greater
Caribbean and the South
American sub-continent, but that
they are now poised to frame our
insertion into the globalised
world, if we would only let them.
The ACS structure has its
foundation in the 'building-block
approach' to regional integration,
which was more vividly
described by Jamaica's Michael
Manley over four decades ago as
the "concentric circles" approach.
For example, the Organisation of
Eastern Caribbean States (OECS)
forms part of CARICOM;
CARICOM has opened its doors
to Suriname and Haiti and
CARICOM, the Dominican
Republic and Haiti form
CARIFORUM, the Caribbean
part of the Africa-Caribbean-
Pacific Group of the Lom6
Convention. There are also close
ties between CARICOM and
Cuba. Moreover, there are
institutionalized relationships
between CARICOM and the G-


3, CARICOM and Central
America, and Central America
and the G-3. And all the
countries of these sub-regional
groupings are, of course, now
members of the ACS.
In the post colonial era.
many if not all of the members
of the ACS have, to varying
degrees to be sure, benefited in
the short and medium-term
from our different bilateral or
other relationships with our
erstwhile metropolis. In many
cases, the long range view reveals
that this is no longer a viable
option.
During the recent Latin
America and Caribbean-
European Union Seminar held
at UWI under joint sponsorship
of the European Commission
and the Institute of International
Relations, Professor Norman
Girvan, ex-Secretary General of
the ACS, made an impassioned
plea for awareness regarding the
future of EU-Latin America and
Caribbean relations. He
explained that (and he will
excuse the over simplification)
the recent expansion of the EU
to include ten new members
from Eastern Europe now puts
our "special friends" in Europe
in the minority, at a time when
the EU will have to look ever
inward in order to absorb the
new countries in a sustainable


0 SALESALE


NISHKS FOWERLAND
1CmLT. Te.: 227g 3553


manner.
Throughout its 10 years,
the Association of Caribbean


EUROPE AND



THE



GREATER



CARIBBEAN


efforts, taking full advantage
of the economies of scale


implicit in
cooperation.


regional


The Greater

Caribbean This Week


States has had important ties
with a number of EU Member
States which has resulted in
securing significant financial and
technical contributions for the
causes of the Greater Caribbean


aspiration enshrined in the
Guadalajara Declaration,
whereby the ACS and the EU
can consolidate this "block to
block" synergy to avoid the'
overlapping and duplication of


CANADIAN IMMIGRATION SEMINARS
Come and let us show you how we can assist you to migrate to
Canada legally.
Skilled Workers, Self Employed, Students, Family Sponsorships, etc.
Essequibo Henrietta: Arabian Atlantic Hotel
-Saturday, June 18" from 1pm to 6pm and
Sunday, June 19* from 9 am to 12 noon
Berbice New Amsterdam: Church View Hotel
Saturday, June 25'" from 1pm to 6pm and
Sunday, June 26' from 9 am to 12 noon
Georgetown: 58 Upper Robb and Oronoque Sts., Bourda
June 12'" to June 30" from 9am to 12 noon
Balwant Persaud & Associates
Canadian Immigration Consultants
A Canadian based Immigration Consultancy Firm
Call: 225-1540 or 622-8308 to reserve your space
Consultation fee: G$1,500.00


S WANTED


SBOLLY WOOD CLUB
Tel.: 227-3553.


A A


A reputable hotel i
suitably qualified
following positions:


s looking to recruit
persons to fill the


ACCOUNTANT
RECEPTIONIST
ASSISTANT MANAGER
(preferable with knowledge of
Restaurant business).

Interested persons are asked to send
resume along with written application
to:

The General Manager
P.O. Box # 12407


MR. LUIS CARPIO

Mr. Luis Carpio is the Director of Natural Disasters and
Transport of the Association of Caribbean States. The views
expressed are not necessarily the official views of the ACS.
Feedback can be sent to mail@acs-aec.org


Invites you to

hi a/a .It l
This manm. i-olure
Rke Rucmod ljik e Dqi. 33


S joy .tmh junrc. 2 Se %cf r ELn;1 HOUSE
.I Georgetown.


A VACANCY EXISTS AT A REPUTABLE ORGANISATION IN
GEORGETOWN FOR:

SALE & MARKETING OFF CER

REQUIREMENTS:
SOUND SECONDARY-& HIGHER EDUCATION
CANDIDATE MUST HAVE PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE AT MANAGEMENT LEVEL,
MINIMUM OF YEARS
a EXPERIENCE/QUALIFICATION IN SALES & MARKETING WILL BE REQUIRED.
MUST POSSESS VALID DRIVER'S LICENCE (CAR/VAN)
VALID POLICE CLEARANCE & TWO RECENT TESTIMONIALS ARE REQUIRED.

THE SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE WILL BE REQUIRED TO TRAVEL OVERSEAS AND TO
CERTAIN HINTERLAND LOCATION IN GUYANA
REMUNERATION: AN ATTRACTIVE REMUNERATION PACKAGE IS OFFERED.
SEND APPLICATION WITH THE ABOVE.
TO: GENERAL MANAGER
P.O.BOX 10101
GEORGETOWN, GUYANA

CLOSING DATE: JUNE 30, 2005


in the fields of transport, natural
disasters, trade and sustainable
tourism.
The ACS was further
heartened when, in 2004, the
Latin America and the
Caribbean-European Union
Summit in the Guadalajara
Declaration recognized, the
ACS as "an important
regional entity, through which
relations between the EU and
the Greater Caribbean Area
can be deepened and
consolidated". If permitted, the
immediate future will see a
growth in our relationship
with the countries of the
European Union, as well as the
i n s t i t u t i o nal
operationalisation of the


. ..... ... ....


~~1~i~F"


s


-M.
TW






8 SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005




MDG 8 Global Partnership


ONE of the most signifi
cant United Nations
documents of recent time is
the Millennium Declaration,
which was ratified by 189
Heads of State in September
2000. Based on the declara-
tion, all members made an
unprecedented global com-
mitment to eight Millennium
Development Goals (MDGs),
to be achieved by 2015.
Goal number eight is to fur-
ther development .by means of
a global partnership. This goal
is in acknowledgement of the re-
ality that the other MDGs can-
not be achieved through the sole
efforts of governments. The
task requires partnerships
among governments and also
partnerships within countries,
involving the various sectors of
society. It is recognized that the
ideals encompassed by the
MDGs generally coincide with
national policies, but that the
attainment of them cannot be
realized without the input of


for Development


every actor in society, and the
private sector has a pivotal role
to play.
The private sector can as-
sist in the achievement of the
MDGs without compromising
its profit orientation, particu-
larly by means of various kinds
of partnerships. Indeed, inter-
business partnerships, and busi-
ness partnerships with civil so-
ciety organizations, U.N. agen-
cies and government bodies can
help achieve the MDGs while
at the same time improving
business profitability.
One case that stands out in
Guyana is the highly successful
business-business partnership
between Topco, a subsidiary of
Demerara Distillers Ltd. (DDL),
and the 'Institute of Private En-
terprise Development' (IPED).


The first few years after
Topco was purchased by DDL
in 1993, the company mostly
produced limited quantities of
non-pasteurised fresh fruitjuice.
At an early stage it was clear to
DDL/Topco that there was po-
tential to move into higher vol-
ume and higher value-added
production specifically into
asceptic packaged pasteurised
pure fruit juice and juice drinks.
To realise this potential, the
company embarked on the con-
struction of a new packaging
plant, which came into opera-
tion in late 2003 and had the ca-
pacity to process five million
pounds of fruits annually.
Knowing that the new packag-
ing plant would have the capac-
ity to process five million
pounds of fruit, DDL/Topco


MINISTRY OF EDUCATION





THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION for the HEALTH PROMOTING
SCHOOL SCHOOL VISION SCREENING PROGRAMME wishes to
recruit a HEALTH PROMOTION SCHOOL FACILITATOR

Responsible for:
Coordinating and implementing the School Vision and Auditory screening programmes
in collaboration with coordinating committee school health teams.

Arranging all training sessions and screening days.

Monitoring the implementation of the programmes in participating schools including
developing a database for data collection and report preparation

Conducting evaluations per school after each screening activity

Contributing to the development of early intervention programmes for special needs in
Health Promoting Schools,

Overseeing the screening mechanism from screening through referrals for
consultations; and dispensation of prescriptions; spectacles, low vision and hearing aids
as necessary .

Assisting the Coordinator Special Needs Education to develop, implement, support,
monitor and evaluate early intervention' programmes developed in response to the,
special needs identified from screening activities. .

Participating in all Health Promoting School conrrnitiee meetings and contributing to the
implementation of other health promoting initiatives in selected schools

Monitor and evaluate and prepare periodic reports for all activities

Period of employment
12 months

Remuneration
Attractive and commensurate with qualifications

Qualifications
Bachelors' degree in education or health or related field.
At least three years experience in the education, health or school health sectors.
Experience in special education would be an asset

Requirements:
Candidate must be computer literate.
Working knowledge of EPI INFO would be an asset.

/-pphr..i: o- to be sent to the:

Permanent Secretary,
Ministry of Education,
26 Brickdam, Georgetown


Closing date for ap;i:!lt .,il. is 27' June 2005


governmentt ads can be viev or, I


also realized that the current de-
livery capacity of the small
farmers providing the fruits to
the company would not be suf-
ficient to make optimal use of
the new packaging plant.
To overcome the constraint
of limited fruit supply and en-
sure the necessary level of pro-
duction, the small farmers
would have to increase in num-
bers and individual production
capacity. Some farmers would
also have to switch crops to
fruits that DDL/Topco had a
demand for. For example, in the
beginning there were too many
farmers growing passion fruit,
but the company found that
there was a lack of cherries.
The task was clear: the small
farmers needed financial support
to -make various kinds of
changes that could make their
activities more useful to the
company and thus more profit-
able for both parties.
DDL/Topco could have
provided the full financial sup-
port necessary to the increase
and/or redirect the production
capacity of the small farmers
that were supplying fruits to
the company, but the company
decided that IPED could man-
age the task more effectively
and efficiently.


The rationale of the part-
nership was straightforward.
IPED would issue loans to
the farmers, the farmers
would increase production,
and/or switch to demanded
crops, Topco would guaran-
tee a market for the in-
creased produce, and thus
the farmers would be capable
of repaying IPED and in-
crease their incomes and stan-
dard of living.
Hence, the partnership
was established in 2002 and
by 2003 the farmers had in-
creased production from 750
thousand to approximately
one million pounds of fruit.
By *2004, production had
further increased to 1.2 mil-
lion pounds and DDL/Topco
projects that 2005 will see
the production of 1.5 million
pounds .of fruit. Assuming
that the benevolent cycle
continues, production should
increase to over two million
pounds by 2007. The num-
ber of farmers involved in
the programme has also in-
creased from approximately
100 in 2003 to approxi-
mately 150 in 2005.
This partnership will be one
of many to be discussed at the
upcoming Caribbea'n MDG
Business Initiative at Le
Meridien Pegasus, June.23 and
24, 2005. Two interrelated
themes are at the heart of the
Initiative: how businesses can
help to achieve the MDGs while


maintaining a profit orientation
and the role of partnerships in
that regard.
The Initiative will be
hosted by UNDP Guyana, in
partnership with the Gov-
ernment of Guyana and the
Private Sector Commission,
and will bring together indi-
vidual businesses, business
associations, civil society en-
tities, Government bodies,
U.N. organizations and other
donor organizations from the
local and regional levels. ,
In an effort to shed some
light on what the private sec-
tor in Guyana is already do-
ing to help achieve the
MDGs, we would very much
like to hear from our readers
who have stories to tell about
what might be called 'devel-
opment-oriented business
practices'. If you do, please
send your story to:
carib.mdg.initiative@undp.org.


GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA NATIONAL ASSEMBLY
FISCAL AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAM (FFMP)

RESEARCH ASSISTANT

The Government of Guyana (GOG) has concluded a Loan Contract'# 1551-SFIGY (US$29.5
million) with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). Part of the proceeds of this Loan will be
applied to the financing of the implementation of the Fiscal and Financial Management Program
(FFMP). The FFMP consists of three sub-components namely:

(i) Tax Policy and Administration;
ii) Public Sector Financial Management; and
.(iii) Fiscal and Fiduciary Oversight.

The overriding aim of the three subcomponents of the FFMP is to build effective and sustainable
executive and oversight capacities in the Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA), the Ministry of
Finance (MOF), the National Assembly (Economic Services Committee (ESC) and Public
Accounts Committee (PAC) and the Public Procurement Commission (PPC), when established.

The PEU on behalf of the National Assembly hereby invites applications from suitably qualified
candidates for the below listed vacant position.

RESEARCH ASSISTANT

Requirements

(i) At least a First Degree in Social Sciences or equivalent and a minimum three years
experience as a Research Assistant and/or five years experience in similar capacity;
(ii) Proven writing, reading and interpersonal skills;
(iii) Excellent computer skills including conducting research on the intemet; and
(iv) Knowledge of Policies and Procedures of National Assembly in Guyana compared with
other countries, would be advantageous.

Pe' iled Terms of Reference for the post referred to above may be obtained from:

Confidential SecretarylAdministrative Assistant
Fiscal and Financial Management Program
Public Buildings
Brickdam Stabroek, Georgetown
Telephone No. 227-7026
Email: ffmpnationaLassembly@yahoo.com


The closing date for all applications is 8th July 2005

Prograin Manager .
PEU, National Assembly


Government ads can be viewed, on
http l!www.gina.gov.gy


~n, --g ~IC4 P I





SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005


CGX oil drillc


operations continue


(GINA) PRIME Minister
Samuel Hinds said the mood
is one of general optimism as
ON Energy, the subsidiary of
CGX Drilling, embarked on
its third week of drilling op-
erations at Yakusari.
Based on recent analysis
made, the probability of finding
oil in Yakusari may have in-
creased to one in three.
According to the Prime
Minister, the initial analysis re-
vealed that there was a one in


20 chance of finding oil in the
Corentyne, Berbice area. Fol-
lowing additional prospecting
works, 20 spots were discov-
ered in three clusters, which
posed a one in seven probabil-
ity of finding oil.
The optimism was spurred
during the drilling of the first of
four wells. Drilling will be done
between 3 000 to 6 000 feet
deep and the first well is ex-
pected to be completed by the
end of June;


New CAIC

President elected
MR JAMES Moss-Solomon, Chief Corporate Officer at Grace
Kennedy & Company Limited of Jamaica, has been unani-
mously elected President of the Caribbean Association of In-
dustry and Commerce (CAIC).
His election came at the organisation's 50th Annual General
Meeting earlier this month at the Courtyard Marriott, Invaders Bay,
Trinidad and Tobago.
A press release said Mr Moss-Solomon has served on the CAIC
Executive for the period 2003- 2005. He will appoint a cadre of
eight Vice Presidents to the Executive Committee. Outgoing Presi-
dent for the term 2003-2005 Dr Rollin Bertrand, will be a member
of the Executive Committee
Mr Audley Walker, Honorary Consul for Barbados in Trinidad
and Tobago, has been reappointed Treasurer for a third term. Mr
Walker is a past President of the CAIC (1997-1999).
Mr Wendell Callender, incoming Secretary to the CAIC
Board, is the Executive Director of the Barbados Manufactur-
ers Association. He has succeeded Mr Dav-Ernan Kowlessar
Please turn to page 15


Operations are being con-
ducted in three phases, and are
aimed at determining whether
there are adequate reserves for
commercial activity. The project
is currently in the exploratory
phase, which is to be followed
by the appraisal and develop-
ment phases.
Yakusari site was one of the
top prospects out of 20 identi-
fied areas after seismic and
geochemical surveys. The three
other sites identified for the ex-
ploration programme are
Palmyra, Albion and Hermitage
in Berbice
A team of 30 specialists
from Trinidad and Tobago is
conducting the drilling opera-
tions supported by a team of
about 25 Guyanese. The team
includes Drilling Engineers, Ge-
ologists and other technical spe-
cialists.
Prime Minister Hinds noted
that the result ensuing from ex-
ploration along the three clus-
ters would determine the need
for continued drilling at yet an-
other potential site.
The Prime Minister added
that if successful, the operations
could contribute significantly to
Guyana's economy, in addition
to providing additional employ-
ment.
ON Energy, which is owned
primarily by Guyanese share-.
holders, has so far invested
some US$6M in the operations


MINISTRY OF HEALTH




The Ministry of Health invites Tenders from suitably qualified Contractors to submit bids for the
execution of the following works:-

Lot (A). Construction of Apartments to Ground Floor of New Doctors' Quarters New
Amsterdam, Berbice

Lot (B). Rehabilitation of Building Doctors' Quarters Vryman's Erven, New Amsterdam,
Berbice

Lot (C). Rehabilitation Works and Trestle to Doctors' Quarters, Fort Wellington Hospital
Compound, West Coast Berbice

Tender Documents. can be obtained from the Administrative Office, Ministry of Health,
Brickdam, during the hours of 9am to 3pm Monday to Friday upon payment of the sum of
Three Thousand Dollars ($3,000.00) each for Lot (A) and Two Thousand Dollars ($2,000.00)
each for Lots (B) and (C).

Each Lot tendered for must be.enclosed in a plain, sealed envelope, which does not in any way
identify the Tenderer. On the top left-hand comer of the envelope, the Project tendered for must be
clearly written.

tenders must be addressed to the Chairman, National Procurement and Tender
Administration Board and must be deposited in the Tender Box situated at the Ministry-of
Finance, Main and Urquhart Streets, Georgetown not later than Tuesday 5th July, 2005 at
9:00 am. Tenders will be opened immediately thereafter.

Each Tender must be 'accompanied by valid Certificates of Compliance from the
Commissioner-General, Guyana Revenue Authority and the General Manager, National Insurance
Scheme in the name of the individual if individual is tendering or company if company is tendering.
A Bid Security of 2% of the tendered sum is required for each Lot. Failure to do so will result in
automatic disqualification of the Tender.

Tenders which do not meet the requirements stated above will be deemed non responsive.

Tenderers or their representatives are invited to be present at the opening of Tenders on Tuesday
5th July, 2005 at 9.00am as stated above.

Sonya Roopnauth Government ads can be viewed on
PERMANENT SECRETARY http://www.gina.gov.gy


in Guyana. This includes capi-
tal equipment, research, labour
and exploration licence. The
company is currently on the in-
ternational stock market and is
hoping to attract investment
from large-scale foreign traders.
Several other companies
have expressed an interest in
exploring 'other sites in
Guyana. Guyana Geology
and Mines Commissioner
Robeson Benn said SADHNA
Petroleum, a Trinidad and To-
bago company, is also working
with the Commission to begin
exploration of a site adjacent to
the ON Energy's at Yakusari.


Lens CroStf
C1 F' -T I C. A. k. w~
40 Croal Street


Stabroek, Georgetowr
Tel: 223-5865


We are offering unbeatable discounts on
all RX Spectacles .
Create a design of your choice and we
make to order!
Either RX Sun Shades or Spectacles in
any form
Free eye test and one frame for senior
citizens and kids below 13 years
Feel fearless when it comes to eye-care
Come and join the professionals in a
sight clear Guyana


1


ir-'.


C fr p p.
SCall for appointments,!

^~~wz 4ilei ~an ^wu


GUYANA REVENUE AUTHORITY

VACANCY




LEGAL OFFICER

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the vacant position of
LEGAL OFFICER LEGAL SERVICES.

POSITION SCOPE
The Legal Officer is responsible for drafting legislation and regulations relating to the
Administration of the Revenue Authority and. to conduct ieseiich to obtain
appropriate amendment to existing Acts of the enactment of new legislation. The
incumbent should also be able to analyse documents such as writs. affidavits and
statements of claim to determine basis and suitable course of action to i repre-r;t the
Authority in Courts of Law or to advise on legal matters. The incumbent ;.luIiei-:,
information to deLiemine v lidIr' of claim or icomplaint by efei( ing to relevant laws
and local precedents and prepares legal opinion or advises on appropriate action to be
taken

The Legal Officer is required to discuss drafts with Senior Counsel and make
appropriate revisions before appearing in Court or at oth, I.li forum for or on ib -.
of the Authority. The incumbent assists in the pri tr. .tit., of contracts and other
important documents by determining legal implications and inconsistencies and
advises and makes recommendations to Senior. V'ii..:giirneIf as necessary. The
Legal Officer is required to ascertain tihe validity' of claims made by individuals and
agencies against the -'.evpnue ALutIhriit and participates in iego:ti':tingj settlements
where necessary.

REQUIREMENTS (EDUCATION & EXPERIENCE
EDUCATION
LLB Degree; Attorney-~at-Law. Must be admitted to practice in the Court of Guyana
and be conversant with the Laws of Guyana as v'til as Income Tax and Customs Laws
and related 'nterr nti:nrial conventions.

TRAINING
Experience.in conducting research on legal t!iLoiit. and priinciplie- and their
relationships to specific laws or court judgements in order to respond to requests
from officials of the Revenue Aut i ] ri.y

EXPERIENCE
A minimum of four(4) years legal practice. Must have a wide range of knowledge
pertaining to Customs and Revenue/Tax Administration. Must be able to prepare and
review draft legislation.

Applications with detailed CV should be submitted not laterthan
Thursday June 30, 2005 to the:

Commissioner General
Guyana Revenue Authority
357 Lamaha & East Streets
Georgetown





10 .- SUNDAY CHRONICLE Junei2, 2005




NEW INVESTOR FOR OIL



PALM ESTATE IN REGION ONE


Government aims to make Region 'organic capital'


(GINA) THE impending Sawh made the announce-
privatisation of the oil palm ment during a recent visit to the
estate, National Edible Oils estate, where he met residents
Company Limited and employees to update them
(NEOCOL), which is located on the stage of the ongoing ne-
in Wauna, Region One gotiations between the Govern-
(Barima /Waini), is expected ment and the preferred bidder,
to contribute to an improved DIDCO Trading Company
.factory resulting in enhanced Limited. It is expected that the
production. This is according negotiations would be con-
to Minister of Fisheries, eluded shortly, allowing the new
Other Crops and Livestock, company to take over opera-
Satyadeow Sawh. tions. '


Several issues have been ad-
dressed, including land tenure
and surveys, loyalty exemption
and environmental clearance.
In his address to the em-
ployees, Minister Sawh said
"Privatisation is not a bad
thing," adding that, "new invest-
ments by the private sector
would reorganise, aipd restruc-
ture the facto ry." i
He also said there is demand
for the end product -.the refined


GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA
INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK
MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE
POOR RURAL COMMUNITIES SUPPORT SERVICES PROJECT

Date: [2005-06-08]
Contract No.: 17/2004, 23/2004, 2/2005 & 5/2005

The-Government of Guyana (GOG), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD),
and the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) have approved (by Loan and Grant) the sum of
approximately US$16.5 Mn to fund the: Poor Rural Communities Support Services Project
(PRCSSP), which is working to alleviate poverty in Regions 2 & 3 by increasing rural household
incomes [through the expansion of on farm production and fostering the promotion of rural
micro-enterprises. Part of the proceeds of'the loan will be used for eligible expenditures under
which this invitation to tender is made.

The projects executed by the Ministry of Agriculture (MOA) through the PRCSSP, and has 5 major
componentS, viz D&I Rehabilitation, Technical Support Services, Credit Services, Community
Investment Initiatives and Project Coordination. It will utilize a demand driven approach and will
involve full beneficiary participation in all aspects of the Project Cycle.

The MOA, through the PRCSSP invites sealed bids from eligible bidders for the following:-

17/2004 Cleaning/De-Silting of Channels, Mainstay/Whayaka Amerindian iCommunity,
Essequibo Coast, Region No. 2

23/2004 Construction of Multi Purpose Building and Boat Landing, Aliki Women's Handicraft &
Development Association, Essequibo River- Region No.3 (Re-Advertisement);

2/2005 Ruby/Good Hope Construction of All-Weather Road, Region No.3;

5/2005 Rehabilitation and Excavation of: Channels/Construction of Structures Free and.
Easy/Maria's Lodge Water Users Association, West Bank Demerara, Region No.3,.

Bidding Documents (and any additional copies) may be -purchased from the Project Manager's
Office, at Den Amstel, West Coast Demerara from 10th June, 2005, for a non-refundable fee of
eight thousand dollars ($8,000) or its equivalent in a freely convertible currency for each set.
- Interested bidders may obtain further information at the same office.

Bids must be enclosed in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identity of the Bidder anl must be
clearly marked on the top, left-hand comer "Tender for the Construction of............ k ....... 2004
or 2005 PRCSSP. Do not open before 9.00 hrs, July 5, 2005."

Bids shall be valid for a period of 90 days after Bid opening and must be accompanied by a
Security of no less than Two Hundred Thousand Guyana Dollars (G$200,000.) or its equivalent
in a convertible currency, valid IRD and HIS Compliance Certificates and must be addressed to:

The Chairman
National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown.

All bids are to be deposited in the Tender Box located in the Ministry of Finance building, Main
& Urquhart Streets, Georgetown, before.9:00 hrs. on July 5, 2005. Bids will bel opened in the
presence of the bidders who choose to attend immediately after 9:00 hrs. on July 5, 2005,

The Employer reserves the right to accept or reject any or all Bids without assigning an reason
whatsoever, and not necessarily to make an award to the lowest Bidder. -

Permanent Secretary Government ads can be viewed on
http://www.gina.gov.gy .


oil but the estate needs an in-
jection of new and modern
equipment, which would boost
production.
It is expected that with
new management, other
transportation routes to the
city would be explored to re-
duce cost. This would result
in a superior product and bet-
ter wages and salaries for
employees.
Minister Sawh assured resi-
dents that Government stands
firm in supporting the estate
with new management.
"The Government has not
and would not abandon the oil
palm estate at this crucial time
of change," he said, adding that
"We would ensure the best deal
in privatization." He also said
that even when the estate is
fully privatised, the Govern-
ment would ensure that the em-
ployees are treated fairly at all
times.
Following the current
privatization phase, which
would accommodate the new
operation, the employees re-
ceived severance pay from the
Government through NEOCOL.
Though the payment formally
terminates the employees' en-
gagement with the estate, pro-
visions have been made for them
to be rehired by the new com-
pany.
However, Minister Sawh


urged the employees "to get out
of the estate syndrome" and
seek other ways of establishing
varying industries. He advised
them that with the availability
of resources such as land, they
can grow their own oil palm or
get involved in other activities
and expand their economy.
He said the National Ag-
ricultural Research Institute
(NARI) will provide assis-
tance and advice on the types
of soils in the region and the
kind of crops that could be
grown there. NARI could pro-
vide residents with planting
material such as seedlings to
start their own farms in vary-
ing products, and do so at a
nominal cost, he said.
The Minister noted that
there is potential for organic ag-
riculture in the region and the
aim is to make Region One the
organic capital of Guyana.
The Wauna Oil Palm Estate
(WOPE) was established by the
Ministry of Agriculture in the
1970s, as a pilot project to test
the viability of cultivating oil
palm in Guyana. From 1972 to
1983, the, Ministry cleared an
area of 1,400 acres, but only cul-
tivated 1,000 acres with 50, 000
palms that were purchased from
Nigeria and the Ivory Coast.
The estate was subse-
quently handed over to Guyana
Agricultural Products Com-


pany, and then later to the
Guyana Sugar Corporation
(GUYSUCO), which then
transferred it to the National
Edible Company Limited
(NEOCOL) in 1985.
NEOCOL processed
coconut oil and made attempts
to process palm oil. However,
this attempt was unsuccessful,
and as such, the crude palm oil
was sold to the animal feed pro-
ducers for inclusion in their ani-
mal feed products. WOPE be-
came the sole operating estate of
NEOCOL in 1997 subsequent
to the privatization of the
NEOCOL business at Farm and
the San Jan Estate.
In 2003, the Privatisation
Unit invited tenders for the busi-
ness of WOPE. Three bids were
received and DIDCO Trading
Company Limited was selected
as the preferred investor. The.
Privatisation Unit is currently
finalising the transaction with
DIDCO_
In April 2005, the estate
was incorporated and has be-
come known as Wauna Edible
Oils Company INC
(WEOCI). The management
of WEOCI has tried a num-
ber of initiatives towards al-
ternative economic activities
to subsidise the estate's op-
erations witl limited success.
These include cash crop
farming and aquaculture.


The Cheddi Jagan International Airport Corporation wishes to invite suitably
qualified persons to fill the vacancy for a:

MANAGER, COMMERCIAL AND ADMINISTRATION

The Manager, Commercial and Administration will report to the Chief Executive
Officer and will be responsible for leading and directing the Commercial,
Financial and Administrative Operations of the CJIA Corporation, to enable the
Corporation to meet defined business objectives.

The successful candidate should possess the following qualification and
experience:

Fully qualified ini accountancy (preferably ACCA)

Extensive experience and knowledge of the financial environment. This
will include fin ncial controls, contracts, financial and accounting
services

Have excellent interpersonal, communications and problem solving -
skills. I

Must be, mature, independent, proactive and capable of representing
the Corporation.

Applications must be addresses to:

Deputy Chief Executive Officer
Cheddi Jagan International Airport Corporation
Timehri
East Bank Demerara

Closing date for applications is Wednesday 22nd June 2005.
.,'. . Government ads can reviewed on.http1/www.gina.gov.gy .





Y ADNUS CHRONICLE Jun 2000


. . . ,


Today is World Day against Child Labour



STAKEHOLDERS MOVE TO



ELIMINATE CHILD LABOUR


MOST of' the cases of child
labour in Guyana are found in
the fishing industry. It has been
found that in all ten administra-
tive regions of the country, many
children harvest and vend fish
rather than attend schooL'
Executive Director of the
Consultative Association of
Guyanese Industries (CAGI),
Mr.. David Yankana, AA, in a
recent';'Viey point' programme
aired on National Communica-
tions Network (NCN) radio last
'ThIurida,. stressed'the need to
u rgentil. 'address child labour,
wthi'h has indisputable evidence
ofeislienrce'here.
'As' Guyana and the rest of
the ,World ,celebrate World Day
Against Child Labout today,
n more than half the world's chil-
.dren'are' suffering extreme dep-
n1 ailonns from poverty, war and
HIV/AJDS conditions that ef-
If cmeli den', children a child-
hood and hinder the de',elop-
nient of nanon .
Guyana's First Lady, Mrs.
:yarshnie Jagdeo, and other local
stakeholders, are. pursuing a
study of the phenomenon at
Parika. Ea.i Bank Essequibo. A
preliminary survey there has
,shown that many children are
absenting themselves from
;school in,non-vacation periods.
Hopefully, after the survey,
Yankana said, social partners
will take on the task of ridding
the country of such cases. He
said many Guyanese are of the
impression (hat there is no child
labour in Guyana, only steete


children abandoned by their
parents or unsupervised by
their families.
According to him, such;
thinking is "very wrong" as mil-
lions of children around the
world are held in the. form of.
, slavery and are being offered for
sale, prostitution or trafficking
on-debt bondage, serfdom, com-
pulsory recruitment in armed
conflicts, and for the production
of pornography, and trafficking
of narcotics.
In October 2002, Profesnor
Ken Danns conducted a rapidA:
assessment survey on behalf of
the International Labour
Organizations in:Guyana,, and.
subsequently, global surveys.
found 'that US$760 billion would.
be needed to eliminate .child
labour in developing economies,
where most cases are found ..,
Mr. Yankana quoted Danhs'
as saying "two third of the'
'amount would have to be dedi-
cated to increase the quantiMi
and quality of education to 'ac-'
commbdate all the world's chil-
dren, and would result in the
building of schools, training and
hiring of teachers, and supply-
ing educational materials."
A new UNICEF report titled
'The State of the World's
Children 2005 Childhood'
Under Threat' revealed, that
more than one billion children
are denied a healthy and,
protected upbringing as
promisedby 1989's Convention'
Please turn to page 15


Ministry of Labour, Human
Services and Social Security

INVITES APPLICATIONS TO FILL THE POSITION OF:

One (1) Caretaker (attached to the Guyana Women's
Leadership Institute (G.W.L.1) Cove and John, East
Coast Demerara)

KINDLY SEND ALL APPLICATIONS TO:

Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Labour,
Human Services and Social Security
Lot 1, Water and Cornhill Streets, Stabroek
Georgetown

CLOSING DATE FOR APPLICATION IS 27TH JUNE, 2005

N.B: Applicant must be matured without children (preferred
age should be 35-50 years).

Job Description and Job Specification' in respect of the
above-mentioned position can be obtained from the Personnel
Department, -

Ministry of Labour
Human Services and Social Security
Lot 1, Water and Corohill Streets
Stabroek
Georgetown


Trevor Thomas
Permanent Secretary
.. . ^, . .=. . . .


Government ads can be viewed on
ShttpI/!www.gina.gov.gy


e Pan Amelt ica PAHO 13TH ANNUAL CARIBBEAN
Health
P Organization MEDIA AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE
Si ,,, IN HEALTH JOURNA.SM
S ' v .. v,/.rd He.Il, Organization ..

SThe Pap American Health Organization (PAHO) is pleased to invite entries to the 2004-2005/ :
:, Annual Caribbean Media AWards for Excellence in Health Journalism. This year, entries must';
be submitted by Monday July 11, and eligible work must have been published or broadcast ^
between June 1',2004 and May 31,2005. .. "

Rules ofthe MediaAwards '
This year submissions will be accepted that show evidence of havingbeen widely
ss: imin.ated bh meansiof altemrnatef.media h hnnels :for example audio .and video


tapes and CD-ROMS, or on the.internet or any otheriof the other new media entities.
No more than two entries will be accepted from any one person in each category.
A series, or a story continued, or followed-up over more than one publication, or
': i programme, will be considered a single entry, but must not exceed a total of six stories.: .
', Criteria for judging will include accuracy, analysis,.balance, content, impact, originality,
consistency of focus, relevance to regional health issues, technique and timeliness,
and in the case of broadcast entries; sound and technical quality.
Requirements, the title and duration of each Radio and Television entry must be
clearly marked on a label. Entries must be properly identified and cued. TV entries
which have no cplour bars will be penalized


National and Regional Awards
, The winning entries at national level will go
forward to the Regional Competition

Section A- PRINT
Category 1: Best News Story
Category 2: Best Feature Article or Series

Section B RADIO `,
Category 1: Best News Report
Category 2: Best Feature or Documentary

Section C-TELEVISON
Category 1: Best News Report
Category 2: Best Feature or Documentary

Section D SPECIALAWARDS
Category 1: Best Health Coverage by a
Media House
Category 2: Best Communication/Mass
.Media Campaign in Health
Category 3: Best Health Page


UN AWARDS. All entries for UN
Awards are judged by th'e Regional,
Panel.'

FAO 25'h ANNIVERSARY AWARD
For the best story in print or elect onic media,
dealing with agricultural health, food safety
issues such as, the :production;
manufacturing,' processing, marketing and
consumption of food and theii relevance to'
agricultural health and food safety.


PRIZES


A plaque and cash prize will be presented to
winners at the National level. All winning
entries at National level will be submitted for
the Regional Competition. A cash prize
ranging from US$1000-1500 and plaque will
be awarded to winners at the Regional level.


NEW AWARDS including...
Special Award for Disaster Preparedness
and Response


SagicorAward for Best Story on any Non Communicable Disease
Best Story on Disaster Preparedness and Response
CAREC Award forAlterrhate Media Story on HIV/AIDS
CARICOMAward for coverage of HIV/AIDS


For further details & entry forms:
E-mail: perouner@guy.paho.org
or contact: .
PAHO/WHO 8 Brickdam, Stabroek, Georgetown. ,,
Tel: 225 3000 Fax: 222 6654
PAHO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO USE WORK SUBMITTED IN THIS COMPETITION "'POMOA .'
THE AIMS OF THE COMPETITION AND TO SUPPORT RELATED TRAINING EXERfif$ES.
^ -, -, =1 '; . 4


(Category 4:
Category 5:
Category 6:
SCategory 7:


I


..


. \11


'


, .


v'. '"..**





12 SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005


ACME Photos


stages expo


in Berbice


Berbice Exposition was the
conference room of the Church
View Hotel in New Amsterdam,
Berbice, for one day.
In opening remarks,
Managing Director, Mr Paul
Ramkissoon told participants
that the main aim of the exercise
was to stimulate Berbicians into
retailing in East and West Berbice
the wide range of goods and


services the company has to
offer.
"We are here to show what
we have to offer and to acquire
sub-agents for our products and
services. ACME is a distributor
first and foremost. We do not
offer competition to our
wholesalers," he said.
He added that another
objective of the expo was to give


back something to the
businessmen and
entrepreneurs in Berbice who
have been ACME customers,
some of them for many years.
Ramkissoon explained
that ACME was established in
Georgetown as a family
business in 1935 by his
grandfather the late AshrafAli
(Please turn to page 14)


THE Managing Director and
staff of ACME Photos on
Wednesday showcased a


dazzling array of the products
and services available at the
company during an expo -


targeting entrepreneurs and
businesses in Berbice.
The venue of ACME's


Ministry of Education
The Ministry of Education hereby invites pre-qualified contractors to tender for the
under-mentioned maintenance works.
1. Rehabilitation-Material Production Unit (NCERD) compound
2. Construction of concrete trestle and reservoir-Richard Ishmael Secondary
3. Renovation works-Agricola Nursery
4. Rehabilitation-David Rose Community High
5, Rehabilitation-Central High
6. Electrical works-Essequibo Technical Institute
7. Construction of revetment-Durban Backlands PIC Agriculture
8. Rehabilitation-Ketley Primary School
9. Repairs to St. Stephens Primary (Main Building)
10. Rehabilitation-Government Technical Institute (GTI)
11. Rehabilitation-Ministry of Education 68 Brickdam
12. Rehabilitation-Test Development Section (NCERD) compound
13. Rehabilitation-Bishop's High School
14. Rehabilitation-Head Start Nursery School
15. Rehabilitation-Comenius Primary School
16. Rehabilitation-Thomas Moore Primary School
17. Rehabilitation-Sophia PIC Agriculture Centre
18. Rehabilitation-Cummings Lodge Secondary School
19. Grill work and finishes-Carmel Community High
20. Rehabilitation-St. Peters Nursery School
Tender documents can be uplifted from:
Mr. T. Persaud
Secretary
Ministry of Education Tender Board
21 Brickdam
Stabroek, Georgetown.
during normal working hours upon payment of a non-refundable fee of FIVE THOUSAND
DOLLARS ($5,000) each for items 1-18 and $1,500 for items 19 and 20.
Tenders shall be submitted in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identification ofthe tenderer and
shall clearly mark on the top, left- hand comer, the job for which tendering is made.
All tenders must be accompanied by Valid N.I.S and I.R.D Compliances. All submissions must be
original or certified copies.
Tenders for items 1 to 18 shall be addressed to:
The Chairman
National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown
-and deposited in the Tender box at Ministry of Finance no later than 9: 00 hours on Tuesday 2811
June 2005.
Tenders for item 19 and 20 shall be addressed to:
Chairman
Ministry of Education, Tender Board
26 Brickdam
and deposited in the tender box at 21 Brickdam no than the 30th June 2005.
Tenderers or their representative may be present at the opening, which takes place at the Ministry
of Finance at 9:00 hrs on Tuesday 28' June and Thursday 3011 June 2005 respectively.
The Ministry of Education reserves the right to reject any or all tenders without assigning a reason
and does not bind itself to award to the lowest tenderer.


SP. Kandhi
Permanent Secretary


Government ads can be viewed on
http:/wwwgina.gov.gy


WINNER: Mrs Molly Seeraj receives her free raffle prize of a Polaroid Nightcam and kit
from MD Paul Ramkissoon.









GUN AVENUE AUTHORITY


NOTICE


GRACE PERIOD ENDS

The public is hereby informed that the grace period for the renewal of annual
licences for Motor Vehicles, House Agents, Hucksters, Betting Shops and
other business places expires TOMORROW, Monday June 13, 2005.


Persons renewing their Motor Vehicle Licences are required to present their
Registration Certificate, Certificate of Fitness, Insurance Certificate and
Licence forthe previous year.

Applicants of renewal of Trade Licences should produce their previous
year's Licence, proof of Address and Identification (ID Card or Passport).

s :.::: ,..... :.:... :.. ............

Khurshid Sattaur
Commissioner-General
Guyana Revenue Authority


page12&21.p65 I





SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005


Bodywork shop


destroyed in early


morning fire


A FIRE early yesterday morn-
ing destroyed an automobile
bodywork shop and the upper
half of a house in South
Ruimveldt Park, Georgetown.
The fire, which originated
from the shop, is suspected to
have been electrical, residents
said. The yard housed the work-
shop and a two-storey building
divided into three apartments in
which sisters and their children
lived.
Mr. Shawn Benn operated
the shop.
Ms. Joy Brummel, an occu-
pant of one of the apartments,


said that she suspects that an
electrical appliance must have
been left on and eventually ex-
ploded, causing the tanks of gas
used for spraying motor vehicles
to also explode.
Brummel said her sister,
Ms. Debra Small and her
two children, who lived up-
stairs, were roused from their
beds and were forced to run
with just the clothes on their
backs. They lost everything
in the blaze.
She added that though fire
did not damage her section of
the lower flat, water that


prompt firemen used to put out
the blaze, soiled some house-
hold articles.
The walls and windows
of the other apartment, occu-
pied by Brummel's nephew,
Rayvon Archer, and his girl-
friend, which is closest to the
bond, was scorched and the
panes broken.
Another section of the pre-
mises, which accommodated a
barber shop and a dog kennel,
was spared.
Small and her children
have since moved in with rela-
tives.


The house that was badly damaged by fire yesterday morning. Cullen Bess-Nelson photo)







ATTENTION EMPLOYERS AND
EMP.iOEF RS REPRESENTATIVESIGEORGETOWNil
Al1 Er:. s iI C *n in Geor-gtown Di,. hereby
for .. imm .- a l Co i P.y.-. .,
Schedules (CS must .. :-d in triplicate of


It I ;..-: r. : necessary to introduce the ihii copy ,C 6 to
c the J.,. y v ..- i'. of .. ni'-ber *.. on
:_ forms.

National .-:.ce Scheme is, more a; o :ea!in. to E- .s
*h -... :r.' .,;. -- to ensure ,- ..! m i-m.yees ,.) .r ,- .. .- .,
issued a ... ,..ity Card.

,r :. :, Cc .. s r- .,;i. without or wvi .
numbers cannot be ,-. -'to an' ed person's i before it
r. . .' Y : ,. - r . L e ,r . .


One Toyota Hilux Surf in good
working condition.

Please call telephone.#: 225-3276
for more information.


G GUYANA REVENUE AUTHORITY


VACANCY


LEGAL OFFICER

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the vacant position of
LEGAL OFFICER LEGAL SERVICES.

POSITION SCOPE
The Legal Officer is responsible for drafting legislation and regulations relating to the
Administration of the Revenue Authority and to conduct research to obtain
appropriate amendment to existing Acts of the enactment of new legislation. The
incumbent should also be able to analyse documents such as writs, affidavits and
statements of claim to determine basis and suitable course of action to represent the
Authority in Courts of Law or to advise on legal matters. The incumbent evaluates
information to determine validity of claim or complaint by referring to relevant laws
and local precedents and prepares legal opinion or advises on appropriate action to be
taken
The Legal Officer is required to discuss drafts with Senior Counsel and make
appropriate revisions before appearing in Court or at otherlegal forum for or on behalf
of the Authority. The incumbent assists in the preparation of contracts and other
important documents by determining legal implications and inconsistencies and
advises and makes recommendations to Senior Management as necessary. The
Legal Officer is required to ascertain the validity of claims made by individuals and
agencies against the Revenue Authority and participates in negotiating settlements
where necessary.

REQUIREMENTS (EDUCATION & EXPERIENCE}
EDUCATION
LLB Degree; Attorney-at-Law. Must be admitted to practice in the Court of Guyana
and be conversant with the Laws of Guyana as well as Income Tax and Customs Laws
and related international conventions.

TRAINING
Experience in conducting research on legal theories and principles and their
relationships to specific laws or court judgements in order to respond to requests
from officials of the Revenue Authority.

EXPERIENCE
A minimum of four(4) years legal puarli Must have a wide -ange of knowledge
pertaining to Cuslom';, and Revenue/Tax Adminiili alion. Must be able to prepare and
review draft legislation.

Applications with detailed CV should be submitted not laterthan
Thursday June 30, 2005 to the:

Commissioner General
Guyana Revenue Aithi ity
357 Lamaha & East Streets
Georgetown






-'IWA SUDA CHONCL Jun 12205 -- -


ACME Photos stages


(From page 12)
supported by his w
Rashida.
Ramkissoon, who w
accompanied by his-mot


expo in...

Mrs Bebe Ramkissoon, said: than
rife "Some of your parents and
grandparents have been customers wide
was of my parents and grandparents serve
her and this is our way of saying exhi


k you."
Participants viewed the
e range of products and
'ices which were on
bition.


GUYANA OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

UNSERVED AREAS ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAMME

Date: 9th June, 2005
Loan Contract No: LO 1103/ SF-GY
Invitation for Bids NO: OPM 0112005

1. The Government of Guyana has received financing from the Inter-American Development
Bank towards the cost of the Unserved Areas Electrification Programme (UAEP) which aims
to enhance Governments socio-economic development and poverty alleviation strategy, It is
intended that part of the proceeds of this financing will be applied to eligible payments relating
to the procurement of vehicles, motor cycles, tool kits and office equipment for the
Government Electrical Inspectorate.

2. The Government of Guyana acting by and through the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of
Public Works and Communications, Wights Lane Kingston, Georgetown, Guyana
(hereinafter called "Employer"), now invites sealed bid from interested bidders, with proof of
their legal and technical capacity for the supply oft


GOODS
1.4 X 4 Motor Vehicles
2. Motor Cycles
3. Fax Machines
4. Internet Ready Computers with Printers
5. Photocopier
6. Work kits


QUANTITY
3


3. Interested bidders may inspect bidding documents or purchase a set of bidding documents by
written communication or by applying in person to the Principal Project Coordinator, Unserved
Areas Electrification Programme, Office of the Prime Minister, Ministry of Public Works &
Communications, Kingston, Georgetown, Co-operative Republic of Guyana, Tele.
592-226-3759; Fax. 592-226-7573 between 08:30 and 16:00 hours (Guyana time) Monday to
Friday, except on public holidays as of June 9th, 2005.

4. A payment of a non-reimbursable amount of four thousand ($4,000) Guyana dollars will be
charged for a hard copy of bidding documents. The method of payment will be cash or
Manager's cheque or Bank Draft made payable to the Unserved Areas Electrification
Programme. The address is Wights Lane, Kingston, Georgetown, Guyana. It will not be
necessary to make the request in person to receive a complete set of the bidding documents,
since these can be sent by mail.

5. Bids must be placed in an envelope, and marked on the outside at the top right hand comer
"UNSERVED AREAS ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAMME Bid for the supply of goods for
the GEl BID NO. OPM 01 /2005" and on the left-hand comer the name and address of
bidder.

The envelope should be sealed and addressed to:

Chairperson
National Procurement and Tender Administration Board
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown, Guyana

Bids must be placed in the Tender Box of the National Board at the address mentioned
above on or before 09:00 hours Tuesday 12th July, 2005. It will not be necessary io submit
bids in person since they may be sent by mail. However, the Employer is not responsible for
bids not received thereof on or before the time and date specified for reception of bids. Late
bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

6. Bids will be opened at a public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders' representatives
who choose to attend, at 09:00 hours Tuesday 12th July, 2005 at the address given above
for the submission of bids,

7. Bidders registered in Guyana must submit an IRD Compliance and NIS Compliance
indicating that the bidder has met its respective obligations.


Coordinator
Unserved Areas Electrification Programme
Office of the Prime Minister


Government ads can be viewed on
http://www.gina.gov.gy


Ramkissoon and other
senior staff made presentations
on these which were supported
by slide shows.
Presenters included Mrs
Bibi Boyce, Sales and Marketing
Manager, Ms Indi Narine,
Manager of the Photo Studio and
Digital Centre, Ms Jackie
Sanasie, Manager of
Photographic Supplies and
Electronics, Mr Ganesh Singh,
Senior Lab Technician and
Salesman and Mr Robert Moore,
Senior Salesman in the
camera store.
They identified
sophisticated products made by
companies such as Polaroid,
VIVITAR, BESCOR (batteries
and camera accessories), FUJI,
BUSHNELL Optics (binoculars,
telescopes, night vision
equipment) Silicon Power Flash
Data Storage Products, digital
cameras and other digital electro-
optics and plasma media,
Lowepro protective cases for
photographic equipment, all of
which were on dazzling display.
Staff also gave details on a
wide range of services offered by
ACME's Digital Services and
Lab.
Mrs Boyce said that ACME
has embraced the futuristic
approach to photography by
employing the service of
professional graphic artists
whose quality of work in many
cases can be duplicated only
outside of Guyana.
The services, she said,
included the production of
customized PVC Digital ID
Cards with customized lanyards,


laminations, photoglazing,
restoration of damaged photos,
digital enhancement and
enlargement of photographs,
graphics for banners and even
lighted signs.
Ramkissoon stressed:
"ACME today is not just about
passport pictures. We have
diversified. We have not been
very aggressive in advertising but
we want you to know that we
have new lines of.products; a
range of products that most
people find amazing".
He also said that ACME
gives 12-month warranties on
most products sold and in some
cases lifetime warranties.
"We don't buy from people
who buy from other people. We
buy directly from manufacturers
and as a result there are some
goods you can buy from us
cheaper than you can get it for
in the United States of America."
During the expo, ACME
held a free raffle for participants
on many of the products on
display as a way of "giving


back".
The firm gave away 45
prizes which included
telescopes, cameras and other
gift items, with the most
expensive being a Polaroid Night
Camera kit, comprising, a
photographer's jacket, a baseball
cap and chair/bag.
The winner of the camera
valued at $50,000 (manufacturers
price) was participant Ms Molly
Seeraj of New Amsterdam.
Ramkissoon said responses
by businessmen and
entrepreneurs who participated
had exceeded his expectations.
"Several persons have
expressed interest in becoming
sub-agents for our products and
services," he said adding that the
company intended to shortly
establish a delivery service to
East and West Berbice once or
twice a month at no extra cost to
sub-agents.
ACME Photos will
celebrate its 70th anniversary
as a business in Guyana on
November 15. (CLIFFORD
STANLEY)


Main causes


of accidents

Parking within 30 feet of a corner
Failing to dip lights at nights
Breach of traffic light signals.


NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The Public is hereby notified that there will be two (2) PUBLIC SCOPING
MEETINGS on the proposed. Berbice River Bridge Project. The purpose of
these meetings is to allow the Ministry of Public Works and Communications
to present the details of the project and for members of the public to express
their views and identify issues which should be covered by the Environmental
Impact Assessment for the project.

The meetings will be held on:
MONDAY 27th JUNE 2005 at 4:00pm
at D'Edward Pavillion, D'Edward Village,
West Coast Berbice and

TUESDAY 28th JUNE 2005 at 4:00pm
At Bohemia Primary School,
No. 19 Village, Corentyne

Copies of the Project Summary are available upon request at the EPAoffice:

En vironmental AM nIa g'en't Division
Environmental Protection Agency
U.G Campus, LIST Building
Tiurlt''cfii. Gr. Georgetown
Tel: 222-5784, 2277 Fax: 222-2442
Email: epa(a epaguyana.org
Website: www.epaguyana.org


-SUNDff CHRONICILE June 12, 2005


ilk;%


\


^t






SIIUDAY RHRnOMIGLE .lJne 12. 2005


STAKEHOLDERS MOVE ...


From page 11
on the Rights of the Child, the
world's most widely adopted
human rights treaty.
The report points out that
failure of governments to live up
to the Convention's standards
causes permanent damage to
children, and, in turn, blocks
progress toward human rights
and economic advancement.
UNICEF Executive Direc-
tor Carol Bellamy said, "too
many governments are making
informed, deliberate choices that
actually hurt childhood. Poverty
doesn't come from nowhere;
war doesn't emerge from noth-,
ing; AIDS doesn't spread by
choice of its own. These are our
choices."

UNICEF concluded that:
640 million children do
not have adequate shelter.
500 million children have
no access to sanitation.
400 million children do
not have access to safe water.
300 million children lack
access to information.
270 million children have
no access to health care services.


140 million children have
never been to school.
90 million children are se-
verely food-deprived.
55 of 59 armed conflicts
taking place between 1990 and
S2003 involved war within, rather
than between, countries.
The report reiterates that
the impact on children has been
high as nearly half of the 3.6 mil-
lion people killed in war since
1990 have been children and
they are certainly not immune
from being.singled out as targets,
as underscored by the Septem-
ber 2004 attack on schoolchil-
dren in Beslan, Russian Federa-
tion.
Hundreds of thousands
of children in conflict situations
around the world are still:
recruited-or abducted as
soldiers
victims of landmines
forced to witness violence
and killing'
orphaned by violence
targets of sexual violence
The document said that in
a typical five-year war, the
mortality.rate of children under
five increases by 13 per cent, and
with conflict aggravating exist-


New CAIC President E...
From page 9
who served for the period 2003-2005.
The CAIC, essentially a representational and lobbying body,
advocating private sector interests in regional, international and hemi-
spheric fora, continues to intensify its. role at Heads of Govern-
ment Meetings, Councils of the Caribbean Community and other
regional and international fora, e.g. Commonwealth/UK Business
Council.
Some of the projects that the CAIC is actively involved in-
clude the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ), the. Caribbean Trade
Support Programme (CTS), and the Commonn ealih ICT/SME
project in five CARICOM member states. .
The CAIC's membership spans the Caribbean region, in-
cluding CARICOM member states, French-speaking countries,
the Dominican Republic and Cuba. .


ing poverty, the emphasis
should be on greater global at-
tention and investment in post-
conflict situations, to ensure a
steady and stable transition to
development.
The impact of HIV/AIDS
on children is seen most dra-
matically in the wave of AIDS
orphans that has now grown to
15 million worldwide. The death
of a parent pervades every as-
pect of a child's life from emo-
tional well-being to physical se-
curity, mental development and
overall health.
But children suffer the ef-
fects of HIV/AIDS long before
they are orphaned as many chil-
dren whose families are affected
by the disease, especially girls,
are forced to drop out of school
in order to work or care for their
families.
'They face an increased
risk of engaging in hazard-
ous labour and of being oth-
erwise exploited. Many teach-
ers, health workers and other
adults on whom children rely
are also dying and because of
the time lag between HIV in-
fection and death from AIDS,
the crisis will worsen for at
least the next decade, the re-
port predicted.
The report detailed mea-
sures nations must employ to
prevent the spread of AIDS,
keep adults with HIV alive and
provide care for children already
orphaned.
At its 87th session, the In-
ternational Labour Organisation
(ILO) unanimously adopted a
convention and recommenda-
tion, banning the worst forms of
child labour.
Governments and
organizations worldwide then
agreed to eliminate the worst
forms. The convention received
150 ratifications, including


-. lorei-n lchanzel Market Avctmities
___ riday u~~ne>.v ,.,miuarm Indicators
Friday June 03, 2005- Thursday June 09, 2005 l
1. IXCllH.AGE RATES
Buwin; Rate Selling Rate
\. US Dollar NOTES OTHER NOTES OTHF.R
B.ank .lrBaroda . 19700 198,00 20L00 203,00
Ran.k ,.r aScotia' 189.00 198:00 201 00 204.00
Cui'en, Bank .19Z.00 .198.40 201'O 204.00
Demerara Banki I"15 00 l97.00 201.00 202.00
GB I' .190.00 19500 201 00 o201.00
NBIC 198.00 19S 00) 202.00 204.00
Bank Average 1- 93.50 197.40 201.50 203.00
Nonbank Cambios Av. (5 largest) 199.40 202.20


BoG Average Market Exchange Rate: .US$1.00 = G$200,10p

B. Canadian Dollar
1, ii.L a rg, r f. 00n 14 'ii) I' 2 15&&8) .

C. Pound Sterling ..

Bank AVerage 325.83 348,80 357.80 .?70.43.

D. Euro .
BankAverage 218.75 241.25 246.25 259.75
E. Selected Cariconi Exchange F. LIIOR US$ G, Prime Rate
Rates London Interbank Offered
Rate.For Thur..-Junc.09. 2005

TTS= G$28.75
Bdos$= GS 91.69 3 months 3.35000% US 6.00%
$ = GS 4.45 6 montlis 3.54000% Ouyana 14 .4%
ECS= GS 65.56
BelizeS= S 93.71 ,
Source: International Department, IB.ank of Guvyana


Guyana's on January 15, 2001.
The convention applies to.
all persons under the age of 18
and calls for immediate and ef-,
fective measures to secure the
prohibition and elimination of
child labour as a matter of ur-
gency.
According to the ILO,
rapid assessment studies
done in 2001 and 2002 in
Belize, Barbados, Bahamas,
Jamaica, Guyana, Suriname
and Trinidad and Tobago re-
vealed the existence of child
labour in forms such as com-
.mercial sexual exploitation,
construction and street
work.
World Day Against Child
Labour was established in
2002 by the ILO to raise vis-
ibility of global and local ef-
forts and to highlight the glo-
bal movement to eliminate
the practice of Child Labour,
a ILO statement said, adding
one of the many activities to
mark the observance is the
launching of a web page on
child labour. (Renu
Raghubir)


OUUMUnnUL6 UIV


THE SUGAR INDUSTRY LABOUR WELFARE FUND COMMITTEE


INVITATION TO TENDER


DEVELOPMENTAL WORKS

Tenders are invited from suitably experienced Contractors to bid for the
projects mentioned below:
1. One Green Heart (Heavy Duty) 30 ft long x 12 ft wide at Area 'LL
Patentia, West Coast Demerara.
2. Construct one Green Heart Timber Bridge (Heavy Duty) 24 ft,.
I long x li ft. wide atArea "JJ", Industry New Scheme, East Coast
Demerara.
3. Construct one bridge leading to Plantation No., 78 Housing
Scheme, Corriverton, Berbice and to construct one quarter mile
fair weather road with red brick approaching the said bridge.:
Tender documents .can be uplifted from the Sugar Industry Labour..
Welfare. Fund Committee (SILWFC). Office any time from June 20, 2005
from Monday to Friday from 08:00 a.m. to 04:15 p.m. upon making a non-
refundable deposit of seven thousand- dollars ($7,000) for each
document.
Each tender document should be placed in separate envelopes and
placed in one large sealed envelope marked on the outside, the name of
the project at the top, left-hand corner and addressed to:

The Chairman
The Sugar Industry Labour Welfare Fund Committee
87 Duke& Barrack Streets,
Kingston
Georgetown
and should be deposited in the Committee's Tender Box located at the -
above address.

Tenders will be closed on July 8, 2005 at 10:00. hrs and tenders will be
opened immediately. thereafter in the presence of tenderer(s) who may
wish to be present.

.Valid Guyana Revenue Authority Certificate of Compliance and
Employer's and. Employee'r National Insurance Scheme Certificate of
Compliance must be submitted at the time of tehdering, failing which the
tender will be deemed invalid.

The Committee reserves the right to accept or reject and to annul the
bidding process and 'to reject all tenders at anytime prior to the award of
the contract without thereby. incurring any liability to the affected
tenderer(s) or any obligations to irif6rm the affected, tenderer(s) on the .
grounds for the employer's action.


c


SENIOR ACCOUNTS CLERK
QUALIFICATIONS:
5 Subjects CXC, Maths and English inclusive
CAT Level 1, 2 & 3 or LCC Subjects equivalent and ACCA
Levell. Peach Tree Accounting Knowledge would bean asset.
REQUIREMENTS:
Minimum of 3 years experience in similar position.
Pleasant Personality
Apply with handwritten application
To: KOJAC MARKETING AGENCY
140 "B" Quamina Street, Georgetown, Guyana.
P. 0. Box 10809



LEGAL COUNSEL & LEGAL SECRETARY
International bauxite mining joint-venture is looking for a
Legal Counsel and a .Legal Secretary to assist .its
expatriate General Counsel in the'Georgetown office.

LEGAL COUNSEL
Successful candidate will have 3 to 5 years of post
qualification experience with a law firm. Responsibilities
will include handling a broad -range of matters including
corporate, labour law, contracts, mergers & acquisitions.

LEGAL SECRETARY
.At least 3 years legal secretarial experience gained with a
good law firm, excellent communication and IT skills.

To register your interest, please fax your CV to:
Cecelia Williams at 225-7975.





16 SUNDAY CH



PPP salutes Walter



Rodney


THE People's Progressive Party (PPP) in a press release
yesterday saluted Walter Rodney and called on
democratic-minded Guyanese to redirect themselves
to the principles he fought so passionately for.
These principles, working class unity, ethnic solidarity,
and social and economic liberation, are part of Dr. Rodney's
sterling contribution to the restoration of democracy in
Guyana, the party said.
"Walter Rodney was a victim of state terrorism. He
was murdered by a vicious PNC government that had
become totally intolerant of criticism. Because they


governed by rigged elections and terrorism, any critics,
was seen as threatening their rule," the PPP said.
The party said that it is important that these events be
recalled as "we are witnessing attempts by many of the
same forces that benefited from the undemocratic rule now
threatening the democracy that was established since
1992."
The ruling party declared that the crime situation that
has developed has had strong political linkages.
The party joins with family and friends in extending a
warm welcome home to Mrs. Pat Rodney and her children.-


Ss rN- mge. oan S3 mmn b!ba

-: "Copyrighted Material.

-- .. ......... C

- -e Syndicated Content.

Available from Commercial News Providers"
^R>~~~~ .m-^ : : ^ fw


PRESIDENT BHARAT Jagdeo(left), with PrimeMinister Sam
to mark the 25th Anniversary of the assassination of politic,


- Gonsalves at Walter Rodney


By Ruel Johnson
PRIME Minister of St.
Vincent and the Grenadines,
Ralph Gonsalves unleashed a
fiery feature address on an
unsuspecting audience at the
official launching of the
Walter Rodney Groundings.


Dr. Walter Rodney. Rodney was
killed on June 13, 1980 when a
walkie talkie given to him by
then GDF sergeant Gregory
Smith exploded in his car.
Gonsalves said that he had
noticed a certain tendency by
some media organizations to say
simply that Rodney "died".


"We must not forget," urged ."Of course," siid Gonsalves
Gonsalves "We must not forget to enormous applause, "he did
that Walter was not killed; he did die. But he did not die of old age
not merely die. He was assassi- in his bed. He was cut down in
nated." the prime of his life by assas-
Gonsalves was at the time sins. And you and I know that
delivering what he called an im- while the alleged assassin may be
promptu keynote address at the dead, those who set the context
official launching of Groundings, for the assassination are still
the 25th Commemoration of the around in the region. It doesn't
Assassination of Working People make sense [that] we speak un-
Alliance (WPA) Leader and less -we have a commitment to
prominent Guyanese historian truth."
1"r"li ir, Tirinl- i ,.- I ,iInI I ni.-


mark events in Rodney's life and
what was going on in Guyana at
the time, Gonsalves said that his
friend entered secondary school
at the time the British Guiana,
constitution was being sus-
pended.
"The unity of the working
people of Guyana," said
Gonsalves, "was ripped asun-
der through the machinations
of US imperialism, British co-
lonialism and the connivance
of an opportunistic section of
the political class in Guyana.
I know that we don't talk
these things anymore like
'this. But it doesn't make any
sense for us to be perma-
nently in retreat ever .since
the triumph of Reaganism
and Thatcherism."
The Vincentian PM spoke
of his student days at UWI
Mona where Rodney just four
years older than him was his
history tutor. According to
Gonsalves, the two became
friends, and when Rodney was
barred from entering Jamaica in
1968, it was he as student so-
-aBigga ar- .'r"-'ara


Valued customers, for your
convenience, we have opened
..',- our spanking new, fuly air-
L -t -'----conditioned and spacious branch on
Sa-1 . t. .' the ground floor of the GPO building
(Robb St e'ntrancel, downtown.I
It is with pleasure we will continue to
t offer you the same.quality products
and service you have come to
expect from us.

GPO, Robb St., Robbstown, G/town

A r Tel: 227-7307, 7308


For Ouick & Easy C-POINTTap-ups GSM Networ.:


SECRETARY-GENERAL of CARICOM, Edwin Carrington (left) in conversation with Prime
Minister of St. Vincent and the.Grenadines, Mr. Ralph Gonsalves (centre) and Dr. Rodney's


I~


I1-


3 1





CLE June 12, 2005 "




Guyana to benefit




,from historic




Sdebt deal


linds and his wife Yvonne at the formal opening Groundings
il activist Dr. Walter Rodney.






Groundings launch


city president who led UWI
students in protest of the Hugh
Shearer Administration's deci-
sion.
Gonsalves said that Rodney
saw in his short lifetime the de-
feat of imperialistic constitu-
tional colonialism. He urged that
globalisation, a new form of im-
perialism, should be creatively
countered within the new global.
environment.
On the issue of recognition
of Rodney's legacy by the young
people in the region, Gonsalves
said that [English explorer]
Walter Raleigh was better known
than Walter Rodney among Car-
ibbean youth.


who did extraordinary things be- .
cause of his commitment and his
passion for justice and the de-
fence of human rights.
"We would be doing him a
disservice," said Rodney, "if we
make him into this superhuman
being, someone who no one
could emulate. He did not want
to be a martyr, and we must not
turn him into a saint."
Rodney said when people
today ask her how her husband
might have responded to a par-
ticular.situation were he alive,
she usually answers that she
does not know.
"His work was dynamic
and he would have re-


G UYANA is
among coun
tries which will
benefit from a historic
deal clinched yesterday
by the world's wealthi-
est nations, to wipe out
more than $40B of poor
nations' debt to Interna-
tional Financial Institu-
tiQns.
The deal, struck by finance
ministers from the Group of
Eight industrialized nations in
London after months of tense
negotiations, leaves leaders to
consider proposals for doubling
aid at a summit in Gleneagles,
Scotland, July 6-8.
British Finance Minister,
Gordon Brown said the debt of
18 mainly African countries' to
multinational, lenders would be
cancelled immediately. More na-
tions would qualify in the
months and years to come,
Reuters News Agency said yes-


*Steel Rods


terday.
"We are conscious of the ab-
ject poverty that so many coun-
tries and individuals face. We're
being driven forward by the ur-
gent need to act. We've found
ourselves united with a shared
purpose," Brown told a news
conference.
The deal, which followed
two days of tense and often
heated negotiations will provide
rapid relief to countries under
the Highly Indebted Poor Coun-
tries Initiative (HIPC) including
Rwanda, Ethiopia, Mauritania
and Zambia as well as, beyond
Africa, to Honduras, Bolivia and
Guyana. HIPC was launched by
the World Bank and the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF) in
1996.
According to Reuters, debt
relief campaigners welcomed
the deal but demanded more.
Other campaigners com-
plained that more than 18
countries had to be helped
now if rich nations were to


ever make good on a United
Nations pledge to halve world
poverty by 2015.
"Tomorrow 280 million Af-
ricans will wake up for the first
time in their lives without ow-
ing you or me a penny from the
burden of debt that has crippled
them and their countries for so
long," said Bob Geldof, the anti-
poverty campaigner who
organised the Live Aid rock con-
certs 20 years ago. Those con-
certs raised millions of dollars for
famine victims in sub-Saharan
Africa, and Geldof is planning
follow-up Live 8 concerts next
month aimed at pressuring the
G8 summit in Scotland to in-
crease aid to Africa.
S "We must be clear that
this is the beginning and the
end will not be achieved until
we have the complete package
... of debt cancellation, dou-
bling of aid, and trade jus-
tice," he said.
Brown told the press con-
ference that Britain will pay


$700 million to $960 million
over the next 10 years to fund
the compensation package,
while the U.S. will pay $1.3
billion to $1.75 billion. Ger-
many would pay $848 million
to $1.2 billion to offset future
lost repayments to the World
Bank and the African Devel-
opment Bank.
"We are committed to meet-
ing the full costs to the IMF,
World Bank and African Devel-
opment Bank," said a communi-
que issued at the close of the
meetings in London of finance
ministers from the United
States, Britain, France, Germany,
Japan, Russia, Canada and Italy.
"We will not jeopardise the abil-
ity of these institutions to meet
their obligations." '
The debt relief proposal
was propelled by "Britain
and the United States after
discussions last week be-
tween President Bush and
British Prime Minister
Tony Blair.


The BEstiabishedl Leaders
in- Stee FPocduiActs
Both Mild Steel and High Tensile..Diameters


*..:.. : --.6.00mm to 25.Omm
*Steel Plates K.-?- Thicknesses 0.90mm (20g) to 3/4'" ,
*Steet Angles Sizes from 1" to 4"
*Steel Channels Sizes (A)4" x 2" (B)6" x 3" (C)8" x 3"
*Steel Columns Sizes (A)6"x 6",x 25lbs (B)8"x 8"x 31lbs-


S S~SS 'S -M
'WSwud edono imadisevcei
we makehimint ths suprhma bin
somon wo n oeSoud eulte H
di otwntt 5e aryan.wems
not turn him into a saint.


"Part of our task this
evening is to...commence the
process of elevating the idea, the
notion and practitioners of etman-
cipation; and to look askance at
the bandits. As the young
people ... say, tonight we got to
'big up' Walter."
Gonsalves committed to
honouring Rodney by naming a
secondary school scholarship in
social sciences and "humanities
broadly defined" after Walter
Rodney.
Also present at the event
was Dr. Patricia Rodney;
widow of Walter Rodney who
spoke on her life with Rodney
detailing high points of their
life together. She spoke about
Rodney's love for music and
board games,'and his humil-
ity as a person.
She said that it was impor-
tant for everyone, young people
in particular, to see that Waiter
Rodney was an ordinary man


sponded to our unique con-
ditions we face today. I
know that at sixty-three
years, his work would have
matured and become more
profound."
Also presenting at the event
were prominent women's activ-
ist Andaiye; Vic Insanally,
former Queen's College class-
mate of Rodney; andAli Mazrui
colleague and friend of Rodney
since the early 1970s. The event
was hosted by Horace Campbell,
a long-time friend of Rodney's.
Also present was President
Bharrat Jagdeo who, according
-to Campbell, was a major sup-
porter of the event; as well as.
Prime Minister Sam Hinds and
several otlier ministers of gov-
ernment.
The Groundings con-
tinue today through to
Wednesday with several
events at various loca-
tions across the country.


*Steel Flats
*Steel "I" Beams
*Hollow Sections
*Galvanized Pipes
*Nails


*BRC Fabric.


H


a;


(C)8"x 8" x 581bs -Lengths 40ft ,
-Sizes "'x 1/8" to 6"x" /"
- Sizes (A) 10" x 5 3/4" x 26 Ibs (B) 8"x 5 1/4" x 18 lbs
- Sizes 3/4 "x 3/4". to 4"x4"
- Sizes '/" to 8"
- (A) All sizes Both wire and finishing
(B) Concrete 1 /" to 2 'A"
(c) Galvanized I 1/" to 4"
(D) For sheets both Umbrella and Flat Head
- Rolls of 75ft sizes #65 #66 -#610


*Chain Link Fencing 4ft to 12ft Gauges 13 1' G to 10G
*Aluzinc Corrugated Sheets- All Gauges- any length Including
Pre-painted in five Colours
*Barbed Wire IOWA and Razor Wire types
*Galvanized Purlins Any length available
*Ridgings Aluzinc and Pre-painted in four co
in standard and special lengths ,_
*Spikes Galvanized 4"- 5" 6" Mis


A M, X"Ps


A NAME YOU CAN TRUST


Now


w1ourskin-.



wo


S.





18 SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005


ST. JOSEPH MERCY HOSPITAL
A

VACANCY
exists in the Laboratory Department for:



Requirements:
Diploma/Associate Degree in Medical
Technology from a recognized University.
At least 2-3 years experience in a Clinical
Laboratory setting.
*Send ALL applications to the:
Human Resources Director
St. Joseph Mercy Hospital
130-132 Parade Street, Kingston /
not later than June 17, 2005 ,


prmfu


S


*
e --


-


- *"Copyrighted Material
-- Syndicated Content


Available fronCommercial News Providers"


- a -


GEORGETOWN PUBLIC HOSPITAL CORPORATION

WeCare VACANCIES

Applications are being invited from suitably qualified persons to fill
the following vacancies of Biomedical Maintenance Technician and
Plant Attendant/Fitter within the Corporation.

Applicants should possess the following:-

BIOMEDICAL MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN
* Diploma in Technology (Electrical) plus two (2) years experience
OR
* Ordinary Technical Diploma in Electrical Engineering plus five (5)
years experience.
OR
* Part 1/11 Electrical Technicians plus seven (7) years experience.
OR.
* Part 1/11 Electronic Servicing Craft course plus ten (.10) years
experience.

* Three (3) years as Technician I.

PLANT ATTENDANT/FITTER
* A sound secondary education with six (6) years boiler house
experience.
OR
* Technician Diploma Course in Mechanical Engineering with three (3)
years boiler house experience.
OR
Technician Certificate Course in Mechanical Engineering with four
(4) years boiler house experience.

Experience in welding would be an asset.

Applications, along.with two (2) references and a recent police'
clearance can be sent to:-

The Director, Administrative Services
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation.
New Market Street
North Cummingsburg
-.eorgetown
.. Deadline for applications is Friday, Juneo24, 2005


* 5-
- ~. .~ ~-

~
S


40-o-w -t
*A dwpq -- o___
.40- q0


-FRCmis .

The ERC in Region Two

' The ihnic Relations Comiiission will be in Region Two on Monday, Junel3
and Tuesday June 14,. 2005'.
Fol'lo ming is its programme of activities:
Monday, June 13 *-

8.30 hrs: Film Festival at the Anna Regina Multilateral School
10.30 hrs: Film F-estival at Charit. Primary School.
17.00 hirs: Film Festival at Devonshire Castle Church -
The ERC will open a Complaints Desk at the Charity Marketing Office
from 9 hrs, to 17 hrs.
r tuesday, June 14

930. htrs: Public Meeting at the Anna Regina Town Hall
11.15 hrs. Film Festival at the Abram Zuil Secondary School
13 hrs: Film Festival at the Anna Regina Town Hall
t3.30 hrs: Regiunal Meeting the Regii1onul Board Room, Anna Regina
15.30 hrs: film Festival NDC Office, Charity

Live Call-in Pr6gramme- RCA TV from 20.30 hrs, to 21.30 hrs.

Complaints Desks will be open-at the Anna Regina Town Hall from 9 hrs. to-
13 hrs. and at the Aurora Youth Centre from 14 hrs.. to.17 hrs. -






SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005





Into U.S. GuN


S -
~ Q ., -
- .
_ ~.
-
- .-~ ~. ~
'~ ~- m


Co-t


S"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content -" .*.
Available from Commercial News Providers"

a .


a -e O


ftv m qma


40-


A A

GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA I
INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

UNSERVED AREAS ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAMME
Vacancy exists for a Chief Electrical Inspector I
Chief Executive Officer

Background:

The Government of Guyana has received a loan from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)
to support the Unserved.Areas Electrification Programme (UAEP). The UAEP will be executed in
three (3) components: (a) Investment Component; (b) Hinterland Demonstration Component and
(c) Institutional Strengthening and Capacity Building Component Under the Investment
Component electricity supplies will be made available to approximately 40,000 households living
in currently unserved areas along the coast of Guyana. The Government Electrical Inspectorate
(GEI) is responsible for among other things inspecting and certifying electrical installations. New
regulations on wiring and other technical standards are expected to be brought into effect under
the Electricity Sector Reform Act 1999 by mid 2005. The Government of Guyana intends to
restructure the GEl for it to operate like a commercial entity and to improve its capacity to
undertake its added statutory mandate of enforcing the new standards. Accordingly the
Institutional Strengthening and Capacity Building Component makes provision for the appointment
of a Chief Electrical Inspector / Chief Executive Officer (CEI / CEO) for the GEl for a period of two
(2) years to be financed from the UAEP loan resources.

Summary of Job Responsibility:

The CEI/CEO will be responsible for (i) reviewing proposed regulations on the technical,
engineering, inspection and other standards applicable to the electricity sector, (ii) preparing a
manual based on the new regulations, (iii) training and developing local staff, (iv) arranging
suitable training programmes for electrical contractors and other interest groups, (v) developing
processes for electrical inspection and certification, (vi) implementing processes for licensing
different grades of electrical contractors, and (vii) in general organizing the restructured GEl to
operate as a commercial entity and fulfill its statutory mandate.

Qualifications and Skills specification:

At least five years relevant experience in both a senior position as a Chief Electrical Inspector and
in the management of a commercial undertaking; or the equivalent relevant experience in a
contracting organisation with substantial involvement in the functions of a Government Electrical
Inspectorate;

A practicing Professional Engineer, with additional Health and Safety experience and
qualifications;

At least BSc Level in electrical engineering or a similar technical discipline.

Application Process:

a) A copy of the full Terms of Reference which includes detailed job responsibilities and skills
specification and the model contract could be downloaded from the website
www.electricity.gov.gy or a hard copy could be obtained upon request from the office at (e)
below or an electronic copy could be obtained by sending a request to
uaep-piu@solutions2000.net.

b) The application letter should highlight the applicants qualifications, experience relevant to the
duties described in the Terms of Reference and accomplishments in previous related jobs.

c) A full curriculum vitae including nationality, date of birth, work experience, educational
qualifications, summary of professional skills and/or expertise, language proficiency, and list
of professional publications is required. Only persons who are nationals of IDB member
countries will be considered. A list of the IDB member countries could be downloaded from
the web site stated at (a) above.

d) The names, affiliation, address, telephone number and email of three references must be
provided.

e) Applications in hard copy should be sent to:

Principal Project Coordinator
Unserved Areas Electrification Programme
Office of the Prime Minister
Wight's Lane
Kingston.

Envelopes should be marked in the top left-hand comer "Vacancy Chief Electrical
Inspector". Applicants may submit applications by email to the address
uaep-piu@solutions2000.net but a hard copy must also be submitted. To enhance the
security of submissions, all files should be submitted in PDF format.

- f) The closing.date-for-applications is on Friday, July 8, 2005& - Government ads can be viewed on
'A*' .:.' -. .. fi rilpwwwginaRgov.gy





20 SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005





REGIONAL DEMOCRATIC COUNCIL
REGION NO. 5 (MAHAICA/BERBICE)


Tenders are invited from suitably qualified Contractors to undertake the following works;-

CAPITAL WORKS:

Buildings:-

(1) Extension of Zealand Primary School

Roads:- Construction


Adams Street, Ithaca, West Bank, Berbice.
Alexander Street, Ithaca, West Bank, Berbice.
1st Street, South Armadale, West Coast, Berbice
Seadam Street, Blairmont, West Bank, Berbice.
1s117 2'1 Cross Street, Section 'A'PB' Bush Lot, West Coast, Berbice.
Fort Path, Crazy Town De Edward, West Bank, Berbice.
1" Cross Street, De Edward, West Bank, Berbice.
Middle Street, Dundee, Mahaicony, East Coast, Demerara.
Grant Avenue, Hopetown, West Coast, Berbice.
Kassim Street, De Edward, West Bank, Berbice
Lall Avenue, Recess, Mahaicony, East Coast, Demerara.
Middle Street, Novar, Mahaicony, East Coast, Demerara.
Foot Path (Play Field Street) Paradise, West Coast, Berbice.
Welcome Street, Rosignol, West Bank, Berbice.
Atoo Street, Woodley Park, West Coast, Berbice.


CURRENT WORKS: (Public Works)

Roads:- Rehabilitation


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
(10)


Jeb Street, Bath Primary School.
Cowdam Street, Bath Settlement, West Coast, Berbice,
Street, Section 'E', Bush Lot, West Coast, Berbice.
Woodley Park School Street, West Coast, Berbice.
Cababa Street, Bush Lot, West Coast, Berbice.
Cotton Tree School Street, West Coast, Berbice.
Calcutta Primary School Street, East Coast, Demerara.
No. 29 School Street, West Coast, Berbice.
Phagoo Street, Bush Lot, West Coast, Berbice.
Bumham Avenue, Rosignol, West Bank, Berbice.


CURRENT WORKS: (Agriculture Roads)

Rehabilitation:-

(1) Perth Biaboo Dam. East Coast, Demerara.
(2) Esau & Jacob Road, East Coast, Demerara.
(3) Champayne Road, East Coast, Demerara.

CURRENT WORKS: (Agriculture-Bridges)

(1) Rehabilitation of Timber Bridge across Yankee Canal, East Coast, Demerara.
(2) Rehabilitation of Foot Bridge Belladrum across FD60.

CURRENT WORKS: (Agriculture Other Infrastructure)

(1) Rehabilitation of La Janette Sluice. East Coast, Demerara.
(2) Rehabilitation of Flood Embankment (Esau & Jacob to Bara Bara)

AGRICULTURE: (Agriculture Drainage & Irrigation)

(1) Rehabilitation of Drains within Mahaica/Mahaicony farm lands.
(2) Manual De Weeding of Mahaicony Creek.
(3) Manual De Weeding of Canals within the Woodlands/Farm N.D.C.

NEIGHBOURHOOD DEMOCRATIC COUNCILS WORK:

Woodlands/Farm N.D.C.:

(1) Manual & Mechanical De Weeding of Drains within the N.D.C.

Hamlet/Chance N.D.C.:

(1) Rehabilitation of Sluice Doors and construction of Roads within the N.D.C.

UnionlNaarstigheid N.D.C.:

(1) Construction of Roads. ,
)Triansportation of Road aBuilding ate-afs.


Bath/Woodley Park N.D.C.:

(1) Transportation of Road Building Materials from Georgetown to N.DC.

Rosignol/Zeelust N.D.C.:

(1) Mechanical De Weeding and Desilting of Drains within N.D.C.

CURRENT WORKS: (Buildings Health)

(1) Rehabilitation of Trestle at Dundee Health Centre, East Coast, Demerara.
(2) Rehabilitation of Trestle at Strath Campbell Health Centre, E.C. Demerara
(3) Rehabilitation of Trestle at Doctor's Living Quarters, West Coast, Berbice.
(4) Rehabilitation & Electrical Works to sections of Mahaicony Hospital.
(5) Repairs to Sisters Living Quarters, Mahaicony, East Coast, Demerara.
(6) Repairs to Nurses Hostel, Fort Wellington, West Coast, Berbice.
(7) Rehabilitation of Roof western side of High Dam Health Centre, E.C.D.

BUILDINGS:- (Education)

(1) Construction of R.C Trestle and General Rehabilitation of Mahaicony Secondary
School.
(2) Rehabilitation of Belladrum Secondary School, West Coast, Berbice.
(3) Rehabilitation of Karamat Primary School, East Coast, Demerara.
(4) Completion of Gordon Table Primary School (Sanitary Block).
(5) Rehabilitation of Rosignol Primary School, West Bank, Berbice.
(6) Construction of Chain Link Fence at Rosignoi Primary (western side).
(7) Rehabilitation of De Hoop Primary School.

Roads- Construction for the Ministry of Works


Old Road, Cross Street, Cotton Tree, West Coast, Berbice
Foot Path, opposite Sookram, De Edward, West Bank, Berbice.
Harold 7 Linton Street, Ithaca, West bank, Berbice.
Henry Street, Rosignol, West Bank, Berbice.
Kingelly 1s' Cross Street, West Coast, Berbice.
Middle Walk, Colden Fleece/Paradise, West Coast, Berbice.
Railway Embankment, Rosignol, West Bank, Berbice.
Shieldstown, First Cross Street, West Bank, Berbice.
Yeoville Middle Walk, West Coast, Berbice.
Zeezight Nursery School Street, East Coast, Demerara.
Humphrey Dam with Rosignol, West Bank Berbice.


Tenders are required to submit the following:


(1) A Valid Certificate of Compliance from the Commissioner of Inland Revenue.
(2) A Valid Certificate of Compliance from the General Manager, N.I.S.
(3) Records of previous performance in areas tendered for.
(4) List of Equipment where applicable.
(5) Two (2) copies plus the one (1) Original tender document must be submitted in
the same envelope.

Tender Documents can be obtained from the Regional Administrative Office, Fort Wellington, West
Coast, Berbice for a non-refundable fee of fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500.00) each.

Tenders for each Job must be separately enclosed in sealed envelopes clearly indicating the Job
applied for.

Tenders must be addressed to:

Chairman,
Regional Tender Board,
Fort Wellington,
West Coast, Berbice.

Tenders must be deposited in Tender Box, R.D.C Office .ort Wellington, West Coast, Berbice not
later than 9:00 a.m on Thursday 23, June, 2005.

Tenders or their representatives may be present on Thursday 23, June, 2005.


E.P. ROCKCLIFFE,
. Regional Executive Officer (ag),.- .... .
"Region i'8


Government ads can be viewed on
http://www.gina.gov.gy






SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005 21


MTV CHANNEL 14
CABLE 65

06:45 h Sign on With Bhajan
Melodies
07:00 b Dabi's Musical Hour
07:30 h Bhakti Bhajans
08:00 h Christ For The Nation
(Live)
08:30 h IQ (Islamic Quiz)Live
09:00 h Indian Movie
12:00 h Religious Melodies
12:15 h Current Affairs
13:00 h Avon Video & DVD
Musical Melodies
13:30 h The Diary
14:00 h The Ramayan
15:00 h Movie
17:00 h Focus On Youths In
Islam
17:30 h Asian Variety Show
18:00 h Birthdays & Other
Greetings
18:15 h Death
Announcements/ In Memoriam
18:30 h Weekly Digest
19:00 h The Fact
19:30 h IBE Highlights
20:30 h Death
Announcements/In Memoriam
20:35 h Health Focus: IPA
21:30 h Indian Movie
00:30 h- Sign Off


CNS CHANNEL 6

06:30 h Deaths & In-
Memoriam
06:50 h Arya Samaj Program
07:00 h GYO Relgious
Program
07:15 h OM NAMAH
SHIVA
08:00 h Geetmala
09:00 h Indian Movie
12:00 h Deaths & In-
Memoriam
12:30 h Radha Krishna
Mandir Satsang
13:30 h.- Bollywood Awards
14:30 h Sanathan Dharma
15:00 h End Times With
Apostle Das
15:30 h Maximum Vibes
16:30 h- Cartoons
17:00 h Greetings
17:50 h Viewpoint By Vibert
Parvatan
18:00 h Indian Cultural Time
18:30 h Eye On The Issue
19:00 h Deaths & In-
Memoriam
20:25 h Interlude
20:30 hi Voice Of The People
21:00 h Heart Land Music
21:30 h Deaths & In-
Memoriam
22:30 h Viewers Choice
English Movie
00:30 h English Movie
02:30 h -AEnglish Movie -
04:30 h Documentary


NCN INC. CHANNEL 11

06:00 h NCN 6 O'Clock
News Magazine(R/B)
07:00 h Voice Of Victory
07:30 h New Life Ministries
08:00 h Lifting Guyana To
greatness
08:30 h-WThe Fact
09:00 h Anmol Geet
10:00 h Homestretch
Magazine
10:30 h National Geographic
11:30 h Weekly Digest
12:00 h Press Conference
With Cabinet Secretary
13:00 h Info. For Nation
Building
13:30 h Groundings
14:00 h- BBC World
14:30 h- Catholic Magazine
15:00 h Growing With IPED
16:00 h Family Forum


1-7:00 h Luth
Fellowship
18:00 h NCN
News
18:30 h Kala Mi
19:00 h One On
19:30 h Close U
20:00 h Feature
20:30 h Movie:T


DTV CHAIN

07:55 hrs. Sign On
08:00 hrs. Sunday
Lady of the Angels
09:30 hrs. Sabrina,
Series
10:00 hrs. Family
10:30 hrs. The Gol
11:00 hrs. Damage
13:30 hrs. James P
to Die
17:00 hrs. Malprai
19:00 hrs. Gre
Announcements
19:30 hrs. Faith i
Catholic Series)
20:00 hrs. Musical
20:30 hrs. A Retu
Biblical Foundation
21:00 hrs. McBride
is Out...Really Ou
23:00 hrs. Sign Off


NTN CHANI
CABLE

05:10hrs -


ieran Men's 05:30hrs Quran This Morning
06:00hrs R. Gossai General
6 O'Clock Store Presents Krishna Bhajans
06:15hrs Jettoo's Lumber Yard
lan 'Presents Krishna Bhajans
One 06:45hrs Timehri Maha Kali
p Shakti Mandir Presents
Ramayan
Titanic 07:00hrs Ramroop's Furniture
Store Presents Religious
Teachings
qNEL 8 07:30hrs Kennav Holdings Ltd
Presents Krishna Bhajans
07:45hrs A & S Enterprise
ay Mass:Our Presents Krishna Bhajans
s 08:05hrs Sa Re Ga Ma
the Animated (Musical Notes) A Live Call-In
Program
Matters 09:30hrs NTN Indian Musical
lden Girls Interlude
d Care 10:00hrs Sunday Morning
'atterson's 1st Services by Pt. Reepu Daman
Persaud
ctice 11:00hrs DVD Movie:
;etings and Branded (Western)
12:00hrs Deaths
in Action (A Announcement & In Memoriam
13:00hrs DVD MOVIE:
I Interlude KARZ (Eng: Sub) Starring
urn to God's Rishi Kapoor, Tina Munim &
n Simi Gareval
e: The Doctor 16:00hrs Guruktila Sandesh
t 16:30hrs Teaching of Islam
f 17:00hrs IPA Presents. Shiv
Mahapuran
17:30hrs- Kishore Local Talent
NEL 18 18:00hrs Mere Awaaz
69 Suno..Karaoke Live
19:00hrs Birthday Greetings /
Meditation Anniversary / Congratulations /


DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE CLOSURE TO ROAD
TRAFFIC FOR SUNDAY, JUNE 12,2005





,7.

.. . . .. ...
. ,.. "



For Ocean Going Vessels & Trawlers 05:30
For Ocean Going vessels opening lasts about 1-1.hrs







P weather

watch g

TODAY'S FORECAST: Mainly fair.
WINDS: Northeasterly to Southerly at 1 to 6m.p.s.
WAVES: Moderately high reaching 2.1m in open waters.
HIGH TIDE: 06:54h at (2.60m) and 20:22h at (2.36m)
LOW TIDE: 01:13h at (1.19m) and 13:27h at (l.07m)
G/TOWN TIMEHRI
SUNRISE: 05:37h N/A
SUNSET: 18:07h N/A
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE: 27.5-32.0C over inland and interior
locations & 26.5-31.0C over coastal areas.
MINIMUM TEMPERATURE: 21.5 23.5C over near inland and
interior locations & 22.5-24.5C over coastal areas.
RAINFALL: Nil
RAINFALL ACCUMULATED : 58.7mm
MARINE ADVISORY: Fishermen and other marine users
are advised not to damage or interfere with the ocean
platforms, whose data are vital to the provision of the
weather information and warnings for the safety of
the marine community.
HIGH TIDE ADVISORY: Nil
SPRING TIDE-ADVISORY: Nil

FOR WEATHER RELATED QUERIES
PLEASE CALL -- 261-2216, FAX 261-2284


Deaths Announcement & In
Memoriam
20:00hrs Maha Shiv Puran
Yagna by Pt. Rajin Balgobind
22:00hrs DVD MOVIE:
KULLAM KHULLA PYAA
KAREN <(Eng: Sub) Starring
. Govinda & Priti Zinta
00:00hrs Sign Off with the
Gayatri Mantra


STVS CHANNEL 4

06:00 h Sign On
06:05 h Morning Melodies
(Old)
08:00 h Cartoons
09:00 h Patsanmajali
10:00 h Caribbean Massala
11:00 h Indian Movie
14:00 h Family Movie
16:00 h Music Break
17:00 h Ahmadiya Muslim
-Jamaat
18:00 h Indian Movie
20:00 h Dance Dhamaka With
Debra Sahadeo
21:00 h Creole Gaff Jumbie
23:00 h Action Movie
00:30 h Action Movie
02:00 h Sign Off


WRHM CHANNEL 7

06:00 h BBC News
07:00 h NBC Today
09:00 h CBS: Sunday
Morning
10:30 h Face The Nation
11:00 h BBC News
11:30 h The Nutty Professor
13:05 h DDL Annual General
Meeting
14:00 h The Bourne
Supremacy
16:00 h Championship
Boxing
17:00 h PGA Golf
18:00 h Eyes On The Issues
18:30 h NBC News
19:00 h 60 Minutes
20:00 h Cold Case
21:00 h Law & Order
22:00 h Crossing Jordan
23:00 h NBC News


VTV CHANNEL 46


r7

. ........ . ......... ...... ..... ..
7 ::.*.--ll....--- .. .... ...... .......


CABLE 102

07:00 h Full House
07:30 h Indian Music Video
08:00 h Memory Lane Live
With RY
10:00 h Movie
13:00 h Movie
15:00 h Movie
17:00 h Travelers Live
Program
19:00 h Majesty 1 Music
Lesson Live With Mark Britton
20:00 h Sports
21:00 h Khans Watch Repair
Center Family Time (Sanford &
Son)
21:30 h Movie
23:50 h Sign Off


RBS CHANNEL 13

09:00 h Hope For Today
10:00 h Revival Crusaders
Hour
10:30 h TBN
12:00 h CNN
13:00 h Canadian Grand Prix
14:00 h Charlotte Street
Wesleyan
14:30 h The Methodist
Church
15:00 h Church Of God
15:30 h Faith & Truth
16:00 h Golf


TENDER NOTICE


Tenders are invited for the construction of a concrete building at Fort
Wellington, West Coast Berbice to house the District 5 Offices of the
Guyana Elections Commission.

Agencies / Persons desirous of tendering are requested to uplift the
prescribed Tender Document from the Guyana Elections Commission, 41
High & Cowan Streets, Georgetown.

Tenders must be submitted to the Secretary, National Board of
Procurement & Tender Administration, Ministry of Finance, Main &
Urquhart Streets, Georgetown, in a sealed Envelope marked "Tender for
the Construction of Office Building GECOM".

Tenders close at 09:00 hours on 2005-07-12 and Tenderers are invited to
the opening of tenders immediately after closure.




Gocool Boodoo
Chief Election Officer/
Commissioner of National Registration

Chief Eiecdon Officer
COM ISIONER OF REGISTRIMOM


18:00 h Biography
20:00 h Extreme Makeover
21:00 h Desperate
Housewives


LRTV CHANNEL 10/17/
CABLE 68

06:30 h Voice Of Deliverance
07:00 h House Of Israel
07:30 h Revelation & Power
08:00 h Cartoons
09:00 h NCN News
Magazine
10:00 h Movie
12:00 h Indian Movie
15:00 h Light From The World
15:30 h Even Stevens
16:00 h Headline News
16:30 h-Aaj Gurukula Sandesh
17:10 h Brandy & Mr.
Whiskers .
17:30 h Proud Family
18:00 h Birthday Greetings &
Dedications
19:00 h In Memory. &
Dedications
19:30 h Death Announcement
& Dedications
20:00 h Islam The Way To
Paradise
20:30 h Final Revelations
21:05 h The Bible Speak-
22:15 h Movie
00:00 h Movie






22 SUNDAY CHRONICLE Junre 12 2005
22 5uNbAY CHRONICLE. Ji~old1? 2005

1: 2 2 6.3 A 3 9. ,..:, 2

~Fax. 225.066?
come .ttc.tba qi, .


Bel Atr Park


1i Geo rgetow n. 4
t-4ease uflccl( yur ac~iSOn ttiohe i -S CLlyca IT Tf~~ .tc.~~i'4(1i.~'~W r~r'' nV:i emvi -'>j.3-


G RE E N H 0 U SE
RESTAURANT, UG Road'.
Special Creole meals'daily for
UG & College Students,. ,$300
per meal.. .



MRS SINGH S Massage.
Hotel and Hcime Ser'vice
availableby 'appointment. I
also work at my home. Tel. 220-
48-42 615.E665


LOW INCOME HOMES

We Duild middle & loi/
income'homes Morigage
financing available Please
call 227-249-1 227-2479



BUILDING. rer,oatinr or.
doing any Kind o"
consiructiori wo,,rk1' We g.e
Iree eslimales Prompl
reasonable and3 reliable
ser,,e Call 6.'22-.i2671629-
2 29



OPPORTUNITIES HI:, orat.
CHEAP! CHEAP! CHEAP! -
.i e .,s Cards;. r,. .l. ,ion-
"'n:ke5, Fl,/er- bil E')ki:
Ero.crures Pr.i,'5amfeT' ei,-
Impress'oins s[nai3 ir Tel 225.
2191 225-7755 627-8008S



.iO'...ELS slor, t.-:.o k re,
an'l I, form s m [a 1:o so
Juieric s Bool Library, 143 Vvesl
Rurm.l'1id Teleprone 223-
823" Mon Fr, ,3 '0 am-
6prrpm ,a Sun 11. am 2
pm. .. .


FOR PROFESSIONAL
COMPUTER Rear ai
. Er i. e C Ill ,a r hr t r s
Computer r Rer pa,; .i .& -
C rnii'te :,i 227-3 .r1',',8i.?-82'3
Hcme Otlhe:e -e,".,,- S
vailale 2 24 l-irs
E BUSINESS Centre, D2
Louisa 'Row, Wortmanville. 226-
0036, 225-6201.. Computer,
Monitor .,iJ UPS Parts:
Transistor, Transformer,
Rc'a.-ier Fly back, Cones,
Calle.. it: Computer Mother
Board & Power Supply Repairs,
Monitor & Printer Repairs and
Service.



WE have Indo'Guyanese
pen friends in North America
who are interested in Guyanese
females for friendship/marriage.
Call 622-8308.
GET immediate friends
linkup with the Junior/Senior/
Singles/Dating/Service 18-80 yrs.
Tel. 223-8237, Mon..- Fri. -8:30
am 6 pm, Sat. Sun. 10am,-
2 pm.
COMMUNICATION with
inire,'sied persons bytelephone
ior ifrendhip Qr serious.
relalon Call i.FI Telephone"
Friendship Link 261-5079,
:Sunday to Saturday, 07:00 to
21:00h. .
THE longest serving Dating
Service is giving -away a trip for
two at a resort. Call today to
niree fr~er.dr comnrarions I, lng
term relant i",p .jr,:,.S2B "e,
f'i. ?- :' 29)1)- ,2 0: 0 -

(7 6 L
most beautiful women and
T'men- in r Georgetown,
G' 1.nn 2_4 hii - days a
A'.,. IT oI.,. .. i. r w eek:
F ,: i :.r-, h.: r, i..culties:
e, ,11 Fri.' -. 'i ... .. Sexual
Orientation: Finance and
Soebs; Dating the Right
Person: Heairh and Exercise
:and more. Call before it's too
9L. 26 0 0 -.'2-dr r 6 'i.i, -
8. 2


AZAD AHMAD
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY -
For all your building construction
needs. New Building, Repairs,
Masonry, Varnishing,. Plumbing,
Painting, Electrical Wiring,
Guttering, General Construction.
Contact 220-9361 624-5583,
610-6012. 76. Persaud St.,
Annandale South, 'EC,..



COME for your weekend''
getaway'or an1' ddA any time;,
njoy the bird; and the oreeze:
Wlle .,i u st -la ;i Ih beauiilful
In,.i Relreal H .el si Ule, o,_,J
a ir, re -acr.e fruit f.arm Ier
minutes walk from pusnh, Park
Beac:n and Ci,, I.1land Disco
Enjo.: the largest outdoor mareil
e..:r, Sur.da, al Parka For mro,
,ri,:,rn',alcin -all 2610-4504 or".
: i-44 51' Als,,. i' you ar. .
l:.:'kin. or a3 place IO slav i' -
Parikas for 3 days or more, ner
s i ,' al *:ne ol Our lu ur'Ou suil.ES
ileal for foreigners or anorne
iloC. n. lor a r,,me., away Irom'n
home Conlaci u ai 260-4-151
,:,r ..,s 1 uS a 61 P.aria Ea lsi
E'lr- E.,sequito


BEAUTYSALN


lDRA E,. uuiI Salon 1.-
r. i-.. n.qiu f.: :(i l a .-
R, al, i'- 1,1n-i dIal 'dr' .',r,
rail' Also 2e ar Ca ilurc
..ua l e Tel 2I l:- 16 1
NATURAL ATTRACTION
BEAUTY SALON 2'1 r'ur.h-,-
t o. lr i u ,.= [ ,''. 0n F ,:.',"
Rela.rnq Scalp TI -.alirr, e ri
" ,1.3 V '/a.-e H ,i. r C o .i :uc' ,'
P' 3..,- r. Tel 2:1 l.- 6.,". Oped';"
i.1 n.d a, t c. F 'iday -ir
app inmr-rrr o.:n Sunda-,


'WORK fror'r home 6-' .
UIS '$$? w -eeIl'H i',-io .rn',.,,i,..,"
':e- ',.) .a m-p., '!d p er, -lop,,e 1
lICjcla Ar,-nej. PO Bo. 1215-4

EE your o ,ca, bos'.s Us-.
,our spare line l f'llin 100
er, slopes fto USrjiGr, or rr,.oE
.ee"i For rnforma.Iacr. send.i
.I a nped Sell-addres- -..
r,.el.:.pe IC. RarndoIph .lI.=am
P '.- o'- 12154 G.-orael, ov. r,
--'.u ~l,3
C)t'TRO'L ;-,u,' ,r coCmne
...-.r nnQ l'uiTi hr,:m e ihlli'i. 1i' 0
I' el,-i.:.Oe for US uSJ 0i or nore
,'. F- For ,nfrnm alI rI 1n'- 3
:-:I srip e 1 .:-c t d h r .ir'= ,J
eln'. ,l.p 10 r ialnci .i- W illiamS..
PO Box 12154 Georgetown,
Guyana.



'VACANCIES exist for:
Computer Operator & Marketing
Representatives. Address
applications to: 137 A Duncan
St., Bel Air Park. Tel. # 226-
4147. _.__ .... .
'. '-,C tNCY e-.,,i5 fic.r Porier;
to v'.-i'. in a Food, & BeveYrage
SOi ,ritiuiion Or,:arnisai, 'r
,pCl,.an15 St..uild h a c 3 ,,ur, 1
'F,..,: ar', e.ucaslirn Call i:.l-
.31' '73

'.PECEPTIClNIST Computer
Tutor. Apply in person to .-
Computer Trarna C'enlre 58
Upper Robb and Or.:noque 'Sts:,
P,-,urdra on- orrr from bo.urdA
.Cr,,:k -! Ground)
"CANGC'' e.*..is for Sales
R._presentlai.es n a F,,od .I
-r rag. DIS-,! ribuuL,:
'.ran, aricr, ippl,: rnt"s 5-;h uldl


E r- .' ' : r .' rtiL:- 'j .
asset. Call 616-8193
ONE :, Female t.
S .:.:ani iih I r,,I,r.ledi oi rll':
S P-_,- I p ..it i . r ,
r'.,. p'lt r hl ra l e ri ,J a ; ,
,-1.- .,,,lv ,-,e ,FM a1ht 3-1,d E ggtli t,' .
pp i, n Or-rCOn 'jilh ,.ril, r
.ipp'l' i,'- aF '3 -" r- leren.'- r:,
LU-n rr, ri i3rd Frj ur. h Sir-. -
'ri.r:, c i ,il.e G if;',,1


' :S


2 DRIVERS. for motor buses
on contract. Must be neat, tidy
and have a sound secondary
education, living in Georgetown
and able to' wotk-flexible hours.
Call 225-1429, 624-1,147.
VACANCIES exist in a
reputable,, stable, financial
organization for sales
representatives. ..Applicants
should be' mature in age and
possess a minimum of 3 CXC, GCE
subjects or an equivalent
qualification. Send application
to: Unit Manager. 133 Church
Street,', South Cummingsburg,
Georgetown. Telephone number:
622-0307.
A vacancy exists at the
GUYANA SOCIETY FOR THE
PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO
ANIMALS tor a CLEANER/
, ANIMAL HANDLER Applicants
should have a. love for animals.
Inleresled p"rs.,ris are ai:.ked to
apply in person t o ine Clinic
Adminslralor 65 Robb Sirevl &
Orange Walk Bourda. Io arrange
San interview. .



.MHS Auto, Sales. Just
arrived Japanese vehicles. Low
down payment, no interest. Also
apartments with all amenities
and rental cars. Call Harry, 614-
4610.'


EMPLOYMENT
: E M P L 0 Y M E N T
OPPORTUNITIES! A reputable
Agency .needs 'skilled
construction' workers -
Contractors, Valuation Officers,
.Carpenters, Masons, Joiners,
Labourers, Draftsmen, Painters,
etc. Contact 900-8258, 900-
8259, 900-8260, 900-8261, 900-
8262 (225-4338 .


JEAN offers courses in
Elementary, Intermediate &
.Advanced Dressmaking, also
PDesigning. 1-'.,'. Barr Si Kitty. Tel.
#'226-9548., ___
WE sea. all :slyle- for you
1.ih In 12 hi- We also I hna..- a
sr,:,[e ,rnal Droe.-.rr.a i gr,
S.-n.oel P f,.l-esional TuIor Call
Kay 226-7437, 225-0571.
K 3."r-J.R golfers Elementary,
S'rii-ei',Tir r.ia and Advance
Dre srna.inqg & Floral Arranging
courses. Contact 8 Courbane Pk.,
Annandale, ECD. 220-9532.



PRUDENTIAL SCHOOL OF.
MOTORING. "You train to
*Pass". Tel., 227-1063, 226-
7874, 223-7908.
ENROL now at D & R
Driving School for only $11
000. 95 Hadfield Street, Werk-
en-Rust. Tel. 226-6454 &
660-4216..
CHECK us now-.atD & R
Dr,.irnq S':hool `,.5 'H.'adfiedh
Sireet Wer. -err-Rust
Proft,.. i nal Traininr Tel f
rAl.-4> 21,6 ur 2.6-645J
ErIRC',L no". al Son-,ianr &
Son', Dri.Lr.' Soh.': Fr-:
Federatlo EBuildingq '.langre
Piace i Crc.al Siretl i,13nui &
,ijomrnaic. Pnone # 225-4S 8,'
i.22-28.2
rENRPOL now 3a Sa31orr'
Drij ig 3.:'-roni Lol 2 ,r.-,'al Si
alabroel' rou could ali.- o:rair
anr Iniernil ,nal Driving Pernil
Call 227-31,69 622-31,-' 6: 11-
'?038



ACCOUNTING SERVICES
RENDERED. TEL 225-9640
[Dj,;, .._.u r.w--. P r .i,..


l F. L F I ,- r. rl l . .11r

... ,' .:u .-. : r. l.:.r
,e'.11, p'-r-dor," -r_,n] .'F-i li -
1 -'I ." .


DO YOU NEED LAND TO
RENT? Then call 624-6855,
623-8652.
FOR efficient con'puie,
diagnostic, repairs,'e.r .'c ,rig and
sales (Hardware and,.software).
Call 233-2770, 614-7880.





U.S.A IMMIGRATION
Papers for National Visa
Centre
Processing, Petiltions,
Adjustment of Status,
Case Follow-ups,
Enquiries, Consulat
Appointments etc.
LLOYD WILLIAMS & ASSOCIATES
[ THElCRUCIBLE]
105 Regent R d, Bourda,
[Between Cummings &
Light Sts .
: Georgetown. '
Tel#;(592)-223.8115
Fa'cBt:1592)225649649
NY 718-479-0879'
E-malt- j'
Sc.uicibica.-guyan.' ne..j/

D-r-l14GE e,,,, -r.,_,eI,.' Repair
r.:r, I r pilac ai a iacir'.i, of the
:-0 l If re p.a.:ernen ,Certified
1 ,.11,.- r, ., hrrn BL.- m.r Tel 643-
5485. ,,
TE,*:H CiJ I'.1N 3i a a bi e for.
appiarn:e repairs.-'. washers,
dryers. ",i,:, il.. '.'.- l.:'. .s, deep
fryers, it Call :6_ -45'1, 263-
,0o50._ .. __,__ _,''_. .
CUSTCMr S C.r Sjlli- i.n
Agent Real E .*i AQenrl
S a te llite : ': ,i,' e i-,o R i- B a r
Building, 4 Craig & Middleton
Sts. C/ville. 231-3088. :
FO'F all :.,' r,in .: I .
r : 3 i,, r, i ng "'. ,,:r' ll
r '-, .,., r 3 r h:9 p lu_ W 'Jm
on ?-3. '.71-1 i _14 -,:, : ,4.4
. . --_ - - - . .
TELE.'lI10N .r- j :omn'puler.
rp- dirr '.Ion n 0, .killed
technicians. Home servicing can
ti a'ranrqged Call 2F. -.0i or
Pr'iilr, p.3ir" i.iva. :o .:,. 0 n'i,
"RE o'uJ uhuilli,4 .-r dc, l'
rn., 1,p- .:.1 iOrnsru.-l.'n: Do '.,ou
reid sarn.I i dacl,.er .:. ,.:.ur l.oc.r
for a .:re.apd rale Cne,:l: our 10-.
to n tru.:l lo ad ,*,.: al. o: d e l ,. -
bag sand. Fast reliable service.
CaTl 225-0571, 226-7033, 226-
7437. .
FO P all Our ,e. l- n, I.r- !
rebuilding and spare parts supply.
Call Raffety's Engine Rebuilding
and Spare Parts.Service. We
rebuild all diesel egin.- and'
.supply any spare parts you need.
Also all workmanship' i backed
by 6 months warr:,nl, Call 218-
3899, 218-146, or F. ',-1003.
RK's Electra Alarms. For the
i,:, .'; '.t prices r, "t- ghl", te,.:,i
ser urilj GE Ir'iterlc.. .i l.arrht
a. a.Lat.ie at wholes-sie i .rn.es
iv .*:3 rn n lill :,r .J.:, 1 o ra ll
Prin .ale i .'rni alleli re ..el,:u irniej
RK Elclra, 125 Reoe-l -Roiad
Tel ure'754n 227.,07. E-rman
rl, 5&c ure"-nemworl, sgy con i

HEDUCATIONA


S L.1ATHS Tuior a .3,lable01.'
('1i,.s s au':4a Oniari. Ingrio I.All
Tel 91:5-919-01i 0 'Orn-lo-Ofr'
'.. ... .
EBl I uolerifng Conmpu., -
. la :.,-, for adults,, i d'..iu1.31
A' 4il#.n,,r,'iiquararin t d ,.- Irllr d .E
TiJl''ir C ill 2'.7-81-1.:i of 624-
g i_," ,4 . i .. .

JOIN THE PHONICS CEN-
TER '. teach your c.rii.j .,r,i.,r,
ir- i.i .'.r reading. See II-:'. .1-.
.:... r.,:r good readers.: Call 618-

I1--IL Tipping/Designing,
Silk wrapping/Manicuring
','or-e p jgicter no ,' P-. onl','
I,J "'l:' '' l .< .Cour e Call I.,lth ll


JEAN' offers courses .in',, E .PI'i a Certificai.e Diplc.na
dressmaking, fabric designing', or De-ree n an, pan of ihe ...'.r
tie ;dye-,,, batik, bedroori,;' from" riome THROUGH
elegance, soft furnishing, softi CORRESPONDENCE For
Stoys, curtains, cushions, ribbon'. information call CFI Global
embroidery, floral, cake Educatior, Link 261-50'79.
decoration; 153'.Barr St., KIll, '. rD ndv: atXenon
226-9548.,, t..Et'JROL' now: at Xenon
226-9548. Academy Grove Purbi.. Rd.
CASH in on our Summer;" rTank Si I EBD Tel n 62-4659.
Special at Nayelli School.j'Qf;' Nurser, l CXC alsr, urier,rnCXC
Cosmetology: Class begins onl' evelni. ,ila"se- 5 3 pm -
June 13, 2005. Evening courses." 7 30 prr,
in airbrushing, Acrylic a and science.
Barbering is also available Call DOMESTIC Soence
us .at 226-2124 or visit at 2 11 .Cookery Classes Ei-menrr,,ary
New. Market : Street rc.rih AO.an:re I. a:'lrv .-i. ..es
Cummingsburg Limited'spaces'. .' ',Tue Thurs -' am 12
noon Reqisiratiorn i.lars -
DESPAT'S Creative Craft' Tue June'14. 05 C.-.rla.l -
311 Rohinital SIreeL. Prashad 122 -7.04 .,
Nagar. Enrol noA, lor classes ir. I
.Chinse 'CoOkery '."eg Coker,, ,SHEER MAGIC oilers a
SIndian Cooker, Food and. complete course n
S. iulrrion. Fat,'.: Design '. 'Cosmelology. at an affordable
edrr:,om Ele._anc: Cak.es aridl ,.prce1. We also, ha..- e-'en,ng
PasIrles Cake DOecc.r,-,ln ',-lasses and a pa).rrenr plan to
SFloral Arran gern,-i and moue 'uit uour need. Lall us ak 226-
Call Pat Herwig on 227-u646 .944 628-7880 or 227-8737
622-9915 or visit u i ,after .hours,
INTERNATIONAL .
BUSINESS COLLEGE. 262' LANDFliAiE
THOMAS ST. NORTH -
CUMMINGSBURG. TEL. NQS. '' 28 ACRES WaitNr fr,-,-,
225-5474, 225-2397 OR 223- land E.sb.,qu'bo $?'0 1-.eg
7219. low enrollin for .-ear or'6 Call'22'-1'.j5.
ard year I.so C C e Ce .n ,),, L, .. Hgi'. 1 '.' r
D,.:la e a, l.:,r 1.1 JuI, ; ',' ,, J.,a 1-re.r. -
Examination fees affordable. sIand dal. ou.i, ler n'al
CLASSES. COMMENCE J.ULY r, ,q3 1.1 Ederson's -
5, 2,005. Call ''.-..J for rr,.'r-r 2.'.\ _,. ' -
I.'nC,tI'r iaIIor .F I.N Triu. ,rp l, tLa-.3 i'- 17
.I N E R N A T ION A L N'TE A.Ta1re 0NrAL.-I I
BUSINESS COLLEGE. 262 rnegc.lalfe Call .' CT
THOMAS ST. NORTH _.-_ -. -. .
,HCUMMINGSBURG. TEL. NOS. LAND FOR SALE OLEAN-
225-5474, 225-2397 OR 223-' DER GARDENS 89 FT BY
S7219. Dear .Parent -u.'uzl 152 FT. PRICE- $25M CALL:
holidays'are here and .i, a- 612-0349.
advised'to take this opportunity;' --
E ,,u ir ,,i.lr.r, .nr,-.led ,fo.. our H-PP .' ,"':re Olj-,r'der
unmer Fr.-.gramme -1 ir,. ed' Ga'denr, Chileau 1Mar -.,.I
r.,1 Programn,. ir,. t 'l e Ogle Tel aP 225-7. .-r7 7-
more pre: pa,''e, f.:.r ihe i-,ei', '464 .>24-832 4
academrrI ,z-r'' 'eplernbi TR',I,=PORTED ".:iJ
2005. SUMMER CLASSES a,^,arrp '.,-ct,r, R,,. HaFt
START ON JULY 5 TO AUGUST '',lnO- 4 .' il". $1.2M neg..
12, 05. C. .- a -..1 n ,:., T. - 1, 226-31.60.
your childr.- -.:e Ir,.-ni .e
will be a'.=ardeVEHICLE FOR PR i.IE commercial land,
SALE ...., r sale '11' 5 1 n :
;---C__ T 'H "iCnari.ii-,l 3ire-i 3,ji.13
ENROL NOW AT THE Co,' l ,-,.Aner -0.".,:
GEORGETOWN SCHOOL OF
BUSINESS AND ART t..4
l.lj3i & lMan :-leeis For Da'/ K ITT I i '. r.;er',-
and E'e r, 1-,..1 i es in ihc Road, .1 lte LO .n r -.alor.
l.. hl i' l0,'',C SULt'e.-I, SireC atr, S ree Tel ,:i
Eisih ..'' ,;ai "S-,n.idte. FO. 225-07"6 027-04.4 1324-
.;'O P FOB EnqlIri B & L latirs 234
p-cal p l :Ic .'a 3Ll. I,'' -. -
For'Ts O-,ne F.- '-all Stu Chfcl- ,P,. E Pul.. Rbad
Cr, a 1, 011 Fr moe- 'F rd r.p FiRoad-i' e 18,
r, o ~-. !o A:e Lan' o- i C ', aan .-
r al Road to R..erl Carnl A 2. 225-
ACADEMY OF 777. 227.-0413-14 64...'234.
PROFESSIONAL STUDIES TO transported adja-
L.0'.l y1" PI'i Rod TWO transported adja-
'EEL 2 1 -, r ,,.,n Pu li Road. cent lots, in' Earl's Court, LBI
fr ,our '- E. e.n 18 080 sq.ft total. Please tele-
i s, uL I I'. rid p in r,'e- "e 2 7 .9 between 6-
Er..ihsn ..1 ih '. P-i3. POE &am n ,3 I'10rif. lmr details.
i. OP : -..rap S:: ' Duke St., KIngsq :.-, 2 large
Siud..- i i,, 1.:i ; 'E.:, rice house lots, 48i 117 Ideal
r.lorr l,.'.r, l e:' nrolo s ,hFol lu, .uriou.u hotel,
'. l,: F. :i, .: Crr., I', aparlri I-.rl t stlora.c3 bond.
.ranln '..i hI-,l ie hri. r, $9.5M. Ederson's -' 226-
comfortable classes. Affordable. 5496.
fees. Classes start July. Call for' !
more information, tel. #;223 : u po-ile 3ai",d Hill.
"'.'', -. .n ,:.- C mern rara R,.er 8y a.-:re of
land Ideal for large oC:ean
SUMMER PROGRAMME -. going. ship; trawler, camne,
Register now at he ACADEMY : .ner-i farming. $15M.
OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Ederson's- 226-5496.
I', '., I- '' ri,,',f d 'uriinn .e'
F rcoramme iarl. ,n u. DEERR4 RIVER Pl.
,aaler for NURSERPY- learn'to arculur-. callle shrpptnl
v,'rie leller. idenilf, ,:olours. 25 50 100 .., 600 acres plot
draw shap.e-, _..3,. ,trnes sorri' 1Note S,655 000 per e,:.,e
lelhlric and r-'.uci.h rrmore '" Ederson's_.- 226-5J.96,
PRIMARY r..-. .on, teller QIJEEFIJ-TOWi lan-, -
reader" ,-i r,.-:p wlin your' 61 1601 Ideal 4- nouse lot, 4-
r..,ulitrpl.:al,.n I ile-1 .. .Tp o ,.'. s ore lj u, I.'U l hotel/
FV.inig :I ills -i.arn 'u spell I-an'r apartment loir'e r. mission,
Ir, s cier:e airou,,. us. and gel churcl-ic.-nooi $22.5M.
n iri i.-ihl ni.:, r.-'i Hiqh )C:rool Ederson's 226;' -5496.
,IF ',,ulF SECONDARY -,be '.MEADvv Ba, $-5-
i. ":,,l ,-,F F;.. ,,l ,-I --'_ 70' :" i. D un nrVV 8 -S5 -
heli:. ,.0,h -our '0D:. E 3rh 5,
,rf ",.b ,', '. rL,:.. l. :r,3e $' 13.5M 120' ,4(1' Eas EBank.
ir. .r.: i' i. 1 L.L1- -| l:irg -" 3 5f.. i & t,1 5 ,. An ani:
and pir.-r,' r 'ni ,' :il e, ( Garere.-OCF l T- .- 2 *.': 1-:3
poelt, te .- -. -. noral* 62( .- -'J
e d u( ,h ,.r . ,r -e--------- -------
educ .i... .. ', -,,,, : ..r,jJ 31% June deduction only.
expe-, -...-: i-. r- Prashad. Nagar S9M:
for only $4 000. C ',. .' Lamaha Gardens SlM;
at Lot 21 Mc Doom 1- W I .'..! .Queenstown $9M; Republic.
or call on Tel # i22:.' '. -.- r 1.4.8M; LBI $4.9M;
,' .: "' I 1 .i,, 1'r,.. ,. r,,- ,.- i''T.4 l -. 6
':]I",I" .".,. -..-l ,. 1- ..,j h.-- :rf| ; H '2'.i^'4


-- -. - - -


I EUCTIOALfc


A


: :






SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005..


SUNDAYCHRONICLE June 12, 2005 25


Earl's Court Land. 8,712
sq. ft. to build your dream
house. Area swimming pool,
children swing. $3.5M neg.
Ederson's 226-5496.
TWO LARGE PLOTS OF
PRIME COMMERCIAL LAND
WITH HOUSE ENMORE
PUBLIC RD. Telephone 220-
9199, 621-7191. No
reasonable offer refused.
J ECCLES 'AA' $8 million;
Prashad Nagar $10 million;
Elizabeth Hall, 1 acre + 8
house lots $6 million; Duncan
St. $11 million. N.P.
FINANCIAL SERVICES 223-
4928, 623-3751,
nepent2002@yahoo.com
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
OFFICE 2"nd Floor, 34 North
Road & King St., Guys & Dolls
Building, opp. St. George's
Cathedral. Telephone 227-
1988, ,623-6431, 270-4470.
"HAVE FAITH IN CHRIST,
TODAY". Malgre Tout $1.5M:
Imax 'Gardens $1.5M:
Friendship (EBD) $2M;
Triumph (North) $2M;
Annandale $2.8M;
D'Andrade St., Kitty $3.5M:
Chateau Margot $4M;
Melanie Public Rd. $4M;
Ogle $5M; Happy Acres -
$7M/$14M; Duncan/Garnett
Sts. $12M: Campbellville/
Continental Park $11M:
Water St. $13M/$10M; Earl's
Court 10 800 sq ft $5.5M:
Grove $6.5M; Bel Air Park -
$14M; Bladen Hall, Front -
$2M; Le Ressouvenir $22M;
Bel Air Gardens $35M/$60M;
Mahaicony (agricultural land)
$60M; Atlantic Gardens/
.Vryheid's Lust Public Road -
$11M; land Lusignan for
Gas Station'- $30M; Gransville
Park (B/V) $4M: Roraima Trust
$5M; Atlantic Gardens -
$6.5M; Courbane Park $2M,
Caricom/GuySuCo $7.5M.



ONE HOUSE TO RENT.
#220-3346.
KITTY 2-bedroom upper
flat $45 000. 233-2968.
Furnished flats for
overseas visitors. Phone
227-2995.
ROOM FOR SINGLE
WORiKING FEMALE. TELE-
PHONE: 227-0928.
SIMALL apt. at Eccles
New Scheme for working
couple. Tel. 628-6565.
ONE unfurnished (3)
three-bedroom upper flat in
Albert St. Tel. 627-3983.
SEPARATE house to rent
at Lusignan. All amenities
available 220-2472.
ONE newly built three-
bedroom top flat to rent -
$55 000. Tel: 227-5748.
SHORT-TERM RENT-
ALS FOR OVERSEAS
VISITORS. PHONE 225-
9944.
S 1 LARGE room for rent
in'Ogle, with inside toilet
& :bath. Tel: 621-9078,
222-5448.
2-BEDROOM apartment
located at Agriculture Road,
Mon Repos, ECD. Tel: 220-
79'37.
; BEL AIR PARK fur-
nished executive house on
double lot US$1 500. # 223-
5204/612-2766.
1 SPACIOUS 2-bedroom
apartment in Goedverwagting
$30 000. Tel. 222-4045/222-
2465.
1 2-BEDROOM bottom
flat unfurnished, Prashad
Nagar. Asking $45 000. Tel.,
225-8088.
1-BEDROOM apt. -
Public Rd., La Penitence.
For single person/couple.
Tel. 623-7047.
ONE 26 X 18 ONE-
BEDROOM APARTMENT,
BETTER HOPE, ECD. # 613-
5144.
SROOMS from $3 500 per
night and apartments from
US$450 per month. Call 227-
3336 or 227-0902
FURNISHED/
unfurnished, residential/
commercial house, flats
country wide. Ryan. Tel: #
223,5204/61-6-3743.
PRIME commercial hot
spots! Guaranteed
prosperity! Hurry. Ryan. Tel:
# 223-5204/616-3743.
MIDDLE floor office space
on Main Street. Georgetown.
Call 227-2094 or 227-0047 for.
enquiries.


STABROEK-furnished 2-
bedroom flat with phone and
parking $38 000. Tel. 226-
2244.
BRICKDAM Office space -
(1 500 sq. ft.) AC. wall to wall
carpet. Tel. # 225-0776, 227-
0464, 624-8234.
ONE bedroom situated at 31
William St., Campbellville.
Phone 225-7777 Tuesday after
17:00 hrs (5 pm).
2-BEDROOM; apt. Lot 4
Public Rd., Mc Doom, EBD $25
000. Call 265-2107 (H), 226-
0642 working hrs., .
FURNISHED ;ROOM DE-
CENT, SINGLE WORKING FE-
MALE. TEL: 226-5035 (08:00 -
17:00 HRS). ;
TWO (2) business places at
Princes & Russell Streets, G/
town. Contact 227-4757, 627-
5379, 613-6369..
DO You need :an honest,
reliable & efficient Real Estate
Agency? Call: UpToTheMinute
Realty. # 225-8q97/226-5240.
SELF-contaiped apartments
available with' all modern
facilities. Contact Tel. 223-1672,
Cell 613-1785:
ONE lower business flat situated
at Lot 1 Non Paripl, Area A, East
Coast Demerara. Apply to
Jerome Fredericks at same loca-
tion.
OFFICE space, conveniently
located at Croal,& Camp Sts.
Price negotiable. Contact
Odessa 226-5131, 226-0523,
640-3577.
COLONIAL-STYLED
building (3) bedrooms upper
and or lower flats, parking and
telephone, Queenstown. Call
624-4225.
FURNISHED American
styled apts. Suitable for a couple
or single person $4 000/ $5 000
per day. Call 231-6429, 622-
5776.
APTS. $60 000; executive
house US$750; Office space -
US$800. Phone Ms. Tucker -
#225-2626/231-2064 or Ms.
Landry.
BAR in Georgetown all new
modern equipment, including
Pool table G$200 000 month.
UpToTheMinute:Realty 226-
5240/225-8097
MIDDLE -& LOW Income
houses for rental in Georgetown
area. Prices as low as $35 000.
Call Shades & Shapes 226-
1808, 614-2073. :
BOTTOM flat 2-bedroom
house situated at John Street,
Werk-en-Rust with car park $30
000. Nicola. Day 642-4539
evening 225-4099.
OVERSEAS visitors two-
-bedroom apt. US$50/60 daily
with all modern conveniences.
Excellent location. Call 227-
3442/222-6996.
Albouystown: large/spacious
active bottom business. Ideal
Chinese restaurant, any other
business. $70 000 monthly.
Ederson's 226-5496.
PRIME location self--
contained apartments, along UG
Road. Suitable for overseas visitors.
Long or short term. Fully furnished.
Call 623-3404, 222-6510.
NEW one-bedroom
apartment unfurnished $25
000 monthly single, couple,
students. Mr. Lall, 4 Craig St.,'
Campbellville. Tel: 223-1410.
OGLE fully furnished'- $70
000; Bel Air Gardens US$1
200, Republic Park $70 000
monthly. Call Vish Realty 227-
4890, 225-9780, 614-5717.
2-BEDROOM fully furnished
bottom flat Roxanne Burnham
Gdns. with verandah, parking &
tel. Short or long term. Call Victor
227-7821, 614-4934.
FOR ,overseas' guests -
house, furnished flats, rooms,
house and apartment. Self -
contained and AC. Contact C &
S Night Club. Tel. 227-3128,
cell 622-7977.
QUEENSTOWN, fully fur-
nished 1 & 3-bedroom apart-
ment with parking space to
rent. Suitable for overseas
visitors on short term basis.
Tel. # 226-5137/227-1843.
SHADES & SHAPES -
furnished apartment. Furnished
executives apts:. suitable for
foreigners, contractors. Bel Air.
S/ville, Big. Gdns, etc. Call 226-
1808, 642-8725. '
BUSINESS or Office space
in Kitty, Cummings St. & Robb
St. Suitable for School, Internet
Cafe, Hardware, etc. 2-bed top
flat in Queenstown/Kitty. TEL.
614-2022/220-0556. Call Now!


BOTTOM flat Duncan
Street, formerly Video World,
also top and middle flats and
part of bottom flat in Regent
Street. Tel. 226-2260, 225-
2873, 619-5901. 641-2643.
EXECUTIVE 3-bedroom.
furnished US$900; Newburg -
3-bedroom top flat $45 000;
Kitty, large bond for rent. N. P.
FINANCIAL SERVICES 223-
4928, 623-3751.
Georgetown Central: Store
your general merchandise in 10
or more 40-ft. containers, high
fence, razor wire. $200 000 neg.
monthly. Inspection Anytime.
Ederson's 226-5496.
RESIDENTIAL and
commercial properties within
and outside of Georgetown.
Furnished and unfurnished .
Price ranging from $50 000
upwards. Contact Lewis Realty
on tel. 227-2136.
FOR immediate lease on
Northem Hogg Island 200 acres
of cultivated rice land along with
rice mill complete with drying
floor and dryer. Also tractor,
combine, bulldozer for sale.
Contact: 626-1506/225-2903.
Serious enquiries only.
DUNCAN ST. $20 000 &
$25 000 (semi-furnished) &
rooms $9 000, $12 000 & $15
000. Kitty -. (3-bed. upstairs) -
$40 000 & $45 000, (bottom) -
35 000. Stabroek $30 000 &
$35 000. Furnished $35 000.
Call 231-6236..
COMMERCIAL property -.
several residential & commercial
property for business purposes
around G/town. Large and small
Offices. Snackette, Boutique,
Restaurant, Stores, Bond, etc.
Broker: Christopher Goodridge.
642-8725, 226-1808.
ONE two-storey three-
bedroom executive house-
master bedroom included,
fully furnished with hot & cold
water, one bathroom & two
half baths, living room and
dining room, maids room. self-
contained room with
enclosed garage situated in
Bel Air Par Tel. 225-8986 or
225-1206, 225-0162.
EXEC. Bel Air Park, fully
furnished US$2 500; Bel Air
Springs US$2 800, fully fur.:
Bel Air Park US$1 800, fully
furnished: Prashad Nagar -
US$800. unfurnished; AA Eccles
US$1 200, unfurnished; AA
Eccles US$1 600 fully
furnished. Please call 233-
2968, for more information.
LUXURY furnished 4-
bedroom house, Eccles fully
air-conditioned, fully screened/
grilled, large fitted kitchen. 3
ully tiled bathrooms, laundry
room, 3-bay car parking space,
large verandah and garden.
washing machine and generator.
No flooding US$1 250 per
month. Tel. 233-2491 or 233-
2492. Email: tff@gol.net.gy
LIFETIME REAL ESTATE
list with you properties in:
North Roa'd, Bourda -
commercial space with bond
(optional) US$700; Robb
Street Robb Street top flat
for business or residence -
neg.; Section "K" C/ville -
executive house US$2 000:
Prashad Nagar furnished,
top flat US$600; Alberttown
furnished, top flat $50
000;tNewtown $60 000 and
many others. Contact us on
tel. # 225-7268, 225-3466, or
23 North Road, Bourda,
Georgetown.
CENTRAL GITOWN: New
large ground floor. Ideal for
Bank branch, Travel Service,
etc. US$2000.
SUBRYANVILLE: 4-bedroom.
furnished home US$800.
COURIDA PARK: 3-bedroom
unfurnished US$1000.
ATLANTIC GARDENS: 3-
bedroom fur. '-US$1200 and a
5-bedroom unfurnished -
US$1000. S/Ruimveldt
Gardens: 3-bedroom top flat -
$40 000. KITTY: Large ground
floor for business. Rent
negotiable PLUS: 2 large
buildings 3 and 4-storey in
central Georgetown. Ideal for
bond or any ype of business.
Call 226-7128, 615-6124 -
ABSOLUTE REALTY.
VERY breezy, one new
semi-furnished executive two-
flat concrete house, Atlantic
Gardens, ECD, upper flat- large
balcony three (3) self-contained
bedrooms, (Jacuzzi in one
room), master room fully air-
conditioned. Ground floor -
spacious living room and
balcony, large kitchen, spacious
dining and living rooms, study,
laundry room, maid room, (fully
tiled), entire building mosquito
proof, fully grilled. Telephone
and standby generator. Will be
available April 1, 2005. For
enquiry, call telephone 624-
6527.


TO LET


75 x 25 sq. ft. front on road.
Central Georgetown
Tel: 226-5935; 2834206

KITTY $35 000; C/ville -
$45 000; Queenstown, 2-
bedroom $50 000; South,
one-bedroom $35 000;
Alberttown, furnished $40
000; EXECUTIVE PLACES:
furnished US$1 000; Bel Air
Park - US$1 200; Lamaha
Gardens, Prashad Nagar -
US$900; AA Eccles Section
'K', fully furnished; Turkeyen
Gardens; Subryanville- Bel
Air Gardens; SHERIFF
STREET; Happy Acres;
OFFICE SPACES: Middle
Street: Kingston, CHURCH
STREET, Queenstown;
Brickdam; business places -
Sheriff Street, Regent Street,
Camp Street, bond spaces,
many others. MENTORE/
SINGH REALTY 225-1017,
623-6136 or come in to Office
at 64 Main and Middle Streets,.
Georgetown.
SHADES & SHAPES all
exclusive homes: Bel Air
Gardens US$1500, Bel Air
Springs US$2000, Eccles -
US$2000, Queenstown -
US$3500, Sub/ville US$1500,
Section. 'K' US$2000, Prashad
Nagar US$1200, BIg./Gdns. -
US$1200, Bel V/Court -
US$1200, Courida Park -
US$800, Ogle US$800,
D'Urban Backands US$1000,
U.G. Gardens US$1500. Also
furnished apt. for diplomatic
community. Executives office
space- Broker: Christopher
GQodridge, 20 Bel Air Gdns. Tel:
226-1808, 642-8725, 614-2073.
Also Property Cleaning,
Maintenance, Interior
Decorating, Renovations &
Sales.
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
OFFICE 2ND FLOOR, 34 NORTH
ROAD & KING ST., C/O GUYS &
DOLLS BUILDING, OPP. ST.
GEORGE'S CATHEDRAL.
TELEPHONE 227-1988 623-
6431,!270-4470. "HAVE FAITH
IN CHRIST, TODAY." Alberttown
whole house $60 000;
Courbane Park $75 000; Camp
Street,- $120 000; Happy Acres
US$500/US$1 200/US$2 500;
'Quee'nstown US$500/US$1
000; Kitty, fully furnished -
US$500; Atlantic Gardens
US$800/US$1 000/US$1 500;
Lamaha Gardens U$900: Bel
Air -'US$1 000: Eccles 'AA' -
US$1 000; Caricom Gardens -
;US$1 200; Bel Air Gardens -
US$1 500; Le Ressouvenir-
US$2 500; Eccles/Lusignan $30
.000; Kitty $45 000/$300 000 -
7business; Alexander Village -
Bond: space-- $75 000; AA Eccles,
La Flora Gardens US$2000;
fully furnished 3-storey
commercial building, prime
location US$8 000; Better
Hope $35 000. Apartments -
fully furnished US$25 daily;
Sheriff St. $300 000; Sec.-'K',
C/ville US$2 000.
SHADES AND SHAPES.
APARTMENTS and houses. Bel
Air Park top flat. fully
furnished US$700; Bel Air
Park top flat US$500,
semi furnished; Subryanville
bottom flat 3-bedroom $50
000; Lamaha Gardens -
bottom flat $40 000;
Brickdam top flat 3-bedroom
$55 000; Alberttown 3-
bedroom bottom flat -' $45
000; apartment in South -
singles $25 000. HOUSES:
Section 'K' Campbellville 3-
bedroom, AC US$750; Bel
Ai'r Park 3-bedroom, AC -
US$750; Lamaha Gardens 3-
.bedroom-m US$1 000;
Cummings Lodge 3-bedroom
US$500; Courida Park -
3-bedroom, AC. yard space
US$1 000; Bel Air Gardens -
executive US$1 000; Eccles
executive house US$1 000;
Queenstown executive -
US$1 800: Bel Air Park 3-
bedroom, executive US$1
500; Prashad Nagar US$1
000. APARTMENTS: Bel Air
Village executives $1 500;
Bel Air Springs; Subryanville
US$400; Bel Air Gardens -
US$200; Blygezight US$500;
Camp Street US$600; Eccles -
US$500. SHORT TERM
APARTMENT COMPLEX. SHORT
TERM ROOMS Queenstown.
Executive property sale as low as
$20 million. Commercial
spaces. Starting your business -
spaces are available North
Road, Kitty Public Road, Church
Street, Camp Street. Bond
and Land for sale/rent. Agent
Christopher Goodri.dge.
Telephone 226-1808, 642-
8725, 614-2073. Location 20
Bel Air Gardens.


TO LET AT CITY, ITS
ENVIRONS ALSO COUNTRY
AREAS 2-3 BEDROOMS
FROM $14 000 TO $40 000,
PRESTIGIOUS FROM $65 000
TO US$3 500. SMALL
PROPERTIES FROM $2.8M TO
$10M, PRESTIGIOUS STATUS
QUO AREAS FROM $25M TO
$80M. PRESTIGIOUS
PRIVATELY OWNED HOUSING
ESTATE. MAGNIFICENT
COUNTRY RESIDENCE. LANDS
OF EVERY CATEGORY FOR
SALE. FROM 11 ACRES TO
247. COMMERCIAL GROUND
FLOOR SECTORS (SIZEABLE)
PRIME SECTOR (KITTY)
WANTED (1) LAND ONLY, OR
LAND WITH BUILDING AT MC
DOOM ALSO ECCLES PUBLIC
ROADS, EXECUTIVE
PROPERTIES OF
SUPERLATIVE CLASS
PURCHASING WISE.
QUEENSTOWN LETTING
SIZEABLE FIVE (5)-BEDROOM
ELEGANTLY FURNISHED
BUILDING ALSO 3-BEDROOM,
BRAND NEW CONCRETE TOP
FLAT. QUEENSTOWN 7-
BEDROOM EXECUTIVE
HOUSE SPRAWLING
SIZEABLE TYPE BUNGALOW
BUILDING OF HISTORIC
SIGNIFICANCE CAPABLE OF
HOLDING OVER 150
PERSONS. SELLING WELL
KNOWN COMMERCIAL
BUILDING AT MANDELA'S AVE.
FURTHER AT D'URBAN STREET,
ROADSIDE PROPERTY
POSSESSED OF VAST SCOPE
FOR BOND. RECENTLY
ERECTED BUILDING THEREON
FOR SALE TWO-FAMILY
HOUSE AT SOUTH RUIMVELDT
GARDENS $5M. ONE-FAMILY
AT NORTH EAST LA
PENITENCE WELL KEPT, KITTY
BACK BUILDING, 4 FT
PASSAGEWAY D'URBAN
STREET BUSINESS CUM
RESIDENTIAL. NELSON'S
UNPRECEDENTED MUSICAL
AUTHOR OF THE WORLD'S
PRESTIGIOUS
INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF
REAL ESTATE AGENT MUSICAL
THEME ENTITLED "PRIDE AND
DIGNITY". WHAT AN UNDYING
ACHIEVEMENT BY THE
WORLD'S SINGULAR REAL
ESTATE AGENCY'S PIONEER
ADVOCATE AMONGST
NATIONS OF HUMAN HABITAT
SETTLEMENTS IN
CONJUNCTION WITH AIDS
AWARENESS PROMOTION
NOTABLE HUMPHREY
NELSON'S A NAME OF
UNPARALLELED HISTORICITY
NATIONAL AND
INTERNATIONAL. TELEPHONE
226-8931.



IN Canal No, 2 on
Conservancy, 8 houses. Contact
Mamoo on Telephone No. -
615-8197 or 641-1318 $3M
neg.
BOND, LUMBER YARD,
CONCRETE BLOCK MAKING,
VULCANISING CUM
MECHANIC SHOP. SUITABLE
LAND MEASURING 95 FT. x 45
FT. LOCATED AT D'URBAN
STREET. SELLING PRICE
NEGOTIABLE. TRANSPORTED.
NELSON'S. 226-8937.
East Bank Demerara: 2
buildings, front 2-storey 3-
bedroom wooden & concrete,.
back labourer house, on 7 Y2
acres cultivated land with 650
bearing citrus and coconut trees,
1 acre reserve for chicken pen
or gardening. $12M neg.
Ederson's 226-5496.
Property /Land from road to
river 41/210'. Gift New'Hope,
East Bank Demerara: active beer
arden with freezer, pool table,
-storey wooden property, top 3
bedrooms, bottom 4 rooms.
Land 41/210' from road to river.
Ideal trawlers, shipping. $12M
neg. Ederson's 226-5496.
Georgetown Central/
Overseas/Local Investors: Wise
Billion Dollars investment,
purchasing new 33 luxurious
suite self-contained hotel.
Inspection welcome anytime.
Ederson's 226-5496.
Gift: Kuru Kuru active
business property with.2 freezers,
pool table, music set, chicken
en can accommodate 3,000
irds. Land 200'/100'.$8.5M
'neg. Ederson's 226-5496.
Nootenzuil, ECD vacant 2-
storey 5-bedroom concrete &
wooden building. Land 607/117'
to build another house. $3.5M.
Ederson's 226-5496.
Vryheid's Lust, ECD: vacant
6-bedroom concrete & wooden
property. $4M. Ederson's -
2 2 6 5 4 9 6
ederson@guyana.net.gy


Turkeyen near Caricom:
vacant 2-storey concrete &
wooden 5-bedroom property -
fully grilled, concrete garage.
Land 50/ 100', build another
house, $11.8M neg. Ederson's
-226-5496.
Eccles Residential AA:
vacant 2-storey concrete 6-
bedroom mansion, grilled,
meshed, parking 2 cars, alarm.
Land 50/100'. $23M neg.
Ederson's 226-5496.
Line Path Skeldon,
Berbice: vacant 2-storey 3-
bedroom concrete & wooden
property, under ground
reseryoir, parking, chicken pen
can accommodate 350 birds.
$5.8M neg. Ederson's 226-
5496.'
Kingston near Seawall:
vacant 3-storey 6-bedroom/
office mansion. Ideal luxurious
hotel, executives offices, 8-car
parking. If qualify move in
tomorrow. $38M ne'g.
Edersoh's 226-5496.
Campbellville: vacant 2-
storey concrete 4-bedroom
mansion, 3 toilets & baths,
large sitting, library, 4-car
parking. Inspection anytime -
$16M. Ederson's 226-5496.
W Vergenoegen Public Road,
WCD 4 active businesses (i)
tyre shop with vulcanizing and
other equipment, (ii) snackette
and internet cafe. (iii) 2-storey
house with modern
conveniences, (iv) unfinished
building 24'/29', no roof. Note
land 20,000 sq. ft. $10M.
Ederson's 226-5496.
Urgently needed:
Commercial, Residential
buildings for sale or rent. Kitty,
South Ruimveldt,
Campbellville, Subryanville,
Prashad Nagar, Bel Air Park,
Lamaha Gardens. Atlantic
Gardens. Also house lots and
land elsewhere. Ederson's -
226-5496.
La PENITENCE Public
Road (2 Bids) or separately;
Eccles; Friendship (Public
Road); Mc Doom (Public
Road); Mandela Avenue. Tel.
# 225-0776, 227-0464, 624-
8234'.
KITTY: Bond, Store, etc.;
Subryanville house 2 flats/
floor; Robb Street 1-flat floor;
office space 1 500 sq. ft. Tel.
226-8-148, 625-1624.
SME ADOW Bank $5.5M;
Broad Street $7.5M; Duncan
St. $13.5M; Kitty $7.5M;
Industry $5.5M; Triumph -
$8M; Subryanville. Tel. 26-
8148/625-1624.
Cahal No. 2 Polder: 2-
bedroom wooden house on 8
acres of farmland $3.5M.
Ederson's 226-5496.
OLEANDER Gardens,
Subryanville, Ogle. 225-0776,
227-0464, 624-8234.
CANAL NO. 2, North
Section 3-bedroom house
(concrete & wood). Tel. 263-
739.
1 -'HOUSE lot with 4
houses: Persons interested
please call 333-2420 Price ne-
gotiable.
4-BEDROOM house in
West Enterprise $3.5M
negotiable. Call 231-5767,
621-1180.
'1 PROPERTY for sale in
business area around
Cummings & Quamina Streets.
Contact 225-4007.
IBEL AIR PARK vacant.2-
storey concrete 7-bedroom
mansion $16.9M. Ederson's.
226-5496.
'DOUBLE-LOT 3-bedroom
operty for sale in Amelia's
ard, Linden. Price
negotiable. Call: 223-4938.
1 HOUSE & land, 113 61h
S rdet, Cummings Lodge, EC
De erara, two houses from
UG.Road. 222-3254.
'1 1-bedroom house in
Diarbond, EBD. (Transported)
- $1M neg. Tel. 612-8937, 222-
3486. Paul.
BEL AIR PARK! Brand new
concrete American style.
Bargain. Hurry. $14M only.
Ryan. Tel: # 223-5204/616-
3743.
EXCELLENT commercial
hot spot in heart of city, hurry!
Will soon begone. Ryan. Tel:
# 223-5204, 616-3743.
EiCCLES AA, brand new
2-flait concrete bidg on
double lot of'land. $16M
neg.' Ryan. Tel: # 223-
5204l 616-3743.
GOED FORTUIN 3-
bedroom wooden house on
double lot. Phone, light, etc.
$4.5M neg. Tel. 226-1192,
623-7742.


_ )_ 1







24 SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005


LAMAHA GDNS/Q/town/
Subryanville/Bel Air Gdns/
Springs, etc. Bargains. Ryan.
Tel: #223-5204, 616-3743.
GOING business place -
Vergenoegen Public Road, 4
buildings, large land space -
$7 million neg. Call 260-2355.
TRANSPORTED
wooden and concrete
property for sale at
Lusignan. Call Indra on
220-0046 or 613-1715.
GUAVA ST., Tucville, 2-
storey wooden & concrete 3-
bedroom house, fully grilled,
well-fenced. Call: 615-7616,
anytime.
COURIDA PARK four-apt.
building with all modern
conveniences. Price $50M
neg. Call 227-3442, 222-6996.
Serious enquiries only.
SHADES & SHAPES buy
houses and land in all areas of
Guyana. Prices as low as $5
million Call Jasmine 226-
1808, 614-2073.
LOT 6 CAMP ST.,
BETWEEN D'URBAN &
NORTON STS. POPULAR
NIGHT CLUB AND
RESIDENCE. CONTACT TEL.
NOS. 226-1742, 623-1317.
LOT 8 Princes St., Werk-
en-Rust, 2nd :,i,.-3r. North
of Camp Street suLitable for
any business your dream
home going cheap. Call 226-
6017.
HOUSE for sale or rent -
De Willem, WCD 2-storey
concrete, furnished, etc. 1-
Mitsubishi Gallant. Tel. 277-
0511 after hrs, 277-0063. 624-
2027.
STABROEK huge 5-
bedroom double corner lot,
parking for 20 cars. Reasonable
offers. Tel. 226-2244.
2-STOREY business/
residential property at 56
Section D Cumberland, East
Canje phone,, electricity, etc.
Price neg. Tel. 628-5264, 339-
2678.
POPULAR Video Club in
very busy area in New
Amsterdam. Terms of Sale &
Occupancy can be negotiated.
Call 333-2990 or after hours -
333-3688.
PRIME business for sale
end of Essequibo Road, along
the Pomeroon River. Gas
Station whole sale and retail
grocery. Contact 771-4111 for
more information.
ONE new (2) two-storey
concrete building with
telephone and garage -
S14.9M neg. corner spot,
Kiskadee Drive, South
S-, -o, Gardens. Call
.i .' 1 1 15-8303.
NEWLY. constructed
three-storey building with
four self-contained
',, :..T .. and all modern
-,.- K. S. RAGHUBIR
-Agency. Office 225-0545,
Home 259-0019.
12' X 18' WOODEN
building Enmore Pub. Rd.,
(residential) on large lawn -
S400 000. Datsun 120Y,
driving $130 000. Tel. 226-
6454. 264-2434, 660-4216.
LAMAHA GARDENS -
$22M: Prashad i'-,.I-,, $15M;
Queenstown i 1 Eccles
S19M: Meadow Brock Garden
- $9M: Happy Acres 26M.
Call 223-1582 or 612-9785.
TWO wooden houses for
sale and removal without land.
one three-storey and one two-
storey $500 000. No
reasonable offer refused. Price
to go. 225-2873, 226-2260,
2252319, 641-2634.
INDUSTRIAL property for
sale Friendship, East Bank
Demerara, western side of
Public Road. Suitable for
Sawmilling, Fi-hin-. Trawlers,
Gas Station i .'ni, business.
Call 626-9087 anytime after
10 am daily.
ONE two-storey wooden and
concrete 4- bedroom house,
South Ruimveldt Gardens .
Contact Ronald on 662-5033 or
Samantha on 624-1370. No
reasonable offer refused.
Vacant possession.
EAST STREET, N/C/BURG
5-bedroom house, wooden
and concrete, vacant
possession, running water and
eight parking, grilled $9.5M
neg. Roydon. Tel. 231-7719.
Owner leaving country.
BEAUTIFUL Ranch type
house concrete structure,
fully secured with tel., light,
over head tank, enclosed
garage, driveway, fruit trees,
flower plants, etc. No repairs.
Price neg. Tel: No. 270-4644.


OGLE Front: residential
area, vacant 4 luxurious
bedrooms, all self-contained,
plus unfinished, 2-storey 2-
edroom building. Double lot.
$11M. If qualify move in
tomorrow. Ederson's 226-
5496.
FRIENDSHIP Riverside:
Public Rd. large poultry farm
with new equipment on 4 house
lots 10 800 sq. ft. $15M neg.
Ederson's 226-5496.
ECCLES NEW HOUSING
SCHEME 1 2-storey luxurious
house with modern facilities.
Ready to go furnishing.
Negotiable $27.5 million.
Contact Millennium
Consultancy Unit. Tel. 227-
4757, 627-5379, 613-6369.
GROVE, E.B. DEM 1
attractive 3-bedroom house,
with modern facilities incl. hot
and cold system, air-
conditioned, overhead water
tank, transported land $12.5
million. Tel. 227-4757, 627-
5379, 613-6369.
SOUTH RUIMVELDT $5M
& $8.5M; Campbellville $8.5M
& $6.5M; Quamina St. (corner)
$9M; Barr St. $14M;
Diamond $2.4M. Land -
Diamond $360 000,
Oronoque St. $7M. Call 231-
6236.
REGENT Street, Water
Street, Lamaha Gardens; New
Haven (Bel Air), Bel Air Park,
Vlissengen Road, Kingston,
Carmichael Street, Alberttown,
Bel Air Park, Kitty. Tel. # 225-
0776, 227-0464, 624-8234.
VERSAILLES, Crane -
H.qr..,. & Old Road Junction),
'ij-m.r-hOr Gardens, Leonora
(3-bids.), Vergenoegen (3
Bids. Highway), Ruby -
(Highway near to Parika). Tel.
# 225-0776, 227-0464, 624-
8234.
NANDY Park $11M $29M;
Republic Park $28M $35M;
AA Eccles $28M $32M;
Prashad Nagar $32M;
Queenstbwn $47M: Eccles CC
$15M; Grove New Scheme -
.,.ar,:I water & phone $7M &
:f[ r Please call 233-2968,
for more information.
HOUSE on Eccles Public Road
$8M; brand new 2-flat concrete
house, in excellent condition,
D'Urban St.: 3-bedroom house in
South R/veldt Gardens $8.5M;
one-flat 3-bedroom concrete
house. East R/veldt.
Success Realty. 223-6524/
628-0747.
SOUTH RUIMVELDT PARK
$7.5M $14M: East Street,'
". $9M; Blygezight -
.. .'l i -, l's Court Ranch Type
$22M: Prashad Nagar -
$20M; D'Urban Street $9.5M,
Robb Street, two-storey -
"$12.5M and others. Roberts
Realty. 227-7627 Office, 227-
3768 Home, 629-9914 Cell.
FOR SALE BY OWNER-
2-storey fully concreted house -
5 bedrooms. 2 full bathrooms,
American fixture faucet, sink,
toilet, cabinet, hot water tank.
eating kitchen, built-in
wardrobe, central air-
conditioner. car garage, front
view to Public Road. Lot 6
Nandy Park, EBD. Interested
M erson only to call. Day 226-
806; evening 225-8410.
YOUR ..... i., what
manifest., i . of
properties have r-r ri-. ?5%
25% now, Kitty - ..i 2-
family, Queenstown $11M;
Meadow Brook $12M: 3-
family in Kitty .$12M; Land
in Kitty; Stevedore H/S $3M;
Bel Air Gardens US$350 000;
New Providence. 3 house lots.
Phone Ms. Denese Tucker- -
#225-2626/231-2064 or Ms
Landry ...
BEL AIR PARK: Large 4-
bedroom on a cool corner, nice
lawns. bearing fruit trees -
US$200 000. ECCLES: AA
large 3-storey, $26M.
QUEENSTOWN: Large 2-storey
with lots of yard space $20M
and a really great 5-bedroom
with lots of lawns in mint
condition $45M and lots' more
all over. Call 226-7128, 615-
6124 ABSOLUTE REALTY.
GIVEAWAY prices. Going
business place located'on
Vergenoegen Public Road, 4
buildings on lot Tyre Service
Center, Snackette, Internet
Cafe, Spray Painting and Body
work shop. New water filtration
plants, wash bay, etc. Going
with all equipment and
machinery. Large land from
Public Road to Street at the
back. 200 ft x 50 ft. This
business can generate million
annually. Price $.10 million
neg. Call 260-2355, 628-7737.


LIFETIME REAL ESTATE
has on its listing properties for
sale in: Queenstown $40M,
$22M, $16M; Alberttown $
Neg.; Newtown $8M;
Newtown, back lot $2M;
Republic Park $9.5M neg.;
Lamaha Gardens $40M and
$25M; Campbellville Kitty,
South Ruimveldt and many
others. Contact us on 225-
3466/Tel/Fax: 225-7268 or 23
North Road, Bourda,
Georgetown. ("We not only
buy, sell or rent we sensitise,
inform and most importantly
advise".)
CALL RAPHAEL'S REALTY,
LOT 204 E /2 CHARLOTTE
STREET BOURDA. FOR THE
BEST DEALS IN TOWN. TEL #
225-8241, 227-4950, AFTER
HOURS 226-7829. FOR SALE
- Plantain Walk $4M; South
R/veldt $7M, $8M & $15M;
Queenstown $12.5M; East
Ruimveldt $6M; Pouderoyen -
$4M; Meadow Brook Gardens -
$17M; Charlotte St. $1OM; LBI
- $15M; Oleander Gardens -
$15M; Ruimzeight $35M;
Atlantic Gardens $35M;
Cummings Lodge $45M. LAND
FOR SALE Agricola $1.3M
and C/ville $4M. All prices are
negotiable. RENTALS from $25
000 and upwards. Guaranteed
to satisfy your needs.






For all your Real Estate
and! Property
Management needs
contact us.
Now listed for sale are
properties from as low as'
$5M to $1 00M and above.

Telephone Number
227-2136
Email:
Lewisrealty@hotmail!com

We do business the
old fashioned way
Honestly and Efficiently

JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
OFFICE 2"D FLOOR, 34 NORTH
ROAD & KING ST., GUYS &
DOLLS BUILDING, OPP. ST.
GEORGE'S CATHEDRAL.
TELEPHONE. 227-1988, 623-
6431, 270-4470. "HAVE FAITH
IN CHRIST, TODAY". Non Pariel
- $4M/$5M/$6M/$8M/$IOM;
Irnmax Gardens $5M/$6M/$8M;
Mon Repos $6M; Roraima
Trust $6M/20M; La Grange -
$6.5M: Courbane Park $6.5M:
Kissoon Park $6.5M;
Alberttown/Covent Gardens -
$12M; Stewartville $11M;
Queenstown $17M/$12M:
Eccles 'AA' $23M; 'CC' $6M/
$11M; Duncan St. $21M: Bel
Air Park $22M/$25M; Happy
Acres $26M/$15M; Section 'K'
Campbellville $30M; Len's -
Parika $160M: UG Caricom
Gardens S28M; Courida Park -
$42M: Atlantic Gardens $35M/
$20M/$18M; Camp St. $55M:
Kitty $20M/$18M/$12M/$10M/
$8M; Carmichael St..- $28M,
Good Hope $6.5M; Bel Air Park
S22M/$25M/$30M:
Queenstown $45M; Lusignan -
$2.5M & $15M; Blygezight -
$18M; Vergenoegen $9M:
Going concern business with
plant and machinery; Amazon,
Essequibo $12M.



ORIGINAL INDIAN CD AND
DVD. CALL 231-4208.
19" REMOTE
TELEVISIONS. $20 000. CALL
265-3050.
(1) JIALING Scooter,
100cc. Contact No. 223-1679.
EARTH FOR SALE.
DELIVERY TO SPOT, CALL 626-
7127
PIT bulls pups for sale,
7 .weeks old. Please
contact 226-9367, 621-
0350.
ORIGINAL Poodle,
puppy for sale. Bull &
female. Tel: 220-2632, 615-
4286.
SALE! Xbox games as
low as $3500. Call 218-
1330 after 6:30pm.
PROCESSED Fish -
Banga, Trout, Butter Fish. Call
226-0642. 102 Regent Rd.


AC Unit, Fridge, TV, Washer,
Microwave. Tel: 227-3717, 623-
5534.
1 25 Yamaha engine, new
model. 1 8 Johnson engine. Call
268-2244. Road Master.
DIESEL water pumps -
2 and 3 inch, brand new
from UK. Call 261-5403 for
details.
ALL household items
for sale due to owner
moving. Kindly call: 226-
8800. 623-1195.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter with
rail, good working condition. Tel.
629-9804, 626-2221.
ONE Aluminium boat 17'
x 6'. Price $300 000. Call -
231-4110, 227-0902, 227-3336.
ONE 4-cylinder Bedford
portable welding plan, D.C.
ey start. Tel. # 265-4217.
Ca l #621-4417.
EXOTIC Buggies, Peach
Face, Cockatiel, Sparrow,
Canaries & Finches. Tel: 220-
2632, 615-4286.
HOUSEHOLD articles -
36" and 27" TVs, furniture.
Also one Toyota Ceres motor
car. 264-2732.
1 3-PIECE suite $65 000
neg, 1 110 volts Hoover
Vacuum $30 000 neg. Call
227-1355.
6 WEEKS old Pitbull pups
fully vaccinated and
dewormed (blue and brown).
Tel. 233-5156, 642-4070.
2 35-FT boats complete
with 40Hp Yamaha engine,
ice box and Banga Mary
seine. Tel. 220-9509, 626-
5947.
ONE brand new com-
.outer with CD Burner, CD
Walkmans, car stereo and
DVD Player. Contact 225-
4112, 626-9264.
ARGON/Co2 mixed gas,
also shock treatment for
swimming pools. Phone 227-
4857 (8 am 4 pm) Mon. to Fri.
GENUINE Mag-lite flash
light replacement parts for sale/
service. New stock fishing rods,
reels & tackle. Call 227-5183.
HONDA 450 ES 4x4
Motorbikes, ATV-tyres, cash
counters, 15, 20 & 30 Hp
Yamaha M'otors. Call 226-
2229.
OXYGEN and Acetylene
industrial gases. #58 :j
Corentyne, Berbice. : i',,.
338-2221. (DAVID
SUBNAUTH)
AC UNITS brand new, 5
000 150 BTU, Kenmore
brand. Contact Juliana at 613-
3319 or 226-7973. Going
reasonable.
YAMAHA Outboard Motor
40hp, short foot, excellent
condition $450 000
negotiable. Tel. 233-2491 or
233-2492.
PARTS for dryers/washers
thermostats, belts, pumps
motors, couplings, valves, etc.
Technicians available. Call 231-
6429. 622-5776.
AC UNITS brand new, 5
000 150 BTU, Kenmore brand.
Contact Juliana at 613-3319 or
226-7973. Going reasonable.
ONE Cabinet & TV Stand -"
$20 000, One Daewoo Vacuum
Cleaner $7 000. one big carpet
-$7 000. Phone 227-8386.
27" SHARP TV Nintendo 64
Playstation one, C-': .. ,--,. -
micro chips, ...,
.accessories. Tel. 231-1332.
18" RIMS (Dip Dish) Chrome
with almost new tyres: 5 holes to
fit SV SUV, 4 pcs. $200 000.
Call 624-8402, 227-7677.
S NEW-Music carts, to sell
music on road, equipped with
power amplifier, equaliser, CD
Player, 12' speakers, tweeters.
17-plate battery, glass case.
Ready to go $140 000 each, 2
pcs left. 624-8402, 225-2503.
CRAFTSMAN, 5000 watts
generator in excellent
condition, Yamashita 950 watts
generator, like new $40 000.
Call 624-8402, 225-2503.
30 KVA John Dere diesel
generators, like new, XEROX
028 Photocopier, Split AC Units
9000 BTU. Brand new Baldor
Grinding Machine with stone,
China Cabinet with Dinette Set.
225-2873, 225-2319, 641-
2634.
., TYRES, TYRES, TYRES.
Just arrived tyres for Bob Cat
Machines, sizes 12 x 16.5 and
10 x 16.5. Call 218-3899, 218-
1469, 623-1003.


BEVERELY Hills Bridal
Dress, size 18, with crown $40
000. Phone 625-6132.
INDUSTRIAL Cummins 6BT
engine, Caterpillar 3306 Di
engine to fit D5 & D6. Good
prices. Call 218-3899, 218-1469
or 623-1003.
30 KVA John Deer diesel
enerator like new; Honda
000 watts generator, XEROX
5028 photocopier machine.
225-2873, 225-2319 /641-
2643.
580C Hymac D4 Bulldozer
hydraulic dumper 30 1 flat bed
trailer, 40' trailer on wheels.
Enclosed. Good for camping.
Call 222-6510.
DACHSHUND/POMPEK 4
months old male pup. White with
brown spots, fully vaccinated -
$12 000. Call: 231-4702 or 618-
2240.
1 FLOOR model PLASTIC
SEALING machine, 1 PORTABLE
ELECTRIC air compressor in
excellent condition Tel: 222-
4507/623-7212.
FREON GAS 1.1, 12, 22,
502, 134A & 404A also Nitrous
Oxide, Argon gas and Helium
for balloons. Phone 227-4857
(8-am 4 pm) Mon. to Fri.
ONE 150 HP & one 250 HP
Yamaha Outboard engines.
Price $700,000 & $1,200,000.
Also parts for 150 HP & 250 HP.
Call 629-6651 anytime.
ATTENTION all Seafood
Exporters: Styrotex 65-lb
capacity boxes with liners for sale.
Large quantities available.
Contact Andre at 623-3655 or
226-9275.
FREON gas: 11, 12, 22,502,
134A & 404A. Also Nitrous Oxide,
Argon gas & Helium for
balloons. Phone 227-4857
(08:00 h 16:00 h), Mon. to
Fri.



16" Plastic Stand
Fans -$1800 W/S
12" Kids Cycle-
S2,000 W/S
Emergency Lamps _
$1800 W/S -
Blank CD's $1 u.iu
Samsung, Sot.
TDK
DVD -$180 -
DVD Cases S$(
Maxwell 3.5 Flop..
Disks $700 per. -
Original Movie'
$500 $700 ea I :
Wholesale & R2-etai -





1 COMPLETE NES Game
system; 2 controls, 1 zapper and
15 limited edition games. Free
bonus of 'I Pentium 4
Motherboard $25 000 neg. For
details call 641-6117. '
STALLS for sale or rent,
three in a row, prime business
spot. Price negotiable. Contact
Sharon's Boutique, Stabroek
Market. Tel. 225-8986/225-
1206.
OXYGEN and acetylene
gases. Fast and efficient
service.10-11 Mc Doom Public
Road, EBD. Phone 223-6533 (8
amrn 4 r i n to Fri. (Sat. -
8 am -21 -
JUST ARRIVED -
mountain bicycle 26 inches
with cotton pin $8 400 W/S.
D. Singh & Sons, 95 Regent
& King Streets. 95 South
Annandale, ECD. Tel. 226-
0881.
ONE Bedford T.L. (500)
engine $220 000; (1)
complete (7)-ton deferential
- $195 000; (1) complete (7)-
ton front axle with brakes
system. Tel. 227-1923, cell
616-5679.
1 HONDA pressure washer.
'r.-,Inew; 2 drills; 1 saw; 1
i..- motorcycle, next to new;
1 amplifier: 1 truck pump; 1
battery charger; 1 bicycle. Tel.
265-5 876. ................ .............
PROJECTORS, Sony and
Canon Digital SLR Cameras (5-
8 mega pixil), DVD recorders,
guitars, plasma screen, etc. Tel.
26-6432; 225-8628; 623-2477.
COMPRESSOR Tank, Brake
Rotor and Drums, Cutting
Machine, Hiace Steering Box,
front Differential, Toyota Pick
Up, Washing Machine. Tel. -
226-2244.


1 LARGE commercial 1
water filter and purified water
system with large UV system."
an generate thousand of
dollars per week $350 000.
Call 260-2355.
PITBULL PUPS pure
bred, red nose and blue eyes,
6 wks. old, colours+- blue, fawn,
white, black. etc. Excellent for
security and breeding. Contact
Ray 264-2911 or 625-3139.
ELECTRIC Stove,
Microwave, TV, VCR, BBQ grill,
Thread Mill, Electric Oven,
Fans, two-door Fridge, two
small Fridge, Ice Cooler,
Cassette Player. Owner
moving. Tel. 225-8986/225-
1206.
ONE fishing bopt'- 36 feet,
350 Ibs banga net, 40 Yamaha
outboard engine (turtle back).
Contact Tel. # 220-9969 or at
address Black Boy, Annandale
Sand Reef East Coast
Demerara.
ONE tyre patching
machine, one tube patching
machine & heating irons, one
hand drill with accessories, all-
purpose gum, tubeless tyre
plugs. and other accessories.
Call: 628-7663 or 223-3356.
CAUSTIC SODA 55 lb -
$3 600; Alum 55 lb $4 000,
.Soda Ash 100 Ib $8 000,
Sulphuric Acid 45 gal $45
000, Granular Chlorine,
Chlorine gas. Phone 227-
4857 (8 am 4 pm) Mon. to
Fri.
PUBLIC Road land 6 x,
50 Rods. Access to light, water.
2 min. drive to Parika. Located
at Orangestein. Also MF 20
Combine for sale. Working
condition, also parts. Contact
260-0355.
5 STALLS, STABROEK
MARKET centrally located
spacious and ideal for business
of your choice. $3.5M $6.5M.
Contact Millennium
Consultancy Unit. Tel. 227-
4757, 627-5379, 613-6369.
SKY Universal, authorised
dealer for the best offer in
Phillips digital dish. View up to
125 channels including Pay
Per View channels and also
Direct TV. Contact: Gray on
Tel. 227-6397/227-1151 (0),
616-9563. -
3 BENCH metal lathes -
240V, all $350 000: 2
crankshaft grinder 240V,
both $200 000; 1 .i.- .
head resurfacer, 20V :''.
000: .a quantity of spares for
machine free. Owner
migrating 611-8766, 621-
4928.
SALE! SALE! SALE -
GRAND sale of ladies. gents
and children clothing. Also in,
stock floral arrangements and
teddies. Prices negotiable
(whole sale). ContactAmar on
626-8141, 220-6639.
A house full of furniture.
After many years in Guyana,
I am relocating and I can't
take it with me. Furniture,
plants, electronics, computer
equipment and accessories,
dinner ware, kitchen ware.
etc Call 227-145-8 for
information.
G N. SOMWAR I
WOODWORKING
ESTABLISHMENT, ECD. Tel.
624-7023. Purple heart
Panel Doors. Square door -
$15 000; Inner Arch with
.glass $18 000; External Arch
with frame $23 000:
External Arch double frame
- $45 000.
BATTERIES watches
and calculator batteries, I
Maxwel Silver Oxide. Buy I
the best. insist on Maxwel
Silver Oxide, only $300.
Fitted free while you wait.
Guyana Variety Store and
Nut Centre, 68 Robb St.,
Lacytown, opposite Salt and
Pepper Restaurant.

Transformer welder. New
(Never used), can weld mild &
stainless steel, cast iron and
aluminium. Turbo fan -
cooled for extended use at
full power amps 35 260 ,
3-Phase 400 volts, electrode
diameter 1.6- 5mm. Call
Godfrey 621-4568.
SQUARE and round
blocks (4 9 inches) square
blocks bolts and nuts, square
blocks blades (3- 12 inches),
band saw blades (1/4 -'1
inches), w-elding machine,
profile cutters (V & groove &
G.T), square blocks moulding
cutters (2.6 inches), router
cutter. Tel. 270-6460, 644- I
0150.


24


-SUNDAY -CHRONICLE June 12, 2005







25
SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005 25
mIiJr'.AV PRNtICI-J u li u12.2065


FURNITURE SALE, special
gifts on Cash Purchases & Free
delivery apart from easy
balance parcels at -
MORGAN' S FURNITURE
STORE 7 doors west of Camp,
in Charlotte Street. Tel. 226-
4129 No business on Saturdays
- the Lord's Sabbath.
SALE! SALE! 2 6-head
moulders, 1 surface, 3 routers,
2 sharpeners, 1 profile grinder,
1 wadkin wood lathe, 2 band
saws, 3 cross cut saws, 2 spindle
moulders, 2 drill presses, 1
circle saw sharpener, 1
compressor, 1 Coats 4050 A tyre
machine, 1 welding generator
set. Tel. 270-6460, 644-0150.
POULTRY FARMS Gar-
den of Eden and Craig Plan-
ning for a bigger yield? We
have pens that can accommo-
date 15 000 birds and lots and
lots of running water we are
situated near to a creek, .1 Ma-
chine Shop Industrial Site with
an extra lot. Call SUCCESS
REALTY 223-6524/628-0747.
2 PC 5050 QSC Amplifiers -
$345 000, 1 pc 1450 QSC
Amplifier $125 000, 1 pc Stage
work equaliser $34 000, 1 pc
Graphic equaliser $43 000, 1 pc
Time machine $12 000, 1 pc
Rain Crossover $20 000, 1 DBX
Synthesiser- $30 000,1 piece DBX
3-way Crossover $25 000, 1
Furman Crossover $20 000.
Contact Sham 615-2464, 612-
8329 Richard.
ONE Cdmputer Operating
System: WINDOWS XP
PROFESSIONAL. 40 GH Hard
Drive, 735 MHz, CD Rewritable
Drive, CD Drive, Diskette Drive,
15" Monitor, Keyboard, Mouse,
Workstation, MSP56 MR'
MODEM, INTERNET READY,
MEMORY 386. Price $90 000.
TELEPHONE NO. 231-6314.
ASK FOR QUINCY/NATASHA.
2 VEHICLE Stands $5
000; 1 Neon sign $10 000;
imported plastic aprons $400;
white over coats $2 000;
sanitation gloves $200; heavy-
duty compressor and tank (less
motor) $50 000; 2 pedestal
drilling machines $50 000;
rolling machine $250 000; 60
K.W. generator $500 000;
concrete vibrator $50 000;
water pump $40 000; 4
welding plants $50 000: 7
shelves steel tool cupboards -
$20 000; quantity steel pipe
fittings/valves $20 000; 2
lengths, 1" high pressure hose
50 $20 000; oil pressure
gauges $1 000; auto electric
switches $500/$1 000;
quantity plastic straps $15
00; electric water pumps $15
000. Contact Francis Persaud.
Tel. 220-3064.
q 20 NEW 5-gal. pale
adhesive carpet paste $7 000
each; 2 STIHL FS 160 brush
cutters, hardly, used both --
$110 000; 1 Sears large water
pump with pressure tank
complete, 110 240V $40
000; 2 security alarm panels for
hook up alarm system. for
building store factory, both -
$30 000; 1 Honda EB 1400 AC,
DC, Honda generator $105 000;
3 wash room sinks with hot and
cold water taps $6 000 each;
1 new sealing fans with lights
110V, Canadian made $6 000
each; 75 pieces galvanised dry
wall frames, new 10 L, W 4
inches, 1 inch, all $30 000; 1
25-piece new Draper inch
drive socket set $12-000; 2
inverters 12V to 110V, 400 to
800 watts along with battery -
$35 000; 1 140 watts with
battery $25 000. Owner
leaving. 621-4928.



TOYOTA TUNDRA. TEL:
623-5534, 227-3717.
ONE EFI 'MINI BUS.
CALL.627-7151, 220-3473,
21 BEDFORD MODEL
M TRUCK. TEL: 455-2303
1 NISSAN CARAVAN E
24, EXCELLENT CONDI-
TION. TEL. # 220-4782
ONE BEDFORD TL 7-TON
LORRY (NOT DUMP). TEL:
227-1923/616-5679.
ONE HONDA CBR F3.
EXCELLENT CONDITION -
$700 000. TEL. 612-6409.
3 TOYOTA COASTER
BUSES, 26 & 29-SEATER. 225-
1429, 624-1147.
TWO BIG
RECONDITIONED FORD
TRACTORS FOR SALE. TEL.
# 623-0957.


1 AT 192 TOYOTA Carina
(excellent condition). Call 268-
2244. Road Master.
1 HONDA CRV. Contact
Sandy 222-4966 or 147
Industry Housing Scheme.
1 TOYOTA MINI BUS -
$1.7M NEG., 15- SEATER.
227-3571, 225-5029.
ONE CRASH TOYOTA
CORONA KT 147 WAGON
PARTS FOR SALE. CALL 618-
3881.
1 RZ MINIBUS. No
reasonable offer refused.
Contact 611-0972 (Anytime)..
1 SERIES 11 Land Rover,
long wheel base, in good
condition. Tel: 266-2241.
1 AT 212 CARINA, PJJ
series, in excellent condition.
Contact 222-2804.
1 3Y minibus; working
condition $400 000 neg. Tel:
233-2208, 613-5543, anytime.
1 AA 60 TOYOTA Carina car.
Credit can be arranged. Call
611-3887. Khan.-
TOYOTA Hilux Pick Up JJ
series. Perfect working condition
$2.1M. Tel. 233-2491 or 233-
2492.
1 ONE Toyota Land Cruiser
(diesel) 13 seater, manual $4.1
million. Please contact 623-
7031.
4-WD RANGE Rover -
Land Rover with alloy rims &
Sony CD player. Priced to go. #
621-7445.
ONE TOYOTA TOWNACE 9-
SEATER BUS. GOOD
CONDITION. CALL 621-9424.
1 LONG Base RZ mini
bus; 1 AT 150 Carina car.
Both in excellent
condition. Phone 268-
3953, 627-6242.
ONE Coaster bus in good
working condition. Contact 616-
3736 or 660-1564. No reasonable
offer refused.
TOYOTA 2 X 4 Hilux
enclosed, magrims, 2Y engine.
Excellent condition. Contact -
269-0432.
1 TOYOTA Ceres, AC,
automatic, fully powered $875
000. Cash and go. Call Shahab
276-0313, 626-1141.
ONE RZ minibus BGG, series
- $600 000 negotiable. Please
call telephone # 621-8033 or
233-5248.
ONE new Izuzu Rodeo V6,
4871 miles. Contact Mark
Chandra Auto Sales 233-2420
or 2409-11.
TOYOTA Hilux 4x4 Pick-Up
YN100, 4 Springs in good
condition. Contact Tel: 622-
9767, 220-9343.
1 EP 82 TOYOTA Starlet
Turbo excellent condition.
Contact Mohamed 641-5155
or 270-4021.
- ONE Nissan Vanette Pick
Up. Excellent condition.
850kg, GHH 5025. Tel: 623-
5560. Price negotiable..
FOR sale one double
axle Leyland-Daf flatbed in
good condition. Tel. 225-
5360 or 626-2990.
TOYOTA Tacoma.
Immaculate condition.
Contact 233-2415, 624-6505,
615-2203
ONE Toyota Corona wagon
ET 176 17" mags, CD Player,
mint condition. Tel. 226-1156 or
22,7-0400.
WHITE Land Rover, County
110 good working condition,
Price neg. Contact 231-2920,
610-4150.
1 AE 91 SPRINTER -
excellent condition. Magrims,
fuel injector, stick gear. Good
price. Tel. 622-1845, 220-5476..
TOYOTA SV 40 Camry.
Good condition. Price $1.5M.
Phone 225-8090 between
11am and 9pm.
TWO five-dish and one
four-dish plough also one 18-
dish trail harrow. Ideal for rice
work. Tel. 623-0957.
ONE double axle Leyland
dump truck for sale, also plenty
parts for double axle and ten-
ton trucks. Tel. # 623-0957.
ONE AA 60 Carina. in ex-
cellent working condition, needs
body work tape deck, AC etc.
Tel. 617-4063/225-0236.


ONE TT 131 CORONA in
good condition mag rims, stick
gear, tape deck. Tel: 626-6837
after hours # 220-4316.
ONE Toyota AT 192 -
manual transmission, in good
condition, AC, music set, etc.
Tel. 611-1'018. Price $1 250
000.
ONE AE 91 Toyota Corolla
- recently spray over,
automatic, fully powered.
$625 000 neg. Tel. 220-4103,
618-1842.
1 TOYOTA 4X4 Extended
Cab Pick-Up, V6 Engine,
automatic transmission $1.9
million. O.B.O. Tel: 233-2545.
ONE (1) 100 Ceres with
magrims, CD Player, alarm set.
Excellent condition. Contact
226-9167, 615-8597.
JUST arrived from USA -
one 1999 model Tacoma
Extra cab 4 x 4, mint
condition, runs like new.
Contact Johnny 226-0702.
SMALL bus Townace,
private use, automatic, luxury
seat, power window. Excellent
condition. $580 000. Tel. 614-
3615, 626-5803.
ONE AT 192 CARINA, with
mag rims, spoiler & CD Player.
Price $1 250 000. Call 231-
4110, 227-0902, 227-3336.
TOYOTA Corona station
wagon T-1.30 back wheel
drive, PCC series. Price $500
000 neg. Call 226-2833 or
233-3122.
AE 81 COROLLA.
Automatic, power steering,
megrims, etc. Perfect working
condition. Asking $390 000. Tel.
# 231-7878.
TOYOTA Corona station
wagon T-130 back wheel drive,
PCC series. Price $500 000 neg.
Call 226-2833 or 233-3122.
1 2-TON Toyota Dyna canter
diesel, double axle, working
condition. Any reasonable offer
accepted. Tel. 623- 3257, 227-
1216.
1 WHITE Toyota Mark 11
Grande twin cam '24, PFF 3637,
AC, fully powered, automatic,
etc. 1 owner. Price negotiable.
Call 622-3736.
1 DUMP truck, 1 water
tender and 330 Timber Jack
Skidder all are in good working
condition. For more
information Contact: 264-
2946.
AE 110 COROLLA fully
powered, air bag, AC, mags,
looks like just off wharf. Must
be seen. 98 Sheriff St., C/ville.
223-9687. -
1 SMALL JEEP,
MITSUBISHI PAJERO JR.
FULLY LOADED, CD PLAYER,
LOW, LOW MILEAGE. LISA-
270-4257, .613-7743.
ONE AT 192 Toyota Carina.
Excellent condition. 2 engines,
25 Yamaha (new model) 8
Johnson (excellent condition).
Call Road Master 268-2244.
1 AT 170 TOYOTA Carina
motor car fully power, spoiler,
automatic, woman driven, never
in hire, excellent EFI condition.
Price $850 000. Call 260-2355.
CARINA AT 170 $700 000
& $800 000; AE 100 $1.1M;
New AT 192 $1.6M; AE 91 -
$700 000: New Carina 212 -
$1.9M. Call 231-6236.
1 TOYOTA 3Y Long-base
minibus (BGG series), manual,
magrims. Excellent condition.
Price $600 000. Contact Rocky
# 225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 PDD 15-SEATER bus,
good condition .. $300 000 or
exchange for reasonable
condition car. Tel. 612-8937,
222-3480. Paul.
TOYOTA Mark II GX 90,
automatic, 54 000 Km. original.
Just off wharf, fully loaded $2.5
million. Will register. Call 624-
8402, 227-7677.
NISSAN CaravartGL minibus
15-sealer size, automatic,. power
steering, air- conditioned. Not,
registered. Only 37 000 Knm.
Original S1.6 million. Will
register. Call 624-8402, 227-
7677.
JAGUAR V-12 Sports Coupe,
needs some work. Sold as is -
$300 000 neg. Seadoo Jet Ski
with trailer needs engine. Sold
as is $175 000 neg. 624-8402,
227-7677.
MITSUBISHI Titan box
canter, diesel. Just off wharf.
Excellent condition. $2.1
million. Will register Call 624-
8402. 227-7677.


*UL3 ATIrlWl~l.L v lIV1


SAAB 900 Turbo, PJJ 5837,
registered 2 months ago, fully
powered, automatic. Excellent
condition. 1' owner $895 000
neg. Call 624-8402, 227-7677.
1 AE 110 TOYOTA Sprinter
- (PHH series), automatic, fully
powered, AC, magrims, alarm,
CD Player. Immaculate
condition. Price $1 425 000.
Contact Rocky # 621-5902 or
225-1400.
1 TOYOTA RAV-4 (2-door).
Immaculate condition.
Automatic, fully powered, AC,
Chrome (17") magrims, AC, roof
rack, CD Player, crash bars, side
bars. Price $2.5M. Contact
Rocky # 225-1400 or 621-
5902.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma (just
registered) GJJ series. Manual,
(1999 model), fully powered, AC,
mags, Bed Liner, low mileage.
Immaculate condition. Price -
$3.1M. Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 AE 110 TOYOTA Corolla -
(PHH series), never hire,
automatic, magrims.
Immaculate condition. Price $1
'350 000. Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA (SR5) V6 Extra
cab. (Immaculate condition).
Automatic, fully powered, AC,
magrims, new tyres, crash bar,
sun roof, CD Player. Price -
$2.2M. Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Hilqtx Surf
enclosed (4 x 4) 5-door.
Automatic, fully powered, AC,
magrims, crash bar. Immaculate
condition. Price $2.3M. (Lady
driven). Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA RZ (short base)
15-seater (new seats), manual,
magrims, music, hardly used,
just spray over. Price $1.1M.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Spacio mini van
(PJJ series), 2000 model,
automatic, fully powered, AC,
magrims, CD Player, Digital
dashboard, 5-door. Immaculate
condition. Price $2.8M.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA (SV 40) Camry -
(PHH series), low mileage,
automatic, fully powered, AC,
Chrome magrims, CD Player.
Immaculate condition. Price -
$2.1M. Contact Rocky # 621-
5902 or 225-1400.
1 EP 82 TOYOTA Starlet
(Turbo). Mint condition. Manual,
fully powered, AC, magrims, CD
Player. Price $1.1M. Contact
Rocky # 225-1400 or 621-
5902.
1 NISSAN Pathfinder (V6) 4
x 4 (2-door) automatic, crash
bar, step bar. Excellent
condition. Price $1.6M.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 AE 100 TOYOTA Ceres -
(PHH series hardly used),
automatic, fully powered, AC,
Chrome magrims. Price $1.3M.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma (V6)
20.00 model (GJJ series),
automatic, AC, Chrome magrims,
CD Player; Bed Liner, Crystal
Light, step board. Mint
condition. Price $2.9M.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA (SR5 4 x 4) 4-
Runner (V6), alarm, automatic,
fully powered, AC, magrims, CD
Player, crash bar, step bar, fully
skirted. Price $3.2M (neg).
Contact Rocky # 621-5902 or
225-1400.
1 TOYOTA RAV-4 (PHH
series, Low mileage), 4-door,
automatic, fully powered, AC,
magrims, roof rack, side bars,
crash bars, CD Player, with music
system, crystal light,'hardly used.
Price $3.4M. Contact Rocky #
621-5902 or 225-1400.
1 TOYOTA RZ (EFI) Long
base (BHH series) Late, manual,
new seats, magrims, music,
crystal light. Im n hbil t. ,
condition. Price i i I
Contact Rocky # 621-5902 or
225-1400.
1 AT 212 TOYOTA Carina -
(PHH series), never hire,
automatic, fully powered, AC,
alarm, hardly used.
.7M. Contact Rocky #
225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 AT 192 TOYOTA Carina
(Private) fully skirted,
automatic, fully powered, AC.
magrims, CD Player, Spoiler.
Immaculate condition. Price $1
450 000 Contanrt Rocky #- 225-
1400 o" ,!;21 -5 "02. .


I VEHICLE


1 AT 170 Toyota Corona.
(Excellent condition). Automatic,
fully powered, magrims, (just
spray over). Price $850 000.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Extra Cab (4 x 4)
V6. (Mint condition). Gear,
magrims, Sunroof, crash bar, AC,
Bed Liner. Price $1.6M.
Contact Rocky # 621-5902 or
225-1400.
TOYOTA Corolla AE 100 -
like new late PHH series.
Excellent condition. Spoiler, AC,
mags, fully powered, automatic
windows, etc., low mileage.
Reasonable offer. 222-7516.
MERCEDES BENZ E200;
Toyota Ceres like new; Nissan
Pathfinder, Honda Del Sol Sport
car, PJJ series; BMW 318i sport
car $500 000. 225-2873, 225-
2319, 641-2643.
JET SKI like new, Yamaha
600 Dirt bike, Yamaha ATV four-
wheel, Honda XL 600 Dirt bike,
Honda 90" ladies motorcycle.
225-2873, 225-2319 / 641-2643.
TOYOTA Carina AT 150 -
power steering, power windows,
power mirrors, music, 5-forward,
PFF series $450 000
negotiable. Call 226-0362, 227-
5982 (h).





TOYOTA


TACOMA

immaculate

condition.
Contact:

233-2415/615-2203.

ONE (1) TOYOTA Hiace
Super GL 14-seater mini
bus diesel engine, four (4)-
wheel drive dual air condi-
tioned, CD deck, BJJ 1995.
Call 225-5274/226-7665.
3 AT 192 CARINAS, AE
100 Ceres, EP 82 Starlet,
Grand Vitara Toyota Pick Up
T100, GX 91 Mark 11. Amar
22.6-9691, 227-2834,
621-6037.
ONE Toyota Camry SV
33 2.0 Lumiere 4-wheel
steer, fully powered.
Excellent condition. AC
alarm, etc. Price $1.8M
negotiable. Tel. 220-7556.
Serious enquiries only.
ONE 4-door Toyota Pick-
up 2000 Model in very good'
condition. Price neg.
Contact 225-6759, between
8:30 am and 5pm. After hrs.
274-0418.
ONE damaged Toyota
Sprinter and quantity of
various damaged vehicle
parts by tender process at
GCIS Inc. 47 Main Street,
Georgetown. Call 226-4262
for inspection.
RZ Short base, BGG
series, music, mags,
crystal light, new seater,
Al condition $1.1M; Nissan
Laurel BWD, PW PM, Auto -
$550 000. Nauth # 275-
0208, 626-0350.
AE 91 COROLLA fully
powered, just sprayed,
rnags, spoiler, tint, big
music. Immaculate
condition. 1 Cressida P/ -
W, P/M, CD, Deck, etc.
Immaculate cond. Luxurious
vehicle. 220-6245 & 624-
5601.
ONE Turboo Toyota
Starlet 15" rims with CD
'-,i :,, AC, 'etc. Price S1
,,, .1*11 negotiable. Also
parts for Toyota RAV-4. Mud
flaps and Head lamps. 1998
Model. Tel: 225-4206, 624-
4587, 623-1433.
NISSAN Caravan Bus.
15-.seater, size, power
steering, automatic. air-
conditioned ever register,
will register at no cost to
buyer. Cash $1.6 million.
Perfect for family. Call 624-
8402, 227-7677. 225-2503.
SALE! SALE! SALE.!
Blue Bird Car S225 000.
Blue Bird Wagon $295
000; Nissan Pick Up $395
000:;. Toyota WVagon 3A
engine, gear box S395
000. Inspect at next to
Success Gas Station.
.: Fow!l Fa rm. 220.


PRIVATE AT 192 -
MAGS, AC, AUTOMATIC,
CD PLAYER, SPOILER, etc.
1 small bus, Toyota Town
Ace mags, 5-forward, etc.
1 AT 170 Corona EFI,
mags. music, automatic. 2
KE 74 Corolla back wheel
wagons. 1 Mercedes Benz,
top notch 17" mags.
Contact Mr. Khan. 28 'BB'
Eccles New Housing
Scheme, EBD. Tel: 233-
2336, 623-9972 or 617-
8944.
TOYOTA FOUR-RUNNER
SURF EXCELLENT
CONDITION, FRONT AND
REAR GUARDS, RUNNING
BOARDS, WINDOW VISORS,
BUG DEFLECTOR, SUN
ROOF, SONY CD PLAYER.
PHONE HAMID 227-2127,
623-6783. 17 BROAD ST.,
CHARLESTOWN.
NOW IN STOCK.
Reconditioned Japanese
vehicles AT 212 T/Carina
- 97-00; CK2A- M/Lancers
- 95-97; AE 100 T/wagon
- 97; GX110 T/Mark 111 -
01; SXM10 T/lpsum.- .98;
RAV 4 98 01; J100G -
CAMI 98; H57A M/
Pajero JR.-All vehicles fully
loaded with mag rims, etc.
As low as $2 000 000.
Contact Randy. Tel. # 233-
2400 or 624-7808. Kenrick
Auto Sales. ,
ARE you interested in
buying or selling a
vehicle? Then contact
Anita Auto Sale, Lot 43
Croal & Alexander Sts. Tel:
227-8550, 628-2833.
Toyota Carina/Corona ST
190, AT 212, AT 170, AA
60, AT 192, Toyota
Corolla/Sprinter AE 110,
AE 100, .AE 91, Toyota
Corolla S/W AE 110,
Nissan Sunny B12, Toyota
Camrv SV\20 Toyota Mark
I G '1 G '*. -) I To, o: .a
i e R Z 4 'N 1- n
C ra. ar, En ar, elle
ju ,' arr .e.1 For Ir.
:, 'I i.I r., i'r ,:, rid 111 ,r-,r ,.
lair, nee 'vehicles -. New
.l.n.die EFI cat eyes 4WD
Sd;e-'eli low consumption
Rmrn, buses; IRZ mini
bus; AT 192,. AT 212
Carinas fully loaded;
Toyota T100 & Tundra 4WD
spacious cab and tray.
Credit terms and trade-in
offers available. Low down
payment @ Paul Camacho
Auto Sales, 111 Croal St.
(bet. Albert & Oronoque
ts.). Tel. 225-0773, 621-
5869.
ONE Nissan 720 pirk up
long. tray along '.,inh pai
engine.. Mint condition..
"',. alel'l used .625 r.i00.
-.e One To,.,:,a C,-r.:ra
t.Ihiion wagon ET 176 5-
.:,ur power steering. Ir.ont
'.\ n l drive 12 ]l. e
;.:,,in-e tC adiluiable se .
nr ai e. P l series.
F '' .,iel v u- J fc-rr, .l.e
dri\ er, G ,:,, d lor 13 i
ser' ,: :.r p r.'_:,rI.al I.rl ,'
use E .,ell,- '-r .: ,onIdri,,.n
lea ing. 621-4928
"J, 3 .' 3 a;ils l r, .,
hi p n n t I re,: :I i' i I ,:, d
.-, r., e- CARS Sprinter
AE 110, Starlet Glanza
Turbo EP 91, Carina AT
212, AT 192, Mitsubishi
Galant EA 1A,. Toyota
Cynos Convertible, Cynos
Sports .Couple. EL 52,
Diesel panel 'an LH 109;
Wagons C.:.,..ii AE 100
G- ..rina PICKUPS (4 x
4) T.., .,i- Hilux YN 100:
TRUCKS Mitsubishi
Canter 2-ton open tray.
Deo Maraj Auto Sales, 207
Sheriff and Sixth Streets,
Campbellville. 226-4939. A
name and a service you can
trust.
HYMAC 580C & D LONG
AND SHORT BOOM; CAT
D6 & D5 WIDE TRACK
BULLDOZER; 22 RB
DRAGLINE (AIR CLAMP
SHELL & DIGGING
BUCKETS); CAT 330
EXCAVATOR, HITACHI
EXCAVATOR, 2 TOYOTA
CAB PICK-UPS, WITH &
WITHOUT ENGINE; TAR &
BITUMEN KETTLE;
BEDFORD MODEL 'M'
DUMP TRUCK; TOYOTA
T100 EXTRA CAB PICK UP;
ISUZU DIESEL PICK UP;
LEYLAND LOW BED TRUCK
AND TRAILER; LEYLAND
BOXER TRUCK 17.5 X 24
TYRES. Call 222-2628 or
220-9199, 643-4749. No
reasonable offer refused











,OW IN STOCK.
TOYOTA Corolla NZE
121, AE 110, EE 103,
Honda Civic EK3 & ES1 ,
Toyota Hilux Extra Cab
LN 172, LN 170, RZN
174, Toyota Hilux
double cab YN 107.
LN 107, LN 165, 4x4,
RZN 167. RZN 169.
Toyota Hilux single cab
LN 106, Toyota Hilux
Surf RZN 185. YN 130,
KZN 185. Mitsubishi
Canter FE 638E,
FE6387EV, Toyota
Carina AT 192, AT
212, Toyota Marino AE
100, Toyota Vista AZV
50, Honda CRV R01,
Toyota RAV 4, ZCA 26,
ACA 21. SXA 11, Toybta
15-seater buses, RZH
112. Toyota IPSUM SXM
15. Toyota Mark 2 GX
100. Lancer CK 2A.
Contact Rose Ramdehol
Auto Sales, 226 South
Rd., B our d a,
Geor ,- r Tel. 226-
8953. -1973, 227-
3185. Fax: 227-3185.
We give you the best
cause you deserve the
'best.


DRIVER. CONTACT
#227-6959 OR 227-
8630.
HOMES WANTED!
$$$$. KEYHOMES #
223-4267
1 LIVE-IN
DOMESTIC, 40-50
YEARS. TELEPHONE
642-8781.
HIRE CAR
DRIVERS. CONTACT
TEL. 227-0018.
FLAT or house to rent in
Central Georgetown. For
home/office. Call 225-
1540.
CONTRACT .pars. Royal
Connections Taxi Service.
Tel. 223-5400.
EXPERIENCED
Domestic. Contact
Telephone No. 227-
4402.
DECENT, mature
minibus Drivers. Tel:
624-3268, 233-5866.
ONE general
Domestic. Call 233-
2738, 622-5794, 640-
0661.
ONE live-in Maid.
Apply to 114, Regent St.
Telephone 223-6071.
3 MACHINISTS. APPLY
18-23 ECCLES
INDUSTRIAL SITE, E B
DEMERARA.
EXPERIENCED LIVE-
IN DOMESTIC BETWEEN 20
AND 30 YRS. CALL 227-
5665.
I ATTRACTIVE
Waitress. Apply in person to
Lot 1 B Shell Rd., Kitty.
Baby.
HONEST. MATURE &
RELIABLE HIRE CAR
DRIVERS TO WORK IN TAXI
SERVICE. CONTACT 223-
1682.
PA R T T !IM E
employment as a Clerk. T.
Singh North Mon Repos,
De Endragt Section (Lot
63).
REGENT STREET.
ESTABLISHED COMMERCIAL
BUILDING. HUMPHREY
NELSON'S REALTY. TEL: 226-
8937.
8 9 7 .................................... ........... .
1 EXPERIENCED
EXCAVATOR OPERATOR TO
WORK IN INTERIOR. TEL. 223-
1609, 624-2653, 777-4126.
E X C AV A T O R-
Operators to work in the
Interior, Must have
experience. Call 225-
2535 from 9am to 3pm.
1 DVD/CD Operator, 1
Video Attendant. Apply in
person to Movie World
DVD Club. Tel: 227-0501.
WANTED one Maid,
must know to prepare
Indian dishes. Preferably
from G/town area. Tel:
225-7700.
BARBERS. Must own
tools. Must be certified.
Tel: Jason 611-9977,
Ravi .660-478.1. 624-
::2505.


1 PUMP Attendant &
1 Salesperson to work
shifts. Please contact
Correia's Esso, in Bel Air
Park.
ONE Tutor for
Computer School.
Contact 259-3274, 624-
3472.
(1) O N E
experienced Roti Maker;
(1) one experienced
Pastry Maker. Contact -
259-3264, 259-3274.
Cell 624-3472.
EXPERIENCED PURl
MAKER TO WORK. CONTACT
185 WATERLOO STREET.
PHONE 225-2866. ASK FOR
FAT-MAN.

B^Kh^S


I Reliable, Responsible DOMESTIC
bT work rom 745 to 4:00 pm
M.;sj b: between 35 45 yrs. old

Duties rncuides assisting in
kiicnen. Ironing and aundry

Call: 227-5885
S 8'301to5:30Mon FI
| 8:30 4:30 Sat
10:00 4:30 Sun

ONE DOMESTIC/
BABYSITTER FROM WCD TO
WORK FROM 6:15 AM TO 5:45
PM, MONDAYS TO FRIDAYS.
CALL 612- 2537..
ONE ARC AND ACETY-
LENE WELDER. MUST
KNOW GRILL WORK. CON-
TACT: 21 BROAD STREET,
CHARLESTOWN. TEL: 225-
2835.
SALESGIRL, kitchen
staff, live-in girl from
country area. Nazeema Deli
318 East St., N/C/ Burg.
226-9654/618-2902
ONE Auto Body
repairman. Must have at
least 5 years experience.
Contact 233-6262,
between 8 am and 5pm,
Mon. Sat.
A T T R A C T I.V E
%Waitresses. Apply in person
or Tel. 220-7846 at
Monty's Restaurant & Bar.
. 155 Last Street; LBI.
SMALL family to live-in
and to work on the
Wakenaam Island. Please
call 624-6855, 623-8652.
EXPERIENCED Cooks
and Males with own
Motorcycle to do food
delivery. Contact Glow Int.
Hotel. Tel. 227-0863-4.
SALESMAN. VEHICLE.
SALARY OR COMMISSION.
PREVIOUS EXPERIENCES
WOULD BE AN ASSET. TEL.
227-3233.
EXPERIENCED sewing
machine operators. Apply at
MILCO Garment Industries,
170 Camp & Charlotte
Streets, Lacytown,
Georgetown.
EXPERIENCED Hairdresser.
Must know to do manicure,
pedicure, facial and
hairstyles, etc. Also chairs to
rent. Please contact. Tel. 223-
5252 or 628-3415.
WANTED Cooks. Must
know to cook Indian and
Creole dishes. Also Waiter,
Waitress, Guard. Cont. # C &
S Restaurant & Bar 28
Sheriff & 1s Sts. C/vil!e.
ONE live-in Maid to
work on ranch and look
after house at Mahaicony
River $20 000 monthly.
Contact. 192 Duncan St.,
Newtown. Kitty. 225-6571.
URGENTLY. Male and
female coconut pickers to
pick up coconut on the
akenaam Island. Live-
in accommodation
provided. Please call -
624-6855, 623-8652.
EXPERIENCED truck
Drivers, to work in the
Interior. Call 223-5273 or
223-5274 for interview.
Applications can be sent to
16 Mudlot Kingston,
Georgetown.
ABLE-BODIED male
-Security Guards. Apply in
person to: The Personnel
Department, Securicor
Guyana Inc. Lot 0'
Ruimveldt, Georgetown.
ei,'.i r. hthe h 'iTS'cTf"08:00
'a,-,, 1 1 v "r) nO .o r, .r. '


Mr. G. W/nit- on 333-


or Mr Clifford Stanley on


DANZliE'S: Brand name
footwear for all. Stall # D 9
N/A Market. Tel: 333-4685



USA Green Card
Lottery. Live & work in the
USA.. Family application -
$4 000.a Contact 227-3339.



WOODWORK Door
Store, panel doors, cupboard
doors, windows and
mouldings. Pitt Street &
Republic Road, N/A. Tel.333-
2558.



CIRCUIT City Internet
Caf6 and Computer School,
Lot 2 D'Edward Vill.aae, W/
C/B. All Internet facilities,
photocopying ?. :, ,
and Fax Ser -
330-2762/2830 or 625-
7189.


One 'Ransom 3-Disc
Plough-, one pair MF 35-cage
wheel, one 35 MF back
blade, one steel rake Call Tel:
333-3460 ,
OXYGEN and acetylene
industrial gases. # 58
Village, Corentyne, Berbice.
Phone:- 338-2221 (David
Subnauth).
3-STOREYED building
located in New Amsterdam;
pool tables, ice maker
machine, 1 complete gym,
1 Lister generator. Call:
333-2457/231-5171.
1 LITTLE Giant dragline
with 371 engine; 1 48" x 36"
pitch propeller: (1) 31/" dia. x
13 ft 6 ins. propeller shaft;.
1 Perkins marine with
transmission; 1 Bedford
engine block with standard
crank shaft and head; all
sizes of 3-phase motors;
cutting torch; one complete
gas welding set; one
371 GM engine. Tel:
333-3226.


WANTE


- 315 s4i 73-SH2R
6-4~ 3-.3 538,1232-10,065


TViVCR Repairs.
Rosignol Market Stelling
Roadc, Telephone # 621-
2256



CHURCH View Hotel,
Main and V; ,- Streets, NA.
Tel: 333-- : :: Gift Flower
and Souvenir Shop, Main
& Vrvheid Streets. # 333-
3927-



MOTORCYCLES East
Coast Traders Independent
suppliers of all makes
Motorcycles and Scooters -
West Berbice. Competitive
prices. For. a bargain tel. #
617-3192.



UPPER flat of two-
storeyed building for business
purposes located in Coburg
Street (next to Police
Headquarters). Call
Telephone # 618-6634.



1 3-STOREYED
building, newly built in
the heart of New
Amsterdam. P.rice
reduced drastically.
Call 333-2457, 337-
2348.
(1) 2-BEDROOM
house at Whim,
Corentyne price -
US$40 000. Phone: 220-
6115. Ideal for
businessperson or
lawyer.
2-STOREY prime
residential property
situated in Canefield
Canje Public Road.
Price $20 million,
negotiable. Contact Tel.
327-7164.
1 HOUSE and land
(double lot), location: Lot
F-10 Albion Front,
Corentyne, Berbice. Price
$3.9 million negotiable.
Contact Liz -, 227-8366.


In loving memory of our dear
mother JOYCE ELAINE
FARLEY. (nee) JONES who
died on June 16,1997.
June comes with deep regret
A month we will neverforget
But we all know that it's God's
will.
Forin our hearts you'llalways
be
Sleep on beloved mother
God only takes the best


f. -


Inserted by her loving husband, child
Julian, Jennifer, Ronald; grandchild
relatives and friends.


r,








a. *



ren Joslyn,
Iren, other


-




Loved with a lo e te ,:')' a,
Selling.
Missed with a gnef le rnd '
all tears
To the world he as u .. .
one
To us he was the worlo
Thewifeandchildren of the
late Mr. Chawbnaraine of 37
Second St. Cummings Lodge
would like to thank the mans

friends who have sympathised with them, sent
cards, called and visited to lend support during
their time of loss of a beloved one.
Special thanks to the management and staff of
National Insurance Scheme, Mayor of G/town,
Hamilton Green, staff of St. Joseph Mercy
Hospital, Regional Administration Region 2, and
Banks DIH Essequibo Branch.
We lost our best and dearest friend
deardad whehr lost ou -.y5.


1, Tom


URGENTLY 2
experienced attractive
Receptionists to work at a hotel.
Please bring 1
recommendation and 1
application: Good pay and
benefits. Apply to 227 South
Road, Lacytown, G/town. Tel.
226-2852 or 611-9134
WANTED three (3)
experienced Waitresses to
work in Restaurant & Bar at
19 UG Road,.on weekends,
at nights, from 4 pm to?
Serious enquiries only. Apply
in person between 12 noon
and 3 pm daily. Attractive
wages.
HACKS HOLLOW
BLOCK FACTORY.
Labourers. Must have N.I.S.
and I.D. Cards and one
reference. Preferable i-
on the East Bank Demerara.
Please contact Hacks Hollow
Block Factory. T1 & T2
Providence, East Bank
Demerara.
WANTED urgently Se-
curity Guards and Ice
Plant Operators. Must
have (2) recent Refer-
ences, valid Police Clear
ance. Identification and
NIS cards. Apply in person
to: The Manager, BM En-
terprise Inc., GFL Wharf.
- Houston, East Bank
Demerara.
PAYING CASH!
ALUMINIUM $30 PER LB/
$70 000 PER TON, BRASS -
$50 PER LB/$110 000 PER
TON LEAD $10 PER LB/
t22 600 PER TON; COPPER
60 PER LB/$140 000 PER
TON, STAINLESS STEEL -
$35 PER LB/$70000 PER
TON. ALL PRICES IN (GYD)
GUYANA DOLLAR. CALL
TRINI 610-8952; 612-
86.84; 618-7939.


lan ~lv r 1'u


TRINIDAD
aL. r ,1r, Domestic, age
S,- -r '' only. Send
recent photo. Ticket. will
be paid for. Applications
without photo will not be
acknowled ed. Mail
application to Mr. Maraj,
P.O Box 5866, Trinidad.
West Indies,




FEMALEBOND CLERK

& BACK-UP-CASHIER
Lust have passes in at least 3 subjects
0' Levels. For Back-up Cashier -
L i. ...-. C C i I .! 1. 1
accounts necessary
Apply in person ,'ii .'riilen





ONE EXPERIENCED
COSMETOLOGIST. MUST BE
AN ALLROUNDER, CUTTING
AND DESIGNING A MUST.
WILL BE WORKING IN
CENTRALLY LOCATED
SALON. CONTACT
BEVERLEY, TEL: 629-1114
SCRAP Copper, brass,
aluminium, aluminium
tins/cans, and radiators to
buy. HAROLD'S METAL
S.TORE, 223 Wellington
*Street, Georgetown. Not
far from Strand cinema.
Phone 226-8026, 225-6347.
PLEASE NOTE: HAROLD'S
METAL STORE'S ONLY
PLACE OF BUSINESS IS AT
THE ABOVE ADDRESS.


SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005



r PA RRQCHRQNJAiCi




Bounty Colts



blow out





Ravens...

From back page

the end of the first quarter.
In the second quarter, Harris and Edghill put the wind into the
sails of their team's offence, carrying them on an eight-nothing run
to tie the game. Colts though fought back as the quarter ended ini
another tie at 34.
In the second half, it was a case of good offence better defence
for the Colts, with the guards of the side out playing the taller
Ravens players. The lead would have been more than nine (55-46)
at the end of the third, but forward Kelvin Simon (finished with
two points) with. seconds left on the clock accidentally;
passed the ball to Mohan who drained a three-pointer at the
buzzer. '
In the last quarter, Bennett went ballistic! He drained shots fro
all parts of the court, to carry his team on a 30-to-10 run.
Prior to that game, Colts' third-division team was not so ex-
plosive since the Sonics boomed their way to a thirteen-point vie
tory 76-63 to be crowned third-division champions.
Power forward, Ruel McKinnon led the host team with 20
points, while point guard Ryan Melville scored 15, Richard
Braithtwaite 14 and Jason Warde 10.
The opener of the night saw the multi-talented Nyota Peters
delivering in the middle for the visiting Kashif and Shanghi Hi Fly-
ers as they trounced the host team Sonics girls by 13 points, 50-
37.
Peters scored 18, while assists came from Tiana Badley with,
eight and Shanna Chester who added six.
For the Sonics Delicia Mayers finished with 10 points
while Kean Andrews and Karen Norville chipped in with nine
and eight respectively.

17* .w 7--






27


SUNDAY CHRdIMtt tJune 12, 2005

P wT iMnOff4C"7t


- *














** -

d "Copyrighted Material a
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
40 4W


_ CYPRIAN BRUCE
LABORDE, 91 pa:szsed
away on May 28, 2005 in
.Orlando, Florida. He is
survived by his beloved
wife of 30 years- Zoreen,
daughter- Deirdre Anne
both of Orlando, Florida;
brother of Dick Laborde ,.
.of England; seven .."-. ....:..
sisters-in-law,, six **.
. brothers-in-law and 36 '' s
Snieces and nephews. Jn
I Funeral services took place on Saturday, June 1
4, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, followed by .
L", cremation -r
rS Remains will be brought to
.'' Guyana for burialat sea. '

,. '- ^,:. ,


The ';2Llsband anid ,~-


children oi the late Mrs.
V A S D A I E
PERSAUD a/k
DULARIE or
AUNTY 'D' wish to


sincerely thank all
relatives, friends and -.
neighbours who i, .
supported us through
our time of bereavement.
Special thanks to Guru 'Gi' Pandil Anand
Snram & family, members of the various
Mandirs who gave support and most of all
her sisters and brothers, both in England
and Guyana.


J~'L *,.'.~
/
.t .1


'A:~


*__~~--1--


7lIn #~{1tiorwariu


SAHAI' In l.'.ir,,g rnemor, of our btelo.ed -ihusb.an,
and iniher MAHADEO SAHAI Ahr:, pa-'..eJ a".'a ,ur
June' 1997
June comes with deep regret
A month we will never forget
A light from our home is gone
A voice w.'e loved is still
A place is va._cant in out heartn'
That r n one elSe c -1- fill


T e' T T ,7,- rii e,,tcs nie ha -e tfiot :. .,. clP
S f'Jo length of lime ca7n take ait .. ....
S fio ver.se. no flowers no tear. :..n say .... .
Hoi. nmuch we miss you ever'uy .: .
Tears wl/flowt anti teats will d' -.;.::.
But ne n.'ne: *:f r',o fll neve,, 'h. ,'. -. .
I' le -t u .'U D.~cidy


Inserted by his loving wife. children grandchildren, in-laws
brothers, sisters., relatives & friends.
. -
* i= .._ ._,t,'.- ".^ *^.. --. .... ....' "- "*. *.. . ....-.. . .. ..


z


* 4t '


I r, merno,, oa In O ri ,g-z'o,,
wonderful brother, fiance, uncle

relative and friend DR. JOEL .....
SJOHNSON. Sunrise: 1980-
04-27. Sunset: 2004-06-09.
June comes with deepest regret
Month we could never forget


We hold ourtears when we speak
yourname
But the pain in our hearts remains
the same


"I,
.7'


No one knows the sorrow we
share
When the family meets and you
are not there
We never ask for miracles but .
only one would do
To see the door pushing open '' '
and you come walking through
Joel if our tears could build a ,.. .
stairway ..
Memories a lane we'd walk .
*: up to heaven
And bring you home again. ,
But we know there comes a time
in life
When every leaf must fall. the
green, the gold, the great, the
small
In God's own time He'll call with perfect love He gathers all
But those we love don't go away
SThey walk besides us everyday until at last our hearts unite
In God's external place of light
Gone to a place covered in mist
Gone for a moment's quiet rest


...,." "'-4


- a-


Forever sadly remembered by your loving mom Jean Johnson, sisters
Sharon Johnson of Canada, Carlotta Johnson, Charles of England and
Nicole.Johnson, fiance of Shennon Bazillio, uncle of Ryan, Maria,
Nicholas, Kiara, Samara and many relatives and friends.

K p- ,w w ae. !/d aw. ue we w i e U, uI d MGjie j V.


4.


S .I)


IS


I


3:1


'---


4m


.."s


'~''


1


ng






28 SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005


AR's seizs pT CHROeICLE i Canaa


BAR's Button seizes pole position in Canada


0 ,, w


40 w -04


* 0 *-


- -


S"Copyrighted Material -



Syndicated Content hno



Available from Commercial News'Providers"


0.0 -4


-


W o










Ministry of Education

Tenders are invited from suitably qualified suppliers to Supply & Deliver the following Items or
Equipment.

Lot "1" Science Equipment (University of Guyana, Turkeyen Campus)
Lot "2" Text Books (University of Guyana, Turkeyen Campus)
Lot "3" Science Equipment and Materials- (University of Guyana, Berbice Campus)
Lot "4" Information Technology E4uipment (Linden Technical Institute)
Lot "5" Science Equipment (Linden Technical Institute)
Lot "6" Air Condition Unit (National Centre for Educational Resource Development)
Lot"7" Information Technology Equipment (National Centre for Educational Resource
Development)
Lot "8" Photocopier (National library)
Lot "9" Photocopier (Ministry of Education, 21 Brickdam)

Tender documents will be available from 161' June 2005 can be obtained from

Mr. T. Persaud
Ministry of Education
21, Brickdam
Georgetown.

upon a non refundable fee of two thousand dollars ($2,000.00) for each lot.

AlI Tenders are to be accompanied by a bid security of 2% of the Tendered sum ioJ'her with
documentary evidence of the firm as set out in the tender document.
Tender documents for each lot shall be placed in a.sealed envelope marked clearly on the top
left-hand comer "Tender For Lot ____

Tenders should be address to:
The Chairman
National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown.

and be deposited in the Tender Box on or before 9,00 am on Tuesday 5th July 2005 when tenders
would be closed. All tenders must be accompanied by valid Income Tax and NIS Compliance
certificate.

Tenderers may be present at the opening which would take place shortly after 9.00 am on
Tuesday 511 July 2005.

The Ministry of Education does not bind itself to accept the lowest tender and reserves the right to
award the contract to any supplier without assigning reasons

P. Kandhi
Permanent Secretary Government ads can be viewed on
http://wwwgina.gov.gy


-q -


40. doo 4
10 t mmit
- m n
mm0 0
so


- ~w 40-
40 4b 4 --w S
S -0 411-
*. 4b 40a
- N Aw .90 4m-lb 4m.m0
.-soo --MOM a 4m
400 4100 40qwo*d qo -p .gl
. 40 4b -a.01 w m MM


.


so
Aa. .


*~ ~ -a
- S a
~
- 0 a -
______ S ~
a ~. -

= a.. -
a. -
a. a.


*0 a w WD 4
0-om 4P.5d
0waft00 moof


O


qm,
p
Q


*l *


qm 4w
'looft" 4D 4b


4P


-W .


" "





SUNDAY CHRONICLE June 12, 2005

4-


3 3


Ae-


S-M


Lien


- -S


--S -


Rugby chf





ovr 'tmmnlt


corn mw s

a ft b
.Wlw 5-q 5 ftm- "o --q wa&


om- S -S w
- Gb-


"Copyrighted Material...


Syndicated Content'-.
O Sl - o


Available from Commercial News Providers"


-40.S


-000
-IdmbS-0
qmm


- S S -
-5 0 -
S S ~-
- m


* -o b l e p


-,.w
lw .m4bam


a


Sk -


-O f a -
af-4w 410- 5-


- I.


qm


- -40 W 09


-~ - a ~


- G


40 0
owe


- m
S.- -


p "


























0 i..---



'C' Copyrighted Materia rS

tIgSyndicated'Contentt
Available from Commercial News Providers"


40qmmbw o
*nw0b 40I
- 0 ag


- --- .-


f w
Gb--W ft Iw


[utaibasmenbrta 0o Fxe


Yek


a


"V

C'.


A


/


I


q


i


U.


Public Relations Officer in the Guyana Women's Crickel
Association, Colin Alfred, works with tape measure yes-
terday at the National Gymnasium.


I'r


~;~bP ,"AT CHRONICLE&


*


g
D -


Sechnca I

Adviser

satisfied

with fitness

level
TECHNICALAdviser to the Guyana Women's
Cricket Association (GWCA), Mark Harper,
is satisfied with the fitness level of the encamped
young ladies that are currently in training for pos-
sible selection to represent Guyana in the July 16th,
to 31st Regional cricket tournament which will b"e
held in Jamaica.
Harper, who is the former coach of Bermuda's national cricket
team, said that the performance in the shuttle run (beep test), yester-
day, at the National Gymnasium was encouraging, but he hopes that
in time their fitness could rise and all the girls can at least do a
minimum of level eight.
At yesterday's beep test most of the girls reached level seven,
with the lowest at level 5.1 and the highest being that of FIFA referee
Dianne Ferreira-James who was stopped at 10.4 by Harper. Also
performing well was Fiona Mentis, one of two cricketers shortlisted
from Essequibo.
- f-Harper said he was also impressed with the attitude of
the cricketers and their approach to the entire encamp-
ment.
Along with the beep test the girls practised running be-
tween the wickets, while in the afternoon they were expected to
have some indoor net sessions.


W-"
dik I


V-







i... ; .1:


SUN AYCHR NILEJ Une 12 2 0
11*


y~. a EU
A w
.t. ~..


'You must keep fit, Worrell



tells young wicketkeepers


"THE number one thing in
wicket-keeping is that of al-
ways keeping fit." That was
the message of former Bar-
bados and West Indies 'A'
team wicketkeeper, Michael
Worrell, during the opening
ceremony of the Joseph
'Reds' Perreira Sports Foun-
dation two-day wicket-keep-
ing workshop, which opened
at the GNIC Sports Club,
Woolford Avenue, yesterday.
Worrell, who is conducting
the wicketkeepers' course, ad-
vised the Guyanese
wicketkeepers present, to run a
few laps after every matclf.
"When you finish playing
on evenings if it is one thing that
you should do it is to take a
couple of laps around the
ground; even if you are walk-
ing. What that will do is to
programme you for the next
day," he quipped.
Worrell stated that a good
wicketkeeper is one who can
keep under the stumps, stating
that this must be to all kinds of
bowling. He said that a number
of persons speak about indis-
cipline in the West Indies team
and most of the time it has.
nothing to do with mannerisms
but with the players' failure in
following the basic rules.
He noted that the West
Indies selectors are respon-
sible for the art of wicket-
keeping dying.,
"The art of wicket-keeping
if not dead is slowly dying, and
I cannot not blame the West
Indies selectors for this. I think
that we were unfortunate to,


have such a good keeper in Jef-
frey Dujon who was also a very
good batsman. Since then they
(WI selectors) try to tell all their
wicketkeepers to bat first and
wicket-keep as a standby and as
a result even the territories de-
cided to go with that process as
well. In Barbados we do the
same thing we look for the best
wicketkeeper-batsmen." Worrell
said.
During the two-day work- -
shop, the wicketkeepers will be
filmed by Worrell and then
analysed in an effort to eliminate.
any possible flaws that they
might have.
President of the Guyana
Cricket Board (GCB), Chetram
Singh,. who also. spoke at the
opening told the young
wicketkeepers that if.they keep
working hard, they will be re-
warded since vacancies will soon
exist for their skills.
"This is a golden opportu-
nity for you guys to upgrade
your skills. We in Guyana also
have a scarcity of very good
- keepers. There are not more that
two or three good keepers in
Guyana. Youngsters, these two
days you can do a lot to upgrade
your skills. There will be vacan-
cies very shortly in the Guyana.
team and the West Indies team,"
Singh noted.
Also speaking at the open-
ing ceremony was head of
Guyenetrprise, Vic Insanally,
who is onei of the directors of
the Sports Foundation, and
-GCB Cricket Development
Officer Clyde Butts. (Faizool
Deo)


The four female wicketkeepers selected to be part of the workshop listen attentively to Mike Worrell during his open-
ing presentation. Former Barbados and West Indies A team keeper Mike Worrell speaks to the young wicketkeepers.
(Winston Oudkerk photo)


-


* ,- .. -U.


a.


-im -- Mb. ..............


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content *


Available from Commercial News Providers"


S;; --;


- -.0.:-:. mm


a


U. -'U,,


" .


mII "a *lll


SUNMY'CHRONICLE Juine12, 2005 .31J


C ~(IY*CZI OIOY?*UV11, 10 ~1*1~~ ig II~~~1












^^i wv 1 V
rjj^iditj


By Faizool Deo
IT was nothing short of a
blow out, at the Cliff Ander-
son Sports Hall on Friday
night when the Bounty Colts
guards exploded in all facets,
snapping the Ravens' seven-
game winning streak for the
season with an emphatic 29-
point victory margin (85-56).
It was game two of the
best-in-three finals of the Pepsi
Sonics 'Generation Next' bas-,
ketball competition.
The win forced the finals
into a game three, which was
scheduled to be played at the
same venue last night.
With coach Phillip George
leading from off the court, it
was Clarence Bennett who
came off the bench in the sec-
ond half for the Colts and
dazzled -spectators with his
fancy foot work and 'hot' hand
shooting to lead all scorers with
19 points.
Bennett's performance was
exciting, but the real heroes for
the Colts were fellow guards,


Trevor McLeod and Curwin
Blades, who played their hearts
out, both offensively and defen-
sively.
The pair set plays, includ-
ing a number of 'back-door
passes', created turnovers and
danced across the court with
the basketball. Blades, who
was flawless from the free
throw line, finished with 15
points, while McLeod threw
in nine.
Andrew Ifill powered his
way to 15 points, but he had
one of his off nights, 'subbing'
his first shot and missing his
next three. The big man did grab
a number of boards, and he was.
also credited with steals and a
blocked shot. Also scoring for
the winners was centre Dayne
Kendall who finished with 12
points.
For the Ravens, forward
Rudy, James was their top


~J

Er ryr9 L-iv


scorer with 13 points, while
former national captain
Lugard.Mohan, with a couple
of three pointers, finished


f-T !

Cifri 9J


game with a quick four points
from James, but then Blades
with perfect shooting from
the free throw line and the


1 f I V

Jijj~Ji .r]


quick legs of McLeod carried
Colts to a 21-13 points lead at
Please turn to page 26


TREVOR McLeod executes one of his hook shots l
in traffic. Looking on are Curwin Blades (number
nine) and Dayne Kendall (number six). (Quacy
Sampson photo)


Edward B. Beharry
& Company Ltd.
77 ........ r -' 4F


Before technology made crossing oceans a safe affair
i.his Nas the oest Life insurance you could get.


:-la~l.'J is s lain salinri nowadaYs.


P11-1. P. -IPHl A JI;q irji,: .ij i~C-*~ j ~T F P -
1 7 i-'- 1: -C kt,7.Ti~~ ~ .: :L~IC' lico.com~gLuvana
;-blished by Guyana National Newspapers Limited. Lama Avenue. let Air Park, Georgetown. Telephone 226-3243 3 ,Gencrai); adi',-rfai: 2272-.37-5214. Fax227 -2d.. r


with 12, Yusif Edghill 10 and
point guard Darcel Harris
seven.
Ravens started off the


Y






Soil


MOO -
,:N t1~


Not to be sold separately
. ., '


.:.p


Sold out house at

DrIsh, innovative


THE First Assembly of God staged this year's
presentation of its .annual Gospelfest at the
refurbished National Cultural Centre two Saturday
evenings ago.
The house was sold out. The first time, we are
told, since the 2001 Awe Society show.


Christian gospel

group to launch

CD; seeks

sponsorship
-.... -.. --.. -., -...- -. .. -- -c-- -


I.(Kumarao Falls is located in Region Seven and can be accessed by a
scenic one hour boat ride up the Kurupung River from the mining town
f Kurupung. A one and half hour trek through the rainforest where you
see scarlet macaws and other birds and then a gradual climb takes you right
.. to the tip of the waterfall. Here you are rewarded with the most spectacular
sight.of this truly beautiful waterfall which at only 100 feet less than Kaieteur
Falls is as equally majestic and unforgettable. (Picture by Annette Arjune)


.. ... "-
,1- ".. .



'*1'
-,* .
-" ; _^


I


ip -a


JIC~






PRP"SudyChoileJn 1,20


THE



ACRYLAMIDE



SCARE

IN 2004, shock waves hit the world when it
became apparent that some of the common foods
we eat might be a cause of great harm due to
acrylamide.
OTHER SOURCES OF ACRYLAMIDE
Acrylamides are useful chemicals in industry, but before
April 2002, it was not commonly known that acrylamides were
formed naturally in foods. Scientists began to study foods to
determine how much acrylamides they contained and if the
amounts were harmful to us. The levels found were always rela-
tively low, although, in some foods, they might be higher than
the levels allowed in our drinking water, paper food packaging
and cosmetics. However, because acrylamides are known to be
toxic to human beings and animals in large doses, its discovery
in foods generated a lot of alarm.
So farm it has been determined that acrylamides are formed
naturally in many foods, particularly starchy foods like pota-
toes, pasta, toasted bread and cereals that are cooked or pro-
cessed at a high temperature (above 120oC). This includes fry-
ing, deep fat frying, broiling, oven baking and grilling. The longer
the foods are cooked at these high temperatures the more of
the product is formed. There is great variability as to how much
of the acrylamide is formed even in identical samples of foods.
It is also uncertain how acrylamide is formed in foods.
ACRYLAMIDE HAS OTHER USES
As mentioned before, it is used to make industrial materials
called polyacrylamides. Taken apart the word polyacrylamide
means acrylamides. This chemical is used to treat drinking wa-
ter and waste water. It removes the chemicals and impurities in
the ,water and makes it safe enough to drink. Acrylamides are
also used to make glues, paper and cosmetics. The foundation
of dams and tunnels re constructed using acrylamides. Also, we
may be exposed to significant amounts of these chemicals
through cigarette smoking.
Acrylamide is known to be toxic to human beings mainly
through its effects on the nervous system. The safety of work-
ers exposed to this chemical through their jobs has always been
a cause for concern. Smokers are also looked at and many coun-
tries seek to determine how much exposure they have to
acrylamides through smoking. These chemicals have also been
shown to cause cancers in animals.
WHAT SHOULD I DO?
The investigations into acrylamides in foods are in the early
stages. So far, it is not known that the levels of acrylamides in
foods pose an actual human health risk. A recent study has
shown that there is no link between acrylamide exposure in
foods and cancer at different parts of the body (bowel, bladder
and kidney). This is good news, but it is only one study and
more information needs to be gathered before we can know for
sure.
Around the world, scientists have stated that there isn't
enough information to recommend avoiding any particular foods.
However, the World Health Organisation (WHO) states that
food should not be cooked for too long or at too high a tem-
perature. We must still remember to cook our food thoroughly
to kill food poisoning bacteria, especially in meat and meat prod-
ucts, but avoid overcooking or burning foods while frying, broil-
ing or grilling foods. The table below shows the. appropriate
temperature meats must be cooked at in order to kill problem- !
causing bacteria.


GUYANESE FASHION

gets overwhelming response in
\ ] \ \r r


J .J


'Diversity in Fashion', an eclectic showing of
Guyanese fashion designs, recently scored high
marks and electrified a fashion-savvy audience in
Washington D.C.
The show was a key component of a programme
of activities hosted by the Guyana Embassy in Wash-
ington D.C. to mark Guyana's 39th Independence An-
niversary. It was encapsulated in an evening of
Guyanese culture held at the Queen Anne Fine Arts
Building of the Prince George's Community College in
Largo, Maryland.
On display was the work of Guyanese designers,
Donna Ramsammy-James, Andrea Braithwaithe and
Muriel Glasgow who have long been associated with the
creation of beautiful fashion harmony.
Drawing heavily from
the brilliant combinations of t: !


each designer obviously gave full reign to their own
creative impulses. Some of the designs were simple
yet sophisticated, some flirty, some whimsical and
charming, while others were elaborate and
intricate and oh-so-chic-chic. Each piece was a
demonstration of the designer's clever
combination of colour, cut and fabric to produce
garments which were delightfully original,
appealing and wearable.
Guyanese-born fashion designer, model and model-
ling coach, Robert Dover, presented the show. The
pieces were displayed, with all the panache of profes-
sional runway models, by Guyanese and Caribbean-
American models from the DC-Maryland area.
Each piece received overwhelming acclamation
from an audience familiar with and appre-
ciative of the many manifestations of fash-
ion, from haute couture to grunge. At the
end of the show, several members of the
audience indicated their interest in pur-
chasing the pieces. (Sandra Seeraj)


Food
Beef
Ground beef, veal or chicken
Pork
Lamb
Whole Chicken


Temperature (6F)
145 (63oC)
160 (71oC)
145 (63oC)
165 (7-4oC
180 (82oC)


A cooking thermometer is useful in determining if foods have
reached the appropriate temperature. Also we should continue
to limit the amount of fried fatty foods that we eat.
One study showed that the amount of acrylamide in French
fries could be reduced by first soaking the cut fries in cold wa-
ter for approximately 15 minutes so as to extract some of the
.reactive sugars and proteins from the surface. Care should also
be taken to ensure that the oil used for frying is sufficiently
hot; it should be left to hear for about 2.5 minutes. Also, one
should try not to cook too many fries at one time; approxi-
mately 100g of potatoes should be added to one litre of oil.
This of course does not mean that the issue. of
acrylamides is closed. Far from it. In the coming years,
there is sure to be more information coming out of the
scientific community about this chemical and how,-when
and why we should protect ourselves. They still need to
determine the levels of this chemical in many foods, and
also find out if when we add up the tiny exposures from
all the different sources, (After all 'one-one-dutty build
dam') we are placing ourselves at risk.


Sunday Chronicle -June 12,2005


Pa II:H






'P~lI I


By Terence Roberts


I 0







comeyadl


By Terence Roberts
HE first definition of
Marilyn Monroe we
must never believe is
that she was an immoral, vul-
gar actress, whose behaviour
led to her own tragic suicide.
Such a definition carries no
truth whatsoever. The truth is
that Monroe grew afraid that
the nervous ailments and
bouts of depression she in-
creasingly experienced from
the late 1950s was unavoid-
able, because she had inher-
ited them from her mother,
who took her own life in a
mental hospital as a result of
such illnesses when Monroe
was a mere child. Monroe's
fears were probably correct,
as neither sedatives nor alco-
hol cured her illness, and led
to her death in 1962.
However, when we look at


the legacy Monroe left in nu-
merous photo-books and two
dozen films, it is clearly posi-
tive and almost entirely the op-
posite of her tragic beginning
and end. This was not an easy
feat for her to achieve, when we
consider her terrible childhood
as an illegitimate fatherless child
put in foster homes, suffering
physical and even sexual abuse,
and being fired repeatedly from
her first jobs.
At some point in her teen-
age years, Monroe decided to
turn her life around towards a
bright and earnable career in the
arts. She, like many others, had
noticed that her body was well
proportioned and quite appeal-
ing, but instead of simply pa-
rading herself before the eyes of
men in a silly, vain, and teasing
manner, she furthered her career
by realising she would amount
to little without literacy and


studies, and therefore learned to
read and also comprehend even
the most complex and difficult
literature, as well as learning to
write well.
She penned many emotional
poems, sending them off to
well-known writers for criti-
cism. Her bookshelves were
filled with literature she read by
advanced writers and poets like
Emerson, Thoreau, Henry
James, Whitman, Yeats, James
Joyce, etc. She took modelling
and serious acting classes,
sought out the company of pho-
tographers, models, actors, po-
ets, writers, magazine editors,
film-makers, etc., socialising
with them in cafes, nightclubs,
restaurants, cinemas, hotels, and
collaborated with them on pho-
tographic books and films.
Monroe's extremely sensual
body was-a problem the young
actress could not avoid, since she


could not prevent tien from fo-
cusing on this quality she pos-
sessed. She certainly liked sex
(who doesn't) and it no doubt
kept her refreshed.
The key to Monroe's ge-
nius, however, lay in what she
achieved with the help of her
artist friends. She was able to
prove with her photos and films
that beautiful women can bring
happiness to others by the vi-
vacious expression of their bod-
ies combined with comedy,
smart speech, and intelligence.
Two photographic events
would enhance Monroe's career
in the 50s. The first was when
she posed nude in diagonal pro-
file across a red background on
a poster, and again when Hugh
Hefner, the young editor of
'Playboy', put her on the cover
and centerfold of the magazine's
first issue. Neither of these
photo-scenes was porno-
graphic, but rather the first
public demonstration of
Monroe's artistry as a skilful
photo-model. Even at present,
very few female models and ac-
tresses can pose, sit, recline,
stand, or walk with the poise
and perfection of Marilyn
Monroe.
Today, none of Monroe's
24 films, from the first to the
last, should be missed. Her first
brilliant role was in the master-
piece Film Noir of 1950, 'The
Asphalt Jungle', her fourth film,
in which her performance as the
naive light-headed girlfriend of
an aging lawyer turned jewel
thief, is perfect. 1951 saw her
in 'As Young as You Feel', her
sixth film and a treasured clas-
sic which proved that Monroe
could master roles that suggest
the power young women pos-
sess in real life. In this film, she
acts as the sensible young sec-


* Vt.


..




: .







YOUNG Marilyn Monroe with Billy Wilder, the middle aged
film director she admired, during the making of -The Seven-
Year Itch', 1955.


retary who cures a mature man
of his fantasies by slowly se-
ducing him.
Monroe skillfully left roles
of positive guidance for young
women. 'Clash by Night' of
1952 is another such role in this
Film Noir classic where she
plays a young rural seacoast
woman trying to make the right
choices in life. 'Monkey Busi-
ness' of the same year is the
first film in which Monroe dem-
onstrated her sex appeal by


wearing thin dresses which ac-
cented her beautiful figure and
walk. This was also the film
which began her roles critical of
women who emphasise their
appealing bodies, but lack
proper literacy and education.
In 'How to Marry a Mil-
lionaire' of 1953, Monroe is
hilarious with her girl-
friends, in another attack on
women who pretend to be
Please turn to page XVI


I QUESTION

I have been robbed by N,.S! I was advised that I would get the highest
paid Pension because I was paying contributions in the highest bracket.
I I have paid N.I.S for six (6) years and now I have only received a Grant.
I I deserve a Pension.
I


.NATIONAL BANK
OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE LIMITED
A Subsidiary of Republic Bank Limited




MOTOR CYCLE & VEHICLES


- Jailing Motor Cycle # CD 6547
Toyota Carina Motor Car # PGG 4635
- Suzuki Super Carry Van # PGG 7636
4 Suzuki Jeep # PFF 9267
Toyota Cor:.-.la Station Wagon # PGG 8982
- Toyota Corolla Motor Car # HA 3930
- Nissan Motor Car # HB 1841


174 Waterloo Street, Georgetown
174 Waterloo Street, Georgetown
174 Waterloo Street, Georgetown
174 Waterloo Street, Georgetown
174 Waterloo Street, Georgetown
N.B.I.C. Corriverton Branch
N.B.I.C. Corriverton Branch


PROPERTIES FOR SALE BY. TENDER

-> Former GNCB Property at Lot 1 Lombard & Cornhill Streets, Georgetown
-> 19 Public Road, Pouderoyen, West Bank Demerara
Tender closes at 14:00 h on June 17, 2005 and Tender Forms can be uplifted at any of our
NBIC locations.
Tenders must be sealed in an envelope marked "Tender For...", and placed in the
Tender Box at Water Street Branch on the Receptionist's Desk no later than 14:00 h on
June 17, 2005.
For further information please contact: Mr. Frederick Rampersaud
,",.. ..,- .TeJephpne ,# 226-4091-5, Ext: 239. ,


ANSWER

I am indeed sorry to hear that you have been misled into believing that six
(6) years contributions would enable you to get a Pension. You have not
been robbed by N.I.S! You have been misled or misinformed by someone.


I


That person was either unaware of N.I.S Regulations or did not know exactly
how many contributions you had or were likely to have at the age of 60,

To qualify for Old Age Pension, you need a minimum of fifteen (15) years or
approximately 750 contributions. Anything less would entitle you to a Grant
which is what you received.

N.I.S is not in the business of robbing contributors We exist to offer you
social protection and guaranteed benefits once all qualifying conditions
are met.

If or when we make a wrong decision based on inadequate or inaccurate
information we allow for same to be corrected through an appeal process.

Do you have a question on N.I.S ? Then write/call.


NIS MAIL BAG
C/O Ms. Dianne Lewis.Baxter
Publicity and Public Relations Officer (ag) ,,
National Insurance Scheme
Brickdanm and Winter Place
P.O. Box. 101135 -
, Tel:227-346l ,*, ,. .. . .... .


_ C ___ I~_~


-Chi ~ay`ChroY lelJ' t '21


I






PaeI udyCionceue1,20


w - -


INFLAMMATORY


DISEASE


ANYONE at
anytime can be
affected by a
condition known as oral
inflammatory disease.
Regardless of the
diagnosis, the lesions
manifest clinically as an
ulcer, a white patch, or
a white spot
somewhere in the
mouth.
Germs are always found
to play an important role in the
cause. Specific antibiotic/anti-
fungal treatment is quite effec-
tive. But as soon as the therapy


(BSuilding valued Relationships


Quyana cankfor ITrade and Jndustry jmited

is pleased to support programmes and activities that

contribute to the imnprovemelit of welfaTre

and the etnrichintent of coImun1111ities.


Mrs Carol Seeral GBTI's Branch Manager at Regent Street
presents stationery items and kitchen utensils to the
Head Mistress of Prince William Street Nursery (Plaisance)












Mr John Barnes, GBTI's Senior Manager Inspection,
presents a Billiards Table B accessories to Mr. Dale Erskine,
Director of Prisons, for the Guyana Prison Service Sporns Club.


GUlIs Annual Uonation presentation to seven
charitable organizations.


Mr. Mano Fannha, GBTI s Branch Manager at Anna Regina,
presents Text Books to a student of the Abram's Zuil
Secondary School, for the School's Library


/N


Mr. Keith Booker. Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Culture,
Youth and Sport, receives a Xerox Digital Copier on behalf
of the National Archives of Guyana from Ms Collette Lyken.
Officer -In-. Charge, Human Resources and Administration,
Guyana Bank for Trade 8 Industry Limited.


GBTI

C9494d~l~qA 9 YO


The Dentist Advises
*I t ,l :1: ; l.;-ig .4 1:)Jii l!^|


is discontinued, the disease re-
appears. Why is this so?
The first search for an in-
traoral germ reservoir was con-
ducted nearly 15 years ago.
Studies were instituted on both
the toothbrush and the denture
to answer one basic question.
Do the toothbrush and the den-
ture become infected and then
transmit this infection either to
the oral cavity or throughout
the body?
The first toothbrush study,
published in 1986, found that
toothbrushes from both healthy
and oral-diseased persons had a
substantial number of patho-
genic and opportunistic germs.
The microorganisms were not
only those that produced oral
diseases, but also that produced
respiratory, gastrointestinal, car-
diovascular (heart), and kidney
diseases.
Alarmingly, the first
study found that 80 per cent
,of the toothbrushes from one
manufacturer were
contaminated by bacteria
,before being used. This
finding underscored that
while toothbrushes may be
packaged and sealed, germs
can infect the toothbrush
during manufacturing and be
maintained until the person
uses it. Remember,
toothbrushes are not
fabricated under sterile
conditions and there is no law
that requires such.
Recognising the importance
of the findings, the researchers
gave oral inflammatory disease
patients new toothbrushes at
each appointment and told them
to discard the one they had been
using. Further scrutiny demon-
strated that herpes simplex vi-
rus could actually attach to
toothbrushes in high enough
numbers to produce an infec-
tion. The virus was especially
concentrated in the defects (e.g.
porosities) and the sharp edges
of the bristles.
The most important finding
of this study was that tooth-
brushes kept in a moist environ-
ment, such as a bathroom, could


retain approximately one half of
the original innoculum of vi-
ruses for up to seven days. The
design of the toothbrush also is
applicable. The more bristles
per tuff, and the more tuffs per
brush, the more retention of vi-
ruses.
An examination of 59 pa-
tients with oral inflammatory
disease revealed that 93 per
cent of them, all except four,
noticed improvement of their
oral condition with a decrease
in symptoms after simply
changing their toothbrushes.
Twenty of the 59 patients (34
per cent) required no treat-
ment other than changing
their toothbrushes every two
weeks. Forty-six of the 59 pa-
tients (78 per cent) had no re-
appearances of symptoms af-
ter their initial therapy
(toothbrush change with or
without antibiotic treatment)
for at least a year and a half.
Two-row clear or light
coloured translucent tooth-
brushes appear to be the most
biologically sound. Tooth-
brushes should be stored in the
bedroom rather than in the bath-
room simply because the bath-
room is the most contaminated
room in the house.
You could change your
toothbrush at the beginning of
an illness, when you first feel
better and when you feel com-
pletely well.
It has been well substanti-
ated that not only could germs
adhere to and reproduce on
toothbrushes, but they could
transmit both local and sys-
temic diseases.
While it is best to change
your toothbrush every three
weeks, this may not be eco-
nomically conceivable for
many. Therefore, special at-
tention should be paid to
frequent decontamination
of your toothbrush. Wash-
ing it thoroughly with soap
and then making sure it is
stored quite dry is the easi-
est and most practical way
to keep your toothbrush
germ-free.


VACANC


A vacancy exists for a Chauffeur at a reputable agency in
Georgetown.
Requirements
Candidates must possess a valid driver's licence
(CarNan/Bus) plus five years driving experience.
The successful candidate will be required to work flexible
hours.
Remuneration
An attractive remuneration package is offered.
Applications must be accompanied by two recent testimonials
and addressed to:-
P.O. Box 1094
Georgetown, Guyana
At the top of the envelope should be written the words:-
Vacancy for Chauffeur
The closing date for delivery of applications is June 20, 2005.


Ili J'lj 1 11 17 t f I I f I~liL~sr I,


~II


SLind'ay lbhfonidl6-Juniq'i2, 9005


Page IV


AWL-






Sunday Chronicle June 12. 2005


ILL-GOTTEN GAINS


Over a four-year
period, I've be
come great
friends with a guy in my
small community. He
moved into town from a
large metro area, and
we met through
common interests -
motorcylcing, surfing,
and boating. We also
share the same sense
of humour, same
interest in world


events, and common
interests in just about
everything else.
He and I, along with our
wives, have become close. I
knew all along he'd made a con-
siderable amount of money in
the cash advance or payday
loan business. I know this type
of business has a sleazy factor
to it, but I never knew how
payday loans actually worked.
We were friends, so I wasn't
judgmental about his business
ethics or morality.
Well the television show


MISMATCH

I have been in a relationship with my boyfriend for
almost two years. Everything has been going greal
except we haven't fixed our problem of arguing ev-
ery time we go out. Now it's taken its toll on us, and my
boyfriend wants us to give ourselves time apart. Is giv-
ing each other time a bad thing? Do you think it's over?
K- E

Kylie, in the child's game Memory, a deck of cards is placed
face down. Each played turn' o\er to cards If the r\o maich.
the player keeps them and adds them to their pile If they don't
match, the cards go face down, and the player \\ans foi an-
other turn.
Dating is like playing Memory. The cards you are trying to
match are called love, harmony and oneness of mind. But if the
cards you turn up are marked testy, contentious and quarrel-
some, they must go face down and you must find someone else
to make a match with.

WAYNE & TA.%LMAR


964 Sprngied,-M 6801oremil


"6:1 Minute' ra.n ia tri about
these businesses a t\\ \\eeks
ago. They explained how they
prey on the poor, the unedu-
cated, and the desperate. People
are trapped in super high inter-
est rates, and they can never get
out from under. The business is
basically legalised loan-sharking.
It was an eye-opener. It
goes against everything I con-
sider good and right. I was so
disturbed by the "60 Minutes"
story I abruptly ended our con-
tact and friendship. This was
one of the toughest decisions I
ever made, and I've thought
about it nonstop ever since. My
question to you is, have I been
unfair?
I don't think you can sepa-
rate what you do for a living
from personal relationships, es-
pecially when what you are do-
ing is unethical and immoral,
even if it's considered legal. It
is true the older you get the
harder it is to make true friends,
and it sure is tough to give up a
good one, but I feel I have to
stand up for what I believe.

BUTCH

Butch, many people have
noted that ancient peoples were
just as intelligent as we are.
Their beliefs and customs may
seem strange to us, but there
has been no change in basic hu-


WCRIIBIN OMUNTY SECRITAmAT


STAFF VACANCY

DIRECTOR, SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
Applications are invited from interested and suitably qualified
nationals of Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Member States
and Associate Members of the Caribbean Community to fill the
above mentioned position with assigned duty station in Guyana.

Full details of this position may be obtained by accessing the
Secretariat's web page at http://www.carico.org

Applications with full curriculum details, including nationality, date
of birth, work experience, educational qualifications, summary of
professional skills and/or expertise, language proficiency, list of
professional publications, three references (at least two of whom
must be familiar with the applicant's work), and other relevant
information, should be sent to the Adviser, Human Resource
Management, Caribbean Community Secretariat, Bank of Guyana
Building, Avenue of the Republic, Georgetown, Guyana or by email
to appinhrm(.caricom.org.
I ,Yt.'fJ I.0 j'5 an a Ct zi^can to'.svi; c u;e;" 7 1 .
L.hae..SecretariaLtlL.commence..considening. applications from,
June 20, 2005.


man intelligence in the last few
thousand years.
What people seldom note is
that there are just as many
slaveholders among us today as
there were in times past. True,
slavery is illegal, but if it were
legal, some people today would
own slaves. Not all those
people are in far off places.
Some of them may be sharing
your pew in church or riding to
work with you on the bus.
In Joseph O'Connor's
novel "Star of the Sea" a char-
acter observes that an unre-
strained free market "may regu-
late everything: including who
should live and who should die."
The economic marketplace, in
and of itself, contains no sense
of good and bad, right or wrong.
That sense must come from
within us.
If this man's sense of eth-
ics offends you, feel free to ex-
clude him from your life. Each
action we take and each choice
we make expresses who we are.

WAYNE & TAMARA


m =~


~ .4.w **-a.-p WD* m
0 ~ a


S -N


- .~ -


"Copyrighted Material -
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"

- 0b- O 4
. a o- b
* -


- S -- w 0
.w a
* 0 a -
a -
- e a


- 0


qmba a


MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS AND COMMUNICATIONS
ROADS REHABILITATION
APPROACH ROAD TO PARIKA (1200 metres)
EAST BANK ESSEQUIBO
DATE JUNE 7, 2005

1. The Ministry of Public Works and Communications now invites sealed Bids from eligible
Contractors for the Rehabilitation of the Approach Road to Parika, East Bank Essequibo
commencing from Parika Stelling and ending approximately 1200 metres in the direction of
Vreed-en-Hoop.

2. The works comprise but is not limited to road widening, construction of concrete drains,
sidewalk, and erection of street lights, traffic signs, and road safety markings.

3. The works will be funded by the Government of Guyana and no tax exemptions will be
allowed.

4. Bidders may obtain further information including eligibility to participate and may inspect the
Bidding Documents at the Office of the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Public Works and
Communications from June 7, 2005 between 8:30 am to 4:00 pm Monday to Friday,

5. A set of Bidding Documents may be purchased upon written request to the Permanent
Secretary and payment of a non-reimbursable fee of Guy $10,000. Payment is to be made in
cash to the Accounts Department, Ministry of Public Works and Communications.

6. Bids must be delivered into the Tender Box, in the office of the Chairman, National
Procurement and Tender Administration, Ministry of Finance, Main and Urquhart Streets,
Georgetown on or before 9:00 hrs Tuesday June 28, 2005 and must be accompanied by Bid
Security of not less than (1%) one percent of the Bid Price, Current NIS Compliance
Certificate and Current GRA Compliance Certificate.

7. Bids will be opened at a public ceremony in the presence of Bidders or their representatives
who chose to.attend, at 9:00 hrs on Tuesday June 28, 2005 at the Office of the:
Chairman
National Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main and Urquhart Streets
.. ... .Georgetown, Guyana

Page V


I


o b


The Permanent Secretary


Government ads can be viewed, on







Page VI Sunday Chronicle June 12, 2005


Cmws mdyfr

-,n,-MIa


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Today we will look at Vegetarians and some of the
fruit and vegetables they eat. Have fun!


*O. -
* 0 *- -
* __ __ -
- ~- S -
* 0 -


- ~ ~


a TRANSPORT & HARBOURS DEPARTMENT

S+CA4REER OPPORTUNITY'


VACANCIES FOR
MARINE TRAINEES
Applications are in'.'ited from suitably qualified candidates for training as Marine Trainees in the Transport and
- ,ment
,ntry Requirements:
-* C.,C General Proficiency in five (5) subjects, Grades I & II, which must include English A Matrenatl.:s
Sand Geography and or Integrated Science.
Or
CXC General Proficiency in three (3) subjects inclusive of English A, Mathematics, Integrated Science
and a Certificate in Maritime Studies from any recognized Marine Training Institute.
Or
Certificate of Marine Training from Transport and Harbours Department, plus the Harbour Licence and or
Certificate of Competency Coastal Mate.
Age:
Eighteen (18) years on or after June 1,2005, but not exceeding age twenty-five years on or before
December 31,2005.
Cardid.late' v, i in. ,rgo irr:iriing f.:, a period of five (5)-years with the view of absorption in the Marine Sel'- lion
as a Ship's Captain.
C ri.. l rt-.". i e :'ir.:,i i, ,.nr i.,- an -i i,. 3.:,n : ii .3 h v after the end of the second year training.
C.-ir,.1i i1 iii r..,i- r_-equii,,,d .: n :r Contractto work with the Department for a further period of five (5) years
a ,.r ih,. ,:,:n ple-;..:., .: training.
SHIPS CAPTAINS
Entry Requirements:
Guyana's Coastal Master's Certificate plus five (5) years experience in the position of Captain.
Age:
Between twenty five (25) years fifty-two (52) years.
MATES
Entry Requirements
Guyana Coastal Master's Certificate plus two (2) years experience in a similar capacity.
Age: Between twenty-five (25) fifty-two (52) years.
Applications must be addressed to: GeneralManager
Transport & Harbours Department
Battery Road, Kingston, Georgetown


APPLE
ASPARAGUS
BANANA
BEAN
BEETROOT
BORA
BROCCOLI
CABBAGE
CALALOO
CARROT
CAULIFLOWER


REGION
2


3


4&5


6


COUS COUS
CUCUMBER
GARLIC
LETTUCE
MILK
OCHRO
ONION
PAPAW
PEANUT
PEAR
PEAS


DATE
June 22 24


July 6 8


June 15 17


June 29 July 1


PEPPER
POTATO
PUMPKIN
RICE
SHELLOT
SPINACH
TOMATO
VEGETARIAN
WATERMELLON


VENUE
Quality Control Lab
Anna Regina, Essequibo
Quality Control Lab
Crane, West Coast Demerara
Quality Control Lab
Rice Research Station, Burma


Quality Control Lab
Corriverton


Audience:This training course is open to interested farmers,
millers and other operatives within the rice sector.
Registration Fee: $10,000.00 per participant (includes course
materials and meals)
-Courses commence: at 09:00 hrs 16:00 hrs each day.
Registration forms can be uplifted from Regional Co-ordinators
in each Region above stated or from the Quality Control Manager
at its Head Office. 116 -117 Cowan Street, Kingston.


0


GUYANA RICE DEVELOPMENT BOARD




The Guyana Rice Development Board will be ci d tin''a Paddy
and Rice Grading & Warehouse Management Course at its Regional
Laboratories as follows: .


Page VI


Sunday Chronicle June 12, 2005


Mrok


S










I'L~

S-II-L Fs ^ I < i ^ T ~ g i ": ^1


Hello boys and girls,
Welcome dear friends-. Let us-remind you that you
should never harbour any distracting thing or thought
about when you are studying. Check your progress at
every study session. Commit yourself to learning some-
thing new each day in each area of study!

'Bye.

IN THIS WEEK

Punctuating the Dialogue
*Remember these rules:
a) Use two sets of quotation marks for quotations
that are interrupted by explanatory words such as he
said or she wrote.
b) Use single quotation marks around a quotation
within a quotation.
c) When you write dialogue into your stories, begin
a new paragraph and use a new set of quotation marks
every time the speaker changes.
Examples:
a) "Sharon Strong," said Mother, "was one of the
better known writers during that time."
b) My mother smiled and replied, "It was my cousin,
Joy Bourne, who said, 'A stitch in time saved me
dollars!"'
c) "What class are you in now, Jeremy?" asked
the village scavenger.
"What is that to you, John?" retorted the new
boy on the street.
"When I ask you a question, I want an answer,"
said the father of five who found an easy way out of
fatherhood.

Solutions to Exercises
Adding quotation marks where they are needed
1. "Algebra is a merry science," said Albert
Einstein's grandfather.
2. His teacher told him, "You will never amount to
anything, Albert."
3. Simon asked, "Why did he say, 'This is only the
beginning'?"
4. I ran when they cried, "Come quickly!"
5. "That's incredible!" my father said yet again.

*Reminder: The effect of stories with dialogue.
a) A story seems very real to the reader if the
characters speak for themselves.
b) A story with dialogue (conversation) in it is usually
easier and more interesting to read than one without.

An Excerpt for You
Look how the following story comes alive with
dialogue.

The Pirates are Lonely
The boys played on the sand and swam in the river.
When they were tired they lay on the hot sand. Then
they covered themselves with sand. Then they sat on
the sand and looked across the wide river. They could
see the village over there. Tom wrote the word Becky
,on the sand with his big toe. But then he was angry
with himself, and scratched it out. Then he wrote the
same word again.
Joe wanted to go home. Huck was nor happy
either because the place was lonely. Tom %wanted to
see Becky again, but tried not to show it.
"I want to go home," Joe said. "It's too lonely
here."
"Oh, you'll be happier soon, Joe," Tom said
"We can catch fish here."
"I don't want to fish. I want to go home "
"You can swim here," said Tom.
"I don't like swimming when nobody forbids it,"
Joe said.
"Oh, you're a baby.. You want to seeyour mother
again!" .


"Yes, I want to see my mother again. You
haven't -got-a mother. So what do you know about it?
And I am not a baby."
"We'll let the little boy go home to his mother,
Huck," Tom said. "But you like it here, don't you,
Huck?"
"Y-e-s," Huck said weakly. But a look of doubt
appeared on his face.


Writing Dealing with Reality

Sophie sat at her desk in her room, thinking about
her life. Last year her mother had left, leaving Sophie
alone with her father. Their family problems had
intensified over the years with her father's drinking, her
mother's irrational behaviour, and Sophie's poor
performance in school. Eventually Sophie stopped
seeing her friends, replacing busy afternoons with
swimming practice and telephone calls with solitude.
The only thing that seemed to matter any more was her
orchids. She poured into them all of her love, since she
was unable to share it with anyone else. They served
as a barrier, protecting Sophie from her family problems,
her teacher's questions, and her own fear of being
vulnerable.

Sophie broke out of her daze and drifted back into
the present. A feeling of frustration flooded over her.
Was she another crack-up like her parents? How did
other people resolve their problems? All that her family
had tried usually failed. Still, there was nothing she could
do. Her parents were the ones with the problems. They
caused all the agony, leaving her only one place to hide
- in her room with her orchids. How could she accept
responsibility for a life that was already ruined by
others? As fro self-respect, the only pride she had was
in her plants.
Nina Molumby, Evanston Township High
School, Evanston, Illinois


This is a story about responsibility.. Read it over and
over until it makes sense in your own personal life.
Invite a good friend and study partner to read it also.
You will both see that for character building there is the
need for willingness to accept the responsibility for one's
own life, which is the source from which self-respect
springs.

Questions

1. What make you sure that the story is one of
responsibility? Point out what convinces you that it is.
2. What is the meaning of "responsibility"?
3. Around which character does the story revolve?
4. Do you agree with the character's resolution?
5. Has your life ever been put on hold because of
family troubles? How differently would you handle that
situation now? Tell the answer to a friend and study
partner.


Reading and Finding Out


The woodman winding westward up the glen:

1. Was the path straight?
2. What is the meaning, of the word "glen"?


3. Would the rising sun be behind the oodman?
4. Was there high ground to right and left of the
woodman?
5. Would the water of the stream in the valley bottom
be coming towards him or moving with him?
6. If he walked east, would he be walking uphill or
downhill?


Writing Sentences

A sentence is made up of a group of words, but
not all groups of words qualify as sentences.

Look at the following reminders:

A station wagon can delight the heart of a little
boy. (Sentence)
All the business of getting rich today. (Non-sen-
tence)
Several lawyers are working for that well-
known firm. (Sentence)
Swinging from the tower last week. (Non-sen-
tence)

One authority had this to say about a sentence:

1. A sentence is a group of words that gives a
complete thought.

2. A good sentence should say what it has to
say clearly and effectively.

Now take some time off toi check your language
exercise books, especially those that were
marked by your teacher recently. Are all of your
word-groups in your paragraphs sentences? Is the
answer easy to arrive at? Good. Are you now bet-
ter able to spot those groups that cannot be called
sentences? That is good for your progress.
Go and explain to a friend and study partner
(who really knows sentences) what you know
about the sentence. Then construct about five
sentences right in front of him/her. Listen to his/
her comments.

Guided Practice:
State which is a sentence and which is not:
1. Dancing is an ancient pastime.
2. Reading Interesting books to babies.
3. Several years in the making.
4. Her father owns the Main Street Bazaar.
5. A twenty-foot trout.


Practice Work:
State which is a sentence and which is not:
1. Some dogs like digging sand.
2. Sang a lovely song for the new member.
3. Other people like cooking soup.
4. Johnny has a large collection of educational
CD's.
5. Enjoyable activities in the "Book of Tapes-
try."
6. Miss Simone is setting class test for next
week. ;
7. Lost a world title at games.
8. We are proud of (he effort.


Completing Senft'inces
Complete the following word-groups to make
sentences:
1. seemed like an additional burden.
2. Eve especially liked
3. Photography is.
4. to prepare the dog food.


u nd ay Chronircle J une, 1i2, 2005,


Page VII






I 7iCglYX. toe.hc.w2t0?

--Bud:e -t -t- q .-'.


Hello boys and girls,
'-Welcome. Let's look at the kind of exercises that can
heighten your study. Let us also remind you to be as active
as possible when doing Mathematics e.g. talk to yourself,
check out sources; walk around the room, or call a friend to
discuss a point that is bothering you. Do take care what you
do when you study. Keep the study groups intact!
'Bye.

IN THIS WEEK
Collect, Organize, Display Data
What do you understand by collecting, organizing and
analyzing information, such as a census or others like it?
(Know that Mathematics at Grade 6 includes statistics.)

A Survey
Try out this survey by working in a group. Use the ques-
tionnaire below. Decide which students you will survey and
-keep your results safe.

QUESTIONNAIRE

Name:..................Age: ....

Male: ....... Female: ........

1. How many hours a day do you
spend doing your homework?
2. On the average weekday, about
how many hours a day do you
watch your television?
3. On the average weekend day,
about how many hours a day do
you watch television?
4. Which activities do you do
between the time you get out of
school and the time of you eat
dinner? You can choose more
than one.
A. Do home work
B. Watch television
C. Play outside
D. Talk on the telephone
E. Play on a sport s team
F. Go to lessons


Make Connections
You can organize and display data in several different
ways. Any one of your partners in your study group can
use a frequency table to organize his data for the question
of the questionnaire above. He/She can make a line plot and
*a pictograph to display the data.
Look at the following presentations of a frequency graph,
a pictograph, and a line plot on Hours Spent on Homework
Each Night.


Pictograph
Hours Spent on Homework
Each Night
Hours Students
0 0
1 00000
2 0000
3 000
4
5 or more O


Line Plot

Hours Spent on Homework Each Night


x
x x
X X
X X X
X X X
X X X
X X X
xx


X X x x x
X x x x x
0 1 2 3 4 5 or more


What information can you find out from the Line Plot?
Find the most common number of hours spent on
homework.
Most of the data in this line plot groups, or clus-
ters, around three particular numbers. What does that tell
you?
One of the numbers in this line plot has no data for
it. It has a missing number. Find the number. Explain what
the missing number.

An Understanding Check
1. Make a frequency table to show your data for Ques-
tion One of the questionnaire.
2. Make a line plot or a pictograph from your data for
Question Four of the questionnaire.


Critical Thinking
1. Why is it helpful to use graphs to display data from
surveys? Ask your study partners to help here.
2. Create a survey question of your own about Grade Five
students. Ask ten students your question. Tell how you
would organize and display the data.


Collect, Organize, Display Data
Let's hope that you have understood something on Fre-
A Frequency Graph quency Graph, Pictograph, and Line Plot. Let us go on to
Mean.


Hours Spent on Homework
Each Night
Hours Tally Frequency
0 // 2
1 10

2 8

3 "T- / 6

4 0
5 or // 2
more


Mean
How would you find the mean of students in your Grade
6 classroom who spend time looking at the newscasts on the
television each month? That is one of the things you should
know if you want to better understand pre-teen preferences.

Look at thb table of data below:

Time Spent Looking at Newscasts
Grade 6 children Joe Ron Mike Sam Tap Ivy
Hours per month 70 109 95 81 67 78

You can find the mean by finding the average time for
the Grade 6 children. You can use the mean to represent a
*st bf data- .


Here is how to find the mean for the time spent looking
at the news:
* Add the times: 70+109+95+81+67+78 = 500


* Divide the sum by
the number of children
in the group


500 + 6 = 83.3


The mean viewing time is 83.3 per month, rounded to the
nearest hour.

Work Together
Work in your study group to find the mean of the data
for your group.
1. Survey to find the number of hours everyone listens
to music, views the television, and exercises each week.
2. Find the mean time spent on each activity for your
group. Round it to the nearest whole number.
3. Discuss other ways to describe and summarise data.

"Talk It Over
1. What is the mean of each activity time for your group?
How did you find each mean?
2. What are some other ways your group used to describe
and summarise the data? What are those. numbers?

Make Connections

Here is how Joseph's group found the mean and median
of the exercising time of its members.

Exercising Time each week:
10, 23, 16, 9, 15

The mean of the exercising time:
10 + 23+ 16+9+15 = 73
73-5 = 14.6
The mean for this group is 14.6 hours.

Look at this:

The Middle number

9, 10, 15, 16, 23

The median for this group is 15 hours.

1. Does the mean or the median better represent the time
spent exercising for Joseph's group? Explain.
2. How do you think the mean will change if 23 is re-
moved from the data of the exercising time? Explain.


Practice
Use a calculator to find the mean to the nearest whole.
number.

1.23,25,31,29,32

2.72,66,70,71,69

3.37,40,39,42,46

4. $420.$510, $S480, $450, $500

5.87, 120,132,125,130

.6.501,519,521.518

7.75,45, 50,90,'0,83,73,60


Check for understanding
Use your calculator to find the means to the nearest whole
number.
1. 84,75.82.
2. 12.15.9, 13.14
3.45,52.52,44.51
4.89, 102,98,99.86, 103
5.$210.$250, $180,$260, 3 10
6.240, 236, 239 242,240,
* * 7 9;7 ;95,.tQ0.0',?3..'67."






Sunday Chronicle June 12, 2005


Woent rober rturndgboogy t

U U 'U a


woundd vicim to s *ave, isOide


U
1' 0


ARMED robber Ma]
iams, in 1985 sla
woman with a razor
robbery.
But, when the crime
woman attracted a po
the bandit first threaten
the woman if she revea
happened.
He then returned thi
he had stolen from the
and ordered her to tell
ber "Everything is all
The answer sent the
man backing away but n
doing his plan.
Minutes later, Willia
had entered the woman's
broad daylight to comm
fence, was leaving empt
after'returning the boot
blood on his clothing ar
suspicion of Special C
Roopnarine, who challenge
It was then that the
Enid Roxanne Waith,
courage to relate thai the
had -slashed her on the


rk Will- pain and took away her gold
shed a chain and pendant and her
during a three gold rings, and if you
believe and accept her evi-
es of the dence that she suffered the
liceman, injuries she told you about
ed to kill and which are stated in the
led what medical certificate and, fur-
ther, if you believe that she
he jewels did not permit him to remove
woman those items from her posses-
the rob- sion or person, then that
right" would be evidence from which
e police- you can reasonably come to
lotaban- the conclusion,that the of-
fence of robbery with vio-
ams, who lence has been committed.
s home in The victim said that on
it the of- September 12, 1985 at a bout
y-handed 10.45 a.m. she was in her
ty, when kitchen cutting up chicken when
used the she felt someone snatch her
unstablee from behind and hold a razor at
gedhim, : her throat. She said that per-
e victim, :son was the accused whom she
got the had never known. .
!accused She said that he then
e thumb pushed her into the next room
with a .and. in doing so. he snapped off
razor,,. : her gold chain which she was


bit off weannj

ByGeorge Barclay

her finger gold rings .and the bed
snatched her gold chain. ., gold fi
Waith 'also noted that the hand, c
bandit had returned the booty '. gers. S
to her after being cornered as a 'right tL
consequence of her shouts of razor. i
'murder' that attracted S.C. after tl
Roopnarme. that the
Williams denied stealing the rings; f
jewellery. He admitted having a Th
razor in his possession but de- U. had'tol
flared "I did not cut the girl. She : was inj.
.is ms girlfriend: she got cut the shir
when she grabbed me". She
Following police insestiga- shouted
tions, Wldhams was arrested and Roopna
charged with robbery with vio- enquirer
lence. .., .. Accord
He was conmmited to stand who w,
trial before judge and jury. The he woti]
trial was held at the Demerara her' i
Assizes in June, 1987,. before Roopna
Justice Lennox Perry and a: all right
mixed jury. '; Sh
The jury disbelieved the fear, sh
story as told by. the accused and ..everyth
returned a verdict of guilty as ':. Th
charged. .. Court,
Taking a serious view of the' 'Roopn
case, Judge Perry sentenced
Williams to 20 years imprison-
ment and ordered a whipping of
12 strokes.
The judge, indicated that.
sentence in such cases must
serve as a deterrent to others
who are minded-to commit simi-
lar offences.
The facts of the case dis-
closed that Williams was
charged with the offence of rob-
bery with violence. It.was the
allegation of the State that on
the 12th day of Septemhber,
1985, in the County of
Demerara, he robed Enid Waith
of one gold chain and pendant
and three gold finger rings, and
at the time of, or immediately
before, or immediately after that
robbery, he used personal vio-
lence on Waith.
In his summation of the
evidence to the jury, judge
Perry had told them: "If you
believe and accept the evi- '
dence of the virtual com-
plainant, Enid Waith, that the
accused Went up to her in her
home and placed a razor at C
her neck and bit her fingers, -
.a.d in so doing caused her


g at the time around her
neck. He
pushed her into
the bedroom
and she fell.on


d.. She said she had three
nger rings on her right
ine on each of three fin-
She said that he cut her
humb and held on to the
She also said that it was
he razor cut her finger
e accused bit off the three
rom her fingers
e virtual complainant.
d the jury that,after she'
ured. there was blood on
r of the accused. '
e said that after she,
d for murder that day,
anne entered her yard and
ed what had happened.
ing to her, the accused,
as nearby. told her that.
d kill her child and shoot
f she did not tell
marine that everything was-

i.said that because of
he told Roopnarine that
ing was all right.
e. victim also told the
that apart from
marine, some neighbours


had entered her yard that day,
when the accused told them
"get out of the f.....g' yard, this
is 'a man-and wife affair."
As a result of the verbal as-
sault, the neighbours left the
yard. It was at this stage that
the accused returned her
jewellery, the woman had testi-
fied.


.
Addressing the juir about the
return of the booty to the victim,
the judge told them: "Itmight seem
strange to you that a robber would
return the booty, but you have to,
remember, if you accept the evi-,
dence of the virtual complainant
and Roopnarine, that Roopiiarine
and other persons were there, the
accused might have considered.
himself cornered and so. perhaps.
decided to return the items to the
virtual complainant so thal if he is
caught, the items would not be
found on his person."
The judge also told the
jury: "Even though the ac-
cused returned the items to
the virtual complainant, if
you find as a fact that he had
removed the chain from her
neck and the rings from her.
fingers, the offence .of rob-
bery would still. have been.
committed.
"If you are satisfied that the
accused was the person and that
he committed the act, having
put her in fear, the fact that he'
returned'them to her would.
have made no difference as far
as the commission of the offence


49


is concerned. Once he took them
from her possession without her
consent and used violence, the
offence would have been com-
mitted"
Touching on the allegation
by the accused to the effect that
the virtual complainant was his
lover and he had gone to visit
her on the day in question,
Judge Perry had told the jury:
"Now, members of the jury,
it is not unknown in human ex-
perience that sometimes a
woman, who is married or has
a reputed husband with whom
she lives, may have what is
called an 'outside man' with
whom she has an affair and,
when found out by her husband,
would want to deny that she
knew the other man and would,
perhaps, try to put him in
trouble to save herself. This is
known to have happened", the
Judge had said.
But he added: "If you ac-
cept and believe that Enid Waith
was bitten on her three fingers
- and these rings were removed
in that manner; then why would
,a true and genuine lover want to
bite off rings from his lover's
fingers? The accused has denied
that he bit her fingers; or that
he removed rings therefrom,, but
you have the silent testimony
of the doctor who found what
appeared to him to be bites.
There is also the chain which is
now in three pieces,
"These are all matters which
you have to consider in trying
to0 determine whether or not
what the accused is saying is
true or whether he made up that
story,'" the judge had said.
Going on, the Judge added!
S"The accused admits he had a
razo,, but says that she got two
of the cuts by accident while
they were grappling, as he puts
.it..
"But what about the bites
on the fingers if you accept and
find as a fact that she did have
those bites? Did. she bite her-,
self, or did the accused bite her.
to rob her of her rings as she has,.
told you?
After deliberating for two
hours, the mixed jury re-
turned a unanimous verdict
of guilty.


a.... .- w f .e =m -
.' 4.. -' . .'. x.. ........ .. s..- ft


-- "Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


..W -. -


ra: j"


Aw-w


'r .a '.:: a --:::::-...::: 4b


IF" ""..


. -


- :


+.. -. .= .


N-g
UK Mad4e 1?lH4;arel








Discounts vary

from 10%. to 25%.


Special: .

MBuy W1,00- i-X-2a-1Web


intact Sales Staff at:(numbers listed in pages 118,119&1ol
louston Complex Parika Broad street i Land -.'.c.


Page IX


..... ----------- .


* w--" ,


I


XK <


-M


.... ... :.








NO5


The Institute of Private Enterprise Development has vacancy for an


IT Technician

The successful candidate will be responsible for maintaining the IT Systems and
providing support to the MIS Department so as to meet the needs of the
Company.
Candidates for this position should have:
1. At least five subjects CXC or GCE '0' Level Examinations including
English Language and Mathematics.
2. Certificate in Computer Programming and Repairs.
3. Two years experience in the operations, maintenance and support of
MIS systems including LAN (local area network).
4. Ability to analyse problems and develop sound problem-solving
models.
5. Good communication skills.
Interested persons can send their applications to:
The Admin Manager
Institute of Private Enterprise Development
253 South Road
Bourda
Georgetown
Closing date for applications is Friday, June 24, 2005.


MINISTRY OF EDUCATION




CAPITAL WORKS

The Ministry of Education hereby invites pre-qualified contractors to tender for the construction of:
St. Cuthbert's Secondary School St Cuthbert's Mission, Mahaica River. Tender documents
can be uplifted from:

Mr. T. Persaud
Secretary
Ministry of Education Tender Board
21 Brickdam
Stabroek, Georgetown.

during normal working hours upon payment of a non-refundable fee of TEN THOUSAND
DOLLARS ($10,000) each.

All interested bidders are asked to make contact with Mr. T. Persaud of the above address for
further information on a site visit on the 25* June 2005

Tenders shall be submitted in a plain sealed envelope bearing no identification of the tenderer and
shall clearly mark on the top, left-hand comer, construction of St. Cuthberfs Secondary school.

- All tenders must be accompanied by Valid N.I.S and I.R.D Compliances. All submissions must be
original or certified copies. A bid security of 2% must accompany each bid.

Tenders shall be addressed to:

The Chairman
National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown
and deposited in the Tender box at Ministry of Finance no later than 9: 00 hours on Tuesday 5t
July 2005.

Tenderers or their representative may be present at the opening, which takes place at the Ministry
of Finance shortly after 9:00 hrs on Tuesday 51" July 2005.
The Ministry of Education reserves the right to reject any or all tenders without assigning a reason
and does not bind itself to award to the lowest tenderer.


,P Kandhi-. ,,
Permanernt Secretary


locev-mirrcill 3- >.C, -be :e I on
http://www.gina~gov gy


A section of the audience at the refurbished Cultural Centre .


Christian gospel

group to launch CoD

seeks sponsorship
By Shauna Jemmott
E 'MESSENGER', a gospel group known for captivating Christian audiences all around
Guyana, is seeking sponsorship for a musical compact disc (CD) to be launched some
L time soon.
The group already recorded a few copies of the album containing some nine songs at Kross Kolor
Recording Studio, but needs financial support to make more copies available.
One of its members, Kelvin Bobb, told the Sunday Chronicle that the album was originally set to
launch last month in Georgetown, but that goal was to difficult to achieve at the time.
The recorded a cappella album features original songs such as 'He's Alive', 'He's my Friend', 'Jesus is Coming
Soon', 'Take Heed', 'King of Kings', 'Guide Me', 'Do You Know Why', 'He's Calling', and Psalms 100.
The songs were all written by the group's members.
The 'Messenger' was formed by five young men within the Seventh Day Adventist faith sometime
in 2001, and has wowed audiences countrywide at various live shows including Gospel Touchdown, the
Rupert Singh benefit concert, and has done quite a few television performances.
They copped an award for being the 'Best Gospel Music Group' at the last Gospel Touchdown
musical extravaganza and award show.
The 'Messenger' is scheduled to perform at a cultural show at the Pniel Wesleyan Tabernacle, in
Agricola, June 24, and at the Seventh Day Adventist church convention in Berbice the day after. They
are also scheduled to appear at the International Youth Conference (IYC) scheduled for Le Meridien
Pegasus, sometime in August.
"It's a different kind of music that you have never heard before," Bobb promised.
He said the group's other members are Eusi Harlequin, Kwasi Knights and Tyrone Seymour, and is
on a mission "carrying the good news of salvation... the message of hope through Jesus Christ... to
reflect the commission of the Lord which says we must take the message of salvation to the world."
Anyone who is interested in sponsoring or purchasing the album should contact Kelvin on
Telephone Numbers: 256-0548 or 62t-7270, or-via e-mail: lo dae64<''ahoo.con'.


T


,-Wimp&
40mirm


INSTITUTE OF PRIVATE ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT
"Promoting Development & Growth of Micro, Small & Medium Business"
A National Development Institution


VACANCY






Guyana Chronicle June 12, 2005





Sold out house at brash, innovative


gospel %ith banners flying. acter
Gospelfest 2005 is brash and and ti
inno \aive. The producers de- T
9 \ cided not to have an emcee. the s
,. Rather, they linked the pieces steali
.. with a hilarious video slkt of two heart
.-- elderly people coming to the ance

IGOSPELFEST is a leading example of church
offerings that have moved way beyond the concerts
of traditional choirs and their liturgical offerings and
miming that passed for dance, and have now become
Pfull-fledged entertainment, of commendable
competence, propagating the gospel with banners
'flying.
*'- ....... -


By Raschid Osman

HE First Assem
bly of God staged
this year's pre-
sentation of its annual
Gospelfest at the refur-
bished National Cultural
Centre two Saturday
evenings ago.
The house was sold out.
The first time, we are told, since
the 2001 Awe Society show.
-And perhaps this is fitting.'
For Gospelfest is a leading ex-
ample of church offerings that :
have moved way beyond'tlie
concerts of traditional choirs and
their liturgical offerings and mim-
ing thai passed for dance, and
have now become full-fledged
entertainment, of commendable
competence, propagating the


show from Mocha, in an old car
that they pushed most of the
way, arriving at the Cultural
Centre after the curtain had come
down. This was so well done
that it almost stole the show.
But Gospelfest had much
more going for it .
There was Trinidad and
Tobago's gospel soca and ca-
lypso artiste, Sean Daniel.
This young man is quite a
wonder, performing with
boundless energy, gesticulat-
ing with his arms and hands
to exciting effect, breaking
into rap idiom when the Spirit
leads, and in his quieter mo-
ments, with tone decidedly
Sparrow-like.
Daniel is always musical,
and his message comes out
bright and clear, urging govern-
ments and people to build char-


solo
propi
vocal
with
ever
fend
singe
U
2005
skit 1
thum
anyw
at ad
B
was a
A
sold-
outsi
well
the s
to ge
be ti
year
second


and not only skyscrapers,
o read the Bible.
The dancers made full use of
tage, with the little ones
ng the audience's collective
with the unaffected exuber-
that only little ones can
manage. A chutney offer-
ing used sari-clad dancers
as its backdrop, with
choreography comprising
both Indo and Afro
movements. This could
quite easily have been ex-
panded into a more
splendid production
number, with the dancers
in more elaborate chore-
ography.
The singing groups
were in fine feather, the
saxophonist blew with ap-
riate savvy, and the solo
list managed her offering
much intelligence, scatting
so lightly so as not to of-
the uninitiated ear. This
r bears watching.
Unfortunately, Gospelfest
was marred by a dramatic
that stuck out like a sore
rb. The plot never did go
'here; there was no attempt
enouement. It just fell flat.
But never mind. The show
resounding success.
Lnd bearing in mind the
out house, with the crowd
de the Cultural Centre
into the second half of
how, hoping for a chance
t in, the producers should
thinking of having next
's show held over for a
id performance.


The Messengers

Hee"s Alive


1> Person versatile In cutting glass, thicknesses 3.0mm tol2.0mm.
Must have minimum three years experience as a glas cutter.

Heavy duty mechanic with experience in total overhaul -
including under carriage'of RB 30 draglines and Caterpillar
bulldozers. Must have minimum five years experience.

> For Purchasing Officer with vast experience in the fishing
industry to purchase fishing requisites. Must have minimum
five years experience











CHRONICLES FATHER'S DA GiVE-WAY




ili "FATHER" .^S


A "Day Trip" for 2 at Shanklands Resort compliments of Shankldand.
SAn "Exquisite piece of Jewellery" compliments of Steve's Jewelley t Tfor
Ni-A "GSM Cellular Phone" compliments of Star Wireless
S,.5 Consolation Prizes- J'
i DIll r- /c T


1.
2.


Cut out letter and affix properly so that they do not fall off
A complete coupon would have to carry all six letters of the word "FATHER" to
be eligible for the drawing.
Letters must be placed in the right order to form the word "FATHER"
Letters placed in the coupon MUST BE from the Daily or Sunday
Chronicle's Father's Day promotion only.
Any Coupon that has letters that are not from the Chronicle will not be drawn.
Coupons must have Name, Address and/or Telephone number.
Employees of Chronicle and their relatives are not eligible. -


GUYANA NATIONAL NEWSPAPER LIMITED, LAMA AVE., BEL AIR PARK, G/TOWN
-............ POQ Qq:1 01.20---...- --------- ----------



N a m e .............. .................... ................................
Address.......................................
A dd ress .........................................................................................


Telephone: ........................................ .......... ............... .. .



- - --" t take-a-e-- --- - - -- -- --
Drawing to take place on June 16, 2005 _


-- I -I------


~x-srr~,-~Fa~r----~u;--r~~---ii





Sunday Chronicle June 12, 2005


9 F,3Aa EE35.


WALTER RODNEY


1942


another scholarship to the
School of Oriental and Afri-
can Studies, London.
He taught for a while in
Tanzania before returning to the
University of the West Indies in
1968, becoming caught up in the
post-colonial political agitations
and the Black Power Move-
ment of Jamaica. So much was
his influence that he was per-
ceived a threat to the govern-
ment.; So, as soon as he left the
country,to attend Black Writers'
Conference, 'the Hugh Shearer-
led Tamaican Labour Party
banned him from re.entering the
island. This led to the 'Rodney
Riot'. Rodney eventually re-
turned to Africa becomiing
deeply mnolved in its liberation
struggles using his 'How Europe
Underdeveloped Africa' as a
catalyst.
In 197-. Rodne3 returned
home to Guyana to take up an
appbintixne;t.: f professor of
historN at the U'nirersils of.
Guyana but the government re-
scinded that arrangement at the
last moment, leasing Rodney to
ditern his energies b) joining the
.Working People's Alliance
,VPA I and by resisting the au-
thoniarian rule of the daN.
Afoubd this period. he was
constantly persecuted and ha-


by Petamber Persaud
ALTER Rodney
knew how to cut
his -coat
according to his cloth for he
was born to a father who was
a tailor and a mother a
seamstress. So it was not.
surprising that he achieved
so much in so little time,
firing the imagination of
tens of thousands around the
world, triggering a 'literary
revolt' in the Caribbean.
region and having af;
bookstore named in his
honour.. .
Rodney's machination.
found-its way even in the no\ el.
'Joey. Tyson', by Andrew '
Salkey, immortalized by Martin
Carter's poetry and a. reggae
song by Linton Kwesi Johnson
At 24,. Rodnei had a
ready secured.a Ph' D. And' d ,
he made that climb to ihe top '
appear so easy. At primarN
school, he won a'n open ex-'
hibition scholarship to
Queen's College, % here in
1960, he won another open.:
scholarship to enter, Univer-.1 .
sity of the West Indies, Ja-- *
maica, graduating in the year
1963 with first class honours '
in history, and winning yet..


1980


rassed. Thoughts on such a situ-
ation were published as
'People's Power, No Dictator'.
The government hounded even
persons who attended poetry
sessions he held at his home,
forcing one female poet to seek
asylum in a foreign land.
Growing up in Guyana and
while at Queen's College,
Georgetown, Rodney made the
Carnegie Library (now the National
Library) his second home.where he
started a dialogue with local,.
regional and international thinkers;.
This reading eventually led to his
writing, expanding the dialogue for
present and future generations, And
when the time was ripe, he did not,
forget the children; .in an.
extraordinary and rare move by any
academic anywhere, he distilled his
thoughts in such children'sbooks
like 'Kofi Baadu out of Africa'.
and 'Lakshmi out of India'.
He'd also planned towrite
'Fung-a Fat out.of China',
'Adriaan Hendricks out of"
Holland' and 'Joao Go/mes out of
1:Made-a'. al in an effortto reveal.
Guyana's rich and varied heritage
so that children "might better.
understand themselves and each
other", something that is more
' needed now than in any other time
of our volatile history. .
Wherever he went, he spoke


the language of the people, lit-
erally and figuratively, taking the.
trouble to learn Portuguese,
Spanish, and French. He was
conversant in Creolese and
Rastafarian; a great debater mas-
tering the Queen's English.
Wherever he went, he left his
imprint on the literature of that area.
In London, he wrote his thesis 'A
History of the Upper Guinea
Coast, 1545-1800' which was later
published in 1970.
In Africa, he wrote his sec-
ond major work, 'How Europe
Underdeveloped Afiica' which,
was published in 1972.
In Jamaica it was 'Ground- .
ings with my Brothers'. And iii
Guyana, where he started his
writing career while still a stu-
dent at Queen's College, he
wrote, in addition to the chil-
dren books cited above, a pam-
phlet, 'People's Power, No
Dictator" and two amazing,"
scholarships. 'Guyanese Sugar .
Plantations tn the 19th Century'
and 'A History of the Guyanese
Working People, 1881 19,05', .
the first in a.. series of three ol-
umes covering the period unto-:
Independence
Rodney's writings pla) ed an
integral rolein post-colonial di-'
rection of the West Indies and
Guyana.


.- .





















muua to t writ-
'2' '





.



















ers and social refoerli hke C. R.
La James and his wife, Selma,


George Lamming, Horace
Campbell, Professor Ali Mazrui,
Denis Brutus, Eusi Kwayana,
among others. In London, he par-
ticipated in a symposium on
Guyana and spoke at the famous
Hyde Park. In Jamaica, he took his
message of Black Liberation to the
ghettoes and shared his knowledge
of African history with the
Rastafarians. In Canada, he at-
tended aBlack Writers' Conference.
In Africa, he established an intellec-
tual tradition to aid the liberation
struggles. In Guyana, he shed his
blood for the self emancipation and
empowerment ofthe working class
-and for democracy.,
Theoretician, revolutionary,
historian, writer, Walter Rodney
was born in Bent Street,
Georgetown, on March 23,
1942, and was killed in
nobody's backyard but his own
on June 13, 1980.
He was silenced while he
was getting the measure of
things, cutting his cloth to
, make a coat of arms, 'another
world is necessary'.


Sources:-
'Waltr SRoney'by Esi Kayan
'Gondns brohue s.sue yS ate ode 2t
Annve sary ommeoraion-ommitee
SDtafro m teevsi ~ on pogrmm, 'eteenTh
Lines' SO fetrn0uetR onrie ai id n
NglW stma xmnn Wle ony h a n
h s .wrtin s'.S S *~0 .0
Responses toti ato y eehoe#26005o


LLIOL


SO /o


V It UB


Candles&Hlolders, Flowers

Figurines,Tools,Stationery,

FurnitureMotion Pictures

Alarms andklot more,
.", .*' .- .. :. ...*- : ._- _"* *.-.&^' if --:'-t.:^ ^ i ,a..' -,. :.:'' .


A.' jf~r


Page XII


I -O ________________








Sandav; Chronic Ie Jun 41;2L, 5


*


S science
Hello boys and girls,
It's go6d-t-imeet again with you today. Today we'll
look at How can we tell whether something is alive?
And last week's review.

How can we tell whether something is alive?

As we try to answer this question, we may discover some
of the things which separate the living for the non-living
(dead). For example, imagine you are taking a long walk
along a path, and you see something that might be a dead
stick, or a live snake.
How would you be able to tell which one it is? You
would probably take a simple approach or experiment,
and throw something heavy on it. If the result were that
it wriggled (moved) away, you would conclude that it
was a snake. If it still remained motionless or did not
move probably it was a stick.


The living snake The dead stick


Do non-living things move?

Can we say, then, that living things move, but non-living
things do not? What the motor car? Is it alive? Or a flag,
fluttering on a pole? Why do these things move? The
flag moves because the wind blows it. The car moves
because someone is pressing on its accelerator. Why do
snakes move? To escape an enemy.


I <^


Review on "Do all objects fall at the same speed?"
with the answers to the questions below.


Take two equal sized round containers or bowls (an open
tin of corn will be very well for this experiment). Fill one
tin with clay or earth (mud) and leave the other tin empty.
Take the tins to the top of a high place and hold them so
that they are pressed together and supporting each other,
as you sees in the photograph below.


Do all objects fall at the same speed?


Ask a friend to stand at the bottom of the building to see
which tin falls to the ground first Suddenly draw your
hands apart, so that both tins are released at the same
time. Repeat this experiment several times until you can
decide whether the heavier or the lighter tin falls faster.
or whether they both fall at the same speed.
(NOTE. It is important that you do not hold the tins, just press
them so that they support each other. If you hold them, it will
be difficult to drop them at exactly the same instant.)

Answers to last week's study
I. What effect does the air have on falling objects?
The air has no effect on the.falling tins (objects).
2. Why'do you think two cans of exactly the same
size were chosen? Cans of the same size were used so
they cannot be any inaccurate measurements.
3. Would a stone and a piece of paper fall at the
same speed? No! The reason being, they both do not
contain the same mass or substance.


4 q I I I -Fm I I ;; "Ib ; II


Hello boys and girls, 8. Many of our Amerindian brothers and sisters live in
Welcome to these columns. Let us urge you to this vast Rupununi area, some of them rear cattle.
list and then review all matter that needs your at- They do business with tourists.
tention before you get into study time. Attend to 9. Tourism is about movement of people to destinations
the urgent ones and leave the rest until later. of interest outside their working or residing places.
Keep good company! 10. Tourism fosters conservation and preservation of
'Bye. natural, cultural, and historical resources in countries
including Guyana.
IN LAST WEEK 11. Tourism also helps build a country's economy.
The Essequibo and Tourism Additional Insights This Week
Pointers: Tourists come to see what is important to them to ful-
1. Essequibo is the largest of the three counties in fill their curiosity. Some other factors of tourists' in-
Guyana. It occupies the whole western portion of terests are our monuments, stately buildings and such
Guyana with its high mountains and savannah lands structures that are called national shrines.
(lands fit for the rearing often thousands of cattle).
2. Essequibo is named after Guyana's mightiest river, Our government has acknowledged the importance of
the Essequibo. our national shrines to tourism especially, so it helps
3. The Essequibo River traverses Guyana from south to upkeep such buildings and structures. The old forts
to north, splitting it in two. Its head waters have their on the Essequibo islands, kokers in Demerara. and
origins in Brazil, our neighboring country. In other polders in Berbice; and the lofty buildings along the
words, the Essequibo River takes a northern flow main streets in all our towns and the city are among
through Guyana. the lot that tourists come to see.
4. Essequibo River is 21 miles wide at its estuary
(mouth). Most of all, some visitors are just interested to see our
5. From its source (where it starts) to where it meets natural hinterland beauty. They fall in love with our
the ocean (its estuary) the Essequibo River register waterfalls, rapids, lakes, sunset and twilight sceneries,
some 270 miles altogether, and flora and fauna. The manatee in the Pomeroon
6. There are hundreds of landmasses (islands) in the River must be specially noted here. The many thou-
Essequibo River sands of flowers that blossom far above the ground
7. Tourists depend much to see our country's peoples; its level in the forest must not be forgotten; they are tour-
length, breadth; forests, savannahs, mountains, rivers, lakes, ists' attractions, too.
natural rapids and water falls; industries; wildlife; hinterland
villages and tourists' spots; shell beaches, and the numerous The Environmentally Conscious
other fearttu, M have to-offer..' *'- -'' 'o.:*,All ofthe mentioned stetutes:pla dnaruaa'"


tractions are drawing the attention of our environment-
conscious people and entities. They encourage com-
munity beautification and revitalisation. For instance,
it is said that the hinterland communities really know
how to do this. They keep their villages and places
of habitation in good order all the year round.
Where it is possible they have been building hotels and
other such accommodation for visitors. They remain
alive to the necessary part they have to play in the line
of tourism. Some act as tour guides to visitors.

Lake Mainstay, a tourist attraction, is located on
the Essequibo Coast just inland from Anna Regina, the
only town on the Essequibo coast. It has its own air-
strip which is reached by a 20- minute flight from Ogle,
Georgetown. You can travel by boat and then by bus,
and drive straight behind Regina town, then you're
there. It has been turned into a holiday resort.
Lake Mainstay issandy. Itswatercanbedescnribedas wine-
dark. Those who have seen the lake and know about the
area and such matters say that peat stained the water. Peat
is vegetable matter that is decomposed by water and partly
carbonized. (Peat can bemused as fuel, it is said.)
If you go further afield, you will have to go past
Amerindian villages. There are other lakes in the area
like Lake Capoey, Lake Tapacuma, and Lake
Ikuraka, which are lesser known lakes. Along with
them is the better known Lake Iteribisci or the "hot-
and-cold" lake. It is found that undercurrents (cur-
rents under the water) are what produce sharp changes
in the water's temperature. That is so wonderful!
F,


--~"~-J


I I I


4








:.!" ... -" : ;"' "- "E... 'm "
r ._. :z ... .. .| r r ?i : ~ -. .


The Excerpt


The show-ground was beginning to fill up, and the women
helpers kept bumping.into you with their big umbrellas,
their baskets, and their babies. You had frequently to be.
getting out of the way of a long row of peasant girls,
maidservants in blue stockings and flat shoes, with silver
rings on their fingers, who smelt of milk when you came
close to them. They spread out hand in hand all across
the field, from the row of aspens up to the marquee. By
now the judging was due to start. And one after another
the farmers were filing into a kind of arena marked off
by a longrope hung on stakes.
Inside were the animals, their muzzles toward the rope,
their rumps jostling together in a rough line. Somnolent
pigs sank their snouts in the ground, calves lowed, sheep
bleated, cows sprawled their bellies on the grass, with
one leg bent beneath them, and chewed with delibera-
tion, blinking their heavy eyelids as the midges buzzed
round them. Short-sleeved wagoners were holding the
restive stallions which kept neighing vociferously in the
direction of the mares. These stood quite quiet, stretch-
ing out their necks, their manes drooping, while their foals
rested in their shadows, or came up from time to time to
suck.
Above the undulating line of massed beasts, you saw a
white mane ruffling up like a wave in the breeze, a pair
of sharp horns jutting out, or the heads of some men
running. Outside the arena, a hundred yards farther on,
a big black bull stood apart, muzzled, with an iron ring
through its nostrils, moving no more than an animal of
bronze. A ragged child held it by a rope.
Sundry gentlemen were now advancing with heavy tread
between the rows of animals, examining each in turn
and conferring together in low tones. One, who looked
more important than the rest, made jottings in a note-
book as he went.
From "Banana Bottom, a novel by Claude McKay

What to do
1. Pretend that you are living in a country where such
agricultural fairs are still being vibrantly staged. Write a
letter to a friend who lives abroad telling him or her about
the kinds of events that happen at agricultural fairs., Use
the passage as you care to use it.
2. Suppose you were the writer of the passage .above,
describe what you think the writer should describe next
for his readers to have a complete look or (or nearly so)
at what was happening on the fair ground on that occa-
sion.

Sentence construction (From last week)
Subordinate Clause: Relationship of Cause
Let us look at some cause relationships again.

"Because" is used to show a cause relationship, and "as"
is also used in the same way. Another common con-
junction is "since", which, like "as", canintroduce either
clauses of time or cause.

Look at the following examples:
I have not seen him since his father died. (time).
Since he did not keep his appointment, I have not
seen him. (cause)

Subordinate clauses of cause are usually divided from
the main clause by a comma when they precede it but
not when they follow it.


should not be used to introduce a subordinate clause.
Notice the difference between:
They seemed ill at ease; for their eyes were wide open.
and
They seemed surprised because.their mouths were wide
open.

Exercise I

Find the subordinate clauses of cause and say what word
each clause modifies.

1. Teacher Simon had not liked asking for leave, as there
was always so much work for everyone at the convent,
but he had not been very well of late and he had been
ordered to go.
2. "If you are asked to teach a child to draw people, how
would you begin?"
3. "I would teach him first to draw people because that
is what a child thinks about and likes."
4. I1 only bring up this matter because you seem worried
by it; but I think I understand why it is so.

The Relationship of Purpose
He got to the dentist's early. His purpose (aim or inten-
tion) was to have plenty of time to face the dentist's
tools.
The commonest and neatest way of showing a connec-
tion of purpose between two ideas is to use an infinitive.
They left early in order to have plenty of time.
They left early so as to have plenty of time
They left early to have plenty of time.
It is however, possible to have a subordinate adverbial
clause of purpose.
They left early so that they would (might) have plenty of
time.
Very many relationships of this kind can be expressed as
either cause or purpose without very much difference in
meaning. In the above example we may say:

They left early because they wanted to have plenty of
time....
But'it is not possible to express all relationships of cause
as relationships of purpose. We can say:
Because they left early, they had plenty of time ...
Their leaving -early can be the reason for their having
time, but it could not possibly be the purpose of it.

As usual in adverbial clauses a comma is placed be-
tween a preceding subordinate clause and the main
clause, but not usually between a main clause and a sub-
ordinate clause that follows it.

Improvement of expression
ThL treatment of a long sentence
When we read works done by other writers we some-
'ntimes notice that some young %\ writers try to pack into one
lo0g sentence \ hat would be more eftcLively expressed
in a connected paragraph \\e also. need not fall into
this habit. This situation is a kind of that could be rem-
eddied.
, Stennt'cc's. phrases. clau~t..
When \ oUn % rite an\ two sentences. 01 e', en think of two
things one after another, here is usually\ some connec-
tion, some relationship of thouglit between the two. If
this relationship is a close one, it is usual for it to be
shown clearly by the running together of the two sen-
tences into one.


"For" is regarded as a co-ordinairig dcodjtiridtion' ad' Exaniple:


I must lock the closet. I want to keep in the crisp air.
These two thoughts are closely related. The second is
the reason for, the purpose of the first and they come
into the mind together. They are therefore better ex-
pressed: I must lock the closet because I want to keep
in the crisp air.
or
I must lock the closet to keep in the crisp air.
The whole aim of sentence construction is to show clearly
(to the reader or listener) these relations of thought. If
you examine some examples from this point of view, you
will find it easier to make good sentences from material
presented to you by an examiner, and you will under-
stand more about punctuation. Let us look now at one
possible kind of relationship.

The Relationship of Equality
Clauses that express equally important thoughts are called
co-ordinate clauses if they are put into one sentence.
This sentence is called a compound sentence.

Examples:
1. They sat on the deck chairs and peered into the dis-
tance.
2. We can cover the chairs ourselves, or we can get
Tommy to do it.
3. The girls could neither stop themselves from eating
nor could they prevent their sisters from watching tele-
vision all day long.
"And", "or", and "nor" are called coordinating con-
junctions.
It is not necessary, however, to have any conjunction at
all in the compound sentence, but in the following case
the coordinate clauses are separated by a semi-colon
rather than a comma.
She spoke absolutely nothing; not even her facial
expression showed any sign of sanity.
Reminder: Compound sentences are not bound to have
anything between the two clauses unless they are very
long or unless there is a prominent pause before the sec-
ond.

Exercise
Find the compound sentences) in the following passage.

When an octopus has eaten its fill of the swarming crabs
and crayfish, it seeks a dark hole in the coral face, and
anchors itself there with a few of the large suckers near-
est to its body. Thus shielded from attack from the rear,
with tentacles gathered ready to strike, it hides glaring
from the shadows, alert for anything alive to swim within
striking distance. It can hurl one or all of those whip-
. lashes forward with the speed of dark lighting, and once
its dozens of suckers, rimmed with hooks for grip on
slippery skins, are fastened about their prey, nothing but
the brute's death will break their awful hold.

Punctuation
Try yQur hand at punctuating the follow \ ing passage. Read
until it is understood then add punctuation marks and
capital letters when you write it.

he was sitting at the table writing his legs were stretched
out before him in th kitchen mary x as N\ashing the dishes
making a great noi: as she did so he could hear the pots
pans enamel plates and cutlery knocking and clashing
together stop that noise this instant he cried out holding
his temples what miary said I said stop that racket he
repeated oh mary said I thought you said stop making
the rock sauce'


Sunday Qhroanicle Julne; 12, 2005


PAgeXIV,-







Sunday Chronicle June 12, 2005


WORLD bAY TO COMBAT




DESERTIFICATON AND DOU&WT


Hello Readers, this week we
will be focusing on the
World Day to Combat
Desertification and Drought.

In 1994, the United Na
tions General Assembly
declared June 17 the
'World Day to Combat De-
sertification and Drought'.
Ever since, country Parties
to the United Nations Con-
vention to Combat Desertifi-
cation (UNCCD), non-gov-
ernmental organizations
and other interested stake-
holders celebrate this par-
ticular day with a series of
outreach activities, world-
wide.
This year. on World Day to
Combat Desertification, the in-
ternational community marks
the llth anniversary of the
UNCCD, which plays a key
role in the world's efforts to
eradicate poverty, achieve sus-
tainable development and reach
the Millennium Development
Goals.
The proposed theme for
this year's celebration is 'Women
and Desertification', as a way to
recognize and support the
unique role played by women in
regions affected by desertifica-
tion and drought, particularly in
rural areas of developing coun-
tries.
Guyana is among the 167
countries that are party to the
U.N. Convention to Combat
Desertification and Drought. Al-


though desertification is not a
problem in Guyana, we cannot
ignore the fact that improper
land use practices can render
portions of our land unproduc-
tive.


DESERTIFICATION IS
A SILENT KILLER
Globally, lands are degraded
making them unproductive and
unable to support any life form.
This is particularly true of dry
or arid land, which covers up to
one quarter of the world's sur-
face. When this condition exists,
the lands become deserts hence
the process is referred to as de-
sertification. Desertification has
been occurring at an astonishing
rate in six continents. Recent
studies show that over 250 mil-
lion people are directly affected
and some one billion are at risk.

IMPACTS OF
DESERTIFICATION
Each year, millions of hect-
ares of agricultural land become
unproductive or are. used up for
housing as cities expand. Yet, the
population in the developing
world continues to increase and
its demand for food is expected'
to double in 30 years. Of ne-
cessity new land can 'and will be
farmed, but much of it is mar-
ginal and, there ore. e\en more
susceptible to degradation

Desertification has environ-
mental, economic and social ef-


fects. Environmental effects in-
clude decreased soil fertility, in-
creased soil erosion and frequent
flooding and sedimentation of
rivers. Dependence on foreign
aid, decrease in food production,
reduced revenue are examples of
the economic effects. Potential
socio-cultural impacts include
land tenure conflicts, migration
and reduced access to natural
materials of cultural use or im-
portance.
The inevitably growing hu-
man needs demand that we take
strong and immediate action to
stop if not reverse the de-
struction of our arable land.


CAUSES OF
DESERTIFICATION
Human abuse of land
through overgrazing, over crop-
ping and deforestation are the
major causes of desertification.


OVERGRAZING
Overgrazing is the major
cause of desertification world-
wide. It is the direct result of
the growing human population.
With more mouths to feed more
land has to be devoted to food
-production. More cattle are
placed to graze for longer peri-
ods on smaller plots of pasture
land. This practice puts in-
creased pressure on the land as
grass is not given a chance to
emerge again and land becomes
eroded. Erosion of topsoil


F4 THEIR' S. DAY

THIS ONE IS FOR YOU DAD




- a Basket hamper filled with fruits


- a bottle of the finest Wine

- a Pair of Sock and other

manly gifts.



Who it is that say we do

- not remember Dads??

YOU ARE WRONG THIS TIME

From your
Favorite Professional Florists.


4/



V


makes the land infertile or un-
productive. Degraded lands
support no vegetation and hence
no animal life. Thus overgrazing
reduces both the productivity
and biodiversity of the dry
lands.


OVER CROPPING
Simply put over cropping is
the growing of too many crops
year after year on the same piece
of land. Like overgrazing, over
cropping occurs in direct re-
sponse to the growing human
population. Because of the need
to feed more people, large por-
tions of lands are being culti-
vated. Over cropping com-
pletely destroys natural vegeta-
tion. damages soil structure and
eventually exhausts the soil of
nutrients.
Often times intensive culti-
vation occurs on marginal lands
which are at a high risk of crop
failure. Marginal lands have lim-
ited fertility. In order to boost
crop yields farmers apply large
amounts of agrochemicals. When
it rains these chemicals drain
into nearby waterways pollut-
ing them.


DEFORESTATION
Deforestation simply means
the removal of extensive portions
of natural vegetation from an area.
Vegetation removal occurs for vari-
ous reasons: mining, the establish-
ment of agricultural systems, con-
struction of houses, fuel wood. Re-
moving the vegetation exposes the
soil to erosion and leaching. With-
out the branches and leaves to
break its fall, 'down pours' can
quickly wash away soil for even the
gentlest slope. Cutting down trees
also takes away the roots which
help to hold soil particles together.


CAN
DESERTIFICATION
BE STOPPED?
To combat desertification,
ways of managing dry land
eco_. stems in order to prevent
desertification need to be
identified and implemented.
Public awareness, science and
technology' consultation and
financial aid are all integral to the
solution.
Developed and developing
countries have to work together
to address the-problem. Assis-
tance by way of substantial fi-


nancial resources and acce s to
appropriate technology, knbwl-
edge and know-how must be
provided by developed c un-
tries to developing countries.
Developing countries must allo-
cate adequate resources andi es-
tablish strategies to combat de-
sertification and drought. Addi-
tionally affected countries
should address the underlying
causes of the problem and pay
special attention to relevant
socio-economic factors. Aware-
ness and participation of local
population in action to combat
desertification and drought is vi-
tal to combating the problem as
are appropriate laws, policies
and action plogrammes.
Successful strategies and
actions to combat desertifica-
tion would ultimately result
in the number of animals
grazing on land being re-
duced; soil conditions en-
hanced by practices such as
mulching and crop rotation;
farming on marginal lands
being prohibited and refores-
tation take place.

CONTINUED IN NEXT
WEEK'S EDITION.


IMINISt ,OF:HEALTH





The Ministry of Health invites Tenders from suitably qualified Contractors to submit bids for the
execution of the following:-

Construction of Blood Bank, New Amsterdam Hospital Compound, New Amsterdam,
Berbice.

Tender Documents can be obtained from the Administrative Office, Ministry of Health,
Brickdam, during the hours of 9am to '3pr6 Monday to Friday upon payment of the sum of Five
Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) each.

Tenders must be enclosed in a plain, sealed envelope, which does not in any way identify the
Tenderer. On the top left-hand comer of the envelope, the Project tendered for must be
clearly written,

Tenders must be addressed to the Chairman, National Procurement and Tender
Administration Board and must be deposited in the Tender Box situated at the Ministry of
Finance, Main and Urquhart Streets, Georgetown not later than Tuesday, 28th June 2005 at
9:00 am. Tenders will be opened immediately thereafter.

Each Tender must be accompanied by valid Certificates of Compliance from the
Commissioner, Guyana Revenue Authority and the General Manager, National Insurance
Scheme in the name of the individual if individual is tendering or company if company is
tendering. A Bid Security of 2% of the tendered sum is required. Failure to do so will result
in automatic disqualification of the Tender.

Tenders which do not meet the requirements stated above will be deemed non responsive.

Tenderers or their representatives are invited to be, present at the opening of Tenders on Tuesday,
June 28, 2005 at 9.00am as stated above.

Sonya Roopnauth
- ^ .onvernmnnt ad,; rn hp vipwpd nn


Page XV


XI'I


SEND FLOWERS OVERSEAS
E FL*MWER SHIsP .-. '
92 Middle Street, Georgetown.
Phone: 226-2499, 226-3109. Fax: 227-1598
Email: cyflo(canetworksgy.com Teleflora.









$50,000.00 FATHER'S DAY, CH RONICLE CROSSWORD 'REMAINS OF THE

'MUST-BE-WON' COMPETITION DAY' FOR CLASSIC
TUESDAYS AT


NAME: NAME-
ADDRESS- ADDRESS-


ACROSS:

1. Homophone.
3. Village on the East
Coast of Demerara in
Guyana.
5. The past tense of this
irregular verb does not
end with ed and has
the same form as the
past participle.
6. Container.
10. Disc-jockey (Abbr.).
11. Acronym for Law
Enforcement Agency.
12. Estate on the Left
Bank of the Mahaica
River in Guyana.
13. Physical Education
(Abbr.).
15. Legal term.


17. Antonym for the verb,
treat.
18. Homophone.
20. A compound of oxygen
with another element or
group.
21. This is usually
advertised in the
classified section of the
Guyana Chronicle.

DOWN:
1. Irregular verb with its
past tense and past
participle being
different from each
other.
2. "Thou hast loved
righteousness, and
***** iniquity, therefore
God, even thy
God, hath anointed
thee with the oil of
gladness above thy


In honour of all Fathers we
have presented you with A
Father's Day "Must-Be-Won"
puzzle for $50,000.00. This
"M-B-W" competition will be
drawn on Friday, June 17,
2005. The rules for this
competition remain the same,
except, that the best entry wins
the prize money of $50,000.00.
If there is more than one winner
the prize money will be shared
among the winners. So let's
give Fathers a Great Father's
Day tribute by getting involved
with this competition and
winning. You've got to win this
one, it's too simple not to win!

If you play smart you can win
this grand offer of $50,000.00.
The more you play, the greater
is the possibility of winning.


fellows." Heb.1:9.
4. Synonym for the verb,
suppress.
7. Type of expenditure in
Accounting.
8. Irregular verb with two
S past tenses and two
past participles which
* are the same.
9. Feminine personal
name.


14. Abbreviation for a
method of stock valuation in
Accounting.
16. Thursday (Abbr.).
18. Territorial Decoration(Abbr.).
19. suffix forming nouns (i)
denoting the person
affected by the action of the
formative verb: employee (ii)
denoting a person
described as or concerned
with: absentee
*>-^^^ -- ] ,''


IW S BM SE .
Alliance. .A\ CO. Bath. bet, capital, cup. D.I, ec, -
FIFO, harm, hated, Hope, hurt, John, Julita, -L -
Lalita, LEA, let, LIFO, Melville, muffle, mug,
muzzle, Nalini, notice, Ogle, oxide, PE, plants,
revenue, set, suit, TD, tea, tee, TH, tub, wanted,
weather, weave, whether, writ, write.


The amount of entries
submitted must be covered
by the relevant sums of
money or they will not be
judged. Then place those
entries in a Chronicle
Crossword box at a location
near to you.

When you need coupons just
purchase a copy of the
Sunday or Wednesday
Chronicle. For extra


Chronicle.

Residents of Cove & John
and its environs are reminded
that a box has been placed at
Ms. L. Mohabir's business
place at Lot 6, Public Road,
Cove & John, East Coast
Demerara.

Players are reminded that no
entry is opened before 12.30
pm on the day the puzzle is


coupons, purchases can be drawn and that judging does
made at our offices in not begin before 4.30 pm
Linden, New Amsterdam when the last entry is opened.
and Georgetown. You can The solution to the puzzle is
also obtain extra coupons not known before that time.
from Mr. Vincent Mercurius
of D'Edward Village, This apart, our general rules
Rosignol, Berbice. They apply.
cost $20.00 each or $40.00
for two as they, ppe4 nlthe,. Thanks ,
Sunday or Wed n e s day Crossw\' itiff&.'.'..'.


CASTELLANI HOUSE
THE decades-long and much lauded collaboration of Indian
producer Ismail Merchant and American director James Ivory,
which ended recently with the death of Ismail Merchant in
London, produced one of its most outstanding films in 'The
Remains of the Day'(1993).
The film will be presented in Castellani House's Classic Tues-
days programme on June 14, at 18:00 h at the National Gallery.
The protagonist of the story, the faithful butler Stevens, remem-
bers in a series of flashbacks his dutiful service to the aristocrat
Lord Darlington, a leading member of the British establishment, who
mistakenly tries to promote support for Nazism in England in the
years prior to World War II.
Stevens' repressed emotions additionally thwart a growing at-
tachment between himself and the new young housekeeper at
Darlington's estate, who views the discussions of the master and
his eminent guests with horror.
Adapted from the 1989 Booker Prize-winning novel by the
Japanese-British author Kasuo Ishiguro, the story was filmed in
several English great houses, detailing Merchant Ivory's trademark
production values of lavish and precise period costumes and set-
tings.
The film won an Oscar nomination for Best Screenplay for Ger-
man-Jewish screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, the third party in
the Merchant-Ivory production team. James Ivory won Best Di-
rector nominations from the Directors' Guild of America, the Golden
Globe and the Academy awards.
A stellar cast is headed by Anthony Hopkins, Emma Thomp-
son and James Fox, supported by Hugh Grant, the late Christo-
pher Reeve and others. Hopkins and Thompson both won Acad-
emy Award nominations for Best Actor and Actress.
The public is kindly asked to be on time. The film's run-
ning time is two hours 14 minutes.


"4,j
* ''; ". '* ;* : .-' L _,: : ': ', ". '. ; .
.* . "= ";." . M :" 2 1 .: .'
.-" -. ..... .- .. ..- ; ..':'^ ^ :...^, *:'"
S.' "* -'" : ; ". :'.'." '_," ,'.,. .' i "
" .. '- ,-: ,,, ., .-* ,, *.*''?..^,,* o;* ^ ; .* .* "
.' $ '.: 3'"

... *i'' ..,
"*. .- .. . , ,* '... & .; . .
:; .f. '.6
. f'

,,, ;, '.. . .. -. -, . . . ,,... .
.- ..; ", .. ,.. : .. l r ' < -.t


MARILYN Monroe engrossed in reading 'Leaves of Grass'
by Walt Whitman, the father of avant-garde American
poetry, during the making of 'Love Nest' 1951.


MARILYN


MONROE:
From page III
what they are not in order to impress and trap rich husbands.
Yet Monroe had a keen eye for men who truly appreciated her
talents. She placed little value in youthful handsome partners,
unlike other actresses far less beautiful than her. Most of
Monroe's male partners, like her husbands, were far older
than she was.
In 'The Seven-Year Itch' of 1955, one of her most beautiful films, she
is truly unforgettable as the young woman who lives in the flat above a
man in mid-life crisis. This is the film in which she always keeps her un-
derwear in the refrigerator, giving one of the screen's greatest moments and
one of her happiest photos when she stood above an air-vent on the street
and playfully let her dress blow high above her waist. So many other great
Monroe colour films rated three stars exist, and are just as thrilling, but her
final film, 'The Misfits' of 1961, with an aging Clark Gable, who would
die, just weeks after filming ended, is her greatest performance which proved
her skill as a tender classic actress, despite her personal problems at that
time.
Monroe worked mostly with Hollywood's best film directors
at that time, profound guides like Howard Hawkes, John Huston,
Billy Wilder, George Cukor, men twice her age she clearly felt close
to, despite differences. With them, Monroe gave hope and happi-
ness to ordinary men and women worldwide who were allowed to
see her films.
Her sexy behaviour in real life, in photos, and in films, had noth-
ing to do with 'white' values, as beautiful black sexy performers
like Josephine Baker, Dorothy Dandridge, Naomi Campbell,
Beyonce prove, as well as numerous ordinary Afro, Oriental, and
Latin American women of today.
Monroe's man photos and films are nothing less tlha
life which ended tragically, yet continues to give pleasure with
some of the greatest performances in 20th century movies. If
her purpose was to make humans haidppy0-shei certainly suc-


r


Sunday Chronicle June 12, 2005


.age XVI


I







u hrnc Jn 1 2 P I


GROWING quirement. As a guide the fol-
lowing recommendation should
EGGPLANT IN be followed;
GUYANA


INTRODUCTION
Eggplant belongs to the
family Solanaceae and its scien-
tific name is Solanum
melongena. It is used mainly as
a cooked vegetable. The nutri-
tional value is relatively high:

VARIETIES
There are three varieties
mainly cultivated in Guyana and
there are open pollinated. These
varieties are long purple, Pink
and White and Black beauty.

CULTIVATION
The seed is initially sown in
seed trays or seedbed then
transplanted four weeks after
germination. It is grown on a
wide range of soil type, but
preferably suited clay soil rich
in organic matters. It grows well
within the pH range of 5.5 6.5,
if the pH is lower then
limestone should be applied 4-
6 weeks before transplanting at
rate of 2000 lb./acre (for rise by
1 pH).
Transplanting is best car-
ried out in the afternoon or any
time during a cool day so as to
resist transplanting shock. The
recommended spacing should be
90cm between rows and 60cm
along rows (18,500 plants/hect-,
are).
After transplanting irriga-
tion should be done once
daily for 5 days thereafter
twice weekly during the dry
period.

FERTILIZER
A soil test should be done
to determine the fertilizer, re-


Urea
272 kg/ha
30% at transplant-
ing (4.4g/plant)
40% at flowering
(5.9g/plant)
30% at Fruit set
(4.4g/plant)

TSP
108 kg/ha
All at transplanting
(5.8g/plant)

MoP
136kg/ha
50% at transplant-
ing (3.7g/plant)
50% at flowering
(3.7g/plant)

If organic manure is being
applied, then synthetic fertilizer
rate should be lowered.


PEST

Whiteflies
There-can cause heavy
loses, by feeding on the leaves.
Resulting in reduce plant
growth and killing plant at early
stages. Spraying with insecti-
cides such as Admire, Regent,
Vertimec and Relevo will control
the flies. .

Lacewing Bugs
There are small bugs that
feed on the under side of the
leaves resulting in a pale yel-
lowish colour and then eventual
death of the leaves. Spraying
with insecticides such as Vydate
L, Basudin and Pestac will ef-
fectively reduce the insect


population.
Flea Beetles
These are small black scale
insects that feed on both sides
of the leaves, leaving .many
holes on the leaves. Spraying
with Actara, Pestac and Vydate
L will reduce the pest popula-
tion.

DISEASES

Bacterial Wilt
This is a bacterial infection
that causes heavy loses in the
wet season, especially on soils
that are acidic and water logged.
The first symptoms are wilting
of the entire plant while the
leaves are still green. The con-
trol measure is a good cultural
practices plus liming the soil to
the require pH.

Anthracnose
This is a fungus that affects
the fruit at the ripening stages
and can cause heavy losses. The
symptoms appear as a brown
and slightly sunken lesion.
Spraying with fungicide such as
Maximo, Benlate, Trimiltox and
Mancozeb will effective reduce
the disease incidence.

HARVESTING
Harvesting begins 10-12
weeks after transplanting and
maximum yield is achieved
within the first 6 weeks of har-
vest. Yield of eggplant ranges
from 60 80 tones per hectare


GROWING OCHRO
IN GUYANA

INTRODUCTION
Ochro belongs to the fam-
ily Malvaceae and its scientific
name is Abelmoschus
esculentus. It is widespread


SUPPLY 8 INSTALLATION OF BED LINERS

ON 4 X 4 PICK UP TRUCKS


UNSERVED AREAS ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAMME
Guyana Power & Light (GPL) Inc. (UAEP PIU) invites sealed quotations
from interested parties for the supply of materials and services relative to
installation of bed liners on 4 x 4 Pick Up Trucks.

Specifications can be obtained at the office of the Procurement Officer of
the UAEP at 232 Middle St., Cummingsburg, Georgetown during business
hours, Tel: 225-7398,. Fax: 225-5255.

Quotations must be submitted in sealed envelopes and addressed as
follows:
Quotation for the supply and installation of
BED LINERS for 4 x 4 Pick Up
Trucks for GPL, UAEP
Contracts & Supplies Manager
GUYANA POWER & LIGHT INC
40 Main Street
Georgetown
Quotations will be opened at 14:00h on Thursday 23 June at the address
given above for submission of quotations. Interested parties may attend.


used as a cooked or steam veg-
etable with a very good nutri-
tive value.

VARIETIES
Many local cultivars are be-
ing cultivated locally, while
there are some improved variet-
ies with good horticultural char-
acteristics. And these are
Clemson Spineless, Santa Cruz
and Emerald Green Velvet.
CULTIVATION
It is initially grown directly
by sowing seed into hole at a
spacing of 90cm between rows
and 60cm along rows i.e. ap-
proximately 18,500 plants per
hectare. The crop can be grown
in both wet and dry season and
any soil type with a pH of 5.5-
6.5.
Irrigation is necessary for
germination, which would take
between 7-12 days after sowing.
There after irrigation is required
once weekly in the dry season.

FERTILIZER
A soil test should be done
to determine the nutrient status
of the soil. The following fertil-
izers could be used as a guide;

Urea
180 kg/ha
45% at 2 weeks af-
ter germination 4.4g/plant)
55% at 50% fruit
set (5.4g/plant).


TSP


90 kg/ha


all at two webks af-
ter germination (4.9g/plant)

MoP 110 kg/ha
50% at 2 weeks after ger-
mination (3g/plant)
50% at Fruit set (3g/plant)

PEST

Aphids
There are tiny brownish
black insect feeding on the un-
der side of the leaves and on the
fruits, they also attract ants
colony. Spraying with insecti-
cides such as Vydate L, Basudin
and Fastac will reduce the pest
population.

Mealy Bugs
There are small whites and
pink bugs with a white coating
over they body. They feed on
the fruit and flowers resulting in
fruit drop. Roughing infested
plants and burn together with
spraying of Vydate L can reduce
the spread of the bugs.

DISEASES

Cercospora Leaf Spot
This is a fungus that first
symptoms are gray spots that
gradually become dark spots on
the leaves progressing to form
circular lesion with a hole in the
center. It is a major problem
during the wet season. Spraying
with Trimiltox, Maximo and
Kocide will reduce the spread of


the fungus significantly.

Sooty Mold
This is another fungus
that affects the crop during
the wet season. The
symptoms first appears on
the under side of the leave as
a dark mould covering the
entire under leaves and it
reduce growth significantly.
Spraying with Trimiltox,
Bravo and Kocide in rotation
will reduce the disease
incidence.

HARVESTING
Harvesting begins 6-12
weeks after germination de-
pending on the variety and con-
tinues for up to 230 days de-
pending again on the variety.
Yield ranges from 30-40 tones
per hectare.
To be continued
next week


The Guyana Revenue Authority is inviting tenders
for the purchase of the following vehicles.


\Vehicle Number
_PDD_ 6194
PEE 8510
PFF 1981
SPHH 3890
_PHH 3896
PHH 3898
PJJ 1904
PJJ 4311
PHH 4769 .
PHH 4761
PEE 6119
PHH 4766


Type of Vehicle
Nissan Douhle Cab
Senira M.ltor Car
Hundai r.1u;.,r C.ar
.Nis_sanLMinig-BuJs 'S6eaterj ).

Toyota Motor Car
Toyota Land Cruiser __
Honda Motor Car
Mazda Truik _____,-.
NJisEan r.ini-Bus (9 seater)
Toyota Surf 4 4
-Nissan Mini-Bus (9 sweater .


These vehicles will be sold on an "as is, where is" basis and can be inspected dadil at the Licence
Revenue Department Smyth & Princes Streets, Georgetown during normal working hours.
Please contact Mr. M.:Kamrouz on telephone number 223-0607 for further details.

Tenders should be addressed to:
The Chairman
National Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finar)ce
Main & Urquharf Streets
Georgetown

And marked at the TOP LEFT HAND CORNER "TENDER FOR PURCHASE OF VEHICLE
NUMBER..............-. Guyana Revenue Authority". If bidding for more than one vehicle, please
submit individual tenders.

Tenders should be deposited in the Tender Box at the Ministry of Finance not later than
09:00 hrs on Tuesday Juie 14,2005 when Tenders would close.

Tenderers may be present at the opening, which would take place
immediately after the close of Tenders. The Guyana Revenue Authority
does not bind itself to accepting the lowest Tender and reserves the right to
reject an\ Tender without as ginny i'reasons.


Khurshid Sattaur
' .. Comiis.iotet-Getietal '.'.. . .. ..
,,. :...:fn L.'.. L' ', ,', .L.r L' 'Io ';',i "- :..J' , cm :.!


su~idaG bfiro'fiicle 'jnn 12, 2005


. ..Ii


Pa&XVII~r











GOVERNMENT OF THE CO-OPERATIVE REPUBLIC OF GUYANA
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
EDUCATION FOR ALL FAST TRACK INITIATIVE (EFA-FTI)
Grant No. 053679

CONTRACTORS FOR THE UTILITIES UPGRADING SCHOOLS

The Government of the Co-operative Republic of Guyana has received a grant from the
International Development Association (IDA), and intends to apply part of the proceeds of this
grant to minor Civil Works (upgrading of utilities sanitary facilities, water & electricity) at sixteen
(16) Primary Schools under the Ministry of Education, Education For All Fast Track Initiative.

Contracting services are required on the educational institutes listed below:
Name of School Location
Package A Individual
Schools
1 Lalini Primary Laluni Creek, Linden Soesdyke Highway, Region 4
2 St. Cuthbert's Prmnary St. Cuthbert's Mission, Linden Soesdyke Highway,
Region 4
3 Low Wood Primary Low Wood, Demerara River, Region 4
4. Abary Primary Abary River, West Coast Berbice, Region 5
5. Grass Hook Primary Grass Hook, Mahaica Creek, Region 5
6. Zorg Primary New Forest, East Canje, Berbice, Region 6
Package B- Combbied
Schools
-7. Augusburg Primary Burma Branch Road, East Coast Demerara, Region 5
Karamat Primary Mora Point, Mahicony River
8. Tacouba Primary Tacouba Mission, Canje River, Region 6
Bara Cara Primary Bara Cara, Canje River, Region 6
9. Friends Primary Friends, East Bank Berbice, Region 6
Lighttown Primary Lighttown, East Bank Berbice, Region 6
10 Plegt-Anker Primary Plegt-Anker, East Bank Berbice, Region 6
Schepmoed Primary Schepmoed Village, East Bank Berbice, Region 6
11. St Andrew's Primary 1 Avenue of the Republic, Georgetown
Agricola Primary Agricola, East Bank Public Road, Georgetown

The Ministry of Education, Education For Al Fast Track Initiative (EFA-FTI) now invites eligible
Contractors to submit quotation(s) for schools listed above. A Contractor will be selected in
accordance with the procedures set out in the World Bank's Guidelines: Procurement of Goods or
Works.

Bids shall be valid for a period ofthirty (30) days after Bid opening and shall be delivered to the
National Procurement and Tender Administration Board on or before June 28, 2005 not later than
9:00am.

The Bidder shall seal the original and a copy of the Bid in two inner envelopes and one outer
envelope, duly marking the inner envelopes as "ORIGINAL" and "COPY". The inner envelopes,
shall be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the address given in the letter of Invitation to Quote,
and on which should be also written "QUOTATION FOR UTILITIES UPGRADING SCHOOLS"

The inner and outer envelopes shall:
1. be addressed to the Employer at the address provided in the Bidding Document
(Preliminaries);
2. bear the tame of the school and
3, provide a warning "Do not open before the specified time and date" for Bid opening
as defined in the Invitation to Quote.

All documents must be placed in a sealed envelope addressed to:

The Chairman
National Procurement and Tender Administration Board
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown, Guyana.

and placed in the Tender Box located on the Middle floor of the Ministry of Finance Building on or
before June 28, 2005 not later than 9:00 hours. Bidders or their representatives are invited to the
opening.

Interested Contractors can uplift "Tender documents" from the Finance Department of the
EFA-FTi unit, address below, between the hours 8:30hrs to 15:00hrs Monday to Friday, for a
non-refundable cost of five thousand Guyanese dollars $5,000.00 (GUY).

Payments ban be made by Manager's Cheque, Bank Draft or Cash. Cheques must be addressed
to the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Education.

Tender documents can be reviewed prior to purchasing at:

Ministry of Education
Education For All Fast Track Initiative (Finance Department)
Lot 3 Battery Road,
Kingston, Georgetown, GUYANA
Tele: 592-22640046, Fax: 592-226-0506.


II OROCOPE


- -


- --- 1w-


-
- -


A -so-
- Mdmmt b-- 4m.


. a


R. "Copyrighted Material --

4 Syndicated Content -

Available from Commercial News Providers"


- a _
-- S S -


- S


-4110- -*


9


- *


w-.
S -


IL
A'


5 -


*1*


Ministry of Educaton*"i


rIn4iOt ads can b6i6eveon'


- - -S ~


9&iday*Ch I'C ~ ron i cb'J '20Z35


Oka ~- 4 - .0.-


- -- S


S An. d


- S
* -


- -


--~- --~---


* *


-


- -W


-


"'Nov-Xvill






Sunday Chronicle June 12, 2005


CANINE GERIATRICS


THE VET

iiw/7gsE


MORE PHYSICAL
CHANGES
LAST week we discussed
some urinary tract disorders
(specifically failing kidneys)
in elderly dogs. Let us
continue with some other
ailments associated with the
urinary system.


BLADDER
INFECTION
Elderly dogs tend to be
more susceptible to bladder-
infections than younger dogs.
Bacteria lodge themselves in the
internal lining of the bladder and
create an inflammatory process.
Often the bacteria stem from
original infections of the genital
tracts of both males and
females. On other occasions, the
bacteria will originate from
kidney infections.


The dog with Cystitis
(Bladder Infection) urinates
often all over the place, giving
the impression that he has no
control of his bladder.
Sometimes there is a tinge of
blood in the urine. Usually there
is some pain associated with
urinating (voiding). We have
also encountered stones
blocking the bladder outlet into
the urethra.
The treatment regime of
an acute Cystitis aliment
involves antibiotics. Let your
vet decide which ones to use
(he/she may culture the
urine and carry out a special
sensitivity test which will
determine which antibiotics
is most effective). In the case
of a Cystitis, I advocate the
use of antibiotics for at least
10 days to counteract the
germs.


In chronic forms of Cystitis
in the elderly dog, the use of
urinary antiseptics and/or the
use of chemical substances to
acidify the urine are part of the
therapeutic arsenal and yields
relatively good results. Some
vets like to flush the bladder by
introducing more salt than usual
to the diet. This makes the dog
thirsty, ergo there will be an
increased intake of fluids,
therefore an accumulation of
urine which, as the bladder
swells, flushes the bacteria out.
Antibiotics will have to be used
for as long as three weeks in the
chronic form of Cystitis in the
elderly dog.

BLOCKAGE
Old dogs and cats suffer
from urine retention due to an
obstruction (blockage). Stones,
accumulated in the bladder, are


notorious for creating a blockage
in the bladder outlet into the
urethra. The bladder fills,
distends and the urine can be
expelled (or only in droplets.
That situation creates great
discomfort/pain and is
ultimately life threatening.
Stones can easily be seen in an
X-ray. I find that only surgery
(followed by a vet
recommended diet) can solve
this problem adequately and
long term.
I should mention there are
other causes that are related to
urine retention. Tumours,


strictures and infections are
responsible from time to time.
Even the enlargement of the
Prostate gland pressing against
the urethra could stop the urine
flow. (This does not happen
too often though). An enlarged
Prostate Gland can press against
the rectum and therefore
compromise the elimination of
faecal matter (constipation).
Next week we will
discuss constipation as an
aliment of the elderly dog
and link it h dietary
considerations.


Please implement disease
preventative measures
(vaccinations, routine
dewormings, monthly anti-
heartworm medication, etc.)
and adopt-a-pet from the
GSPCA's Animal Clinic
and Shelter at Robb and
Orange Walk, if you have
the wherewithal to care well
for the animals. Do not
stray your unwanted pets;
take them to the GSPCA
Clinic and Shelter instead.
Also, find out more about
the Society's free spay and
neutering programme by
calling 226-4237.


Copyrighted Material

WSyndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"
lk,


7L4-OW OW'
- S 4w.


CHAMPION.I.


cookery Corner

J Welcome to the 349'h edition of
"Champion Cookery Corner", a
weekly feature giving recipes and
tips on cooking in Guyana.


Although sounding an unlikely combination, curry powder makes delicious sdlad
dressings and dishes. Try these you will be pleasantly surprised!


Serves 4

1 lb lean cooked pork loin, cut into
thin strips
2 cups diced celery
V cup raisins
I apple, cored and diced
1/4 cup dry roasted peanuts, coarsely
chopped
/2 cup low fat plain yogurt
'I teaspoon INDI Curr -Powder


Directions:
In large mixing bowl toss together
pork, celery, raisins, apple and
peanuts. Combine yogurt and curry
powder. Spoon over salad, stirring
lightly to coat. Serve immediately or
cover and refrigerate overnight.

Serving Suggestions:
Serve on bed of shredded lettuce with
wann dinner rolls


i CURRIED CHICKEN SALAD


6 boneless chicken.breast halves, ;kin rcmo ed, cooked and diced about 3 cups
I cup chopped celrN
2 cup diced red un-peeled apple
2 to 3 tablespoons raisins
1/4 cup coarsely choppedped pecans or walnuts
1 teaspoon IND] Curry Powder
V2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cider vinegar
/2 teaspoon Chico Black Pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1 cup mayonnaise, or to moisten to your taste

PREPARATION:
Combine the diced chicken with remaining ingredients in a large bowl, adding more or less
mayonnaise, to moisten according to your taste. Cover and refrigerate until serving time.
SPONSORED BY THE MANUFACTURERS OF

Baking Powder
PASTA Curry PoFbwder
,Custard Powder I MGarm wrasala
Black Pepper -, --r. a-.la


Page XIX


- I .~ Ill~ill


'r













4m


_ -
a.- MON-0 -


4- 41 ft4 -4
QW - .m a 4o 1



PA- 213-




Availab


dW 0
4D 4aw-


.00
ow 00
- b 4-
ft- -


0. -49- 10. P"

GOMM 0w olb
- 0so- 4
.0w lomp ..
00* -
ft "ow-a O
ww
..M--


vo ant ,d Ann, 401 4Mn,,dbu -m

Iu n eme O m e mm e emJ,,
6 - -- -- m
- 4w 40* emS 00 one




"Copyrig hted,
4be, f CodmmercIaGla


SyndorigatedC

lie from' Commercial


. 4b

ow 49DROOMO
m - -


- -am a.
a. ~
-~ % ~-Q 0.-
-a a. a.. -
- -
- a.
~ m ~.
~


Vlaterial


ontePntd .

INe providers"


_ 1


- w- -
m- 4D q


40 m d -
- -0 0 45n
-db 1106as
-mm up-0 -m


E3 ~ CF~'~ d a










'N4t



-it


I-


"- l~ -. -
"* .v i ''- -r- ", "i-? a -ft .< '-i'"'-. ,,

.. .- . .
,. v A- ..-%y

U''^^y


.~ztt.~l 4
"'1.
a


/ /
/


I


. T ^ *:r11 *



t "I .'- ..


. .:. -.

r .. -'- .- H ^'


.; ., .. ~. ~... ',. .::;: . .:.;.1.....~ ,.......~.,.,,... .,......,...


''' ~"'


,


. I


"









Weddings


around the world


.We live in a
world where
cultures
abound, where people
in different societies
have built traditions
upon centuries and
centuries of existence.
In all of these cultures,


rituals have been
established to bring
men and women
together in the sacred
union of marriage. We
take a look at the way
the wedding thing is
done in some of these
societies.


,


'I
A


For the perfect bride '
SHUMPHREY & COMPANY
S' 5 Avenue of the Republic, Georgetown
Telephone: 226-1906


Rbhilosha's ,
Fashions
NEVW ARRIVALS
DIRECT FROM INDIA
Bridal $ ear, Saris.
Lchengas, Ghararas.
Bell Bottom Suits. I
Panchoes. Gents. I
3-piece suits. Girl & I
Bos tear and "
matching accessories
i. ,)i. ur Brid, & (rom ( l.lr L L RII .
Come and check. us out at our showroom i
Lot 'E Enachu Street Secinon K,
Campbellville,Georgetown
Phone: 226-0063


THE BENGALI
WEDDING
The traditional Bengali
wedding ceremony com-
bines Vedic scriptures with
regional traditions. Bengalis
have created a synthetic and
beautiful marriage ceremony.
The Indian region'of
West Bengal and its pre-par-
tition eastern counterpart,
modern day Bangladesh,
provide unique variations to
the classic Hindu marriage.
The days before a
Bengali wedding are filled
with several key additions.
The first of these is
Ashirwaad. Very similar to
the ritual blessing offered af-
ter a classic Hindu wedding,
in this Ashirwaad, a pundit
gives the couple blessings
prior to the ceremony.
The second Bengali pre-
wedding tradition is a feast
held for the bride the night
before the wedding. This
meal, the Ai Buddo Bhaat, al-
lows family and friends of
the bride to wish her well
and help her prepare for the
wedding day ahead.
The day of the wedding
begins early for the bride
with the Haldi Uptan. In this
ritual, she is anointed with
turmeric, giving her skin a
soft glow. After this treat-
ment, the bride participates
in another tradition called
Please turn to
centre page


right song


Our picks for the ten best wedding songs

For most people. the right song at the wedding creates a lasting memory of the event.
Decades after the esent certain words, or a certain tune would just tug at the
heartstrings making you relive that wonderful moment all over again. Our top ten
picks for Best Wedding Songs with the artistes and a sampling of the lyrics, presented
in no particular order:
All My Life bN K-Ci and Jojo
"And all my life/ I've prayed for someone like you
And I thank God that 1, that I finally found \ou
All mN life/I've prayed for someone like you
And I hope that you feel the same \\ ay too
Yes. I pray that you do love me too
From This Moment by Shania T\\ain
"I gi\e m) hand to Nou with all my heart
I can't \.ait to li\e m\ life with you, I can't \ ait to start
You and I \ ill never be apart
My dreams came true because of \ou"
I Finally Found Someone bN Barb.ar Surei.-and and Brian Adanm'
"It started o-er coffee.
We started off as friends.
Its funn. how\ from simple things.
The best things. begin
Here and Now by Luther Vandross
"Here and nowV
I promise to lo\e faithfully .. .
You're all I need
Here dnd no%
I \o\\ to be one \\ ith thee
Your lo\e is all I need" -- .... .
I'l lways. Love You by Ta lor Dane ..
"I'll always love you '
For the rest of my days
You have \\on my heart and my soul
With \our sweel sex\ ways"
Only You b\ The Platers
"Only you can make this change in me,
for it's true. you are my destiny.
When you hold my hand,
I understand the magic that you do."

To Make You Feel My Love by Garth Brooks
"When the evening shadows and the stars appear
And there is no one to dry your tears
I could hold you for a million years
To make you feel my love"
Unchained Melody by The Righteous Brothers


"Oh my love
My darling
I've hungered for your touch
A long lonely time
And time goes by so slowly"
One Regret by Beres Hammnond and Roberta Flack
"And I wanna touch you and hold you
For a long, long, long, time
Now. I have one regret, that I've never met you
Before"
Up Where We Belong by Joe Cocker
"Love lift us up where we belong
Where the eagles fly on a mountain high
Love lift us up where we belong
Far from the world below
Where ithe clear winds blow"


V eel 040 /"I ap


~?


h ^


1 11"II..." .: m




.C


STIMULATE YOUR SENSES




STIMULATE YOUR SENSES


Incredible Prices...





A:' i ., z"


Incredible Deals...


**
'i <''4% --'
..:',..-- f,., ,;


LG 8.5CF
FRIDGE FREEZER
311480
Was Cash $94,999
Now Cash $89,999


SHARP 20" TV
102144
Was Cash $59,999
Now Cash $52,999


,~,


AKITA
TWIN TUB WASHER
302076
Was Cash $54,999
Now Cash $44,999


FRIGIDAIRE 25CF
CHEST FREEZER
315148
Was Cash $189,999
Now Cash $169,999











HIRt L I

IWsI 499 '
'..I t


-s's,


FREE 12 MONTH
WARRANTY


Ir A ,& PI Z-

WIN UP TO 20 MILLION
IN CASH & PRIZES


SONY 120 WATT
MINI HIFI,
MULTI VOLT
202323
Was Cash $67,999
Now Cash $54,999









Adding value EVERY day!
www.courtsguyana.com


LO WEST PRICE
ANYWHERE


DELL DIM2400 PC
WITH 17" MONITOR
401193
Was CasJl-.$199,999'
Now Cash $169,999
-mm--k .-.


k S Downr

Ask Staff For Details


VO


. i


i,,






D WEDDING SUPPLEhr





Weddings around the w


From page B

Shakha Paula. In this
ritual, seven married
women place traditional
marriage bangles on the
bride's hands. The
seven women represent
the seven forms of God;
one for each day of the
week. ,
The wedding morning
starts with the groom re-
ceiving new wedding
clothes from his relatives
in a ceremony called Potto
Bastra. The groom is then
dressed in his gift, normally
a conventional wedding
suit. In a traditional
bharaat, the groom and his
entourage then head off


for the wedding.
As the couple individu-
ally makes their way to the
wedding hall, a famous
Bengali tradition takes
place: The oolu-oolu and


the blowing of the conch.
Oolu-oolu is the onomato-
poeic term referring to a
sound made by Bengali
women simultaneously
moving their tongues and
beating their mouths with
an open palm. The oolu-
oolu, performed by women
of both families, is meant
to draw widespread atten-
tion to the wedding cer-
emony. To compliment the
oolu-oolu, a conch is
blown.
When the bride and
groom arrive at the wed-
ding, they meet each other
with a ritual exchange of
flowered garlands or phool
malas. Their hands are
then joined with a sacred

Ne--i


thread and the couple is
blessed in the Sampradan
ceremony.
The couple is first ritu-
ally seated in front of the
Agni (sacred fire) in a


small ceremony named
Yagya. As the ceremony
proceeds, the couple is















I .















asked to stand and walk
seven times around a
decorative circular pattern
on the floor, reminding
them of the sanctity and
solemnity of marriage.
These seven rounds are
known as Saat Pheras.
After Saat Pheras in
Anjali ceremonies, an of-
fering is made to the fire.
Although many Hindu type


weddings involve fire of-
ferings, Anjali is-typical of
and specific to Bengali


42P







wil


weddings.
A traditional Bengali
wedding is completed with
the Sindoor Daan. The
groom applies the symbol
of marriage to his bride's
hair parting: a red marking
(Sindoor). As a Hindu
woman, the bride will wear
this symbol from the time
of the Sindoor Daan until
her death. The groom then
offers his bride a new sari
with which she covers her
head. With this the couple
is then considered officially
married.
The wedding ceremony
is followed by a reception
for the guests. The recep-
tion is usually a spectacu-
lar display.
After the reception, the
bride leaves behind her old
life and family, becoming a
member of the groom's
family instead. In the ritual
Bidaai, the bride's family
both grieves their loss and
wishes her joy in her new
life.
Even as the couple
leaves together they are
not yet free to begin'mar-
ried life. First, in the Kaal
Ratri, the couple is sepa-
rated and the girl cooks and
serves a meal for her new
family. This action, Bohu
Bhaat, marks the girl's en-
trance into her new family.
After Bohi- Bhaat, the
couple is garlanded with


flowers in the Phool Shojja
ceremony. They are then
free to start married life.

THE ZAMBIAN
WEDDING
To demonstrate the dif-
ferences of African cul-
ture, here are some ex-
amples of several Zambian
weddings. Although these
weddings take place in the
same country, difference
provinces have different
ways of approaching the
marriage ceremony. The
common thread is the
closeness of the bridal
family to achieve the goal
of a wedding and lasting
relationship. Marriage pay-
ments are to the family of
the bride rather than to the
brides parents.
In traditional Zambian
society, a man marries a
women, a woman never
marries a man. It is taboo
if a woman seeks out a
man for marriage.
In Namwanga, a young
man is allowed to find a
pirl- He nmnnse and wives


elected someone, the tv
agree to many and tell th
respective relatives.
The Lamba or Lin
mother started the proce
of finding a girl for her s
to marry. She wou
search for an initiated gi
known locally as ichisunm
or moye. (An uninitiaut
girl was not for maria
until she reached puber
or initiation age.) TI
mother of the man visit
neigbring v esloo Io
for the right unmarried"
tiated girl. When sl
found one one who
was from a good f
according to her jud.
ments, not the son's, sl
would go to the mother
the gid and tell her that
wanted her son to m
her daughter. The moth
would then discuss th
with her daughter and
man's mother would re
home and come back
few days later for an
swer.
Many Bemba men b
gan their marriages by


p


"41


called Insalamu. This is ei-
ther beads or money to
show his commitmentL It
also shows that the girl has
-agreed to be married. His
parents then approve or
disapprove his choice.
Should they reject his
choice, he starts to look
again. If they agree, then
the marriage procedure
begins.
A man who has
reached the age for mar-
rying in the Ngoni society
looks for a girl of maniage-
able age. Once he has se-


the age of puberty. Tt
young girl is not consult
with at all. The girl wou
go to her future husband
house, sometimes alon
most often with friends a
ter the marriage price w;
negotiated. On her first tr
to his house she did n
talk to him or enter h
house without small pr
sents being given to hir
She would then speak
him and do a lot of house
work for him. She worw
do what she thought w;






WlT Sunday June 12, 2005





world


o good for her future hus-
ir band. This period of court-
ship was known as
a ukwisha. During this pe-
s riod, she was responsible
a for the man's daily food.
d The groom had to build his
1 own house in the village
where he was living, or in
d the village of his parents-
e in-law.
y The go-between to ini-
e tiate the marriage negotia-
d tions is the commonalty of
g all marriage arrangements
- in Zambia.
e In Namwanga, the
a man's parents arrange for
y a Katawa Mpango. This is
- a highly respected person
e representing the groom's
f interests. The groom's
e family gets ready and de-
y cides on a day to visit the
r girl's family. The girl, after
s receiving the Insalamu,
e takes it to her grand-
a mother. This is the official
a way her family is in-
- formed.
Her grandmother in-
forms her parents and the
t family. They either accept
or reject the proposal.
Whatever the decision,
they then wait for the
man's family to approach
them by way of the
Katawa Mpango. When
he visits, he traditionally
will take a manufactured
hoe, wrapped in cloth with
a handle. The hoe is a
symbol for the earth, for
cultivation, for fertilization..
He carries white beads
and small amount of
money. The beads and
money are put in a small
plate covered with another
small plate of equal size.
The go-between must
know the house of the
girl's mother. Traditionally,
he knocks on the door and
is invited in. Dramatically
he falls on his back and
claps his hands. This is to
indicate to the girl's mar-
riage panel that he is on a
marriage mission. Then he
places the hoe and plates
I on the floor halfway be-
I tween the marriage panel
s and himself. He then ex-
plains his mission and is
asked many questions by
s the girl's family. If no de-
) cision is made by. the girl's
t family, the hoe is taken
3 back, beads and money
are taken by the girl's fam-
ily. If a decision of rejec-
) tion is reached that day,
the hoe is taken back. If
I they accept, the plates are
3 opened and the hoe is.ac-


cepted once the girl ac-
knowledges she knows the
source.
The go-between re-
ports to the man's family.
If the answer is positive,
the family starts to prepare
marriage payments and a
marriage council is insti-
tuted to look into affairs.
The go-between returns on
a specified day for details
on the marriage payments.
When he returns, exotic
foods are prepared for his
second journey by the
man's family.
In pre-colonial period,
the marriage payment in-
cluded cattle (four or
more), chickens and a cow
(if the girl was a virgin).
This payment went to the
mother in appreciation for
giving birth to the girl.
Other payments are de-
manded nowadays a
chitenge cloth, canvas
shoes and a dress 2
blankets, a pair of shoes
and a suit for the father.


THE JAPANESE
WEDDING
A Japanese wedding
ceremony usually takes
place in a Shinto shrine or
in a chapel, weddings typi-
cally are held-in the Spring
and Fall. Very often the
ceremony is held in con-
junction with mul-



... m










tiple other weddings taking
place. weddings are often
scheduled on a day of for-
tune as listed in the alma-
nac.
The marriage system
seems to have gone
through various changes.
The system, however, is
said to have been made
from the "Muko-iri" prac-
tice for a bridegroom to
enter the family of his
aimed-at bride to the
"Yome-iri" system for a
bride to be accepted into
her bridgeroom's home.
During the age of aris-
tocracy, a bridegroom
would nightly visit his bride
at her home. Only after
the birth-of a child or the
loss of parents to ,the
bridegroom or huishand. _
would the bride.'be~'aci


cepted as the wife in the
man's home. It was an ac-
cepted norm in northern
Japan for the bridegroom
to live with the bride's
family to offer his labor for
a certain period of time.
This practice is still being
done today for a man to
become a member of an-
other family by marriage.
After many nightly vis-
its of a man to the home of
his bride to be ,her parents
might invite him to their
bedside and offer "Mochi"
rice cakes. This ancient
wedding custom, called
"Tokoro-Arawashi", was a
most important function.
After the 14th century,
marriages came to be ar-
ranged by and for families
by a "Nakodo" a go-be-
tween.
Similar to African cul-
ture, the Nakodo would
assist in the engagement.
This person would see to
the ceremonial exchange
of drinks with the bride
side immediately upon ac-
ceptance of the proposal.
"Yui-no" betrothal is still
being observed. At the Yui-
no, gifts are exchanged be-
tween the bridegroom and
the bride. The main item to
be presented to the bride is
an "Obi" (a sash) which
represents female virtue.
A "Hakama" skirt is re-
turned to the groom which



*t




.. v
i-






express fidelity. The Yui-
no gifts, in addition to the
Obi and Hakama (a long
pleated skirt of white
Sendai silk), will include as
many as nine items of hap-
piness and fortune. These
gifts are accompanied by a
list of family members, as
they are exchanged be-
tween the two families
through the go between on
a "lucky" day of the alma-
nac.


According to Shinto
tradition, the ceremony is
performed in a sanctuary,
either set up for the occa-
sion or in a Shinto shrine.
If the ceremony is being
held at home in the Shinto
style, a temporary sanctu-
ary is set up on the
.-Tokonomia alcove.
.....The. ajitlies of the
'oup}ee(eparatel yto


the altar where there are
offerings of rice water,
salt, fruit and sake every-
thing to sustain life. The
Shinto priest stands to the
right of the altar, and to the
left, the miko.
The bride and groom
are seated in front of the
priest with the go between
directly behind them, and
then the, families behind
them in age order.
The Shinto priest begins
with a purification service
of all present. The priest
shakes a paper-decorated
staff over the altar, bride
and groom, and then all the
guests. The wedding is at-
tended by. members of
both families, close rela-
tives, the go between and
the couple. After the priest
offers words on marriage,
and asks for those present
to give favor to the mar-
riage, the San-San Kudo
(or the ceremony of the
Three Times Three ex-
change) of nuptial cups is
next. Shinto serving girls,
Miko, serve sake (rice
wine) dressed in red and
white dresses. Three
stacked sake cups are
placed before the bride,
who sits beside the groom.
They each take three sips
from each cup, three
times. At the conclusion of


For your
Engagement Parties &
Wedding Receptions


this elaborate ritual the
couple is considered to be
married. The couple then
steps forward and the
bridegroom will read an
oath of faithfulness and
obedience to be shared by
the couple. The go be-
tween may also read the
oath.
Sake is then exchanged
between members and
close relatives of both
families to signify their
union through the wedding.
The couple may then ex-
change wedding rings. The
bride and groom proceed
to the sanctuary to offer
decorated twigs of Sakaki
(a sacred tree in worship
to gods). In some ceremo-
nies, the rings are ex-
changed here. This ends
the main part of the cer-
emony.

BUDDHIST
STYLE
(ACROSS ASIA)
A Buddhist wedding, as
performed at the Honganji
Temple, includes a prayer,
the presentation of Bud-
dhist rosaries, address by
the priest, incense burning,
drinks of oath and a Bud-
dhist worship by clasping
hands. Buddhist temples
were usually not the place


for a wedding, they were
used for funerals.
The Japanese bride
wears a quilted robe a
uchikake, and an under-ki-
mono, with an elaborately
tied obi. An attractive cus-
tom is the tying of the obi
to resemble flowers, for
wearing in the month of
their bloom. The robe is
often with a pattern of
cranes, waves and pines
(symbols of happiness).
The robe is made of white
silkjaquard woven with the
groom's family crest, and
she wears a special wig.
The wig and robe are
sometimes handed down in
the family.
The Japanese groom
will wear a white under-
kimono, fvith a black ki-
mono or five-crested
haori (short kimono
coat) with haori cords
on top. The crests refer
to the little circular mo-
tifs printed or woven
into the haori cloth, rep-
resenting a person's
clan ancestry. Japanese
heraldry comprises 400
basic family crests, with
over 20,000
sublineages. These
little circles are exquis-
itely varied. This all fits
Please turn to page F


National Miling Company
of-Guyana Inc.
Agricola, East Bank Demerara
Tel: (592) 233-2462
Fax: (592) 233-2464


MAID MARIAN
Range of Products
Roti Mix
Thunderbolt
Self-Rising
Harvest-


Visit our website at www.namilcoflour.com
S. . -..





W eddn Supplement Suna Jn 2,20


Weddings




aroltlnd




the told


From centre page

over the hakama and is
worn with white tabi
(split-toe socks) and
zori, or sandals with
white toe thongs.
The Japanese bride will
change her outfit three or
four times during the wed-
ding. First, a white kimono
is worn to show. the
bride's willingness to
adopt the groom's family.
Her head must be covered
to hide horns of jealousy.
She then changes to. a
Western style wedding
gown. Next she dons a
, multi colored kimono a
furisode, for the reception.
Finally she will change into
a Western-style ball gown.
If the bride is Korean,


she will wear a delicate
crown, or chokturi, beaded
and decorated with flowers
and tiny pendants. The Ko-
rean groom wears a hat for
the first time on his wedding
day. Men also wear a silken
cord, called a sejodae, worn
around the chest under the
armpits on ceremonial occa-
sions.
The Chinese use .an
umbrella in their weddings
as a covering for the
bridal couple. This ancient
ritual was to honour and
protect the bridal couple
as they begin their new
life together.
A reception, or hiroen,
for family and friends fol-
lows the ceremony. The
reception is usually held in
a hotel or restaurant.


Guests are seated first
and then the bride and
groom make their en-
trance with the go
between. Short speeches
are made by the go
between, fathers of the
couple and a chief guest
of the bride and bride-
groom. The go between
introduces the bridegroom,
the bride and their family
backgrounds. Very often
these introductions provide
more information on the
families than on the bride
and groom. Stories are
told about the couple by
older, honoured guests,
which take -up. the major-
ity of the wedding festiv-
ity. '
Red and white is a
happy colour


sii


combination in Japan
and this is used
abundantly. Colorful
candies, Kyogashi, are
made into the shapes of
flowers and are signs of
celebration.

THE IRISH
WEDDING
The most traditional of
Irish weddings follows a
match made for economic
and political purposes by
the father of the groom.
The father chooses from
one of his son for a son to
be married. His choice is
important as the son to be
married will inherit the
farm. In early times the
land could be and was
subdivided endlessly so
that all received a portion.
This practice was forbid-
den as small land holdings
became uneconomical and
land scarce. Later it was
the obligation of the
farmer to "settle" only one
son "on the land".
A young man looking
for a young lady would
work through his friends
and from friends to rela-
tives with the setting for.
such discussions being the
markets or public houses.
Eventually all families be-
come involved. Once a
lady is recommended the
man will send a "speaker"
to her to determine her
fortune and suitability. If
the speaker and the
woman's family are con-
vinced that it would be a
good match the speaker
will be given a go ahead to
"draw it down" He re-
turns to the young man's
house and arranges a
meeting between the two
fathers and the young
man.


At the meeting the first
drink is called by the
young man: the second b.
the \oung lad\'s father
\\ ho then asks the speaker
of the dowry price. The
girl's father inquires as to
the nature of the home, the
farm the li\ stock and the
situation of the farm.
Ho\% many cow s. sheep
horses? What sort of gar-
den? What sort of water
supply? Is it far from the
road or on it? What kind
of house and what sort of
roof- slate or thatch?
Near a chapel a school?
If a nice place and
eight cows near the road
the fortune of 350 pounds
may be asked. The Young
lady's father offers 250
then the father throws off
50. Then the speaker di-
vides the 50 between
them so now its 275 then


drink until intoxicated.
After the fortune is ar-
ranged they then set a
place and time for the
young people to see one
another. The \oung lady
takes her friends, brother,.
mother and father. The
young man takes his
friends and the speaker.
If they like each other
they \\ill set a date to
come see the land. If
things aren't right they
simply say they do not suit
not revealing details.
The day before the
girl's people come to see
the land, preparations for
a feast are made. Geese
are killed the house white-
washed whiskey and por-
ter bought. The cows are
fed and sometimes cows
are borrowed -to make
things look good.
The girl's family comes


,'fr !
' .
. .,-,/
LA)---^.


the young man insists on
300- but maybe he will
think of it.... if she is a
good housekeeper, They


SPECIAL DISCOUNTS,
TO ALL
BRIDES
-UNTIL JUNE THE 30TH, 2005



I-..A.







Co. .. 1 .



JEWELLERY
INCORPORATED
49 Years Of Quality Craftmanship

5 Robb Street, Robbstown, Georgetown, Guyana.
oTeJl 226 1556 Fax:.225 1171 E-mail: corrjew@guyana.net.gy
S ...... .. f .-


and the land is.walked.
The young man sends his
best friend to show the
girl's father round making
sure the bad points are not
shown.
If the girl's father likes
the land he will join in the
feast until night. The next
day they go to the attorney
to get the writings be-
tween the parties con-'
cluded. The father agrees
to sign over the land. Af-
ter that the wedding can
go forward.
In ancient Ireland it
is said to have been the
custom for the man to
give the woman he
wanted to marry a
bracelet woven of
human hair. Her
acceptance of it was
symbolic of accepting
the man, linking her to
him for life. The use of
some strands of hair in
love-lockets, usually
curled into a circle, has
been a custom down to
modern times. In the
bracelet, as in the
ring, there the circle -
the link symbolizing
union unbroken without
ejidj *.-


r







I Wedig uplmet unayJne1220


Marriage can be a strange
thing indeed but you would
never think that it can get as
strange as it sometimes does.
The following fast facts prove
that matrimony can be an in-
sane thing indeed.
In Yorkshire and
Lincolnshire in England, at
one time a plate of bride-cake
was flung over the. new
wife's head as she returned
from church, and omens
were read from the way the
plate broke. The more the
pieces it shattered into, the
happier the marriage was
foretold to be.

Jewish women of the
Hasidim sect believe that the


were aged 82 when they fi-
nally got round to getting
married.

The oldest recorded
bride was Minnie Munro,
who got hitched at a
sprightly 102 years of age.
Minnie, from Australia, wed
a toy boy of 82. Britain's
oldest recorded bride was
just one day off her 100th
birthday when she took her
vows with a man nearly 20
years her junior.

As for grooms, Harry
Stevens was 103 when he
married 84 year old Thelma
Lucas at the Caravilla Retire-
ment Home in Wisconsin


in 1965.

Richard and Carole
Roble, a pair of New Yorkers,
enjoy marrying each other so
much they have taken their
vows an incredible 55 times.
To add a little variety into
proceedings they have car-
ried out each ceremony in
different locations, including
all the states in America.

It was the largest mass
wedding in history, took
place when nearly 35,000
couples all got married on
the same day in 1995 via sat-
ellite linkup. The ceremony
was performed by Unifica-
tion Church leader, Sun


Mad Matrimony


The bill for the reception
to beat all receptions came in
at 22 million pounds. The
event was held in a purpose-
built stadium in Dubai and
lasted seven days. It was
held to celebrate the wedding
of a sheik's son.

Wedding dresses can
make a major dent in your
budget, but however much


way to beat the longest
wedding dress train, which
steamed in at a massive 157m
(515ft) in Germany.


you spend it will be nothing
compared to the outfit cre-
ated by French designer
Helene Gainville. Estimated
to be worth a cool 3.5 mil-
lion, the dress is embroi-
dered with diamonds
mounted on platinum.

If expense is not your
thing then size might be. But
you would have to go a long


.... .. ~A NA


P.O. B P1147,.
Georgetown-


Tel: (592) 225 2856
Fax: (592) 225 3703


I do, I do, I do, I do, I do, I do...one of Reverend Sun Myung Moon's mass marriage
ceremonies.


only person who should ever
see their hair once they are
married is their husband.
And in fact he may only see
it on their wedding night.
After this she shaves her
head and wears wigs for the
rest of her life.

Not so long ago, in
Mohanpur, India, a four year
old girl married a stray dog
in a traditional Hindu ser-
vice. The ceremony was
prompted by an astrologer
who told the girl's father it
would transfer the evil ef-
fects of the planet Saturn
from the girl on to the dog.

Each year in Swaziland,
tens of thousands of young
women gather to dance be-
fore their king, Mswati I I in
.the hope of being chosen as
his latest bride. The girls
spend days preening and
practicing for the big event
and the chance to trade vil-
lage life for the royal palace.
Mswati took his 11lth wife
earlier this year.

Octavio Guillen and
Adriana Martinez had quite
possibly the world's longest
bethrotal This odd couple fi-
nally took the plunge after
being engaged for 67 years.
Both Octavia and Adriana


USA on December 3, 1984.

When it comes to matri-
monial longevity, Sir Temulji
Nariman and his wife Lady
Nariman were hitched for a
grand total of 86 years, al-
though they did have a dis-
tinct advantage over most
people. Both were aged just
five when they got married.

The longest recorded
marriage in Britain was 82
years, between James Bur-
gess and his wife Sarah Ann,
who were married in 1883


is
I


VV I n-I su niiily wIVes,
why is King Mswati III
smiling?

and stayed together until-Sa-
rah Ann's unfortunate death'


Myung Moon who sur-
passed his 1992 record of
25,000 couples. The former
record still holds in a sense
since all took place in Seoul.


.... For Unforgettable Moments
& Everlasting Memories

Engagement Parties
Weddings & Wedding Receptions
Honeymoons


For more information
visit our website at www.lemeridien-pegasus.com


A44





1'0*


RYAdip-IfWEL MOUSE


__


.GUYANAL'SE NG 4JW LRS FOR OVER 50 YEARS
137 Regent St., Lacytown. Tel: 226-2708


Grandfather Clock
An heirloom even when it's new is what people
will say about this 31 Day Grandfather Clock.
The beautifully ranted wood shows all the love
and attention given to fine furniture by craftsmen
who take pride in their work.






















Each clock includes a winding key and it
chimes the hour andonce on the half hour.
* The pendulum length adjusts to make the
clock run faster or slower. The total
measurement is 75 h x 22" w x 10 !A d


The person credited with
being married the most times is
strangely enough not Elizabeth
Taylor but former Baptist min-
ister Glynn Scotty Wolfe, who
has taken on 28 brides and di-
vorced 27 of them.


_


I ` '


- ,~-a~


Rh












WeddiR6






When it comes to getting married, people suffer from so much anxiety that some wonder whether the entire
When it comes to geLuckilyg time and tradition have conspired to produce some sure-fire ways of
thing is worth all the stress. quite literally on the right foot to matrimonial bliss. Though they may be
ouaranteeing that you set off quite liter y them as sound pre-nuptial advice.
referred to as "'superstitions" now, we prefer to term them as sound pre-nuptial=.advice.,


GUYANESE
WEDDING
SUPERSTITIONS

A bride should not look her
face in a mirror.
She must not see her
ring before the ceremony.
She should not see her


bridal costume before she
puts it on, on the day of the
wedding.
A bride should not dress
herself.
A bride should not bathe
herself, an old woman must
do this.
When she comes out of
the house she must not look


SRdhARMDS RE59(RT


SPECIAL

Sperfect gift for the perfect couple.


2 nights, 3 days (Sunday
to Tuesday) regular-
US$360.Book now for
speciall US$268. Includes
return road/boat transfers,
meals, soft drink bar,teal coffee facilities in rooms.
Complimentary Bottle of Wine


vs i j : 2 nights, 3 days (Sunday to
Sv Tuesday) regular- US$480.
Book now for special US$365.
.i 5 Includes return road/boat
transfers, meals, soft drink bar,tea/ coffee facilities in rooms.
Complimentary Bottle of Wine.


back.
She should not dress
in the matrimonial home
when she is going to be
married.
Before she gets into it,
rice and old shoes must be


The bride should not lie
first on the bed when they
go home after the wedding.
The i.. should dance
with every male present at
the reception.
When the bride is ready


JUST make sure it's the left shoe pussy eats out of.


thrown in the car which will
carry the bride to the church.
The car taking the bride
should drive straight to the
church without stopping
anywhere.
At the altar, the bride
should try to rise before her
husband; who gets up last
will die first.


AND SOME
EVEN WEIRDER
WEDDING
SUPERSTITIONS
FROM AROUND
THE WORLD

A week before the
wedding, it is considered
good luck to have a cat eat
out of your left shoe.
It is thought unlucky for
the bride to make her own
wedding dress.
The loan of a wedding
dress means good luck to
the borrower and bad luck
for the lender
It is lucky if the bride
finds a spider in her wedding
gown.
If there is a full moon one
to two days before the wed-
ding, your married life will be
filled with luck.
It is bad luck to see an
open grave, pig, or lizard, or
to hear a cockerel crow, on
your wedding day.
It is good luck to see a
rainbow, black cat, or chim-
ney sweep.
It is good luck for the
bride to take one look in the
mirror once she is fully at-
tired, but she should not look
again.
Wear earrings when you
are married and you will al-
ways be happy.
If candles are lit on your


wedding day, and they sput-
ter out, it means an evil spirit
is nearby.
If is considered bad luck
to say your wedding vows
when at the bottom of the
hour.
It brings more luck if the
groom arrives at the church
before the bride.
The bride should step
with her right foot first into
the church to ensure good
luck.
Chinese superstitions
state that carrying an open
red umbrella over the bride
will protect her from evil spir-
its.
If the bride sheds a
tear on her wedding day,
she will never cry again
for the duration of her
marriage
If the bride rips her wed-
ding dress on the day, it
means that the marriage will
end in death.
A combination of red and
white flowers should be
avoided, as they stand for
blood and bandages.
It is unlucky for a woman
to marry a man whose sur-
name began with the same let-
ter as hers: "To change the
name and not the letter, Is to
change for the worst and not
the better."
It is unlucky for the
bride to step into her new
home with the left foot
first.


to leave the reception, she
should not walk out, some-
body should dance her to the
door, while the husband
waits on the steps.
If the bride gives her
handkerchief to any of the
bridesmaids that bridesmaid
will marry next.
A married person should
not take the bride to the
church.
The bride should not
decorate her matrimonial
home.
The bride and groom
should leave the reception
hall before the guests.
The wedding cake must
not be cut and served until
the third day after the wed-
ding.
The elderly relatives
must go to the matrimonial
home and do the domestic
chores for the bride for at
least three days.


.... .




IN CHINA, a red umbrella comes in handy in protecting
the bride against evil spirits.





SeKIn & uiflInS&fol
d EWEL L E RS
Jewellers for over 35 years
226 B Camp Street,
SNorth Cummingsburg,
Georgetown
Tel: (592) 225-7201, 227-3214
Fax: (592) 227-5022




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs