Title: Guyana chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00016
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Alternate Title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown Guyana
Publication Date: May 1, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088915
Volume ID: VID00016
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text

7
I I ~f
&9~ s~J I k' ~/)~


,/
*^ j r
';


The Chronicle is at http://www.guyanachronicle.com


A TICKET TO YOUR
DREAMS!
RESULTS HOTLINE 225-8902


MAN SUES "Copyrighted Material
NA C~L Syndicated Content 0.
Available from Commercial News Providers"
........... ..Pr v. .


Ar


,~.;: ~


Motorcyclist
found with
9mm pistol
POLICE manning a
roadblock in the city
late Friday night found a
loaded gun...


Best Wishes to all the Workers of Guyana on Directo gement and Staff

There is strength insoliarity Group of Companies
I.-r There is strength, in solidarity _. c. .e .,ne~e


A


-H--:X


t^'


3..
'** "


~-


.. 4d






2 .... CH.QNI.E ; 1, 2005


SUniversal to fly

Guyana-Canada route


~l~iiI


UNIVERSAL Airlines Inc.
has announced that it has
been granted a licence by the
Canadian Transportation
Agency (CTA) to operate
scheduled international
flights between Canada and
Guyana.
Universal Vice President
Mark De Freitas, in a press re-
lease, said the airline plans to
offer flights on the route from









C: .2- ,","'.


without joining long lines!

Use your phone to pay your phone bill with
the touch tone service of these banks:

DEMERARA BTI
J6BANK V4 GBT
L I M I T E D "I -II ,


(ITIZEN's BaNK


NATIONAL BANK
OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE LIMITED


Call your Bank & find out how


DATE FOR OUTSTANDING BALANCES ON YOUR
MARCH 2005 BILL IS
SUNDAY MAY 8, 2005
AND THE SECOND SUNDAY IN EVERY MONTH


June this year.
He said Universal had ap-
plied to the CTA to operate a
scheduled international service
between Hamilton, Ontario and
Guyana after Guyana and
Canada signed a bilateral air ser-
vice agreement in January this
year.
"The CTA has granted the
application and issued a licence
to Universal Airlines to operate
the route subject to the provi-
sions of the Guyana/Canada bi-
lateral air agreement", he said.
Mr De Freitas explained
that the accord required the
G u'. i n.. (-o ', inell inI i,. 0 C l,2-
natc ., cdrrici r 1 ill. ,a-rccnilnt
and pi,-, ide loi t.'u! ckl'I
fligiiht ih local I i alli fi,..mn
Canajd.a i an inierini di.lte
point t
Tic GuLin.1ai G. ci iIeiien
has -ii e Jde,'ign.ir d i_ iici ial
Ailinc. in accO.:l dane ,,1 '. 1 it h.1
agreenicni. he :.ud


He added that Universal has
chosen New York as its inter-
mediate point in the United
States.
According to De Freitas, the
U.S. Department of Transpor-
tation last year granted author-
ity to Universal Airlines to op-
erate foreign air transportation
of passengers, property and
mail over the route Georgetown,
Guyana New York (JFK) and
beyond New York to Hamilton,
with local traffic rights between
New York and Hamilton,
Ontario.
"This means that Universal
A- l[ ll.c ; '. l | 1, 11' Il,-: c
Ii. .hl ,:, I1'., pj,,engcl,- , L,' e' _, ,
N oC '1 1 J. l a d. i 1-1.L M Ill.I -i
m.In riu. C.in.ida lie ,.aid
He reported that the
Gusana Civil A\iation Au-
Ilioriti has granted rights to
Universal .Airlines to operate
on the (.u ana-Hamiilon.
Ontario route.


To Celebrate the 167TH Anniversary
of Indian Arrival in Guyana.


Monday May 2nd National Park
Thursday May 5th -Albion Sports Complex


Sunday


(Berbice)
May 8th -Anna Regina Community
Centre Ground (Essequibo)


= ..-.. -Celia Samaroo, Anand Persaud :
Rocky Persaud,Mahendra Ramkellawan & others

Dances by the-Sitare & Tarana Dance
troops, the Indian Cultural Centre & others

Free Admission to the National p#ik

Dedicated to those affected by the ._oods


Berbice & Essequibo *^- .

o coho aAllowedpc


THE Organi :
can Statei~s t(T a ..,
nouniced th"atr l..Ill y'
monitors frt't ay eec-'
tions in, Spint ii-
bers of the'e ioM"si sii-
bly and district cuils
The organism n press"
release, s d; it wi 'it
ing the polls tider gree-'
iienits i ned Frid.Ay L J O.AS
]lc,,dquii.iucr? in \\m lun.pt,,n
One l me ag rcemienti -
leriaiu ing t. the elecioial pr,:,-
cc, nHslt in ,:lics the OAS
the Surmri.miie, Home .ii Afr
Miniitr,. .rd [he- Independcni
Electoral Ctninri .'ion r .I
Sunnam- ic
The other agreement s'ets
out the tennsT of reference as-
%\ell a. pnLi.lce a.nd iunmln ii-
nieC t10 be aLL.rded the OAS
tleaim oh.er. oii t he -'IctioOn., time
orLanih 'ltin d t hd
Memnjbci- elected to the Na-


tional Assembly will later this
year select the country's presi-
dent and vice president.
Ambassador Corinne
McKnight, a Trinidad and To-
bago diplomat, has been desig-
nated Chief of Mission for the
OAS observer team that will
monitor the election process and
report its findings.
Signing for his government,
Suriname's Ambassador to the
OAS, Henry L. Illes, welcomed
the agreements as once again
putting focus on the relation-
ship between the OAS and
Suriname.
The OAS said he com-
mended the organisation for its
longstanding, positive role in
monitoring electoral processes in
member states.
Brian Stevenson, OAS Ex-
ecutive Secretary for Integral
Development, who signed on
behalf of acting Secretary Gen-
eral Luigi R. Einaudi, said that
observing elections was "one of
the fundamental roles" of the
organisation.
Stevenson reiterated the
ambassador's observations,
remarking that the OAS was
proud of its record in observ-
ing elections "particularly
because it reinforces the ties
and the partnership between
the organisation and its
member states."


Consultations

on IMC

continue

Tuesday
THE government is con-
tinuing consultations with
Georgetown residents on
whether the City Council
should be replaced by an
Interim Management
Commillttee (IMC).
.: The Government Infor-
;mation Agency (GINA) said
!Minister of Culture, Youth
and Sport, Gail Teixeira,
chaired a .es'.,on Friday
night at the Kingston High
School
It said she explained to
the residents that the gov-
ernment *. a'. not demanding
that there be an IMC but
,.- following President
Bharrat Jagdeo's request to
get their views on what
should be done about the in-
efficiencies and unsatisfac-
tory performance of the
council over years.
She stated that during
(Please see page three)


I I


FREE TICKET 2005-04-30
LETTER BONUS BALL


A


DRAW DATE

BIG-D

323


RESULTS
2005-04-30

MIlD-D LITTLE-D


927


651


Playde
2 Dream


COW


'lily
-Million$ plus
MONDAY 2005-04-25
TUESDAY


14


WEDNESDAY 2005-04-27 20


08 20

09 11


THURSDAY 2005-04-28 17 23 24
FRIDAY 2005-04-29 07 18 13
SATURDAY 2005-04-30 17 20 09


. I I I I . ..I I.I .. I .II..I.i.


S i r AC t r-
(-\f~~r' *.\ "^r"\PA"


RESULTS


13 01

01 25
07 26
04 23
26 02


::~:


;:::._::: ::


o f, 1 1 11 11 1 11 1 1 1 1


. I I I i I I





-Sb~DAYCl~lO~lI~vay-l,- 2605-


BLOCKED: garbage dumped at the Avenue of the Republic
and Robb Street, Georgetown. (Delano Williams photo)



Steel pans


for North


West school
EDUCATION Minister Dr Henry Jeffrey has fulfilled a
promise to students of the North West Secondary School
in Mabaruma, Region One (Barima/Waini) with the recent
handing over of steel pans to the school.
The Government Information Agency (GINA) said the min-
ister had promised in October last year to provide the instru-
ments for students to enhance their musical capacity.
The steel pans were handed over to the students by Re-
gional Chairman Norman Whittaker, the agency said.
Following this, Roy Geddes who leads the Roy Geddes Steel
Orchestra, spent one week in the region introducing interested
students to the instruments.
Meanwhile, the agency said the school has also received
a 6.25 KVA Coleman generator donated by the AMCAR
firm at the request of the Regional Chairman's office.



Consultations on...


(From page two)
the January floods, scores
of Georgetown citizens turned
up at the President's official
State House residence saying
they were dissatisfied with the
council's performance, GINA
reported.
Ms Teixeira also noted that
several citizens had been com-
plaining about the neglect by
the council over the years, the
agency said.
As a result, she said the
President was concerned about
the situation and instructed that
consultations be held with citi-
zens to solicit their views on the
issue.
According to GINA, she
noted that Georgetown was
faced with several problems and
the consultations would also
provide citizens with the op-
portunity to suggest what could
be done and how they think


SFOR RENT



Space 800 sq. ft.
Prime location -
91 Middle Street, South
C i i ,.,rg. Geogetown.

Call: 226-5903 (0)
[ 226:6229 (R)_


matters in their specific areas
affecting. them could be re-
solved.
One resident participating
in the consultation stated that
he does not think the council
should remain, since it has not
been pulling its weight, GINA
said.
The agency said another
resident attempted to provide
alternative measures that could
be taken to resolve the issues in
the city, especially with regard
to its management.
Some residents preferred to
listen, with some admitting that
they did not fully understand
the local government process, it
added.
The consultations will
continue in Alberttown,
Agricola and East Ruimveldt
on Tuesday, it said.

r'. .=- .1


lit h pur,-i- (]d
In 't \\ill It.i [ n o I
lhat laIss. II
liniJih%
4:6-S


ALARM BELLS: flood waters in Good Hope, East Coast Demerara yesterday.


p


ALARM bells went up yester-
day after parts of
Georgetown and the East
Coast Demerara were flooded
following early morning
rains.
The avenue on Main Street,
Georgetown, was flooded and
water covered some parts of the
street.
Other sections of the city
were also under water up to
mid-afternoon and many drains
clogged with debris overflowed.
Streets in South and North
Ruimveldt, and Bel Air Park,
Georgetown we're also flooded.
Flood waters also covered
parts of Good Hope and other
villages on the East Coast
Demerara which were among
the areas hardest hit in the di-
sastrous January floods.
With the destruction of
those floods still fresh in their
minds, residents around
Georgetown and on the East


Aw
Coasi Demerara were yesterday
wondering about their fate if the
May/June rains are anything
near the record January down-
pours.
The floods spawned by the
January rains the heaviest in
more than 100 years triggered
the country's worst natural di-
saster and affected more than
360,000 people in Regions
Three (West Demerara/
Essequibo Islands), Four
(Demerara/Mahaica) and Five
(Mahaica/Berbice).
The flood damage forced
the government to declare disas-
ter zones in the three coastal re-
gions and to launch an appeal
for international help to cope
with the crisis.
Officials have said that mea-
sures -are in place to clear
blocked drainage canals and
outfalls 'ahead of the May/June
rains to avoid a repeat of the
January\ flood, but residents


L ensr '-,7Cf"
U F T I C It% L "'-" '
40 Croal Street, Stabroek
Tel: 223-5865
Come & choose among ournew arrivals:
A Rimeless at the lowest cost.
A All types of RX Lenses:
Transitions &
. Progressives, etc.

One (1) hour service available.'

[ Free frames for kids & senior citizens.
4t. ;,,," ,_,.- ', ./ 4./ / r .
............


fear there is still a long .way to
go.
Some said there was not
much comfort from what they


saw in the rising waters in
and around the city after the
early morning rains yester-
day.


Motorcyclist found


with 9mm pistol
POLICE manning a roadblock in the city late Friday night
found a loaded gun on a motorcyclist.
The man was stopped and searched around 23:45 h at the
roadblock on Sheriff Street in the vicinity of the Botanical Gar-
dens, police said in a press release yesterday.
He was found with a 9mm pistol loaded with a live round
and was arrested.







InternatioiU y Ucognieein
mIploam in Coupater Stmiles
Certificate Courses ($5000 each)
1.Windows 2000/XP & Internet Operations (Beginners).
2. Word 3. Excel 4. Access 5. PowerPoint 2000/XP

Diploma in Computerized Accounting
1. Service Business Acct. 2. Merchandise Acct, $5000 ea,
3. QuickBooks Acct. $7000 4. Peachtree $7000
Diploma in Computer Repairs & Networking
1. Hardware 2. Software & Networking $12000 each.
Diploma in Desktop Publishing & Webpage Design.
1. PowerPoint-$5000 2.CorelDraw-$7000
3.Webpage Design $7000 4. Adobe Photoshop ($7,000)
Diploma in Computerized Office Admin & Accounting
1. Word 2. Excel 3. Outlook 4. QuickBooks or Peachtree

** Courses Begin May 7, 10, 11 & 14 **









rJ~!!0 ~V


1i


SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1, 2005

I* /^ "


vem


bodi


to


- Q -
-
-~ 9-.
* ~- ..~ ~
* ~
- -~ S
a _
-a -


- ow
- *-. m-ma


"Copyrighted Material



y ^Syndicated Content --:_.-

Available from Commercial News Providers"


-- pswm -"WW


- *a b. e a f


- -- m Af.0- --
.Nump040 wSf- -0 o
-m-- asof IP *


ob o 4 IS 0 4
4bamp. s


..oo


~--0
* S
S


* ~ S .0


- --
- a -


0 ~ 0 0
S S ___ 0
- .5 .5 - a - S
-0 0. ~ 0 0
- 0 0 0 ~
0 - 0
0
* S
0~ -- S a
-0 0 -
-
S - -0
-


*0
0 - -- 5.-a
* 5. -
~.
0


- a
a


Diamond New Scheme, EBD
(Front Section)
3 bedrooms, master bedroom
self-contained
Large living & dining rooms
Spacious yard, black tanks
Security fence, security lights
3-car driveway

Call Donna
23345397 8 am, to 4 pm.


*0 w f


- a


a a
--0


b- a- ft
S S Now
-- g0


K .OO TRADING COMPANY LIMITED
: 2000 Model,
fully loaded, 27 000 miles, one owner/driver $5 Million
Serious enquiries Call Tel. # 660-2854.

*- -. -.A-.% _

House and land situated a
Lot 199 Charity
.. Essequibo Coast
SNB: Riverfront View

Serious enquiries can call telephone nos.
771-4180 or 223-5274


43 Croal St.
Tel: 231-5602; 624-5814
For the best movies
Sale <$8O each


GP-4


Sales Girls, Porters &
Security Guards.
Apply: Anand's Regent, Athina's
& Avinash Water Street.
Call: 226-3361/22-7829


IU DR. J. F, EVERTSZ >
Dermatologist (Skin Specialist)
will be in Guyana on


_Clinics will be held on those days at Mercy Hospital.
--For more information
--? please call Mercy Hospital at
S.;-227-2071-5


lb














4b l


410 *- q* m
4100400 0 q*

40 a db fta
_______0 411mlm


U.


40 bo- -4





-.0wlom a
4dmmw


4 l- "m
a*mui ONEa a. a


d-p

4=
0
om-momp
- 4b


a
-
-
- a


~iiiE
*


w 'a -
- - -
-a
- a a 'a- -
'a -a


W-0 0 opyrightedsMaterial --
,--,0 -- son = &-MG o mp ..w, a-4


%-mo -- Sndicated Content" ;- 9".


Available from Commercial News Providers"

_~= M loa m 10a a


- 4b -Maio Nmm .


qwsomam
40 40- omm
fto= W MO
410 0 *m b4


a Olo m


m ft-- W-II WI






b.. Now-

4b.- 4b~

'aw


- .w.

- a4w





a M-


4b 4b.


a.
a ~ -. -
a a a -
a a -
__ ~ a-
b - 'a -
40 - a
'a
* .5 a
p. - a.
a
a
-- 'a -
0
'a - ee S


TWO TRANSPORTED PROPERTIES LOCATED AT

JOHANNA CECELIA, ESSEQUIBO COAST

1 Building measuring 240' x 28' x 10' is already partitioned for retail
or wholesale space, offices and warehouse. Building comprises of
drop ceiling, tiled floor and show cases, is completely grilled and
serviced by all utilities.
2nd Building measuring 60' x 50' x 14' is suitable for warehousing and
is located on an adjacent lot with separate access designed for cargo
vehicles. Lot also includes parking for 6 trucks.
These properties were previously occupied by COURTS LTD and
consideration'will be given to persons wiling to lease sections of the
buildingss.
Interested parties can Call: 226-2306 or 623-8588 for further
..information.


a
a
'a


- nm -


4b w mao






4*om0 4b doom 4
q0 r = Up : 0 401
OW MWO 461 40
.00 'm -


k Oft


-~ 1 ~ -L~C- -C 1


wo


o


o


91LA


I






6 SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1, 2005


Editorial )



WELCOME


RESPONSES


ON BELIZE
W E BEGIN by extending warmest May Day greetings
to all our readers as trade unions gear themselves
for various activities to mark this memorable event cel-
ebrated worldwide as a national holiday.
It comes at a time of serious internal problems for one
leading affiliate of the Guyana Trades Union Congress -
the Guyana Public Service Union (GPSU).
It is faced with threatened legal action for alleged
electoral malpractices at its just-concluded election of of-
fice bearers, and in particular that of its President, Patrick.
Yarde.
We hope those directly involved could peacefully re-:
solve, in a practical manner, the problem on hand so that
the welfare of innocent members of the public service is
in no way compromised.
It is also our hope that the disunity that prevails
within the GTUC as a consequence of the withdrawal
of leading affiliates, and which has long exposed a


basic weakness in the labour movement, could be.
seriously addressed and resolved before another
May Day.
At the same time, we wish to revisit the issue of last
Sunday's editorial on 'Crisis.in'Belize', by commending
the Permanent Council of'.the Organisation of American
States (OAS) for the resolution unanimously approved
at its sessiontlast Wednesday *condemning attempts to
destabilise the legitimate government of that CARICOM
member country. Also encouraging was the "concerns"
expressed by CARICOM.
Against the backdrop of open confrontation between
the government of Prime Minister Said Musa, the oppo-
sition United Democratic, Party and trade unions, disrup-
tion of transportation, electricity and telecommunication
services, and, open threats to force the administration out
of office, we stated:*
"Both the OAS and CARICOM have an obligation also
to pay close attention to the civil unrest in Belize before
they are left to simply conduct a political post mortem for
academic interest..."
It is appreciated that the resolution approved by the
Permanent Council involved the member nations of our
Community.
The resolution expressed the Council's "full and de-
cisive support for theconstitutional government of Belize
led by'Prime Minister Musa, and for the democratic in-
stitutions in Belize".
It further condemned "the use of violence and any
actions that .threaten democracy, governance and the
rule of law in'Belize" and reiterated its "categorical re-
jection of any action that.disrupts the democratic order..."
The following day, April 28, a statement released from
the Bureau of CARICOM, currently headed by President


Runaldo Venetiaan of Suriname, expressed "alarm at the
reports of violence, looting and deliberate acts of sabo-
tage" that had affected the personal security of the
people of Belize and result in "a negative impact on its
economy".
It further urged all Belizeans to "respect the rule of
law, to abide by the constitution of Belize and to engage
in the process of dialogue in order to resolve in the na-,
tional interest, such outstanding issues as confront the
nation..."
This newspaper remains hopeful that better judge-
ment will prevail among the disputing parties. Instead of
confrontational politics, strenuous efforts must be made
by the government arid those directly involved in the
original row over ownership shares in the Belize Tele-
communications Limited (BTL), to speedily and peace-
fully arrive at a compromise.




CHRONICLE

Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Sunday Editor: MNlichelle Nurse
Editorial: 227-5216: 227-5204: 22-63243-9
Sports: 225-7174
Alter hours 226-3243-9
Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is at ww.guyanachronicle.com
e-mail address sundayeditor@guyanachronicle.com
Lama Aenue. Bel Air Park. Georgeloi n, Guyana.


Cubana bomb tragedy off



Barbados new focus on U.S.A.


J5 ir' Il


THIS May Day weekend,
when the Caribbean reflects
on the gains, losses and chal-
lenges for workers and the
social and economic ills to be
overcome, Cuba plans on also
making it an occasion to ex-
pose a significant contradic-
tion in America's "war on ter-
rorism" that directly relates
to our region.
The contradiction is associ-
ated with the protection afforded
by two U.S. administrations of
two Cuban 6migr6s who were the
reported masterminds in the
bombing of a Cubana passenger
aircraft over Barbados airspace


on October 6, 1976, resulting in
the horrific tragedy of the deaths
of all 73 people on board.
Countries with an interest in
that human tragedy would include
Cuba, U.S.A., Venezuela,
Trinidad and Tobago and Barba-
dos.
Among the dead were 53


Cubans; 11 Guyanese and. five
North Koreans on their way to
Havana having started out from
Guyana with stops at Piarco In-
ternational in Trinidad and To-
bago and Grantley Adams Inter-
national in Barbados.
In 1998, Barbados dedicated
a sea-front monument in St.
James to the victims of the trag-
edy with President Fidel Castro
as an honoured guest for the oc-
casion.
But why, 29 years after that
first-ever massive terrorist bomb-
ing tragedy in the Greater Carib-
bean, has the Cuban President's
government decided to place spe-
cial focus on this May Day
of 2005, an exposure of U.S.
protection of two Cuban
Smigr6s linked with that
shocking Cubana disaster?
The short answer is
that if the world's sole su-
. perpower is honest in its
current war against all forms
of terrorism and in bringing
.:' all terrorists to justice, then
Cuba, which has so often
suffered from terrorism
hatched and executed from
U.S. soil, wants to remind
more than Caribbean na-
E tions of the protection be-
. ing afforded by America of
two wanted Cuban 6migres
who were major players in
that Cubana tragedy.
Cuba's argument, to be ar-
ticulated at a planned massive
rally today in Havana, is that
America cannot selectively pro-
tect Cuban 6migr6s wanted for
documented terrorist activities,
such as the Cubana tragedy, while
adopting a self-righteous posi-
tion on the war against terror-


The two Cuban 6migr6s,
Orlando Bosch and Luis Poasada
Carriles, have been both ex-
tended, at different periods, pro-
tection by U.S. authorities al-
though it was publicly known
that they had been repeatedly
engaged in terrorist activities and
linked as anti-Castro collabora-
tors with the CIA.

VENEZUELA
CONNECTION
Venezuela, under the leader-
ship of President Hugo Chavez,


I


PRESIDENT CARLOS
ANDRES PEREZ


has also recently shown an in-
terest in reviving prosecutorial
investigation into the Cubana
tragedy.
Bosch had received a "par-
don" from former President
George Bush, after he was facili-
tated in leaving Venezuela for


Miami following a controversial
judicial ruling and before an ap-
peal.
And just over a month ago,
while his son, President George
W. Bush, contin-
ues his "war on .*
terrorism", Posada
was facilitated in
arriving in the RICI
U.S.A. from
Panama, report-
edly with the help
of a Miami-based
businessman.
Posada had been arrested in
November 2000 in Panama,
along with another anti-
Castro militant, for plot-
ting to assassinate the Cu-
ban President during an
Ibero-American Summit in
Panama. Prior to that, he
was also wanted for the
murder of the Cuban Am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions, Felix Garcia, on Sep-
tember 11, 1980, in New
York.
Question: Where in the
U.S.A. are Bosch and
Posada today, and how are.
they being facilitated to
freely travel, but kept far
from the reach of the Cu-
ban government for crimes
committed against Cuba?
The two had been ex-
posed by naturalised Ven-
ezuelans Hernan Ricardo
Lozano and Freddie Lugo im-
plicated in planting of the fatal
bomb on the Cubana aircraft as
their "principals" operating out
of Venezuela.
As intelligence reports and
two Barbadian taxi drivers were
to subsequently confirm, follow-


ing earlier confessions by
Lozano and Lugo to Trinidadian
police; their planners for the trag-
edy in Venezuela were Bosch
and Posada.

MURDER OF CHILE'S
ENVOY
Prior to the Cubana tragedy,
Bosh and his 'Commando of


United Revolutionary
Organizations' (CORU), which
was also directly implicated in
the Cubana tragedy of 1976, had
been involved with Chile's intel-
ligence service, DINA. in the as-
sassination of the Chilean Am-


Row' (Pantheon Books 1980).
At the time of the Cubana
tragedy, many controversial le-
gal issues were raised about why
the then Venezuela government
felt that the captured bombing
duo of Lozano and Lugo should
face trial either in Trinidad and
Tobago or Barbados.
For their part, Trinidad and
Tobago settled to
\ expel Lozano and
*Lugo to Venezuela;
S and Barbados
shared intelligence
and other relevant
information in its
,,' possession for the
initial'investiga-
tion in which the U.S.A. had re-
quested and given a presence.
Subsequently, however,
the U.S.A.- failed to respond
to an appeal made in Novem-
ber 1976 by then Venezuela
President. Carlos Andres
Perez. for cooperation
Fin dispelling allega-
tions of America's in-
volvement with the
Cubana tragedy.
Later. Washington
was to claim non-in-
volvement and, there-
fore, had no information
to share.
This then, is the


"4 scenario involving two
Cuban imigres linked
, i. to the Cubana tragedy
S/ and the U.S.A. which,
while seeking to
mobilise the world to
i fight "terrorism", pro-
tects two known ter-
President Hugo Chavez tects two known ter-
rorists in keeping with
bassador to Washington, Or- its own "war against
lando Letelier. Castroism", and from whose
There is an entire chapter territory acts of terrorism and
devoted to this in the inspiring aggression continue against
investigative journalism of John Cuba, a member nation of the
Dinges and Saul Laundau in their Association of Caribbean
'Assassination on Embassy States (ACS).


AA,





SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1, 2005 '


am


boat


FORGET cars and bikes and
horse carts and donkey carts I
am buying a boat.


I am not taking any chances
- not after the floods in
Georgetown and rising water on
the East Coast Demerara again
yesterday.
Sure it rained and there
was thunder and lightning early
yesterday morning. But it
rained heavier before and people
on the Guyana coast have seen
worse thunderstorms before
without their yards and streets
being flooded.
Yet it rained off and on for
a few hours before dawn yes-


terday and the floods rose again.
The question on
everybody's lips yesterday, as
they surveyed the flooded
streets in the city and watched
flood waters creeping into parts
of Good Hope and other vil-
lages on the East Coast
Demerara was 'What's going to
happen when the May/June
rains come?'
Me I am buying a boat.
I simply do not believe
those in authority who have
been trying to assure those who


have been through the January/
February floods that measures
are being taken to avoid a repeat
of the country's worst natural
disaster.
How can you believe them
when streets in the city are
flooded after a couple hours of
rain and Saturday shoppers have
to play hop scotch on make-
shift planks to get in and out of
stores?
I already have a pair of long
boots, an umbrella and a rain-
coat and I am looking around for
a boat.
'Paddling in a canoe to and
from work, or going shopping or
to a restaurant or nightclub in a
boat seems the way to go.
All that paddling though


could be tough work, so maybe
I'll buy an outboard engine to
go with the canoe.
I'll also probably build a
little shed on the boat to serve
as shelter from the rain or sun
as I move around.
I hear they make some of
the best canoes in the Pomeroon
so I may head there to check
them out.
The more I think about it,
this idea about buying a boat
becomes all the more appealing.
Think about it the traffic
lights in Georgetown do not
work; there are potholes in
many streets and a lot of money
has to be spent on patching and
fixing; driving is a nightmare and
accidents occur almost daily;
the City Council seems unable
to get its act together so the gov-
ernment is thinking about re-
placing it with an Interim Man-
agement Committee; and, of
course, when it rains, there are
floods.
So why not just flood the
city all year round and make


boats the main means of trans-
port?
There will be no need for
traffic lights; accidents could be
drastically reduced; the council
or the Interim Management
Committee (was it Shakespeare
who said a garbage dump would
by any other name smell just
as...?) will not have to spend
money on patching potholes and
fixing streets; there will be no
need for garbage collection as
citizens could simply dump
their waste in the water flow-
ing around them; and so on and
so forth.
The boating possibilities are
endless instead of cars, 4x4s,
trucks, mini-buses, vans, motor-
cycles and bicycles zipping by,
there will be boats of all kinds.
The taxi services could
switch to water taxis; the mini-
bus operators could move into
fast-powered boats like those
plying the Demerara River and
Essequibo River routes; the rich
could have luxury yachts; the
others could have little sailing


boats, inflatable dinghies or ca-
noes.
We could all be happy boat-
ing around, waving to each other
as we cruise by on our way to
and from work or to and from
play or shopping at floating
malls.
Don't you just love the
idea?
After all, the rains won't go
away, and in spite of all the
grand talk about what's being
done to avoid a repeat of the
January disaster, the floods
seem here to stay.
So, we are all in the same
boat.
We've been through the
January floods, we're in floods
every time it rains, and God help
us if the May/June rains are
heavy.
We shouldn't wait until
then and hope that God will
send a Noah to guide us out of
our travails on an ark.
The signs are already theie.
I am shopping around for
a boat.


SHOPPING FOR A BOAT? Shoppers on Main Street, Georgetown, yesterday. (Delano
Williams photo)

CARIBBEAN RESOURCES LIMITED (CRL)


VACANCIES

Caribbean Resources Limited have embarked on a Major Rehabilitation
Programme. Expected shortly, is the equipment to revitalize the company's
Production.
CRL has vacancies for






Remuneration will be in accordance with experience oras otherwise negotiated.
Please make applications to:
"Operators"
Att: General Manager
P.O. Box 10608
Caribbean Resources Limited
Plantation Houston
East Bank Demerara
Post or alternately deliver to the security Office at the gate to our facility at
Houston, EBD (Old Guyana Timbers Compound., South of the Gafoor's Houston
Complex.)
Applicants please state age, experience, and expected remuneration.


THE FOLLOWING PERSONS ARE ASKED TO COME INTO,

JUMBO.JET AUTO SALES IN CONNECTION FOR PAYMENT OVERDUE,


Name Address
David Dixton for Advance Collected on 9th Dec. 2004. Previously
employed at Ultratech Sign Works Inc.
Or Creative Advertising & Marketing Services.
Davnanand Dookie 162 Zeeburg, W.C. Demerara.
Roger Stanley Hinds 111 Miles Madhia.
Jose P. F. Lima 38 Cummings St. South C/burg.
Beerdat Harrinandan 115 Lethem. Region 9.
Abiola Smyth/Alwyn Bhino 51 Blue Mountain, Richmond Hill. Linden.
Andrew & Cleopatra Famey Long Creek, Soesdyke. Linden Highway.
Harnaraine Chiranji 26 #2, Settlement Blairmont
Amardat Persaud De Hoop Mahaica E.C. Dem.
Yougool Cedarry 81 Vergenoegen, East Bank Demerara.
Leyland I. Cruikshanks Lot 1 Craig & Middle Sts. C/ville.
Abdul F. Hamid Bengal Farm C/tyne
Handel S. Garnett Lot 88 Vigilance East Coast Demerara.
George Poon Port Kaituma, Turn Basin.




uM-BO-JET AUTO SALES


I '92 .


bu i -





8 -SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1,2005


Are we giving





value to what we




are celebrating?


TODAY marks the official
opening of this year's 10th
Linden Town Day celebra-
tions, but more important,
Linden is commemorating its
35th anniversary as a town-
ship.
The ceremonial opening
takes place once more in the
compound of the Linden Town


A Joe -hap


known as a town.
What can one expect know-
ing the late decision which was
taken, is not important as both
the Town Council and the
Town Day Committee agreed to


But the idea of a Linden
Town Day was born out of a
need to find something to cel-
ebrate our achievements, not
only as a town, but in terms of
its development. Over the past


Council beginning at
11.00 h and among the
guests expected are
Prime Minister Sam
Hinds and a prominent
Lindener who is ex-
pected to give the fea-
ture address.
The local governing
Chairman of the Linden
Town Council's Interim
Management Commit-
tee Mr. Orrin Gordon
and Chairman of the
Regional Democratic
Council (RDC) of
Council of Region 10
Mr. Mortimer Mingo .
should also address the
audience.
A few months ago
the Linden Town Day
Committee committed -i W
itself to honouring the
traditional dates of the fir .
Linden Town Day, in r. '
keeping with the old Linden's first mayor Egbert Benjamin now 80 years
setting of celebrations at old. On May 21, he will be 82.
the end of April, closest
to the date of April 29, 1970, follow through after thinking of
when the three known commu- postponing the event, due to this month. A
nities of Mackenzie, Wismar Guyana first natural disaster honour him p
-and Christianburg became the flood of January/February. We can ce
heroes in our


CESO/IDB WORKSHOP


Facilitator: Henning Rasmussen CESO Consultant -
Toronto
Attention: Members of the Construction Industry.
You are invited to the following workshops as per details
below:

Workshop 1 Wednesday, 4'" May, 2005 9.30 am 12
noon & 1.30 pm 4 pm. Target group: Contracting Firms,
Quarrying & Aggregate Producing Enterprises,-
Producers of General Building materials (cement, timber,
thermoplastics, bitumen, etc.).

Workshop 11 Friday, 6"' May, 2005 9.30 am 12 noon
only.
Target group (knowledge based industries (Engineering
design companies Architectural design companies,
Project management design companies, Specialist
survey and mapping companies, University of Guyana,
Specialist testing services, R&D Organizations.
Attendance is free but you must register not later than
Tuesday, 3"' May for Workshop 1 and 4'" May for
WORKSHOP 11 w.,- .. ..e -


'A -T 4 Lil 41-


Please call 627-3855. 227-1043 to confirm registration

'vevvvf^'^.:'^ ^ ;-.?, 7:.. O., -^ ^^*n ^ i' -


few years, there
have not been
many things to
shout about par-
ticularly with
the down-turn
of the bauxite in-
dustry.
However,
against the odds,
there were some
positives and
other ways tan-
gible enough in
which we can
find to observe
this activity in a
positive sense.
Linden's
first Mayor,
Egbert Benjamin
is 80 years old
and still very ac-
tive as a key fig-
ure addressing
the needs of the
Linden Centre
for Disabled
Children. He
turns 81 later
re we waiting to
posthumously?
rtainly find other
r midst and with


careful planning, more achievers
can be found in the fields of
education, and culture. Thinking
of individuals who have
achieved much in their quest to
promote and be proud of Lin-


den, names which come to mind
are the current Linden Fund
Chairman, Dr Vincent Adams,
the man who is credited with
being the founder of the Linden
Fund, Sam Wright, and of
course, there is the person who
conceptualised the Linden Town
Day activity, Norville
Fredericks.
How about having a data
base on how many persons
come home to Linden for Town
Day.
With this in mind there
must be persons of integrity to
address the matters of
honouring persons and/or
organizations.
The Linden Fund and many
other Lindeners/Guyanese are
here for the celebrations and
even more would have been.
here, but for the information
which was leaked out from the
Linden Town Day committee
that had decided to postpone
the Linden Town day to later in
the year. The number of visi-
tors here must be at record lev-
els and it seems an appropriate
time for them to come home. We
must cash in on it. What about
the Linden Town Day Commit-
tee each year selling souvenir
jerseys bearing the year of the
activity?
These are simple but help-
ful ways of even promoting the
event.
The conference which was
held Friday by the Linden Youth
Vision and the Linden Fund with
backing by LEAP came off suc-
cessfully. Ideas like these can
stir interest in what we can do
as a community, and Linden

(Please turn to page 11)


VACANCY

ST. JOSEPH MERCY HOSPITAL

SCHOOL OF NURSING
for


Must have a minimum qualification
of
HEALTH SCIENCE TUTOR CERTIFICATE
or
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING, BSN
or
REGISTERED NURSE, MIDWIFE
Closing Date: May 15, 2005
Applications directed to:
The Director School of Nursing
St. Joseph Mercy Hospital School of Nursing
.... .. 130 132 Parade Street


REGION'S




CRIME




PLAGUE



T&T, Jamaica

'horrors'

Analysis by RICKEY SINGH
CRIMINALITY has emerged as a major challenge today
in a number of Caribbean Community jurisdictions. But
none more so than for Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago
with their respective alarming murder rates, armed rob-
beries and kidnapping for ransom.
Quite frequently, the criminal rampage compels priority
headlines coverage, leaving Heads of Goemrnment and/or their
National SecuritN Ministers strikingg pathetic postures v.ith
warnings to rnnunals and assurance, to \ victims, that hardlI gen-
erate public confidence.
By last weekend, Jamaica. \tih its unenviable reputation
as the murder capit:il of the Western Henusphere on a per capila
bas.-, had recorded ,ome 450 killings for 2005
Trinidad and Tobago, which ha, an unequallI unflattenng
profile as the "kidnapping centre" for ransom among hemusphenc
states,. was revealing 105 murders and at least 18 known kid-
napping cases already\ for the year.
Guyana and Barbados _eem to be heading for thurd and fourth
position respect,\eli in the depressing criminal scenarios.
Whenever a populace, e\en one perceived as being numb
to crimes of murder and Armed robbery. is shocked and dis-
gusted enough to scream outrage and fear, it is not unusual for
government spokesmen to roar warnings of ne%% and tough anu-
crime strategies.
No surpnr.e. therefore, that Prime jMinster Patrick Man-
ning felt compelled last week to threaten to "lock dow n"
Trinidad and Tobago, if necessary, to systematically move
against the criminals. He also warned of the re-introduction of
corporal punishmcnt fi',t oung conm icled offendcis.
The cis mics m sj\ that the\ hae heard "'that kind ot talk
before". A hard-hitting editonal in last 'SundaN Express'. had
this rather disturbing observation:
"From armed robbery to kidnapping, to murder, criminals
have come to believe that they can do wh.it the\ please: not
simply because of pohce inadequacy, but because of the loop-
holes in bail procedures, the slowness of'court operations and,
indeed a prison system that seems not only to breed criminals
but to facilitate criminal activity\ both on the inside and the out-
.ide. ".
In Jamaica, the wastage of lives, many of them young
(Please turn to page 21)


LU
I- Must have ti.e ,ears experience as an operator
7 Apph in pernoio ,., Ashmin's Trading Co.
< I48 Hig.h Street
~>.,Aerk-er,-R usi, G ,:.r.jetos .rn
Tel. # 226-7352/624-8882.


NOW IN STOCK









Mourne Maid Milk Powder,
Garlic Channa, Black Eye, L -
dooking Oil etc.

P. RAMROOP & SONS
4 1 23 Lombard Street Werk-en'-Rust. ..
S....-G..oGeorgetown:-Tel:227-,4587Fax.-227--6tt10'.-----





NDAY CHRONICLE May 1, 2005




DGs and the private sector's role


SEPTEMBER 2000, the them alone. All actors in society
rld's leaders gathered at the have a role to play over the next
ited Nations Millennium decade.
mmit at the UN This article is the first
adquarters in New York to of a weekly series that will focus
mmit their nations to on the MDGs, specifically with
rengthening global efforts regard to the role of the private
r peace, human rights, sector and the connection
mocracy, strong governance, between business and
vironmental sustainability development.
poverty eradication. The The first of the MDGs
'llennium Summit resulted is arguably the most
the Millennium fundamental: reducing poverty.
claration and the All other MDGs relate to this
rmulation of the eight first goal in one way or another.
illennium Development But being poor does not simply
goals (MDGs), which are to mean that you do not have any
achieved within the time- money. More broadly, it is about
an of one generation. having a limited number of
These eight goals are to choices. Thus, it is a form of
adicate extreme poverty and poverty to not have access to
nger, achieve universal goods and services, either
imary education, promote because you cannot afford them,
nder equity and empower orbecauseyoulivein a ruralarea,
men, reduce child morality, too far from the arenas of
prove maternal health, combat economic activity.
V/AIDS, malaria and other Poverty is important for
eases, ensure environmental businesses in many ways. With
stainability and develop a a significant portion of
obal partnership for population under the national
velopment. poverty line, it goes without
The MDGs are the saying that the purchasing power
duct of many consultations of the Guyanese people is
volving a wide range of limited. In other words, thelocal
terests, including those of market size for Guyanese
vernments, civil society products is unnecessarily small.
anisations and private sector Poverty in the form of illiteracy
tors, demonstrating the multi- and poor health also has effects
mensional nature of on businesses that are faced with
velopment. Essentially, the a limited and weak human
DGs concern everyone and resource base from which to
vernments cannot achieve acquire a labour force.


Main causes of

accidents

Parking within 30 feet of a corner
Failing to dip lights at nights
Breach of traffic light signals.



OFFICE OF THE ENMORE/HOPE NEIGHBOURHOOD
DEMOCRATIC COUNCIL
BEEZIE, ENMORE, EAST COAST DEMERARA


* A * *

S


27104/2005
*


S I I


Please be informed that The Budget for Year, 2005
Income and Expenses has been approved by The
Regional Council at a Meeting Dated 21st
December, 2004 In keeping with the Provision of
Section 10 (1) of The Local Democratic
Organization Act No. 12 of 1980 and applied to
Section 54 (2) of the Local GovernmentAct Chapter
28:02.
The Budget is as follow ws:-
Expenditures
Current $315497300
$ 48500200

$363997500
Rates has also been approved as per Estimates
There has been No Increase in Rates & Taxes for
Year, 2005 because the Council is now Processing
newAppraisement to all properties within the NDC.
Sgd: P. Chanand
Chairman


But poverty can be
reduced in Guyana and
businesses can play an important
part in various ways that also
help the bottom line.
One of the ways in
which companies in developing
countries have been able to have
a positive impact is by offering
credit scheme, which allow
people to pay for goods in small
installments, increasing the
company turnover and allowing
people to improve their quality
of life. One of the many
companies that has engaged in
such activities is the Brazilian
company 'Casa Bahia'. Not only
does the company allow people
to pay for their household
appliances in small installments,
the entire organisation is
specifically geared towards
providing the poorest people in
society with access to affordable
products using highly innovative
and locally tailored credit
schemes.
Casa Bahia is just one
example of how businesses can
help achieve the first MDG
(poverty) while seeking profits.


There are numerous cases of
'best practice' in all areas of
business activity, not just in
marketing and distribution.
Many companies, particularly in
Brazil, China and India, are
researching and developing
affordable products and services
specifically for lower income
consumers, helping them meet
their basic needs. Many
companies also make a difference
with their Human Resource
Management policies,- actively
hiring less advantaged people
and providing them with
education, training and health
benefits, expanding their choices
while getting a more motivated,
productive and loyal workforce.
The examples are plentiful and
businesses around the world can
learn a lot from each other in all
areas of business.
Governments, civil
society, UN agencies and other
donors also have a part to play
in strengthening the role of the
private sector in achieving the
MDGs. For example,
governments and businesses can
partner to influence national and


international business
environments, civil society and
businesses can partner to help
businesses optimally manage
change and deliver products and
services to the poor, and UN
agencies (and other donors) can
partner with businesses to help
facilitate and support
partnerships between
businesses and other entities.
These are just a few examples
of the great potential of
partnerships.
p-a In order to identify
ways in which the private sector
can expand the role it is playing
in achieving the MDGs in
Guyana (and the wider
Caribbean) while maintaining a
profit. orientation, UNDP
Guyana, in partnership with the
government and the Private
Sector Commission, will be
hosting the Caribbean MDG
Business Initiative 2005 at Le
Meridien Pegasus, on June 23
and 24. The event will bring
together individual businesses,
business associations, civil
society entities and UN
- organizations from the local,


regional and global levels, as well
as Government Agencies,
Ministries and other donors from
Guyana and the wider region.
In an effort to shed
some light on what the private
sector in Guyana is already
doing to help achieve the
MDGs, we would very much
like to hear from any of our
readers that have a story to
tell about what might be called
'development-oriented
business practices'. If you do,
please send your story to
carib.mdg.initiative@undp.org


U I


LEAF


LINDEN ECONOMIC ADVANCEMENT FUND (LEAF)




FUND MANAGER
Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the position of Fund Manager at the Linden
Economic Advancement Fund (LEAF) office. The Guyana Fire, Life & General Insurance Co. Inc is responsible
for the management and administration of the Linden EconomicAdvancement Fund (LEAF). LEAF is a revolving
credit fund of $1.9 million Euros, to provide credit to existing and new micro, small and medium businesses
operating in Region 10.

The duties of the Fund Manager includes:
The management of the LEAF loan operations and the LEAF team.
Reviewing all loan applications as prepared/verified by the Finance Section and to make
appropriate recommendations to LEAF credit committee. /
Ensuring that LEAF provides a corporate and collaborative relationship with all stakeholders
Including preparation of appropriate documentation for their review.,
Assisting and train staff in the execution of their duties.
Representing Guyflag and LEAF in public related activities.
Exercising control in implementation of the LEAF operational procedures and the Credit Manual.
Reporting on a daily basis to Guyflag on all business activities.
Preparing financial and loan portfolio reports as required by Guyflag, the GOG and the European
Commission.
Being cognizant of the activities of LEAP and to maintain liaise with LEAP Project Unit.
Facilitating the International Credit Consultant to execute his activities with LEAF.
Other duties as may be determined by Guvflag.

Qualifications:
A recognized University Degree in Management, Banking, Finance or ACCA Level 2 with a
Minimum of ri'e (5) years relevant experience OR ten (101 years Managerral/Financial
Experience
Preferat', a ltrorig entrepreneurial attitude rri.ed with development drive
Relallionship builder and able to create synergies among business (In superused credit
schemes
Result focused to deliver on time
Financial niiornilring and reporting e.perienrce experiencee in micro/niedium credit will be an
asset)
SE...cellent inerpersonal skill. to manage arid moivale LE.F learn and foster client relaton l-iips
World and'or i.ring e. perience in Region 10
Computer literate. Knowledge of CUMME and auick Boo.'s Programs
The selected candidate is required tol Ive in Linden
Attractive remunerallion package will be offered to the successful candidate
Application to be submitted to: The Human Resource Dept.
P.O. Box 101666, GPO Building..Georgetown
NOT LATER THAN WEDNESDAY MAY 11, 2005.

A programme of the Government of Guyana and European Commission


311 1






10 SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1,2005


Strengthening



Ethnic Harmony


GUYANA'S multi-ethnic
make-up has always been the
cause of century-long
political, social and academic
discourses, both of a helpful
and unhelpful nature. They
are those who view this
diversity as one of the
weaknesses while many
others sees this as a unique
strength of our society. From
the outset, let me say that
any perspective on the ethnic
issue in Guyana in just a few
lines would be incomplete
and certainly lacking. But as
a nation in pursuit of its full
potential, the diverse ethnic


factor must constantly be
considered and fully tapped,
where possible, if Guyana is to
record the type of progress it
needs for all its inhabitants.
Our historical
circumstances cannot be
reversed. The different ethnic
groups are here merely as a result
of an accident of our history so
as to satisfy certain imperatives
of our coldhnial masters. The -
diversity of our population
cannot ever be removed; hence,
we must constantly seek to
ensure that there is unity in this
diversity. There is simply no
alternative.


Another example of

NBIC's Commitment

to Service Excellence.


This facility ensures ready access by the
community to their funds, and reduces
loss of valuable productive hours, as a
result of commuting to and from central
Georgetown.


The National Bank of Industry and
Commerce continues to make banking
easier, by increasing the availability of its


Sadly, there have been
those, over the past many
generations and even today,
who seek to manipulate this
diversity for negative ends.
They attempt to deliberately
sow mistrust and plant the
seeds of ethnic animosities.
Fortunately, our people in the
main have rejected these
attempts and have prevented
social catastrophes- which
could have led to unimaginable
consequences.
There still is today
a concerted effort to paint
Guyana as a nation in a state
of ethnic turmoil. Yes, there


are suspicions, yes. there is
stereo-typing and yes, there is
baggage of the past which have
impeded the swift and full unity
of our people. Recent post-
eleetions violence has not
helped. So, too, have the
constant bombardment of race-
hate messages by extremists


from the different ethnic groups
being unhelpful. Certain talk
shows and publication by these
extremist hate-mongers
reinforce these destructive
suspicions in the minds of some
of our people. They even
convey to the international
community a sense of ethnic
conflict.
The reality is


..



Picture shows Leona Newton
making use of the new ABM
facility on Mandela Avenue.


service nationwide, and is living up to its
motto "PEOPLE HELPING PEOPLE"





NATIONALL BANK

OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE LIMITED

A Subsidiary of 4 Republic Bank Limited


totally different. People live,
work and play in their
respective areas in relative
harmony. Interestingly, it has
been found that the experience
of people living in unity and
cooperation increases once we
go farther away from the range


of certain television stations'
signals.
The PPP/C has made it
clear that one of its primary
missions is to remove all
sources of ethnic-division-and-to
promote unity and harmony in
our country. This has not only
borne fruit for the country but
has increased the fortunes of
the governing party. The PPP/
C was able to enlarge its
political support in areas which
were once traditionally
considered opposition
strongholds. However, it would
be foolhardy not to
acknowledge that the two main
political parties enjoy
considerable support from
specific ethnic groups. But this
has been changing and will
certainly take awhile longer to
reverse it considerably.
Recently, one of the
agents of building unity and
removing suspicion has been the
Ethnic Relations Commission
(ERC) a realisation of a 1992
elections manifesto promise of
the PPP/Civic alliance. This
constitutional body, which
enjoys support across the
political divide and from civil.
society, has been in the forefront
of promoting greater ethnic
harmony.
One of the more
recent initiatives taken by the
ERC has been a conflict
transformation workshop for all
stakeholders in our society
facilitated by a South African
conflict resolution expert and-a
key player in the negotiations
to dismantle apartheid Roelf
Meyers.
Of recent interest
have been the considered


observations of Mr. Meyers
following his facilitation
activities. I wish to quote
excerpts of his public
statements.
"I don't see a serious
case of ethnic division in
Guyana. I say that particularly


i- m







MR. ROBERT PERSAUD
in respect to ethnic conflict
elsewhere in the rest of the
world. There is no comparison
to those and what you are
experiencing here in Guyana."
"If I am to reflect
specifically on the workshop
that was conducted on Sunday
and Monday, it is my
impression, the participation
there, in other words, the inputs
that we have listened to from the
different participants from all
sides of the political equation, as
well as from civil society,
indicated that willingness to
commit to the future. I think
that is a very positive sign and
there is a lot of energy around,
there is a lot of dynamics around
that tell me that the time is
right."
"The Guyanese case in
that regard is quite unique
compared to other countries that
I have visited in the past.
Unique in the sense that this is
a nation that lives together but
at the same time the ethnic
division is something of a
political issue."
Mr. Meyer's
observation is quite insightful
(Please see page 18)


GUYANA SUGAR CORPORATION INC.




The Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc., through its Engineering
Services Department, LBL. E.C.D wishes to construct the
following: -
Reinforced Concrete High Bridge at BK West 48, West
Demerara Estates
Reinforced Concrete High Bridge at Stewartville
West 73, West Demerara Estates
Reinforced Concrete Flat Bridge at Zeeburg 10, West
Demerara Estates
Reinforced Concrete Flat Bridge at ACS 13 East, West
Demerara Estates
Reinforced Concrete Flat Bridge at Cl West 20, West
Demerara Estates
' Interested contractors are asked to check with the Engineering
Services Department to purchase tenders by latest Monday, May
9,2005.
Site visits at bidder's own expense is arranged for Friday, May 6,
2005 at 9 am and closing date for submission of tender is
Tuesday, May 10,2005.

Tele. No. 220-1083
Fax No. 220-2919
Email: zorinaG@guysuco.com


Weekly Viewpoint by Robert Persaud





SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1, 2005 I


President sas


Use


May


Day to forge


lasting unity
L L ". '


PRESIDENT Bharrat Jagdeo has
acknowledged the efforts of workers to
restore Guyana to normalcy, after, the
devastating floods which caused
widespread damage, particularly on the
East Coast Demerara.


In his message to mark May
Day, the President also assured
workers that his government
continues to examine ways to
lift their standard of living.
"My government, as a pro-
working class government, will
always seek to promote the in--
terest of the working people
and protect their general well
being. We have demonstrated
this commitment over the years
by our efforts in consistently in-


creasing wages to the level
where genuine improvement i4
evident. We have also tried, to
keep the cost of living to the'
.level within the reach of the or-
dinary worker. Much more will!
have to be done if we are to
realise the drams and aspirations.
of the Guyanese workers. This
cannot happen with input from
government alone but,.by the.
contributions of every
Guyanese in every sphere of


public life and activity," the
President said.
The full text of the message
reads".
We started the year 2005
under very stressful and damag-
ing circumstances. Our country
witnessed the most devastating
flood in its history resulting in
widespread damages particularly
on the East Coast of Demerara..
Several families had their lives
completely dislocated and the
State had to concentrate all its
resources and energies towards
the rebuilding process.
Our nation lost three
months in this effect and when
one: examined; the crisis, one
would say that the nation faced
a setback which will take years
to rebuild. However, with the
Government's resolve and the


,pr(

will and cooperation.of the
Guyanese.people, coupled with
the help from the International
community, we have been able
to quickly take measures to re-
store normalcy.
: Our nation is getting back
on its heels and we can look
forward to another year of pros-
-.perity despite the massive set-
backs. :
In all of .these;efforts; ,our
workers have played that part or
would be expected to contribute
.significantly. Our country cannot
be developed without the work-
ers putting their shoulders to the
'wheel and working with dedica-
tion an'd sacrifice. I
We. have travelled a long
way from serious decline in real
wages, declining living stan-'
dards, shortages of essential


food stuffs, declining health and
education protection and im-
provement in the real wages of
workers.
I am aware that May Day
is an occasion for workers to
pass resolutions and examine.
their working conditions with a
.view to seeking to improve their
living standards. The govern-
ment assures you that it exam-
ines continuously ways in which
workers standard of living could
be improved.
My government, as a pro-
working class government, will
always seek to promote the in-
terest of the working people
and protect their general well-
being. We have demonstrated
this commitment over. the years
by our efforts in consistently in-
creasing wages to the level


where genuine improvement is
evident. We have also' tried to
keep the cost of living to the
level within the reach bf the or-.
dinary worker. Much more will
have to be done'difwe are to.
realise the drams and aspirations
of the Guyanese workers. 'This
cannot happen with input from
government alone, but by the
contributions. *of every,
Guyanese in every sphere of
public life and activity,
We should use May Day
2005 to rededicate all our people:
to develop Guyana which will
ultimately bring improved ben-
efits to all our people. Let May
Day 2005 cause us to forge a
lasting unity for progress, pros-
perity and development.
A very happy May Day to
all Guyanese.


Are we giving

value to what we,.,


(From page eight)
Fund, with its North
America Chapters, has shown
keen interest in de\ eloping this
toy. n Both chairmen of the Lin-
den Fund in Norh Amenca Dr.
Vincent Adams in the US, and
Mr. Wainwright in Canada are
here and. alone hith the Guyana
chapter chairman. Mr. Granville
Ruthcrford-Fehli. are open to
ideas otf upporrng millau' e.0 to
help improve our situation.
The North America Linden
Fund organisation would, I am
sure, subscribe to honouring our
Linden heroes only if we seek their
assistance: The Linden Youth Vi-
sion sought their help and got it.
But the first idea of
honouring our sportsmen/
women was first thrown at the
door of the relevant authorities.
History shows that last year,
Linden produced two Olympi-
ans for the Athens Games in
Onan Thom, who is the first and
only swimmer to attend the
Olympic Games, and of course
the national record holder over
800mn Marian Joan Burnett..
Why. have these significant
achievements been ignored?-
There have been other ac-
complishments over the past
year in sports where history
was created. Linden's teenaged
cyclist Marion 'Fishy' Williams
became the first Guyanese cy-
clists to win a Senior Caribbean
race at the Caribbean champion-
ships. And what of coach Jimmy
McLean's coaching his club to
the professional football league
championship in Trinidad and
Tobago? Ii.is again historic since
it is the first time this has been
achieved by a Guyanese. For
his hard work, he was :i..nmd


the Coach of the Year in the
Twin Island Republic.
Todai 's celebrauons will
culminates three da% s of hectic
acti ities and our out-of-lo. n
and oveisea..-based brothers and
1ielers haje come home to cel-
ebrate with us, but, are they ul-
timatelN impressed with'what
k as on offer"'
Both Mr Gordon and Mr.
Mingo should take a serious
look at what we are doing to
promote and develop our town.
We must establish bench-
marks at every Linden Town
Day and measurable indicators
will tell us where we are and
where we are going. What do we
want to see? Is it just music and
dance and drinking?
I suggest that each year
those in authority report on ar-
eas such as how many streets
were repaired, the status of
health issues including life-
threatening diseases like HIV/
AIDS and malaria. The building,
of/or refurbishing of health cen-
tres, schools and the progress of
our housing schemes over the
past calendar year.
What about the percentage
of passes at schools both at the
. SSEE and CXC" levels across
Linden and Region 10?
And the police can address
us on crimes over the period un-
der review.
All these would be-unique
yet interesting information to be
given to the Linden community
as we look towards develop-
ment and expansion in ourl'town.
From tomori'ow, lets start
planning towards a better
Linden Town Day, 2006 'and
the aim must be that when
this time comes around, we
must givevalfe to, whitie.'ir '


The Indian Commemoration
i Trust Foundation of Guyana




An


Evening Of Mui(,


Dance 8 Skit


,' 1 r o i1 ', '. L t f -I 'i l r, I


CL h & Crpr- rhe's. Gi i o


Wednesday,

May 4th, 2005

1111-01


Complim ents of:


sperity
-Ly9


I


ij r-






12 SlUMBAYCIlI(IQ ME May 1,2005


Berbice



sugar



estates in



near clean



sweep


By Mark Ramotar
HE Albion and
Blairmont sugar
estates in Berbice
virtually swept the five
occupational health and


safety awards the Guyana
Sugar Corporation
(GUYSUCO) handed out
Friday afternoon at
Herdmanston House in
Georgetown.
The awards given to


sugar estates were reintroduced
this year after they were
discontinued in 1994.
East Berbice took the
Best Estate award; Albion estate
took the award for Best
Agriculture Department, while
Blairmont estate won two
awards for being the Best
Factory and the Booker Tate
award for the Most Improved
Factory.
The other award for
Best Field Workshop was won
by the Wales sugar estate on the
West Bank Demerara.
At the ceremony, the
corporation's Chief Executive
Officer, Mr Michael Boast, said
although GUYSUCO's record in
the area of health and safety is
fairly good in Guyana, in the
international context it is poor.
"We seem to have an
awful lot of people (in
GUYSUCO) who seem to get
themselves injured in one way
or the other by various
means...and a lot of these
incidents and accidents could
have been avoided," he declared.
Boast believes that
with a little more care and
caution, 99.9% of the incidents
on the job could have been.
avoided.
He said history has
shown that there have been
safety awards held for the
estates across the industry, the
last being discontinued in 1994.
The primary reason


GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA/CARURMVAN DEVELOPMENT BANK
BASIC NEEDS TRUST FUND -FIFTH PROGRAMME



The Government of Guyana (GOG), Caribbean Development Bank (CDB)
and the Government of Canada through the Canadian International
Development Agency (CIDA) have recently signed an agreement, to
finance several projects under the Basic Needs Trust Fund (BNTF) Fifth
Programme. Construction of the sub-projects is expected to be
implemented in 2005/2006. The sub-projects consist primarily of buildings
and other civil works aimed at improving the social and economic
infrastructure.

The Basic Needs Trust Fund invites tenders for the following sub-projects:

1. Lethem Hospital Expansion Reg. # 9


Tender Documents for this sub-project can be purchased from the office of
the Basic Needs Trust Fund at 237 Camp Street, G/town in the form of a
MANAGER'S CHEQUE payable to the BASIC NEEDS TRUCT FUND.
Tender Documents can be purchased for a non-refundable fee of
G$20 000.
Sealed tenders accompanied by valid National Insurance Scheme (NIS)
and Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA) Compliance Certificates (both of
which should be in the name of individual orfirm submitting the bid) should
be addressed to the Project Manager, and deposited in the Tender Box of
the Basic Needs Trust Fund at 237 Camp Street, SIMAP's Building,
Georgetown, on or before 10:00 am on Friday. May 20.2005.
Tender Document must be placed in a sealed enveloped with the
name of the sub-project clearly marked on the top left hand comer.
The envelope should in no way identify the tenderer.
The Basic Needs Trust Fund does not bind itself to accept the lowest or
any other tender.
Tenderers or their representatives may be present at the opening of the
tenders at 10:00 am on Friday. May 20.2005.
Project Manager
April, 28 2005

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE CLOSING DATE FOR THE LETHEM
HOSPITAL EXPANSION HAS BEEN SHIFTED FROM MAY 3, TO MAY
20.2005 AT 10 AM.


for the last award being
* withdrawn was the top-
heaviness of non-related safety
matters that were included then,
he said.
On the insistence of
the past and present functional
Directors of the Occupational
Health and Safety unit, the
challenge was taken up to
develop a new award system
and, after reviewing a number
of similar systems, a hybrid
competition was developed and
reintroduced this year.
According to Boast,
the competition goes beyond
encouraging a greater
commitment to good health and
safety practice, or the
achievement of a lower accident
rate yearly across the industry.
It also enables the collection of
valuable data as the information
on safety is useful to all estates
in assessing the effectiveness of
their safety programmes
compared to others in the
industry, he posited.
Noting that good health
and safety awareness and
performance are closely
associated with efficient
operations, GUYSUCO
indicated that it will not only
prevent accidents but will also
assist in lowering production
costs.
Boast said the
management of the corporation
trusts that these awards will
help increase morale in the
workplace, lower the cost of
workers' compensation claims,
and improve employees'
interest and involvement in the.
health and safety programmes
which are in place for their
benefit
Labour Minister with


responsibility for Occupational
Health and Safety in Guyana, Dr
Dale Bisnauth, congratulated
GUYSUCO for re-introducing
its safety awards scheme and
commended those who received
the awards.
Recognising the
challenges that the sugar
industry is facing at the World
Trade Organisation (WTO)
level, the minister contended
that GUYSUCO might well
have been excused if its
preoccupation over weighty
things resulting in sufficient
distractions from the
consideration of health and
safety matters at the workplace..
He noted that
internationally, the loss to
business enterprises and to
workers, in dollar terms,
occasioned by diseases,
accidents and fatalities at the
workplace, amounts to some 4%
of the global GDP (Gross
Domestic Product) billions of
US. dollars.
"But how do you put a
dollar value to the human
suffering, to personal, individual
grief and family and social
dislocation attendant to
accidents and fatalities many
of those avoidable at the
plant, the fields, the workshop
and the factory?"
"How does one attempt
to ease the pain and the hurt of
a young wife widowed by the
accident to her husband at the
factory, or the field? How does
the system compensate the
children, made bereft of a parent
by accident? What do you tell a
man in the prime of his life,
who must now hobble around
on one leg because the other leg
was crushed in an accident, a


man who has now become the
object of pity or charity?
How do you compensate for
his loss of that dignity that is
related to work?"
"We cannot say that
these things are inevitable,
part of the price of
development. That argument
will not wash anywhere since
none will be convinced," Dr
Bisnauth said.
Noting that work-
related accidents and diseases
continue to be a serious
problem in both developed
and developing countries, the
minister alluded to statistics.
provided by the International
Labour Organisation (ILO) of
which Guyana is a member.
"The ILO estimates
that workers suffer 250
million accidents every year.
There are at least 335,000
fatal injuries caused by
accidents at the workplace.
Further avoidable suffering is
caused by 160 million cases of
diseases related'to people's
occupation at the work site.
Taking accidents and diseases
together, the global estimate
of work-related deaths
amounts to 1.1 million per
year, and this is possibly an
under-estimated figure since
some enterprises do not
advertise the number of
deaths by accidents."
And quoting from the-
Declaration of Philadelphia
adopted by the ILO in 1994,
Bisnamth said: "Labour is not
a commodity and it must not
be seen as an abstraction in
contract with capital. We must
think of workers as human

(Please see page 18)


MRM


National Insurance Scheme would like to announce
the following increases that will take effect from 1st
May 2005.

INCREASE IN PENSIONS
All pensions that will be in payment as at 30th April
2005, will be increased by 5%.


MINIMUM PENSION
Minimum amount of Old Age and Invalidity Pensions
will be increased from $11,520.00 to $12,096.00 per
month.

INSURABLE EARNINGS CEILING
MONTHLY
From $88,397.00 to $92,817.00


WEEKLY
$20,400.00 to $21,420.00

BY ORDER
NIS MANAGEMENT


'I,






SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1, 2005


'Fresh Fire' to be presented at 'explosive' Youth Conference


HE Assembly of God
Church in Guyana is
hosting its 35th
National Youth Conference


, tomorrow in Berbice.
Public Relation Officer
of the event, Ms. Denise Harris,
in an exclusive interview with


KDT
music


the Chronicle said that the
event, which is held annually
with participation from all 14
branches of the church, is
IePent, then, andfttn tot (o d,
so th dyour sins may be wiiped
out, thattimes oefrefrhingi
may4 comefrom the Lord ...
Acts1 31.


," ,.' C


expected to be especially
"explosive" this year as
competition in the categories of
drama presentations, poem
renditions, dance and skit
presentation is "stiff".
She said that tomorrow
will be. the. first presentation of
this year's album dubbed 'Fresh
Fire', a combination of
exceptional talent recorded by
Lester Rodney. The album is a
combination of original pieces by
youths from all over the country
who have written and sung their
own lyrics.
Harris said that the


album of originals was first
started three years ago after
judges of the event decided that
some creativity is needed to
spice up the competition, as
this would allow participants
to be judged not only on their
vocals, but on their ability in
compiling songs. The first
album was named 'Restoration'
the second 'For God and
Country' and last year's album
was called 'Seasons of
Refreshing'.
Another segment of the
event, the quiz competition,
which was hosted at the


Central Assembly of God
Church, will be held before the
actual day of activities but
winners will be declared
tomorrow.
Harris said that the
churches host the event,
themed 'Maintaining Core
Values' this year. The event
is among efforts aimed at
developing more interesting
methods and modes of
reaching today's youth to
empower them to make
positive life choices and put
them on the right track.
(Delana Isles)


- .." .' .


The cover of the album


VACANCY

Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS/Ministry of Labour in
Guyana invities applications from suitable candidates to fill the following
position:
The UNAIDS/MOL has embarked on a HIV/AIDS in the Workplace
Programme with the aim of increasing national capacity to support
workplaces in the development and implementation of HIV/AIDS
Workplace Programme and to raise awareness in workplaces and
communities against stigma and discrimination towards People Living
with and affected by HIV/AIDS.



Post Title: Consultant

The Consultant is responsible for conducting consultations in the ten (10)
administrative regions and the drafting of the National Tripartite Policy on
HIV/AIDS and the world of work.
Minimum Qualifications
Experience
Minimum 5 years working experience dealing in community-based
projects dealing with HIV/AIDS and experience in policy
development.
Excellent analytical and English writing skills.
Very good knowledge of country's response to HIV/AIDS
Experience working with an international organization.
Experience working with the tripartite constituents will be an asset.
Academic Qualifications
Master's degree in the social sciences or related field of study.
A complete Terms of Reference for the above mentioned post could be
obtained from the reception desk at UNDP.
Candidates with the above mentioned criteria are invited to apply to the
Resident Representative, UNDP, 42 Brickdam & United Nations Place,
Stabroek, Georgetown.
Deadline for applications is Friday, 13 May, 2005
The envelope should be clearly marked "Consultant HIV/AIDS in the
Workplace Programme"
Only qualified candidates will be short-listed and contacted.


GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA GUYANA REVENUE AUTHORITY
FISCAL AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAM [FFMP]
SHORT TERM CONSULTANTS

The Government of Guyana (GOG) has recently concluded a Loan Contract # 1551-SF/GY
(US$29.5 million) with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). Part of the proceeds of this
Loan will be applied to the financing of the implementation of the Fiscal and Financial
Management Program. The FFMP consists of three sub-components namely:
(i) Tax Policy and Administration;
(ii) Public Sector Financial Management; and
(iii) Fiscal and Fiduciary Oversight.

The overriding aim of the FFMP is to build effective and sustainable executive and oversight-
capacities in the Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA), the Ministry of Finance (MOF), the National
Assembly (Economic Services Committee (ESC) and Public Accounts Committees (PAC) and the
Public Procurement Commission (PPC).

The main focus of subcomponent (i) is on the introduction and operation of an integrated
information technology and database system at the GRA.

To this end the FFMP hereby invites applications from suitably qualified candidates for the
following short term consultancies:
(I) SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR
Requirements:
(i) Graduate Degree in Informatics/Computer Engineering, Computer Science or equivalent
qualification;
(ii) Minimom of five (5) years of Senior Analyst with implementation experience in the field
of information systems and information technology;
(iii) Minimum of five (5) years experience in the successful management of large systems
involving customer information databases; and
(iv) Proven communication, interpersonal skills and effective working relationships.
Specific Expertise:
(i) Implementation of large Information Systems/Information Technology Systems;
(ii) Supervision of Programmers;
(iii) Maintenance of Customers Information Databases; and
(iv) Development of Information Systems/Information Technology Training Programmes.

(I) PROGRAMMER
Requirements:
(i) Graduate Degree in Informatics/Computer Engineering, Computer Science or equivalent
qualification;
(ii) Minimum of five (5) years of programming in Delphi 6, Visual Basic or C++;
(iii) Minimum of five (5) years experience in the manipulation of database management
system such as MS SQL 2000 and/or Oracle 9.0 and above;
(iv) Minimum of five years web development experience using such web development tools
as CuteHTML, Frontpage 2000 and Dream Weaver; and
(v) Proven communication, interpersonal skills and effective working relationships.

Specific Expertise:
(i) Implementing Integrated and Modular Application Systems;
(ii) Methodical Programming;
(iii) Expertise in Data Base Management; and
(iv) Completeness of Documentation.
Detailed Terms of Reference for the posts referred to above may be obtained from:
Confidential Secretary/Administrative Assistant
Fiscal and Financial Management Program
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets, Georgetown
Telephone No.: (592) 225-0742
Fax No.: (592) 225 0742
Email: pcuffmp@bbgy.com
Website: http://www.revenuegy.org

The closing date for all applications is Monday May 9, 2005.

Procurement Manager Government ads can be viewed on
Fiscal and Financial Management Program http://www.gina.govgy






14 SUNDAY CHRONICLE IVMy,, ,2005



Professor Cynthia Pine





Reconnecting
. . .. . . .. . . . . . . ...... ..... ..


with


Guyana


By Shawnel Cudjoe

GUYANESE-born London-
based dentist, Professor
Cynthia Pine visited Guyana
last month for a series of
meetings with various health
institutions.
Just before leaving
Georgetown for the Ancient
County for one of those rounds
of meetings, she sat down with
the Sunday Chronicle and spoke
about a number of issues includ-
ing why she came back to
Guyana after nearly 50 years,
family history and life in gen-
eral.
Professor Pine has the dis-
tinction of being the first female
Dean of Dental Studies in the
United Kingdom (UK), a posi-
tion to which she was appointed
at the Liverpool University in
2003..
Professor Pine, 51, came to
Guyana for the first time since
her family left in the 1950s and
met with personnel from the
Cheddi Jagan Dental School,
Georgetown Public Hospital
Corporation (GPHC), Vice
Chancellor and Deputy Vice
Chancellor of the University of
Guyana, Dr. James Rose and
Mr. Al Creighton, respectively.
Sad Dean of the Faculty of
'Health Sciences, Dr. Emmanuel
Cummings. :
She also met with adminis-
trative personnel from the Re-
:gional Health Centres. A visit
to Guyana would not have been
complete without a tour of. the
majestic Kaieteur Falls, which
professor Pine .made two Sun-
days ago.
But what exactly was the
reason behind Professor's Pine
-visit? It was- Guyana's Health
Minister, Dr. Leslie Ramsammy.
"You feel his (Minister
Ramsammy) enthusiasm and
commitment and I wanted to
know how I could help," she
told this newspaper.
The initial spark of interest
in visiting Guyana was lit early
in 2004 when she addressed the
parents of students who were


pursuing dental careers at the
University of Liverpool.
"After the ceremony, this
one parent came up to me, Mr.
Ramjohn, I think was his-name,
and-started asking me where I
was from," she told the Sunday
Chronicle. According to Pine,
she was both surprised and de-
lighted to know that the man
was Guyanese.
"I did not know many
Guyanese living in England,"
she said. But within months,
she was introduced to Guyana's
High Commissioner in London,


'My mother us
tell me about ti


that just drop
the sky, the b
f birds and wil
and the house
stilts.' Profess
i Cynthia Pine


Mr. Laleshwar Singh, and in
September 2004, she met
Health Minister Dr. Leslie
Ramsammy and was invited to
Guyana.
She said that she was only
in Guyana to give advice, since
the :groundwork had already
been laid in relation to establish-
ing a dental school here.
"All the work is being done
by Dr. Cummings and Dr.
Joannes Jean and the Health
Ministry; I am just here to give
advice," she said.
The Government Informa-
tion Agency (GINA) in a press
release stated that after discus-
sions between the Minister and
Professor Pine, a-dental school
may be established in Guyana
by yearend.
According to the release,
Ramsammy had spoken of
starting such a programme to


s
Pe
dl
cis
so


I0


WORLD Air Holdings Inc., a publicly traded holding com-
pany based in Peachtree City, GA., has acquired North
American Airlines (NAA), a release from the NAA
Georgetown office said yesterday.
North American Airlines, a financially healthy, privately
owned airline that was established in 1989, will now form part
of the World Air Holdings organisation, along with World Air-
ways Inc., and World Risk Solutions Limited.
NAA, with its fleet of eight passenger aircraft, three Boeing
767-300 ER, and five Boeing 757-200 ER, will continue to fly
the Guyana/New York route and other routes.
"North American Airlines wishes to reaffirm its com-
-mitment to the Guyana operations and looks forward to
the continued support .of ,tl travelling.public,' therelease
stated. -


train dentists and technicians
with the aim of improving their
oral and dental education and he
is looking forward to working
with Professor Pine and the
staff at the University of
Liverpool.
"Government sees this as a
positive development which
will improve the initiative al-
.ready planned," Minister
Ramsammy was quoted as say-
ing.
The release further stated
that according to Professor Pine,.
there have already been signifi-
cant changes and
investment at the
ed to Cheddi Jagan
Dental School,
he rain which could
form the basis for
from the dental school.
Professor
autiful Pine stated that
the establish-
life, ment of the Den-
tal School must
on be done in part-
nership with the
)r Ministry., of
Health and Uni-
versity of
Guyana.
She told this
newspaper that she was very
impressed with the standard of
the facility, and especially the
students.
"I was very impressed with
the students who came from all
parts of Guyana," she said. She
further pointed out that they
can now go back into the vari-
ous communities and educate
the people.
Since most of her time was
spent at the Dental Centre, Pro-
fessor Pine said that she ob-
served that more than 100 per-
sons visit the centre on a daily
basis from very early in the
morning, which is exactly what'
happens at the dental institu-


MUSIC examiner Antonietta
Notariello has noted that
generally, Guyanese are un-
der-exposed to classical mu-
sic, and this does not bode
well for competent Guyanese
composers and musicians in
the future.
Ms. Notariello was here
late last month to conduct prac-
- tical music examinations for the
Associated Board of the Royal
Schools of Music.


tions in the UK.
However, she pointed out
that the two countries are at dif-
ferent levels in terms of equip-
ment but "the Ministry wants
to make things better". She also
commended the Oral Health
Month programme which was
started by the Ministry of
Health and Dr. Jean.

Family life
Professor Pine was born
Cynthia Freeman to Frederick
and Nora Freeman at the
Georgetown Public Hospital in
1953.
Mr. Freeman's has his roots
in Leguan, but he left for stud-
ies .in the United States (US).
He went to England to serve his
country during the Second
World War, where he met Nora.
According to Professor
Pine, her elder sister, Shirley,
was born in London, but the
family soon moved to Guyana
in 1951.
Election violence and racial,
tension created quite a turbulent
life in Guyana back then and
two years after Cynthia was
born, the family went back to
London.
"It was difficult for them to
settle. My father could not get
a good job... I think it was just
hard generally, and so they went
back to England in 1955," she
said.
The family settled in Bir-
mingham where she and her el-
der sister attended school before
she decided to pursue a career
in Dentistry in Manchester and
graduated in 1976. She subse-
quently completed her PhD at
Manchester in 1982 and gained
an MBA from the University of
Dundee in 2001.
She was a Professor at
Dundee before joining the Uni-
versity of Liverpool in January


Appreciating classical music
is an acquired taste, very much
like appreciating good wine.
Classical music grows on one,
allowing a growing appreciation
of form and rhythm and sheer
beauty as one listens. All this is
implicit in Ms. Notariello's
comment as she observed what
the local radio offers with re-
gard to classical music.
"When children do not lis-
ten to classical music, it affects


PROFESSOR CYNTHIA PINE


2002 as Professor of Dental
Public Health and Primary Den-
tal Care. She became Director
of the World Health
Organisation Centre for Oral
Health in Deprived Communi-
ties earlier this year and is also
an Honorary Professor at the
University of Dundee.
And what was it like to be
appointed the first female Dean
of a Dental Institution in the
United Kingdom?
"I was honoured, it was
just a great honour and it was
quite humbling actually," Pro-
fessor Pine told this newspaper.
She said that the fact that
the Board was unaware that she
would become the first female
Dean, made it even more spe-
cial.
'They did not know; they
were just looking for the right
person to do the job," she said.
According to Professor
Pine, choosing a career in Den-
tistry was not an overnight de-
cision.
"I was thinking about it for
quite some time.... I wanted a
"degree that would take me into
a career where I could meet
people, since I enjoyed working
with them," she recalled.
She said that her greatest
achievement in her 27-year ca-
reer was seeing her name on the
pass list on the notice board at
the Manchester University.
"There is this big crowd
around the notice board and you


are elbowing your way through
and you get up there and see
your name, and you realise that
this is. the turning point to. be-
coming a professional dentist,"
she said.
Though her father has
passed on, her mother, Nora, at
90,. still lives in London. She
never returned to Guyana.
"She was always telling me
that I would not like Guyana,"
Professor Pine said. This was
mainly because of the difficul-
ties that she experienced while
living in the country.
However, the stories told of
Guyana while she was a child,
were not all negative. ,
"My mother used to tell me
about the rain that just drops
from the sky, the beautiful birds
and wildlife, and the houses on
stilts," Professor Pine said with
a laugh.
Expressing her thoughts
about Guyana, Pine had this to
say: "Guyana is really interest-
ing; there have been significant
developments in recent years".
However, quite noticeable, is
"the big contrast between the
more affluent and less affluent
people of society, but then
again, that is everywhere", she
said.
Professor Pine, who is
married and the mother of
two children, Helen 22, and
Mika 18, plans to return to
Guyana on a regular basis.


their interpretation of music,
and robs them of the opportu-
nity to do well in this art form,"
she said.
At the examinations, Ms.
Notariello listened to 147 stu-
dents on piano and recorder.
The results included 17 distinc-
tions, 35 credits and 59 passes.
Ms. Notariello has been a
Professor of Piano at the Royal
Academy of Music for 14
years. For much of this time she


has run an Art of Teaching class
for undergraduates and Ad-
vanced Course students. She
has taught at the Junior Acad-
emy for many years and
coaches chamber music. She also
has a piano class at Imperial
SCollege London. Her recent con-
certs specialised in works for
two pianos.
As for the examinations

(Please turn to page 21)


Music examiner laments



Underexposure




Sto classical music


















- *- ,~


r -


CATEGORIES
A Best Looking Vehicle
B Best Vehicle Sound System
C -All Vehicles Present on Day of Competition
Cash Prizes, Mo- insuranr.. GSM Cellphones


Venue: Guyflag Head Office Tarmac, Ruimzeighlt Gardens, W.C.Demerara.
Registration: 10 :00 .r, lO pmt & Competition Time: 2:30pm
Music by Force Ripe Sound SystemMe8 Kcrry Porter
BANKS DIH BAR WILL BE PRESENT -'l' -a,
--- .ENJOY BANKS BEER HAPPY HOUR..
COMPLIMENTS OF:
BANKS

J. LsC'.:. "I r N.
: ,r ..*,, -


WON,:


OVEI




SUNDAY C


4.' ~ ;~~~~~ .i 'A.. A-' k ;~, C~~rubtH~rE Y I .IY- 44,'~5- U


.44,


IjIY C~ThY"'Z.4~W7~


*V- -A _-


i1-


~"Th :rX


L ^c T .. .. -


%


T.-or yt s1I@-hping c v vtihngc,

untilatotMay 00Jwe 44i"ti opncd

from nm to Is pm .o undaysp


-. -M. -
4W A~.;


111JIMeP41hir 3


Q.L c~.l


1W T~.7.-"~t. A. AT r~<'{ c~
~ Si ~


.,. -. . .... ...-/. .. .r . ., --._ -t .a + ... .





j tw ,/U J/ D S.'_ rjome th uIs

Everg Tues Thursa Saturda? and Sunda


#9rr20a m

Airrie .IFI


A-;


I yqIr TIe l Agg. 9p


rw f A


Co pMptitO


reF


rrqpw ar n r rr ^ w '"-
F-Sf J ,s0gge .PMo.?we 40
t 2v.^cA^.~ssy-.7' 7&Msk*


-, A." I'--
'1'
'A 9*A j J~ .4.. -- A "' 'A .
////L A 5. /J#K'9// P/ /44
T.@D fl7-EAO~~fl74Sfr~fl7 ~.fl7=4V~4


A ,. --


.zr-nr.. rs~= cfl~- a. -i KI-s~~rsur~- --d~


..L-ci.zn. - w'~A-- "-~~kfr'----Thr~,~.'' .it~A1~ 7rrflr ~rr..!r~? Aar"rr *~'-*~' -- --t -~ -.- -27r -. .'r-r.-Ar...- ~.. ,rs~ t~~~aa.j .Z~.&E..&A
* -. . . -n A. ''fl '~"?trTrr'2. k~ ?~'' ..In" A


Sunday Cr-nlrer'~ 4


[ : **, .. *^ . ***;.. .. ..- ..-_. ;/...S 3 -.-:. "
, ,- ;" .: *: r ,_ '_.- -* ." .^- ... I ~- ., _t-
-.. .:_-._. ; '-4. _-.1 .


L~Pf~a1


r:


,,


i_ ' :' :


-p,


f


.-:*


es





A






IRONICLE May 1, 2005 1"


ON MAY 3 every year, the
United Nations invites mem-
bers of the media and other in-
terested groups to observe
World Press Freedom Day.


This year, the theme is 'The
Media and Governance'.
World Press Freedom Day is
an opportunity to remind the
world of the importance of pro-


tecting the fundamental rights of
freedom of expression and free-
dom of the press, as stated in Ar-
ticle 19 of the Universal Decla-
ration of Human Rights. Without


these rights, democracy cannot
prevail and development re-
mains unattainable.
The date is meant to cel-
ebrate the fundamental principles
of press freedom, to evaluate
press freedom around the world,
to defend the media from attacks
on their independence and to
pay tribute to journalists who
have lost their lives in the exer-
cise of their profession.
World Press Freedom Day
serves as an occasion to inform
citizens of violations of press free-
dom a reminder that in dozens
of countries around the world,
publications are censored, fined,
suspended and closed down,
while journalists, editors and pub-
lishers are harassed, attacked, de-
tained and even murdered.


According to the United
Nations, it is a date to encour-
age and develop initiatives in
favour of press freedom, and to
assess the state of press free-
dom worldwide. It serves as a
reminder to governments of the
need to respect their commit-
ment to press freedom and is
also a day of reflection among
media professionals about is-
sues of press freedom and pro-
fessional ethics.
Just as importantly, World
Press Freedom Day is a day of
support for media that are tar-
gets for the restraint, or aboli-
tion, of press freedom.
According to the UN Edu-
cational, Scientific and Cultural
Organisation (UNESCO), an in-
dependent, free and pluralistic
media have a crucial role to play
in the good governance of demo-
cratic societies, by ensuring
transparency and accountabil-
ity, promoting participation and
the rule of law, and contribut-
ing to the fight against poverty.


To bring focus to the issue,
a conference will be held in
Dakar, Senegal from today until
Tuesday that will pay tribute to
this critical role played by the
media in promoting democracy
and good governance
The United Nations Mil-
lennium Declaration repre-
sents the strongest unanimous
and explicit statement to date
of UN Member States in sup-
port of democratic and partici-
patory governance. The decla-
ration clearly articulates that
the Millennium Development
Goals must be achieved
through good governance
within each country and at the
international level. It also
states that Member States
"will spare no effort to promote
democracy and strengthen the
rule of law" and goes on to re-
solve "to strengthen the capac-
ity of all countries to imple-
ment the principles and prac-
tices of democracy and respect
for human rights..."


Members of the local media fraternity at the relaunch of the
Guyana Press Association's lecture series at the Demerara
Mutual Fire and Life Insurance Company conference room.
The 'Law and the Media' lecture was delivered by Attorney-at-
Law, Mr. Teni Housty (Picture by Mike Norville)


DATE FOR OUTSTANDING BALANCES
ON YOUR MARCH 2005 BILL IS

SUNDAY MAY 8, 2005
AND THE SECOND SUNDAY IN EVERY MONTH
Please note that bills can be paid until 6:00 pm (1800 hrs)
Monday to Friday and until 2:00 pm (1400 hrs) on Saturday
at GT&T's Business Office, 78 Church Street, Georgetown
and at these following Bill Express Locations:

R & S Shopping Centre, Belvedere Public Road, Corentyne

J's Supermarket, 131 Essex St. & Republic Road,
New Amsterdam, Berbice

Neighborhood Pharmacy, 54 Second Avenue, Bartica

Nigel's Supermarket, 44-45 Robb & Light Sts., Bourda

Johnny P Supermarket, 1571 Aubrey Barker Road,
S R !*'dt Park


10 E Baqot.j..'.n EED

S & J Camrno Vainty Slr re
14 1 Daqeraad Avenue
Mc F.e-nzie Linden


32 Sislers vilane. Wales. WBD
-A'


'_ dj -"- ...... ..... . .....


Save

when

calling those

close to


Choose


numbers on U mobile's network and


on all calls to those numbers

all day, everyday!


.,' 6S~Q


r ...'...:I ~. . . : ; ...






18 SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1, 2005 '


.1*j ..~


ui ti.~


,o "


THE Guiana Hindu Dharmic
Sabha has organised
countr)yide activities to
mark the 167th Arrial.of East
Indians to Gu)ana. The
Sabha has observed this
historical e'ent annually and
its President, Pandit Reepu
Daman Persaud, "as among
those who initiated the
celebration and lobbied for it
to be a national holiday.
Pandit Persaud recalls
being interviewed by
Wordsworth Mc Andrew on the
significance of the celebrations,
many years ago. Among the
speakers at the first celebration


"ere Di Fenton Ratniahoye
The function v.as co-chaired b%
Attorney General Doodnauth
Singh and Pandit Persaud
This sear the reegi'n.il
bodies I Pra.iani of the Dharmic
S.iha .in Berbice hj\c t ome
together to elebr.ate Indian
Arrival Day .ia the Albion
Complex, Berbice tomorrow
starting at 15:00 hrs, while the
West Demerara Praant has
organised a grand cultural
programme at the p,.icious
lawns of the Uitvlugt/ Ocean
View Mandir on \Vednesdda.
May 4 at 18:00 hrs. The
Essequibo Praant of the Sabha


meceti in S.is,-ngh .ti the Anna
Regina .NiMndir on the morning
of Thursday May 5 at 10:00
hr-. The East Coast Demerara
Pr-aant has a march and cultural
programme at the Betterhope
Mlandir Comnipouid also on
Thursday beginning at 10:00 hrs
and another function at the
Fairfield Community Centre in
the afternoon of May 5 from
15:00 hrs. The Sabha will be
opening a medical clinic at
Betterhope on the same day.
All of these programmes
will feature prominent and talented
artistes of the Sabha. There will be
no alcohol


Berbice sugar


S(From page 12)
beings. what else, Who are
in ol\cd in creatinir c:pii.l i he
bedrock ol economiic gro'. th aind
clIek'.elpient '
HIe in-isted tlh.it:the
provision ot ) a work.
en. iruninent th.t is hazard free
and conducive to the hliuth and
velfarie .f the workers is the
c.ib ( e' o n o every employer.
\\ here, by the nature of
the enterprise, some hazards are
unavoidable, every precaution
ought to be taken to ensure that
workers are provided with
Roperr protective gear. he-said


On the other har
minister re pl.nstibtlit., at .otr
protect tilh i seles al
unnece.-,.ar\ 1' 1id tl
gear 'a nsm1 be pro'. id
theu 'afe\et and secunt\
In receiving the
for Best Es.tate. G
Mjanaer ol the East B
Estate i.Albion Estate
Aaron Dulkhia, ihank.ed
GUYSUCO employees
estate.
He noted that th
Berbice Estate represe
largest employer


~ W


Strengthening

Ethnic...
(From page 10)

-and certainly there would
be only a few who may want
to disagree with him. Also, his
comments about Guyana's
ethnic relations reality are not
singular. Several months ago, the
U.N. Rapporteur on racism,
who was invited by the
government, came up with a
similar conclusion while noting
some of the areas which require
work.
By all means, the ethnic
relations situation is not
perfect. But our people are too


often led to believe that our
situation is beyond help and
there is no hope. This has led
to all sorts of airy-fairy
solutions. There are certain
demographic and cultural
realities which cannot change.
Also, acts such as criminal
violence may serve to
perpetuate certain perceptions
among the different groups.
However, it is time we stop
listening to the hate-preachers
and those who promote ethnic
insecurity for their personal and
political schemes.
Sadly, Guyana's ethnic
diversity will always be
exploited by those with their
own nefarious agendas. And, we
should not be afraid to admit


that we will never have a
society which is free of ethnic
suspicions and even occasional
bouts of tensions. Then again,
show me a plural society which
doesn't have its share of
suspicions and tensions based
on ethnicity.
While the ethnic
factor is a complex one and
can be viewed from a range of
angles, our people's positive
contribution can be a simple
one: a dedication by each of
us to do nothing which will
endanger ethnic harmony in
our country. This will go a far
way in cementing long-
lasting bonds of unity and
friendship amongst all our
people.


BEST ESTATE: Director on GUYSUCO's Board, Mr Hubert Rodney presenting the 'Best
Estate' award to General Manager of the East Berbice Estate, Mr Aaron Dukhia.


LIFE INSURANCE COMPNt MITED
Congratulates Mr. Peter Bryan (left)- Premium Club Awardee


J-11


-.- .'*'~.5
. . . I


4.4' J~' ~
4~* -, 'I.


Award being presented by Director, Mr. R.L. Singh



A Premium Club Award is presented to an agent who produces Annualized Premium Income in excess of

$1.25m with Persistency of at least 90%. Mr. Peter Bryan has achieved this remarkable feat for the 8th time
.during his 25 years of distinguished service.


GTM and Peter providing exceptional service to the Guyanese public., ,


-I ~


'I ~'


~
5, .~.
* t


! I


*II



, i


80th
Annwir!
General
Meeting


0oth
AnllnualI
General
Meeting


'


-P-ypyrslrSplse~--p


c


bllm9s~fc


1I


GUYSLUCO. making it e\en
more dilticuit to achiec thle eiiat
S* since u ith the magnitude of the
%%ork,.rce. a lot ,of effort
dedication and coinmuiment had
nd, the to be made b) the employees on
be the that estate to vin the a.'.ard
kers to The ceremony \v.
against chaired b\ GLUYSUCO' Hea.lth
1,e uch and Sjaf:i\ Officer. ir Earl
ded for MNorrt
Among those making
in% ard brief remarks at the
encricrajl ceremony e'ere Booker Tate
Berbice Technical Consullant from
ei. Mr the Uniled Kingdom. Mr Bill
.,ll ihe Nelson; Directlor on
at the GUYSUCO's Board, Mr
Hubert Rodney, and
e East Personnel Director of the
nts the corporation. Mr Lakeram
in Singh.








SUNDAY CHRONICLMay;.,, 2005/ ,


C CD CD-


cr 0
CD C

'D D CD


-4-0 CD)> Cnc-,

2 C DCD CD~


CACD CDD C0



CD


C:) n N)0)





-p -. 4CC.01)-





CY) W C t
-C4, C:)O


03 C
=r =0 CD


00 Cl3


-= CD


_0-r
00CD c.



20 .

NA CDf
NAO 0-


E0-3
CL. CDc
0CLO





0


--A--;C n CD>0 -0C) 00

03 C03 CCCo C30
'-(D 0 C D co -, CD0C
z- E-m CD O CDCD C
a M CCMCD CDCD 2 C'

CCD
CjCD CD a t





CD CO
o 0 0.. W C
x SC.VT


-N S~S~to


C0n


-0



go


:, N,
.a. C3


IN)


Na


U2 N
cmC:5)0


CoL
(D 0 -<
0. CD -
0- CD> 0


to


CD*

0- ~ CD





CD
3.









C. 0)!
0,1 -cc3-









crQ
-<-0






0 )
C:,



0)
0)
0-

00.
D
N,


CD -
CD
71

CD


-C


CD~



0-





CD

(D

0


CD


CD

C)




CD


C,)
5. (00)01 3




-4-.-0)
0)0)01n
-(s (0 4-0


8'li
CD Co
CDCC
-< CD
CLOCD

CD C0

CD -:I C
0 0 c



CDDC


C:, C D






CoCD


CD

c-) 2

0CD



(D


E-CD2
ca n











CD C
CoLC
iC.
0 0.e


8D 5






a-00
cD

CD
CDCD
20.


0D 0.


-~- 2
0
C, -4
in
C, Cn
o ...~
Co
2 -~
-4 =
2 ~
0
-02
a ~
2
C, C~

CA. i~
CA
-4
-4
in

in
2
-4
CA


> ZD o --4aCD ..-.CD C) z
E D.0 C C C I-o 0CD
~CDCDD 0.M 0 -
0 cc0 CD
5 (D CD(D >.~ C C
CD C D3 -a c0a
= I c D c D C D c 2
CDC
co 0 0-o 0 o C
CoD o CoDo C
C DO- 'cn > C0
M C4 w~

'D @-CD C0
0CD

2 ~ CD
CL CD.
-4 C-)



CD 'd 0 ) I~
'M m
0=r~lC',









NJ) C) C C4 o 0





W CD 3 D0 CD 0 0s,2-


CA =M w ~ ~ C 2

4A E-* CD)- D 0 --I C -a n--
3 CDC73-CCD C C>

21, -o2 0

CA =, C3

Z I cm CD c



AC") C) 0 -n (Dw C


-4 W 0)M C wCDS'=0) 3
DCo 0) 0 0 )
< C.) <.
m0 c) ca*


2,CD = R 3
Co L m co L 0=t


01 IM=r
0)C 3 C o c> C
CA2 a0) 0 9q


U3
C)


M* --4


CA -
zz~


,C--


L4
5- "n
MIi



FOa-4-q Cl)




C30







C0


Ik.








ca
a. ca
m
m
C4,

M
w'
m)

Mn


M M~









=CAqM

m
C03~
m 2

o ~m


WO-4


8)c


(j -4
3 0

m r-
0 I-

m"


m -
A -
-


CD -C


ID ~

Q30
(02


ml-

Sw

-4
m
CA

CA
z

m
=
0
I-
0
I,,
CA


-~JCO -~J
(.1-CD


9D0.
=21




CD




C0


CD


aCL

0) CDo

C>-Cc?

co

CCD-
0~CD -M





S D





CD =rCD






aD ) 0
s
0-


Na-CD 0)CD.



-C:) CD0C:>


C).0C) C.)


CM 01
CD L t,)


CD CD

o'0
~CD

<0 CD
CD CDe0



0CD wc


CD -


CD C
C')


@D to CD





CD -


=D CD


m m





CD2


C, 4
= N









m
5










CD


oz
,n






0









-1
0 >








?>

Z*-j^^"


0




m I-4
'a- m
Z- a


m 03DC
CD CD
-C5D
C) C
CDCD7CC


coc 0


S.)
~ -~ C-.)
0) N, N,
C.) -CD





N~ -.010)





.b 0) -~ -J


m








-"3
=















C2





Ulm









i %^ lh






--r


$40,000.00 "ALL-CORRECT "

CHRONICLE CROSSWORD PUZZLE


NAME' NAME

ADDRESS- ADDRESS'


annual pilgrimage to 6.
Mecca.
18. Indian dish.
ACROSS: 20. The abbreviation of an
accounting method used 7.
1, Village on the Left to value stock. 10
Bank of the Mahaica 21. The basic monetary unit
River in Guyana. of a European Country.
3. A recent survey revealed
that most women are DOWN:
not fond of, men. 11.
6. A herd of 2. Local area network a
7. Proceed. system that links
8. A country whose basic together electronic
monetary unit is rial. office equipment. such
9. Antonym for the verb, as computers, word
restrict, processors and forms a
12. During a local cricket network within an office
match, the fielder orbuilding.
struck the 4 Word used as
instead of the stumps homophone, i.e, a word
in order to effect a run- that is pronounced in
out. the same way as another
13. Executive Committee but spelt in a different
(Abbr.) .way and has a different
16. -ul-Adha, the meaning.
festival marking the 5. Village on West Coast
culmination of the BerbiceinGuyana.


1,
/5'

F

-~ ~-~*- /~
I.. -

I',


5'


Amsterdam; Mr. R. Samai of Cane
Grove, ECD and S. Chapman of
Arcadia, EBD. Once again,
congratulations to you all.

All winners will collect their prizes
from the Georgetown, Head office on
Wednesday, May 04, 2005. Please
present a suitable form of
identification when collecting
payment.


An "All-Correct" puzzle for
$40,000.00 plus is now presented to
you.. This NEW "All-Correct"
competition will be drawn on Friday,
* ,, May 13, 2005. So don't delay, get in
the action and WIN!


Hi Fans!
The Winning Solution of last Friday's
"Should-Be-Won" competition is now
presented to you. Congratulations to
Kylana Crawford of 60 Melanie
Damishana, ECD for winning the 'two
mistakes' prize money of $15,000.00.
Additionally, four players captured the
incentive prizes of the 40+ and 80+
entries categories. They are: Mr. J.R.
Lord of McDoom, EBD; Mr. C. E.
Bracclly of Republic Road, New


The additional incentives of
$1,000.00 and $2,000.00 for the 40+
and 80+ entries groupings are in
effect.

The more you play the greater is the
possibility of winning. The amount
of entries submitted must be covered
by the relevant sums of money or they
will not be judged. Then place those
entries in a box at a location near to
you.
If you need coupons just purchase a


"My ***, forget not my
law; but let thine heart
keep my Command-
ments..." Prov.3:l. 14.
Georgia (Abbr.)
You can have this 15.
advertised in the
classified pages of the 1 7
Guyana and Sunday
Chronicle. 19.
The past tense of this
irregular verb does not


end with ed and has the
same form as the past
participle.
Synonym for the verb,
search.
Past tense of an irregular
verb.
.Imperial Chemical
Industry (Abbr.)
Word used to give a
negative response.


copy of the Sundai or Wednesday
Chronicle. For extra coupons,
purchases can be made at our
offices in Linden, New Amsterdam
and Georgetown. You can also
obtain extra coupons from Mr.
Vincent Mercurius of D'Edward
Village, Rosignol, Berbice. They
cost $20.00 each or $40.00 for two
as they appear in the Sunday or
Wednesday Chronicle.

The Rules governing all Chronicle
Crossword Competitions will be
published on Sunday, May 08,
2005. Secure a copy of these Rules
for future reference.

Players are reminded that no
entry is opened before 12.30 pin on
the day the puzzle is drawn and
that judging does not begin before
4.30 pm when the last entry is
opened. The solution to the puzzle
is not know nn before that time.

This apart, our general rules
apply.

Thanks
Crossword Committee


"Copyrighted Materiald
Syndicated Content 1
Available from Commercial News Providers"


-. w I
-

~IbdP I


am -0 ___ W -o o
M.11 4 % -Ob -4 .4b. j -
41M am 40 q 4 --
ww- 04 410






:S Y N* t
0 -eril-a
-DRG andYE toLIE!


- * -


-SUNDAY CHRONICLE- ,Mav-O.12.005


Alliance. Armadale, Belmonte, boler, EC, Eid,


FIFO, GA, go, help, ICI, Iran, kofta. korma. krona,
krone. Lan, lead. lend. LIFO, look, Massage,
Melville, no, Oman, Paradise, Penpals, push, seals,
seek, send, shy, sly, son, spur. swine, torn. umpire,
worn, yoke, yolk.


IL-


-Eli 3 tf [I a I 11PI 1 OLIN v (1301


.1






.imV IIRflMELE Mav 1 2005


r GLOBAL FUNDI/GUYANA HIV/AIDS PROJECT
GRANT# GYA-304-G02-M

MINISTRY OF HEALTH

HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT UNIT



Invitation for Bids


1. The Co-operative Republic of Guyana has received financing from
the Global Fund towards the fight against AIDS, Malaria and
Tuberculosis. It is intended that part of the proceeds of this financing
will be applied to eligible payments under the contract for the supply of
Goods and Services.
2. The Government of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana now invites
sealed bids from eligible suppliers for the supply of:
(4) Four 4 x 4 Double Cab pick up Vehicles with Winch
(2) Two Wooden Boats 20' x 5' x 3'
(3) Three Outboard Engine 48 HP (2 long leg, 1 short leg)
(2) Two Outboard Engine 25 HP (short leg)
(2) Two Outboard Engine 15 HP (short leg)
(30) Thirty Life Jackets
(3) Three Computers
(3) Three Printers
(3) Three UPS
(3) Three Surge Protectors
(3) Three Scanners

3. Interested Bidders may obtain further information from and
purchase a set of bidding documents by written communication
addressed to:
Executive Director
Attention Procurement Officer: Prakash Sookdeo
Health Sector Development Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation Compound
East Street
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel. No.: 226-2425, 226-6222
Fax: 225-6559
mohgoh(a)networksgy.com

The documents will be available from May 03, 2005 and on payment of a
non reimbursable amount of G$5,000 (five thousand Guyana dollars) in
cashier's cheque made out in the name of the Health Sector
Development Unit.
4. Bids must be deposited in the Tender Box, National Board of
Procurement and Tender Administration, Ministry of Finance, Main
and Urquhart Streets, Georgetown, Guyana, no later than 9:00 am on
Tuesday, May 31, 2005. The bids must be marked on the top, right-
hand comer of the envelope with the name of the programme,
including the words 'do not open before Tuesday, May 31,2005'
The purchaser is not responsible for bids not received thereof on or
before the time specified for the reception of bids. Late bids will be
rejected and returned unopened.
5. Bids from local suppliers must be accompanied by valid compliance
certificates from the Inland Revenue Department (IRD) and the
National Insurance Scheme (NIS), Guyana.
6. Bids must be accompanied by a bid security of 2% of the bid price
made out in the name of the Ministry of Health and in Guyanese
currency.
7. Bids will be opened at a public ceremony, in the presence of those
Bidders' or their representative who choose to attend, at 9:00 hours or
shortly thereafter, on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at the National Board of
Procurement and Tender Administration, Ministry of Finance, Main
and Urquhart Streets, Georgetown, Guyana.
Executive Director
Attention Procurement Officer: Prakash Sookdeo
Health Sector Development Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation Compoun
East Street
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel. No.: 226-2425, 226-6222
Fax: 225-6559
mohgoh@networksgy.com


(From page 14)
here, the examiner found
that though the orals were good,
there were problems with scales.
Secretary of the Guyana
Music Teachers Association,
Mrs. Marilyn Dewar identifies
another problem facing young
people interested in music a
paucity of music teachers.
"The established ones are


getting down and the are
hardly younger ones ( mgng
up," she says.
This was manifesto..: stu-
dents going up just ft .ano
and recorder at last mo, s ex-
aminations.
There are calls for violin
teachers, and parents have told
Mrs. Dewar that they have al-
ready bought violins and are
waiting on teachers. There are


Mrs. Marilyn Dewar at the new organ at Christ Church.


also calls for classes in brass in-
struments and for this Mrs.
Dewar has set her sights on
Cecil Bovell of the Police Force
Band.
"But since his appoint-
ment as an Assistant Commis-
sioner, he is very busy. And
though he would like to take
up the classes, it's difficult for
him to find the time. He even
has problems finding the time
for band rehearsals, and he is
thinking of having retired
bandsmen train the younger
ones," she said.
Another problem facing the
Association is acquiring sheet
music. Austin's Bookstores does
bring some, and these go off like
hot cakes when they arrive.
Mrs. Dewar has been able
to acquire teaching aids on video,
including 'Bach to Rock' and
'Why Toes Tap', lessons in
rhythm with Wynton Marsalis.
Students who did well at
the examinations will be in con-
cert at the Marian Academy on
June 5, 2005.
In all this, there is one hap-
pening that has set Mrs.
Dewar's heart singing. Christ
Church, were she is organist,
has acquired a new organ.
"It's quite


an instrument,
doing all sorts
of things, and I
am now becom-
.- ing familiar with
'all its wonderful
appointments,"
she gushes.
For -her,
and for those
Swho could
hardly live
without it,
Congreve cap-
tured the es-
sence of their
very being
when he wrote,
"Music has
charms to
soothe a sav-
age breast, to
soften rocks,
Ms. Notariello (second from right) with members of the Guyana Music orbend a knot-
Teachers' Association. ted oak."

9&,Ja ac


(From page eight)

people as in Trinidad and
Tobago has resulted in some
folks taking the law into their
own hands, with dreadful con-
sequences.
In two known cases, one
suspected robber was beaten to
death; and in another, two were
hacked to death. Such 'jungle
law' behaviour has outraged the
human rights group 'Jamaicans
for Justice'. Its president, Susan
Goffe, has sternly warned:
"This is not justice. It is mob
murder... Bypassing due pro-
cess of law eats away at the
heart of the justice system..."
But there was a different
and comparatively creative re-
sponse from a group of deeply
distressed mothers over the es-
calating killings of sons and
daughters, many leaving behind
children for whom others must
bear the burden for their sur-
vival.
Under the leadership of
mom Doreen Billings, these
women have formed 'Mothers
in Crisis' with the aim, as re-


ported by the 'Jamaica
Gleaner', to use their influence
as mothers with first-hand ex-
perience in tribulations associ-
ated with the consequences of
sons and daughters who have
ran foul of the law.
The group is encouraging
empowerment of mothers with
ideas on how to get their loved
ones back from crime -. and in
so doing, reduce the crime rate.
Expansion of witness pro-
tection programmes and inde-
pendent monitoring by a civil-
ian body of the operations of
the Jamaica Constabulary Force
(JCF) are among some new
measures being pursued by the
P.J. Patterson administration.
However, given the increas-
ing interdependence of
CARICOM states and cross-
border crimes, the region's
people are yet to be informed
about creative collective re-
sponses to beat back the crime
plague afflicting too many juris-
dictions.
The Regional Task Force on
Crime would know that crimi-
nal networking has expanded
from the national to regional


boundaries and that the need for
greater and more imaginative
anti-crime intelligence gathering
is an imperative for most, if not
all member states of the Com-
munity.
At the same time, we are of-
ten faced with conflicting com-
plaints from some police ser-
vices of shortage of manpower,
technical and mobile resources;
while, on the other hand, there
are governments that point to
significant beefing up of re-
quired resources but still con-
fronted with poor anti-crime
performances.
When the Association of
Caribbean Commissioners of
Police meet in St Croix this
month for their annual confer-
ence, they should perhaps ad-
just their agenda to come for-
ward with a collective presen-
tation to the Community's gov-
ernments of a report with pro-
posals for a minimum set of pri-
ority initiatives to combat crime
at the national/regional level.
Such an initiative could
be a welcome departure from
the traditional business of
the Association.


Under-exposLe to ...


__


MyUMNUK a ,v


~ "


--


"I,-- '. n - "I


garel





S2"SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1, 2005


2Z


MTV CHANNEL 14
CABLE 65

07:00 h. Dabi's Musical Hour
0)7-306-h-- hakti Bhajans
08:00 l- 'Christ Fqr The Nation
(Eive).'- .
08:30 h TQ Tslariic Quiz)Live
09:00 h Indian Movie
10:00: :.h Death
Announcements/ In Memoriam
10:05, h -.Continuation Of
Indian Movie
12 00 h Religious Melodies


12:1 .fhe-Fact
12:3(- leet Smaran Karna
13:00) village Voice.
13:30'. kvon Video & DVD
Musical-M bodies
14:00h The Ramayan
15:00 h Movie
17:00 h-Three's Company
18:00;h Birthdays & Other
Greetings
18:15 h Death
.Announcements/ In Memoriam
18:30fi The Fact
19:00 h Weekly Digest


Weather

W, atch'

TODAY'S FORECAST: Cloudy conditions with light to moderate
showers are likely over coastal and inland. locations. Interior
locations may experience possible thunderstorms.
WINDS: Northeasterly to Southerly at 1 to 8m.p.s.
WAVES:. Slight to moderate reaching about 1:3m in open
waters... : '
HIGH TIDE: 10:05h at (2.47m) and 23:04hat (2.41 m)
LOW TIDE: 03:30h at (1.35m) and 16:15hat (0.95m) .
G/TOWN 'TIMEHRI
SUNRISE: 05:39h N/A .
SUNSET: 1801h N/A
SMAXIMUM TEMPERATURE: 28.0-32.0C over inland and
iriterior.locations & 27.0-31.0C over coastal areas.
MINIMUM TEMPERATURE: 21.5 23.5C over near.inland and
.iriterior locations .& 22.5-24.5C over coastal: areas.
RAINFALL: 50.0mm
RAINFALL ACCUMULATED : 264.7mm
MARINE ADVISORY: Fishermen'and other marine users
.are advised not to damage or interfere with the ocean
platforms, whose. data are vital to, the provision of the
weather information and warnings for the'safety of
the marine community.
HIGH TIDE ADVISORY: Nil
SPRING TIDE ADVISORY: Nil

FOR WEATHER RELATED QUERIES
PLEASE CALL --- 261-2216, FAX 261-2284


19:30 h IBE Highlights
20:30 h Death
Announcements/ In Memoriam'
20:35 h Indian Movie
23:30 h-Sign Off .
CNS CHANNEL 6

: 07:15 h Voice'Of Hinduism
08:00 h Geetmala
08:55: h Today's Top Story
09:00 h Indian Movie
12:00 h Deaths & In2
Memoriam
12:30 h Radha Krishna
Mandir Satsang
13:30 h Bop The Builder
Teamwork
14:30 h Sanathan Dharma
15:00 h End Times With
Apostle Das. *-'
15:30 h Maximum Vibes .
16:30 h Cartoons
17:00 h Greetings
17:50 h Viewpoint By Vibert
Parvatan
18:00 h Indian Cultural Time
18:30 h Eye On Thd Issue
19:00 h Deaths & In-
* Memoriam
.20:25 h Interlude
20:30 h Voice Of The People
21:00 h Deaths &. I.n-
Memoriam .
22:00 h Viewers Choice
English Movie
00:00 h English Movie
02:00 h English Movie
03:30 h English Movie'

VTV CHANNEL 46
CABLE 102

07:00 h Full House
07:30 h Fashion TV
08:00 h Memory Lane' Live
With RY
10:00 h -Movie'


Yes v Mother's Day is here



s ca t Le '-eI w m -i ... ,

.. .. r *. '




>I--t t je& /ev
5.' ,


13:00 h.- Movie
15:00 h- Movie
17:00 h Travelers Live
Program
18:30 h Music Video
19:00' h,- Majesty 1 Music
Lesson Live With Mark Britton
20:00 h Sports
21:00 h.- Khans Watch Repair
Center Fainily Time (Sanford &
Sons)
21:30 h-Movie
23:30,h -Sign Off

NCN INC. CHANNEL 11

08:00 h Lifting Guyana To
greatness
08:30 h-Anmol Geet
09:30 h-The Fact
10:00 h Cricket Day 3 4'" Test
Match
12:00 h Western Union
Cricket Info & Quiz
12:40 h Cricket Resumes
14:40 h GINA
15:00 h Cricket Resumes
17:30 h Guysuco Round Up
18:00 h NCN 6 O'Clock
News Magazine
18:30 h Kala Milan.
19:00 h One On One: The
Media & Elections
19:30 h Growing With IPED
20:30 h Cricket Chat
21:00 h Vedo Ki Vani
21:30 h IAC Mela
23:00 h Movie
DTV CHANNEL 8

07:55 h Sign On


EP4,


DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE CLOSURE T(
TRAFFIC FOR SUNDAY, MAY! 1, 2005




. . .-. .


'-~

.1~


For Ocean Going Vessels & Trawlers 10:30
For Ocean Going Vessels opening lasts about 1-11/2

PEDSTRANS O
SI O RIG


-r~. c.


7/' CA6.I



F~l IIlI(,reIII im-1 ~liwufI ctII'il tC oil a'kdri L.)f o-~ Ii':tcd t I
~ ;~,I1J x.( ~ BC. k Aii'.I~r~ ~ 'I *~l )1 i.~tif 5 tt


_ __!11- J d oeho j o1 r 7

v ea r Od 1 d t.


08:00 h -- Sunday Mass: Our,
Lady Of The Angels
09:30 hb Sabrina, The
Animated Series
10:00 h familyy Matters
11:05 h;- Bringing Down The
House. ..
13:00 h Nature
14:00.h That's So Raven
14:30fli hil Of The Future
15:00 h The Suite Life Of
Zack And Cady
15:30 h -'Lizzie McGuire
16:00 h Lilo & Stitch, The
Series
16:30 h ,- Brandy & Mr'.
Whiskers
17:00 h What I Like About
You
18:00 h News Channel 4 At 6
18:30 h NBC Nightly News
19:00 hl Greetings &
Announcements -
19:30: h Faith In Action A
Catholic Series
20:00 h Musical Interlude'.
20:30 h A Return To God's
Biblical Foundation'
21:00 h Desperate
Housewives
23:00 h Charmed
00:00 h Sign Off

NTN CHANNEL 18
CABLE 69

07:00 h Ramroop's Furniture,
Store Presents Religions
Teaching !
07:30 h Kennav. Holdings Ltd..
Presents Kiithna Bhajans
07:45 h -h A&S Enterprise
Presents Krishna Bhajans
08:05 h Sa Ra Ma (Musical
Notes) A Live'Call In Program
09:30 h! Bollywood
Flashbackl... Songs Of


S 09 00 h Patsanmajali
) ROAD 10.:00 h Caribbean Massala
11:00 h Indian Movie
14:00 h Family Movie
16:00 h.- Music Break
17:00 h Ahmadiya Muslim
Jamaat
18:00 h Indian Movie
20:00 h Dance Dhamaka With
S Dbra Sahadeo
21:00 h Creole Gaff Jumbie
23:00 h Action Movie
00:30 h Action Movie
02:00 h Sign Off

WRHM CHANNEL 7

,hrs 06:00 h- BBC News
07:00 h NBC News
09:00 h CBS Sunday Morning
10:30 h Face The Nation
11:00 h Oliver & Company
13:00 h Gymnastics
15:00 h Championship
B Boxing
16:00 h- NBA Basketball
18:00 h Eyes On The Issues
18:30 h NBC News
19:00 h 60 Minutes
20:00 h The Contender
21:00 h- Law & Order
22:00 h Crossing Jordan
4 23:00 h Desperate
Housewives

HBTV CHANNEL 9

ty" 11.:00 h Nation Watch
I 13:00 h ACDA Presents
jE" 14:00 h Dalgety's Africa
m 15:00 h Birthday Request
m5 15:05 h Swansea
Informational Hour
16:00 h From The Heart
Church Ministries
.- 17:00 h New Life Ministries
17:30 h Mystery Of The
t Gospel
18:00 h Sports Show
19:00 h Birthday Request
19:05 h Spot-light (R/B)
20:00 h Soul Spectular (R&B
Musical)
21:00 h People Of Distinction
22:00 h Death Announcement
Y 22: 10.h-Movie
m 0 00:30 h Sign Off


c ftoI 0 . .


' f/t. I- O ,- ."


Yesterday
I1:'00 h. Sunday Morning
Services By Reepu Daman
Persaud'
12:00 h Death Announcement
&'ln Memoriam
13:00 h- DVD Movie: PHIR
WDHI DIL LAY HOON(Eng.
Sub.) Starring Joy Mukherjim
Adha arekh & Rajendrainath
16;00 h Gurukula Sandesh
16:30 h Teaching Of Islam
17:00 h IPA Presents: Shiv
Mdhapuran (Eng. Sub.)
17?30 h Kishore Local Talent
1-800 h Mere Awaaz Suno...
Karaoke Live
19:00 h Birthday Greetings/
Anniversary/ Congratulation/
Death Announcement & In
Memoriam
20:00 h Ram Katha By Shri
Prakash Gossai
22:00 h DVD Movie: Hero &
The Terror Starring Chuck
Noiris
00:00 h -. Sign Off With The
Gayatri Mantra
RBS CHANNEL 13
09:00 h Hope For Today
100O0 h Revival Crusaders
Hour
10'.30 h- TBN
12:00 h-CNN
13:00 h TBN
14:00. h Charlotte Street
Wesleyan
14::30 h The Methodist
Church
15:00 h TBN
15:3Q h Faith & Truth
16:00 h Golf
18t00 h Biography
19:00 h Dateline
20:00 h The Contender
21:00 h CNN
STVS CHANNEL 4


mm I -


BRIDGE WAT4















1A 5 ,: r


~i __ Pi;


GREEN House
Restaurant. UG Road.
Special Creole Meals daily
for UG & College students.
$300 per meal.


NOVELS, story books, text
and informative books.
Juliette's Book Library, 143
West Ruimveldt. Telephone -
223-8237 Mon. Frin. 8:30
am 6pm. Sat. Sun. 10
am 2 pm.


BUILDING. renovating or
doing any kind of construction
work. We give free estimates.
Prompt, reasonable and
reliable service. Call 622-0267.'
629-2239.


FOR PROFESSIONAL
COMPUTER Repairs, Sales &
Services Call Kerstings
Computer Repairs & Sales
Centre @ 227-8361/618-8283.
Home & Office services
available. 24 hrs.


GEORGETOWN Japan
Karate Association. Enroling
new students for classes
starting Tuesday, May 3, 2005.
Forms can be uplifted from
Woon-A-Tai's. Shell Service
Station. Vlissengen Road or the
Thomas Lands, YMCA.


HERBAL MEDICINE -
Lymphatic massage, natural
herbal facials, herbal soaps.
natural cleanse, intensive
cream. Tel. 225-0115. Mon. -
Sat. Ask for Waveney.
HERBAL, Medicines skin
infection, asthma, impotency,
cholesterol, blood pressure,
weight loss, gallstone, stricture
pain, diabetes, internal
cleansing and many more.
Appointment # 220-7342/
614-5650.



JEAN offers courses in
Elementary, Intermediate &
Advanced Dressmaking,
also Designing. 153 Barr
St., Kitty. Tel. # 226-9548
FASHION Designing &
DRESSMAKING, MORNING
AND EVENING CLASSES.
Beginners to Professional
levels. Sharmila 225-2598.


ARE you cursed,
depressed, demon possessed
OR need finance? 'Call
Apostle Randolph Williams
- # 261-6050 (20:00 h -
21:00 h.)
GET connected to the
creator and your real self, in
order to enjoy life's
wonderful gift. Call now. Tel.
233-2934 or 625-1252.
Contact Miss Bennett, 164 C
Hassan Street, Eccles, EBD.



WORK from home for
US$$$$ weekly.
Information? Send stamped
envelope to Nicola Archer,
PO Box 12154 Georgetown,
Guyana.
CONTROL your income
working from home filling 100
envelopes for US$500 or more
weekly. For information, send
stamped self-addressed
envelope to Nathaniel
Williams, PO Box 12154
Georgetown, Guyana.
B U S I N E S S
OPPORTUNITY Be your
own boss. Use your spare
time filling 100 envelopes
for US$500 or more weekly.
For information send
stamped self-addressed
envelope to Randolph
Williams, P.O. Box 12154
Georgetown, Guyana.


FRESH CUT FOREIGN
FLOWERS CREATE YOUR OWN
BOUQUET/VASE OF FLOWERS
at a price that suitable to you.
Add your personal touch. Flowers
sold by the stems. Call 618-2240
anytime. Sunday to Sunday. Call
early for Mother's Day.



AFRICAN Violets, Norfolk
Pines Christmas Trees, Orchids
(Cattleyas. Den, Onc, Vardas)
hanging baskets, Bird Nest Ferns
and lots more. At the back of the
Key Shop. Camp Street. 226-
2882.



23 yrs. male seeks female
friends, 18 28 yrs. Hobbies:
reading, cooking, chess. Write to:
Justin Ludwig, #145170 GSC -
6 Dorm, P.O. Box 473 Westville,
IN 46391 0473 USA.
COMMUNICATION with
interested persons by telephone for
friendship or serious relations. Call
CFi Telephone Friendship Link -
261-5079. Sunday to Saturday,
07:00 to 21:00 h.
To date the Junior/Senior/
Singles/Dating Service 18-80
yrs. has produced two marriages,
one engagement, couples
seriously dating and genuine
friendships. This can be your
lucky day. Call now. Tel. 223-
8237, Mon.- Fri. 8:30 am 6
pm, Sun.- Sat. 10 am 2 pm.
Immediate link.



ESCAPE Body bliss
massages. Alleviate headaches,
insomnia, muscular pains, tension
and stress. Certified Massage
Therapist Ulelli Verbeke # 226-
2669/615-8747.
NEED to activate your body
and mental strength? Come for
a well-balanced health
massage, shower available.
Call Mrs. Singh (daily). Tel.
220-4842/615-6665.


PRUDENTIAL SCHOOL OF
MOTORING. "You train to Pass".
Tel. 227-1063, 226-7874, 223-
7908.
ENROL at D & R Driving
School, 95 Hadfield Street, Werk-
en-Rust. Tel. # 660-4216 or 226-
6454.
ENROL now at Shalom
Driving School, Lot 2 Croal
Street, Stabroek, Georgetown.
You could also obtain an
International Driving Permit.
Call 227-3869/622-8162/611-
9038.



TECHNICIANS available
for appliances repairs -
washers, dryers, microwaves,
stoves, deep fryers, etc. Call
622-4521, 263-0050.
TECHNICIAN on call for
all your television, VCR and
microwave repairs. We
provide home service. Call
Ryan # 265-2634, 615-7361.
Canadian Immigration
Paperwork. We assist with the
paperwork. Cost: $5 000 for
full package. Consultation is
FREE! Contact 227-3339.
FOR all your construction,
repairs renovations, as well as
masonry, varnishing plumbing
and painting, contact Mohamed
on 223-9710/614-6634.
FOR efficient service and
repairs: washing machines,
refrigerators, microwave ovens,
clothes dryers, gas stoves. etc.
Freezezone Enterprises, 6 'A'
Shell Rod, Kitty. Telephone 227-
0060, 616-5568.
ACTNET INC. now offers
professional computer repair,
upgrades, installation of
software, virus removal and
much more. We are located at
70 New Road, V/Hoop, WCD.
Tel. # 254-0324.


FOR professional services
in Dressmaking, Cake
Decorating and Curtains. Tel.
220-6419. 220-2889.
FOR all your telephone
services, repairs to cable
equipment, rewiring, adjacent,
etc. Contact Qualified Technician
with over 35 years experience. Don't
delay, Telephone 226-2766/617-
0427 anytime.
WE are highly 'professional's
"Millennium Consultancy Unit &
General Services", 166 Charlotte
St Lacytown, Georgetown.
Providing a comfortable
environment at home/office.
Services include Real Estate:
Home Management; Repairs,
Re-modeling, Redesigning:
Electrical; Air-Conditioning;
Refrigeration; Cleansing,
Security Consultancy. Our
reputation is impeccable, our
name your guarantee for an
honest deal. Call us on 227-
4757, 627-5379. 613-6369.


1 DAY Guard. Apply Lot
10 Meadow Bank. Walk with
written application.
ONE general Domestic,
good wages, between the
age of 30 and 45 years.
Tel. 220-2695 LBI.
TYPIST/RECEPTIONIST -
Pleasant personality, good
command of English
lan guage. MENTORE/SINGH
REXLTY 225-1017.
ONE Snackette Attendant
and Waitress. Must cash and
sell. Tel. 226-6527. Come in
after 5 pm at the Tennessee
Night Club. Ask for Donald.
WAITER, Waitress,
Counter person, Salesgirl,
Handyman, Cleaner, Live-in-
maid, Accounts Clerk. r ja 's
Temp Agency. #231-'
e A pp... g y .... .2 .. '... ...........
OPERATIONS Supervisor.
Must have security or military/
par military experience. Must
have Driver's Licence for
motorcycle. Call 222-5790,
5791 for appointment. D.
Singh & Sons Protection
Force Inc.
NOW recruiting dynamic
worldwide, part or full time.
Will train. Join the team
fabulous compensation plan
and incentives. Limited
openings for country. Contact
e m a I I
thenetworker@candw.lc
1 ACCOUNTS CLERK
with NIS/PAYE experience.
Must be able to work with little
supervision. 1 experienced
General Mechanic with some
knowledge of welding. PO
Box 10331.
ONE Supervisor to work at
Buxton Esso Service Station.
Must have Supervisory and
Management skills. Be able
to work shifts, Sundays &
holidays: Apply to: The
Manager, 269 271, Buxton,
ECD. Tel. 617-3045.
APEX EDUCATION -
vacancy exists for teachers in
all subject areas especially
Maths, POA, OP I/T, Carib
History & Geo., retired Head
teachers and secretary. Apply
with written application to the
Director of Studies, Apex
Education 11 Vryheid's Lust
Public Road ECD. INSTANT
EMPLOYMENT.
VACANCIES exist in a
reputable stable, financial
organization for sales
representatives. Applicants
should be mature in age and
possess a minimum of 3 CXC,
GCE subjects.or an equivalent
qualification. Send
application to: Unit Manager.
133 Church Street, South
Cummingsburg, Georgetown.
Telephone number: 622-0307.
IMMEDIATE VACANCIES
exist for the following positions:
Counter Attendants. Documents
needed application, 2
references, Food Handler's,
Police Clearance, 1 Passport
Photo. Security Guards,
Handyman, Delivery men.
Apply in person with application,
Police Clearance, 2 references,
1 Passport Photo to: K &V C
Hotel, 233 South Road,
Lacytown.


LEARN Dressmaking and
Cake Decorating the eas way.
Tel. 220-6419. 220-2889.
Same as above.
BSi is offering Computer
Classes for adults. Individual
attention guaranteed. Certified
Tutor. Call 227-8143 or 624-
8084.
NAIL, tipping/designing,
silkwrapping/ manicuring
courses. $5 000 per course.
Call Michelle (227-7342, 222-
3263).
JOIN THE PHONICS
CENTER. We teach your child/
children the art of reading. See
them develop into good read-
ers. Call 618-2068.
EARN a Certificate. Diploma
or Degree, in any part of the
world from home THROUGH
CORRESPONDENCE. For
information, call CFI Global
Education Link #261-5079.
ACTNET INC. is fr..:.
computer classes for :
and adults. Come let our trained
and experienced tutor guide you
to success. 70 New Road V/
Hoop. WCD. Tel. # 254-0324.
The Centre of Brazilian
Studies invites you to enrol
now for Portuguese classes.
New term begins May 09,
2005 Registration begins: April
18, 2005. Call for more info:
226-8054/226-2573. Email:
cebgtown@networksgy.com
JEAN: offers courses in
Dressmaking, Curtains, Cushion,
Bedroom Elegance, Soft
Furnishing, Soft Toys, Ribbon
Embroidery, Tie-dye, Batik,
Fabric Painting, Floral, Cake
Decoration. Crochet. 153 Barr
St., Kitty. 226-9548.
SHEER Magic Saloon offers
a complete course in
Cosmetology at an affordable
price. We also have evening
classes. Call us at 226-9448,
628-7880 or 227-8737 after
hours. Come and make your
dreams come true.
Bd sheermagic@yahoo.com
PRACTICAL Electronic
course beginning 1 1 June, 2005.
Learn to repair TVs. Microwave
ovens, power amps. combination
stereo systems, monitors, CDs,
etc. Logical and systematic
troubleshooting techniques
taught by qualified instructor
with more than 21 yrs.
experience. Limited spaces
available! Book early! Call
Abdul's Electronics. 225-0391 or
226-6551. 349 East St.,
Georgetown.
COMING to New Amsterdam
for September 2005 a
Christian School, Emmanuel's
Educational Complex. Nursery,
Primary, Secondary Levels.
Recognized by the Ministry of
Education. See your children
progress and delight in their
positive life changing
experiences as they journey
through this institution.
Discipline is one of our key
factors. Make wise decisions for
your children. Choose
mmanuel's. Keep checking the
Ad and television for more
information. Tel. # 226-2144,
223-6028, 618-2068.
ATTENTION PARENTS/
GUARDIANS Do you have a
child/loved one 9 yrs and
older, who do not like to read
or is a weak reader and
speller? Did he/she fail the
Easter Term exam? Do you
think it is due to poor reading
skills? Call BSI now on 227-
8143 or 624-8084, Mon. -
Thurs. 10 am 5 pm, Sat.
10 am 11:30 am, Sun. 8 am
- 10 am, or come to 25
Hadfield Street, Stabroek
(bet. George and Smyth
Streets, opp. Regency Suites).
We use the number 1 reading
programme "HOOKED ON
HONICS" Classes are smalt
and conducted in an
atmosphere conducive to
learning.



240 ACRES of farm land
situated at Vilvoorden,
Essequibo $20 million neg.
Call 227-1355.


LAND FOR SALE OLEAN-
DER GARDENS 89 FT BY
152 FT. PRICE $25M. CALL:
612-0349.
LINDEN HIGHWAY 10
acres land. Ideal poultry, general-
farming $3.5M, Ederson's.
226-5496.
PRIME commercial land
for sale 115 ft x 31 ft.
Charlotte Street, Bourda.
Contact owner 226-0683
(anytime).
TRANSPORTED house lot
for sale eight hundred
thousand dollars each, light and
water, phone in place. Singh -
254-0101.
28 ACRES river to road land
suitable for housing scheme,
wharf, etc. Vilvoorden,
Essequibo. Price $30 million
neg. Call 227-1355.
5 ACRES well cultivated
sugar cane land at La Retraite,
WBD $700 000 per acre
negotiable. Tel. 263-5362
between 6 pm and 10 pm.
TWO transported adjacent
lots in Earl's Court. LBI 18 080
sq ft total. Please telephone
623-7438 between 6-8am and
8-10pm for details.
17 HOUSE lots, 9 acres of
vacant, transported land to be
sold in 2 separate parcels at
Blankenburg, WCD. Tel. 225-
2487, 641-8341.
EAST BANK Land $1.5M
and $3M; Sussex & Curtis
Streets. Albouystown, 94' x 64' -
$2.75M. TEL. 226-8148, 625-
1624.
HIGHWAY lands, East
Bank. Lands Robb Street, High
Street, Regent Street. Camp
Street, Church Street. TEL. 226-
8148. 625-1624.
DEMERARA RIVER Plots
of land. Ideal housing,
agriculture, cattle, shipping -
25. 50, 100 & 600 acres plots.
Note $65 000 per acre.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
OPPOSITE Sand Hill,
Demerara River 88 acres of
land. Ideal shipping, ware
house, bond, cattle, general
farming $15M. Ederson's.
226-5496.
TWO LARGE PLOTS OF
PRIME COMMERCIAL LAND
WITH HOUSE ENMORE
PUBLIC RD. Telephone 220-
9199. No reasonable offer
refused.
QUEENSTOWN land -
61'/160'. Ideal 4 house lots,
4-storey luxurious hotel/
apartment, foreign mission,
church/school. $22.5M.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
GATED community with (24)
hours security. Exclusively
residential lots at Pin. Versailles,
West Bank Demerara size 6 000
- 12 000 sq. ft., priced from
$3.9M. Immediately
Transportable. Contact
Seetaram # 264-2946/7.
QUEENSTOWN 160 X 60 -
$21M; Nandy Park $5.5M;
Milton Street $8M; Atlantic
Gardens $6M; Regent Street -
$26M; Le Ressouvenir 116 x
96 $21M; Oronoque Street,
High Street near Pegasus 280
x 80- $60M; Ogle, Friendship
river side 360 x 360 $100M.
Others. MENTORE/SINGH
REALTY 225-1017, 623-6136.
DUKE ST., KINGSTON 2
large house lots, 48'/117'. Ideal
school, luxurious hotel,
apartments, storage bond -
$9.5M. Ederson's. 226-5496.
QUEENSTOWN- land- 61'7
160'. Ideal 4- house lot 4-storey
luxurious hotel/apartment,
foreign mission, church/school -
$22.SM. Ederson's. 226-5496.
DIAMOND $360 000 -
$1.5M; Grove $400 000;
Friendship $250 000 & $300
000; Coverden (Road side) -
$1M; Queenstown $4M;
Alberttown $3.5M; Oronoque
St. $7M; West Ruimveldt $2M;
LBI $1.9M; Main St. (corner) -
US$650 000 & Camp St. (corner)
- US$650 000. Call 231-6236.


LE RESSOUVENIR
Happy Acres (Double lot),
Atlantic Gardens, Ogle,
GuySuCo Gardens (Turkeyen),
Queenstown, Versailles, East
Bank. TEL. 226-8148, 625-
1- 2-4.-
8 ACRES transported
land at Land of Canaan,
E.B. Demerara, Lots 7 and
8 Sarah Johanna with house
and Farm. Call 233-2152 -
Ram, Eccles. E.B. Demerara
and 220-8338.
LAND at Nismes, WBD, 5
minutes drive from the
Demerara Harbour Bridge.
Measuring 180 ft. along the
public Road by 470 ft. from
the Public Road to the Old
Road. The land is between 2
roads. There is a canal on the
southern side of the land. This
land can give you 9 house lots
measuring 50 ft. by 180 ft. No
reasonable offer refused. Also
there is a land on the Old Road
at Nismes measuring 36 ft. by
235 ft. going for S3Mv
negotiable. Land at Supply, E
B Demrnerara from Public Road
to the Conservancy measuring
240 ft. along the Public Road
by 9 000 ft. from Public Road
to Conservancy with building
there on $45M neg. There is a
trench on the northern side of
the land. This property is good
for chicken, pigs or cattle
farming or any other business.
Call Ambrose Enterprise 227-
0809 or 226-6513.



1 BEDROOM APT. 25
LILIENDAAL. TEL. 222-
3610.
ROOM FOR SINGLE
WORKING FEMALE. TELE-
PHONE: 227-0928
3-BEDROOM apt.,
lower flat unfurnished.
Tel. 225-2749.
HOUSE to rent
Deobirana Street, Prashad
Nagar. Tel. 622-8361.
FURNISHED bottom
flat to rent Shell Road,
Kitty. Tel. 225-9587.
SMALL business place
at Russell and Princes Sts.
Phone 226-3949.
FURNISHED FLATS FOR
OVERSEAS VISITORS.
PHONE 227-2995. KITTY.
E>ECUTIVE furnished
and unfurnished houses and
apartments, office, bond, etc.
TEL. 226-8148, 625-1624.
TUiSCHEN, WCD 3-
bedroom newly built concrete
house.: $15 000 monthly.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
TURKEYEN: 3-bedroom
executive type house, 1 self-
contained room, fully grilled,
alarm system, water treatment
filter, 4 cars parking. US$1 200
neg. monthly. Ederson's. 226-
5496.
OFFICE SPACE. Prime
location 78 Hadfield Street,
behind Brickdam Police
Station. Contact Ms. Wendy
Simone 225-9211/227-
0501.
SHORT-TERM RENT-
ALS FOR OVERSEAS
VISITORS. PHONE 225-
9944.
BEL AIR PARK fur-
nished executive house on
double lot US$1 500. # 223-
5204/612-2766.
FURNISHED rooms and
one unfurnished two-
bedroom apartment. Tel.
270-1214 Gloria
EXECUTIVE HOUSES -
Kingston, Bel Air Gardens,
GuySuCo Gardens (Turkeyen),
Lamaha Gardens, Bel Air Park,
Eccles, New Providence. TEL.
226-8148, 625-1624.
MEADOW BANK vacant
2-storeyed 6- bedroom semi-
furnished concrete building.
Ideal large family, or guest
house, phone, tanks, 2-vehicle
parking. $60 000 monthly.
derson's. 226-5496.


"1-


Foe custvtlpei -"7,UF-aj.:'i I 0p.,




3,5







2 A... ........,. _.. -4 On,


tINIj rHH1INI(F MaI y 12005


ONE four-bedroom house
to rent at 81 Agriculture Road,
ECD. Tel. 220-6174 or 614-
7770.
OFFICE space for rent.
Upper flat at Cummings Street,
large and Vacant. Immediate
possession. Tel. 233-5688.
FIVE-BEDROOM AC,
house fully furnished with theatre
room with AC. US$1 200. G & I
Realty 622-5853 or 660-1267.
LONG term & short term
apartments. Murray's Property
management Services. #231-
3302.
ROOM by it self with
kitchen, bath, water, light -
$15 000, Middle Road La
Penitence. Tel. 225-9759.
2-BEDROOM apt. 2""
field, Cummings Lodge,
kitchen, hall, toilet and bath.
Contact Vishee on 222-3255.
SEMI-FURNISHED two-
flat house Dr. Miller St.,
Triumph, 3-bedroom, spacious
yard $20 000 neg. Contact
afil/Sue. Tel. # 220-3799.
Bottom flat Duncan
Street, formerly Video World,
also top and middle flats and
part of bottom flat in Regent
Street. Tel. 226-2260, 225-
2873, 619-5901.
NEW AMSTERDAM fully
furnished 3-bedroom house in
residential area, self-
contained master room, study,
wash room, enclosed garage,
telephone, etc. Call 333-
3293 or, 227-7373.
FURNISHED two-bedroom
apt. Ideal for a couple or single
person US$450 per mth and
US$20 per day. Call 227-3546
or 624-1881.
BUSINESS properties in
and out of Georgetown,
offices, bond spaces, etc.,
227-4040, 611-3866 or 628-
0796.
FURNISHED ROOM -
DECENT, SINGLE WORK-
ING FEMALE. TEL: 226-
5035 (08:00 17:00 HRS).
ONE room to rent,
furnished apartment for a
single decent working female
on East Bank. Tel. 233-2541
or 615-5839.
DO You need an honest,
reliable & efficient Real Estate
Agency? Call: UpToTheMinute
Realty. # 225-8097/226-5240.
2-BEDROOM bottom flat -
Happy Ac(rs (residential area),
(concrete, toilet, bath, 2-car
garage, '24 hrs security. Tel.
220-7879.
ONE furnished two-
bedroom flat situated in Queen
Street, Kitty. Suitable for
overseas visitors. Tel. 227-
1871.
3-BEDROOM back house
- 127 Fourth Street, Alberttown
- $33 000 per month. Contact
Benjamin at the above
address.
AVAILABLE fully
furnished, 3-bedroom, flat
(short and long term rentals).
Also 2-bedroom apartments.
Call 226-0210.
OFFICE space -
conveniently located in
Central G/town Croal &
Camp Sts., Stabroek. Tel.
226-5131, 226-0523.
LONG term & short term
apartments. Murray's
Property Management
Services. #231-3302.
TOP flat $45 000; house
$75 000; apt. $20 000; rooms
$15 000. Call 225-2709, 225-
0989.
BEL AIR PARK/
Subryanville/Section 'K'/P/
Nagar furnished/
unfurnished houses. Ryan -
Tel. # 223-5204/616-3743.
F URN I SHED /
unfurnished residential/
commercial buildings,
flats, apts country wide.
Ryan Tel. # 223-5204,
616-3743.
PRIME location self -
contained apartments along
UG Road. Suitable for overseas
visitors. Long and short term
basis also (2) office spaces or
any other business. Call 623-
3404/222-6510.
FURNISHED American-
styled apartment ideal for
a couple or a single
person $3 000/$4 000
per day. Call 622-5776.
ONE lower business flat situ-
ated at Lot 1 Non Pariel,
Area A, East Coast
Demerara. Apply to
Jerome Fredericks at same
location.


3-BEDROOM UPPER FLAT
IN TRIUMPH, ECD 220-5173 OR
220-6245, 641-1913
FIVE-BEDROOM AC, house
fully furnished with theatre room with
AC. US$1 200. G & I Realty 622-
5853 or 660-1267.
BAR in Georgetown all new
modern equipment, including
Pool table G$200 000 month.
UpToTheMinute Realty 226-
5240/225-8097
3-BEDROOM top flat (above
Rite Health Pharmacy opp.)
Emergency Unit (PHG), black
verandah, hall, kitchen, etc. -
$65 000. Tel. 226-8730 Jean.
BEAUTIFUL ranch type house -
fully secure with enclosed garage,
over head tank, telephone, spacious
yard, etc. in highly residential area.
40 000. 270-4644
RESIDENTIAL and
commercial properties -
furnished and unfurnished.
Prices ranging from $35 000 to
US$3 000. Contact Carmen
Greene's Realty. Telephone
226-1192, 623-7742.
FLAT above Triple B Barber
Shop, 235 South Rd., Lacytown.
Adequate space that is excellent
for offices and/or living area, (3
bedrooms) with toilet/bath.
Contact telephone 220-3196,
* 220-2247..
BUSINESS place situated at
Princes & Russell Sts. Contact
Millennium Consultancy Unit &
General Services. Tel: 227-4757,
627-5379, 613-6369.
OGLE fully furnished $70
000; BelAir Gardens- US$1 200,
Republic Park $70 000
monthly. Call Vish Realty 227-
4890, 225-9780, 614-5717.
FOR overseas guests -
house, furnished flats, rooms,
house and apartment. Self -
contained and AC. Contact C &
S Night Club. Tel. 227-3128,
cell 622-7977.
C & S NIGHT CLUB and
Roof Garden and Pools Hall -
furnished or unfurnished (long
term). Interested person only.
Contact C & S Night Club. Tel.
227-3128, cell 622-7977.
FURNISHED & unfurnished
apts. from $30 000 US$5 000;
5-bed. fully furnished house, hot
and cold, AC, tel., parking, etc.
A & R Real Estate &Auto Sale.
231-7719.
QUEENSTOWN, fully fur-
nished 1.& 3-bedroom apart-
ment with parking space to rent.
Suitable for overseas visitors on
short term basis. Tel. # 226-
5137/227-1843.
2-BEDROOM bottom flat, S/R
$25 000 per month; apartments
in Dazzel Scheme with bath tubs -
$15 000 & $20 000; 2-storey
property on East & Church Streets,
good for dwelling and business -
S$1 200. Contact Success Realty
223-6524, 628-0747.
QUEENSTOWN. BRAND NEW
CONCRETE TOP FLAT.
UNFURNISHED.THREEBEDROOMS
ONE SELF CONTAINED $75 000;
NANDY PARK 2 BEDROOMS $35
000; HOTEL (BOURDA) AREA 7
BEDROOMS US$1500; SMALL AND
LARGE PROPERTIES (MANY)
PRIVATE MORTGAGES AVAILABLE
IN FEW AREAS. HUMPHREY
NELSON'S. 226-8937.
BEL AIR PARK (one-
bedroom), parking $20 000; Eccles
$25 000; Prashad Nagar (phone
& parking) $40 000; Kitty $30
000; Campbellville $35 000;
Lamaha St. (4-bedroom), phone &
parking $70 000; East Bank house
4-bedroom) phone & parking $45
00; Queenstown, fully furnished -
$65 000. Call 231-6236.
BEL AIR PARK, fully furnished
3-bed., AC, etc., US$600; 3 two-
bedroom apts. fully furnished, all
modern conveniences, parking, tel.,
hot and cold water, AC, etc. Rental
neg. A & R Real Estate &Auto Sale.
231-7719.
ATLANTIC GARDENS- LARGE
2-FLAT BUILDING, RENTING
SEPARATELY, 3 BEDROOMS, 2
BATHROOMS, AIR- CONDONED -
EACH FLAT, LARGE YARD.
TELEPHONE # 227-0972.
FOR immediate lease--en
Northern Hogg Island 200 acres
of cultivated rice land along with
rice mill complete with drying
floor and dryer. Also tractor, com-_
bine, bulldozer for sale. Con-
tact: 626-1506/225-2903. Se-
rious enquiries only.
COMING from overseas or
across the Counties or the
Hinterlands? Check out
Sunflower Hotel. Long term or
short term 3 hours, daily, weekly,
monthly. AC, TV self-contained. We
take bookings. Call 225-3817, ask
for Margaret, Fazia or Rose Ann.


CENTRALLY located
bottom premises suitable for
internet/computer service.
Immediately available. Tel.
226-6544. -
BEL AIR PARK: Large
senior executive residence, with
5 bedrooms, 4 are self-
contained, generator, water
filter, etc. US$2 700 (neg.) and
another 4-bedroom at US$1 200.
SHERIFF STREET: 2 top flats
furnished $60 000 and $75 000.
SUBRYANVILLE: 2-bedroom,
AC, furnished. US$800 (neg.).
OFFICES: Middle, Main and
Hadfield Streets. Call 226-7128,
615-6124. ABSOLUTE REALTY.
SHADES AND SHAPES.
APARTMENTS and houses.
Bel Air Park top flat, fully
furnished US$700; Bel Air
Park top flat US$500, semi
furnished; Subryanville -
bottom flat 3-bedroom $50
000; Lamaha Gardens -
bottom flat $40 000;
Brickdam top flat 3-bedroom
- $55 000; Alberttown 3-
bedroom bottom flat $45
000; apartment in South -
singles $25 000. HOUSES:
Section 'K' Campbellville 3-
bedroom, AC US$750; Bel Air
Park- 3-bedroom, AC- US$750;
Lamaha Gardens 3-bedroom
- US$1 000; Cummings Lodge -
3-bedroom US$500; Courida
Park 3-bedroom, AC, yard
space US$1 000; BeI Air
Gardens- executive-US$1 000;
Eccles executive house -
US$1 000; Queenstown -
executive US$1 800; Bel Air
Park 3-bedroom, executive -
US$1 500; Prashad Nagar -
US$1 000. APARTMENTS: Bel
Air Village executives $1
500; Be! Air Springs;
Subryanville US$400; Bel Air
Gardens US$200; Blygezight
- US$500; Camp Street -
US$600; Eccles US$500.
SHORT TERM APARTMENT
COMPLEX. SHORT TERM
ROOMS Queenstown.
Executive property sale as low
as $20 million. Commercial
spaces. Starting your business -
spaces are available North
Road, Kitty Public Road, Church
Street, Camp Street. Bond and
Land for sale/rent. Agent
Christopher Goodridge.
Telephone 226-1808, 642-
8725, 614-2073. Location 20
Bel Air Gardens.
LAMAHA GARDENS
US$500. STRICTLY FOR HIGH
PROFILE PERSON. CUTE ONE-
STOREY EXECUTIVE
CATEGORY CONCRETE
BUILDING CARRIES TWO
SELF- CONTAINED
BEDROOMS. AMENITIES ARE
PAR EXCELLENCE.
AVAILABLE JULY 1.
AGREEMENT WILL BE READY
AS SOON AS SELECTED
PERSON IS CHOSEN (2) AT
PRIVATELY OWNED HUMAN
HABITAT SETTLEMENT (CITY).
TOP BRAND NEW CONCRETE
SELF CONTAINED TWO-
BEDROOM FLAT. A 1
AMENITIES. FURNISHED
US$600. UNFURNISHED
GUYANA $80 000. (3)
QUEENSTOWN. BRAND NEW
TOP THREE BEDROOM FLAT
FOR RESIDENCE $75 000.
OFFICE $100 000.
QUEENSTOWN HUGE (6)
BEDROOM HOUSE RENT
NEGOTIABLE DEPENDENT ON
THE NUMERICAL STRENGTH
OF PROSPECTIVE TENANT (7)
S(8) LAMAHA GARDENS
EXECUTIVE HOUSE (TWO-
STOREY) 3 BEDROOMS, ETC.
US$1000 NEGOTIABLE. (9) NORTH
ROAD (PRESTIGIOUS SECTOR)
WELL APPOINTED EXECUTIVE
CATEGORYTWO-BEDROOM FULLY
FURNISHED FLAT, US$450.
WORTMANVILLE. PRIME
RESIDENTIAL CUM COMMERCIAL
AREA. BRAND NEW, MOST
BEAUTIFULTHREE-BEDROOM (TOP
FLATCONCRETE, FURNISHED $75
000. (11) BOURDA MARKET
VICINITY. SEVERAL SMALL
COMMERCIAL SECTORS
(GROUND AND TOP FLOORS) TO
ETAT VARYING RENTALS. (12)
PROPERTIES FOR SALE.
SMALL FROM $3.5M TO $8M.
MIDDLE OF THE ROAD FROM
$10M TO $15M. HIGHER
PRICES, FROM $20 TO $80M.
(13) LAND FOR SALE (DOUBLE
LOTS) FROM $8.5M UPWARD
ENCOMPASSING BLOCKS OF
LAND AT CANAAN, 57 ACRES
LAND OF CANAAN ALSO 329
ACRES. WEST BANK OF
DEMERARA,ALSO 11 ACRES (LAND
OF CANAAN), NOT FORGETTING
DOUBLE LOT AT KINGSTON,
ETC. WANTED. BUILDINGS
ALREADY SET UP AS BONDS
NOT WITHSTANDING
RESIDENTIAL ETC.
CARMICHEAL STREET
PROPERTY FOR SCHOOL AND
GYMNASIUM. HUMPHREY
NELSON'S. 226-8937.


OGLE, large and secured
two-bedroom apartment with all
conveniences. Price $22 000.
K. S. RAGHUBIR Agency. Office
- 225-0545. Home 259-0019.
THREE-BEDROOM (3)
concrete house to let in Glandale
Park, BV with telephone and
parking $30 000; three-bedroom
concrete cottage, with suite and
two cane chairs, North East La
Penitence $35 000. Wills
Realty -227-2612/ 627-8314.
KITTY $35 000; C/VILLE -
$45 000; Subryanville $100 000;
executive places Section 'K',
furnished US$900; US$1500; Bel
Air Park, Queenstown, Happy Acres,
Bel Voir Court, Prashad Nagar.
OFFICE SPACES Kingston, Main
Street, Brickdam, Middle, Church
Street, Others. MENTORE/SINGH
REALTY 225-1017, 623-6136.


1 HOUSE lot with 4
houses: Persons interested
please call 333-2420 Price ne-
gotiable
CANAL NO. 2, North
Section 3-bedroom house
(concrete & wood). Tel. 263-
5739.
BEL AIR PARK vacant 2-
storey concrete 7-bedroom
mansion $16.9M.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
DOUBLE-LOT 3-bedroom
property for sale in Amelia's
ard, Linden. Price negotiable.
Call: 223-4938.
(2) TWO-STOREYED busi-
ness/residential properties in
Robb St., Bourda. Tel: 225-
9816, Monday Saturday
.(08:00 17:30 hrs).
LOT 8 Princes St., Werk-en-
Rust, 2nd building North of
Camp Street suitable for any
business your dream home go-
ing cheap. Call 226-6017.
ONE 3-bedroom and two 2-
bedroom wooden buildings
situated at Agricola, EBD. Price
negotiable. $10M. 226-7025,
660-4621.
TRANSPORTED business
property for sale at Lusignan,
wooden & concrete, shop
included. Call Indra on 613-
1715.
2-STOREY house and land in
South R/veldt, house & double lot
of land in D'Urban Street. Tel. 226-
.9029, 226-4177, 619-8225, 225-
2873.
HOUSE & land in
Stewartville, WCD. Giveaway
price. Tel. 226-9029, 226-4177,
619-8225, 225-2873.
2 BRAND new buildings
(concrete) on Duncan Street -
Lots 36 and 40. Interested
person only. Vacant building.
Contact 227-3128, 622-7977.
ONE-STOREY three (3)-
bedroom wooden building
situated at Bagotstown, East
Bank Demerara. Price $4 000
000 negotiable. Tel. 225-7330
or 623-3950.
BEAUTIFUL ranch type
house, fully secure with enclose
garage, overhead tank,
telephone, spacious yard, etc.,,
highly residential area. $6.5M.
270-4644.
FIVE-BEDROOM house with
bath tub, sash windows and
overhead tank at $10M and
many more just above $5.5M. G
& I Realty 622-5853 or 660-
1267.
LOT 48 Stanley Place, Kitty
8 ft driveway; land 63.4 ft.
length, 40 ft. width; house 28
ft. x 17 ft. Phone no. 231-7991,
cell 626-8340. Price $3.6M
neg.
CHARLESTOWN, Charles/
Sussex Sts., near school vacant
front building & land. Ideal internet
cafe, mechanic shop, taxi $4M.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
Mc DOOM RIVER SIDE river
side land 47'/218'. Ideal wharf,
large ship, auto sales, 4 stores, mini-
mall, supermarket $22.5M neg.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
ROXANNE BURNHAM
GARDENS vacant 3-bedroom
wooden building with concrete
garage land to build another
house $5.3M neg. Ederson's. 226-
5496.
1 bungalow 2-flat concrete
house concrete fence, grilled gate,
1 year old. Owner leaving country.
Agriculture Rd., Mon Repos. ECD.
Tel. # 625-6821, 621-0004, 627-
5104.
TUSCHEN, WCD vacant
newly built 3-bedroom well-
designed all-concrete building -
$9M. Ederson's. 226-5496.


URGENTLY needed -
Commercial, residential
buildings for sale or rent. Kitty,
South Ruimveldt,
Campbellville, Subryanville,
Prashad Nagar, Bel Air Park,
Lamaha Gardens, Atlantic
Gardens. Also land. Ederson's.
226-5496.
GIFT Kuru Kuru, active
business property with 3 freezers,
pool table, music set, chicken pen
can accommodate 3 000 birds.
Land 200'/100' $9M neg.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
ECCLES Residential AA -
vacant 2-storey concrete 6-
bedroom mansion, grilled,
meshed, parking 8 cars, alarm.
Land 50'/100'. $23M neg.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
CAMPBELLVILLE vacant
2-storeyed concrete 4-bedroom
mansion, 3 toilets & baths, large
sitting, library, 4 cars parking.
Inspection anytime. $16 M.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
GIFT New Market St. -
Doctors, Investors. Ideal for
hospital, beer garden/food
restaurant, 2-storeyed concrete &
wooden building, from road to
alley $17.5M (US$85 000)..
Ederson's. 226-5496.
NOOTENZUIL, ECD vacant
2-storey 5- bedroom concrete &
wooden building. Land 60'!
117' to build another house..
$3.5M. Ederson's. 226-5496.
PROPERTY/Land from road
to river 41'/210'. Gift New
Hope, East Bank Demerara -
active beer garden with freezer,
pool table, 2-storey wooden
property, top 3- bedroom, bottom
4 rooms. Land 41'/210' from.
road to river. Ideal trawlers,
shipping $15M neg. Ederson's.
226-5496.
KINGSTON near Seawall -
vacant 3-storeyed 6-bedroom/
office mansion. Ideal luxurious
hotel, executives offices, 8 cars
parking. If qualified, move in
tomorrow. $38M neg.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
PORT Mourant Public Road,
Berbice 2-storeyed concrete &
wooden newly built corner
property. Ideal for business and
residence. $10M neg,
Ederson's. 226-5496.
NEWLY constructed three-
storey building with four self-
contained bedrooms and all
modern' facilities. K. S.
RAGHUBIR Agency. Office -
225-0545, Home 259-0019.
GREIA Carmichael Street,
opposite Bishops' High School,
back building 10ft. driveway,
fenced with separate gate -
wooden building, three-
bedroom and living area top
flat, bottom kitchen, living area
and inside step. Price $6M. Tel.
225-4398, 641-8754.
3-BEDROOM flat concrete
house East Front Rd. $6M; 2
concrete and wooden building,
S/R by Shopping Plaza $6M;
furnished 2-storey house fully
grilled with AC, telephone and
parking in Thomas Street, Kitty -
$14M; 2-storey concrete house
in Queenstown; Land No. Canal
2 $4.5M. Contact Success
Realty. Tel. 223-6524, 628-
0747.
LAMAHA GARDENS $22M;
Prashad Nagar -. $15M;
Queenstown, $20M; Eccles $19M;
Meadow Brook Garden $9M;
Happy Acres 25M. Call 223-1582,
or 612-9785.
PROPERTY & land located
at 53 Earl's Court, LBI (Railway
Embankment). 8 712 sq. ft.
Property worth G$7M. Selling
@G$5.8M nag. Interested
persons please contact (561)
01-5924 or send email to
Bignutts@adelphia.net
ONE (1) newly renovated 3-
bedroom house telephone fa-
cility, overhead tank, car park for
(2) vehicles Drysdale Street,
Charlestown. Tel: 225-9816,
Monday Saturday, (08:00 -
17:30 hrs)
UNFURNISHED property
on % acre of land in Kuru Kuru,
Soesdyke with three chicken
pens to get your business
going. Also lot of fruit trees..
$4.7 million enquiries only.
Tel. 261-5960, cell 614-5768
Jenny.
ONE two-storey wooden and
concrete 4- bedroom house, South
Ruimveldt Gardens Contact
Ronald on 662-5033 or Samantha
on 624-1370. No reasonable
offer refused. Vacant possession.
1 EXECUTIVE 5-bedroom
master room, three toilets,
three baths, fully filtered, in-
sect-proof, generator, air-condi-
tioned, large yard space with
beautiful gardens, etc. Bel Air
Park. # 225-9816.


REGENT Street, America
Street, Camp Street, Queenstown,
Eccles, Oleander Gardens, Kitty.
TEL. 226-8148, 625-1624.
LARGE concrete and wooden
building with three-bedroom and
one self-contained. Price $5M
negotiable. K. S. RAGHUBIR
Agency. Office 225-0545. Home
- 259-0019.
FOR SALE AT BUSINESS
SECTOR OF NELSON'S
MANDELA'S AVE. SIZEABLE
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
CONCRETE) WELL KNOWN.
SALE SUBJECTTOTHE HIGHEST
OFFER. SOLE REALTOR
HUMPHREY NELSON'S REALTY.
TELEPHONE 226-8937.
BROAD ST., C/town $7.5M;
Annandale Sth $3.2M & $1.5M;
Friendship Pub/Rd., EBD $10M;
Line Path Skeldon $6M; Nismes
- $1.3M. SEEKER'S CHOICE
REAL EST. 223-6346, 263-
7110, 618-6033.
DIAMOND NEW TWO-
bedroom $2.5M; South
Ruimveldt $8M; Kitty -
$8M; C/ville $11M, North
Road ,with extra land three-
storey $28M, Queenstown -
$16 M;Happy Acres, Others.
MENTORE/SINGH REALTY -
225-1017, 623-6136.
KINGSTON, Queenstown,
Lamaha Gardens, Eccles,
Subryanville, Blygzeight Gardens
$f2M; Oleander Gardens,
Atlantic Gardens, Kitty, Cummings
Lodge, Industry. TEL. 226-8148,
625-1624.
KITTY $3.4M; Diamond
(newly built) concrete house -
2.4M; Eccles $8M; Quamina
St. (comer) $9M; South $6M &
$8M; Bel AirPark- $15M; Prashad
Nagar $12M; Banrr St. (business) -
$14M; Robb & Alexander Sts -
$25M; Liliendaal $4.5M. Call
231-6236.
10 ACRES river side, Land of
Canaan,Access to Kokerand road,
available in parts. 20 Lombard
and Harel Sts. Ideal commercial
spot. 11-14 Lombard and Princes
Sts. Going corner car wash and
lumber yard. Tel. Mr. Ally 226-
1750 or 225-6197.
HOUSE on Eccles Public
Road $8M; brand new 2-flat
concrete house, in excellent
condition, D'Urban St.; 3-bedroom
house in South R/veldt Gardens -
$8.5M; one-flat 3-bedroom
concrete house, East R/veldt.
Success Realty. 223-6524/
628-0747.
FOR SALE BY OWNER -
2-storey full&\ concreted
house 5 bedribms, 2 full
bathrooms, American fixture
faucet, sink, toilet, cabinet,
hot water tank, eating kitchen,
built-in wardrobe, central air-
conditioner, car garage, front
view to Public Road. Lot 6
Nandy Park, EBD. Interested
erson only to call. Day -
26-7806; evening 225-
8410.
ONE five-bedroom house
on double lot, Atlantic
Gardens, E C Dem. $25M
neg.; wooden cottage, Werk-en-
Rust $4M; One executive four-
bedroom house with modern
amenities in landscaped
compound, EBD $50M.
Wills Realty 227-2612/
627-8314.
KITTY $7M; C/ville -
$13M neg.; Bel Air Park $18M
& $25M; Prashad Nagar $16M
neg.; Queenstown $13.5M;
Lamaha Gardens $22M;
Eccles 'AA' $20M; Meadow
Brook $8.5M; Regent St. -
$45M. Sheriff St. $45M.
Contact Carmen Greene's
Realty. Telephone 226-1192,
623-7742.
7 1/ ACRES transported land
at Garden of Eden, East Bank
Demerara with two buildings, one
two-storey wooden and concrete
house, upper flat with 3-bedrooms,
lower flat with living, dining, study
room, kitchen, toilet and bath. One
labourer house, garage to park 3
vehicles. 6 / acres cultivated with
approximately 650 bearing citrus
and coconut trees. 1 acre reserved
for building chicken pen or
gardening. #266-2300.
ECCLES AA: Large 4-
bedroom $20M. LAMAHA
STREET: Large 3-storey with
small cottage at back -
$25M. PRASHAD NAGAR: 2
three-bedroom concrete at
$13M and $20M.
QUEENSTOWN: Very nice 4-
bedroom with extensive
lawns $40M. NON PARIEL
on the Public Road: Very nice
3-bedroom 2-flat $12.5M
and lots more all over. Call
226-7128, 615-6124.
ABSOLUTE REALTY.


SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1, 2092







SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1, 2005 25


PRPETI


South Ruimvel
$8.5M; Aubrey
Road, South Park
Huston Ville $7.5
Air Park $16M;
Court, ranch-type c
$22M; BI ygezight
D'Urban Street
Prashad Nagar-
Atlantic Gardens
Barr Street US$5
Land Queenstown
$30M. To let
bedroom bottom fla
000. Contact R
Realty, First Federa
Bldg. 227-7627 -
227-3768 Home
9914 Cell.
IT IS A ST
OCCURRENCE IN TH
ESTATE AGENCY'S S
VIZ. PRIVATE MORT
BEING GIVEN AWN
PEAS TO SMALL PR(
BUYERS DOING BU
WITH HUMPHREY NE
WHICH
UNSURPASSED SPHI
INFLUENCE HAS AR
SLEEPING BENEVO
OF ITS WEALTHY PRO
INVESTORS TO
FROM THEIR SLUME
MEANS OF H
AGREED TO GIVE TO
MEMBERS OF
HUMANKIND P
MORTGAGES. STA
OFF WITH THE FOLL
PROPERTIES
ALBERTTOWN -
DEPOSIT OF
NEEDED. HALEY
NORTON $4.7M. D
OF $1M NEEDED. D'
STREET RESIDENCEC
BUSINESS FRONT
DEPOSIT OF $2M N
D'URBAN BACK
$10M. DEPOSIT O
NEEDED. CARMI
STREET (HUGE)
DEPOSIT OF $3M N
LEST IT
MISUNDERST
PERSONS MUST
QUALIFIED. HUM
NELSON'S WORLD
ESTATE AGE
PIONEER ADV
AMONG NATION
HUMAN H
SETTLEMENTS
CONJUNCTION WIT
AWARENESS PROMI
FEATS THAT GAVE B
(FIFTEEN YEARS
ASTONISHING NO
ALLEGEDLY TC
PSEUDOAIDSAWAF
IMPOSTORS, SO!
WHOM ALLE
POSSESSED OF GIG
BE GRUDGENESS
NATION'S FIRST
AWARENESS MUSIC
LYRIC POETRY EN
"KILLERS AIDS"
SUPPRESSION U
PROTECTION WIS
RELEVANT BODY. AS
PENNED,GUYANA"(
A TANGLE WEB WE
WHEN WE DO PRAC'
DECEIVE". ENOUGH
FOR THOSE GUY
OCCUPYING
POSITIONS IN THE S
OF AIDS AWAR
PROPAGATION WI
ASSUMEDLY SPE
HAVING GE
INTEREST.
ADVERTISEMENT I
FOR BY THE WC
SINGULAR PIONEER
ESTATE AGE
ADVOCATE A
NATIONS OF
A W A R E NI
PROPAGATION
PERPETUATION NOT
HUMPHREY NEL:
TEL. 226-8937.



EARTH for
Delivery to spot. Te
7127.
ONE size 22 w
dress for sale. Te
0676.
FURNITURE e
piece suite, etc. C
619-2373.
ROTTWEILER
FOR SALE. CONT
621-8871.
VAUXHALL Viva
for car parts. Phone
3949.
1 STALL at I
Market. measuring -
12 ft. Tel. 612-5749
NEW
generators from U
e00. 4 000. 6 000
Call 233-5500
DIESEL water
- 2 and 3 inch. bra
from UK. Call 261
for details.


dt Park
Barker
- $14M:
5M, Bel
Earl's
concretee
- $35M;
$9.5M:
$22M;
- $18M:
00 000;
- $20M
three-
at $35
;oberts
tion Life
Office,
e, 629-

RANGE
IE REAL
SECTOR.
FGAGES
4Y LIKE
OPERTY
ISINESS
-LSON'S
DIVINE
IEREOF
ROUSED
)LENCE
OPERTY
ARISE
BER BY
HAVING
SMALL
THE
PRIVATE
PARTING


DACHSHUND & Pekinese
pups. Contact Majestics. Tel.
226-6432. 227-0269.
FIVE large stalls suitable
for a large business. For sale/
rent located at Bourda. Tel.
218-1176.
ONE 4-cylinder Bedford
portable welding plan. D.C.
Key start. Tel. # 265-4217.
Carl #621-4417.
EARTH for sale. Delivery to
spot. Excavating, grading and
leveling of land. Contact 621-
2160, 229-2520.





2-60KVA (SILENT)
ON WHEELS
1-145 AND 1-35KVA
WITH CABINET
COMPRESSOR,
WHEEL BALANCER,
TYRE CHANGER

CO CROWN MINING

kmm 8 k.g i


OWING MOVIE Town DVD Club, 43
VIZ. Croal St. 231-5602/624-5814.
$5M. Sale! Sale! Original DVDs $800
$1.2M each.
AND
EPOSIT WHOLESALERS enquiries
'URBAN welcome, all types of invitation
CE CUM direct from India. Tel. 621-1498.
2) $9M. 254-0494.
EEDED. TWO five-Dish and one
LANDS four-Dish plough and one trail
F $2M harrow. Ideal for rice work. Tel.
CHAEL 623-0957.
18M.
EEDED. ONE new complete Dell
BE Desk top PC (black). Must sell.
OO D, Call Sheldon on 617-2510.
T BE 1 EVINRUDE outboard 55Hp
PHREYA engine. Excellent condition -
D REAL $225 000. Giveaway price. Call
ENCY'S 260-2355.
LOCATE
IS OF 1 KAWASAKI Jet Ski 1100
ABITAT CC very fast, like new, with
IN trailer. Tel. 226-9029, 226-4177,
rH AIDS 619-8225.
lOTION, NEW air-conditioners split
AGOr system 9 000 & 12 000 BTU,
DOUBT remote control. Tel. 226-9029,
ODAY'S 226-4177, 619-8225.
RENESS 1 pr. Glass sliding doors,
ME OF measuring 48" x 8 ". (No
GEDLY tracks). Asking $27 000. Ray -
GANTIC 226-6630.
OF THE
AIDS ONE brand new computer
ALCUM with CD Burner, CD Walkmans,
TITLED car stereo and DVD Player.
HENCE Contact 225-4112, 626-9264.
NTOLD ARGON/Co2 mixed gas. Also
SE VIA shock treatment for swimming
3OFTEN pools. Phone 227-4857 (08:00 h
EWHAT 16:00 h), Mon. to Fri.
WEAVE
TICETO ENGINES for sale 4-cyl. &
H HINT 6-cyl. Perkins, 3, 4, & 6-cyl.
ANESE GM, 1 & 2-cyl. Lister, PTO's
HIGH for all types. Tel. 225-8448.
SPHERE 6-FT. DOUBLE DOOR
ENESS REFRIGERATOR IN WORKING
THOUT CONDIITON FOR SALE. CALL
MAKING
NUINE 231-3107.
THIS PARTS for washers/
S PAID dryers, thermostats, knobs,
)RLD'S belts, pumps, motors,
R REAL splines, etc. Technicians
ENCY'S available. Call 622-5776.
iMONG
AIDS 15 LIMITED Edition Nes
E S S cartridges. W/console, 2
ALSO controls, zapper. Call for
rEABLE details 623-3920.
SON'S. LARGE quantity truck tyre
liners, size 20, Good Year
U brand $1 000-each. Call 621-
4928.
3 BENCH metal lathes -
sale. 240V, all $350 000; 2
el. 626- crankshaft grinder 240V, both -
$200 000; 1 engine head
weddingg resurfacer, 240V $250 000; a
I. 218- quantity of spares for machine
free. Owner migrating. 611-8766,
621-4928.
contactt SHARP 27" Television,
Playstation consoles, CDs.
Nintendo 64, cartridge aames
PUPS accessories, micro r.,, T'
FACT 223-0713.
"FREEZERS" Small.
car or Medium and Large GRL
ie 226- Freezers at give away prices.
All in perfect working conditions.
Bourd-a Call 225-8802 anytime.
16 ft x 1 STALL in Stabroek
9. Market. Contact Millennium
Honda Consultancy Unit & General
K 3 Services. Tel. # 227-4757,
watts. 627-5379, 613-6369.
LEWISVILLE LADDERS: 24
pup.s-p... ft. extension $35 000; 20 ft,
nd new extension $30 000: 16 ft.
1-5403 extension $25 000: 8 ft. A $20
4 000: 6 ft A $15 000. Contact
Dave on 231-6547.


PLAYSTATION II GAMES
SYSTEM, 1 PENTIUMS IV, 1.6
Ghz, 30 GB CD/RW/DVD ROM,
19" monitor. Contact 619-2373.
HOUSEHOLD furniture one
Nordic track thread Bar-B-Q
rill. Owner leaving country.
el. 225-8986, 225-0162.
STALLS for sale, prime
business spot. Price
negotiable. Contact Sharon's
Boutique, Stabroek 'Market.
Tel. 225-8986, 225-1206.
OXYGEN and Acetylene
gases. Fast and efficient service.
0 11 Mc Doom Public Road,
EBD. Phone 223-6533 (08:00 h
16:00 h), Mon. to Fri., (Sat. -
08:00 h to 12:00 h)
1 FLOOR model PLASTIC
SEALING machine, 1 PORTABLE
ELECTRIC air compressor in
excellent condition Tel: 222-
4507/623-7212
ONE 150 HP & one 250 HP
Yamaha Outboard engines.
Price $700,000 & $1,200,000.
Also parts for 150 HP & 250 HP.
Call 629-6651 anytime.
VIDEO Projectors, laptop
computers, digital cameras, key
boards, electric and box guitars,
DVD recorders. Contact
Majestics. Tel. 226-6432, 227-
0269.
ONE (1) Mitsubishi Canter
(2 tons) in immaculate
condition, double back wheels,
enclosed box. Price $1.5M neg.
Call 337-4007, 337-4819, 621-
2870.
MIXER, CD Player,
equaliser, power amplifiers,
speakers 12", 15", 18', Bullet
tweeter, horn. For more
information, call 220-4738/619-
9313 Anil.
HIGH quality compatible
cartridges for Canon Bubble
Jet printers ranging from $1
500 $$2 500. 337
Cummings St. Tel. 226-6847
or 613-6379.
FREON gas: 11, 12, 22, 502,
134A & 404A. Also Nitrous Oxide,
Argon gas & Helium for balloons.
Phone 227-4857 (08:00 h -
16:00 h), Mon. to Fri.
MOTHER'S Day Sale. AC
Unit, microwave, DVD, fridge,
stove, bar-b-que grill, stereo,
TV, brand name colognes &
watches. Tel. 227-3717, 614-
6453.
D. SINGH & SONS, KING
ST., GEORGETOWN & 95
SOUTH ANNANDALE, EAST
-COAST. GARLIC 1 000 PER
BAG WIS.
EACH 12 000 BTU, 230V
AC, used working computer, PCI
TV card, Laser jet and Desk Jet
Printers. Ten combination table
chairs. Call 623-9438.
HOUSEHOLD items 1
circle set, 1 fridge, 1 wooden
single bed, 1 double wardrobe,
1 4-piece dinette set, wooden.
125 D'Andrade St. Newtown.
ONE Frigidaire 23 cu. ft. two-
door with ice maker fridge.
Asking $195 000. One GE 4-
burner gas stove with oven 30-
ins wide, in good condition.
Asking $45 00,. Call 225-5591.
1 NEW Kenmore gas
stove $100 000; 3 Motion
Sensor Security lights $6 000
each. Call 623-1195, 227-
3339.
PANASONIC Surround
sound stereo/home theatre
system Dolby 5.1 amp, 110 Disc
payer, 5 or 7 speakers, Sub-
Woofer. 223-0731, 613-1788.
1 HONDA 450 4 X 4 ATU
(Motor bike); ATU tyres,
winches, parts; 1 10 000 watt
belt driven gen.; 1 money
counting machine. Call
Timothy 226-2229/613-
3746.
BRAND new computer -
Intel Processor 256 MB DDR
RAM, 333 MHZ 40 GB hard
drive, CD ROM,ICDRW, fax
modem, etc. Tel. 220-7643/
220-6045.
FOR all of your hard to get
spares, visit Motor Spares & Co. Ltd.
Gaskets for Bedford & Leyland
Trucks, suspension parts, battery
lugs, battery cable and much much
more. Located at 35 Robb & King
Streets. Tel. 226-3071.
FOR SALE one female
driven Pajero JR. (First owner),
fully.powered, auto start, chrome
rims, CD Player, power amp.
Immaculate condition. Call 622-
4488, 640-4094.
1 HONDA pressure washer,
brand new: 2 drills; 1 saw; 1
Jialing motorcycle, next to new:
1 amplifier; 1 truck pump: 1
battery charger: 1 bicycle. Tel.
265-5876.


PURE BRED PIT BULL pup,
female, 3 mths, vaccinated and
dewormed, ears cropped.
Excellent for security and
breeding. Contact Ray. 264-
2911 or 617-2231.
MOUNTAIN Bicycles 26"
18-speed $8998; 20" $6985;
16" $5998; 12" BMX- $3398.
ANANDS/AVINASH BRANCH
STORES.
ONE automotive boring bar
to rebore engine blocks;
Compressor unit (large tank);
two- cylinder engine: engines
for Leyland Daff (98 mm).
Cheap. 330-2361/627-5900.
1 SET mag rims; 6 TVs; 1
microwave; 1 CD Player; 2
VCRs; 2 music sets; 2 DVD; 1
tape. 265-5876.
NOW open Sky Digital. We
offer the best price & better service
in Philips Sky Dish. Do you have
problems with your Sky Dish & want
to be free from stress? Call 643-
4136 or 625-5351.
SKY Universal for the best of-
fer in Phillips digital dish. View
up to 125 channels including
Pay Per View channels and
also Direct TV. Contact: Gray
on Tel. 227-6397/227-1151
(0), 616-95
CAUSTIC SODA: 55-lb $3
600, Alum: 55-lb $4 000, Soda
Ash: 100-lb $8 000, Sulphuric
Acid: 45-gal $45 000, Granular
Chlorine, Chlorine gas. Phone
227-4857 (08:00 h 16:00 h),
Mon. to Fri.
HAND carved antique
furniture from India dining set,
centre table, book case, room
divider, jewel, boxes. Telephone
# 225-5926 8 am -4 pm, Cell
# 622-8713. Lay away plan also
available. Items can be viewed
at Bel Air Gardens.
WATCH and Calculator
Batteries, just arrived new
shipment Maxwell Silver Oxide
Batteries, only $300 each.
FREE installation while you
wait @ Guyana Variety Store
& Nut Centre, 68 Robb Street,
Lacytown. Tel. 226-4333.
LINGERIE Clearance Sale
- Bra sets, PJ sets, baby dolls,
tops, slippers, etc. All Victoria
Secret and Old Navy. Call 225-
4495, 626-3178, 226-8800 for
appointment.
2 BRAND new film strip and
slide projectors, THD Halight
(English made) with manuals,
replacement bulbs. Never used.
Sold as package $125 000.
Phone 624-8402, 225-4631,
225-2503.
CLOTHES hangers at
wholesale prices, skirts, pants,
and underwear, thousands of
pieces. Starting as low as $17
each. Guyana Variety Store, 68
Robb Street, Lacytown. Phone
Call 227-7677, 624-8402.
BRAND new music carts,
equipped; power amplifier
300W; equaliser; 2 12" speaker;
6 tweeters; 1 horn, CD Player -
$125 000. Call 227-7677, 624-
8402.
JUST arrived a new
shipment of Philco Sky Dish at
unbeatable price. Guaranteed
best customs service provider for
fast reliable and best service.
Contact RANISAT INC. at 235
South Road or call 227-5167.
Get connected today.
1 MALE German Shepherd,
2yrs. old (black & tan). Price $50
000; 1 female Dachshund, 1'yr.
old (brown). Price $10 000; 1
female Koikerhonjie and
Dachshund mixed (brown & white).
Price $15 000. Address Lot 00
Hadfield Street, W/ville. Tel. 231-
7590.
INDUSTRIAL Transformer
welder. New (Never used), can
weld mild & Stainless steel, cast
iron and aluminium. Turbo fan
- cooled for extended use at
full power amps 35 260 3-
Phase 400 volts, electrode
diameter 1.6- 5mm. Call
Godfrey 621-4568.
(1) FOUR cylinder Ford
Cargo truck with wooden tray,
brand new tyres, excellent
condition. Price $675 000; (1)
four- cylinder Ford r-'in,.
nqiin, Good condition '"
":' i,1) 75 Hp Yamaha outboard
engine. Good condition $325
000. Tel. 220-1068 or 625-0551 -
Ally,
5 COMPUTER Systems -
$60 000 each; 6 IBM CPUs -
$30 000 each; 4 UPS Back
Up $18 000 each; 9
Monitors $10 000 each; 6
Triplite Stablisers $9 000
each; 2 3-user work stations -
$60 000 each: 2 6-user work
stations $150 000 each. For
more information, call 225-
8915. 226-4514.


FO SL


POULTRY FARMS Gar-
den of Eden and Craig Plan-
ning for a bigger yield? We
have pens that can accommo-
date 15 000 birds and lots and
lots of running water we are situ-
ated near to a creek, 1 Ma-
chine Shop Industrial Site with
an extra lot. Call SUCCESS
REALTY 223-6524/628-0747
VULCANISING
equipment and other
accessories available
including: 1 spotter for
patching tubes; 1 spotter for
patching tyres and tubes will
shoulder and sidewall plates.
Optional plate package for
patching tubes available. A
set of air hose with fittings, 1
6Hp 150 PS. Air compressor
with fittings. 1 2-ton hydraulic
jack. Also all purpose gum,
tubeless snap on valve, etc.
Call telephone 628-7663 or
223-3356



*Windows XP w/SP2
Microsoft Office 2003 5 in 1
*Norton & Mcafee Anti-virus
2005
*Adobe Premier From
&After effects $1 500.,.
*Quick Book
A/Cing & POS 2004
*Adult & children Edu-
Programmes
*Computer Training
on Cds
Games
And Lots, Lots More
Also have your computer
expertly repaired at your home
Genius computers unlimited

Tel: 626-8911 or
231-7650 anytime

ONE Computer Operating
System: WINDOWS XP
PROFESSIONAL. 40 GH Hard
Drive, 735 MHz, CD Rewritable
Drive, CD Drive, Diskette Drive, 15"
Monitor, Keyboard, Mouse,
Workstation, MSP56 MR MODEM,
INTERNET READY, MEMORY 386.
Price $90 000. TELEPHONE NO.
231-6314. ASK FOR QUINCY/
NATASHA.
SALE! SALE! SALE
SALE! ELECTRICAL ITEMS. -
Star Delta starter; main switches
500 Amps 500V; bus bars;
transformer line wire; entrance
cable; polyphase Wati hour
meter. ALLAN WEST Auto
transformer starter. MOTORS: -
3 HP, 20 HP, 25 HP, 30 HP,
75HP, & 100HP 3-phase.
Horizontal portable compressor
-450 PSI; horizontal compressor
tanks. MISCELLANEOUS
ITEMS Caterpillar 518, skidder
parts, assorted windscreens,
assorted car parts. FILTERS -
AC, Delco TP 540 x filters (oil &
fuel) Forstschritt tractor.
SAWMILL PARTS Winch
heavy duty; 52" & 60", circular
saw blades. TYPEWRITERS
MANUAL: Olympia & Royal.
ELECTRICAL: IBM, Smith
Cornea 410 & Royal. Large
four-burner gas stove, 50cc
Jailing motorcycle (new). Tel.
619-1390.
JUSTARRIVED- NEW BOB
CAT TYRES SIZE 12 X 16.5,
ONE NEXT TO NEW
CATERPILLAR 3306 DI ENGINE
CAN FIT D5 OR D6 BULLDOZER
HAS BELL HOUSING WITH ALL
ACCESSORY DRIVE. ONE
DETROIT DIESEL 8V92
MARINE ENGINE 350HP
REBUILT WITH 6 MONTHS
WARRANTY. CALL 218-1469,
218-3899, 623-1003.
JUST arrived from the U.K.
are Perkins Industrial Turbo
Engine with power take-off over
200 Hp: 4236 and 6354 Turbo
and non Turbo engines -
starters, radiators, cylinder
heads, crankshafts. etc. Heavy
duty woodworking machine:
planers, band saw resaws, rip-
saws, suitable for chain saw
lumbering: wood lathes.
shapers, mrortisers, and Esterer
gang saw 28" gate. Metal lathes.
shapers, milling machines, drilling
machines, air compressors, hack
saws,. ,i,,... and welding
plants.,I ... is (1) one 30-
ton low loader trailer, gear boxes,
springs and differential for Leyland.
Bedford, and model M 4x4. Tyres -
1500, 1400 x 20 etc. Bulldozers.
rollers, idlers, sprockets, -.ii,.i
track chains, etc. for 215 i
excavator and D4, D5 & D6D
bulldozers. Contact 220-2034.
220-1787


20 NEW 5-gal. pale
adhesive carpet paste $7 000
each; 2 STIHL FS 160 brush
cutters hardly used both -
$110 000; 1 Sears large water
pump with pressure tank
complete, 110 240V $40
000; 2 security alarm panels for
hook up alarm system for
building store factory, both -
$30 000: 1 Honda EB 1400 AC
DC. Honda generator $105
000; 3 wash room sinks with hot
and cold water taps $6 000
each; 1 new sealing fans with
lights 110V, Canadian made -
$6 000 each; 75 pieces
galvanised dry wall frames, new
10 L, W 4 inches, 1 inch, all -
$30 000; 1 25-piece new
Draper '/ inch drive socket set -
$12 000- 2 inverters 12V to
110V 400 to 800 watts along
with battery $35 000; 1 14
watts with battery $25 000.
Owner leaving. 621-4928.
1 DIESEL Kubota
generator. 110-240V 50-60Hz
with security casing battery 12V
or crank start $700 000 neg.;
1 18 inches surface planer
heavy duty (Industrial) 230 -
460/3 Phase 4-head $350
000; 1 Mortising machine, 110-
240V $60 000; 1 12-speed
drill press, 110-240V $45 000;
1 6 inches Delta belt sander
on stand, 110V $30 000; 1
125K 240V welding plant
transformer complete with
shield $35 000; 225 Amps
complete $50 000; 1 English
Yale chain hoist /2 ton $20
000; 1 edge and surface
sander, 110-240V $40 000; 1
Skill Mitre ad stable angle
saw, 110V- $40 000 1 circle
rip saw (Dayton), 110-240V on
metal stand adjustable $55
000; 1 Dayton heavy-duty
Industrial 110V dry vacuum with
dust collector bag on wheels -
$35 000; 5 privately owned
oxygen cylinders full with
oxygen $100 000; 1 small
oxygen and 1 small acetylene
cylinder with gauges torch
complete for refrigeration -
refrigerator gas R404A 241bs
$35 000 R134A 30 Ibs -
$30 000 Genetron brand; 1 18
000 BTU and 1 12 000 BTU
split unit need servicing good
compressor, both $110 000; 2
12 000 Window Unit Peak $25
00, need serving, (working);
3 18 000 BTU Window Unit,
working but casing missing -
$20 0(TOO each: 12 large
aluminium canisters 3 VY x 2
ft. 12 in $10 000, 3 Y2x 2ft 18
ins- $15 000, 3 x 2 ft. x 24
ins $20 000 good for storing
money, guns, ammunition.
tools, valuable belongings etc.;
75 pieces new galvanised dry
wall frames 10 ft. long by 1 inch
by 4 inch width, all $30 000;
1 large bench grinder, 110V -
$25 000; 2 motorcycle
helmets $1 000 each; -1
Toyota Prado bonnet $15 000;
1 electric pressure washer, 240
440 $100 000; 1 new 25-
piece '/2 inch draper silver drive
socket set AF/metric $12 000,
USA; two Bedford 4 x 4 crash
bars $25 000 each. Owner
leaving. 621-4928.
1 36 inch RCA television
remote, 110 240V with stand
on wheels $170 000; 1 Sharp
microwave, 110V, turn table -
$15 000; 1 new tent enclosed
to accommodate 4 persons
huntingor overnight, USA $25
000; T round pTastic table 4
chairs and umbrella $15 000;
1 Toshiba radio tape and CD
Player, 110 240V- $11 000;
3-piece cupboard at $10 000
each; I Apex DVD remote,
110V, new $15 000; 1 12-
inch coloured Citizen TV 110V
- $25 000; 1 large wall divider
with compartment for TV,
stereo music set or computer,
etc., USA made in two parts -
$50 000; 1 small freezer $40
000; 1 small fridge 110V $40
000; 1 Presto warmer or roti pan
cooker, 110V $12 000; 1 large
music set 2 large base 2 mid
range (24 tweeters 2 boxes)
equalizer; 2 amp, mixer all
mounted on metal stand with
wheels; 2 JVC turn tables: 2
tape decks double all for $300
000 neg. lot of extra sound
effects all cables, etc.; printers
- Hewlett Packard Desk Jet -
810c $12 000; 1600c $10
000; 612c $8 000; 1
Canadian heavy-duty shredder,
fully automatic 110V $20 000:
2 typist secretarial chairs on
wheel $5 000; 3 4-drawer
filing cabinet $15 000; 2-
drawer $10 000: 3 computers
monitors, 3 CPU. 3 Pr;;--rr 3
Keyboards, 3 APC. - 1. ii ,.
3 mouse. 1 voltage regulator
with conditioner, 6 speakers. 1
Star billing machine, 1 scanner
and stand 1 computer desk.
all cables,. 12V power pack.
all for $205 000 along with
computers covers; 1 new'digital
camera with charger complete
(Soiiny) used computer disc $30
00:; 1 new digital camera used
pen torch hattery and chip with
cable accessory to computer, to
print photograph $45 000
(VIVITAR). Owner leaving. 621-
4928. 611-876G


11111111.1 _1__1_1 1 ..~_II~_1I -~"l~--~-c--y--m~- arr~L~--YPB. a u ar ~I -p- II I---~


I ORAL '






26 SUNDAYCHRONICLE May 1,2005
,. ,' rV ..*r~T ^ rrzqiW^l


1 AT 192 CARINA. PRICE
NEGOTIABLE. TEL. 218-4060.
1 BEDFORD MODEL M
TRUCK. TEL: 455-2303
1 NISSAN Caravan E 24,
excellent condition. Tel. #
220-4782
ONE Bedford TL 7-ton
lorry (not dump). Tel: 227-
1923/616-5679.
TWO big reconditioned
Ford tractors for sale. Tel.
623-0957
ONE Toyota Carina AT 170,
automatic. Tel. 229-6271, cell
625-5611.
1 NISSAN Cefiro good
working condition. $900 000
neg. Call Tel. 627-0158, 442-
3901.
4-WD RANGE Rover -
Land Rover with alloy rims
& Sony CD player. Priced to
go. # 621-7445.
1 ONE Toyota Land
Cruiser (diesel) 13 seater,
manual $4.1 million. Please
contact 623-7031.
TOYOTA Land Cruiser,
trail ready; Nissan Sports car.
Tel. 225-6359, 623-8353.
ONE AT 192 Carina. Priced
at $1 250 000. Call 227-0902
or 231-4110.
MITSUBISHI Lancer fully
loaded, etc. Price neg. Tel.
226-0041, 621-5407.
1 AA 60 Carina music,
mag rims, spider. $375 000
neg. Tel. 621-0420.
TOYOTA TT 125, Corolla
KE 30, Carina parts. 265-5876.
TOYOTACorona, PEE series,
ST .170 in good condition. Mag
rims, etc. Tel. 612- 7477.
ONE EP 82 Toyota
Starlet fully powered, PHH
series. Price $1.2M neg. Tel.
623-7684.
ONE EP 71 Toyota
Starlet automatic, power
steering, mag rims. $650
000. Tel. 220-1467.
ONE SV 20 Toyota Camry
motor car. Good condition.
Price excellent. Contact
Sheldon on 617-2510.
ONE AT 170 Carina fully
powered, EFI PHH series $700
000 negotiable. Tel. 223-6218,
231-3690, 642-8630.
SUZUKI Fronte car -
manual transmission and no
AC 36 000 miles from new.
PDD 567. Lady driven. 223-
0731 or 613-1788.
ONE used doubled
Axle Leyland truck, also
plenty of Leyland truck
parts for sale. Tel. 623-
6957.
1 AE 100 Toyota Sprinter -
EFI, fully loaded, music, mags,
AC, PJJ series. Excellent
condition. Tel. 220-6461.
2 RZ mini buses long
base. 2 AT 150 cars. All in
excellent condition. Phone
268-3953, cell 627-6242.
AE 91 TOYOTA Corolla,
HA 7892 $600 000 neg.
Tel. 625-4159, 222-2954
after 5 pm.
ONE ET 176 Corona
Wagon automatic. Perfect
working condition (no repairs
needed). AC, 13" mags, tint.
Tel. 619-5087, 218-3018.
ONE AE 91 Sprinter -
PGG series, automatic, fully
powered. Excellent
condition. Tel. 256-3750,
cell 622-9720.
TOYOTA Tacoma PGG
series. Excellent condition.
Toyota Previa mini van.
Great buy. Tel. 226-9029,
226-4177, 619-8225.
NISSAN Cefiero car AC,
PW, PS. PJJ series $800
000; Mazda 4 x 4 pick up -
$600 000. 226-4177, 226-
9029, 619-8225.
TWO (2) Toyota Pick ups -
GJJ series and one (1) Honda
250 Custom motorcycle. Tel.
227-8579/226-8583.
TOYOTA Starlet new
model. Toyota Starlet EP
82, series PGG. Tel. 226-
9029, 226-4177, 619-8225.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter
(3 tons), enclosed. Contact
Tel. # 263-5404 after 16:00
hrs. 618-9602, anytime.
1 TOYOTA 4-door Pick Up
diesel engine, 2000 up
model. Price neg. Contact 225-
6759 during working hours.
ONE AA 60 Carina, in ex-
cellent working condition.
needs body work tape deck,
AC etc. Tel. 617-4063/225-
0236.


ONE TT 131 CORONA in
good condition mag rims,
stick gear, tape deck. Tel:
626-6837 after hours # 220-
4316.
ONE RZ mini bus, BGG
series, one open canter tray,
aluminium sides, metal
bottom. Call 260-2806, 621-
2859.
ONE Toyota AT 192 -
manual transmission, in good
condition, AC, music set, etc.
Tel. 611-1018. Price $1 250
000.
4-WD Long Base 110 Land
Rover Defender. 5-door.
Excellent condition. Priced to
go. Call 619-9536, 616-6669.
1 ST 190 Corona Pearl
white. Immaculate condition,
like new, PHH fully powered. 98
Sheriff St., C/ville. 223-9687.
1 TURBO Starlet EP 82 -
automatic. Fully powered,
like new, immaculate
condition. 98 Sheriff St., C/
ville. 223-9687.
ONE Nissan U12 car, in
excellent condition, mag
rims, power steering, central
locking, AC, $650 000. Tel.
623-9584.
ONE RZ minibus in
excellent condition. Price $1.5
million (negotiable). Call Tel.
No. 231-5955, 622-3627.
ONE Toyota Carina car in
working condition. Model AA 60.
Contact Phone no. 225-4160
after 4 pm and onwards.
AA 60 CARINA, in good
condition. Tape deck, etc. Terms
can be arranged. Tel. 621-2472
- Sharmela Khan.
HONDA Prelude in
immaculate condition, fully
powered, sun roof, mag rims.
rice $475 000 neg. Call 622-
3934, 220-1243.
TOYOTA Master Ace 9-
seater minibus automatic,
in private, top condition.
Price $700 000 neg. Nissan
canter truck 2-ton. Price $600
000. Contact Bobby. Tel. 336-
6625, 616-2804(C) .
1 DUMP truck, 1 wa-
ter tender and 330 Timber
Jack Skidder all are in
.ood working condition.
or more information
Contact: 264-2946.
ONE AA 60 Carina car -
automatic (back wheel drive),
PFF series. Excellent
condition. Asking $370 000
(neg.). Owner migrating. Call
#277-0194.
1 RZ minibus Long Base.
In excellent condition. BHH
series with CD Player, mag
rims, etc. Needs no body work,
ready to work. Must go. Tel.
220-3653, 222-5013.
1 RZ MINI BUS long base,
in immaculate condition with
mag rims, fully loaded, # BJJ
2132. Tel. # 222-6533, 222-
5013, 220-3653. .Call
anytime.
ONE Mitsubishi Canter, 2-
ton, in immaculate condition,
double back wheel, enclosed
box. Price $1.5M neg. Call 337-
4007, 337-4819, 621-2870.
ONE (1) TOYOTA Hiace
Super GL 14-seater mini bus
diesel engine, four (4)-wheel
drive dual air conditioned,
CD deck, BJJ 1995. Call 225-
5274/226-7665.
1 TOYOTA (ET 176) Corona
Wagon gear, (new 5A engine),
just spray over, clean. Price -
$725 000. Contact Rocky #
621-5902, 225-1400.
TOYOTA Carina AT 150 -
power steering, power windows,
power mirrors, music, 5-forward,
PFF series $450 000
negotiable. Call 226-0362, 227-
5982 (h).
1 TOYOTA Hilux Surf
(enclosed) hardly used -
automatic, fully powered, AC,
mag rims. crash bar. Price -
$2.4M. Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
FORD Lincoln Stretch Limo
(black, auto, loaded, seats 7,
needs minor repairs, sold as is
with registration $3 million neg.
Call 227-7677, 624-8402.
MERCEDES Benz 190E
parts. Windshield, bonnet and
grill, radiator, distributor and
Feads, some engine parts. Call
227-7677. 624-8402.
1 TOYOTA Double cab
(pick up) 3Y engine solid .- ",,
mag rims, AC, Bed liner, F'.iil
Def). Excellent condition. Price
$1.8M. Contact Rocky #
225-1400 or 621-5902.


1 AE 81 Toyota Sprinter
(private) automatic, mag rims.
Excellent condition. Price -
$550 000. Contact Rocky #
225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma (2000
model) GJJ series, automatic,
AC, chrome mag rims, CD
Player, Bed Liner, Crystal light,
step bar. Immaculate condition.
Price $2.9M. Contact Rocky -
# 225-1400 or 621-5902.
ONE Nissan Pathfinder -
new paint job, fully loaded with
mags wheel, CD Player and
more. Must see asking $1.5M.
One Toyota Corolla AE 81, in
good condition, auto, new paint
job. Asking $695 000. Call 225-
5591 or 612-7304.
1 AT 150 TOYOTA Carina
(private) manual, tape.
Excellent condition. Price -
$550 000. Contact Rocky #
225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 SV 40 TOYOTA Camry
(PHH series new model).
Immaculate condition. Low
mileage, automatic, fully
powered, AC, chrome mag rims,
CD, DVD Players, TV. Price -
$2.1M. Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 NISSAN Pathfinder (V6) -
PHH series, (2- door), automatic,
crash bar, step bar, (5 seats).
Excellent condition. Price -
$1.8M (4 x 4). Contact Rocky -
# 225-1400 or 621-5902.
CARINA 212 $1.6M; RZ
buses $850 000; Sprinter AE
100 -$1.1M; AE 91 -$650000;
AE 81 $400 000; Starlet EP 82
(Sunroof) $1.1M; Carina AT
70 $600 000 & $850 000; AT
192 $1.3M ($450 000 down
payment). Call 231-6236.
ONE Nissan 720 pick up
long tray along with spare
engine. Mint condition.
Privately used $625 000 neg.
One Toyota Corona station
wagon ET 176 5-door, power
steering, front wheel drive, 12
valve engine, AC, adjustable
seats, 5-seater fold down back
seat, mag rims, disc brakes, PHH
series. Privately used, female
driven. Good for taxi service or
personal family use. Excellent
condition $800 000. Owner
leaving. 621-4928.
1 AA 60 TOYOTA Carina
(back wheel drive) gear.
Excellent condition. Price -
$500 000. Contact Rocky #
225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Land Cruiser
(2001 model) V8 (Air bags)
American made), automatic,
fully loaded, sunroof, mag rims,
crash bars, leather seats, CD
Player. (Never registered, duty
already paid). Mint condition.
Price $18M. Contact Rocky -
# 225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 FORD Aero Star mini van
Family type) automatic, side
back doors, mag rims, CD,
music system. Price $1.1M
(neg.) 1 Honda Vigor motor
car (executive, leather inside)
automatic, fully powered, AC,
mag rims, alarm, spoiler. Price -
$1.3M. (Right hand drive). Both
vehicles immaculate condition.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA RAV-4 (PHH
series), hardly used, automatic,
fully powered, AC, mag rims,
crystal light, roof rack, fog lamp,
CD Player, side bars, crash bars.
Immaculate condition. Price -
$3.4M. (Fancy music system).
Contact Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 SR5 TOYOTA Extra cab
(V6) automatic, fully powered,
AC, crash bar, CD Player,
sunroof, mag rims. Immaculate
condition. Price $2.3M.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA (15-Seater) RZ
'L : 1 Iase). Immaculate
--.r .:. -, Manual, mag rims,
music. Hardly used, never jam.
Price $1.3M. Contact Rocky -
# 225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA (15-Seater) RZ
(Short base). Immaculate
condition. Manual, mag rims,
music. Never jam. Price $1.1M.
(New seats). Contact Rocky #
225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 AE 100 TOYOTA Ceres -
(PHH series never in hire),
automatic, fully powered, AC.
chrome mag rims. Immaculate
condition. Price $1 325 000.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 GX 90 TOYOTA Mark 11
(New model) private -
automatic, fully powered, AC,
17" chrome mag rims. CD Player,
music set, fulry alarm. Price -
$2.1 M. Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.


AT 170 CARINA -
$800 000- AE 100
Sprinter $1 250 000;
AT 192 $1 450 000;
RZ $900 000; Hilux
Surf $1.7M. All prices
neg. A & R Real Estate
& Auto Sale. 231-7719.
1 TOYOTA AA 60
Carina car; Toyota
Cressida RX 80, fully
loaded; 1 3Y mini bus.
All vehicles in working
condition. Credit can be
arranged. Tel. 611-3887,
642-7172, 621-2472 -
Khan.
TOYOTA CERES,
mags, spoiler, AC, music
- $975 000; AE 91
Corolla white, mags,
music, fully powered -
$775 000 neg. A & R
Real Estate & Auto
Sale. 231-7719.
ONE AT 170 Carina,
EFI, automatic, fully
powered, AC, tape deck,
etc. PGG series, never in
hire. Excellent
condition. Tel. 623-
8700, 270-4465.
1 ET 196 CALDINA
Wagon, 1 AE 100
Marino, 1 ETT 71
Starlet. Also one
transported concrete
property. Owner wants to
leave country. C all 625-
1676.
1 (C-33) Nissan
Laurel automatic, AC
type, fully powered car
with low fuel
consumption (4-cyl.).
Price less than its duty.
1 Long Base RZ BHH
series. Contact Tel./Fax:
229-6421, 616-9523.
TOYOTA LEVIN
Sports car AE 110 LOW
MILEAGE, fully
powered, A/T, 15" mags
with low profile tyres, CD
music system with
amplifier, alarm w/
remote start, etc.
Immaculate condition.
Call 611-0832.
RECONDITIONED
vehicles from Japan at low
price AT 192, AT 212
Carina, CK2A Mitsubishi
Lancer, AE 110 Corolla/
Sprinter, Toyota RAV4 &
Honda CRV. Contact
Arnold. Tel. 226-1831,
612-2139, 661-2419.
SALE on fully factory
reconditioned vehicles -
AT 192, AT 212, RAV 4,
TV, NV, CD, C-Player
Visors; T-100, 4WD Pick
Up. EFI cat eye, RZ mini
buses. Low credit, terms
and trade-in facilities
available at Paul
Camacho Auto Sales, 111
Croal Street, Stabroek,
bet. Albert & Oronoque
Sts. Tel. 225-0773/621-
5869.
2003 TOYOTA TUNDRA,
LIMITED (PEARL
WHITE), WITH REMOTE
CONTROL ON STEERING
WHEEL FOR RADIO,
ETC 4-WHEEL DRIVE,
LEATHER INTERIOR
(TAN), 20-INCH CHROME
WHEELS, VERY PRETTY.
MUST SEE. CALL 612-
0099 OR 444-6617.
3Y time, time for 3Y,
2 3Y buses BGG series
$500 000 each; one
automatic 3Y, excellent
condition, private or B
Series $550 000, BDD
or DEE; 3Y buses $375
000, $450 000; zip buses
with road reduction.
Contact David at Pete's
Auto Sale, Lot 8 Croal
St., Stabroek. Tel. 223-
6218, 642-8630, 226-
9951. 226-5546. After
4pm 231 -3690. Credit
can be arranged.
HYMAC 580C & D
long and short boom;
CAT D6 & D5 wide track
bulldozer; 22 RB
Dragline (air, clamp
shelT & digging buckets);
CAT 330 excavator;
Hitachi excavator: MF
Brazilian tractor with
chipper and plow, tar
& bithumen kettel;
Bedford model 'M'
dump truck; Toyota T
100 Extra Cab pick
up; ILsuu diesel pick
up: Leyland low bed
truck and trailer;
Leyland Boxer truck,
17.5 x 24 tyres. Call
222-2628 or 220-9199,
No reasonable offe r
refused.


ONE NISSAN 4 X 4
jeep. Good condition.
ag rims, 4-wheel
drive, tape deck. Asking
- $900 000 negotiable.
226-7230, 619-1570.
2 AT 212 Toyota
Carinas. Price 1.7 million
dollar each; 1 AT 192
Toyota Carina. Price 1.5
million dollars; 1 Honda
Prelude (2-door). Price 1.1
million dollars. All in
excellent condition with
AC, CD Player & mag
rims. Price negotiable.
Tel. 226-6458 or 624-
5196.
NOW AVAILABLE.
NEW SHIPMENT
RECONDITIONED
VEHICLES. CARS:
Sprinter AE 110; Starlet
Glanza Turbo EP 91;
Carina AT 192; Lancer
CK 2A; Mitsubishi Galant
EA 1A; Toyota Cynos
Convertible; Cynos
Sports Coupe EL 52.
WAGONS: Corolla AE 100
G-Touring, Mitsubishi
RVR N 23 W, fully loaded.
PICK-UPS: (4 X4)
TOYOTA HILUX YN 100.
TRUCKS: Mitsubishi
Canter 2 tons -
Freezer; Canter 2 tons
open tray. .DEO MARAJ
AUTO SALES. 207
SHERIFF AND SIXTH
S T R E E T S ,
CAMPBELLVILLE. 226-
4939 A NAME AND A
SERVICE YOU CAN
TRUST.




One Toyota Land
Cruiser, 4-wheel
drive with winch. In
excellent working
condition.

PCC 4733.

Call 223-5273 or
223-5274 for more
information

ARE you interested in
buying or selling your
vehicle? Then contact
Rocky or Anita at Anita's
Auto Sales at 43 Croal &
Alexander Streets.
Telephone No. 227-8550,
628-2833, 660-7448,
Toyota 'Carina/Corona AT
212. AT 192, AT 170, AA
60; Toyota Sprinter/
Corolla AE 110, AE 100,
AE 91, AE 81; Toyota Hilux
4 x 4 Single and Double
Cab, Toyota 3Y, RZ, E24
Caravan, Nissan FB 14,
F13, FB 12, Honda Integral
CRV; Toyota Camry GX81,
GX 71, GX100, Toyota
RAV4.
MITSUBISHI RVR
N23W, Toyota Hiace RZH
112 minibus, Toyota
Hilux Surf YN 130 & RZN
185, Toyota Hilux RZN
174, Toyota Ipsum
5XM10, Toyota Hilux
Extra Cab LN 172 & LN
170, RAV 4 SXA11,
Corolla & Sprinter AE
110 & AE 100, Mitsubishi
Truck FE 537, Toyota
Hilux Double Cab RZN
167, Carina AT 212,
Honda CRV RDI. Mark 11
GX 100 & GX 90. Toyota
Hilux Single Cab LN 167
& LN 106, Toyota 'Land
Cruiser Prado VZJ 95 &
RZJ 120, Toyota Hilux
2x4, YN 86 and many
more other cars. Toyota
SIpsum SXM10, Toyota
HiluxRZN169 & LN165,
Mark II GX110, Toyota
Corolla NZE121, Honda
Civic ES1, Toyota Vista
AZV500, Toyota Hilux
YN107, Toyota Carina
AT192. Please Call or
come into our office -
Rose Ramdehol Auto
Sales, 226 South Road,
Bourda, Georgetown.
Office tel: 226-8953, 226-
1973, 227-3185. Fax 227-
3185. We give you the best
because you deserve the
best. RD5. CRV Honda
Jeep, ZCA26, RAV 4,
MCU10 Harrier Prado,
Land Cruiser, RZJ95 Prado,
RVR Jeep N23W.


TOYOTA 4-Runner,
PHH series $2 200
000 and $2 500 000; I
Tacoma $2 600 000
and $3 000 000; CRV -
$2 900 000 and $3 300
000; RAV 4 $3 3000
000; Prado $8 500 000;
Alexes van $8 000 000;
Double Cab $2 200 000;
Extra Cab Toyota SR5,
like new, 50 000 miles -
$2 200 000; 4 x 4 $900
000; $1 400 000. Contact
David at Pete's Auto
Sales, Lot 10 Croal
Street. Telephone 223-
6218, 612-4477, 226-
9951, 660-2815, 226-
5546



1 LIVE-IN BABYSITTER.
CONTACT 619-2373.
NOT WORKING
R E M O T E
TELEVISIONS. CALL
265-3050.
ONE EXPERIENCED
DOMESTIC. CALL
TELEPHONE NO. 227-
4402.
1 LIVE-IN
DOMESTIC, 40-50
YEARS. TELEPHONE 642-
8781.
HOMES WANTED!
$$$$. KEYHOMES #
223-4267
3 MACHINISTS.
APPLY 18-23 ECCLES
INDUSTRIAL SITE, E B
DEMERARA.
1 CASHIER, 1
WAITRESS. APPLY TO
KAMBOAT RESTAURANT,
51 SHERIFF ST.
ONE experienced Cook
to work in the Interior. Age
18 35. Tel. 223-160 /
616-5668.
1 MAID to work at
Waterloo Guest House,
139 Waterloo St., South
Cummingsburg. Apply in
person.
HONEST, mature &
reliable hire car Drivers to
work in Taxi Service.
Contact 223-1682.
ONE live-in Domestic
over 30 years, to prepare
tasty Indian dishes.
Georgetown. Phone 225-
9201.
REGENT STREET.
ESTABLISHED
C O M M ER C IA L
BUILDING. HUMPHREY
NELSON'S REALTY.
TEL: 226-8937.
ONE Domestic/
Babysitter from WCD to
work from 6:15 am to 5:45
pm, Mondays to Fridays.
all 612- 2537.
ONE Arc and Acety-
lene Welder. Must know
Brill work. Contact: 21
road Street,
Charlestown. Tel: 225-
2835.
EXPERIENCED
Waitresses & Cooks to work
at Restaurant. Attractive
salary. Call 623-3404 or
222-6510.
SALESGIRL, kitchen
staff, live-in girl from coun-
try area. Nazeema Deli 318
East St., N/C/ Burg. 226-
9654/618-2902
ONE (1) Groundsman,
age 30 45 needed.
Please call 225-6509,
between 6 am and 8 pm to
schedule an interview.
DIESEL Mechanic to
work in the interior. Must
have knowledge of Cat
excavator and Perkins
engine and welding. Call
225-2535.
URGENTLY- Waitresses
to work at New Bar in East
Coast, Demerara. Living
available. Call 227-5238,
622-8321.
WAITRESSES, 20 30
yrs. Apply in person to
ijay @ Neil's Hideout,
172 School St., LBI. Tel.
627-7032.
T PERSAUD, 57
Russell Street.
Charlestown, needs Arc
Fabricator and Acetylene
welders. Tel. 227-6204.
COU N T E R
Salesclerks and Porters.
Apply in person with
Police Clearance to Bish
& Sons. 159 Barr Street,
Kitty.


* .~ h4 ,






SUNDAY CHRONICLE May'1, 2005 27


EXPERIENCED
Salesgirl, porter and
driver. Apply with written
application To: Th'e
Manager. House Hold
Plus, 131 Regent Road,
Bourda.
WANTED urgently,
Drivers/Salesman. Apply
with documents to
Survival Bond, Lot 10
Vlissengen Rd. Phone
227-7580.
SALESGIRLS', Porters &
Security Guards. Apply
Anand's. Regent Street,;
Athina's & Avinash, Water
Street. Tel. 226-3361, 227-
7829.
EXPERIENCED B.ar
Tenders to work at Hotel
Purple Heart Rest. & 'Ba,
Charity, Essequibo Coast.
Call 225-2535 from 9 am -
3 pm.
1 COOK to make puli,
egg ball, potato ball.
Contact Lee's Snackette,
opposite Public Hospital.
Tel. 231-1272.
A B L E B O D I EiD
Labourers. Contact T.
Jahurally Lumber Yard, 39
Broad Street, Charlestown,
Georgetown, between 9 am
3 pm. ,.
WAITRESS & Night
Cook (6 pm to 2 am) to
work at restaurant/ba'r.
Sheriff St. Call 227-
8576. ..
PRESSER 3' pe:r
week. Contact T.
Jahurally Lumbe.r. Yard,
39 Broad Street,
Charlestown, Georgetown.
DRIVERS & contract
cars to work 24 .hours.
Must have hire 'car
Licence. -Co-ntact
Pacesetters Taxi
Service. Telephone
223-7909, 223-7910.
EXPERIENCED
Cashier, Puri & Roti
Maker. Apply in person
with written application
Hack's Halaal Restaurant,
5 Commerce Street, G/
town. 9 am 11 am.
ONE TWO-
B E D R O O M
UNFURNISHED FLAT
OR APARTMENT
WITHIN GEORGETOWN
$20 000 $25 000.
TELEPHONE 615-
2206, 227-8758, 225-
2096. GENEVA.
LIVE-IN Staff to do
semi-clerical work from
out of town. Application:
Personnel Manager, Lot D
Lama Avenue, Bel Air
Park, Georgetown. Call #
225-9404 or 225-4492.
ONE live-in family to
work on ranch and look
after house at Mahaicony
River $20 000 monthly.
Free place to live. Apply
at 192 Duncan St.,
Newtown, Kitty. 225-6571.
ONE live-in Maid to
assist in home. Must be
from the country area. Age
between 25 and 35 years.
Apply in person to 305 East
Street, South
C u m mi ng sb u rg ,
Georgetown.
MANAGER to work at
Hotel Purple Heart
Restaurant and Bar,
Charity. Essequibo
SCoast. Must have
knowledge of Night Club
and Hotel. Call # 225-
2535 from 9 am 3pom.
.E XdIPeE R I E N C E D
Hairdresser. Must know to
do manicure, pedicure,
facial and hairstyles,
etc. Also chairs to rent.
Please contact. Tel. 223-
5252 or 628-3415.
1 ASSISTANT to
Production Manager, 1
Machine Operator to work
night shift and 1 Ma-
chine Operator to work
day. Call 615-9752 be-
tween 13:00 and 16:00
hrs.
TWO live-in
Domestics between the
ages of 17 and 20 years
from the country areas.
Also one live-in boy to
do Handyman work around
yard and bond. # 621-4928.
1 DRIVER for contract
bus, between 25 and 45
years old. Must be neat
and tidy; have Secondary
education and able to
work flexible hours. Apply
35 Delhi St., P/Nagar or
call 225-1429-.-


TWO workers, Driver
Licence and knowledge
about vehicles important.
Apply in person with
.application to the Manager
;at Pete's Auto & Real
Estate Service, Lot 2
George St., W/Rust.
ONE live-in Domestic
from the Country area also
one live-in Handyman from
country a'ea. with masonry
,experience, one Carpenter
to do repairs -and other
work. 621-4928.
BACK To Eden, 85
David Street. Wanted -
experienced Bakers &
Pastry makers, rivers (non
alcoholic), Cook, Kitchen
.Assistant, 1 live-in
Watchman (religious
minded, non-drinKer).
Snackette Attendant. &
Yard boys....Tel... 226-0476.



Sewing machine
operators, trimmers
& ironers.
Appiy in person to:
CARIBEAN CLOTHING:
27 Lama Ave. Bel Air Park
(nex to C':,;- ii'

MAJOR Trading
Company seeks .:Office
Assistants. Minimum
qualification: CXC 'Maths
and English Grade 111.
Computer knowledge
desired, but not
compuls -ry. Application:
Personal Manager, 'Lot.D
Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park,
Georgetcwn. Call # 225-
9404 or :25-4492.
I NT LLIGE NT,
compute literate;
knowledge of Acco.unts
between :he ages of 25 -
40 years to work at Pe.te's
Auto & Real Estate
Services. Lot 2 George St.,
W/Rust v, th application in
person.
YOUNG, intelligent,
computer literate who
resides around Georgetown
to work at Pete's Video
Club. Apply in person with
written application to
Manag-er. Pete's Video &
DVD CTub. Lot 2 George St.,
W/Rust.
ONE Mechanic to work
in interior. Must know to
repair, Perkins Bedford
Excavator engine and
hydraulics and pick up.
Full knowledge of
excavator would be an
asset. All accommodation
provided. Call 223-1609 and
624-2653.
BACK To Eden, 85
David Street. Wanted -
experienced Bakers &
Pastry makers, Drivers (non.
alcoholic), Cook, Kitchen
Assistant, 1 live-in
Watchman (religious
minded, non-drinker),
Snackette Attendant &
Yard boys. Tel. 226-0476.
2 YARD Cleaners.
Porters to work at one of
these locations Water
Street, industrial Site,
Providence. Apply in
person with written
application. 2
recommendations, valid
Police Clea,-nce to: The
Personnel & Training
Manager National
Hardvar1 (Guyana)
Limited. 17 19A Water
Street, South
C u m m i n g s b, u r g ,
G e o r g e t n w ..
WANTEDC urgently -
Securit/ Guards and
Ice Plant Operators.
Must have (2) recent
Refe.rences, valid Police
Clearance. identificationn
and NIS cards. Apply in
person to: The Manager.
BM Enterprise Inc GFL
Wharf. Hoiuston, East Bank
Demerara
GIRLS FOR FACTORY
WORK labeling, i.',,
and pacs .... STOCK
CONTROL '.C-r.iD CLERK -
with CXC/GCE subjects.
Previous experience a
definite advantage.
HANDYBOYS/PORTERS -
to work in stock room and
on delivery van. DRIVER/
MECHANIC must have
experience in diesel and
gasoline vehicles. Apply in
person with written
application to: Secretary,
Twins Manufacturing
Chemists. 30 Industrial
Estate, Ruimveldt
(Opposite Textile Mill)


fwr m m
Kallls, Prince pile





on the pressure









_.. Copyrighted Material


-'^1---' Syndicated Content -


Available from Commercial News Providers"








0 7 'wa. f


we-'

r'T .. m 1 ,,
a


- -


- do-.a

-omom dw


Y~tic i vt jo r1 ai iU-


;" - *^ K




1 6 RAMNARINE: In I,:. .ng- an1l ,herishe'l merrir,- of
our t:eloved fathe-r an-d m.:,tr MR. & MRS. HARRY,
SAGNES RAMNARINE.
It /has Deen 5 tears since t0yoiu btl fl&'9r ait ,3
.. But it .til// seems as if itit n s yesterday
Your inoriderful lot e and it isdomi you both .sh i ed
t Siitllhiveon inour dailit less
Love you both. forever will be missed
Your loving children and grandchildren.


. a


In lov'rig n-, : i ri.iry ,)f our beloved
Wife, im iriti r an d riira ii I-i
J E AN.E T TE
VIMAKARDAJH I. i ed:
May 3,2000,
Five years have passed since :"

When our ,ri',eJ one was
calledaway.
People like you made the world a
happierplace
That is why 'hi, or loving
thoughts of you today
Years may come
Years maygo ,
' 4t "_. 9 ," h,,3/.:'', .:' -l, .l m ilt l. L; tl,'
You taught us how to live Sa
[o, 1ti Lu,21 plat l: o'.I c
That is why God chose you R
E .*,. 0u;. e g ,l ... . ',:,y,it M
No one knows oursorrow ch
No one knewyourpain P
But this is life Ke
Where we can nevermeet again S
Weloveyoumom At
And that's what keeps us alive F
We will treasure the memories si
Of you until we die d
God knew you were the best S
And that is whyHe chose you b
and put you to rest no
So sleep on ourloved one ot
in God's arms fri
You're now in His care.
Aa, 4dah plak- d 4y m e,,7,o


.. *- ', -...a !
---I-,,.




-rn,.:


adly missed by her
tving husband
a m n a r i n e
akardajh (Gandhi),
children Davo, Lizzy,
utsy, Terry and
evin; grandchildren
helly, Robin,
nnmarie, Antonio,
arina and 6 others;
sters, brothers,
on s i n I a. w,
aughters-in-l'aw,
isters-in-law,
rothers-in-law;
eces, nephews,
her relatives arid
ends.

etwl ed


kSa






28 SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1, 2005


9 SAID Guyana HIV/AIDS

SReduction and Prevention (GHARP) Project
A Joint Government of Guyana -U.S. Government Project



VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT

USAID Guyana HIV/AIDS Reduction and Prevention Project (A Joint Government of
Guyana -U.S Government Project) invites applications from suitably qualified persons for
the positions of:
Monitoring & Evaluation Supervisor
Regional HIVIAIDS Monitoring & Evaluation Officers (3)
To assist the national M&E team with the design and implementation of monitoring
and evaluation for USAID/GHARP and other stakeholders, and support the
improved availability and use of monitoring and evaluation data for program
planning, evaluation, improvement, management and policy advocacy at the
national and regional levels. The Officers will be placed in Regions 4,6 & 10.
MINIMUM RECRUITMENT STANDARDS:
First degree in Economics, Geography (Demography and Statistics analysis) Statistics, or
related field. Proficiency in the use of word processing and one spreadsheet package.
Previous experience in M&E would be an asset.

JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT
Responsible for the processing of routine payments of the office.
Prepares financial reports for Country Office staff to monitor and track obligations
and expenditures.
Carries out data entry in either the MTX double entry accounting system or Excel
spreadsheet.
Prepares bank and other account reconciliations.
Assists in the preparation of monthly and annual financial reports.
Assists in the execution of the day to day functions in the Finance Department
including the processing of requests for expenditure, payments and check writing.
Assists the SeniorAccountant as required in carrying out the accounting function in
the FHI/Guyana Country Office
MINIMUM RECRUITMENT STANDARDS:
The successful candidate must possess a University Degree in Accounting or completion
of ACCA Level II or recognized equivalent professional qualifications with a minimum of 3
years experience in accounting related to NGOs and community level programs. Working
knowledge of USAID-funded programs. Experience must reflect the knowledge, skills and
abilities listed above. Must be computer literate.

Regional HIV/AIDS Program Officers (10)
Responsible for mobilizing and galvanizing within a region NGOs, FBOs and CBOs
into a unit which will work to achieve objectives under the USAIDIGHARP portfolio.
MINIMUM RECRUITMENT STANDARDS:
A BSc in Social Work, management or related field and four (4) years relevant experience
in community mobilization.
Persons from all ten (10) administrative regions of Guyana are encouraged to apply
for the Regional HIV/AIDS Program Officer position.
Job Descriptions can be uplifted from the Receptionist at USAID/GHARP office.
All positions are contractual for one (1) year and renewable for up to three (3) years.
Applications must include the name, address and contact number of at least two (2)
referees, one (1) from a community member and/or former employer (s;) as to fitness for the
position.

Please send applications to the PROGRAM ASSISTANT, USAID/GHARP Project, 3'd
Floor, 44 High Street, Kingston, Georgetown, no later than Friday, May 13, 2005 at 16:30
hrs. For the Regional HIV/AIDS Program Officers position, th6 closing date will be Friday,
May 20, 2005 at 16:30 hrs.
USAID/GHARP is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
ONLY SHORTLISTED CANDIDATES WILL BE CONTACTED. NO TELEPHONE CALLS
PLEASE.



,ail- ".USAID Project implemented by
S ,.. Family ilithh International, Cicatelli Associates Inc., Howard Delafield
International
\ i )and Management Sciences for Health.


... .. 44 igh Sir..'l. Kin.-i.. Georgetown, Guyana, South America;
..' .: TLl_.*592-231 -6311 Faxk 592-23'1-6349


iItFSJPFART CHRONICLE[ U


sft v% skd bet


4D ___%__liaw -
41bdbmw 401b 04
@mp hm- -pX 4




& 4NW -


S q= lm w umo -
-ft _m_ a
o MEMO 4p 4____


ftommo ow4b40m


4p OR D
-VN q*w


-- "Copyrighted Materiala -."

S- Syndicated Content .-E --

Available from Commercial News Providers"


dip- M-



- 0. -MOW
0-


0..bo- 1~I
w __ -1_4M

.0 ml0 0 0 f


Undr*1 rgbymath.
hi by bad weathern,~


A FLOODED southern field
prevented Annandale Sec-
ondary getting their first
competition run in the Dia-
mond Mineral Water Schools
League rugby championships,
S but the threeUnder-14
matches came off.
Heavy overnight down-
pours flooded the rugby'field
and the Under-18 fixture be-
* tween Annandale and South
Ruimveldt Secondary could not





NOTICE


ALL JURORS SERVING IN THE
COURT OF THE HONOURABLE
MR. JUSTICE J. BOVELL-DRAKES
ARE REQUESTED TO ATTEND


COURT ON 3R"I DAY
AT 9 AM INSTEAD
MAY, 2005 AS WAS
REQUESTED.


OF MAY, 2005
OF THE 121T1
PREVIOUSLY


Sgd: S.RAMLAL
REGISTRAR OF SUPREME
COURT ..


be played because the match
had to be played on the full
size pitch.
Annandale had a friendly-
run with a mixed combination
with players from South
Ruimveldt and Dolphin.
The East Coast Demerara
gave good account of themselves
with some players displaying
'text book' moves, according to
one official. The match will be
rescheduled.
Later, the match between
Yamaha Caribs and Hornets in
the William Blackman 15s cham-
pionship could not be played
because the conditions remained
the same.
Earlier, the Under-14
teams were in action with the
lone victory going to
Charlestown while the other
two matches ended in draws.
In the first match, Tuto-
rial High and Dolphin Sec-
ondary played to a 1-1 draw,
with Clinton Mars scoring fot
Tutorial and Jermaine
Fullington producing the try
for Dolphin.
A I -1 draw was also the re-
sult for the encounter between
New Campbellville Secondary
and St John's College. Adrian
Benjamin scored the try for
Campbellville and Carl Lewis
for St John's.
Jermaine Gustave made
good-a, peniaty try to give
Charlestown the victory over
St George's High.


O






SUNDAY CHRONICLE May 1,2005 29


4~. .~


Chelsea win title for



first time in 50 years


Forvlebl


stores ssure


of spnsrsi


loes o ~

b 41 4D 0 up -
6.004am mm m


-"Copyrightedb aerial


Syndicated Content -- --

Available from Commercial News Providers"


of


FOUR national volleyball
championships are assured
sponsorship for this season
and the first one will serve off
next Saturday at the Cliff
Anderson Sports Hall.
The Guyana Volleyball Fed-
eration (GVF) recently an-,
nounced that the major sponsor
Demerara Distillers Limited
(DDL) confirmed support for
this year's calendar of events.
"DDL recently gave the go-
ahead for the continuance of the
DDL Mineral Water Senior
Male, DDL Mineral Water Se-
nior Female 2nd Division, 5 Year
Old 2nd Division Male Open
and the DDL Inter-county 2nd
Division Male tournaments,"
the GVF stated.
The first national tourna-
ment is the DDL Mineral Wa-
ter Senior Male, while the DDL
Diamond Mineral Water Senior
Female Tournament is set for
May 18.
Tomorrow, the Berbice Vol-
leyball Association is staging a
Beach Volleyball tournament
sponsored by Ansa McAl at
No.63 Beach for $50 000 in


cash prizes.
On May 22, the Bartica
Coordinating Committee, in
collaboration with the
Essequibo Volleyball Associa-
tion, is organising an All
Fours- tournament in Bartica.
The Region Five Physical
Education Association, sup-
ported by the GVF's Region
Five coordinator Edwin Jo-
seph, will be staging a Vol-
leyball Extravaganza on May
25, the event being a part of
the GVF Region Five Special
Project, designed to introduce
the game to 72 there, and to
establish 20 regular teams in
the region.
Castrol Strikers of the
Demerara Volleyball Association
hosted an international club
tournament, which included
Ciserone Seagulls of St Lucia..
The Strikers, sponsored
by Guyana Oil Company
(GUYOIL) will be staging an-
other tournament, a super
league, in mid-June to coin-
cide with the sponsors' anni-
versary. The inaugural tour-
nament was held last year.


a -


0 a.Nw

41b -



-ob0 O -.b a&-4 ft- o- W


SNOW


- -
S
a


--ft


d -


BANKS DIH will confront
Don's XI in a best of three
softball cricket series under
the floodlights at Thirst Park
this week.
The series to be sponsored


DHARAM'WADEKAR''
-PERSAUD


~- -





* -. 0
0


by Mike's Pharmacy will be
played on May 4, 7 and 11
with the winner cashing in on'
$25 000 and the champion's
trophy, while the loser will earn
$12,000.and the MVP $2 000
and a trophy.
The 30-over-a-side series
will have no lbw decisions and
round hand bowling will be ap-
plied.
Meanwhile, Don's XI will
be led by Dharam 'Wadekar'
Persaud and includes Ricky
'Babulal' Deonarine, Mike
'Shane' Singh, Rahaman Khan,
Molan Sukhu, Royston
Ramsarran, Vicky Ramsaywack,
Ramesh Ramsaroop, Kameel
Khan, Colin Greaves and Gre-
gory Smith.
Matches will start at
18:00 h on match nights.


FORMER Secretary and Treasurer of the Guyana National
Dominoes Federation (GNDF) Colin Taylor, who now holds
the portfolio of Secretary of the New Jersey Domino and Cul-
tural Association, will be sponsoring an 18-team dominoes com-
petition today at the Malteenoes Sports Club (MSC) pavil-
ion.
Prizes up for grabs are 1st prize: $45 000 and winning trophy,
2nd prize: $30 000 and second place trophy, 3rd prize: $20 000
while the fourth-placed team will receive $8 900. In addition to the
monetary prizes and trophies, a pack of dominoes will be given to
the final four-teams.
Entrance fee is $6 000 and all teams, are kindly asked to
walk with a good pack of playing dominoes. Starting-time is
12:30 h with the usual half-hour grace period.


- 44M mol -40 41w OO p

a*q do - p 0. 4111=
NOW -no 4waw m
ftw* .0a w 4a =
4w4 m0 b ft-mom0-
*~o m 4b 40~.




er'dam 0afe a amm
4wao 4
~ ~400 _a'l


a. 5- a

a.
a ~


- 4VA


- q


W& .0 0 0. moft--ED.0 m
qmfi 4-
400 4w ft o 40


In photo: Sponsor Colin Taylor (centre) is flanked by
organiser Wendell McPherson (right) and Edward Rich-
mond of MalteenoesSports Club. -


a- 4w -- a -.o
-modb Wt ab 0 -in
ft=a o4bfa d


-_- --


Don's XI and Banks, DIH

clash under lights


c


* *


-


an*






30 SUNDAY CHRONICLE' May'1 ;''205



PfRT CHRONICLE 8j


England hopefuls Carryl slams GABA officiating


O 0 F MS 8 I By Isaiah Chappelle for this level of competition." ment. We will give him our did not recognize UDABA.
hI d t The promoter disclosed full support as long as things Permission for the use o
BOXING enthusiast that a copy of fight tape would are being done in the interest the national venue wa


f
s


ROB Key and Ian Bell were both pleased to further their En-
gland claims with Championship centuries for their respec-
tive counties on Thursday.
Key hit form with a fine 164 for Kent against Gloucestershire,
while Bell struck a superb 143 not out for Warwickshire against
Middlesex.
"It is so important to feel in decent nick whenever you play or
are looking to play for England," Key said.
Bell added: "Getting runs early in an English season cannot do
me any harm."
The form of the right-handers is good news for England
fans, who have watched on as the likes of Andrew Flintoff,
Marcus Trescothick and Andrew Strauss have struggled.
The issue of who will fill England's middle-order for the Test
series against Bangladesh and subsequently the Ashes is wide
open.
Many feel Hampshire's Kevin Pietersen deserves a shot after
impressing in the one-day team, and Bell admitted he relished be-
ing out of the spotlight.
"All the talk about Kevin has probably helped to take some of
the pressure off me," said Bell, who made 70 in his only Test ap-
pearance against West Indies last year.


IW'


Michael Carryl, has
slammed the officiating pro-
vided by the Guyana Amateur
Boxing Association (GABA)
for the recent USA/Guyana
boxing exchange at the Na-
tional Gymnasium.
In a post-fight release,
Carryl contended: "The ref-
ereeing was atrocious and has
flunk in flying colours. The
safety of the boxers is of
great importance. The major
role of the referee is to pro-
tect the boxers."
The former boxer, who of-
ficiates in amateur boxing with
USA Boxing Metro Inc., the
governing body for amateur
boxing in New York, singled out
a female referee for poor perfor-
mance, suggesting the individual
re-train before she officiates
again.
"We need more qualified
officials with integrity that
understand international rules
to better prepare our boxers


u~-- a-..... u. .. ..... - _--
be sent to Dr Anwar
Chowdhry and Domingo B.
Solano, president and conti-
nental Bureau Chairman of
AIBA (International Amateur
Boxing Association) respec-
tively.
"Solano is currently con-
ducting an investigation of
GABA violations."
Carryl also said the
behaviour of some GABA offi-
cials "seriously jeopardised" the
exchange programme with USA
Boxing-Metro Inc.
"Their open hostility to-
wards me for the work that I
and the Upper Demerara Ama-
teur Boxing Association Inc.
have done has blinded their ob-
jectivity."
However, he was high in
praise for GABA president
Laurie Lewis and would thus
support him.
"He has shown us a genu-
ine concern for the sport and
appears to want real develop-


of the youth and the sport of
boxing."
Thd exchange programme is
between the Upper Demerara


Amateur Boxing Association
Inc. and the United States Ama-
teur Boxing Association -
Metro Inc., but the two cards
were staged under the Carryl
Boxing Gym.because the GABA


granted at the eleventh hour
and the three-night
programme was cut to two
nights, with the opening
night at Linden being can-
celled.
However, Carryl said the
programme was "a great suc-
cess" through the hard work of
dedicated, volunteers, coach and
fighters.
"The fights were exciting
and very competitive. We be-
lieve the fans got their money's
worth and were not disap-
pointed."
The promoter contended
that the exchange programme
gave some indication how the
local amateur programme stood
in preparation for the 2008 and
2012 Olympic games.
"Almost 30 years after
Michael Parris won Guyana's
first and only Olympic medal
we could have a team of box-
ers in.Beijing competing for
the elusive gold medal."


11.11~ ['-I6(U~. F4-fu'd .].111 flsI!M


Good form for lan Bell and Robert Key will be music to
England fans' ears.


FAS
will
squad
acco

field
ness
actic
comr

tionm
horn
with


"There's no point in me worrying about what other people are is
doing. All I can do is to concentrate on Ian Bell and trying to score thsex
as many runs as I can." mall
Key was relieved to hit a big score after totalling just 25 runs
in Kent's opening Championship fixture against Warwickshire. drop
"If you are feeling at all out of touch as I did when I batted again
last week it makes it really hard. and
"It is so important to have a few runs behind you." (BBC has b
Sport) the I


5Aw e ips ft M


T bowler Shoaib Akhtar
be left out of Pakistan's
id to tour the West Indies,
*rding to reports.
The selectors are not satis-
with .Shoaib's level of fit-
despite his recent return to
in in a domestic Twenty20
petition.
He'has not played interna-
al cricket since returning
e from Australia in January
a hamstring problem.
Former captain Moin Khan
pected to be recalled when
17-man tour party is for-
y announced tomorrow.
The 33-year-old was
ped after the home-series
nst West Indies in October
November last year, but
been in excellent form with
bat and will now compete


with younger rival Kamran
Akmal for the wicketkeeper's
role.


Shoaib Akhtar took 5-3:
Twenty20 match earlier this


-- rA.Copyrighted Material


. ---- Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


- ot- --oo

quo- 4


-6 a.- 40


But the main talking point
is bound to be the exclusion of
Shoaib, who took 5-32 for
Rawalpindi Rams against
Queeta Bears in Lahore
last Monday, if his omis-
sion is supported by the
Pakistan Cricket Board.
"I am feeling great. I
OW hope it will help my come-
j back," he said afterwards.
rl Shoaib is the quick-
est bowler in world
cricket and has taken
144 Test wickets and
S .186 in one-day
internationals.
He has not always
seen eye to eye with the
national governing body,
however, and last year had
2 in a to prove he was suffering
week. from a genuine injury af-


ter his commitment was
questioned following the team's
home defeat by India.
The 29-year-old had more
fitness problems in Australia
but his off-field activities also
attracted attention from the
PCB, who fined him for visit-
ing nightclubs and talking to the
media without permission dur-
ing the tour to Australia.
Shoaib's regular new-ball
partner Mohammad Sami is also
expected to miss the first part
of the trip to the Caribbean fol-
lowing surgery on his heel, the
Press Trust of India reports.
But Pakistan recently
won a one-day series in India
without either of them and
will be confident of coming
out on top in the three games


against West Indies, the first
of which takes place in St
Vincent on May 18.
The one-day series will be
followed by two Tests in Bar-
*bados and Jamaica.
It is expected that seam
bowler Shabbir Ahmed will re-
-turn after a lengthy spell on the
sidelines with knee trouble, and
all-rounder Shoaib Malik will
keep his place despite admitting
that he threw a Twenty20 game
to ensure another team would be
knocked out of the competition
Pakistan squad (possible):
Inzamam-ul-Haq (capt), Younis
Khan, Yousuf Youhana, Yasir
Hameed, Salman Butt, Shahid


MOIN KHAN


Afridi, Asim Kamal, Kamran
Akmal (wkp.), Moin Khan
(wkp.),:Abdul Razzaq, Rana
Naved-ul-Hasan, Shabiir
Ahmed, Shahid Nazir, Rao
Iftikhar Anjum, Shoaib Malik,
Arshad Khan, Danish Kaneria.


QUARTER FINALS
GFL *. a S.. Monday, May 2, 2005



GC vs Thomas United (2:00 pm) Santos vs Pouderoyen (6:00 pm) Venue:
GF vs estnTiter (2:oo0 pm GFC BOURDA
GDF vs Western Tigers (4:00 pm) (Camptown vs Uitvlugt (8:00 pm)
... . ...... "" '"'" ': ":" ""," *" ""' "... ... "


. -






aItuflAY flhItonnunLv -,iay1i a-2OfI I


f ILO7-


"A,


Findlay: Rousseau questioned selectors


By Vinode Mamchan

FORMER chairman of the
West Indies cricket selection
panel, Michael Findlay, said
last week that during his
tenure as a regional selector,
he received no direct inter-
ference from the West Indies
Cricket Board (WICB).
However, the former


MERV DILLON
Windies wicketkeeper/batsman
said that there were two occa-
sions when the then president
of the WICB, Pat Rousseau,
wrote him on matters of selec-
tion.
Findlay's response comes
in the wake of comments made
by former West Indies chief se-
lector Sir Viv Richards this
week. The Master Blaster


lashed out at insularity and in-
terference b\ senior members of
the West Indie, CrnckLi Board
(WICB).
Richards described his two-
year tenure as the equivalent of
navigating through a "war zone".
Findlay recalled: "At the end
of the 2000 tour of England, we
received a report that Chris
Gayle and Franklyn Rose were
not a good influence on the other
players. We then made a deci-
sion that we were not going to
select them."
Findlay said Rousseau
wrote him, claiming that the
panel over-stepped its bounds
by punishing the players.
"I wrote to him and ex-
plained that there were policy
guidelines when selecting the
team and these were all insti-
tuted by the Board. From that
point, I never got a response
from him, although we still
maintain a good relationship
until this day."
Findlay revealed that the
other occasion was when the
panel decided not to recommend
Jimmy Adams to continue as
captain of the regional side.
"We thought at the time
that Jimmy couldn't make the
team and hence, we decided to
go for Carl Hooper as the cap-
tain. I told my committee to al-
low me some time to speak to
Jimmy and explain the situation,


before making the recommenda-
tion to the Board.
"I met Jimmy on a flight
from Guyana and told him I
would call him on his return to
Jamaica that day. I did call him
and we had a conversation, in
which I explained our position.
Jimmy, being the man he is, just
said, 'Okay, man'."
Findlay stated that
Rousseau then wrote him say-
ing that he had again over-
stepped his bounds and that he
should not have contacted the
player, before making the rec-
ommendation.
"I prepared a letter to send
to him, but soon after, he and
Clarvis Joseph resigned over the
Ricky Skerritt incident and I
didn't need to defend my posi-
tion again."
Findlay said that apart from
those two incidents, he never
had anyone from the Board
questioning his panel.
"Of course, when you
went around to the Islands
you heard Board members
saying all sorts of things, but
there was no direct communi-
cation."
Findlay said that his stint,
which ran from 1996 to 2002,
was disappointing for the mere
fact that the committee exposed
a lot of talent, but many guys
didn't carry on.
He said Merv Dillon .came


on the scene before Makhaya
Ntini, but has fallen away, while
the South African is a world
beater. He said that this was not
a problem of the selectors, but
the development process.
"The development process
will correct this problem of so


CHRIS GAYLE


many cricketers not carrying on,
but it is taking too long."
Findlay described
Richards as a good person
and someone who just wants
the best for the region.
"He is very cut-up by the
fact that the team is not win-
ning. I served with him on the
cricket playing and develop-
ment committee, and although
he was frank when making his
points, he was never confron-
tational. I think people just


hale to undcrainnd the man
Richard, and thc\ c.in get along
,vith him "
'Findlay, who skippered
Richards on the Combined Is-
lands team in the 1970s, said
he was a good friend of
Richards and the latter had


time and time aigjin com-
paiined ibout the taWe of the
game in the region, which is
really hurting him.
Richards took over from
Findlay as chairman of the
selection panel in 2002.
(CaribbeanCricket.com)


El Dorado Sports Club to

play second match today

ENTERPRISE El Dorado Sports Club cricket team will be
pla. ing the second match today on their tour to Suriname
as guests of the Amar Shakti club in Paramaribo.
The East Coast Demerara team were due to pla. their irsi
match yesterday, to start their first tour of the neighbouring
counfnl
Sulton Safdar is the captain of the team, v hilch has
Parnanjnd Dindial. N K Omar, Brijaram'Singh, Lakerarm
Dmidval. Lakeran Samaroo. Latchman Dardram, Rajah Annmt.
Pooran. Sham and Jilall Lall
The manager is N.K. Omar while Singh is the secre-
tary of the tournament and Parmanand Dindyal is the se-
lector on tour.
The touring party left early Friday morning 'and % ill return
tomorrow.
While the club never toured Suriname, it has been in an ex-
change arrangement with a club in Trinidad & Tobago since 1978,
with visits alternated.
The Trinidadians visited August last year and Enterprise
were to return the visit during the March/April period but the
recent historic floods prevented the trip from materializing
A two-week tour is now on the drawing boards for next
year.
The club is sponsored by Demerara Distillers Limited.


S ~1A~


LIBk_ ~ -rnI- -rnTI


.j^ ^L *^ --- ^ y- ,-^ *,:'.^ -'
O-O . .
Pool Balls Cohli&ex






Houston Complex


ft..,,Aft.:
-low^^


Cue Stick Cases,



- __ .


Soccer Balls e.i


.5,, r*~ .


Wi kets


i p.I


Gym Equipment & Boxing Gears

A, j ^
-y m -

J7 ^7 "1: *


Flex Ball


Trampolines


Houston Complex


Recumbent Bike






251b Dumbbell


1flw ..


Weights | ,-, ..-

All these and much more..


Head Guard Dumbbells



Boxing gears and Guards
Stretching Ropes



ench Press

T O I IT'


Hand Wraps




d oxing Glioves PunciBalini Skipping Rope


9


Dr


4^


Discount


~Cie"[ 4a~t 6


Volley balls
& Basket Bdals


- o C~LSr~puolirp-ji.


' -


v


3,1


SUNDA CHRNICL ., Mv-1. 200


^


N2r4 *ufLN


46


e a d &A 4 In Ba I I d


.S tra


-~5 wo


I






Ambrone Winadle palaful to watch


'ii


I


.x 'st "'91m s 'lh" "


W e


I


S-- --
C"opyrighted Material

Syndicated Content *

Availablefrom Commercial News Providers"


I


s Oqupsm
amh.. 4


ow If .


I %


I~ A K LH TiHEKEY


pr.




al


w 4w 9 '4*-.


TO


It is always important to recognize that one day you may need help. that sooner or later you will need to find
security in strength of another.
You must choose a strong company, a pillar that answers your needs, one with assets, reach, scope. history
and imagination to afford you security in life, today and tomorrow.
ANGUILLA -ANTIGUA -ARUBA BAHAMAS -BARBADOS* BELIZE *BERMUDA -CAYMAN ISLANDS* CURACAO* DOMINICA- GRENADA* GUYANA -MONTSERRAT
NEVIS- PANAMA- ST KITS* ST LUCIA- ST. MAARTEN- ST. VINCENT- SURNAME ITRINIDAD & TOBAGO- TURKS & CAICOS- U S. ViRGIN ISLANDS


: IN SURANCE ic PiA!S..-] T.
A Member of the CL FINANCIAL GROUP
191 Camp SireeL South Cummingsbuig
Georgelown, Guyan, SA. P.O. Box 10530*
Tel. ( 592) 226-2826/8, 225-5845. Fax: (592)226-2843
E-mail: dicccamp@cficosa.com


eemaw MAY 4 1 20


a -


, '.





Edward B. Beharry
& Company Ltd.


~~~~ ~_~_~ __~___~~~____~__ ~_ _____ .______ ..__ ~_~~ __. __~__~_


rl~ll~u ~lu ruurru r~ ,,ls, ,,-r ----~-r-- -------- ------ -------- --- ---


ADNUS Y, 5


I


Printed and Published kv Guvana National, Newspapers Urnited, Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown. Telephone 226-3243-9 (General); Editorial: 227-5204, 227-6216.Fax:227-6208







Maf to be s-otd separately


A AA


DI TTA11 IiDA DQ1TA


kNt h,


~~9~-"~~-~


'"Al
;k~A


41.2'~


(
- A A


'1


.-'. (


-1,mn


:-- --~_,. i


a


W I







Page II


This article is
about power and
how you can use
it to be what you
want to be, to do
what you want to
do, and have
what you want in
life.

LEF me break it
down. The power
that each of us is
born .ith is part of
God, the spiritual aspect of
our being, whichh is perfect.
This power is a creator. or
generator of energy that is
either potential or kinetic.
Potential energy is passive
energy energy) that is stored.
"%ailing to be used. Kinetic
energy is acltie energy. en-
erg3 that is being used. As ac-
tiie energy this power is neu-
iral and ma. be used to cre-
ate sickness. loneliness, po%-
ert crime or war or good
health. wealth. peace. friend-
ship, happiness and
fulfilment.
God h:,- ginen us hl'ti
-rne e .all free v ill. but tthat it
I call it the opiiin of ch,,ie \\e
ha.e the choice to use ul.
power posli.el. or necatielf.
constructilelh or deslrucl ii'eli
If that is so. \ou mni.\ ask. :%h
on earth ,ou'ld an\ i'ne choose


the negative No one would
consciously nake such a choice.
And that 's the point' Most o't
our choices are made uncon-
sciously. 'ou need to heighten
sour consciousness. '\,ur self-
awareness. so that .ou can
choose conscious.
The first truth you need to
accept is that 'ou are already\ a
complete person, i ith nothing
missing That's the ',.a', God
made N ou
The second truth is that
',ou are a create being That is
sour nature. and you'ree Jl\'.a.s,
creaung
The third truth is that ou
create from %our belief, about
God. %ourself. and life in gen-
eral
The fourth truth is that you
ha. e made decisions about%, our-
self. others. and life that v.re
once conscious decisions, butt
ha. e bcCome UlIcins'cious ones.
and iel continue to dircctt ,our
decisions .ind to deLtenune the
quality l ',,:.ur lile
The fiflthi truth is thit the
universe is total\ support e
and cooperate' e it sa, \es'
to ,our idea.s. ti both tile ood
ones and the bad -.n ies i 's
vesese.en i ,,in idea ilut i ill
destrio SOLI S. rno one i ,com-
irn, aloni ti': sa e ',ou Onl,, ',ou
can :do that
There is a s-,l'r \ of ., man
..,ho fell into a deep hole a.nd
-elled for someone it iliri'\. him
a rope When it finally became
apparent to himnt that rno rope
.,.as fOrthcoming,. he gre,, tired


of 'ailung and gol out himself
What I am getting a is that the
same poeer that traps ou also
frees you You hate the pot'el
and \ou'\e alxia\s used it You
hae no choice oter ih:at. The
power flot\\ continu:all\ and
%dIl be used. no matller %hal
'iou do ha\e a choice as, .li ho\
)ou use this p,,v.er
Your Iraniforiiation de-
pends upon conscious choices
And ,',ur conscious l choices de-
pend upon ',,our increased
al\arcness o t ,urselt, upon
%our illingrne., 1to practice the
art and skill of self-ub'ei atnon
Beein to stand back Iromn \our-
self and observe sour though,
beliefs, ie.itconls to people.
those who puh .,our button,
and those \% ho don't Obsere
your bod\ rc-acilins Ntiice
lienin ,ou are lense or icrlaed
Thee are messages 111om \our
tuod, .ind 'i,,.ti should le.in -10
undetii.iiand ilthe Ohic the
result min vour life and rec,..nei-c
that tilhe phi si.il unit e se
doein' lie .-\.i.cpl th.ii ,ou c.an
only reap %\h.il ',oui ":'o.
One of the biggesi ob',acle,
ae create in uI ties s our reI-
sistancc to change M\lOi cl us
combat chan Iron thlic d.i\ ',.e
ale born until the d.i\ %e die
Kno'. ing that change is ine. i-
table .LhC isn't [.p us, Ifromnl ight-
ing it We v.Jilnt si.ibilmt e\ei, -
w',here and think that ihe \a j
to security\ \\Hc \ant all out
rnends. our lomers and our jobs
io remain the same That \-..v
we think .e '.ill be ':ife O'.er


the coming weeks, we ill learn
together. that hen \ou are at
o.me ih \ourself and God sou
can quit lesistin change. You
aill learn 1o accept that all e\-
presions of Gid are di nanic
and that conequenitl, ,anous
aspects ol oursel-es and our
Lies are ai. als changing

OTHERS ARE NOT
YOUR SOURCE
Self-reliance depends on
knowing deep -. thin i,ourself
that. no itialter w hait s coing on
in '.1ou1r 11 Oitheis are noIt our
iitrcec It'C kn.'.- n tha ... h lce
\Uo. dlo teed i. tleii people and
do chii.oe to reaict i \,h them
thie. aiie ni rcponsible for
..JI happiness
People hit:\ be the avenue.
the chaiinel. tluii.u-h \, which ',our
li.ppiine-, well-being .ind pro>-
pet',i flir.., but ihe\ are nol
the c.iuc The source is God -
',our Hlchei Sell \'our True
Selt BeC .iale V think otherr
people "ire the soUICo 0t oiur
*ood. ..e make ilicnm mi,, od-
\\e look t, ouit p:i( enis hil-
dren mnaie and Irlend, to ,i'e
PLEASE TURN TO
PAGE I


- the forgotten but essential nu ient



)''


A,


CONTINUED FROM LAST WEEK


WHY DO I NEED TO


GET IT RIGHT?


It is important to stay properly hydrated so-1 that the bod\ has suf-
ficlent water to piovide for all the \arted functions of watei Out.
side of the short-term consequences to deh\dratioin. in the long-
term. it is better for oui health to maintain proper h.dration sta-
rus. Studies have show n ihat deh\drauon diminishes our physical
performance as %well as our mental performance in the short-term
In the long-term. persons who drink adequate fluids are less hkel'
ro have kidney stones Men %who dnnk a lot of water are less likely
to have cancers of the prostate. bladder, kidney and testicle Women
are less likel., to hase cancers of the renal pel is. urethra. bladder.
colon and breast Children \ho drink after r are less likely to be
obese

CAN I HAVE TOO MUCH OFA GOOD
THING?
On t.are ccasitons. itn t possible to have too much water This
causes a condition knov.wnr as hyperhidration. water intosicatnon or
water poisoning, w ith consequent dilution of sodium in the blood
laknown as hypn.atraenita after r poisoning results firim taking in
too much %water v. iiout a corresponding increase in electrolytes
sodium and potassium salisi oter a shori period of time Socme
person ,shi hia'.e water poisoning ilma\ experience no symptoms
while others become Lnifuused. tired, produce too much saliva, ex-
perience somuting and dianlnea and become apathetic, or disinter-
ested in %what is going 'on around them The condition can eventu-
all',' lead to brain swelling. coma and death. Hyponatraemia is usu-
all> seen in marathon runners. ,.ho -sometimes overestimate how
much ,jater the'. need to sta'. h\diated, but do not eat any food
during the 26-intile race This absence uf food, plus the loss of salts
in their s.ecat changes the sodiuirm levels in the blood and throws
the electrolytes iftt balance H% p>inatraemia can also occur in per-
sons .hoe drink too much water when trying to get rid of a hang-
i. er.


WHAT IS RIGHT FOR ME?
The aniount :of water .lluid .doui need to consume everyday de-
pends on \oui age. Se\. size and 'our metabolism. The water re-
quirement may be calculated based on caloric requirement for the
day or using body weight. In general, for an adult living in general


conditions tin terms iof environmental exposures and how much en-
ergy is expended i requires approumnately mnil of water per calorie
consumed Thereloie. if the average caloricrequu-ement for the da5
is, 2000 kcal, then that person needs two litres of fluid a da' In-
fants and children need approxm.titely 1 .Spil per da'lorie consumed.
The requirement is higher for children because they lose v.ater faster
from the surface of their skin, since relative to their small size. they
hase a large surface area.
The fluid requirement i increased or decreased outside of these
average conditions The requunements are increased if you are ex-
posed to high temperatures. like those here in thq Caribbean. dry
condition and h-uh altitudes. You also need more fluids if s our diet
is high in fibre and ou consume a lot of alcohol and calfeine
Pregnant \,omen need a bit eura vatier per da\ to pro'.de for
thiiir o n needs as well as the protecir.e cushion the animiouc fluid.
for their tiab} Breast feeding v.omen need a lot more exua fluid,
appro.imatel$ 750- 1000O ml per da\ to make breastinlk Breasinulk
is appro\inatel. 87 per cent watet.
The requirements of bedridden elderly persons .re deternuned
based on body %weight. It is suggested that they receive 100 ml/kg
for the first 10 kg of v.eight and 50 mnil'for the next I-i kg, 15 ml/kg
tor remaining k; of bod,, weight.
It is imponant to reinember to keep hydrated before, during
and after eewrcis. It can take the body a Ilone a-s 12 hours to be-
come properly rehiydrated after exercise.

HOWDO I GET IT RIGHT?
An individual', entire fluid requtiemeni does not have to be met
by water alone. Water is the preferred choice, because it is calorie
free, inexpensive and for the most part, widely available, but other
non-caffeinated, non-alcoholic drinks, fruit juices, milk and soups
are tasty alternatives, especially for children. Some foods especially
fresh fruits and vegetables make significant contributions to our fluid
intake and are a part of a healthy diet.
Taking along a water bottle and taking sips through out the day
may be a useful habit to adopt. This practice keeps you hydrated,
and helps to control hunger pangs, a.useful ally if you are trying to
maintain or lose weight.
Generally, try to drink enough fluid, preferably water, that your
urine is always straw coloured or pale yellow. Whether or not you
need eight glasses of water a day will depend on your individual
needs. Just remember to keep moist. (NYAM NEWS)


I I





'1g6 P 'Hf


S.

-


Sb.
.0.91













JwI


A


i~:


I ~~4h t~i II


S S I


~b I d/\ ( lIh'hI


'Copyrighted Material


S-Svndicated Content-


Available fro


Commercial News* Providers"


- --dome a-


.dmman-.NMI I


00 ____ ____ m qmm d ~e -M wMU


ew- *mp
=4-4 - 40
a-o


OR do.4m -.o
q.-.dml- -
-low


- ~.
- ~
- ~
* ~- U
S


- ,
S Sl


Georgetown Legal Aid Clinic


VACANCY


Minimum 4 years post-qualification experience required.
Salary negotiable
Applications please to:
'Managing Attorney'
Georgetown Legal Aid Clinic
Maraj Building
185 King & Charlotte Sts.
Georgetown
by 6 May. 2005" ............... ...


GCIS INC.
Head Office: 47 Main Street, Georgetown

ARE you 25 years old and over with secondary school
education?
ARE you interested in a career with exciting
opportunities for personal development and high
income?
WELL then, the search is over! Become a GCIS Inc.
INSURANCE SALES REPRESENTATIVE.
Experience is not a barrier. We will provide training
and close supervision. You owe it to yourself to apply
now
Send vour applications to the
SALES MANAGER
At any of our Offices:
GCIS INC.


47 Mai:,,, Sutc
Fe1: 225-9153


15-16 No% Sweetc
Berhice
Tel: 333-2452


cOf %Ir.SmiumY Rampes a
'I el: 77 1-4 61(,(


EDUCATION/TRAINING
* EXPERT British Training for YOU. (
* Earn professional QUALIFICATIONS YOUR CIC
* RAPIDLY gain a GREAT CAREER. ",Dipl'oma,
* Accredited awards, accredited College. lor Award 1
*Train for a top job with HIGH PAY. '
International Certificates & Diplomas (150 or US$300)
*Accounts, Hotels, Tourism/Travel, Computers & IT
*English, Marketing, Administration, Purchasing
*Business, Management, Stores, Personnel, Sales
*Advertising, Economics, Secretarial/P.A., Office
Advanced & Post Graduate Diplomas, BBA, BCom
*Business, Accounts, Hospitality, Marketing, Personnel
CIC MBA Programmes:
Finance, Organization, Human Resource, Marketing
For FREE Prospectus write, fax or e-mail to:
CAMBRIDGE
INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE
PO Box 1378, Southampton, S017 3WX, Britain
E-mail: info@cambridgetraining.com
Web: www.cambridgecollege.co.uk
Fax:00 44 1534 485071
t /-^l| Name & Address: __

CAREER-SUCCESS:-ACCREDIFTED BRITISH TRAINING!.- -


.9


-GCI. iCi,,, ~berO,. .


41b g


^


1;






P IaC i M 2


UNLEASH THE


POWER ...

From page II
us security, abundance and happiness. And, as we think that what
we want emanates from others, we become frightened. We come to
believe "they" are withholding, and'we seek to placate them to get
what we think we need. That is what dependence is. We manipu-
late and threaten others to get what we want. We really believe that
if "they" don't give it to us, we won't have it. As a result, our
relationships become based upon dependence instead of upon love.
To look to others as the source of your life is to look in the
wrong place, and you will never be satisfied. You may try to find a
substitute for love by insatiably seeking money, food or posses-
sions, but ultimately you will still feel empty and alone. Look at
the tragedy of Marilyn Monroe. She was a woman of great beauty
and talent, yet she died of an overdose of drugs. The sadness in her
life came because she was not self-reliant. She did not recognize her
God within. In her quest for gratification, she used her beauty, tal-
ent and helplessness. But no matter how many people adored her,
either as fans or as friends, it wasn't enough. She didn't know that
she was the source. She thought it might be anyone or everyone
else. She was begging for someone, something to fill the empty ves-
sel of herself, never recognizing the ironic truth.
We all do that at one time or another. We beg others to fill us
up. But when we are honest with ourselves, we know that it just
doesn't work. It doesn't work because we are already filled with
the Spirit, just waiting to be poured forth.
It takes real courage to break out of these snarls. Courage
is required because we've entangled need and love. Each of
us, parent and child, is scared to death that, if the other
recognizes his or her own wholeness, we won't be needed. Ac-
tually the opposite is true. The more secure, whole, actualised
,and self-reliant a person is, the more he or she is able to be
Please turn to page V


Eviction



Notice


Have been living with
my flanc6 for two years
and dating for four. Last
year, we were engaged
an purchased a new home.
We were planning on getting-
married next year; however,
he's changed his mind. He
says it stems from a bridal
show we attended a few
months ago.
He says he isn't sure he can
give 100 per cent to a relation-
ship and wonders if he would
rather be alone. Our relationship
was strong prior to this. He was
always doing sweet things and
was very romantic and loving.
We travelled a lot and spent a lot
of time together. This all stopped
a few months ago.
He says it's not me. He's
just not sure where he wants
to be in life. He cannot make
a decision either way. Unfor-
tunately it is extremely diffi-
cult for me to pretend there is
nothing wrong. We get along
for the most part, except
when we talk about the future.
We haven't gone to counsel-
ling yet, but I am looking into
it. Any suggestions?


ADDIE

ditch, but what you
can do to a ditch you
cannot do to another
person. Emotions are more com-
plicated than dirt. They don't
lend themselves easily to ma-
nipulation and control.
In the past, people wore amu-
lets to bring good fortune and con-
trol the future. We think we are
more sophisticated than that, but
nothing really changes inside the
human psyche. Today we hope
to get from psychology and coun-
selling what people in earlier times
expected to get from amulets.
The truth is, what psychol-
ogy is best at explaining are
those things which can be clearly
defined, like how we learn and
how many items we can hold in
short-term memory. But that sort
of knowledge doesn't help us in
relationships. The question you
have, how to get my fiance to
marry me, is one psychology
cannot answer.
The best that counselling can
do is lead out from an individual
what is there to be led out. Your
goal is to make your fiance into
your husband, but his goal is to
pursue a life outside your rela-
tionship. Counselling may help
you both, but it may not lead to
marriage.
There is one thing we can
tell you for sure. If you've been
sharing expenses and buying
a house together, you need a
good lawyer to explain your
legal rights.

WAYNE & TAMARA


1


~1~~7~77iN
t -,


%I e been dating a wonderful man for a year no'w. Last
Tuesday he called me and ended our relationship. say
ing. "I'm not sure about myself and my abili3 to gi'e
you the life you deserve. In order to saie you from hating
me later on. I hate to do this."
I am incredible s.hocked. w while I do thank him for his direct-
ness Ho.w can I get omer this' What steps shall I take' We'%e
spoken once since the breakup. but it was cjust a "hovw was your
da Yi pe of conersation. That w as a joke Please help me. lam
unable to -leep.

SUSAN

S usar. you aje grieving Something has died A hope. a
dream, a plan for the future There are three pants to et
ting over this First. know ing hat it is. second, getting
through the process, and third. lime.
There are mans excellent book, w hiuch can help people through
the gne\ ing process. One easN one. w which has been around for
awhile. i How to Survive the Loss of a Love' b\ Colgrove.
Bloomtield and Mc\\ illiams It is not the land ol book .ou sit
dow n and read cover to cover It is a book to pick up hene.er
\ou need comfort.
The book is arranged wilh one and two page sto-
ries. quotations. suggestions. and thoughts. As the au-
thors say, "One thing I forgot: after the pain of parting
comes the happiness of healing: rediscovering life.
friends, self. .Io."

1 AYN1E & TAMARA


POBox:964, SpringfieldMO658031

DHiBectlBw@a


MINISTRY OF TOURISM, INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE

1. The Ministry of Tourism, Industry and Commerce invites suitably qualified !Contractors to
submit bids for the Construction of reinforced concrete bridge Belvedere Industrial


Estate.
Tenderdocumemts for the above works will be available from Tuesday 3rd May', 2005 and can
be obtained fronm the Ministry of Tourism, Industry and Commerce upon payment of a non-
refundable sum 6f G$5,000.00 each. I
Each Tender must be enclosed in a sealed, plain envelope which must riot, in any way., identify
the Tenderer and, should be clearly marked on the top left-hand corner "Construction of
--_- ^- ..*.. Lk AI-.- Rn-i.I.-. I.J.. -l Pc.a


d reinrorced concrete bridge oelveoere Induustrial state.
4. Each Tender must be accompanied by valid Compliance Certificates frdm Guyana Revenue
, Authority (GRA) and National Insurance Scheme (NIS) Tenders without valid certificates
will be disqualified

5. Tenders must be addressed as stated below and submitted not later than 9,00 hours on
Tuesday 17th May, 2005.
S Chairman
Natiolral Board of Procurement and Tender Administration I
i' \Ministry of Finance
Main and Urquhart Streets
Georgetown

6. Tenderers or their representatives are invited to witness the opening of the Bid documents on
17-05-2005 at 9:00 hours at the National Board of Procurement and Tender
Administration boardroom.

7. The National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration does not bind itself to
accept the lowest Tender and retain the right to reject any Tender without assigning specific
reasons)
Kenneth Jordan
Permanent Secretary Government ads can be viewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy


GUYANA POWER & LIGHT INC.





NEW PAYMENT OFFICE



A new PAYMENT OFFICE has been set up at the Pattensen/
Turkeyen Health Centre for the convenience of residents of
the surrounding areas.

Residents of the following UNSERVED areas are encouraged to
pay their CAPITAL;CONTRIBUTIONS there instead of at the GPL
Main St. Office:


* Sophia Block AA (Plum Park)
"Sophia Block E (Farmer's Field)


s Liliendaal Block X
Pattensen Section B
; Turkeyen Section C
Turkeyen Section D
Cummings Lodge Area Y

The PAYMENT CENTRE is open on SATURDAYS ONLY
from 09:00 h to 16:00 h.



CONSTRUCTION WILL COMMENCE WHEN
50% OF RESIDENTS MAKE FULL PAYMENTS,


Sunday Chronicle May:1, 2005


Paoe IV


: I






Sunday Chronicle May 1, 2005


I


The Dentist Advises
iff=i;Vailo; a a id m


D DURING a
conversation
recently with an
educator who
visited my clinic for dental
treatment, I was quite
surprised about how little he
knew concerning the basics of
oral anatomy. I was surprised
because he was well educated
in the context of Guyanese
society. I shuddered as I
envisaged the magnitude of
ignorance in this regard, which
may exist among the so-called
man in the street. The only
logical thing to do I thought,
would be to dedicate some time
to teaching the basics.
There are 32 permanent
teeth (16 per jaw). These in-
clude; (1) anteriors (front teeth)
consisting of: (a) incisors, for
cutting and biting; and (b) four
canines cuspidss, "eye" teeth),
for grasping and tearing; and (2)
posteriors (back teeth) consist-
ing of: (a) eight pre molars (bi-
cuspids), for preliminary grind-
ing and chewing; and (b) 12 mo-
lars for thorough grinding and
chewing.


A tooth consists of a crown
(biting surface) and a root or
roots (embedded in the bone).
The anteriors usually have one
root. The premolars usually
have two roots (uppers) or one
root (lowers). The upper molars
usually have three roots and
rarely have one or two roots.
The lower molars usually have
two roots. The outside of the
crown is made up of enamel;
outside of the root is made of
cementum. Beneath the enamel
and cementum is the dentin.
The innermost core of the tooth
is the pulp chamber (within the
crown) and the root canal sys-
tem (within the roots). In the
healthy tooth, the pulp cham-
ber and root canal system con-
tain nerves, blood and lym-
phatic vessels, connective tissue
and various types of cells. Up-
per anteriors usually have one
root canal. Lower anteriors have
.one or two root canals (although
they have one rot). Upper first
premolars usually have one or
two root canals. Lower molars
usually have three root canals
(two in the front root and one
in the back root).
Pain (toothache) or sensi-
tivity ("shocking" or "edg-
ing") of a tooth happens be-
cause the nerve endings from
the pulp are irritated. This
could result from simple ex-
posure, infection, pressure or
stimulation (chemical, heat


or cold). Commonly, when
the pulp becomes unhealthy
it develops inflammation
which can lead to infection
and subsequent necrosis
(death of the pulp). The pulp
tissue, which is normally
pink in appearance and
bleeds easily, becomes yel-
lowish and then grayish as it
becomes necrotic. It can de-
compose into a dry "cheesy"
mass.
Each root is surrounded by
bone (alveolar). The cementum
of each root is attached to the
bone by periodontal ligament (a
collection of connective tissue,
cells, nerves, and blood and
lymphatic vessels) which acts
as a cushion for the tooth. Cov-
ering the bone is the alveolar
mucosa (a fibrous skin-like tis-
sue) and closer to the crown; the
covering is called gingival (gum).
The pulp of the tooth can
be injured by dental caries
(tooth decay), trauma (a blow or
fall), periodontal disease (gum
and periodontal ligament dis-
ease), and dental procedures
(drilling and filling). Once the
pulp is injured, it becomes in-
flamed. Bacteria can travel from
the mouth through decayed
enamel and dentin and reach the
pulp, thereby cause root canal
infection. Bacteria can also
travel through root canal
branches (lateral and accessory
canals) from infected periodon-


SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE
MINISTRY OF LEGAL AFFAIRS





Renovation works at the High Court of the Supreme Court of Judicature

Tenders are invited from eligible Contractors for the Renovation of Western Courtrooms and South-
Western Tower of the High Court Building.

Copies of the Tender Documents can be purchased from the Office of the P.A.S Finance, High
Court, Avenue of the Republic and Crharlotte Sireef for a non-refundable fee of three thousand five
hundred dollars ($3,500.)

Tenders must be submitted in a sealed envelope bearing no identity of the Tender on the outside.
The envelope must be clearly marked on the outside.
'Tender for Renovation of Western Courtrooms and South Western Tower of High Court
Building'.

A valid Certificate of Compliance issue by the Commissioner General, Guyana Revenue Authority
and Certificate of National Insurance must be submitted with each Tender.

Tender must be addressed to the
Chairman National Procurement and Tender
Administration Board. Ministry of Finance
Main and Urquhart Streets, Georgetown


The Tender must deposited in the Tender Box located at the Ministry of Finance Compound, Main
and Urquhart Streets, Georgetown, no later than 09:00 hrs on May 03, 2005.


tal pockets and reach the main
root canal, again producing root
canal infection. In addition, bac-
teria can get into the blood
stream (bacteremia) following
chewing, tooth brushing, biting
and a blow or fall. They then
can localise into a previously in-
flamed pulp (the process is
called anachoresis) and cause
root canal infection.
Once the pulp is infected,
the bacterial products can
travel through the root canal
at the end of the root (apex)
and enter the apical (end) pe-
riodontal ligament and the
surrounding bone. Then a bone
lesion can be formed that shows
up on the x-ray as a dark image
(periapical radiolucency) there
are two primary periapical le-
sions that result from an in-
fected pulp. These are known
as a periapical granuloma
(most frequent and radicular
cyst. Some cysts can become
malignant and cancerous.


r13, I C-


PUBLIC SERVICE APPELLATE TRIBUNAL


The Registrar Public Service Appellate Tribunal is interested in
rewiring (electrical) at the Public Service Appellate Tribunal Building
Brickdam, Georgetown, Guyana.

Interested Contractors are invited to submit Tenders for undertaking
the following work:

Rewiring of the Public Service Appellate Tribunal Building -
Brickdam, Georgetown, Guyana.

Tender Documents can be obtained from the Registrar Public Service
Appellate Tribunal 39 Brickdam, Stabroek, Georgetown upon payment
of a non-refundable fee of Five thousand dollars ($5,000).

Tenders must be placed in a sealed envelop bearing no identity of
the Tenderer. The envelope must be marked on the top left hand
corner "Tender for Rewiring of the Public Service Appellate
Tribunal Building" and must be addressed to:

The Chairman/Chairperson
National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown

Not later than 9am on Tuesday, 24th May, 2005
Tenders must be accompanied by valid IRD and NIS Certificates of
Compliance. All tenders must be deposited in the Tender Box situated
on the First Floor of the Ministry of Finance Building Main &
Urquhart Streets, not later than 9am on Tuesday, 24th May, 2009.
Tenders will be opened after the closing time, in the presence of those
tenderers or their Representatives who wish to attend.



Registrar ......... ...............
Public Service Appellate Tribunal


Page V


m


UNLEASH THE...

From page V
sensitive and respond to the other person. True self-reliance
allows love to flow.
Let's look at how dependency develops. As parents we don't
accept the fact that maturing is a gradual process. The result is that
the child goes from birth to adulthood by curious path. In our desire
to keep children dependent because we think their dependence
proves their love for us we don't allow them to mature gradually.
We don't allow them to take small, independent mature steps. We
don't allow them to learn from their own mistakes and successes
how to handle their own lives. Instead, it's total dependence one day
and complete independence the next. One day we say "Well, you're
only seventeen. You're still justakid, sol'llmakethe decisions."The next
day, they are eighteen and we say, "You're an adult now, so get out there and
make your own decisions." In this way, we become the source for our
children and may remain so long past their initial adulthood. So the child
becomes mature in years, but not in emotions. The child then looks for, and
often finds, a mate he/she hopes will fill the role of the protective parent. The
new couple has children and perpetuates the cycle. This dependence
of the parents is visited upon the children.
The final twist in this vicious circle is the dependence of old age.
It's sort of a game: called "I am old now, so I'll lose my mind and
you'll take care of me." So we go from dependence to dependency,
from birth through adulthood and into old age without ever achieving
maturity and self-reliance.
The sorrow is that each of us has sufficient God-given power to
become self-reliant. In fact, we each use our power. Some of us,
through lack of consciousness, use it toward sickness and helpless-
ness, others of us, for strengths we can hide behind. And there are
the enlightened ones who use their power within for loving, nurtur-
ing, supportive relationships. They are self-reliant ones, the ones
who .are creative, prosperous and healthy. The marvellous fact is,
however, that no matter how misdirected your power was yester-
day, YOU CAN make a complete turnaround today. You can do this
by expanding your consciousness, your self-awareness and tuning
into the Spirit that's an integral part of your True Self.
I hope you are enjoying these self improvement articles.
Stick with me and next week we will tackle and learn to cope
with more physical, mental and spiritual problems.






Pa3 e VI r.'.' C." ,,, May 1, 2005




a n-. -. " -- -- --, '06, .... ,-*j ," "*" "- *....
" -' * ,y -"- .. . '* .* ..- -. *, -; **; , ; -..'^ y y : . .. [ -'; .. -, .' . .-'* '";,; ,', .. -* J S ;' .. '- '. ..1 "='; ^ .E. '&.- : ; *" *ij 3 ? ~ r R ^ ".i" -
_._ . -^ :' ,- J.& ... b ..^._ *^-.:- - -' %L ---^- -JZ,- .. .'-- -- -^ / --'.^ ^-'.l -=' -: "= ---- -'.. . '


Helena Correia



(1930- 2000
!., o:-


by Petamber Persaud
T WILL never be known
how many arrows were
left in the quiver of
Stephanie Correia
when she died in 2000. But
those she utilised, she fired
with unwavering accuracy, ac-
quiring many trophies. Be it
in whatever field of human
endeavour teaching, pot-
tery, poetry, painting or moth-
erhood she participated with
distinction, a characteristic
that made her internation-
ally famous like two of her
other siblings, David
Campbell (Cabacaburi Chil-
dren) and Rosanna an oper-
atic classical soprano.
'Arrows from the Bow'
was Correia's first and only
book of poems. Published in
1988, some five hundred years
after Columbus, this collection
of poems may be the first such


book written in English by an
Amerindian woman writer. Sig-
nificantly, the book was pub-
lished by Red Thread, a
Guyanese women's network, to
coincide with the historic retro-
spective exhibition 'Sixty years
of Women Artists in Guyana'
organised by the Guyana
Women Artists' Association.
The 'Arrows from the
Bow' comprised Correia's "im-
ages playing hide-and-seek
within my head" images of her
father taking her to various
Amerindian reservations where
she became acquainted with the
rich folklore of her heritage; im-
ages of her father teaching her
to boat, fish and farm.
"I followed him, small foot-
steps placed in his/and listened
enchanted to his forest lore, se-
crets of bark and root and leaf
and flower/I learned... to under-
stand the laws of sustenance/a
farmer's patient waiting/and af-


ter dark he wove a spell with
singing strings' playing mari
maria. Those were the images of
her father, Stephen Campbell,
an Arawak from Santa Rosa on
the Moruca Reservation, who
became the first Amerindian
Legislator in the National As-
sembly of British Guiana, serv-
ing for nine years until his death
in 1966.
There were also images of
her mother, Umbelina, the
daughter of Portuguese immi-
grants from Madeira, encourag-
ing Stephanie and her siblings to
sing harmonies together; images
of her mother's beautiful voice
passing on to them the deep
feeling found in Portuguese
fados.
Images of Kabacaburi Chil-
dren....
Stephanie Helena Correia
was born on April 28, 1930 in
Pomeroon, Essequibo, Guyana.
She was the third of nine chil-


--~~~~~-- -- -----'^^^^.^BWW'5""^"8^^^^^^^

QUESTION
I am working with a company for five (5) years now. My employer pays NIS for me but
I read in the newspapers that there is a ceiling on which NIS is paid.
',. s rv i f3r c.er the ceiling !uit on!,, pay.' NIS onr 6 .nO .ll .-
What can I doin such a situation.

ANSWER

First of all your emrnplyei is in breach of the laws of NIS. .Your Contribution should be.
I aid on $88,397.00 which is our current ceiling.
You would only pay on $60,000. If your salary was $60,000.
Note, that by paying on the wrong amount your employer is actually doing two (2)
things..

(1) Saving himself from having to pay more money. Remember he would have to pay
the bigger part (7.8%) of $88,397. While you only pay 5.2% of $88,397.

(2) Denying you from being paid a higher rate on your benefits when y'ou make claims
to NIS.
I am suggesting that you visit the compliance department as soon as possible to
have this situation investigated.
Kindly walk with your NIS card & payslips (if you have).
IDo you have a question on N'..S ? iThen write/calf
NIS MAIL BAG
C/O Dianne Lewis Baxter
Publicity and Public Relations Officer (ag)
I National Insurance Scheme
BrdaidrWm atnd, Winitter Place' ;
I P.O. Box. 101135
F.-mail: nr nis(Wsolution2000.net


E


-0)





a)I









I"N

e


dren born to Stephen and
Umbelina Campbell.
She attended Martindale R.
C. Primary School and was only
14 when she was appointed pu-
pil teacher at the same institu-
tion.
In 1950, she was called to
the Teachers' Training College in
Georgetown. Two years later,
she graduated as a Class I
Trained Teacher. Correia won
the Bain Gray prize for the
most outstanding student, plac-
ing first in both years at the col-
lege. It was at the college she
came under the influence of the
late E. R. Burrowes who was
her tutor in art.
Her teaching career was
short. Fresh out of college, her
first teaching assignment was at
S.,ic.i1 Heart R. C. Primary
School in Main Street in 1953.
For the next couple of years she
taught at St. Joseph.
Mabaruma, North West Dis-
trict.
In her marriage to Vincent
Jerome Correia in 1955, Guyana


U-~ r----I -


OBTI
. 0. . -. 1 . : :.


lost a teacher but gained an art-
ist, painter, ceramicist and an-
thropologist. Her husband's job
entailed frequent uprooting and
resettling. It was during these
trips that Stephanie started a
data base in sketches and notes
on various tribes of the region.
Marriage has its own bless-
ings and frequently offspring
become extensions of the par-
ents, of the aspirations of the
parents, a fulfilment of life.
Stephanie and Vincent had eight
children, all of whom are in-
volved in the fine arts, four be-
coming excellent potters. In
1969, after the birth of her
eighth child, she decided to re-
visit her artistic desire. The de-


cision was not easy for she had
to balance her dedication to her
family, her devotion to her art
and fight for creative space, all
against the backdrop of the in-
digenous woman in a somewhat
unaccommodating mainstream
Guyanese society. Except for
short courses in Canada and
U.S.A., Correia was virtually
self-taught. She was like 'that
clay pot... ground, washed,
blended, kneaded, molded,
carved, caressed, burnt... a
battle-scarred warrior'!
In the poem, 'A Part of
Me', she described her cre-
ations, 'sculpture conceived in
the mind and molded perma-
nently into form/a poem writ-
ten down in the dawn after a
sleepless night/a painting emerg-
ing stroke by stroke into a last-
ing statement'.
For her dedication to the
arts and for creative use of in-
digenous materials and designs,
she was awarded a Medal of
Service by the Government of
Guyana in 1980.-In 1996, she
was again honoured by her
country, this time with the
Golden Arrow of Achievement
(AA).
In September 2000, the Na-
tional Art Gallery, Castellani
House, staged a tribute to her
under the title 'Sharing Remem-
brances of Stephanie Correia'.
At the time of her death,
Stephanie Helena Correia
was researching the history
of Amerindian pottery in
Guyana. It is hoped that that
arrow in her quiver will hit
the public soon for a nation
ought not to diminish the im-
port of its artistic heritage.


G^^*rass Roots f Gyn a byi BfljettyeisiJTn^
Intferviews wiothRAInaCorreia Be ,a--
Respons^es to this uthrb eulephone
^^^^^226-0065 or by e-mail:


NOTICE


NEW TELEPHONE NUMBERS

CORRIVERTON BRANCH

We wish to inform the general public that,
due to GT&T's commissioning of
a new digital switch at No. 76 Village,
our telephone numbers will now be
TELEPHONE:
335-3399 to 335-3404
FACSIMILE:
335-3396
This takes effect from April 28, 2005.


STEPHANIE HELENA CORREIA


- - - - - - - - - - - --














Hello boys and girls,
To a very great extent you must enable yourself to study
without your text and information books. At this time when
examinations are just around the corner make it your duty
to depend upon your notes only. You will now see the worth
of those neatly and correctly written well-structured notes
that you have been encouraged to.make all along.
Remember that your personal notes are a source of quick
and on-target referencing. You have made them yourselves
to take the place of the voluminous texts recommended
for you. As a matter of fact, you should be more reliant on
what is in your memory and the kind of skills you have
acquired by this time.
Press towards the mark of high achievement.
'Bye.
IN LAST WEEK
Grammar: Suffixes Solutions
Reminder: A suffix is a word part. When it is added to the
end of a word, it changes the meaning of the word. Er means
"someone who" or "something that." Ful means "with," and
less means "without."
A. The suffix identified in the following words:

1. camper 3. mower 5. helpful

2. truthful 4. hopeless toothless

B. Some new words: 1. helper; 2. helpful; 3. helpless; 4.
useful; 5. useless; 6. player.
C. A word with er, ful, or less that makes sense in the
following sentences.
1. When Amanda fell, her arm felt full of pain. It.was very
painful. *
2. Jervis always works with care. He is very careful.
3. Rodwell likes to dance. Some day he hopes to be an
expert dancer.
4. The Sidwell's home burned in the fire. Now they are
homeless.
5. Angie drives with skill. She is a skilful driver.,
6. John went camping. He is a camper.
7. The puppy likes to play. It is a playful pet
Conversation Punctuation Solutions
Reminder: Quotation marks (" ") come before and after
the exact wordsisomeone says. The speaker tag tells who is
talking.
1. Sheila said, 'That old field is a good place for a garden."
2. Danny remarked, "We'll really have to clean it up."
3. Jeari said, "Let's take the garbage out."
4. Jacky said, "What will we plant?"

IN THIS WEEK
The Dictionary
Reminders


A dictionary tells you -
How to spell a word
How to say a word
What the word means
If the word is a verb, noun,
adjective, or other kind of word.
The guide word tells the first and last
words on the page.
A. Study'these words which are arranged like a dictionary
page.
Front
'front (runl) adv First; facing forward; not the back; n. the
from part of something
fruit (frfut) n. the part of a plant that holds the seeds and
which it often good to eat.
fry (frT) v. to cook in fat over high heat
Fuss
full (ful) adj. without room for any more
fun (fun) n. a happy, gay time
funny (fun'g) adj. causing people to laugh
fur (f&r) n the coat of hairthat covers many animals
fuss (fus) v. to make a bother.about, n. a bother, worry


1. The guide words on this page are and __
2. a) Would you put frothy on this page?
b) Would you put foam on this page?
c) Would you put further on this page?
3. Is this page from the front or the middle of the dictionary?
4. How many nouns are no this page? Write them.
5. Use an adjective in a sentence.

6. Can you fuss about a broken shoelace? __
7. Find the words below in a dictionary. Write them in the
sentences.

ferret perplex
valour ecstatic
mammoth concede

1. The firefighters got awards for their __
2. Bonnie decided to __ the race.
3. The had curved tusks.
4. The palace guards had to __ for the lost ring.
5. George was __ when his sister won the medal.
Synonyms
A. Synonyms are words that mean nearly the same. Read
the words in the Bank. They are synonyms for underlined
words in the story. Write the synonyms next to the word.
,Bank
begin rattled
crashed screamed
flashed stared
pounded terrified

Ricky was very (scared) The wind (howled) .
All the windows (shook) in their frames. The screen
door (banged) _. The rain would (start) soon.
Footsteps (thumped) across the porch, Yellow
eyes (looked) __ at Ricky through the screen. Lightning
(flared) Ricky could see the shape of an animal.
B. Write synonyms for these words. Use a dictionary to
check your work.
happy, noise, easy, hard, under, beside, cry, wet, save
Antonyms

A. Reminder: Antonyms are words that mean nearly
opposite. Change the meaning of this story. Use an antonym
from the Bank for each underlined word.
Bank

late sad
frowned younger
hard angry

Sandra was feeling (happy) _. She (smiled) at
her (older) ___ sister.
"It is very (early) _. Mom will be (pleased) when
she gets home. This homework was (easy) to do."
B. Write antonyms for these underlines d words on the
blanks..
Janet (dropped) the cat. The cat (growled) _. It
was (skinny) and had a (long) tail.
Janet said, "You are (an ugly) __ cat and very (mean)

C. Write synonyms for these words. Use a dictionary to
check your work.
Quick, alone, often, many

Words that sound the same

These pairs of words are "sound-alikes." But they are
spelled differently.

hear/hear see/sea
nose/knows eye/I

Use the "sou'nd-alikes." Vrite the correct word in each
blank. -


1. The elephant wanted to (see/sea) __ himself in the
mirror.
2. He (nose/knows) ,__ his (nose/knows)!
3. Yes! What a handsome (knows/nose) __!
4. "Your (knows/nose) __ looks like a hose," said the
giraffe.


5. "You've stuck your neck out, (eye/I) __ (sea/see)
," said the elephant.
6. "My (knows/nose) __ is long, but your (I/eye) __ is
high."
7. "I take it back," said the giraffe: "Everyone (nose/knows)
__ your (nose/knows) __ is as lovely as a rose."
8. "What did you say, Giraffe?" called the elephant. "(Eye/
1) __can't (hear/here) __ you. Oh, I (sea/see) you.
Your head is really out of sight."
Sense Details
We all have senses, One of the reasons we use them is
to let people know about what we hear, see, feel; smell, and
taste.
On Saturday Leslie learned how to use the washing
machine: Here is an entry from his:journal. Read Leslie's
Journal. Find the details and tell about the senses.
A. Write each detail beside the name for the sense it fits
best.
The way to set it out is shown after the entry below.


Saturday, April 30
I turn the dial slowly with my fingers. It goes
click-click. Suddenly I feel the machine shake. It
goes chug-chug. Is it broken? No! It's only the
water coming in. It gushes like a dam breaking. I
add the soap powder. It feels like dry sand. It
smells lemony; and it makes ,me sneeze, I add a
small white mountain of clothes. I watch through
the small! round window. The machine twirls the
clothes. It swirls. It swishes. It splashes. It goes
ruma-tum-tum-tum, rumpa tum-tum-tum. I munch
some salty peanuts I have in my pocket As I eat
them they add a crunchy sound to the noisy
room..


Hear


B. Write an entry of your own. Let it tell about any experience
that you can describe well using the senses. Make it
interesting.

Writing Dealing with Reality
As Denise drove up the road into the mountains of the
Rupununi, she watched the sun slowly abandon her. The air
became heavy, and the heavy mist moved in. The thick clouds
enveloped her and her car so abruptly that Denise gasped.
She could only see a few feet into the white mist, but she was
afraid to pull over. The shoulder was narrow and there was
no telling when another vehicle mighl come up and hit her
from behind.
Instruction
Continue to write the story. Make it interesting by adding
other characters.
You can even turn it into fantasy. Remember that
fantasy is that special kind of literature that concerns
itself with impossible things things that could never
happen in the natural world. Fantasies are stories
about animals, people, things, places and events that
defy reality.





~Page VIII 'Spnday ~oii..a12O



KTool: I L:L 7X ...... S;


Hello boys and girls,
We are here to help you improve your skills, content, and
attitude. Be good to yourself by being regular at your study,
and by improving the big habit of self-discipline. See how
much you remember about decimals and vulgar fractions
today. There is some other work also.

Take care now.
'Bye.

IN LAST WEEK

Fractions & Percentages

Reminders:
1. The improper fraction is called the top heavy fraction. It
is. always carrying a higher number as its upper number.
Every top heavy fraction can be written or expressed as a
whole number and a proper fraction. These are sometimes
called mixed numbers. Thus 1 /2; 1 3%; and 1 4/5 are all
mixed numbers.

2. Look at 555.555. It can mean 500 + 50 + 5 + 5/10 + 5/
100 + 5/1000. The dot called the decimal point, separates
the whole numbers from the fractional parts, e.g. in the
0.555, each figure 5 is ten times the value of the following
figure, reading from left to right. Thus 5/10 is ten times as
great as 5/100, and 5/100 is ten times as great as 5/1000,
and so on.

3. Decimals are also fractions.


IN THIS WEEK

Multiple-Choice Questions

Shade the letter that is next to the correct answer to each
question.

NUMBERING & NAMING: Questions 1-4


I am 7 more than 57. Who am I?
48
64
84
68


2. If you double me and add 0.5 you get 2.10. Who am I?
e. 0.008
f. 0.08
g. 0.8
h. 80

3. By how much is 3705 greater than 3570?
i. 75
j. 135
k. 235
I. 275

4. The teacups in Simon's cafe are stored in racks of 10
teacups. Four racks fit on a shelf. How many shelves are
needed to hold 110 teacups?
m. 11 shelves
n. 40 shelves
o. 3 shelves
p. 15 shelves

FRACTIONS: Questions 5-7
1 2
3/5 1/4

8/32 6/24
4 3

5. Which square has a fraction that does not fit?
(a) 1
(b) 2 .
(c) 3
(d) 4

6. What is the following fraction in its lowest terms? 56/-
378
a. 56/378
b. 8/54
c. 4/27
d. 1/7

7. Which fraction represents a whole number?
a. 38/38
b. 30/36
c. 38/76
d. 1/13


MULTIPLICATION: Questions 8-10

8. Sandra plays baseball. In the last game she made 3
plays in each of 9 innings. How many plays did she make
in all?
a. 9
b. 3
c. 27
d. 81

9. The new house built down the street has 9 bedrooms on
each of its 2 floors. There are 8 bedrooms on another of
its floors. How many bedrooms are in the building?
a. 15
b. 20
c. 18
d. 26

10. Triple 1.4 plus 14 is equal to:
a. 18.2
b. 14.2
c. 14.142
d. 18.14


PERIMETER & AREA: Question 11 & 12

11. One side of a rectangle is 3m in length. Another side is
4m in length. What is the perimeter of the rectangle?
a. 13m
b. 14m
c. 15m
d. 16m

12. What is the area of the spot of painted wall below?
11 cm

2.5 cm


(a) 275 cm2
(b) 2.05 cm2
(c) 2.75 cm2
(d) 27.5 cm2


Multiplication and Division: Question 13

13. A scout leader wants to divide. 23 girls into four teams
for relay races. She wants the teams to be equal or almost
equal in size. Sihe doesn't want any girls to be left out. How
many girls will be on each of the four teams?
(a) 3 themes with 5 girls each; 1 team with 8 girls
(b) 2 teams with 7 girls each; 1 team with 9 girls
(c ) 2 teams with 7 girls each; 1 team with 5 girls
(d ) 3 teams with 6 girls each; 1 team with 5 girls


Congruent Figures: Question 14

Congruent figures have the following characteristics:
(a) same shape and colour
(b) same size and shape
(c ) different sizes and shapes
(d) different sizes and colours

Mixed Skills Applications

The Chart
Here's a chart that shows Fahrenheit temperatures, rainfall,
and snowfall for some areas around he world.. Maybe you
have read about some of these places.

SEE CHART BELOW


Solve.

1. What is the highest temperature shown?
2. What is the lowest temperature shown? Where was it?
3. Where is the yearly rainfall almost twice in Garraway's
Town?


Place


4. How many more inches of rainfall are there in Yuunt Yun
Village, than in Garraway's Town?
Problem Solving

4. In a club, 7 members are 12 years old and 4 are 13 years
old. The rest are 9, 10, 11, 15, and 17. What are the range
mode, median, and mean of the ages of the members?

5. Four weeks before a recital, Roy will practise 2 hours each
week and 3 hours each Saturday and Sunday. How long
will he practise in 6 weeks?

6. Sandra wants to have a test average of 90., He scored
77 and 98 on the first two tests. What does he have to score
on his next test to reach the average he wants?

7. There are 10 boxes of jumbo shrimp. Each box contains
10 bags. Each bag contains 12 shrimp. How many jumbo
shrimp are there?

8. On his last five tests Fay scored 98, 94, 86, 69, and 88.
Green's scores were 87, 92, 100, 63, and 78. Who had a
greater average? By how much?

9. Freddy baked 59 cookies and put them into bags. Each
bag holds 12 cookies. How many bags does he fill? How
many cookies are left?

10. Mary worked 3 hours and earned $1500. Yonnette
worked 6 hours and earned $3000. Do they earn the same
amount each hour? Explain.

11. Bakers put yeast into dough to make it rise. Some yeast
cells reproduce by splitting in two. Suppose there are 1,000
yeast cells to start each and each yeast cell splits in two
every hour. How many yeast cells will there be in 6 hours?

12. The baby shark tank at an aquarium holds 28,000 litres
of water. If there are 16,783 litres in the tank, about how
many more litres can it hold?

13. The Polder Roadway needs to have 460 km of track
built. It has only 4 months to build the road. How many
kilometers of road will the roadway have to build each
month?

14. Each km of roadway has 57 sections. There is work for
4 workers in each section. How many people can be
employed to build 200 of roadway?

15. If Sandra drove at 80 km per hour, how long did it take
her to travel 496km?

16. Fifteen friends made $3750 raking leaves. When they
divided up the money, how much did each receive?

17. A volcano called Paricutin in Mexico, built up a cone 457
m high. In 26 weeks. How many metres is that per week?

18. Paricutin erupted for about 17 years. How many months
is that?

19. Paricutin threw out 40,980 kg of ash every second it
erupted for the four few months. How many kilograms is
that per day?


General Reminders:

Area: The number of square units in the surface of a shape.

Average: The quotient found by dividing the sum of a group
by the numbers of addends.

Decimal: A number which uses a decimal point to show
tenths and hundredths and so on.


Fraction:
group.


Record Temperature


High


Low


A number that shows part of a whole or part of a


Yearly
Rainfall


Yearly
Snowfall


Hunbuntin Falls 99 above 0 21 below 0 .36 in 89 in
Great Gatsby City 107 above 0 49 below 0 15 in 59 in
Hoisington Village 108 above 0 21 below 0 48 in 0 in
Yuunt Yun Village 87 above 0 49 below 0 55 in 120 in
Mammary City 99 above 0 21 below 0 60 in 0 in
Garraway's Town 109 above 0 49 below 0 32 in 8 in


page 8 & 13.p65


__






1S-... C c Ma 1 2 P--- IX


Living


Ruel Johnson

DURING the launch of the
Caribbean. Rastafari
Organisation's 10th regional
gathering at the Umana
Yana, recently. Minister of
Culture, Youth and Sport.
Gail Teixeira told the gather-
ing that it "as time that
Rastafarians entered the
mainstream of Gusanese so-
ciety.
Worldwide" the imase of
Rsiataniriis.ni hais ro-v. i n ihe
pa.t ti o decades or si ite big-
gesi actor quite possihly being
the rise of Robert Nest.or
Marley and his posthumous leg -
endary status which only seems
to grow in strength e'ier ',ear.
Despite the enduring presence
rof Brother Bob and the legacy
of his ,.works however. the
growth .'f this inmge has alo
had a negause side one whichh
more often than not ec lipses the-

In Gu.ana. as else where.
RJ,-iafan has become a parad,.x.,
or rather a bundle of paradoxes,
the spiritual consciousness of
Bob Marley veisus the inmawc
not complerel ws without basis.
of the criminal Rastaman, the,
advocacN of smoking cannabis
as a legitumate religious rme % er-
sus the illegal trafficking in the
weed which has negated the
same advocacy, the race-nan-
scending hipness' of dreadlocks
.ersus the rebelliousl, unkempt
"bunriga" nany: the all-embracing
philosophy of Racsiafarianism
%which is nevertheless built on
the enhancement of black Afri-
can self-consciousness.

A CULTURAL
THING
The Sunday Chronicle


spoke to some Raslafari
about ihatl life is hike IL\inI
'Fart' inGuana
"I am Rasta for the past
tielhe \ears.' saas fony-fe
tear-old ta\id St. Hill St
- a leather craft vendor %we
at the corner of North Road'
W\aier Streei s s that


an theuiller moinemeni Accoldin quitiie
g as to.Chapter 2, Arucle 18 ofl the rc mer
Constitution of Guyana; "Land a bic:
ten, is for social use and must go the ago h
our- tiller" ration
Hill "Me and some other broth- _3. H
met ers seh ig.best %e sight Fan and si\s
arid get tek from these-land hay and wings
he t ar l


d through hard wdrk He'
%ibers o hen be used in nrde
,cle, and then four years;
he suddenly got he inspi-
i to purchase a ca on Jul,,
aile Selassie's birthday\ He
th.t he got up all his sa'.'-


S ,



ro op and others atthe Umana
S t Icommunity with Mr. Peter RamsrioPanrisationt hegio
EMBERSotRastafariancc was the Caribbean Rastafarian Organisato1thregional
na lastmonth The occasionnd ei n t o u t
Ya-,-Anin Georgetown. until he found a man wiih a sec'-


gatherin n"- -. -
faith prima-
ril. because he saw "It was a
cultural thin "
"And that lime deh ever -
body did seeking identity% and
then society\ ain't rejllI doing
nothing for we and then %we tol-
low through, well. itth history
and Bob Mtarle did done
spread the word.. culture did
ruling at that said time: %was a
natural mysuc in the air at the
said tune." he said
There were economic fac-
tors as %well St. Hill recalls that
around that time there was of-
ficial support for the "land to


MARIJUANA
IN HIS recent hit Ode to the Weed. reggae singer Richie
Stevens sings.
"Burn di marijuana pun di coma
It keep me calma. it mek me smart
Burning on di highway, its di highest grade
Get into my head".

In countries all over the world, there is an ongoing debate
about whether the possession and use of marijuana
should be legalised. Proponents of the decriminalization
of marijuana say that there is plenty of evidence about the
good that the herb does, citing everything from the Bible to
Tolkien's Lord of the Rings.
"I have created every herb-bearing Iree and it shall be
meet for thee," says Ras Michael, paraphrasing Genesis.
He says thal according to the Bible. every"herb was created
for use by man and marijuana has its uses too. He claims
Ihal marijuana is a sacred Ithing that was used by all the
Biblical high priests and 'priests of all olher religions.
"Aaron, Moses. all these patriarchs and priests and
prophets, they had marijuana on the table. When Jesus was
breaking the bread, is marijuana him'break amongst him
bredren. When they talking bout-the peace pipe the
Amerindians used to smoke, was hemp, was marijuana."
He cites the cultivation of hemp which is used for a
variety of purposes, including the manufacturing of fabric -
as evidence of some usefulness of weed,
"It's a discrimination fuh a seh a man cyan use weed
when they got alcohol selling, when they get cigarette
selling, all these things that they made. We never made


farming as part of culture.
So we get into this movement
and start farming and them
thing."
St. Hill says that this 'enr-
lure did not last too long how-
ever. A couple of years after,
they had started farming, the
land was taken from them to ,
construct what is now the Joint
Ser ices Housing Scheme in
Lamaha Springs. He says that
he and his friends had to: abain-
don their faming ventures and
seek employment elsewhere.
"I come out here selling
belts, wallets and passport hold-
ers for some Indian people. And
as time go by now I get a
grasp of the operation and I
start mekkin these belts and
these wallets and these pass-
port holders."
St. Hill said that learning
leather craft allowed him to
continue to be independent
of society.
"We get caught up now
and start just living fuh the
fullness, living Rastafari, 'be-
ing self-sufficient, self-em-
ployed and them thing."
St. Hill says that though
he is strong in the faith, he
does not practise certain te-
nets of it as strongly as some,
like the Nyabinghi worship-
pers do. He says that the ad-
herents of the Nyabinghi
mode of worship practise a
more pious Rastafarianism,
including drumming and
chanting against 'Babylon',
and sticking to a strict veg-
etarian and 'ital' diet.
"I'se deal with the ital
yeah, but from time to time
I use a lil fish broth and dem
kinda ting. You gotta main-
tain you strength; you's a
family man and then you
can'tjust deh out in the sun."
St. Hill believes that his
faith has brought him where
he is today, not wealthy, but
leading a comfortable life ac-


ond-hand car to sell and bought
11 Si Hill proudly acknowl-
edges that lie onl. had to change
the batter\ for the firs a couple
of weeks ao'
No man i, an island howi-
e\er. St Hill sa\ s he worked h.~
, a., up until he owned a stadl
' which he constructed on the


pa'. ement on'\\'at'er St'ee
w hen the City Council cleared
the pa'ements last Near. Si Hill
was forced to relocate to ihe
\endor's arcade Like man\ o0
the ,endors whose stalls are lo-
cated in the arcade, he says that
people hardly venture in so he
.0i forced to come out and sell
his, iood in front ol Foganmr'
dcp.irlment sole. a couple of
feet away from where he once
had hi l! .ili

NO
COMFORTABLE
PLACE IN
SOCIETY
St. Hill .says that
Rastafarians do not enjoy a se-
cure plaice within Guyanlese so-
ciety. .
S" naih a comfortable place
because people like demi ain't
accust.inied io changes and dein
thin,' The\ doe'. \\aich at ou
ditffrent, the\ ain't watch h at
you like a human being %th a
different religious choice and
demni thing."
He does not, hos eer. onl\
think that simple narrow,,-
nundedness is the sole contribu-
tor to how oiher persons \lew
Rasiafarianis.
"Then again ihe\ does see
SIorta people dem "ho is unkie
and suh "ho sleeping on the
road, and by they keeping them-
sel'.s unitd\ the\ head tend to
knot up and they think that is


Rastas degenerate to that
state.;.. People tend to,
...tegrilse Rastafari and seh
'Duh one i, a Rasta and look
hoi" he smoke up and deh pun
the rad '
He sajs that man\ other
factor,. fli more than smoking
marijuana and thinking about re-.
ligion, contribute to people end-
ing up destitute and on the.
streets.
"People trying to seh thik
other than Bob Marley... if a
Rastaman don't really st.'irid oui
within whatever trade he mani-
f,-sliihn in, and letting he light
show, people tend to put you
in all kinds of derogatory cat-
egories."
fHe says that outside of
Guyana, Rastafarians occupy
high positions in various spheres
of life, adding that conversely,
in this country, they have to
'tirk c or self-elevation '*'
"I ,ec s"a.\I SI HIll
' Rjqiafatn could nick ridess In
tihi. _stiL'iC\ it he is to keep do-
ing the pio.iitie things and iuti
thinking about themselLes and
being opliistic about thec life
1 believe in the long run due to
hard ssork and determination to
do good Raitatari n ill shine in
times to come.
Another Raslaman. Ras
Michael. Aho sells craftwiork
on the Aenue of the Repub-
lic has a different experience

Please lurn to
centre page


A team of GPL Commercial officers will be at the

Wakenaam NDC office on Wednesday 4th May

and Friday 6th May to conduct on-the-spot billing

queries for customers living at Wakenaam.



.Consumers at Leguan should continue to go to

the GPL Commercial office at Enterprise.



Disconnection teanis will be at Leguan from

Monday 9th May and at Wakenaam from Monday

16th May, 2005.



Consumers are kindly asked to bring their accounts

up to date in order to avoid disconnection.
-- - - ,,-,nwr.W i- t


...... ........... ,
//
r,


'Sunday Chronicle Mayv 1, 2005


Pa'gee~i X


in; ff 'a~






Guyana Chror


GREETINGS are extended to Mr. and Mrs. Mohan
Tularam on their fourth wedding anniversary. Best wishes
from their loving mom, Rampatie, dad, Benny Gopaul,
other relatives and friends who wish the couple all the
best in the future. May Lord Rama shower his richest
blessings on you and keep you safe.


CONGRATULATIONS are extended to Mr. and Mrs.
Sherrod Kyle Chester who recently tied the knot at
Adolfos Plantation House, Coverden, Barbados. The
bride resides in Canada while the groom resides in Bar-
bados. Their relatives and friends in Guyana, especially
Aunt Hazel, wish them a blissful marriage. May God con-
tinue to shower his blessings on their lives.
we. -'-mmu e~e -


CONGRATULATIONS and best wishes are extended
to Jimmy and Shamsoon Jamaludeen of Line Path,
Corriverton who celebrate their 52nd wedding anniver-
sary on May 3. Greetings from their children, Son-Son,
Raymond. Karlo, Dizal, Hazin and Saudia, daughters-in-
law Mildred, Dolly, Bebi and Ackleema.


From page IX

from St. Hill's. Asked about
how long he has been in the
faith, he gives a slightly more
philosophical and colourful
response.
"Well I and I been in this life
basically all I and I life. If I were
to tell the I, "fifteen years",
"twelve years", is not so. [It's]
from Creation," he said.
Asked, more directly, how
long ago he started wearing
dreadlocks the 35-year-old says
he started growing them from the
age of 17, but he has been forced
to cut his hair several times.
"Right about now, this is
about the third crop me have
pun me head hear so, due to
tribulations and times and things
like that," he told the Sunday
Chronicle.
The first time he says he
was forced to cut his hair was
during his early twenties when
family members in America were
applying for a visa for him to go
live with them. He says that he
spent 15 years in the United
States where he lived and
worked as a musician.
Ras Michael says that he
was the vocalist in a five-man
reggae band called The
Silvertones. He says that like
"most musicians" in America
whenever the band travelled,
they carried a bit of recre-
ational stuff, in a word,
'weed'.
"Any musician you ask,"
says Ras Michael, "across the
earth, they gun have weed with
dem. A coincidence happen
whereas they find the weed in
the drum set and it cause a
whole set of disturbance."
The long and short of it is
that after 15 years:in the States,
he was sent back to Guyana.
"They gave us each five
years before we could return to
America, to the States. So we on
a five years ban. I'm in my
fourth year now, so when you
don't see me I'm back in the
band; Silvertones. mash up de
place."

HAVE LOCKS;
CAN'T WORK
Until then, Ras Michael has
to live the life of a Rastaman in
Guyana.
"As a Rastarman in life in
Guyana you have to realise sell
you have to find a job of your
own, you have to do something
off your own. you can't depend
on the system. You find a man
without a locks get a work from
the system, a man with a locks
can't get no work. Living in
Guyana. either you be a planter,
a farmer, or you got a lil busi-
ness like you see I got here."
"Or," he adds with the
slightest of inflections, "you got
to gel some kind ol thin, going
own... Ain't nobody goin to give
you no job."
Ras Michael says that when
it comes to Rastafarians and em-


ployment within mainstream so-
ciety it is simply outright preju-
dice; he says that if a Rasta man
and a "bald head" apply for the
same job, despite the Rasta man
being more qualified, it is the
"bald head" who is going to get
hired.
"I man is an entrepreneur, I
man is a musician. Musicians is
some of the wisest people on the
earth. Is not a lack of talent, or
intellect or things like that; they
just fight against I and I for no
reason at all."
A friend of Ras Michael's,
Ras 'Bubba' comes up at this
point. He agrees with Ras
Michael that Rastafarians
face a great deal of prejudice
when dealing with main-


stream society.
"Yeah man. is true. You got
to look to man works and 'cord-
ing to he works he's get pay.
But you see the people them in
this country lack of
hyperstanding mek them does
act and behave in the kind of
way. But is still wise minds have
fe lead the people dem and mek
the people learn and overs what
a gwan in this side here suh."
He says that "in the West"
there is no love for Rastafarians.
He too offers a philosophical an-
swer to the question of how long
he has been an adherent of the
faith.
"Rastal'ari is an inborn con-
cept. How the parents ha'dl !ie
I. they keep the I under control.
but as the I rise and the I
oveirstand the fullup now, the I
decide to full and let the world
and the people know the full-
ness of it. That I and I father live
and never die."
For the past five years. 31-
year-old Ras Bubba has been im-
parting the fullness. He meets
and counsels young
Rastafarians, and occasionally
visits a Rastafarian tabernacle in
Linden to give of the fullness.
He says he earns his living


by planting, making crafts or
singing .in, ri,._, which can
earn him a living at a particular
time. Ras Bubba says he started
growing his dreadlock crop in
the army, something that didn't
go down too well with the
Guyana Defence Force brass. He
doesn't regret his stint in the
army, however.
"I give thanks to the knowl-
edge wuh I trod through within
that I could teach ones and I
could survive in the knowledge
in this time. It [the army] is
teach you a lot and you must
pass it on to I and I brethren and
sistren."
Samuel Kelly. a circulation
assistant at Guyana National
Newspapers Limited, publishers


of Guyana Chronicle and Sun-
day Chronicle has been
Rastafarian for 30 of his 56
years. He sums up his attraction
to the faith as simply "Con-
sciousness."
"Society don't accept
Rastafari whether it's a half, quar-
ter or whole. Society just don't
accept Rastafari. Society is
something like this: if it's being
run by, say 'bald heads', that's
what they gun look for, there is
no way a Fari could ever be on
that [high] level."
Kelly puts forward a sur-
prisingly frank view on what
society would like if things were
reversed.
"It would be the same
thing," he surmises.


DREADLOCKS BUT

NOTDREAD
DREADLOCKS have become
a fashion statement that
has. cut across racial
boundaries in recent times,
something that has done a
great deal in taking away
some of the stigma
attached to the Raslafarian'
hairstyle.
While one I e qgae song.
-:laims that "'You don't have'
hl: be dread to be Rasta" rI
.eemr that thm re terse 1i
also true- you don't h.:', i t, -- l-
be: Rasta to be 'dread' eith e Welli Verbeke
i,>t.:-.e th,, i: t Ulelli Verbeke is one of many women
who -_-.p,- dr -i l,. but are not Rastafarian.
"I didn't like the --traightening. it was too hard. It used to
-,in y.-uil -c:alp an-id so metlrries Cut you hair out and :ill 1,f
rial ,ays LIellri.'iling her leasonrs tor locking hei"r hatir
She says Ihati she has been gro%,,ing her lc cks- for 3boulI
Ih.e years now, trimming threm dcowvn every n cn.vi and tihenr
She says that in Ine egnning 1 was Iougtl but she
eventually got lit under control
Asked it she s,.er gets mistaken for a Rasta woman.
she replies thr, she does


0'


Mr. David St. Hill greets President Bharrat Jagdeo during the latter's visit to his stall.




icle May 1, 2005


U mobile is pleased to announce new and
improved coverage during the month of April
in the following areas:




)nlythe beginning of further expansion of
U mobile's network.
Look out for more improvements
coming soon to your community!


'~.


a


fl'





2 All applicants muSi have currently acceptable quaiirkai)ris, in Enqlisr Lariguage and Mairienmaiics
The cIIfollong programmes are available -
EARLY CHILDHOOD
ai1 A irare-year Pre-Service Early Childrood Educatoin Progranimme i Tujrl.ve'ri
Ito A hrre-year Cislaneri, E-ducalon lri-Ser.ivice Earl, Criildhod Educalon FPro.i ramnime a F3Pel.-q I Mlabirurrm, Pe,.a n 2 irnii Prginral F.gion
:'. .reed-en.-Hopi Region -J GeoretowniTurev-eni Peqion 6 iNew Amsterdaml Re Pin '9 Lelhni ,anrd Peirion ii. ILiri, ni

PRIMARY
I.: i iihre.-year Pre--S-ervi:e Primary Progiramme at Turl'e.,er
idi rt,.e-year Diitance Educalion In-Service Prinmary Programme at Regionr 1 ii.llarrumal. Region (Anna PgIrIa;) Recicn 3
i.reed,-len-Hoop Pegion 4 IGeorgelowrii/Turkeyer, Region 6 (New .Amiterdami P'Reicnr ') Leiremi a3nd Pegion 10 (Lineni
SECONDARY
(e) A three-year Pre-Service Secondary Pre-Vocalionr i Proqramme (Hoime Economics Agricullural Sciern:-., and Indusirial Ans i al Turkeyer,
ii A, Iree--year Pre-Service Secondar' Academic Programme (English Language '.airieni.ii-s Soa.: S3ludie. Science, .parrinh Art and
blusic I al Tur eyen
i1q A ihee-vear In-Service Secondary Academic Programme iEnglish Language lMathematics Soo.,al Studies, Sciencel at Region 2 1i-nna
Peinal. Region 3 (Vi1reed-en-Hoopi Region 4 iGecorgetown)/Turkleyern Region 6 iPose Halli arid Pgi-r: 111 iLindenri
ri h. three year In-Service Seonrdarv Pre-Vocalional Pr.gramme iEnglish Language [F.1aihernmaiirc Sc',:,al Studie.. Science Sparnirh.
A,.riculture Sciencei Region 4 iGeorgeiown/Tur_.evenn
CONDITIONS FOR ENTRY
AGE AND YEARS OF SERVICE
For Inei Early Crildhoicod Education Primary and Secondary AcadenmiiPre-Vocation, l In-Service Programmes applicants must tbe o.,er
sev.nteer, 17) years of age and must have been employed in a school.lor at least ONE acadernic year before the commencement of training..
For the Early Childhood Educafton. Pnmary and Secondary Acadernic/Pre-Vocationa[ Pre-Service Programmes applicants must have attained
a minimum age of seventeen (171 years on 2005-08-31
QUALIFICATIONS
For the Early Childhood Primary Pre-Service' and in-Service Programmes applicants must have obtained:
(i) A minimum of four. i4, GCE 'O Level subjects OR four 141 CSEC subjects at ONE (1) sitting OR five (5) GCE 'O' Lvel OR five (5)'CSEC
subjects at no more than TWO.(2ysinings .
OR
(ii) A pass al one of thteFouhflafop'E.arriiiations (CPCE. GBET GUIDE).
SOR
(iii): A cenrific ate from Cntcnlow'Laour College.
For the ihree-year Pre-Vocational Programmes applicarils mus I have obtained
(i) A inimur of foirr (4) GE 'O0 Level subjects OR four I4I CSEC sublecis at ONE Sitting OR five (5 GCE 'O' Level OR five 151 CSEC subjects
at no more than-TWO Sittrngs Applicants riust have passes in at least TWO areas of specialization.
OR
(ii) A certificate in Agrrculture (for students specializing in Agriculture) plus currently acceptable qualifications in English Language and
Mlathematics ,
OR
(iii) A c:-rnif'ale in Home Economic.s irum Caregie Sno:iol of Home Economics (for students specializing in Home Economics) plus currently
acceptable qualifications in Enghsh Language and r.alriemalics.
OR
(iv) A e:iiiticale in any technical course from GTI. J;ATI LTI or ETI (for students specializing in Industrial Arts) plus currently acceptable
qualifiations in English Language anr.1d *lalhemai: -.
F,:., itietIr ree-yeat Secondary A:cademic Prograrrmne: applicants must have obtained:
A minimum of iour i4) GCE 0 Level sublets OP :four 4i(4iCSEC subjects at ONE Sitting and five (5) GCE 'O' Level OR five (5) CSEC sut lects
atno more than TWO Sihigs Applicants must have pa ses in irheir intended areas of specialization.
GENERAL INFORMATION
4,pplh ailon ,f-rnms can be obtained from all Hea- i1 Edcal'3iiori Deparl'i-enrs
E.elr:.- adri~ion 10 a Pre-Serv':e Prc.,ranmme u:T'-:.ul applicants will be required to undergo a medical examination by an approved
Medi al n,.: er
Successful nppiicarin? to the Pre.Seryi,,e Progiarnne will be required to sign a bond to serve as a teacher in Nursery, Primary or Secondary
schools'in any pan of Guyana for a period ol five (51 ,.ear: immediately after completing the course.
Pre-Service .studerins will re,:eive a grant which is subject to revision from time to time.
Successful apphi.ans I h Ine lI-Service Programme will be required to sign a bond to serve as a teacher in Nursery, Primary or Secondary
schools in any pan o. Guy.anr lor a period of three (3) years immediately after completing the course.
Distance Eduj: a.l.n Prograrmmes .iiell rnence in July 2005. Completed application forms for these Programmes must be returned to the
Heads of Education Depanmenis n:, i -aer I, n 2-0ih May, 2005.
Distance Edu.: li,-n lui.,nal will te held at least once per week for approximately four hours.
Face to Face .es-ion, vill be held during the vacation period for Distance Educatiof In-Service Programmes.
The Pre-Service and In-Service Secondary Academic Programmes will commence in September 2005. Completed application forms for
these programmes must be returned-to the relevant Departments of Education, no later than 20th May 2005.
Chief iEducation Officer Ct 'v' "'t" "


Government ads can be viewed on -,up ...n-, ;r.:- ,/


NO ,,MORE



MYSTERIES

Keith David

FROM all that has and can eer be said of the recent Decem-
ber/January rainfall phenomenon, the simple explanation is:
I Temperature decreases from the equator i ouiith 1o the
North Pole north) The same is e\ ideni for the height of the active
atmosphere Areas therefore. ati similar latitudes or simular distances
from the equator on the earth's surface \\ill ha'e siniular tempera-
iures and subsequently sinmlar pressures ideallv.
2. The atmophlierc has three dimensions, the third being.
height. MNi% in- upwards into space and particularly towards the
tropospheric boundary' (the tropopause), ideally, temperature and
pressure decreases by;'6.5 for every thousand feet and ten milli-
,.,rs f,,r e.i, three hundred and lu enty feet, respectively,
3 In re.,lhih. hio e\ er, the atmosphere is dynamic, and mov-
;ni ain cunenrs aFJCon.i-.' Force causes, continuously, areas at
sinular Jdiiiances Irom the eqLualor ,as well as above the earth's sur-
lace nor i, h'. c exacti emper.turex and pressures. Joining with lines
iherefoic. .ierns with similar pressure and temperature values create
a series ofif rsin and sliping curves with ridges and troughs. Fig.
1.0.
4. lTroughs therefore are indicative of low temperature or
pressure value .ii ind can occur at various heights above the earth's
surface or above and; below other pockets of air.
5. ; Chiracieiicticall.. low pressure areas are warm, warmer
or hot areas where air rises almost to create vacuum only to be
filled by cool, cooler or cold air which essentially moves down a
pressure gradient..
6. Last December a trough evolved at the equatorial line where
the ITCZ already exists. As discussed last week, the ITCZ is al-
ready responsible for creating a low pressure zone along the equa-
tor. In the end, the normal low pressure zone along the equator was
enhanced into an even greater low pressure zone. Technically, this
made the pressure gradient steeper.
7. The consequence of this was the influx, of larger than nor-
mal masses or pockets of cold air moving in to fill this gap at the
equator.
Cloud formation, movement and the accumulation of cloud sys-
tems within this area were greater than normal and subsequently,
was the amount of precipitation.
This is no new or rare occurrence. But what is important
to note, is that had the Trade Winds been stronger or weaker
we may have had an extended rainy season with a lower in-
tensity of rainfall or the intense cloud systems would have ei-
ther passed us or emptied over the Atlantic.


Sunday Chronicle May, 11,2005


tVle rOlcaio uue


Paoe X11


CYRIL POTTER COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 1

Applicalion`s are invited 'or suitably qualified persons lor erniry 10 a programme of leacner training' leading 10 the Traind Teacher 5 Cerificale T O D A Y
Special emphasis will be placed on the trarrnng ,j persons for the Secondary Academic and Secondary Pre-Vo.catioral Programmes
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
1 The College accepts. ,
in CSEC General Proficiency grades l OR II acquired teliore June 1998 and grades I If OR III from June 199 .
i.i CSEC Basic Proficiency Grade I '
iiiii G,'E O' Levels, Grades A, C OR E before June .1'-75 and GCE 'O' Levels Grades. A B OP C from June 197,







. .> . . .- - - -


Sieiice


Hello boys and girls,

It's good to meet again with you today. Today we'll
continue to look at The Earth and Space.

The Earth and Space

Although the Moon looks very large in the sky, it is really
much smaller then the Sun, the stars or the planets, which
I will discuss soon with you. It only looks so large because
it is nearer to us then any of these.

Scientists call the Moon a satellite, a word which means
a 'guard' or an 'attendant', because it goes round and
round the Earth just as a guard might go round the walls
of a castle. The Moon takes about a month to complete
its journey round the earth

The Moon always presents
the same side to the Earth, so
throughout history nobody
knew what the other side was
S1 like. At least, back in 1959
October a rocket was fired to
the moon. This rocket had a
/ television camera on board,
and sent pictures back to
Earth.

The Earth is not the only


planet to have a Moon. Several other planets have
satellites: for example, Saturn has nine and Jupiter has
twelve. So we see we even have guards in outer space,
but these guards a called Moon as some Scientists did
years ago


Look up to the sky tonight with a friend and try to make
an image on the moon in your mind and then ask your
friend. Do you see what I see? Or simply these "are you
seeing what I am seeing?"

Do have fun with the question below.

Questions


4C31 C:::JRL 3 ii.'A' .1


Hello boys and girls,
Here we are together again. Keep on reading your good
notes and continue to do discussions with your study
partners. It will help you improve your knowledge and
understanding and foster confidence for the big day!

Love you.
'Bye.

IN LAST WEEK

The Global Environment: Questions 1-4
(1) (b)
(2) (c)
(3) (a)
(4) (c)
(5) (c)
(6) (c)
(7) (a)
(8) (c)
(9) (d)
(10) (d)

IN THIS WEEK

Choose the correct answer to each question by crossing
out the letter next to it.

National Symbols: Questions 1-3
1. Which set of characteristics generally describes the
national flag?
(a) Arrowhead; three colours; square
(b) Golden Arrowhead; five colours; square
(c) Arrowhead; four colours; oblong
(d) Golden Arrowhead; five colours; oblong

2. The helmet in the coat of arms symbolizes the:
(a) Amerindian head-dress
(b) six peoples
(c) British Monarchy
(d) indigenous people


3. In the National anthem this phrase is not included:
(a) land of the free
(b) brave and free
(c) united and free
(d) Guyana the free

Development in the community: Questions 4-7

4. Which pair does not belong?
(a) Alesie Guyana Rice
(b) Booker Tate Sugar
(c) Rural Areas Roads
(d) Mahazarally & Sons Timber

5. Peanuts and beef are found plentifully in this area:
(a) Pomeroon
(b) Lethem
(c) West Coast Berbice
(d) Linden

6. Guyana exports all except one of the following
commodities:
(a) rice
(b) fish
(c) preserved fruits
(d) cement

7. Foreign exchange is used to buy one of the following:
(a) black pearls
(b) bananas
(c) machinery
(d) bauxite

Weather and Climate: questions 8-10

8. Small drops of condensed atmospheric vapour on cool
surfaces appear at this time in Guyana:
(a) between mid-day and evening
(b) between evening and nightfall
(c) between nightfall and morning
(d) between morning and mid-day


9. One effect of global warming of our planet is:
(a) longer days
(b) regular high tides
(c) dying rainforests
(d) low river water levels

10. Our rivers had their origins here:
(a) mountain tops
(b) small lakes
(c) flat lands
(d) valleys

Protection and Budget: Questions 11 & 12

11. All these institutions protect the country except this
one:
(a) judiciary
(b) defence force
(c) trade winds
(d) courts

12. Government gets its revenues from one of these
sources:
(a) customers
(b) custom duties
(c) pensioners
(d) street vendors


,Pjage NIJ


- Sunday .ChrqfniqlleMay, 1., PQ


I


("a in mgi t o.n E "&4-ij-n 1-4---


Which planet has is the
hottest?
Which is the coldest planet?
Name the planet closest to
the Sun.

Name the planet furthers
from the Sun.

Give the name of the third
smallest planet and how
many planets are before it
reaches the sun.

Give the name of the third
biggest planet and how
many planets before it
reaches the sun.

I hope you had read about
the outer space and what it
contains, because it will be
important to you one day,
e.g. Common Entrance Day
I hope you also made a very
good effect with the names
of the planets I left out. Now

I would like you to make a
recheck to see if you have
the correct name next to
the correct planet.

Let us start from Mercury
all the way down to Pluto.







Pa~e~ IV Suday Cronicl May 1:$2O

___ "-~""~' '~ .r'
-i-- 41
....... ......

'......... ..


He was an undersized little man. with a head too big for
his body a sickly little man. His nerves were bad. He
had skin trouble. It was agony for him to wear anything next:
to his skin coarser than silk. He had delusions of grandeur.
He was a monster of conceit. Never for one moment
did he. look at the world or at people, except in relation to
himself. He was not only the most important person in the
world, to himself; in his own eyes he was the only person
who existed. He believed himself to be one of the greatest
dramatists in the world, one of the greatest thinkers, and
one of the greatest composers. To hear him talk, he was
Shakespeare, and Beethoven, and Plato, rolled into one.
And you would have had no difficulty in hearing him talk. He
was one of the most exhausting conversationalists that ever
lived.: An evening with him was an evening spent in listening
to a. monologue. Sometimes he was brilliant; sometimes
he was maddeningly tiresome. But whether he was being
brilliant or dull, he had one sole topic of conversation:
himself. What he thought and what he did.
.-He had a mania for being in the right. The slightest hint
of disagreement, from anyone on the most trivial point, was
enough to set him off on a harangue that might last for
hours, in which he proved himself right in many ways, and
with such exhausting volubility, that in the end his hearer,
stunned and deafened, would agree with him, for the sake
of peace.
It never occurred to him that he and his doing were not
of the most intensive and fascinating interest to anyone with
whom he came into contact. He had theories about almost
every subject under the sun, including vegetarianism, the
drama, politics, and music: and in support of these theories
he wrote pamphlets, letters, and books thousands upon
thousands of words, hundreds and hundreds of pages. He
not onrily wrote these things, and published them usually
at somebody else's expense but he would sit and read-
them aloud, for hours to his friends and his family.
What if he was faithless to his friends and to his wives?
He had one mistress to whom he was faithful to the day of
his death. Music. Not for a single moment did he ever
compromise with what be believed, with what he dreamed.
There is not a line in his music that could have been
conceived by a little mind. Even when he is dull, or downright
bad, he is dull in the brand manner. There is a greatness
in his worst mistakes. Listening to his music, one does
not forgive him for what he may or may hot have been .It is
nct a matter of forgiveness. It is a matter of being dumb
w:rh wonder that his poor brain and body didn't burst under,
th.? torment of the demon of creative energy that lived inside
'i;m, struggling, clawing, scratching to be released; tearing
shrieking at him to write the music that was in him. The
miracle is what he did in the little space of seventy years
could have been done at all, even by a grate genius. Is it
any wonder that he had no time to be a man?

ABOUT THE EXCERPT '
1. Read the extract twice over and understand the drift
of it. Suppose we tell you that the writer describes a genius
who refuses to be devoured by or to compromise with
society, would you be' able to find support in the extract?
Yes? Well, why not write to a friend telling him/her about
what is remarkable in this great man. Quote the words and
phrases that have caught your attention to his personality
and b haviour.
2. his genius is Wagner. The author says in effect that
Wagner's contribution as an artist makes his-shortcomings
as a man relatively unimportant. Do you agree or disagree?
Why?

GRAMMAR
Sentences and Fragments
If y6u do not quite remember what a fragment is, be
reminded now. A FRAGMENT is an incomplete thought.
This is the opposite of what the sentence is about. THE
SENTENCE is at all times a complete thought.

Let us see.

A group of words without a verb or predicate

The young new speaker (fragment)
The young new. speaker was very nervous at first.
(complete thought)

A group olI ords wiinoul a subject
Sponsored the beauty queen contestant (fragment)
Thp successful performing artiste sponsored the beauty
queers contestant. (complete thought)

Aigroup of words lacking both predicate and subject
Except twirly strips of black soot covering the stairway
(fragment)
He cleaned off everything except the. twirly strips of bJack
soot covering ;he stairway. cofnplele th6ugiht)'' ""-'
.


A group of words forming a dependent or subordinate
clause
Before they performed (fragment)
Before they performed, they improved their facial make-
up. (complete thought)

A. Write the following paragraph, correcting all sentence
fragments. You may have to add words to some places.
Compare your finished paragraphs in .your study groups.

A beach-rest chair is a'strange object. And an
entertaining one. It consists of two rows of wooden slats.
One end of one row is attached to one end of the other row
with a sort of hinge. Which is really a spring. This spring
holds one row upright to form a back rest. The other resting
directly upon the ground. The beach-rest is not entirely to
be trusted. It may throw the sitter over backwards, letting him
land on the base of his skull. If he suddenly moves his
legs, which act as a lever for the back: rest. It is possible,
too, that all the slats may start a simultaneous, gradual,
sliding movement in one general direction. As a result, the
sitter's body in a strange position diagonal to itself. Then
he seems at odds with the world and wonders why the
originator called the thing a beach-rest,

B. Write a conversation between two 'street boys' using
only complete sentences; then cross: b t words to makethe
speech sound more natural. Read both versions for critical
comment by your study group. Here is a possible opening
line: '"Where are you going on Motherd Day?"
Note: When you proofread papers for subject areas try
to avoid unintentional; sentence fragments. Be careful,
however, where you use them intentionally.

C. Which of the following groups of words are
sentences? Which are fragments? Tell what is lacking in
each fragment. Make,this an oral atlivity after you have
written it.

1. Shooting free throws and other shots from a standing
position.
2. Once they do their homework, they can play.
3. Prays by the hour in a cranny in his father's yard.
4. Open pastures protected under surveillance better
than fenced ones.
5. Insists upon the liability of sick watchmen.
6. Although they have never tried ope of them.
7. Short, fat women, especially a team of teen mothers,
drawing monthly child support.
8. In four years, averaging three a year. and promising
to do better.
9. They were among the finalists
10. Because they said they were sorry.

Fragments & Conversation: In conversation, fragments
are often properly used as answers. ,
Where do you york?
At Palson's Dry Goods

Are you happy in your work there?'
Yes, very, very happy!

When do you plan to leave?
Not even today or tomorrow!

Make up some fragments as answers of your own
questions in named situations. Show them to your study
partners.

Turn the following into Reported or Direct Speech:

1. The general asked his soldiers, if they were ready
to follow him to the death.
2. The policeman told his hearers that he should have
to compel them to move if they did not move from there by
the next day.
3. The referee declared that hq' did not believe that
the centre-forward was off-side when he scored the goal.
4. I asked where to go from thero.
5. I argued that the situation thdn was never what it
was the year before nor what it would be the year after.

FIGURATIVE EXPRESSIONS
Melaphor and Simile
A direct and simple statement is 6ften the best way of
saying what you have to say But. sometimes. you need to
add force to what you have to say by the use of a figure of
speech. The simile and metaphor are well known figures
of speech.
In a simile the comparison between two things is
claimed by the introductory use of 'like" or "as".
At noonday the cane fires flickerhlike red tongues with
black tips under the hot sun.
-' In ,a metaphor the idea'of compare son is still there but ,it
is not advertised by the use of "' s" ori,"like"; ,it takes the form


oI a sIateeIII aI in u nI l is U In toue redUerso l du uui 1a 1 idaul
a figure of speech has been used.

At noonday the black-tipped longues of cane fires flick
under the sun.
Let's hope that:you are now able to recognize a simile
or metaphor when you see one, and.'to say what is
compared with what, and why.
In the simile and metaphor gone before the comparison
is between the flames of the cane fires and black-tipped
tongues. Both may flicker, both are to be found burning
under the noonday sun, both are behaving like tongues. You
may think that the comparison is a good one or a bad one.
Try to find reasons for your judgment.
You can say that probably the metaphor is more difficult
to detect than a simile. This is pertly because the metaphor
is much more likely to be compact.

EXERCISES
A
:Consider the following examples of similes and
metaphors. Tell in each case what is compared and to what;
and why is the comparison made? Indicate clearly which
is metaphor and which is simile.
1. So far as his business arrangements were
concerned, he sowed the seeds of ruin on that bloodstained
battlefield.
2. The big bird snapped in two like a brittle stick.
3. Perfectly controlled relaxation, like a bird in a nest.
4. Their plots crystalised.
5. The road upon which we traveled'was long but at
the end was the goal of freedom.
6. The university campus has had its'face lifted.

B.
In the following passages point out any examples of the
use of Metaphor or Simile, state clearly what is compared
to what, and give some indication of why this comparison
is made.
1. Most of life is so dull that there is nothing to be said
about it, and the books and talk that would describe it as
uninteresting are obliged to exaggerate in the hope of
justifying their own existence. Inside its cocoon of work or
social obligation, the human spirit slumbers for the most
part, registering the distinction between pleasure and pain,
but not nearly as alert as we pretend.
2. Too long a sacrifice
Can make a stone of the heart.
3. An ill-made street petered out towards the cliff -
bungalows of every shape-and like and kind, a vacant plot
full of salt grass and wet thorn bushes like bedraggled fowls,
no lights except in three windows.
,4. Peter's eyes rested on the chair against the wall In
the usual course of things it should have been occupied by
the lieutenant, who I id the habil of sitting there with hardly
a movement, for h urs, like a spider watching for the
coming of a fly.

GRAMMAR
Punctuation
On the board he read reading maketh a full man
conference a ready man and writing an exact man and
therefore if a man write little he had need have a great
memory if he confer little he Iqd .need have a present wit
'and if he read littlehe had need have much gunning from
'francis bacon of studies.


Page, XiV-t


Sunday C~hroncle---MayJ- 005







Sunday Chronicle May 1, 2005


Hello Boys & Girls!
Today we will be looking at words you would hear

in the business of buying and selling houses/lands.

Have fun.


S A S D T B S E Y S G E T V B N

C E N E U E G D E T S N I A A E

R A M Y C A L T E T R E I B L N

L E E I G L A A A E W E R V E F

S R S T F R U T H A D U P D O H

D Y R I D U E D A C B R R OO M

D O E E D A R P E U 0 A E M R E

M E X K G E A N S D G T E F G P

T I H E Y R N T I T S E T N F T

F E N C T E E T N S R R A A 1 0

G T R M A L V A I U H H O S G F

S K E R A T C R S A C J 0 0 R E


O N P H A A EN UX L P Q I

T M C N V C I D E S -E H E L

S D L O H E E R F D R E K O


M L

A S

R B


APARTMENT
BROKER
BUYER/SALE
CHALET
COTTAGE
DEEDS
DEPOSIT
DETACHED
ESTATE/AGENTS
EXCHANGE


FIXED RATES
FLAT
FREEHOLD
GARDEN
HOME
INSURE
KEYS
LAND
MORTGAGE
MOVING


OFFER
PROPERTY
RESIDENTIAL
ROOMS
SECLUDED
SEMI-FURNISH
SUBURBAN
SURVEY
TERRACE
VACANT
VIEW


CHEDDI JAGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT CORPORATION
TIMEHRI, EAST BANK DEMERARA

Tenders are hereby invited from suitably qualified Contractors/Suppliers to undertake the following works at
the Cheddi Jagan International Airport. All tenderers must attend the site visit at the times and dates stated
below:


Foreign Exchange Market Activities
Summary Indicators
Monday April 25, 2005 Thursday April 28, 2005
1. EXCHANGE RATES
Buying Rate Selling Rate
SAUS Dollar .. . ...NOTES- OTHEP NOTES OTHEP
Bank of Baroda 197.00 198.00 201.00 203.00
Bank of Nova Scotia 189.00 198.00 201.00 204.00
Citizens Bank 192.00 197.38 203.00 204.00
Demerara Bank 195.00 197.00 201.00 202.00
GBTI 190.00 195.00 201.00 201.00
NBIC 198.00 198.00 202.00 204.00

Bank Average 193.50 197.23 201.50 203.00

Nonbank Cambios Av. (5 largest) 200.25 203.00 -


BoG Average Market Exchange Rate: US$1.00 = G$200.00

B. Canadian Dollar

Bank Average 133.33 142.46 148.33 157.46

C. Pound Sterling

Bank Average 318.33 350.55 349.83 372.42

D. Euro

Bank Average 216.75 236.67 243.25 254.67
E. Selected Caricom Exchange F. LIBOR US$ G. Prime Rate
Rates London Interbank Offered
Rate For Wed., Apr. 27, 2005


TT$= G$ 28.75
""** -"':"* Bdbs$-=" O-'9'1.71"'
J$= G$ 4.45
EC$= G$ 65.58
Belize$= G$ 93.68


months -19~000%
6thbfthls '3*41'3" r:


IUS.- 5.75% .
Guyana 14.54%''


. Tender
1. VHF Portable Radio and VHF Base Radios
(136-174 MHz)
2. Refurbishment of Washroom Facilities in
the Public Area on Landaide
3. Constructing Security Fence in the Engineering
'la;,i.-nr,.,:e Division Compound and rme Executive
ar '. P.' r-,m Gate 01 to the Control Tower


Date and Time for Site Visit


Wednesday April 27, 2005 10:00 hrs.

Wednesday April 27 2005 11:00 hrs &


The tender documents can be purchased during normal working hours from the Cashier at the Accounts
Department, Cheddi Jagan International Airport Corporation for a non-refundable fee of $2,000 each.

Tender documents for number 1 must be addressed to:
The Chdirman
CJIA Corporation's Tender Committee
Cheddi Jagan International Airport
East Bank Demerara

Tender documents for numbers 2 & 3 must be addressed to:


The Chairman
Central Tender Board
Ministry of Finance
Main and Urquhart Street
Georgetown

Tender for number 1 must be deposited in the Tender Box located in the corridor, on the Mezzanine 1
the Airport, while tenders for number 2 & 3 must be deposited in the Tender Box located at the Min
Finance, Main and Urquhart Streets, Georgetown.
All Tenders must be deposited on or before 09:00 hour on Tuesday, May 10, 2005.


loorof
stry of


Tenders will be opened at 09:00 on Tuesday May 10, 2005 in the presence of Tenderers o- their
Representatives who choose to attend, at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport and the Ministry of
Finance, respectively.
Each tender must be accompanied by valid Certificate of Compliance from the Commissioner,
. Guyana Revenue.Authorityand from the'GeneraiMaage; atipanl surfacee i Scheme.

Leon Romero
Chief Executive Officer


I..,
fl
I.


~~rr~m~~Y~u~l~. ---~1.~--------~-----------------------


4]i~R~Blli~BE~B~B1~:~ '


2".- : -














Sncient County's olde



Church celebrates anni ersary .


eune Bailei Van-Keric
r HE All Saints Pres
Sbylerian Church in
New Amsterdam.
Berbice. last month
ct brated its 185th anniser-
sa with a thanksgiving ser-
vi, held under the theme
'Sustained by His: Grace and
Power'. -
The three-hour service,
which commenced with a pro-
ce sion headed by the 'Path-
fi: lers' an arm of:the Seventh
D ; Adventist Church, on the
M in road of the township -
st ., the inclusion of a wide
.c' s section of the .society.
Among those who were in
at ndance in the packed church
w -e members of sister par-
is 's, Permanent Secretary in
th Ministry of Culture, Youth
ai Sport, Mr. Keith Booker;
I' naority Leader, Mr. Robert
C'::bin; Mayor Claude Henry
an! his wife, Paulette; Justice
Winston Moore; Members of
Parliament, and Officers within
tl': Municipal Council.
The history of the county's
oldest church was read by El-
der 0. Stevens. She highlighted
tlhit in July 1818, Rev.
C.:nradus Schwiers of the Dutch
PR,-ormed Church, approached
C vernor. Bentinck and the
C ancil of Government to urge
tl building of a church.
The Governor, she said,
a!.,ng with his council, agreed,
a;id a subscription of 25,000
guilders was raised privately to
which the colony added an
equal amount.
In November that year, a


Available


contract ~ as signed with
Messrs. John Carruthers and
Company to erect the building.
In May 1820. the Colonial
Church. as it was then known,
was opened for the purpose of
Diune Sermice b% the Congre-
gauon of the Dutch Reformed
Church and the English alter-
nately.
But following Governor
Bentinck death in November,
services were held regularly,
first by Rev. R. Austin and af-
terwards by Rev. T. R. Redwar,
on behalf of the English congre-
gation. The Dutch and the Scots,
however, were not so fortunate,
as Predicant-Schwiers retired to
The Hague, and prayers were
then read by the senior Elder of
the Dutch Church. At lengthy
intervals a service was held by
a visiting minister of the Pres-
byterian Church of Demerara.
By 1835, Stevens said,
there appears to have been a
dispute between the two con-
gregations for whom the
church was originally con-
structed. Numerous petitions
were sent to the Governor re-
questing his intervention to
determine the right owner-
ship of the structure.
Eventually, the dispute was
settled by a grant from public
funds, in aid of the building of
a separate church for the English
congregation on the condition
that they "renounce all claims to
use the colony church in favour
of the Church of Scotland."
The new edifice was conse-
crated on June 30, 1839, prior
to which a Kirk Session was
..formed with four Elders -


Donald C. Cameron..Allan Mc
Donald. Francis Jackson. and
Richard Thomson.
In 1959, the first local nun-
isLer. Re\. John Lord. was in-
ducted to the Parish Since then.
six others have taken up ihe
mantle.
The All Saints Church
has brick-wall foundations
and its durable frame is made
of greenheart and pine wood,
among other local timber.
Following a reminder of our
country's cultural, social and ar-
chitectural heritage, Mr. Keith
Booker, representing the Gov-
ernment of Guyana, read a pre-
pared speech by His Excellency
the President Mr. Bharrat Jagdeo,
who extended warmest greetings.
Minority Leader, Mr. Robert
Corbin, recalled with nostalgia, his
first visit to the church a week
after his marriage in 1970. He
admonished members not to for-
get the Church's mission of
molding destinies and changing
values, among others.
. The programme, which was
punctuated with hymns, greet-
ings from sister churches and
musical renditions by the
Guyana Police Force Band, was
chaired by Liturgist Jonelle
Jacque. The guest preacher was
Rev. Ewart Richards, while the
officiating minister was Rev.
Kenneth Applewaithe.
Meanwhile, those attend-
ing the auspicious ceremony
were adorned with fan-shaped
blue and white corsage, to
which a pair of clasped hands
was affixed. The church was
also beautifully decorated in
blue and white.


SJobPm top

P0ople beautiful




Copyrighted Ma



syndicated Coni


from Commercial Nc


iterial



tent"a


Nws Providers"


er
S


- o -.0 -


Sunday Chronicle M\ay 1, 2005


P,-ae XVI


qb w "No






Sunday Chronicle May 1,2005


Page XVII


N 1968, Justice Victor
Crane, upheld a de
fence objection to the
prosecution's attempt to
put in evidence at a criminal
trial, three depositions of ab-
sent witnesses, who were
abroad, but whose evidence
was regarded as the "body
and soul" of the case.
Among other things, the
Judge, who later became Chan-
cellor of the Judiciary, agreed
with defence counsel Mr. Claude
Massiah that it would be an in-
justice and prejudicial to the ac-
cused to receive them in evi-


not necessarily to the very next
sitting after committal;
(v) taking all the circum-
stances into consideration, to
permit the
depositions of the three absent
witnesses to be read would op-
erate to the prejudice of a fair
trial;
(vi) the most appropriate
time to make a submission as
the one under consideration is
before the accused is put in
charge of the jury.
The Judge then sustained
the objection by the defence.'
Attorney-at-law, Mr. R.
Sharma had appeared for the
Crown.


I In his decision, Justice
Crane noted that on the


ByGeorge Barclay

dence. presentment of the Director of
As a consequence, the pros- Public Prosecutions, the
ecutor, having denied the right accused, Edwin Ogle, stands
to use the depositions as evi- indicted on ten counts. These
dence, decided not to offer fur- charge him with various
their evidence against Edwin offences alleged to have been
Ogle, who was accused of forg- committed between April 13,
ery. An acquittal was directed by 1964 and August 29, 1964, and
the Judge. involve allegations of forgery of
Among other :things, the certain receipts for money
Judge had taken into account purporting to be receipts of the
the Constitutional Law with Guyana Airways Corporation,
Fundamental Rights provision with an intent to defraud,
and fair trial within a reasonable contrary to Section 257 of the
time, as well as Article 10 (1) Criminal Law (Offences)
of the Constitution of Guyana. Ordinance, Chapter 10.
The facts disclosed that on The accused pleaded not
March 25, 1965, Ogle was com- guilty to all ten counts, there-
mitted to stand trial at the next upon the prosecutor opened the
sitting of the Criminal Assizes Crown's case and sought to call
for Demerara for certain of- evidence to prove the deposition
fences of forgery alleged to have of a witness who is now resi-
been committed between August dent abroad. Mr. Massiah imme-
13 and 26, 1964. diately objected to the course
Some 12 assizes later, on proposed, intimating that what
May 6, 1968, the indictment, he intended to say would apply
containing 10 counts, came on equally to the case of two other
for trial. On his arraignment, the depositions which the Crown
accused pleaded not guilty to all would also seek to prove in the
the counts. course of the trial.. The jury ac-
The prosecution, after cordingly withdrew.
opening their case, sought, by :Mr. Massiah then submit-
the usual method, to' lead evi- ted 'that the depositions of the
dence with a view to having ad- three witnesses, Gordon, Pugh
mitted into evidence the depo- andiPhillips, who were resident
sition of a witness who was in England. and who testified at
then resident abroad, and had the prelimnarN mnquirN consu-
intended to adopt the same pro-. lute. as he put it '- 'the bodN
cedure %%ith regard to two other and soul" of the case against
wimesse. the accused. meaning that the
Mr. Massiah, Counsel on prosecution had no chance of
behalf of the accused, objected, success without them. He re-
and arguments were heard in the ferried to Section 93 I) of the
absence of the jury. Ei\ ience Ordinance. Chapter 25
The Judge held: ti) the by virme of which the Crown
word 'may" in Section 95 (1) sought to put in those deposi-,
of the Evidence Ordinance lions, and urged that the word
Chapter 25 is permissive and '"ma." in the sub-section gises
not mandatory: the iCourt a discretion as to
,ii) in exercising that discre- whether it ought or ought not to
tion. a Court must look at both ad nit depositions of siinesses
sides of the picture. \\ho are out of the country.
(niii under Article 10 I1 of He submined the Court is not
the 'Constitution. it is manda- bourid to admit them and that it
tory that an ,accused person would be an injustice and prejudi-
have a fair hearing within a rea- cial to the accused to receive them
sonable time, and %hen the time in evidence inthe circumstances of
is long delayed between com- this case, notwithstanding that the
mittal and trial; the burden is on conditions for their admissibility
the prosecution to satisfactorily had been observed at the prelimi-
explain the delay. In nary inquiry.
the present case, no explanation Counsel for the Crown, Mr.
has been proffered for what was Sharma, had stressed with
clearly a long period of delay; vigour that Section 95 (1) is
(iv) 'when Article 10 is read specific and that it must be car-
in conjunction with Section 71 tried out and that no manifest in-
of the Criminal Law (Proce- justice can occur by putting in
dures) Ordinance, Chapter 11, the depositions. On reflection,
the words, "next prac- however, it seems to me that the
ticable sitting" of the Assizes sub-section does indeed give the
means any subsequent sitting at Court a discretion in the matter,
which the Crown can conve- Justice Crane had said.
', riently arraign the accused and According to Justice Crane,


"the word 'may' I interpret in
a permissive and not mandatory
sense, and in the exercise of my
discretion I do so in a judicial
manner. I must weigh the pros
and cons of the application to
admit the deposition by looking
at both sides of the picture.
"Now, taking this approach
as my yard-stick, what do I
have here? When I look at the
date of committal of the accused
for trial, I see that it was as long
ago as the 25th March, 1965 -
just over three years' ago. I
must, therefore, ask myself
what excuse does the :.Prown
have for having kept hInhi4o long
awaiting trial, when Section 71
of the Criminal Law (Procedure
Ordinance), the healrng of
which reads, 'Commiittal for
Trial', lays it down that-
"If upon the wholj of the
evidence the Magistrate is of
the opinion that a sufficient
case is made out to pu the ac-
cused person upon his trial, he
shall subject to the provisions
of Section 9 of this Oilinance,
commit him for trial tolthe next
practicable sitting of tte Court
for the County in which the en-
quiry is held".
After delving into the law,
Justice Crane added: "It is com-
monplace that the interests of
justice demand thad a trial
should be speedily conducted
for it has been truly said that
"justice delayed is justice de-
nied".
"In conformity withithis prin-
ciple, therefore, when an examining
Magistrate commits anr accused
person for trial after declaring that
there is a sufficient prima facie case
made out, the law as above stated,
directs him to 'commit him for trial
to the next practicable sitting of the
Court for the county in which the
inquiry is held'. This provision
must, however, be read in the light
of Article 10 (1) of the Constitu-
tion of Guyana, the supreme law
of the State which reads: :,
"If any person is charged
with a criminal offence, then,
unless the charge is withdrawn,
the case shall be afforded a fair
hearing within a reasonable time
by an independent and 'impar-
tial Court established b la\%
'In my v e the Judac
said, the accused cannot-be said
to have been "-afforded a fair
hearing within a reasonable
time", if he is now called upon
to defend himself by ha ing
deposittons read in evidence on
behalf of the Crow n more than
three,' ears after he wascobmmi.-
led to stand trial. unless a ver',
sansfactor, explananon frr the
delay be forthconning from the
prosecution
Justice Crane explained that
"what is a reasonable lime, will
of course. ala) s be a question
for each Court to decide in the
exercise of its discrefii&. After
listening to any explain ~n of-
fered by the prosecution for the de-
lay in the hearing, and the: greater
the lapse of time between commit-
tal and trial, it seems,tome, the
stronger must be the excuse.
However, none has been
offered in this case, only an
insistence on the part of the
prosecution that I must, with-
out any exercise of discre-
tion, permit the three deposi-
tions to be read, but I am unable
to agree, since that view would
exclude altogether the power
of the Judge to do justice in
.the particular case.".


What do you



know about the



ENVIRONMENTAL



PROTECTION



AGENCY?


their depletion. In the case of
our fisheries, wildlife, forest and
so on, we have to harvest them
so that we do not deplete stocks
to such a low level that we
would not be able to continue
to do so in the future.

WHAT IS EPA'S
APPROACH?

One of the major roles of
the EPA is to coordinate envi-
ronmental management. This
means that the Agency works
with all existing institutions,
agencies and organizations to
ensure that the environment is
given due consideration.


The EPA is also responsible
for also coordinating public
awareness at the national level.

The EPA also regulates the
quality of the environment by
establishing systems and stan-
dards. These tools allow the
EPA to assess the impact of de-
velopment activities on the en-
vironment, help to prevent pol-
lution and promote public par-
ticipation in the development
planning process.


HOW IS THE
EPA'S WORK
ORGANIZED?

EPA's work is organized un-
der FOUR programmes

Natural Resources Manage'-
ment
Under thi prormme h
Linder this programme, the


i ~I SA


use of and impact on biological
resources are managed. This
programme focuses on carrying
out the National Biodiversity
Action Plan. The regulation of
the use of plants and animals for
commercial and research pur-
poses is the business of this
programme. Conservation of
animals and plants in and out of
their natural habitats (in-situ
and ex-situ conservation) and a
protected areas system are also
looked at under this programme.


This programme area in-
cludes the development of regu-
lations, standards and guide-
lines, monitoring and enforce-
ment. This programme also
deals with Environmental Im-
pact Assessment (EIA) which is
the "cornerstone" .upon which
the environmental management
programme is built. Other im-
portant parts of this programme
include the issuing of environ-
mental permits, collection of
data and environmental testing
to ensure observance of envi-
ronmental regulations and guide-
lines.

Continued in-

next Sunday's

edition

Do share your ideas
by sending your
letters to: 'Our
Environment', C/o
EIT Division,
Environmental
Protection Agency.
LAST Building,
Turkeyen, UG
Campus,
GREATER
GEORGETOWN.


j


THE environment belongs to
us, so we should take an in-
terest in the Agency that
helps us to manage it. Let us
start with the name of this
Agency it is the Environ-
mental Protection Agency
(EPA), located at the Univer-
sity of Guyana Campus at
Turkeyen. This Agency was
set up on June 5 1996, the
day that Parliament passed
the Environmental Protection
Act. Do you realise the sig-
nificance of the day that the
Environmental Protection
Agency came into being? Yes
it was on World Environment
Day!!

WHAT IS THE EPA
REQUIRED TO
DO?

The Environmental Protec-
tion Act of 1996 requires the
EPA to take care of the environ-
ment through the implementa-
tion of THREE main kinds of
measures:

Conservation measures aim
at managing or regulating the use
of our natural resources so that
the rate of use (exploitation)
does not affect the ability of the
resource to renew itself over
time.
It is the act of finding a bal-
ance bei\neen current and future
consumption of naturallre-
sources.

Protection measures to.
prevent damage to the environ,-.:
medt by pollution or careless
use of resources Individuals
and industries have to ibe
authorised before they are air
lowed to carry out actliities
that impact on the environmehit
In auihorising these activities'
the EPA.ensures that adequate
measures are put in place to r.-
duce the impact on the enviroh-
mieni

..Sometimes certain kinds of
plants, and animals need to be
protected from use because
they exist in very small numbers
natuiall '. Habitats may also
need to be protected because
they are rare or are already nega-
tively affected by the prior use.

Sustainable Use These
steps strive for use of resources
in ways that do not result in, ',






l:viiopjktlIll


PEST IVIANAEII I


DIPTERA
i afmnincrs. iirio \ 'Iat
. ; ac. L ri i' i o11
1 p) t C ra: \ ; ro I n Z I a L

: miners attack a s, ide range
o egcmtabie and ornamental
"-- ps in the field. Typical
n. 'ing damage to the leaves
o i omato. cucumber. celery.
le uce. beets. Asian greens.
p> aito. peas. beans, nelons.
c, c crops, eggplant. pepper.
onions. leeks, okra. spinach.
chrysanthemum. gypsophila.
gerbera. ageratum. marigold,
aster, petunia. zinnia, snap-
dragon, calendula. dahlia and
several others is characteris-


Fig :- Lafnne dmage on


Fig 11: Leafminer damage on


tomato leaves
L.alnminers are small (2 -
m )ti.. thins .black aind .elbos
flies M Inch a\ ihlcir eggs into
leC\es s o thal t1C lcar\ae Iced b e'
*, .s.C l cn ihe ]c l "stir'faocs .i-'eihce !l
pulnctuI'rs and egg-Iaying punti
lures may also cause .serious
damage in some cases. The lar-
vae of Leafminers usually ima-
tire in the leaf and then drop to
the ground to pupate.
There may be several gen-
erations per year, however
these. Severe damage to leaves
can reduce the photosynthetic
ability of plants and cause-cos-
inetic damage to both vegetables
and ornamentals.


Fig 12: Adult ieafmiiner


MANAGEMENT
OPTION FOR
LEAFMINERS

Scouting/ Thresholds
In all crops, watch carefully
for the presence of adult


PUBLIC NOTICE


The joint project between the Guyana Forestry Commission and International Donors,
to establish a Forest Products Marketing Council (FPMC) for Guyana, is about to
commence. As part of the preparatory activities for the establishment of the FPMC, the
following organizations/bodies are hereby invited to the. respective consultation
sessions which will be facilitated by the Guyana Forestry Commission and two
international marketing consultants.


Group: Georgetown Stakeholders
S Date and Time: 4th May, 2005. 1:30 pm to 4:30 pm
Venue: CheddieJagan Research Center, High Street


S Group: Berbice Sakeholders
Date and Time: 9th May, 2005. 9:00 am to 11:00 am.
Venue: St. Francis Community Center, J. C. Chandisingh School Street.


Group: Holders of Timber Sales Agreements and Wood Cutting Leases.
Date and Time: 9th May, 2005. 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm.
Venue: Guyana Forestry Commission, Lower Conference Room.
Kingston.


Group: Linden Stakeholders
Date and Time: 10"' May, 2005. 8:30am to11:00am.
Venue: LINMINE Constabulary Recreation Hall, Mackenzie, Linden.


Group: Holders of State Forest Permission

Date and Time: 10"' May, 2005. 3:15 pm to 5:15 pm
Venue: Guyana Forestry Commission, Lower Conference Room.
Kingston. '


Group: Essequibo Consultation
Date and Time: 11 "May, 2005. 9:00am to 12 midday.
Venue: Region 2. RDC Board Room. Anna Regina,


* We look forward to having your attendance as it is vital to the effective establishment
of the Council. .. --------,


tcafmniner flies, mined leaves
and make careful note ol'
problem areas. In field
vegetables. sticky traps or
,weep nelets can be used to
1tonllor adull flies, however the
nuimiber of adult lealminer flIes
doe, not necessarily correlate to
!cil daniage. Thresholds lot
ealininer oln lield vegetables fee not
fieabldished. however relatively high
numbeNrs ol lics and mines I leaves
ate needed to cauIse severe
economic damage.

Sanitation
Begin cleanup immediately
antl d dispose of debris as far as
possible from the growing area.
In field vegetables, cultivation of
crop debris or removal of
infected plant material from
fields is recommended.

Tolerant Varieties
If susceptible varieties have
to be grown, it is recommended
they be grown in isolation. In
field vegetables, there is little
information about leafminer
tolerance. Degrees of infestation
vary with the type of crop,
neighboring crops, weeds,
temperatures and leafminer
species.

Crop Rotation
Crop rotation is an effective
pest management tool.
Alternating leafminer
susceptible crops with leafminer
resistant crops reduces the
population. Crop rotation in
field vegetables is always
recommended for this and many
other pests.

Weed Management
Many wild plants act as


hosts for Leal'minners.
Maintaining weed free
conditions both in the
greenhouse and the field is
recommended.

Pest Control Products
Leafminers are known to
develop resistance to
insecticides quite quickly. Most
effective control is obtained
with systemic or translaminar
products which target the
larvae. Thorough coverage of
the crop is essential for
effective leafminer control.
Time insecticide application to
have the most impact on
susceptible stages. Spraying
should only be based upon
regular and consistent scouting
information.

Biological Control-.
A number of parasitic.
wasps attack vegetable
leafminer and may provide high
levels of mortality, especially
late in the season. Therefore,
insecticides with low or no
toxicity to leafminer parasites
should be selected for
controlling leafminers and other
pests.


MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS &
COMMUNICATIONS

ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION IN
CONSUMERS PREMISES
(Unserved Areas)

Consumers are hereby notified, that the following information
listed hereunder is a guide to wiring of Buildings for Supply
from Guyana Power & Light.

1. Buildings must be wired by Licenced Contractors or
operatives supervised by them.

2. Good Workmanship and the use of proper materials will
be required.

3. Except for buildings previously wired, all concrete
structures must be wired in conduit or cables on the
surface and neatly installed.

4. The rinsl.lla:,n must be electrically and mechanically
sound.

5. All buildings previously wired and not connected to G.P.L
after three months must be re-inspected and certified,
any other details relative to the above, or during
construction please feel free to contact the Electrical
Inspectors at the site Office or Kingston, Ministry of
Public Works and Communications, Compound.


Electrical Inspectorate
Division


Government ads can be viewed or
http://www.gina.gov.gy


4'O z f--4 1,F ,, I .I II. -


i


IF






Sunday Chronicle May 1. 2005


TODAY we embark on "hat
will be the final chapter of a
journey that begun more
than a decade ago. Eler).
single week some bit of ad-
'ice was gien. and according
to the mail I receive I do be-
lie'e that the column made a
difference to our general
knowledge and the way we
look after pets. No,. having
dealt with all those ailments
and methods of caring ani-
mals. we turn to some discus-
sions on the "old" dog. But
what is old? What is an "old"
dog?
If I vere to ask you about
canine chronology. for e\iample.
rhat ~ the relationhip of hu-
man age to that of a dog e
ho,% many human years are
equal to one dog ,eCar ou


would d probabh answer seen
to one seven human yearc- be-
ing about equivalent to one ,year
of a dog' life Thai's hoa %e
were caught and %e accepted
these figure-.. nof onl% because
the\ appeared in tex books, but
also because the figures looked
right W\ell. no'' research -cien-
iitis sa\ ihaj the 7.1 rajio is not
correct
Eiper1s at the Lim%\ers-it of
Penn. I'\ama's School of Veienr
nar\ Medicine are follow ing the
calculations made bN a French
\eterinanan. one Dr. A Le Beau.
.-hos.e finding,. relat.i e to the
ranto between dog -ear. and hu-
man \ear., the\ think are much
more accurate

THE REFERENCE
TABLE GOES LIKE


. .
--------------


6::.


THIS."

3 dog months =5 human 'year.
b dog month-. = 10)huiman
years

\\ hen the dog i, a e.r i old
that is most likel equ'. .lent to,
a human that i 15 .year, old

At 2 \ears- of age. that i,
equal to 24 human ,eAu .

Four 4-1 dog ears =
32 human yeaiis
Six (6) dog years =
40 human sear,
Eight 1Sidog sear-. =
48 human yea:s
Ten i Ii dog sear.i =
56 hum.in \ear,

A- the dog get-. .lde. the
equialency charge-s a bit Then
the table sho,%st

14 dog years =
72 human 3ear-
18 dog ,ears =
"I human veal
21 dog ',,ear- =
116 human 'ewi

I don i hi',e to eniph"ai ec
thai the mnulnple ,ire-.,r-. .i dog
in the Thud \\.iltd itrpicls ha:i
IL- endure i. ill unL.'ubiedl', .il-
1e1 ihe_,e fig'ure-. Heal. e\tienic
humidii., leels. poor nutritiion
r unbalanced dicii. dise.i-.e,. e -
toparastiec rickh. fleas,. lice. etcI
inte.tations and endopaia-silc
ikornms) burdens all help to
shorten a dog life.
What these figures in general
are illustrating i- thail sour ca-
nine \\ard beconime a senior citi-
zen dog before you do In
Guyana. that is mniosil true A\n


eight-Near-old dog i,, not middle-
aged. He is old' Haming said
that I kno\\ quite well hat
dogs \hich ha\e been fed %ell
and vaccinated and hose % which
e.peinence optional care and pre-
\eniative treatmierts can still run
around chasing cats at 10 sears
of age
Finally. I should mention
that cats age at about the .same
animal it human ratio .i, do
dogs-
Happy Labour Day!


" .. . .. '. - .- .- ,.- . .

lease implement disease prexentuati\e
measures., i vaccinations, routine
dewormings. monthly anti-Heart%%orm
medication, etc.) and adopt-a-pet from the
GSPCA's Animal Clinic and Shelter at Robb Street
and Orange Walk. if you have the wherewithal to
care well for the animals. Do not stra., \our
unwanted pets. take them to the clinic and shelter
instead. Also. find out more about the Societv's free
spa\ and neutering programme by Calling: 226-4237.


"Copyrighted Material j


KSyndicated Content I
Available from Commercial News Providers"


T~db
MMiW wftftM- _M.. __W % a


-' "-"-, %04 ..



erw Co.rne

C^ .1i Welcome to the 343Id edition of
S "Champion Cookery Corner", a
,' weekly feature giving recipes and
tips on cooking in Guyana.

Curried Fish Batter


Makes a nice spiced, crispy batter: Adjust the amount and hotness of curry powder t,"
your own liking. This is enough for approx '/ lb offish cut up in pieces.


3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup cornstarch
! teaspoon salt
2 tablespoon INDI Curry Powder
V2 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon Champion Baking Powder
I egg
/2 cup water, maybe a bit more
V' teaspoon mustard


In a bowl mix all the dry ingredients.

Whisk together the water, egg and mustard.

Add to the dry ingredients, whisk until you
have a smooth batter, if needed add a bit more
water but do not make it too thin.

Ifyou have the time let it rest for an hour in the
fridge.


Th~is is an CAL'leekiI i i%Il btaler recipe'. FTh'e''irefis in the beeg,', i'JrjilIisiII w i twrei.%p('evll
on icAe',ii~'~i nrmini/t'on.Svrv''%2to 4


I .Iup I Floi


'1 lb White Fish Fillets
450 g Vegetable Oil


.I l ti :
M 1 1- 1 11. '; .iII ;i( 11. 1 b1C I i'll, '. n li l .I i O -ilI ,
Dr)., It~'l l- i h.Inc ,ii'i l'm lhii%. ,"m l', nm i j [li ,
i.. m.i li'2; ,t. L. u j lr ., t h l ^ ,i ] 1'i. ., ,Jl...inJ -/
minutes. Rpmo;e with .slotted spoon; Jdi ,i on
paper towel '.


Fill deep fi-yer half full with oil: preheat to 3750F Then place on
[190C] If you don't have a deep fryer, use a deep cookie sheet in
heavy saucepan and an accurate thermometer. warm oveii until
all have beeiadeep
Cut fillets into serving-size pieces: sprinkle lightly fried.
with pepperand dredge in flour.


SPONSORED BY THE
SPONSORED BY THE Ml:ANfIE ICT'ikk"OP.? "
Arm*


Page XIX


Sct'il, sugg c.iiong vn"im



Curry Powder
Garam Masala


Carni, eria cso~


r~-serr~


I


"70F:~-








Guyanese lends support to

Alcohol Awareness Month



C RECOR)DS recording
amst, Guanee JamesI
Canning and the "
legendary Jamaicai.n reggae
Ska producer Clement
'C)XSONE' Dodd,
di'co'erer and producer of
Bob Marley, Peter Tosh,
BunnN Wailer, and lirmn
CIlft, came together for this l
photo-op in support of the "
Don't drink and drive'
campaign.
Sir Co\'one lent his
s up porter e o i icadse PICTURED here are James Cannings and "Sir Coxsone"
while e he %%a' .live, and
his legac. of support Dodd. Photo was taken during Caribbean Music Expo,
continue nto this day. March 2002 at the Renaissance Hotel in Ocho Rios,
Equally dedicated to the Jamaica.
cause, ,Cannings, who reggae song 'Don't drink support of 'Alcohol
now lives in the USA, and drive' has, for many Awareness Month' each
and who composed.the years, offered this song in April in the USA.


ENTERTAIN CENT




" :T-Z


World.
?-


...-_... .
^. ^ .


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


4if


I LI




-p"

SSo

woo, "Oil


I


/4w





* '5
".5
-'I
"-3,

V


. .....



lki



jA


ULEX Atwell, Guyana's contestant at the Miss Caribbean World Pageant in St. Croix poses with other contestants at a pre-pageant function at Burt Hotel.
' (Pictures by Andrea Wilson)


lommom --Rw-


~' )-----




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs