Title: Guyana chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00012
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Alternate Title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown Guyana
Publication Date: April 3, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088915
Volume ID: VID00012
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text




SUNDAY


The Chronicle is at http://www.guyanachronicle.com


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Guyana police ask Brazilians



to help track suspects


POLICE investigating the
brutal slaying of an American
couple in the Rupununi have
asked Brazilian federal au-
thorities to help track two
suspects who they believe
murdered the couple and fled
with cash stolen from the


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house.
Prime suspects are a Brazil-
ian who worked at the cattle
ranch where the husband and
wife lived in a thatched roof
house and his Guyanese
cousin, sources said.
Relatives and friends of Ri-


KILLED: Richard and
Charlene Hicks





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chard Hicks. 42, and his wife
Charlene Hicks, 58, arrived at
Lethetn in ithe Rupununi just af-
ter noon yesterday as police
searched for more clues at the
couple's burnt-out house at San
Jose ranch.
Residents said the Brazilian
suspect was seen Thursday in
Bom Fin across the border
Takutu River and seemed "very
nervous" when persons he knew
spoke to him.
Those who saw him in Bomn
Fin heard about the Wednesday
night murder of the couple when
they returned to Lethem on
Thursday, residents said.
The man, in his 30s,
worked on the San Jose ranch.
owned by Patrick D'aguiar and
his wife who were in Bom Fin
when tragedy struck Wednesday
night, residents said.
A pair of Brazilian-made
'Havaianas' rubber slippers the
man was known to have worn
around the ranch, and a tube of
toothpaste he collected from the
ranch house on Wednesday were
found at the murder scene,
sources said yesterday.
Police are also looking for
the Brazilian's cousin, a
Guyanese, who lives in the
neighboring village of Quarrie.
Sources said the Hicks were
apparently attacked outside
their house where they usually
sat late into the night.
They appeared to have been
beaten to death and the house
ransacked before it was set on
fire and the husband's body
thrown inside.
Charlene's body was found,
in bushes in the kitchen garden
and the charred remains of her
husband uere found in the gut-
ted house, sources said.
Sources said the attacker,'








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stole money from the house be-
fore setting it on fire.
They said Richard Hicks
was known to have boughlit for-
eign currency from residents and
others in the Ruplnunti.
Also arriving in Lethem
yesterday were the pastor and
his family of the Wycliffe Bible
Translators International group
with which the couple worked.
The two had been living on
the San Jose ranch, about nine
miles south of Lethem, for
about 10 years and were well-
known to residents in the
Rupununi.
Their bodies were flown to
the city Friday morning for au-
topsies while detectives contin-
ued a probe into the killing
which has shocked the Lethemi
community.
An official at the United
States Embassy here said the
wife was from Illinois and
Hicks, a South African, had mi-
grated to Canada and became a
U.S. citizen too after they mar-
ried.
The Hicks moved to the
Rupununi in the mid-1990s and
were continuing work on a bi-
lingual education project among
the Wapishiana Amerindian
tribe.
Lethem residents, baffled at
the motive for the killing, said
they were not known to have
anything of much value in the
humble house they had on the
ranch spread and paid for goods
and supplies by cheque.
The house in which the
Hicks lived is about 200 metres
from the home where 'the
,D'aguiars live with Patrick's
mother, who is in her 90s, and.
some workers.
Elaine Foo, a close friend ot'-
the Hicks,'said the two are to
be buried in the Rupununi
'Residents said Hicks left
the county last year for the fru-
nerd of hi-s father and the two



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did not appear to have had
many other close relatives.
They were found dead
Thursday morning after Joel
Issacs, a Wapishiana and a
member of the Christian Breth-
ren Church, who was due to
travel with them later that
morning to villages in the Deep
South Rupununi, arrived to find
the house gutted.
The Chronicle understands
that when he drove up around
01:30 h and saw the burnt
house, he checked at the
D'aguiar home and was told by
an old worker and another there
that they had seen the house on
fire at about three hours earlier.
Issacs returned to Lethem
where he had attended the just-
ended annual Christian Brethren
Church conference and informnned
Ms Foo about what he had seen.


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She advised him to report
the matter to the Lethem Police
and ranks from the station re-
turned to the scene with Issacs
and her son Jason Foo.
At the San Jose ranch, they
searched and found the
woman's body in the bushes in
the kitchen garden.
Sources said the key to the
vehicle the couple owned was
found not too far from her body
and it appeared that she tried in
vain to flee her attackers who
caught and severely beat hear
with a heavy piece of wood.
The two were working on
translating the Bible into the
Wapishiana language, a
project started some 30 years
ago by another American,
Francis Tracey, who has since
returned to the U.S., accord-
ing to a source.


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3, 2005 3


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Telephone Nos. 226-9369/9302

The Indian Cultural Centre hereby announces the commencement of new
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Interested persons are requested to collect Application Forms from the
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Fee: G$ 1,000 for four months course
Library:
The Centre has a well stocked Library containing a large number of books
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Heritage. Library Membership can be obtained at a fee of G$500.00. In
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In addition to three (3) years post qualification experience.

Further information as it relates to conditions of employment could be obtained from the
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Applications should be addressed to the office of the:-

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Government ads can be viewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy


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6 SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3, 2005


A Chief


Justice on


trial?

THE decision by Prime Minister Patrick Manning for
the creation of a tribunal to determine whether Trinidad
and Tobago's Chief Justice Sat Sharma should be
removed from office, is an unprecedented development
in the history of West Indian jurisprudence.
It is a development that is expected to attract the widest
possible interest, beyond the Caribbean region, and not
only from members of the legal profession, institutions
of learning and political parties.
Ever since Mr. Manning received written complaints in
January from his Attorney General and the Director of
Public Prosecutions alleging "interference" by the Chief
Justice in a high profile murder case involving a leading
physician, Vijay Naraysingh -who has since been freed -
there have been indications that the Prime Minister would
take the constitutionally-provided route of requesting the
country's President, Maxwell Richards, to establish a
tribunal to determine if indeed the head of the judiciary
was guilty of any improper conduct.
Manning told the House of Representatives on Friday
that, without prejudice or ill-will, he had decided to act in


accordance with Section 137 of the Trinidad and Tobago
Constitution in requesting the President to appoint the
members of the tribunal to investigate the merits of the
complaints against the Chief Justice.
Should the tribunal find that a reasonable case of
claimed interference has been made against the Chief
Justice, then the matter would have to be forwarded to
the Judicial Committee of the London-based Privy
Council which remains the final appellate court of
Trinidad and Tobago.
From the very beginning of media exposures of
claims and counter-claims in this unprecedented
judicial dispute, there have also been allegations of a
"conspiracy" among like-minded elements to oust the
Chief Justice from office.

'Conspiracy' claim

The parliamentary opposition United Niational
Congress of ex-Prime Minister Basdeo Panday, has
been quite vocal in its own allegations of covert
manoeuvres against the Chief Justice.
Nor surprisingly, therefore, following Mr. Manning's
statement on his recommendation to President Maxwell
to appoint the tribunal, Mr. Panday noted that the Prime
Minister was using his constitutional powers to "order
the President to appoint a tribunal named by him
(Manning)".
If the government wanted to be wholly transparent
in the matter then, according to the UNC leader, it
should have gone the route of an inquiry to determine
whether there was "any conspiracy" on the part of the
Attorney General and the DPP to remove Mr. Sharma
from office. Panday said he would have more to say
once the members of the proposed tribunal have been
appointed.


For his part, Manning said it was with "a very heavy
heart" that he had ordered the investigation and wished
it to be known that under Section 137 of the Constitution,
the Prime Minister "is neither judge nor jury and makes
no finding of guilt or innocence, but he must weigh very,
very carefully, the action, if any, he must take..."
Both sides, Prime Minister Manning's and the Chief
Justice, have already initiated actions to be advised by
the most high-powered team of legal luminaries from
within Trinidad and Tobago and CARICOM, as well as
from outside the Caribbean region.
Perhaps there is no significance in the fact that the
move for the tribunal has come within two weeks of the
ceremonial inauguration in Port-of-Spain of th-e
Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) which is intended to
eventually replace access to the Privy Council in London
as the court of last resort.


CHRONICLE


Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Sunday Editor: Michelle Nurse
Editorial: 227-5216; 227-5204; 22-63243-9
Sports: 225-7174
After hours 226-3243-9
Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is at www.guyanachronicle.com
e-mail address sundayeditor@guyanachronicle.com
Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown, Guyana


Mocking Haitians with



democracyc' promise?


IF 'DEMOCRACY' in Haiti
must rest on another five
minutes in a polling booth by
voters at coming new
elections, then those familiar
with the political culture of
that poverty-stricken
Caribbean state could well
appreciate why there seems
to be no excitement, no
expressed enthusiasm by the
mass of Haitians for what is
being officially promoted in
Washington and Port-au-
Prince as the "restoration of
democratic governance".
A culture of revenge
and confrontation politics in
that poorest of nations in the
Western Hemisphere continues
to make a mockery of promised
democratic governance-even if
we restrict examination from
the 'Duvalierist' dynasty to
that of the Roman Catholic
priest turned politician, Jean
Bertrand Aristide.
The 'democratic'
deficit that existed under
Aristide's second term has
clearly widened, in a shorter
period, and in spite of a heavy
foreign military presence, under
the interim regime of Prime
-Minister Gerard Latortue,
created and sustained primarily
via the influence of the George
W Bush administration.
Never favoured by the
Bush administration, the
Aristide government had failed
to deliver on some core pledges
to the Haitian people. But it
was not the ogre the hawks of
the Bush administration had
deemed it to be to justify
Washington's lead role for
"regime change" in Port-au-
Prince on February 29, 2004.
Last week, as Jamaicans
and their government agonised
over the future of some 288
Haitians who. fled to that
CARICOM state, following the


SNeither Aristide's return nor

coming poll offers solution


orchestrated coup against the
Aristide government, supporters
of the ousted President were
showing that he continues to
enjoy visible national popularity,
even as he remains in exile in South
Africa.
However desirable is
Aristide's return from exile, the
harsh reality suggests, according




-44







PRESIDENT GEORGE W
BUSH

to credible reports out of Haiti,
that this development by itself
offers no serious solution to the
fundamental political and
economic problems facing Haiti
where democratic governance
remains elusive.
Right now, Aristide's
'Lavalas' party is not an active
participant in the process for new
local government, parliamentary
and presidential elections.
Further, leading colleagues of his
deposed administration are
political prisoners without
charges among them a Prime
Minister and a Minister of
Justice.
Consequently, official
pronouncements such as "the
Organisation of American States,
and the United Nations are.


cooperating closely to ensure
that Haiti can hold free and fair
elections in 2005...," continue to
evoke cynicism and
disenchantment.

RULE OF LAW

It is quite discouraging
to follow official rhetoric about
"free and fair" elections under
present conditions of ongoing
political violence, lawlessness
and fear and an interim regime
that seems not to understand its
responsibilities to ensure a
climate of stability and uphold
the rule of law.
UN Secretary General
Kofi Annan was himself
lamenting last month the
"precarious" internal security
problem in Haiti when he
observed that:
"Although the general
security environment across
Haiti has improved", he
claimed, MINUSTAH (UN
Stabilisation Mission in Haiti)
(faces) the risk of retaliation in
determining to take action
against gang members and
former soldiers" of the
disbanded Haitian army.
While the impasse
lingers over collective
engagement by the Caribbean
Community with the interim
regime in Port-au-Prince, we
should not expect any new
initiative of significance from
CARICOM that could possibly
make a positive impact on even
a single distressed town or
village in Haiti.
But what of the Bush
administration that had moved
with such alacrity, 13 months


ago for a military intervention,
under UN auspices'?
It was an intervention
of American, French and
Canadian forces that coincided
with the downfall of the
Aristide administration in the
face of an orchestrated
campaign of violence that


involved a mix of traditional
domestic political opponents,
rebel military personnel and
criminal elements.
For that matter, what
is the UN Security Council
itself doing to arrest the
nightmare of cyclical political
violence, spreading fear and
deepening poverty, even as
UN peace-keepers themselves
are now being killed by well-
armed rebel soldiers'?
If the rebel thugs of a
disbanded army and criminals
have a common cause in
spreading the climate of
violence and fear in which the
country is gripped, while
leading members of Aristide's
Lavalas party remain
prisoners, what will happen as
Haiti moves closer to October
9 when the first round of local
government election is
scheduled to be held?

AID DONORS

Between October 9
andDecember 18, when the


presidential poll takes place.
following that of parliamentary
election on November 13. the ill-
trained and severely limited
Haitian police force of some
3.000 in a country of an
estimated eight million people.
will be under even greater stress
t. g._a~vb .,, n'. Ill t e he I LN-
France, with its sordid
history as ex-coloniser. and
which was a convenient partner
in the military intervention of
February 29 last year that
converged with the anti-Aristide
coup, hosted earlier this month
in Cayenne an aid donors
conference on Haiti as a follow-


up to that held in the USA in
July.
Participating donor
nations and groups reaffirmed
commitment to some US$1
billion for development projects


MR. KOFI ANNAN


in Haiti, which remains the
poorest nation in the Western


Hemisphere having been the
oldest independent state foi
two centuries.
But since the 2004 aid
donors' conference. that
followed the grim economic
devastation and hundreds ol
lives lost from floods and

billion has been received in
Haiti.
It is as if the donor
community is mocking the
suffering of the Haitian masses
for being stuck with an interim
regime fumbling its way
through the crisis scenarios
while it sponsors grope for
solutions.
Therefore, I return to
an earlier question: What are
the Bush administration, the


JEAN BERTRAND
ARISTIDE.


OAS and the UN Security
Council really doing about the
Haitian crisis of political
instability, violence, gross
human rights violations and the
hunger and suffering of
millions?
If the short answer
is, "preparing for free and
fair elections", they need to
generate confidence by
actions not words in a rule-
of-law climate and point to
what extent the quality of
life of the Haitian masses
has improved following
Washington's "regime
change" in Port-au-Prince,
in preference for its
arbitrary rejection of a
CARICOM "peace" plan
that it had previously
accepted..






SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3, 2005


Get






,and


GET something and wave!


Get anything and wave! It's
waving time again!
The getting something and
wave refrain is a West Indian in-
vention and wonderfully cap-
tures the full flow of the
celebratory spirit as only West
Indians can.
Nothing comes close to
West Indians getting something
and waving when they have
something to jump up and cel-
ebrate not even the Mexican
Wave.
I don't know if the South
Africans have anything close to
the West Indian 'get something
and wave' at jump up time, but
they dearly would want to 'Get
Tiger and Wave'.
Don't you just love those
guys?
No matter how the Bourda
cricket test match turns out, it
came along at the right time and
Tiger and Wave have already
carved their niche in the annals
of this wondrous game.
I confess that I was among
those who had all but given up
on the West Indies cricket team


before the current series against
South Africa.
That bunch has caused die-
hards so many heartaches in the
recent past that few gave them
much chance against the South
Africans.
The sad contract saga that
led to a split in the team on the
eve of this home series further
lowered the battered spirits of
a people for whom cricket is
their lifeblood.
With Brian Lara and some
of his sidekicks out of the first
test at Bourda, there were even
calls for fans to boycott the
game here and a pall of gloom
hung over the match.
But with Tiger at the helm,
Guyanese looking for some kind
of respite from the battering
they have had to endure from
the January floods that trig-
gered the country's worst natu-
ral disaster, seemed to some-
how sense that they would at
last have something to wave
about.
We kind of sensed it too.
and while others in a kind of


fiendish delight serve
most daily front page
turning offerings of
head and bloodied co
tried to give the Tige
men top billing.
And boy, were th
loose at Bourda yeste
The shenanigans I
to the start of the test
to be a blessing in dish
Our gentle Shivn
ger' Chanderpaul, tf
leading a weakened V
team into battle, tool
by the tail and he ar
Hinds gave it such a
two days that the Sc
cans seemed in a da
day.
The 'Get Tiger a
chant buzzing arour
heads over the first t,
the test had the Soutl
doing a calypso dar
Bourda pitch yesterd
tried to come to grip
ger and his team with
up in the air.
Get something
Get anything and wa
Tiger and Wave!
Team!
Diehard West Ir
needed this. A bruise


Tiger





Wave


ed up al- tered Guyanese nation needed
stomach- this and the cheers went up at
a severed Bourda yesterday as the rains
nrpses. we withdrew and the Tiger team
er and his went on the hunt with a sense
of purpose.
icy letting Double double records
2rday! tumble Chanderpaul and FAN MA
leading up Hinds score double centuries.
now seem Chanderpaul and Hinds take M ake
marine 'Ti- two days in a row way to
hrust into go! IN RESPONSE
Vest Indies Wonder how the boycott it's a crying sh
k the tiger callers feel today'? Wonder how used for Sharie
nd Wavell those who were mocking the While Khan
a twist for Tiger and his 'babes' feel to-
gence. or as he tl
south Afri- day? "And then h
ze yester- Wonder how that newspa- in absolute won
per cartoonist who saw the Ti-
and Wave' ger and his men as a babe in dia- "To the Office of t
id in their pers, crawling and trying to drag to the Office oft
wvo days of a bat to face a towering and for- and hung up the
h Africans bidding South African team, At first, he
ice on the feels today'? person, face to f
ay as they Cricket is a game of glorious on the telephone
is with Ti- uncertainties, they say. much alcohol w
their tails You can say that again, but Apart from
whichever way this test turns tantly disrespec
and wave! out, it will be a long time before As I recall, CN S
ve! the roar stirred by the Tiger he invited by' t
Tiger and and his team dies down. visited Guyana?
Get something and wave to Can the man
ndies fans Tiger and Wave and the team. work for Khan -
*d and bat- Take a bow, guys!


nev 0 t...






"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


SK'S NOTE
hung up the p
dent to make a
now so scared
Worship may
have to beg Pr
lum. Lord, wha
to plead my ca


-- 71


t./4- i


UL;


Khan a cleaner
to 'Khan's Chronicles' (27th March, 2005),
lame that the State newspapers should be
f Khan's sarcasm.
is taking pot shots at other's people intelli-
links, lack of. he misses his own lack.
er face lit up in ecstasy. She smiled and sighed
nderment". About the same person, he says:
stopping her. She said she was hurrying over
he President to lobby Mr. Jagdeo for her choice
phone".
gives the impression that he is talking to the
ace, then ends up by saying that she had called
;. Lack of logic? I guess a brain abused by too
would have problems with continuity of thought.
being abundantly sarcastic, Khan is also bla-
tful of President Bush and Queen Elizabeth.
harma is no stranger to meeting royalty. Wasn't
ie President to meet Prince Charles when he
agement of the Chronicle find some worthwhile
* heard you need a cleaner.
M. BROWNE
EXECUTIVE MEMBER
JFAP

E: I am sorry. I should have added that she
hone after calling the Office of the Presi-
an appointment to see the President. I am
- if Mr Sharma does become Mayor, His
declare a fatwah against me and I may
resident Bush or Queen Elizabeth for asy-
at have I got myself into? I'll probably have
,se on Mr Sharma's TV show.


[ GUl ANA SUGAR CORPORATION INC.


INVITATION TO TENDER
TENDERS ARE INVITED FOR
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
AT NCN, HOMESTRETCH AVENUE.

TENDER DOCUMENTS CAN BE
COLLECTED FROM OUR GATE SECURITY
FROM 11:00 HRS ON MONDAY,
APRIL, 4, 2005.

TENDERS MUST BE PLACED IN THE TENDER BOX LOCATED
*AT *CN ORkfWORE ^H-.f 9# "TN


Ihe Giti\ana Su;ur (oporation Inc.. through its
n min cr in, ScI\ ice,, I )p.mrn~Ilem t. 1_11. F.C'.l \ Ishcs
to c rtI'l olit re| ir.m I' to: -

a Proccs,,inm lotc .it [ I\. 1 1. l[)elnicr!r',li l't tcs

e Pow rc I louscat L .LI. -t'ts ltmmctrari l:,tltcs

Sugar Bond at Ll31. l-ast Demerara LEstate,

Interested contractors are asked to check with the
Engineering Services Department to purchase tenders
by latest Thursday. :'" April. 2005

Site visit at bidder's own expense is arranged lor
Thursday, 7"' April. 2(105 at 9.00 am and closing date
for submission o ttendcr is Friday. lh ..\April. 2005.

Con, tact i'f ei in.g Serv'ices Department on Tele.
1:.i^ .^ 1 *t *- u -. ^ i-^ i .i*


* *


Khan -I
.m






SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3, 2005


Support,




not




attack!


OVER the past week, I have
had cause to pen two open
letters to the media following
a misinformation spree by
the opposition and parroted
by a so-called analyst -
Christopher Ram. Ram and
others in the opposition are
entitled to their views,
however, jaundiced and
uninformed. But when these
views are expressed with the
aim of frustrating an
important task such as the
national recovery from the
January flood, the record
must be set straight. The facts
must be given more light.
My open letters of
March 23 and March 29
addressed several
misrepresentations being


peddled. It all started on the
PNCR's Nation Watch
programme two_"iays after the
President of Guyana announced
a recovery and rehabilitation
package for the people who
were affected by the January
2005 flood disaster. Mr. Ram
and other leading lights in the
PNCR were misrepresenting
instead of supporting the
Government in this national
effort to recover and rebuild.
The main bone of
contention was the false
assertion that the President of
Guyana violated the
Constitution of Guyana when
he announced the recovery
package i.e. he had no right to
announce the assistance for his
people.


In a private letter of
March 21st, 2005 to Mr. Ram, 1
requested that he identifies the
article in the Constitution which
waS breached by the Head of
State. On March 23rd. ; received
a response via the media
(subsequently, a copy was faxed
to me from Ram & McRae
Chartered Accountants) in which
he repeated the same
misinformation and launched a
political tirade against the
President and his Government.
I have no difficulty with
our exchange taking place in the


to clear Contingencies Fund
Advances (arising from
emergencies, such as the flood
disaster).
I further advised
Mr. Ram of the relevant
laws regardingI
s u p p I e ni e n t a r y
appropriations which are
the Constitution of
Guyana and the Fiscal
Management and
Accountability Act 2003.
As an "analyst' he ought to
have been aware of those
provisions.


28, 2005, contii
misinformation c
However, he spiced
all sorts of political
and the usual anti-g
rhetoric. He also attci
to hide behind the ti
po!;;C;; fl'utrality
lhat he had for some
exposed how he was
hip-and-thigh to the
1 responded
on March 29 pointing
his misleading lines
In that I said that Mr
his political acolyt


Weekly Viewpoint by Robert Persai


media.
On the same day of
March 23rd, 2005, 1 responded
to his 'Open Letter' pointing out
that he failed to either identify any
real violation of any article of the
Constitution of Guyana or
unlawful usurpation of the
authority of the Minister of
Finance and the National
Assembly by the President of
Guyana.'
Mr. Ram was informed
that the mechanism, which is
being followed currently for the
recovery package is
Supplementary Appropriations


GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA/CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

BASIC NEEDS TRUST FUND FIFTH PROGRAMME

INVITATION TO TENDER

The Government of Guyana (GOG), Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the
Government of Canada through the Canadian International Development Agency
(CIDA) has recently signed an agreement to finance several projects under the
Basic Needs Trust Fund (BNTF) Fifth Programme. Construction of the sub-
projects is expected to be implemented in 2005/2006. The sub-projects consist
primarily of buildings and other civil works aimed at improving the social and
economic infrastructure.

The Basic Needs Trust Fund invites tenders for the following sub-projects;


1. Lethem Hospital Expansion


- Reg. # 9


Tender Documents for this sub-project can be purchased from the office of the Basic
Needs Trust Fund at 237 Camp Street, G\town in the form of a MANAGER'S
CHEQUE payable to the BASIC NEEDS TRUST FUND. Tender Documents
can be purchased for a non-refundable fee of G$20,000.

Sealed tenders accompanied by valid National Insurance Scheme (NIS) and
Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA) Compliance Certificates (both of which should be
in the name of individual or firm submitting the bid) should be addressed to the
Project Manager, and deposited in the Tender Box of the Basic Needs Trust Fund at
237 Camp Street, SIMAP's Building, Georgetown, on or before 10:00 h on
Tuesday, May 3, 2005.

Tender Document must be placed in a seal envelope with the name of the sub-
project clearly marked on the top left hand corner. The envelope should in no
way identify the tenderer.

The Basic Needs Trust Fund does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any other
tender.

Tenderers or their representatives may be present at the opening of the tenders at
10:00 h on Tuesday, May 3, 2005.

Project Manager
March 30, 2005


I then proceeded to
quote sections of the
Constitution and the Fiscal
Management and
Accountability Act 2003
which proved that there was
no violation. Among the
sections of the Constitution I
referred to was Article
220(2)of the Constitution
which states that 'where an
advance is made from the
Contingencies Fund, a
supplementary estimate shall,
as soon as practicable, be laid
before the National Assembly
by the Minister responsible
for finance for the purpose of
authorising the replacement of
the amount so advanced.' In
layman's language, this meant
that there is no requirement for
prior approval of the National
Assembly before sums are
spent. If the January flood
does not constitute an
emergency, then I don't know
what does? I also alluded to
some other relevant issues.
Mr. Ram, in another
letter to the media on March


ab


MR. ROBERT PE

fixation on the
assistance to each h
which will cost the St,
as 70,000 household
benefit. Well, not e
well endowed like th
consider a $10,000
insignificant. I quer
prepared to encourage
not to accept this
forms of assistance?
advice to his political
Congress Place be to
their members to r
recovery assistance? I


nued his the focus' on only the
-ampaign. $10,000 grant is designed to
it up with shift attention away from the
invectives entire $2.8 billion short-term
overnnment recovery and rehabilitation
united now assistance package which
hIin veil of comprises of: drainage work on
forgetting the cons,.i'Vati-cy ,'inmn, East
clime now Coast of Demerara and
joined by Georgetown to the tune of
PNCR. $80OM; assistance to farmers
o his letter and small business owners -
g out again $700M; water sector repairs -
of attacks. $320M; heath care infrastructure
r. Ram and repairs $50M; garbage
es have a collection and sanitation -
$100M; and replacement of
books, uniforms and school
furniture $150M.
ud I further stated that the
sentiments of Mr. Ram and his
ilk have no public resonance. I
then reiterated a few points:
There is no violation of the
Constitution or the FMAA by
His Excellency, the President.
All sums allocated are in
--, accordance with laws of the
country, are subjected to
Parliamentary consideration, and
are being audited by the Auditor
General's Department which
report will be made public and
tabled in the National Assembly.
The Government will not
be distracted from implementing
its short-term recovery and
RSAUD rehabilitation package even as it
plans the medium to long-term
$10,000 recovery which is estimated to
household cost another $6 billion
ate $700M The President of
ers stand to Guyana will continue to fulfill
everyone is his constitutional mandate to
e Rams to lead and govern in the best
I grant as interest of the entire nation
rled: Is he i do hope that the
Guyanese opposition will now
and other support, not attack the
Would his national effort to recover
masters in and rebuild from the flood
encourage disaster. It's time for more
reject the positive action and less idle
However, distractions.


MINISTRY OF HEALTH

Contractors are invited to be pre-qualified for minor works to be undertaken by the Ministry of Health.
Areas of works to be undertaken are as follows:
a). Construction and Rehabilitation of Buildings
(i) Carpentry and masonry
(ii) Painting
(iii) Plumbing
b). Construction and repairs to bridges and fences
c). Electrical Repairs and Maintenance to Buildings

Contractors are required to submit at the time of tendering:

1). A valid Certificate of Compliance from the Guyana Revenue Authority. It must be noted that
where a Tender is submitted in the name of a Company /Firm the Certificate must reflect the
name of the Company/Firm and not the owners.
2). A valid Certificate of Compliance from the General Manager, National Insurance Scheme.
3). Evidence of financial resources from banking institutions available to undertake works.
4). List of manpower/resources.
5). Record of past performance.
6). List of machinery/equipment.

Pre-qualification must be submitted in a sealed envelop, bearing no identity of the Contractor and should
clearly indicate on the top left-hand corner the areas of work to be undertaken.

Pre-qualifications should be address to:
Chairman
Ministerial Tender Board
Ministry of Health
Brickdam, Georgetown
and deposited in the Tender Box at the Ministry of Health, Brickdam not later than 15th April, 2005 at 10.,00hrs.
Contactors or their representatives may be present at the opening of the Pre-qualification.

Sonya Roopnauth
Permanent Secretary
SGovernment ads can be .iewed'ori http://WWw,oiiia.gov.gy






SUNDUA CHRONICLE A nil 3. 2005









'roa 6,va a-


By Rajendra Rampersaud


THE present epoch of globalisation will experience the
erosion of preferential market as a result of new rules and
regulations that will govern International Trade. The
granting of Preferential Market to developing countries in
my mind was done as a trade strategy for large political
objectives thereby ensuring mutually shared benefits beyond
economics. However, more recently, preferential regimes
were coming under great pressure for survival. This article
looks at the preferential market for sugar under the EU/ACP
Arrangement from a more critical standpoint.
The literature on Preference describes it "'as a form of
assistance normally provided to developing countries by developed
countries whereby imports of selected products are permitted from
recipient at lower import duties than import from elsewhere." Sugar


is one commodity that enjoys
such access under the EU/ACP
arrangement where some 19
ACP countries are allowed an
equivalent of 1.3 million tons of
sugar export to the EU at
remunerative prices. Sugar from
the ACP countries has been
exported to the European Union.
for more than a century. This
trading relationship was
.' "-""alised in 1951 as the
Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement that later manifested
into the EU/ACP Sugar Protocol
(1975) with Britain accession to
the community.
The new millennium
witnessed the quiet but gradual
and now almost full preferential
erosion of the ACP sugar access.
In 2001, the EU introduced
Everything but Arms (EBA)
Initiative with little or no
consultations with ACP
member states. The EBA, the
EU claimed, was intended to
help the Least Developed
Countries (LDC) enjoy duty
free access to the EU market. In
this case, the Special Preferential
Sugar (SPS), which the ACP
countries were allowed an
additional access of over
300,000 tons of sugar export
was taken away and given to
the LDCs as Dr Clive Thomas
so ably described the EU action
as "robbing Peter to pay Paul."
Then the proverbial
bombshell mid last year when
the ACP countries became aware
of the EU proposal for the
reform of the sugar regime that
involves the cutting of the
guaranteed price for ACP sugar
by 37 per cent. The proposal
further recommends a 60 per
cent compensation for the
European farmers for their
income losses whose 34 percent
price reduction was estimated at
1340 million euro. Even though
this proposal for reform will
have a more devastating impact
on the 19 ACP countries that
export sugar, there was only a
vague reference to providing
some "appropriate
accompanying measures" in the
text as an element of
compensation or assistance to
the ACP who will suffer even
greater losses and dislocation
when compared to the EU.
S The proposal for sugar
reform provides no transition;
no time for restructuring and


clearly for Caribbean producers
of sugar is an unmanageable
process. The EU action
violates the basic trust of the
Sugar Protocol, which states that
"The European Community
undertakes for an indefinite
period to purchase and import
at a guaranteed prices, specific
quantities of cane sugar, raw or
white, which originate in the
ACP states and which these
states undertake to deliver"
(Article 1 of the ACP/EU Sugar
-1l Moreover the recent
Protoc,.,. --. (2000) the
Contonou Agreemem ,_
successor to Lome IV between
the ACP and the EU further
incorporate the Sugar Protocol
into the text as article 36 (4)
states "the parties reaffirm the
importance of the commodity
protocols attached to Annex V
of this Agreement. They agree
on the need to review them in
the context of the new trading
arrangements, in particular, as
regards their compatibility with
WTO rules, with a view to
safeguarding the benefits derived
there from bearing in mind the
special legal status of the Sugar
Protocol." These agreements
were negotiated over a long
period of time and were binding
on the parties involved the EU
and the ACP to honour its
obligation. However, the EU
sugar reform proposal came after
no consultations with ACP
countries is a clear manifestation
of high-handed unilateralism in
its worst form and breaches all


trust of multilateralism and
bilateral agreements.
The Caribbean sugar
exporting countries have always
fulfilled their obligations to the
EU under the protocol in
ensuring the full supply of the
sugar quota. There were
opportunities for the Caribbean
to divert its export to secure
higher world market prices in
1974 when prices were 2f1
times higher than EU prices,
and again in 1978, when prices
were again some 50 per cent
higher. The Caribbean was,
however, contented with
honouring its obligation to the
EU. There were cases where
Guyana ai-id other ACP
countries chose to import sugar
for domestic consumption in an
effort to secure its quota
arrangement with the EU. The
Caribbean and the ACP have
been a very sincere and reliable
source of export for sugar to
the EU even in times of greater
opportunities elsewhere. During
this period also, the EU moved
from being a net importer of
sugar to being among the
world's largest exporters, while
the Caribbean remained
stagnant due to strict quantative
limits on their export and
inability to exploit the
economies of scale. What is
important to note is that since
the negotiation of the Lome
Convention, the Caribbean
countries have always
requested a special window
towards improving the
competitiveness of their sugar
industries but without any
success. Furthermore, the tariff
escalation imposed by the EU
on value added sugar act as a
disincentive for diversification
of Caribbean Sugar. The ACP
has pointed out that even
though the EU membership has
increased regularly their sugar
quota was never adjusted
upward from its present
allocation. The sugar protocol
thqt many thought was sacred
1... cn fs.ched along
and cannot De -- .
with stagnant export under the
quota arrangement has lulled
many ACP countries into a
false sense of complacency. The
EU action has contributed to
the under development of the
sugar industries especially in
the Caribbean as countries
target output level and
implement policies only to
satisfy the EU quota.
In the banana tussle
between the EU and Latin
American countries, the US
was used as the scapegoat by
the Europeans. However, with
sugar, the EU was exposed in
its true nakedness. Even though
there was that challenge to EU
subsidized sugar exports at the
WTO by Australia, Brazil and
Thailand. These countries were
at pains to point out that they
have no difficulty with ACP
export of sugar to the EU. In


WANTED URGENTLY:

(1) Refridgeration Plant Operators
(2) Industrial Electrician
(3) Welder/Mechanic

Requirements Valid Police Clearance

Proof of experience and
qualifications.

Apply in person to:

The Operations Manager
B.M. Enterprise Inc.
GFL Wharf, Houston
East Bank Demerara.


fact, the ACP secretarial has
continuously slated that their
exports constitute no part of
the illegally subsidized C sugar
being exported by the EU.
Brazil's Ambassador at the
WTO Luis Correa stated that
their complaints are only
against the EU. They had no
difficulty with the ACP
arrangement, a position further
endorsed by Australian
Ambassador David Spencer. It
was further pointed out that the
present ACP/EU preferential
arrangements could remain valid
until 2008 under the present
WTO rules. There is no doubt
that the pressure for sugar
reform is driven by other
spcC;?! interests outside of
trading. Since under these
proposals the European
consumers will benefit little but
business will maximise their
profits.
The Caribbean and ACP
countries have fully utilised all
lobbying efforts in the different
ways in the European capitals
speaking to Trade Ministers and
EU Commissioners
respectively. They were all very
sympathetic to the ACP case
and generally agreed that there
is need for a significant
extension of the transition
period over which the price
should be cut, but on the other
hand, promised the ACP
nothing concrete. However,
only Spain offered some hope
by rejecting outright the EU
proposal and promised to
organise within the EU a


blocking minority of the EU
sugar reform proposal if not
amended whenever it reached
the EU Ministerial level. The
CARIFORUM Countries are
now locked in negotiations with
EU on a new Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)
the sugar protocol will
definitely be a contentious issue
for discussion. Whatever the
reality it is definite that
preferential market will go
through rapid changes. In the
past ACP countries was only
able to utilise 50y per cent of
their Preferential market share
due to rigid, difficult and
inflexible EU rules. This type of
arrangement has locked the ACP
countries in a continuous cycle
of export dependucr.C on
primary commodities. The
Caribbean countries will have to
begin the process of reform of
their sugar industries with its
own resources. While seven and
a half cents world sugar price is
used as the ridiculous
benchmark for sugar, it is still
uncertain what the true market
price for sugar really is. It is
widely believed that large
producers such as Brazil and US
have large influence on the world
market price that is below the
cost of production for most
countries. Even more, the
American Sugar Alliance
estimates that Brazil provides
about US$200 million per year
in direct subsidies to producers
in Northern Brazil. The
Thailand Government provides
tax incentives and subsidies


credit to millers and exporters of
sugar (Mitchell 2004). There is
still a chance for Caribbean
sugar to capture the
CARICOM sugar market
including Haiti for refined sugar
that is now estimated at 294,000
tones. Guyana has an even
better chance of surviving this
period if it can only bring down
its excessive labour cost of ten
cents per pound and improve
on its factory recovery rate that
is presently the lowest among
ACP countries. After all, only
with improvement in Total
Factor Productivity (TPF) can
sugar be competitive and
withstand all adversaries in
small economies such as ours.
When the EU and US
fight contributed to the
destruction of the Caribbean
Banana (in the mid 90's), the
most celebrated world renowned
scholar on trade issues, Jagdish
Bhagwatie, himself a former
advisor to GATT, wrote in the
Financial Times (March 9,
1999) under the title 'US
Known As Nation That
Believes In Law Of The Jungle'
stated that there is nothing in
the doctrine of free trade that
requires that we ride rough-shod
at break neck speed and reckless
regard, over the economies of
small and poor nation."
Today history is once
again repeating it self. Small
and poor countries will have
to find or make a way forward
since history and culture
matters little in the new
global environment.


GUYANA SUGAR CORPORATION INC


^- .VACANCY

ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

Applications from suitably qualified employees arp .-,ited f^ fill tfhe portion nf
Administrative Assistant within the Finance Department at Head Office, Ogle.


Main Responsibniuii

Schedule appointments, greet visitors, o:",ertain nature of business and
direct visitors to the appropriate officer..
Answers telephone and give information to callers, route call to appru, ..
official for response and place outgoing calls.
Receive, read and route incoming mail to staff members; draft and type
responses/documents for the department.
File transaction documents and control the filing room.
Purchase, collect, issue and monitor all stationery for the Department.
Compile and compute various data inputs to financial system.
Assist in administrative problem solving; program planning, development
and execution of goals/objectives.
Perform diverse administrative activities for the department and serves as a
liaison person to other departments on a daily basis.

Requirements

Applicant should have:

Five (5) subjects CXC (inclusive of Maths & English) and must be pursuing studies in
the field of accounting with an ambition to further career in this field.
CAT level II or equivalent.
Must be computer literate.
Experience in related field would be an asset.

Remuneration

An attractive remuneration package is offered.

Interested persons possessing the relevant qualification and experience should
send their application and detailed CV not later than April 15, 2006 to:

The Personnel Director
Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc
Ogle Estate
East Coast Demerara

Or by e-mail to JharnaB@guysuco.com










) I I I


a a I


a a a
77


GUYANA'S flood relief
assistance efforts have been
boosted with contributions
from Guyanese nationals in
Vi.ezuela and Venezuelan
citizens totaling more than
US$62,000 (G$12.4 million).
According to a press release
from Guyana's Embassy in
Caracas, the first response came
from Guyanese nationals living
in El Tigre in eastern Venezuela


who. in a very short time, raised
more than two million bolivars
(about US$1,100) which the
Guyan F.h,-sb y dispatched to
the Guyana Relief Council. At
the same time, Guyanese in
other parts of Venezuela also
responded by sending relief
supplies directly to their
affected relatives in the flood-
affected areas in Guyana.
In addition, members of


the Muslim community in the
city of Valencia also responded
by sending a four-"r.;.iber team
in mid-March to Guyana to
distribute cash and food hampers
to affected residents in areas
between Mahaicony and Ogle.
The team dispensed assistance
to the value of US$60,000 during
their visit to Guyana. This
assistance included cash
donations to persons who needed


The Inter-American Development Bank, the largest and leading source of financing for
regional development in Latin America and the Caribbean, offers challenging
opportunities to aid economic and social development in the countries of the Region.
Your technical knowledge and local experience are needed to provide support to the
Country Office in Guyana for a:




As the Consultant Specialist the main functions of the position are:
* Advises and assists borrowers and beneficiaries in fulfilling contractual conditions of
loan contracts and technical cooperation agreements, advising in the preparation and
presentation of the documentation required. Analyses contractual modifications, as
applicable, making recommendations accordingly. Reviews and verifies
disbursement requests.
* Assists borrowers and beneficiaries throughout the bidding and hiring process.
Reviews and approves selection procedure results and contract awarding. Reviews
technical documentation (studies, reports, plans, specifications, work programmes,
etc.) for compliance with project objectives and Bank's requirements.
* Performs project inspections. Anticipates events that may adversely affect the
successful completion of a project within budget and in auCGGrdtce with the operative
policies of the Bank, technical specifications and other contractual document"
approved by the Bank, making recommendations accordingly.
* Advises and assists prospective borrow/, ,
applications andtechnics prospective borro ...or beneficiaries in the presentation of loan

inquiries and _e,. cooperation requests for potential projects. Analyses
inquiries an applications, prepares profiles as first input for loan and technical
operationin processing.
* Identifies and assists in the promotion of loans and technical co-operation for potential
projects that respond to the country's financing strategy, ensuring consistency with
programming guidelines, and which could be financed by the Bank.
* Provides support for preprogramming and programming missions, and actively
participates in Bank missions.
* Assesses the institutional capacity of executing agencies in coordination with the
Financial Analyst. Reviews reports prepared by Consultants with respect to
institutional analysis.
* Keeps in depth knowledge and a continuous follow-up of the most relevant matters in
the technical, economic, financial and institutional field affecting the assigned sector
or speciality.
* Performs other functions pertaining to the Country Office as assigned by the
Supervisor.
Education: Master's Degree in Economics, Business Administration, Engineering or
equivalent.
Experience: Minimum of six (6) years of professional relevant experience in the local
private sector environment in Guyana including micro-enterprise and developmental
issues affecting the sector, sound grasp of the regional issues. The successful candidate
mustdemonstrate ability to work independently and in teams with Bank staff, government,
other public and private sector officials. The candidate must also possess strong oral and
written communications skills.
Languages: Proficiency in English. Knowledge in Spanish would be and advantage.
Afull description of the position including core and technical competencies can be uplifted
at the IADB Country Office at the address below or can be requested by e-mail to Ms. Ava
Yarde (Avay@iadb.org).
Applicants for the vacant position of Consultant Specialist should send a cover letter
and detailed Curriculum Vitae, including salary history, by April 27, 2005 to:
The Representative
Inter-American Development Bank
47 High Street
Kingston, Gebrgetow .. ..


urgent medical care, the release
said.
The release also noted
that, earlier, the Venezuelan
Government had responded
very quickly by dispatching a
medical and technical
assistance assessment mission
to Guyana, and this was
followed by delivery of
substantial supplies of food,
medicine, and equipment for
the affected population.
G u y a n a s
Ambassador in Caracas, Dr.
Odeen Ishmael, has
expressed gratitude on
behalf of the Government
..;. people of Guyana to the
Guyanese nationals,
Venezuelan citizens and the
Government of Venezuela
for their quick response and
tangible assistance to
Guyana during the flood
crisis, the release said.


YOUTH Can Move The
World (YCMTW), held its
seventh Annual Training
Programme from March 19-
20 at School of the Nations.
One hundred and forty
youths aged 15 to 30-years-
old participated.
The training
programme organised by the
Varqa Foundation in Kingston,
Georgetown, was funded by
the Unity Foundation and the
Luxembourg Government in
collaboration with the
International Baha'i
Community.
Participant -'"
fro - uled
s... ast Berbice, Corentyne,
Essequibo Coast, East Bank
Demerara, East Coast
Demerara, West Coast
Demerara, Georgetown and
Linden.
The programme
included a series of workshops
with special emphasis on issues
including HIV/AIDS, drug and


Gouveia


heads


GCCI

THE Georgetown Chamber
of Commerce and Industry
(GCCI) last Wednesday
elected Captain Gerry
Gouveia as its new President.
T. eiectuion was held during
the Annual General Meeting
in the organisation's
boardroom on Waterloo
Street.
Gouveia takes over
from Eddie Boyer whose
contribution to the work of
the GCCI was acknowledged,


alcohol, abuse, domestic
violence, prejudice, prevention
of suicide, protection of the
environment and moral
education.
Ten youths acted as
tutors while the 140 youths
completed part one of the Ruhi
materials on the 'Reflection on
the Light of the Spirit.'
The first training was
conducted by Help and Shelter
and by Mrs. Kala Seegopaul.
Those in attendance
were taught how to make
puppets and use thi- u to
con--' ..edium to
-...,unicate social messages.
They were also trained to act as
facilitators to present similar
courses to their peers in
schools, youth clubs and youth
groups attached to various
religions.
Participants will return
to own communities to work
with junior youths (aged 11-1
14-years) and youths (15- 25-
years) and at the end of the 10


NATIONAL BANK
OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE LIMITED



EXECUTION SALE

Properties for Execution Sale at the Instance of the
Registrar of the Supreme Court, to be held on April
05, 2005 at the State Warehouse, Kingston at 13:00
hrs.


* A track of land situated on the left bank of the Bonasika
Creek, Essequibo

* Land and building situated at Lots 4 and 65 Section A East
of Public Road, being portion of Grant No. 2767 Crabwood
Creek, Corentyne, Berbice

* Land situated at Lot 289, being a portion of sub-lot 'A'
part of La Penitence, Georgetown

* Land and building situated at sub-lot lettered 'B' being
part of Lot 8 Section 'C' Campbellville, Georgetown

* Land and building situated at Lots 215 and 216 Section 'B'
Bel Air, West Coast Berbice

For further information kindly call telephone no. 226-4091/5
Ext. 267


with the new President and
members of the GCCI
expressing gratitude "for his
immeasurable fortitude in
his association with the
Chamber over the years,
which led to the creation of
vibrancy in the
organization...," a release
from the GCCI said.
Gouveia pledged to
work hard to carry out the
mandate and objectives of the
Chamber to establish it as a
"beacon for the business
cq'n--r>ty in Guyana," the
release further stated.
The other members
of the executive committee
are: Senior Vice President -
Eddie Boyer, Junior Vice -
President-Brian James,
Treasurer Charles
Sookram and Honorary
Secretary Mark Harris.


months of training,
festival will be held at which th
various YCMTW groups wil
present how they havw
incorporate the various arts
poetry, dance, song, puppets
banners and drama to portra
the different social messages.
Over the years, Varq
Foundation has received funding
from UNICEF, CIDA, the office
of Social and Economi
Development at the R"-'
World C" ..
-we min Israel and the
last year received an award froi
the Inter-Americai
Development Bank for th
work they are doing wit
youths in Guyana.
A press release fro
Varqa Foundation said the ne-
phase of training will be held o
April 24, 2005 at the School
the Nations with a team
animators who are now i
process of visiting the vari&i
YCMTW groups around th
country, which are emerging
from the training.
YCMTW material
have been developed in Guyan
and translated and used i
South Africa, Ethiopi
Malaysia and Cambodia
training programmes are bas
on an illustrated 80 page manua
The manual w
developed by Varqa Foundatio
in collaboration with a numb
of groups and individuals ov
the years including Help an
Shelter, National Commissio
on the Rights of the Chilk
Iwokrama and the Ministries
Health and Education.
The manual, current
in its fifth edition is bein
revised based on field-testing i
Guyana and overseas and
accompanied by a 120-minu
video-training package, filme
and produced in Guyana.
illustrates each of the key soci
issues.
The release sai
spaces are still available o
the YCMTW training
programme for persons w
may wish to join t
programme. Interest
persons can make conta
with Varqa Foundation.


Youths benefit from


training programme


10 -,i ri,, *G0 :






SUNDAY CHRONICLE .A ril 3. 2005


Caste dilution among


Caribbean East


paper presented at the Conference on The Islands in
between: Language, Literature and Culture of the
astern Caribbean
ovember 3-7, 2004, Tortola, British Virgin Islands


Continued from last week)

physical as well as
psychological barriers were a
necessary function of the
lantation system. The
olonial policy of "divide and
ule" was intended to
orestall any unity among the
workingg class and to secure
he survival of the planter's
lass. This isolation produced
ome interesting results in
erms of social stratification.
The Caribbean East
ndian community became
stranded from itself and from
ts segmented parts. The caste
system was severely
ndermined on the plantations
because Western forms of work
outine did not respect East
dian-ascribed caste rules. For
example, high positions on the
ugar plantations were not
determined by skin colour and
religion but by achieved
characteristics. Workers were
rewarded according to ability
nd performance. Yet, East
dian emigrants tried to hold on
o their caste system in their
espective communities. They
ere able to do so because the
lanters were not especially
concerned about how East
dian communities functioned
socially. The planters were
interested in production and
profits. But the low-caste men
d women were not willing to
maintain the caste system in
eir communities. It is strangely
*ronic that low-caste East
dians would want to maintain
system that was restricting
d oppressive to them.
These dichotomous
social experiences further
widened the gap between East
Indians from India and
Caribbean East Indians,
between Caribbean East
Indians and the Creoles, and
between East Indians on the
plantations (at work) and East
Indians in the communities
(at home). This complexity as
to how the Caribbean East
Indian caste system became
diluted and subsequently
vanished has yet to be
examined. Certainly, the
caste system was not diluted
uniformly nor did it revolve
solely around the plantation
system. Still, if the plantation
system were not totally-
responsible for the dilution of
the Caribbean East Indian
caste system, then what was
responsible for this
transformation? Perhaps the*
most appropriate question to
be. asked is: who was
upholding the caste system in
the Caribbean? Were East
Indians merely seeking to
replace, the caste, system with
another social system, and'
they got: instead a class'
system that shifted in their.
favour?


(Lomarsh Roopnarine,
Guyana-born, is Assistant
Professor of History at the
University of the Virgin
Islands, St. Croix. His
articles have appeared in
many regional and
international journals.)

This paper examines
how the East Indian caste
system was diluted in the
Caribbean. The objective is
twofold. The first is to
demonstrate that the caste
system was partly diluted
because of pressure from the
plantation system and Western
forms of work routine; but this
was not the only cause, as
espoused by so many other
studies. Rather, Caribbean East
Indians were responsible for
and capable of their own
cultural change. To be sure, no
one is downplaying the power
structure of the colonial regime
in suppressing Old World
cultures. The argument here is
that the plantation system did
interrupt East Indian culture,
but East Indian modes of
adaptation and cultural
magnetism enabled them to
maintain key cultural traits to
deal with the throes of
dislocation and disorientation in
an alien environment. The
second objective is to show
that the caste system was
diluted in the Caribbean to a
point where it has no significant
meaning today in East Indian
communities; more importantly,
the caste system has never
been used to maintain cultural
purity and political power in
the contemporary Caribbean.

The background of
Caribbean East Indians

Like so many ethnic
groups who were brought to the
Caribbean region, East Indians
were the last wave of emigrants
brought in to fill a so-called
labour shortage following final
emancipation of African slaves
during the nineteenth century.
Their arrival.into the Caribbean
. was coterminous with and
integral to the expansion of
world capitalism arid the
mission of colonialism sweeping
through the nineteenth and


twentieth centuries. East
Indians were brought to the
Caribbean under a labour
contract system commonly
known as the indenture system,
which lasted for about three to
ten years. Essentially, the
indenture system "locked" East
Indian labourers under
conditions and circumstances
that favoured the employers/
planters. The East Indian
labourers provided indentured
labour under a plethora of laws,
and the planters, in exchange,
provided some basic amenities
such as fixed wages, medical
care, accommodation and
rations. Needless to add, neither
the laws nor the responsibilities
were obeyed or kept. Moreover,
East Indians during the first
three decades of the indenture
system were forced to return
home when their contracts were
over. This recycling of East
Indian laborers relieved the
colonial administration of
obligated responsibilities and
denied East Indians the right to
bargain for better wages
(Roopnarine 2003).
By the 1870s,
however, it dawned upon the
planters' class that it would
be cheaper and beneficial to
the plantation system if East
Indians were to be
permanently attached to the
region. Subsequently,
colonial schemes were
drafted to have East Indians
settle locally. They were
induced with the option of
accepting a piece of land to
settle in the Caribbean in
lieu of return passages to
India. Many East Indians
opted to stay in the
Caribbean in light of
deplorable conditions in
India. So when the indenture
system finally collapsed in
1917, about 500,000 East
Indians were brought to the
Caribbean. More than one-
half of them stayed and
accepted the Caribbean as
their new-found home.

Early attempts to maintain
East Indian customs in the
Caribbean

As expected, East
Indians brought to the
Caribbean their homeland
culture. They tried very hard to
maintain this culture in spite of
the despotic and authoritarian
nature of the indenture system.
Interestingly, the culture East
Indians brought to the
Caribbean was not uniform
mainly because they were
recruited from different areas in
India. They were from a
number of different castes and
religions (see Verteyoc 1992).
Yet within this diversity there
were some foundational cultural
similarities. Except for the joint
family organisation, the most
common cultural trait East
Indians. brought to the
Caribbean was the caste system system
(Neihoff & Neihoff 1960). Not


all East Indians, however, came
from the same caste. The caste
system is a highly complex
social institution in India. There
are several hundred castes and
sub-caste systems in India, but
they are traditionally ranked
within the four varnas (castes)
according to importance and
purity: Brahmin (priests),
Kshatriya (warriors), Vaisyas
(merchants) and Sudias (working
class). Beneath these four varnas
are the untouchables (slaves).
Most researchers
contend that the majority of
East Indians who came to the
Caribbean were from the
medium and low castes, but a


sizable number of them were
from the high caste. For
Trinidad, Brereton (1974:
261) shows that Brahmin and
other high castes made up 18
per cent; artisans 8.5 per
cent; agricultural castes 32
per cent; low castes 41.5 per
cent. For Guyana, Smith
(1959: 31) suggests that high
castes made up 13.6 per cent;
artisans 8.5 per cent; low
castes 31.1 per cent. For
Martinique and Guadeloupe,
Renard (1993) writes that
East Indians came from
various professions and
backgrounds, but they were
mainly from the inferior


castes. These figures are
misleading for essentially two
reasons: first, the colonial
authorities were lax at record
keeping; and second, East
Indians used this loophole to
give false information about
themselves in order to gain
new status in the Caribbean.
Some East Indians did "up-
caste" themselves upon
arrival in the Caribbean.

The Process of Dilution of
the East Indian Caste
System in the Caribbean

The dilution of the
East Indian caste system did not
begin in the Caribbean, but
rather in the depots in India and
in transit to the Caribbean. The
mere act of leaving India meant
the loss of caste, and so to East
Indians in India all Caribbean
East Indians were outcaste. But
caste status could be reclaimed
through a purification ceremony
in India, and could be bought in
the Caribbean colonies,
particularly in indentured East
Indian communities where social

(Please turn to page 19)


V LINDEN ECONOMIC ADVANCEMENT PROGRAMME

MI (LEAP)
LEAP P[ ]


The Government of Guyana (GOG) with the support of the European Union has
allocated funds towards the cost for constructing a reinforced concrete bridge-culvert at
Speightland, Retrieve, Linden for the residents and farmers of Region 10.

The Speightland bridge-culvert will replace the existing steel culvert located
approximately half mile beyond the Alumina Plant, Linden

It is intended that a portion of these funds will be used for eligible payments under the
Contract for which this Invitation to Tender is issued.

The Project is being implemented by LEAP (Project 8 APC GUA 009)

LEAP now invites Contractors with the relevant experience to tender for the
construction of the bridge-culvert.

As of Monday, April 11, 2005, Tender Documents may be uplifted at the LEAP Office
at 97-98 Republic Avenue, Mackenzie, Linden for a non- refundable fee of five
thousand dollars ($5,000)

The works will include:

I. Re-routing of the creek in vicinity of the existing culvert, installing
temporary culvert and providing a by-pass for pedestrians and vehicular
traffic.
II. Constructing temporary cofferdams to facilitate construction works under
dry conditions.
III. Constructing reinforced concrete bridge-culvert with reinforced concrete
wing walls.

Tenderers are required to submit three (3) sets of the Tender (one original and two
copies)

A clarification meeting will be held at LEAP's office on Monday, April 18, 2005 at 10:00
hrs and a compulsory site visit will follow immediately after.

All tenders must be addressed to:

Linden Economic Advancement Programme
Thru The Central Tender Board
Ministry of Finance
Main &Urquhart Sts.
Georgetown
and deposited in the Tender Box at the Central Tender Board on or before Tuesday, May
10"', 2005 at 09:00 hrs
Tenders must be clearly marked at the top, left hand corner, "TENDER FOR THRi
CONSTRUCTION OF SPEIGHTLAND BRIDGE CULVERT" and at the top, right-hanm.i;
corner "DO NOT OPEN BEFORE May 10"', 2005AT 09:00 hours" ,;g
Tenders will be .opened in the presence of those Tenderers or their aythori '
representatives who choose to attend at Q9:00 hours on Tuesday, May'10'", 2Q05 at.
Central Tender Board. .. '...
LEAP is not obligated to accept the lowest or any Tender A i


ndians






12 SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3, 2005




a


a ST







S. S












0 THE GUYANAOIL COMPANY LIMITED
VACANCY

JOB POSmON: MARKETING MANAGER

JOB LIOATICONL BASED IN GEORGETOWN WITH RESPONSIBILITIES FOR


REMUNERATION:


GUYOIL LOCATIONS COUNTRY-WIDE

ATTRACTIVE, DEPENDING ON QUALIFICATIONS
AND EXPERIENCE


The Guyana Oil Company Limited is wholly owned by Government. It is the Country's leading Marketer and
Distributor of Fuel Products, Lubricants and Bitumen Products.

ROLE

Reporting to the Managing Director, this person would be responsible for managing relationships, providing
sales support to assigned Customers and ensuring products are supplied on a timely basis.

Also, to conduct business reviews, prepare reports and make recommendations to Management and the
Company's Board of Directors to ensure both correct and competitive pricing while maintaining Customer
demand and satisfaction at all times. With the ultimate goal of proactively promoting sales and service of
the. full range of the Company's products, the person is expected to deliver quality customer service to
achievesales-driven targets.

ESSENTIALFUNCTIONS

To communicate with Customers on a frequent and professional basis to secure orders,
provide product support information and general Customer service;
To anticipate and develop plans which will. reflect the future needs of
Customers;
To manage inventory levelsand stock rotation;
S Todevelopand implement marketing, sales and distribution strategies for the different
regions to improve the quality of distribution across the full product range;
To continuously improve product knowledge across the full range of the
products the Company offers;
S o be prepared to attend trade shows, conferences, seminars and training when requested,
both local and overseas;
* To work with the Print and Electronic Media to promote the Company's product.

PROFILE

At least five ..,5) years proven sales and marketing experience in .a sales
environment;
Excellent interpersonal and communication skills;
Aself motivator with proven influencing and problem solving skills;
Good planning and organisational skill mirust be able to prioritise, meet deadlines and follow
through on tasks; .'
Articulate dynamic, confident and enthusiastic with a passion for selling and service;
Team playerwith calm and professionalapproach;
Target-driven individual;
Computer literate Word, Excel, Power Point, etc. ,

QUALIFICATIONS & EXPERIENCE

A Degree in Marketing from an accredited University plus five (5) years Sales and Marketing
-experience;
OR a Diploma in Marketing plus seven (7) years Sales and Marketing experience;;,
OR a Degree in Engineering plus ten (10) years in Sales and Marketing;
Any other equivalent qualification with ten (10) years Sales or Marketing experience.

Applications together with curriculum vitae and names of two (2) referees should be submitted to the
Company Secretary, 166 Waterloo Street, Georgetown not later than April 15, 2005.


R"Copyrighted Material

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page 12 & 21.p65






SUNDAY CHRONICLE April-3,-005 -., ,. ,., . -.,,. ,- --,-... . ,


Guyana



Annual 2004/



2005



launched


IN THE presence of former
President, Mrs. Janet Jagan,
and Texas-based Guyanese,
Dr. Tulsi Dyal-Singh, the
2004/2005 edition of the
Guyana Annual Magazine-
was launched on the lawns of
Castelanni House Friday


evening.
Dr. Singh has been
providing money for the
issuance of the magazine,
originally called the Guyana
-Christmas Annual, which was
first produced and published in
1915. It was not published for


many years, but was
resuscitated in 1998.
Mrs. Jagan, briefly
speaking, thanked Dr. Singh
for the financial support
saying that it is a distinct
encoturagcement 'or
particularly young writers.
"There is nothing
more exhilarating than to see
what ou havi~e produced in
print and Dr. Singh has given
youths an opportunity to
express themselves, to be
creative and to improve
themselves," she said.
Mrs. Jagan told Dr.
Singh, who was born in
Palmyra. Berbice, and is now
working as a medical doctor
in Midland. Texas, that he has
tremendously served art,
sports and culture in Guyana.
Dr. Singh, told the
small gathering of mostly
young writers, short story
judges and photographers
working for the magazine,
that he was proud of the latest


Dr. Tulsi Dyal-Singh and Mrs. Janet Jagan at the launching on the lawns of Castellani
House Friday evening.


edition, but expressed hope of
having more participation from
persons in rural communities.
Editor of the magazine.
Mr. Petamber Persaud, now
entering his second year in the
post, said the launching was also
a celebration of past successes
of Guyana Annuals.
He noted that there is a


passion for further
improvements, and added: "The
outcome of ... support from
every quarter garners a climate
of opportunity for Guyanese
talents to be exposed and
maintained by many individuals,
and organizations.
The editor
concluded that the aim of


Guyana Annual is to
continue to keep
Guyanese art and literacy
tradition alive. This
edition has 92 pages of
photographs and articles
on drama, chutney music,
cinema in Guyana, African
folk music, theatre in
British Guiana, poetry.


NATIONAL BANK
OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE LIMITED
A S.Ls' dary o 4 Republic Bank Limited
FO SALE B-TEND"


A section of the gathering at the launching of Guyana Annual 2004/2005.





The Regional Democratic Council, Region No. 9 hereby invites suitable contractors to
tender for the following Contracts:

A.) Contractors to supply all labour and materials. A fee of $3,000 must be paid
to uplift these tender documents.

1. Construction of Teachers Quarters at Sand Creek, Shea, Nappi, Fairview
and Tiger Pond.
2. Construction of Nursery School at Tiger Pond and Surama.
3. Construction of Primary School at Yurong Peru, South Pakaraimas.
4. Construction of Auditorium at St. Ignatius, Central Rupununi.
5. Construction of Foot and Mouth Camps at Mickie crossing and Baitoon.
6. Construction of Bridge at Araqui Creek, and Chaiwar Creek, South
Rupununi.
7. Construction of Pedestrian Bridge, Chico Crossing.
8. Construction of Health Post at Surama.

Tender documents must be uplifted from the office of the Superintendent of Works,
R.D.C Offices, Lethem.

Tenders must be addressed to the Chairman, Regional Tender Board clearly marked
showing which project they are tendering for and must be deposited in the Regional
Tender Box not later than 12:00 hours (mid-day) on April 11th, 2005

D. Kissoon
Regional Executive Officer
Region No. 9


(Irn tdson beppego ~op h A~~w wqqa~gov~gy,


MOTOR CYCLE & VEHICLES
-4 Longshen Motor Cycle # CD 7611

-4 Toyota Town Ace Mini Bus # PEE 3874
- Nissan Mini Bus # PGG 5302

-4 Toyota Mini Bus # BDD 8887

4 Toyota Carina Motor Car # PHH 6948


LOCATION
N.B.I.C. New Amsterdam
Branch
N.B.I.C Rosignol Branch
174 Waterloo Street,
Georgetown
174 Waterloo Street,
Georgetown
174 Waterloo Street,


Georgetown

PROPERTIES FOR SALE BY TENDER

-4 Tract Lettered 'B' Lonsdale, Sisters Village, Berbice River
-4 37 Section 'A' # 71 Village, Corentyne, Berbice
-4 18 Grant 1803 Crabwood Creek, Corentyne, Berbice
4 74 Huis'T Dieren, Essequibo Coast
-4 Lots 86 & 87 Block 'A' Plantation Zorg, Essequibo Coast
-4 110 & 116 Westfield, Essequibo Coast
-+ Block XXXII Parcel 141 Devonshire Castle, Essequibo
- 46 Section "A" Bush Lot, West Coast, Berbice
-4 8 Danielstown, Essequibo Coast
-4 East Portion of 23 & 24 Main Street, South Cummingsburg,
Georgetown
Tender closes at 14:00 h on April 15, 2005
Tender Forms can be uplifted at any of our NBIC locains.
Tenders must be sealed in an envelope marked "Tender For...", and
placed in the Tender Box at Water Street Branch on the Receptionist's Desk
no later than 14:00 h on April 15, 2005.
For further information please contact:


Mr. Frederick Rampersaud
Telephone # 226-4091-5, Ext. 239.


The Bank reserves the lght noi 1o occeptt the highest or
.... .. .. any Tender,. ,iii assigning a reason.,










CARICOM'S


..SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3,' 2005



decisive vote for


By RICKEY SINGH

BRIDGETOWN The
Caribbean Community is
once again set to play a
decisive role in the election
of a new Secretary General
for the 34-member
Organisation of American
States (OAS), scheduled for
Thursday, April 7, in
Washington.
This time, however,
there is a small crack within
CARICOM in its backing of
Chile's Vice-President and
Minister of Interior Affairs,
Jose Miguel Insulza without
involvement of Belize and St.
Vincent and the Grenadines.
They have indicated preference
for Mexico's Foreign Minister,
Luis Ernesto Derbez.
In addition to Insulza,


the perceived front-runner, and
Mexico's Derbez, the third
candidate for Thursday's
election is El Salvador's former
President, Franciso Flores, who
has the support of the USA
and, within the Caribbean
region, Dominican Republic and
that of Haiti's interim
government.
While Chile's Insulza is
expected to emerge the winner
with the already declared strong
support from CARICOM,
tallying at least 11 votes among
the 14 independent CARICOM
member states, there are
indications that none of the
three candidates may secure


victory on the first round of
balloting.
This three-way split in
votes contrasts to the situation
back in June last year when
CARICOM had played a
crucial role in successfully
garnering early significant
support for Costa Rica's
former President, Miguel Angel
Rodriguez, to emerge as the
"consensus" candidate for the
OAS top post.
But Rodriguez was
dramatically forced to quit as
OAS Secretary General within
two weeks of his inauguration
as a result of legal action
against him at home for alleged


bribery offences while in office
as President of Costa Rica. The
case is still before the courts.
In a rare move in its
hemispheric diplomatic
initiatives, CARICOM went
public Friday with a statement
by current chairman, President
Ronald Venetiaan of Suriname.
It declared that "an
overwhelming majority of the
Community's member states"
have signalled their support for
Chile's Insulza as the new OAS
Secretary General.
President Venetiaan said
the "early election" of a new
OAS Secretary General was
"important and necessary in light


of the current challenges the
hemispheric body is facing".
With Cuba's seat in the
OAS remaining vacant since the
USA forced its expulsion back
in 1962, it means that no less
than 17 votes would be required
for a candidate to emerge
victorious to lead the
hemispheric body as Secretary
General.
Prime Minister P.J.
Patterson of Jamaica is reported
to have been "very persuasive"
in mobilising substantial
support within CARICOM for
the Chilean candidate.
And yesterday, various
Community Heads of


Chile's OAS victory


Ministry of Education

Construction and delivery of school furniture
Capital Programme-2005

Pre-qualified contractors are invited to bid for the Construction and Delivery of the following items
of School Furniture for Georgetown Schools:

Lot I Teachers Tables & Chairs 120
Lot 2 Screen Display Boards 20
Lot 3 Large Cupboards 10
Small Cupboards 10
Lot 4 Nursery Sets 70 sets
Lot 5 Chalkboards -Short 20
Lot 6 Desks & Benches
A Type- 100
B Type- 100 300 pairs
C Type- 100
Lot 7 Lab Stools 151

Furniture are required to be manufactured from seasoned lumber that are either kiln dried or air
*dried for a minimum of three (3) months.

Tenderers must be owners/occupiers of factories that can produce the articles and must submit a
valid photocopy of their factory licence. Details and specification of the works to be undertaken
can be obtained from:

Mr. T. Persaud
Ministry of Education
21 Brickdam
Georgetown

upon payment of a non-refundable fee of two thousand dollars ($2,000). All tenders submitted
must be accompanied by valid Income Tax and NIS compliance certificates. Form of Tender will
be available as from the 7th April 2005.

Tenderers may bid for one, more than one or all the lots listed above. Each bid for each lot must
be submitted in a sealed envelope bearing no identity to Tenderers and clearly marked on the top,
left-hand comer, "Tender for Furniture, Ministry of Education Lot No............."

Tenders should be addresses to:

The Chairman
National Board of Procurement and Tender Administration
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown

And should be deposited in the Tender Box at the Ministry of Finance, not later than Tuesday 26th
April, 2005 on or before 9 am.

Tenderers may be present at the opening, which takes place shortly after 9 am on 26th April,
2005.

The Ministry of Education does not bind itself to accept the lowest tender and reserves the right to
reject any tender without assigning reasons.

P. Kandhi
-P r-,3r,"!l '_;,i-r l i]-y -Gevenrnent ads G ,,- i .. .. .. .,'11 1,...j


"Copyrighted Material -

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"











S* *

-








Notice of Award

The Government of Guyana in collaboration with the Organization of American States is offering a
limited number of scholarships for the completion of undergraduate studies for the 2005/2006
academic year.

Applicants are required to provide notification of admission into a University in an OAS member
state outside of applicant's country of origin for the final two (2) years of the programme. This
means that the applicant should have been enrolled at a university and have two years to complete
the undergraduate Degree.

Application forms can be obtained from the Office of the Permanent Secretary, Public Service
Ministry, 164 Waterloo Street, Georgetown and/or Scholarships Department, Training Division,
Durban Street and Vlissengen Road, Georgetown.

Closing date for the receipt of applications is Wednesday 6th April, 2005 and should be returned to
either of the above addresses on or before the specified deadline herein.



Nanda K. Gopaul
Permanent Secretary
Public Service Ministry
... ' Goveinment ads can be viewed on iittp' ,.v \iiim, ov g}
.-. . ..-. a 1 l


Government and Foreign
Ministers told the Sunday
Chronicle that they were quite
"optimistic" of Insulza emerging
as the new man at the helm of
the OAS, either on the first
round or second round of voting.
El Salvador's candidate is
expected to be removed from the
contest on the first round.
In addition to the bloc
of votes expected from
CARICOM states, the Chilean
candidate has also been
promised support from Brazil,
Argentina, Venezuela, Uruguay
and Ecuador.
Together, these would
amount to 16 plus its own vote
for a marginal 17-16 victory
in the first round. But Chile
said it was also confident of
securing support from among
Central American states.


w





SUNDAY CHRONICLE .Aprl- AQQ5%1










Area Agricultural Business claim Agricultural Total
claim and business
claims
Nabaclis 80 3 9 92
Cove and John 111 3 5 119
Victoria 235 12 24 271a
I I~ M11



Belfield 10 2 0 12*
Nooten Zuil 67 1 1 69
Doch Four 81 2 0 83
Two Friends 78 3 6 87.
Anns Grove 114 16 4 134 .
Clonbrook 183 4 11 198
Bee Hive 162 4 9 175
Greenfield 64 0 0 64
Unity 98 3 13 114
Nooten-Z-- l-7 11r rp69


Lancaster / z o oJ


* CatWve


446


Consultative assessments rescheduled
GINA- Owners of small businesses, livestock and cash crop farmers in the under mentioned areas are asked to note that
the consultative assessments slated for Sunday April 3 as per the schedule below have been rescheduled.
Presently, teams are gathering information in your community with respect to the payment of the $10,000 household grant. The
Secretariat does not wish to have this activity clash with the verification of your claims, and thus we have taken a decision to resched-
ule the consultative assessment.
The Recovery Planning and Implementation Secretariat shall -advise you of the dates, times and venues when the public
verification of your claims will take place.
AREAS LOCATION
Liliendaal, Pattensen and Turkeyen Cummings Lodge Secondary School (Upper Flat)
Cummings Lodge Cummings Lodge Secondary School (Lower Flat)
Industry, Ogle and Goedverwagting Ogle Community Centre
Plaisnance, Sparendaam Plaisance Primary School
Haslington/Golden Grove Golden Grove Primary School
Hope, Logwood, Enmore Enmore Primary School



S". Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Ministry of Culture, Youth & Sport
Steel Pan Competition
The Ministry of Culture, Youth and Sport is inviting all interested steel-
pan leaders and owners to attend a meeting on Monday, April 04, 2005
to discuss plans for a steel pan competition to be held as part of the
2005 .Independence Celebrations. This meeting will be held at 4:30 pm
at the Ministry's Head Office, Main Street, Georgetown. Your presence
will be greatly appreciated.


FOR SALE

One Black Nissan Pulsar
Motor Car
in perfect condition

Call: Office 226-3361/227-7829
Cell: 628-8676



Seeks success oriented individual or company to
represent high performance industrial, commercial &
agricultural oils, greases & special purpose lubricants.
Outstanding earnings & growth opportunity. No prior
experience needed. Complete training. We're
professionals with 72 years experience. Contact P. Z.
Thomas, Senior VP, Southwestern Petroleum, Box
961005, Ft Worth, Texas 76161-0005 USA, Phone: 817-
348-7259, Fax: 817-877-4047, ww...swep.c.o.u.b..o..ro!i.
Please respond in English with your complete mailing
address.


DATE FOR OUTSTANDING BALANCES
ON YOUR FEBRUARY 2005 BILL IS

SUNDAY APRIL 10, 2005
AND THE SECOND SUNDAY IN EVERY MONTH
Please note that bills can be paid until 6:00 pm (1800 hrs)
Monday to Friday and until 2:00 pm (1400 hrs) on Saturday
at GT&T's Business Office, 78 Church Street, Georgetown,
Guyana Lottery Company, Regional Office, Robb Street,
Georgetown, any Post Office and at these following Bill
Express Locations:

R & S Shopping Centre, Belvedere Public Road, Corentyne

J's Supermarket, 131 Essex St. & Republic Road,
New Amsterdam, Berbice

Neighborhood Pharmacy, 54 Second Avenue, Bartica

Nigel's Supermarket 44.1-45 Robb & Light Sts. Bourda

Johnny P Supermarket 1571 Aubrey Barker Road.
S.'R/Vdt Park


C & F Supermarket Bagotstown,
10'B. Bgotstown, EBD

S& 'rbio& VarietyStbre,
,414 iDg'eri'dAvgnue: ;; .;.,
Mc drizi,,inden, -i,' .'. '

A. rd, br...

..e j W .


-I


.~4 .->~:


I


lfi -:






16 SUNDAY(


King of the



Cowboys





SUPERIOR strength, bravery, courage, skills and years of
training helped Jules Fedricks from the Silver Sands Ranch
in the South Rupununi to secure the much coveted title of
Rodeo King 2005 at the Easter weekend Lethem Rodeo.
Clad in a jaguar's outfit to symbolise the manner in which
the jaguar hunts and conquers, Jules outperformed his competi-
tion to win in three of the roughest and most dangerous rodeo
events the saddle bronc riding, bareback bronc riding and bull
-riding.
Exercising great skill, balance and control and surviving the
leaping, kicking, bucking and bogging, Jules successfully took on
and won the age-old challenge of man against beast, skill versus
brute force.
According to Fedricks, he was very confident that he would
win. The years of hard work, training, determination and focus
finally paid off, he said, adding that he hopes he could success-
fully defend his title next year "as there are dozens of young
hopefuls" on the scene.
This was his first Rodeo King title in over five years of
competition. Fedriks said that it was always his dream of
becoming Rodeo King. He wants "more people from the
coast and abroad to attend the rodeo and support our indig-
enous communities as well as our traditional cowboy
lifestyle." (Guyana Tourism Authority)


The Universal University




New institution aim,





promoting harmony


By RUEL JOHNSON
ANEW institution of learning the Inter
national Vedanta University has slowly
begun laying roots here in Guyana, some-
thing its founder, Indian-born Guru Balakrishna
believes will help heal the rifts which divide the
country by utilising the age-old philosophy of


GURU BALAKRISHNA


Vedanta.
According to President of
the Guyana Pandit's Council and
a disciple of Balakrishna, Pt.
Haresh Tiwari, the bramcharya
(a Hindu celibate) who hails
from the state of Kerala in India
- has been in Guyana for going
on five years. Balakrishna origi-
nally started out in Guyana as a
yoga instructor attached to the
Indian High Commission and
during that time began a one-year
stint lecturing English at the Uni-
versity of Guyana.
Tiwari, a trained accountant
and President of the Interna-
tional Vedanta University
(Guyana) when it gets under-
way said that the idea from the
University stemmed out of
Balakrishna's vision of what is
needed to bring harmony not
only to this country with its
multitude of divisions but
eventually to a very unstable
world.
Tiwari related to the Sunday


Chronicle that Guru Balakrishna
- a senior disciple of the re-
nowned Swami Chinmayananda
has dedicated his life to study-
ing and teaching.
"Guruji wants to share and
spread Vedantic knowledge, the
knowledge of self-realisation,"
he said.
According to Tiwari,
Balakrishna has decided to es-
tablish the IVU with the intent
that the institution will serve as
a training centre for people in
whatever field of endeavour they
aspire to, as he puts "it from the
medical field to the rice field."
The idea is to provide sup-
port, as such, to all existing
organizations by essentially pro-
viding the intellectual/philosophi-
cal framework in which the per-
son can best put their mind and
spirit
Vedanta, he explained, does
not confine itself to a particular
religion, scripture, race, or cul,


Georgetown Readinq and Research Centre


Endorsing the



importance of reading

'This is not a lucrative arrangement. But I want to get people to read, get
people interested in acquiring the skills to help them better their lives and pin hoe n ta h
better contribute to society.'- Rupert Hopkinson, Directol; Georgetown in order to assimilate the contend
Reading and Research Centre of publications to effectively mar
I-Pt UR2 UUUk Q\- nOthini h iC


a' j-w Mwy. a_ m -- '. L.,n .-Iw a--
COWBOY KING: Jules Fedricks after winning the
prestigious Lethem Rodeo title.


by Stacey Bess and reading runs though li-
braries and bookshops. From
THE exciting road to books a library, publications may be
borrowed and taken
away for a stipulated
period or are made
available for use in a
reading room. Pur-
chases, for keeps, are
Made from a book re-
tailer.
4-7,Today, in
.. Georgetown, the latest
' highway to literacy ad-
venture interlocks the
Library and bookshop
experience. This free-
.-.. way has been opened
up by Georgetown
Rcadig and Research
Centre (GRRC).
GRRC's Director,
Rupert Hopkinson's
approach to making
m books available is unde-
ALL-TIME t'2LASS? "D' V U1, :.rs ~n'ofniably unique and,,ll:
Success'. encompassing. In the


80s, he sold books on foot in the
United States of America. The
states of Alabama, Texas, Missis-
sippi and Louisiana became his
book-merchandising field. Rupert
was hard-pressed then, pushed
to pay for his tertiary-education.
and to at least ensure the subsis-
tence of his growing family.
It is the prickliest job that
he has done in his lifetime, but
not sufficiently thorny for him
to cast off. No longer the walk-
ing stranger knocking on the
doors of prospective buyers, he
has become well known to stu-
dents and book lovers operating
from a metropolitan library/store
front, not for survival, but with
the same dedication.
Hopkinsoni has read countless
books, to carn his Bachelors and
Masters degrees from Tuskegee
and Auburn Universities in the
USA and stopping short of com-
pleting his doctoral degree at
Harvard University before return-


e
d
it
r-


ket Ulthe UUUIoos someIuuti lie titl
does today. One of his all-time
classics is 'The University of Suc-
cess', a book encapsulating the
thoughts of 50 of the world's best
inspirational writers.
He has latched on to the
words of Thomas Carlyle who
writes in this book, which is di-
vided into semesters for the
phase of reading for a degree: "If
we think about it, all that a Uni-
versity or final highest school
can do for us, is still but what
the first school began doing -
teach us to read. We learn to read
in various languages, in various
sciences, we learn the alphabet
and letters of all manners of
books. But the place where we
are to get knowledge, even theo-
retical knowledge, is the books
themselves. It depends on what
we read, after all manners of
professors have done their best
for us. The true University of
It-is this idea. endorsing the







RONICLE April 3, 2005


sat





in Guyana


ture. \
"Universality," said Tiwari,
"is it's fundamental position.
Universal harmony, universal
love, universal peace, universal
enlightenment: these are the fun-
damental principles on which
Vedanta stands."
The man behind it all, Guru
Balakrishna also spoke about the
reasons he had for initiating the
university.
"In the world," said Gurjuji,
"we need a bit more harmony and
cooperation. We think that it can
knit the Guyanese community,
with all its differences. "
According to Balakrishna,
Vedanta is the essence of the
Vedas, the most ancient scriptures
of India; its basic teaching is that
our real nature is divine. God or
Brahman exists in every living be-
ing. Or as Guru Balakrishna puts
it,
"[Vedanta means] the Self in
One is the Self in All which is the
Self Divine."
Vedanta uncompromisingly
insists that man is essentially
perfect, and therefore infinite are
the possibilities that are lurking
in him. The Rishis assert that we
must realise that we have within
ourselves all the resources abili-
ties, energy and power for build-
ing up a supremely successful
life for ourselves and for others
in our world.


According to a booklet pre-
pared for the IVU, incompetence
in life generally springs from our
false and hasty conclusions that
we are impotent, insignificant
and ineffective. Spiritual educa-
tion and practice makes us realise
that we are part of a whole
scheme, and the essential cre-
ativeness behind the whole uni-
verse is essence ruling in the
heart of every one of us.
Vedanta, according to the
booklet, has the capacity to
bring out the "sleeping giant" in
each person. According to the
booklet, just as it aroused in
Arjuna the ability to confront the
Mahabharata battle, so too we
can if carefully attentive, dis-
cover a larger capacity in our-
selves to meet the challenges in
life.
It is this power of self-
realisation upon which the IVU
will draw to establish a learning
framework for its courses.
"We have problems," said
Guru Balakrishna, "not because
of lack of teachers, or lack of re-
ligion or anything like that. We
have problems because of the
lack of teaching systems. As an
institution as a coordinated
body, we think that this
[Vedanta] has to be once again
brought to the community in the
form of a [teaching] system in
place."


The graduates of the 2004 Vedanta course. President Bharrat Jagdeo is standing in the centre.


Both Tiwari and Balakrishna
take pains to reiterate that while
Vedanta does draw on some of
the basic tenets of Hinduism,
the system of thought itself not
only transcends religion but also
complements it as well.
According to Balakrishna, in
understanding Vedanta, the
Christian person will be able to
understand the Bible more; the
Muslim person will come to un-
derstand the Koran more; and the
Hindu will have a deeper appre-
ciation as well for the Bhagavad-
Gita and the Ramayana more.
"Vedanta," Tiwari added,
"promotes, proliferates and
propagates a unified approach to
living. It promotes the ideal type
of living, with a universal


outlook...The teaching of
Vedanta is therefore applicable
to every single cross section of
the society."
Tiwari said that the charac-
teristically reserved Guru has
been a force of positive growth
in Guyana, especially in the
Hindu community. He has per-
sonally spearheaded many
programmes, upping the ante
"For the first time." said
Tiwari, "Sanskrit is being taught
in Guyana at a level that is


comparable to universities
abroad."
"I don't like," said
Balakrishna. "to do things the
same old way. If something is
being done one way, why go do
it that way again?"
Balakrishna will be bringing
that same drive, that same inge-
nuity to the International
Vedanta University.
Currently, the University's
programmes will be conducted at
various locations across the


country, until plans are finalised
for the location of an actual
campus. Many of the courses
that Balakrishna has initiated will
now come under the auspices of
the University.
Guru Balakrishna said
that once the International
Vedanta University is fully op-
erational in Guyana, they in-
tend to use the local campus
as a springboard for launch-
ing other centres around the
Caribbean and eventually in
other Western countries.


Mr. Rupert Hopkinson with some of his books.


importancee of reading that
HFIpkinmi-n i promoting with the
Span ion t GRRC. At three lo-
,ajions --Noreen's building on
Church Street; Insurance Brokers
complex on Carmichael Street;,
and Guyana Teachers' Union
Hall, Woolford Avenue GRRC
is currently promoting book ex-
hibitions, borrowing, reference re--
search and sale. '


Hopkinson feels that it has
become inadequate for his books
to be up only for borrowing and
refcrenLc and has intensified his
book-reading drive with vending.
Recently, he pitched a sizable
tent at Woolford Avenue selling
books at unbeatable sale prices.
Indoor sales are also ongoing at
other GRR C locations. -....-
'"They did not have books.


They said that their performance
was poor because of a lack of
books and when persons bor-
rowed tiline, they did not return
them," he said of a group Ac-
counting Technician students
whom he once taught.
Hopkinson and the many
books that he has made available
for use, since opening GRRC in
1997, have become the cherished
friends of many students. With
personal funds he roams the US
book market and ships thousands
of books to Guyana.
"This is not a lucrative ar-
rangement. But I want to get
people to read, get people inter-
ested in acquiring the skills to
help them better their lives and
better contribute to society," he
says. He lectures in Economics
and Management at the Univer-
sity, Berbice Campus.
GRRC stocks over 100,000
books in a variety of areas to ben-
efit young children tertiary level
students, novel readers, and
those who just want to infuse
their minds with knowledge of
any kind. These publications
prove to be relevant as people,
especially students, are sapping
up his supply.
For a nominal fee you can
sign up and become a member of
GRRC. With membership you
have freedom to borrow and read.
And of .course you can cash in
on the bargain sales all year
through.
Hopkinson says that he
will soon be housing ith li-
brary and market enterprise
under one roof.


THIRD DAY





18 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, April QQ .,


Uttle old I dles Just


want to have fun


Group


* *


*EhbI

9 'I


p 4


0 4


0 op


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t ,"'- *" '"
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without joining long lines!
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DEMERARA
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DATE FOR OUTSTANDING BALANCES ON YOUR
FEBRUARY 2005 BILL IS
SUNDAY APRIL 10, 1 005
A-4 THE SECOND SUNDAY IN EVERY MONTH

be n all t .


The public is asked to note that the Consultcaii. e Assessment of Claim's for .mali
Business, Live:.lo': and Cash Crop Formers !',heduled for today, Sunday .pril 3rd, 2005
in the under mentioned areas has been rescheduled so as to not clash ..i tr ongoing
exercise for household.
The Recovery Planning and Implementation Secretariat will advise residents of the new
dates, venues and times for the Consultative Assessment of the new claims.


AREAS
Lliicri.daali I, tatenscii
and TUrkevcn
CumIniIIngs Lodge
Industry Ogeleand
(Go)d\c I'verugh ii
Pin isance
Spaarciinhamn
I fasfinlgton. / (olden
(Grove
H ope, Logwood
Entinore


LOCATION
Cummings Lodge Secondary
School (upper 1iat)
C'unmings Lodge Secondary
School (lower flat)
Ogle Community Center

Plaisance Prinary School

(Golden Grove Primlary School
Finmore Hope Primary School


D)ATE & TIME
10:00 hrs

10:00 hrs
13:30 hrs

13:30 ibrs

10:00 hrs
10:00 lirs






19


SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3, 2005


Caste...
(From page 11)
customs were still intact.
Caribbean historian
Keith Laurence (1994: 233)
shows us how the caste system
was diluted on the ships bound
to the Caribbean:
With so many castes
represented in a limited
space, emigrants could not
avoid contact with members
of other castes, which
brought caste pollution to
many. On board the ship,
with 12 square feet of space
to each adult below decks, it
was quite impossible to
maintain the purity of caste.
The higher castes even
suffered the ultimate
indignity of having to eat
with all and sundry, though
separate cooking facilities
for Hindus and Muslims
were generally provided. It
was certainly possible to
undergo purification if and
when the immigrant
returned to India, but most
immigrants on arrival in the
West Indies had suffered
some measure of pollution
and loss of caste. Indian
society in the West Indies
therefore grew up in
circumstances which
necessarily blurred caste
distinctions.
Nothing more
humorously explains the
beginning of the disappearance
of the caste system in Indian
overseas communities than an
old Indian woman's experience
on board a ship bound to a sugar
plantation in Fiji. She said each
caste had its own cooking
fireside; then a wave rocked the
ship and all the different types
of food overturned on the deck
together. It was a choice of
eating food which had been
mixed and so polluted or starve
(in Speckmann 1965: 105).
As mentioned earlier,
East Indians tried very hard to
maintain the caste system when
they arrived in the Caribbean. In
some cases, as we will see
below, this was inadvertently
supported by the European
colonial policy of isolating East
Indians from the general
population. But where the
Caribbean Indian population
was relatively small
(Martinique, Guadeloupe, St.
Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada,
Jamaica, Belize), caste system
gave way. This process was
more evident after the fall of the
indenture system. Soon after
indenture, the small population
size, coupled with
opportunities for social and
economic advancement, made
the process of cultural
assimilation inevitable. The
assimilation of East Indians
resulted from the plantation
work system, missionaries'
efforts, and Western influences
including exposure to English,
shortages of East Indian women,
mixed marriage, and a lack of
continuous contact with India
and with East Indians in other
parts of the Caribbean. The
caste system in smaller
territories is now a thing of the
past, although some traces of
Indian culture are noticeable
among older surviving East
Indians, especially in the area of
food, dress, and language
(Roopnarine 2002).

Caste Transformation on
the Caribbean Plantations

The caste system also went
through a major transformation
in territories where East Indians
had become a majority of the
population: Guyana, Trinidad


and Suriname. In the latter part
of the nineteenth century,
Surgeon Comins (1893: 37)
reported that in Trinidad
"caste is not a subject which
troubles coolies long after their
landing, and in most cases
many prejudices disappear or
become much modified." On a
broader level, he said East
Indian children in the colony of
British Guiana were quite
different from their parents, to
the extent that it was difficult
to conceive they were from the
same family.
The fundamental
reasons for this change were
the clash of East Indian caste
characteristics ascription,
endogamy, hierarchical,
occupational specialisation,
religious restrictions,
cooperation and the Western
forms of work routine on the
Caribbean plantations, along
with the willingness of East
Indians themselves, especially
the low caste, to disregard caste
characteristics. The plantation
work routine did not respect
nor facilitate caste rules.
Emigrant diversity also
impeded the possibility of
transplanting the caste system
in the Caribbean. Managers
often chose workers who were
diverse in language and caste
background to work on the
plantation in order to prevent
the reformation of the caste
system. The planters divided
workers into gangs from
diverse backgrounds and
enforced Western modes of
labour. Some codes were
explicitly racist as in the case
of South Africa where
apartheid laws were enforced
(see Kuper 1967: 237-266). It
was the classic colonial policy
of divide and rule. Unity
among the workers based on
caste, class, ethnicity or race -
was perceived to be a direct
threat to the maintenance and
survival of the planters' class
and subsequently, the sugar
industry. But interestingly,
Western forms of work codes
chipped away at the caste
system and provided a sort of
freedom from the narrowness
of caste prejudice. More
importantly, Western forms of
work routine opened up
opportunities for personal
advancement, especially for
low-caste Indians.
Some East Indians
grabbed the slightest
opportunity to abandon the
traditional caste system and
adapted Western ways. Other
Indians identified with the
cultural mores and values of
other ethnic groups such as the
Amerindians, Africans,
Portuguese, Chinese and
Javanese. East Indians had long
noticed Western behaviour
among their fellow East Indians
in India, but were unable to
emulate these behavioral
styles because of caste
restrictions. East Indians were
also familiar with Arya Samaja,
a North Indian reformist sect,
known for its anti-caste
doctrines. The teaching of Arya
Samaja exposed East Indians to
a different vision of life, one
that allowed them to re-examine
their religious beliefs. But the
Brahmin and other high castes
counteracted Arya Samaja and
consolidated their beliefs into
one single tradition, Sanatan
Dharma (Vertovec & Veer
1991: 151).
East Indian adaptive
capacity for a distinctive
cultural path one leading
away from caste restrictions
emerged in the Caribbean
when the plantation system
suppressed East Indian
"caste prescriptions and
proscriptions" and
jnadyvertepu1iy provided, tlhe


Guyana Water Incorporated

VACAN C gI ES

Guyana Water Inc. is inviting applications from suitably qualified persons for the following positions in the
Hinterland Unit:

1. Small Towns Manager- Re-advertisement
The incumbent will have responsibility for managing the development and implementation of water supply
programmes in the hinterland small towns.

The requirements for this position are:-
A Bachelor's Degree in Engineering, Social Development or Management or considerable experience of managing
community based projects
At least three (3) years experience in a management position
Willingness to learn about and apply social and community development approaches to technical work, including
gender approaches
Agoodteam memberwith the abilityto lead when necessary
Experience of working in the Hinterland
Proficiency in the use of computers

2. Small Towns Engineer
The incumbent will have the responsibility for managing the technical aspects of the development and
implementation of the water supply programme to the Hinterland small towns.

The requirements for this position are:-
S ABachelor's Degree in Civil Engineering ora related branch of engineering, or considerable work experience in low-
cost water supply
At least two (2) years experience since graduation preferably in water supply
Agood team member with the ability to lead when necessary
Good oral and written communication and presentation skills
Willingness to learn about and apply social and community development approaches to technical work, including
genderapproaches
Willingness to travel extensively in the Hinterland ,often in difficult conditions

3. Secretary
The incumbent will be based at Shelterbelt in Georgetown and will be required to provide secretarial support to the
staff of the Unit.

The requirements for this position are:-
At least five (5) years experience as a personal secretary
Computer literate, including competence in Microsoft Office and Excel
Good command of English, including oral and written communication skills
Experience of working in a team
Willingness to travel occasionally to the Hinterland forteam meetings

4. Driver/Mechanic
The incumbent will be based at Mabaruma Region 1 and Lethem Region 9 and will be responsible for providing
transportation services in support of the unit's operations and to ensure that the assigned vehicle is properly
maintained.

The requirements for this position are:-
Secondary Education
A valid Driver's Licence for cars and vans
Three (3) years driving experience
Experience in servicing and effecting repairs to motor vehicles

Interested persons should send applications with Curriculum Vitae to reach the Executive Director, Human Resources
Management & Development, Guyana Water Inc., 10 Fort Street, Kingston, Georgetown by April 13, 2005.


19


opportunity for especially
low-caste East Indians to
disregard restrictive caste
rules. In some cases, the
plantation system protected
East Indians from unjust
work relations based on
religion and caste customs,,
although one should state
that the plantation work
routine was also oppressive.
The working style was
different but the substance
of oppression remained.
Nevertheless, East Indians
acted upon this opportunity
through conscious
motivations and refused
whenever possible to
continue the caste system.
The benefits from
caste relaxation and restriction
were numerous. For the first
time a majority of East Indians
experienced a sense of worth,
if not a rebirth. They took
conscious, deliberate steps to
bolster a renewed sense of
identity, from mindless and
gullible to industrious. Some
low-caste East Indians were


the best workers while other East
Indians experienced occupational
mobility on the plantations. The
drive to retain some aspects of the
caste system therefore was found
more in East Indian communities
(reinforced by new indentured
immigrants) and less so on the
plantations.

Caste Transformation in
East Indian Communities

East Indian communities
alongside the plantations were not
totally controlled by the
plantation system, at least not the
cultural aspects. While the
planters did isolate East Indian
communities from other ethnic
groups, they were not so much
concerned about how these
communities lived as in how they
functioned on the plantations. In
fact, the planters were not aware
or chose not to know the
importance of caste among East
Indian emigrants. They were more
interested in the production and
profit of sugar. So East Indians
relied on their own culture and


customs to cope and survive. As
expected, they turned to their
homeland culture, its customs
and religion, for reassurance. But
the revival of their homeland
culture was accompanied by the
rise of many low-caste East
Indians in social and economic
status, particularly on the
plantations which was opposite
to the caste system. The absence
of effective leadership, and the
fear of any outside leadership,
nonetheless pushed the East
Indian community to turn to the
high caste for inspiration and to
perform important functions as
they had done in India.
What emerged in
East Indian communities was
that they were different in
language, culture, and custom
from other ethnic groups, but
having an overall similarity in
terms of economic wealth and
social class. As far as the caste
system was concerned, two
extreme forms emerged: the
Brahmin and the Chamar or
the "high nation" and the
"low nation," and the


continuum in between
vanished. The Brahmins
were still the leaders of East
Indian communities and the
Chamars were basically
followers. East Indian
communities therefore
became stratified in relation
to the Brahmin beliefs and
values. The Brahmins
reasserted their monopoly
over "ritualistic functions,
which were needed by the
Indian community to meet
the life crisis of birth,
marriage and death" (Singh
1974: 49). Their status was
recognized mainly in East
Indian quarters and less so
on the plantations, since the
planters paid scant attention
to their religious importance,
and, moreover, many
Brahmins refused to work in
the fields under the
supervision of low-caste East
Indians and Creoles.

TO BE CONTINUED
NEXTWEEK SUNDAY






,SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3,-2005


All New $40,000.00 "MUST-BE-WON"

CROSSWORD COMPETITION

Lc 0 LEC 0


O0GY BW "ORAGY Y BAU W


A T O O ATO


Vmns te


U N


A


T


NAME,
ADDRESS:.


ACROSS: 20

1. The Guyana Post Office
Corporation has an outpost at
this location.
2. Metric prefix, -. 22
6. A period of excessive
indulgence in a specified
activity: an orgy of buying. 25
8. Bureau (Abbr.)
9. Direction. 27
10. Lively.
11. Plantofthe Botanical family
Solanaceae'. D(
14. Saint (Abbr.)
15. To place in a position of rest. 1.
17. A member of a female
religious community, -"
typically one living under 3.
vows of poverty, chastity and
obedience.
18. Prefix in words adopted from 4.
Latin originally meaning 5.
'apart' (as in separate) or:
-nre:riiig 'Wilhri ul i,l inr


secure).
I. A polite and respectful form of
address to a man.
i. Word used as a homophone,
i.e, a word that is pronounced
in the same way as another but
spe r in a dinerenl ,.\3y an-J r,,,
a different meaning.
2. United Nations Industrial
Development Organisation
(Abbr.)
5. Acronym for"Act Now to Stop
War and End Racism".
. River on the left bank of the
Essequibo River in Guyana.

OWN:

This was handed over to the
Police Officer during the
investigation.
To cause someone to submit
to one's wishes by
intimidation.
Male personal name.
The single European currency.
which replaced the national


currencies of
twelve member states of the
European Union in 2002.
7. Homophone.
8. "How much *""* is it to get
wisdom than gold and to get
understanding rather to be
chosen than silver."
12. In spite of her setbacks, and in
order to obtain a degree,
Shaneeza devoted her time
to much studies at a West
Indian Un;versity.


13. To ask for information.
15. Oforpertaining to dance.
16. Homophone.
19. South Dakota (Abbr.)
21. The harsh cry of a rook. crow
or similar bird.
23. Creek on the left bank of the
Essequibo River in Guyana.
24. Durn- ir Rie- Operations a
Journalist gave an excellent
report on the findings of the
26. Homophone.


Altar, alter, ANSWER, BA, better, bu, caw,
cow, enquire, Euro, groan, grown, hecto,
Inig, inquire, Imbe, Leguan, Lethem,
loom, loot, MA, micro, nun, NW, Omar,
orgy, Orin, Ovid, Owen, perk, pert, potato,
ramp, Rupununi, Salsa, Samba, samp, SD,
Se, set, sit, sir, son, Supenaam, sun, St, SW,
tacet, tacit, tomato, UNIDO.


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"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"









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OFFC14L COt/t/ON/
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Hi Crossword Fans!
The Official solution of the "AII-porrect"
Chronicle Crossword competition that was
drawn on Friday, April 01, 2005 is now
presented to you. No one was able to submit
an all correct entry. However, we are pleased to
publish the names of the 40+ and 80+ entries
prize-winners. Congratulations to Mr. J.R. Lord
of McDoom, EBD, Mr. Baldwin Softley of 131,
Catherina, West Coast Demerara Mr R. Samai
of Cane Grove, ECD and Mr, R. Khan of 8 Verg,
East Bank Essequibo.

Could the prizewinners collect their paymentfroies
Could the prizewinners collect their payment from


the Georgetown Head office on
Wednesday, April 06, 2005? Please
present a suitable form of identification
when collecting payment.

The Official Solution and a new "Must-
Be-Won" puzzle for $40,000.00 is also
presented to you. This competition will
be drawn on Friday, April 15, 2005. The
rule for this competition is that the best
entry wins the Prize money. If there is
more than one winner the prize money
will be shared among the winners.

The additional incentive of $1,000.00
and $2,000.00 for the 40+ and 80+
entries groupings is in effect.

If you play smart you can win this offer of
$40,000.00. The more you play the greater
is the possibility of your winning. The
amount of entries submitted must be
covered by the relevant sums of money or
they will not be judged. Then place those
entries in a Chronicle Crossword box at a
location near to you.

If you need coupons just purchase a
copy of the Sunday or Wednesday
Chronicle. For extra coupons,
purchases can be made at our offices
in Linden, New Amsterdam and
Georgetown. You can also obtain extra


coupons from Mr. Vincent Mercurius
of D'Edward Village, Rosignol,
Berbice. They cost $20.00 each or
$40.00 for two as they appear in the
Sunday or Wednesday Chronicle.

Players are reminded to write legibly
for the judges to understand. Only
use words that are provided in the
"words-to-be-used" column. Words
will be judged as incorrect if they are
not recorded in the manner
provided. No entry is opened before
12:30pm on the day the puzzle is
drawn and judging does not begin
before 4:30pm when the last entry is
opened. The solution to the puzzle
is not known before that time.

This apart, our general rules apply.

Th inl .' .' .

Crossword Committee


C o n g r a l'u l a
chivnurinc Chunderpaul
on his appointment as
S.,iin oI U h e


NAME-
ADDRESS-


~nl


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took


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3. 2005 21


a


I 7<'- 7 j


MTV CHANNEL 14
CABLE 65

06:45 h Sign On With Bhajan
Melodies
07 00 h Dabi'- Music.d Hour
07 30 h Bhakti Bhj.in.m
08 00 h Christ For The
Nanon (Li\eI
08 30 h IQ IlaLniiC
Quiz lLi-e
09.00 h Sunday Morning At
MTV With Renu
10 00 h Death
Announcement,'/ In
Memorial
10 05 h Religious Melodies
10.20 h Indian Movie.
Sanarn Ter Kasam
13 30 b The Diar
1-1 00 h- A'on Video& DVD
Musical Melodies
14 30 b Village Voice
15.00 b Movie
17:00 h IAC Symposium
18:00 h Birthdays & Other
Greetings
18:15 h Death
Announcements/ In
Memoriam
18:30 h Weekly Digest
19-00 h The Fact
19-30 h [BE Highlights
20:30 b I Death
Announcements/ In
Memoriam
20-45 b Indian Movie
23.30 h- Sign Off

VTV CHANNEL 46
CABLE 102

07:00 h Full House
07.30h Indian Music Video
08:00 h Memory Lane Live
With RY
10:00 h -, Discovey Health
1300 h-.Movie
^''7- "-a


17 00 h Travelers Live Program
18:01.1 h Fresh Prince
18.30 h Dance Mastic Live
Kajol
19:00 h Majesty 1 Music
Lesson Live Wibh Mark Britton
20:00 h Spori,
21:30 h Molie
23:51 h Sin Oil

,NCN INC. Ci'I NNEL II1

2-00 h NCN Nes, Ma.t.izine
.(R/Bi
02:30 h Late Nile Wihl GIN -
03:00 h Nloir % -.i.po,
065:00 h Hour 01 Poilcr
Q.:30 h NewtI i1n Gospel Hoir
06:00 h NCN Ne\m Il.i:-.uine
(R/B I
qf7:00 h CNN
.R-30 h New Life Connection
08:00 h Litdlin. Gu'ana T1
_ ness
30 h The Fact
00 h AnmuI Geet
Oi_0 h Sangeet Sansar
'00 b Feature
- 0 h Weekly Digest
. h Press Conference With
libinet Serertary
-I0 00 h Info For Nation
ding
(30 h Breaking The Silence
0 h- Catholic Magazine
h Grow With IPED
00 h Famndy Forum
S30 h Vedo Ki Vanj
|00 h Lutheran Men's
wsfup
S 0 Guysuco Round Up
Sh- NCN 6 O'Clock News

; h- Kala Milan
S One On One
S Close Up
5 h Test Match Review
'Reds' Live


21:00 h Between The Lines
21:30 h Islam For Guyana
22:00 h Movie: The Pelican
Brief


NTN CHANNEL 18 CABLE
69

05:00 h Sign On With The
Mahamrtunjaya Mantra
05:10 h Meditation
05:30 h Quran This Morning
06:00 h R. Gossai General
Store Presents Krishna Bhajans
06:15 h Jetto's Lumber Yard
Presents Krishna Bhajans
06:45 h Timehri Maha Kali
Shakti Mandir Presents Ma Ki
Shakti Amrit
07:00 h Ramroop's Furniture
Store Presents Religious
Teachings
07:30 h Kennav Holdings Ltd.
Presents Krishna Bhajans
07:45 h A&S Enterprises
Presents Shiva Bhajans
08:05 h SA RE GA MA
(Musical Notes) A Live Call-In
Program in
09:30 h NTN Indian Musical
Interlude
10:00 h Sunday Morning
Services By Pt. Reepu Dama
Persaud
11:00 h Fashion File"
12:00 h Death Announcement
& In Memoriam
13:00 h DVD Movie: April:
Fool(Enig. Sub.) Starring
Biswajeet & Saira Banto -
16:00 h Gurukula Sandesh
16:30 h Teaching Of Islam
17:00 h IPA Presents... Shiv
Mahapuran (Eng. Sub.)'.'
17:30 hi- Kishore Lcal Talent
18:00 h Mere Awaaz Suno...
Karaoke Live '


19:00 h Birthday Greetings/
Anniversary/ Congratulation/
Death Announcement & In
Memoriam
20:00 h Ralm Katha By Shri
Praskas Gossai: Environment &
Management, Meeting The Saint
21:30 h DVD Movie.:
SHUKRIYA(Eng. Sub.) Starring
Aftab Shivdasani & Shriya
Agrdhotri
01:00 h Sign Of With The
Gayatri Mantra.


DTV CHANNEL 8

07:55 h Sign On
08:00 h Sunday Mass: Our
Lady Of The Angels
09:30 h Sabrina: The Animated
Series
10:00 h Family Matters
11:00 h The King & I
13:30 h Boy Meets World
14:00 h That's So Raven
14:30 h Phil Of The Future
15:00 h-The Suite-LifeOf Zack
And Cady
15:30 h Lizzie McGuire
16:00 h -'Lilo & Stitch
16:30 h Brandy & .Mr.
Whiskers
17:00 h What I LikeAbout You
18:00 4-News Channel 4 At 6
18:30,i NBC Nightly New,.
19:00 h.- Greetings &
Announcements' ,
19:30 h Faith In Action A
Catholic'eries
20:00 h Musical Interlude
20:30 h A Return To God's,
Biblical Foundation
21:00 h- Desperate Housewives
22:00 h-. 14 Hours
00:00 h ign Off.


rm


--EM


W 'Copyrighted Material
- Syndicated Content -
Available from Commercial News Providers"
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,piayexpenence showekIs
exertenrinA -otly lou

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bbrfera-With the ocoerI
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'S PLEASE CALL, -


DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE CLOSURE TO ROAD
TRAFFIC FOR SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005.


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S. 1*

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For Ocean going vessels & Trawlers 12:00h
For Ocean Going Vessels opening last about I-I"'hrs


I P DS T R A S D O N O SO I T O* B R D G E R AI S


21


SUNDAY CHRONICLE Apdil 3. 20055


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22 SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3, 2005


- For customer service call
P~l-e- c c Tel: 226-3243-9,225-4475
Fax: 225-0663 or
come into to us at
Lama Avenue
Bel Air Park
I, Tjr Georgetown

Please check your ads on the first day of appearance. For queries call Pratima on Tel: 226-3243-9


BUILDING. renovating or
doing any kind of construction
work? We give free estimates.
Prompt, reasonable and
reliable service. Call 622-0267/
629-2239.



ENROL now at D & R
Driving School, 95 Hadfield
Street, Werk-en-Rust,
Georgetown. Telephone 660-
4216/226-6454.
PRUDENTIAL SCHOOL OF
MOTORING. "You Train to
Pass". 227-1063, 223-7908,
642-4827.




ESCAPE' Body bliss
massages. Alleviate headaches,
insomnia, muscular pains,
tension and stress. Certified
Massage Therapist Ulelli
Verbeke # 226-2669/615-
8747.
NEED to activate your body
and mental strength? Come for
a well-balanced health
massage, shower available. Call
Mrs. Singh (daily). Tel. 220-
4842/615-6665.


TO be connected to your
creator and enjoy all the
wonderful gifts that life has to
offer. It's just a phone call away.
If you don't help yourself, then
you would not get help. Phone
No. 233-2934. Contact Miss
Bennett. 164C Hassan Street,
EBD.



IMPROVE your
dressmaking and designing skill.
Classes from beginners to
professional levels. Sharmile -
225-2598. 1
JEAN offers courses in
Elementary, I;ntermediate &
Advanced Dressmaking, also
Designing. 153 Barr St.,
Kitty. Tel. # 226-9548
JEAN offers courses in
dressmaking, the dye fabric
designing, bedroom elegance,
soft finishing, soft toys, curtains,
cushions, crochet, ribbon
embroidery, hand embroidery,
plastic canvas, smocking, floral,
craft, cake decoration. 159 Barr
St., Kitty. # 226-9548.



MAGAZINE Worldwide Pen
Friend. Information? Send
stamped envelope CFI, PO
Box 12154 Georgetown,
Guyana.
FEMALE, 30 years, seeks
enpals 30 years and over.
riteto S. Balram, Apt. 10
Stanmore Crescent, Black
Rock, St. Michael, Barbados.
FIND that special someone.
Call the Junior/Senior/Singles
Dating Servicing 18 80 yrs.
Immediate link. Telephone
223-8237, Mon. Fri. 8:30
am- 6 pm. Sat. -Sun.- 10 am
- 2 pm.
SINGL,E female, age 40
needs to correspond with single,
honest, hardworking,
understanding, loving, non-
smoker, rion- alcoholic, male for
lasting relationship leading up
to marriage. Write to: Radha.
.P.O. Box 101596, GPO
Building, Georgetown,
Guyana.
SEEKING eligible females
underE40 yrs. for relationship and
marriage. Contact Allan Smith,
300 East Webster St., Apt. M
15, Maddison, TN37115.
COMMUNICATION with
interested persons by
telephone for friendship or
serious.relations. Call CFI -
Telephone Friendship Link -
261-5079, Sunday to
Saturday, 07:00 to 21:00 h.


HERBAL facials, herbal bars,
deep cleanse and scrub,
intensive cream. Mon. Sun.
Telephone 223-8993.



NOVELS, story books, text
and informative books. Juliette's
Book Library, 143 West
Ruimveldt. Telephone 223-
8237 Mon. Fri. 8:30 am-
6pm. Sat. Sun. 10 am 2
pm.


WORK from home for
US$$$$ weekly. Information?
Send stamped envelope to
Nicola Archer, PO Box 12154
Georgetown. Guyana.
CONTROL your income
working from home filling 100
envelopes for US$500 or
more weekly. For information,
send stamped self-addressed
envelope to Nathaniel
Williams, PO Box 12154
Georgetown, Guyana.


INDRA'S Beauty Salon, 122
Oronoque Street for cold wave,
straightening, facial, manicure,
scalp treatment and design on
nails. Also Beauty Culture
available. Tel. 227-1601.
NAYELLI School of
Cosmetology is now enrolling
students for cosmetology
classes that begin on April 4,
2005. Limited spaces are
available. Call us at 226-
2124 or visit at 211 New
Market, Street, North
Cummingsburg.



FOR prompt and reliable
sewing done on Regent Road,
Bourda. Call Roxanne 226-
3712.
ARE you looking for a safe
and reliable Baby sitting,
Cleaning or pest control service?
CALL MURRAY'S TEMP.
AGENCY. 231-3302.
TECHNICIANS available
for appliances repairs -
washers, dryers, microwaves,
stoves, deep fryers, etc. Call
622-4521, 263-0050.





CANADA IMMIGRATION
Applications for Permanent
Residence Self Sponsorship
(Management, Business
Administration, Technical &
Skilled Trade or Service
Sector Occupations)
Examining and Perfecting
Documentation Prepared by
Individuals
LLOYD WILLIAMS & ASSOCIATES
(THE CRUCIBLE)
105 Regent Rd., Bourda,
(Between Cummings & Light
Sts, Georgetown,
Phone: (592) 223-8115
Fax: (592) 225-5495
Email:
crucible@guyana.net.gy

FOR Wedding Invitations,
Funeral, Programmes, Typing-
of Documents/Assignments,
Business Cards, Flyers,
Scanning, etc. Call 227-7342.
MR Youssouf (Spirutual
Healer) especially for family
problems, regarding love, luck,
work business, protection and
examination. Call 223-37,46.
WOULD you like to be free
from the stress of selling or
renting your property? We at
Meg's Realty & Information
Services can do .it for you.
Contact us on 613-5735, 263-
6043.


FOR all your telephone
services, repairs to cable
equipment, rewiring, adjacent,
etc Contact Qualified Technician
with over 35 years experience. Don't
delay. Telephone 226-2766/617-
0427 anytime.
FOR efficient service and
repairs: washing machines,
refrigerators, micro wave ovens,
clothes dryers, gas stoves, etc.
Freezezone Enterprises, 6 'A'
Shell Road, Kitty. Telephone
227-0060. 616-5568.



i' I .i


VACANCIES exist for Porters
and Sales Clerks. Apply in
person to Queensway, 24 Water
Street, Georgetown
1 INTERIOR truck Driver, 50
male/female labourers, 2
trainee Bee Keepers. Lot C
Eccles. Telephone # 233-2423
ONE Handyman (day shift),
one assistant Barman, Waiter.
Telephone 226-6527, 623-
7242. Tennessee Night Club.
VACANCIES exist for 2 heavy-
duty Drivers, 7 Waitresses, 3 Waiters,
4 Cleaners. MURRAY'S TEMP.
AGENCY. 231-3302.
ONE Bahai Teacher, must
be a graduate from Wings of
Word Programme. Apply to 81
Annandale West, ECD.
Telephone 220-4344.
VACANCIES exist for trained
and experienced teachers in all
subject areas, especially
Mathematics and Geography.
Call 220-0538/629-5300.
SALESCLERK 20- 30 years,
(2) years experience and must be
good at Maths & English. Apply to
Lens, Sheriff & Fourth Sts., C/ville.
Tel. 227-2486.
ATTRACTIVE girls to work at
car wash. Telephone 231-1786.
2-ACCOUNTS Clerks, Driver/
Mechanic, Trainee Machinist,
Machinist Welder/Fabricator. Send
application to 172 East Field Dr.,
Nandy Park, E B Dem.
FIVE females needed to do
door-to-door selling of
household commodities. Send
applications to Charles Griffith,
287 Albert Street, Queenstown.
Now.
PORTERS to work on truck.
Apply with written application, two
references and Police Clearance
to Manager, Shell Gas Distributor,
9 Dowding Street, Kitty,
Georgetown. Telephone 227-
7350.
VACANCIES exist for Security
Guards. Must have previous
experience. Apply in person with valid
Police Clearance and 2 references.
Also porters. Apply to May's Shopping
Centre, 98 Regent Street,
Georgetown.
,NOW recruiting dynamic
individuals worldwide, part or
full time. Will train. Join the.
team fabulous' compensation
plan and incentives. Limited
openings for country. Contact
e-mail: thenetworker@candw.lc
VACANCIES 1 Typist/Clerk.
QUALIFICATIONS 3 subjects
at CXC must include English
Language and Advance
Typewriting. Must be computer
literate. 1 Stores Ledger Clerk.
, QUALIFICATIONS 4 subjects
CXC. Apply to Office Manager
P.O. Box 101660 G/town.


OFFICE Assistant/General
Clerk. Requirements -
expediter, smart intellect, team
player, highly motivated to
perform, a smiling face. Must
have own transportation.
Female preferred. Males
welcome. Apply to Executive
Office Services, 82 Albert
Street. Bourda. Georgetown
before April 10, 2005.
TRINIDAD BABYSITTER
AND RECEPTIONIST
REQUIRED. AGE UNDER 30
ONLY: MUST SEND RECENT
PHOTO:TICKET WILL BE PAID
FOR ; APPLICATIONS WITHOUT
PHOTO WILL NOT BE
ACKNOWLEDGED. MAIL TO
P.O BOX 5866. TRINIDAD,
WEST INDIES.
VACANCIES exist in a
reputable, stable, financial
organization for sales
representatives. Applicants
should be mature in age and
possess a minimum of 3 CXC.
GCE subjects or an equivalent
qualification. Send
application to: Unit Manager.
133 Church Street, South
Cummingsburg, Georgetown.
Telephone number: 622-
0307.
GUYANA EMPLOYMENT
AGENCY, 37 CROAL
STREET. PHONE 227-3339.
Vacancies exist for the
following: Industrial
Electricians for Interior Area,
Insurance Sales Reps.,
Supervisor, Live-in Domestic
for Berbice and Eccles.
Florist, Labourers,
Pharmacist for Trinidad,
Bobcat Operator, Nursery Head
Teacher, CXC Business &
Social Studies Teacher,
Computer Technician/
Teacher.
1. BOND CLERKS.
Applicants must have at least 4
subjects at the CXC level,
inclusive Mathematics and
English Language and 2 3
years experience. Send written
application, 2
recommendations, valid Police
Clearance. 2. Porters. Apply in
person with written application,
2 recommendations and valid
Police Clearance to: The
Personnel Manager, National
Hardware (Guyana) Limited, 17
19 A Water Street, South
Cummingsburg, Georgetown.
A vibrant financially stable
Company is looking for Career
Oriented People who is
desirous of a Career in
Insurance Sales. You can
earn a minimum of $50 000
per month. Training would be
provided. You will be eligible
to join the Company's Medical
and Pension Schemes.
Applicants must be mature and
possess a minimum of three (3)
GCE or CXC Subjects or
equivalent qualification.
Applicants would be considered
from Georgetown, Essequibo
and Berbice. Kindly send
applications to P.O. Box
10607.



BSI is offering Computer
Classes for adults. Individual
attention guaranteed.
Certified Tutor. Call 227-
8143 or 624-8084.
NAIL Tipping/Designing,
Silk wrapping/Manicuring
courses. $4 000 per course.
Call Michelle (227-7342,
222-3263).
JOIN THE PHONICS CEN-
.TER. We teach your child/chil-
dren the art of reading.' See
them develop into good read-
ers. Call 618-2068
Ts, voice training and
Siano classes. Call 626-
804/225-8447.
TECHNICAL STUDIES
INSTITUTE The Institute of
Technology, 136 Shell Road,
Kitty. Telephone 225-9587.
1. Electrical installation and,
wiring; Television repairs and
l '.-, ,iii"',-. Computer
S -1 i ai rr.j repaiirs; Air
conditioning" and
refrige iationr.


WE care. Bright Ray's
Interactive Playschool, 81
Annaiidale West. ECD, wishes to
inform the general public that it
has reopened. Registration is
ongoing at the above address.
For ages 1 yr. 9 mths. to 3yrs. 9
mths. Call 220-4344,
Administrator Mrs. B. Sarjoo.
FABRIC DESIGNING
CERTIFICATE COURSES.
Learn the art of tie-dyeing, batik,
fabric painting and discharging
in one month. A complete
designing kit is available to
each student. Registration
begins from 4' April. For further
information, call 227-6548, 231-
7135 or 628-7637.
ENROL now for new classes
beginning shortly at: The
Guyana Institute of Business &
Information Technology. Choose
from our wide range of
Certificates and Diploma
Courses in: OPERATING
SYSTEM Microsoft Windows
2000/XP, Microsoft Office XP,
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel,
Microsoft Access. ACCOUNTING
PROGRAMMES Peachtree A/
C, Quickbooks A/C. Dac Easy A/
C. GRAPHICS APPLICATION -
Corel Draw, Microsoft Power
Point. Computer repairs &
maintenance; Internet Training
& Webpage Design. Also, now
offering Spanish Classes. For
more information, call or visit us
at:- 161 Pike & Alexander
Streets, Kitty, Georgetown.
Telephone # 225-9249/226-
7407.
PRACTICAL electronic
course beginning 12"' April,
2005. Learn to repair TVs,
Microwave ovens, Power
Amps, combinations stereo
systems, monitors etc. Logical
and systematic
troubleshooting techniques
taught by qualified instructor
with more than 21 years
experience, get started on
your career now! Call Abdul's
Electronics, 225-0391, 226-
6551. 349, East Street,
Georgetown.



90 ACRES land for sale in
Western Hogg Island. Call 625-
6296.
1 HOUSE lot for sale.
Mahaica Market Dam, First
Street. Telephone No. 228-2775.
LAND FOR SALE OLEAN-
DER GARDENS.- 89 FT BY 152
FT. PRICE $25M. CALL: 612-
0349.
TRANSPORTED land 140
x 60'. 3 First Ave., Bartica,
riverside view. Call Nicholas on
455-2500.
LAND for sale 100 ft. x 40
ft., opposite Safari Inn Hotel,
Friendship, EBD. Telephone
6400-545.
MOBLISSA 10 acres land.
Ideal poultry, general farming.
$3M. Ederson's. 226-5496.
PRIME commercial land
for sale 115 ft x 31 ft,
Charlotte Street, Bourda.
Contact owner 226-0683
(anytime).
REPUBLIC PARK vacant
transported land 50'/100'.
Build your dream home. $6.5M.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
TRANSPORTED house lot
for sale. Eight hundred
thousand dollars each, Best
Village, WCD. 254-0101 Singh.
TWO transported adja-
cent lots in Earl's Court, LBI
18 080 sq ft total. Please
telephone 623-7438 between
6-8am and 8-10pm for de-
tails.
DORA Mission river side -
acres of land. Ideal shipping,
ware house, bond, cattle,
general farming. $15M,'
Ederson's. 226-5496,
DUKE ST., KINGSTON 2
large. house lots 487117'. Ideal'
school; luxuriouss'. hotel,
apartments, storage bond.
$9,5M. Ederson's. 226-5496,


LE RESSOUVENIR,
Happy Acres, Atlantic Gardens,
Ogle, GuySuCo Park
(Turkeyen), Queenstown. East
Bank. TELEPHONE 226-8148/
625-1624.
HIGHWAY lands. East
Bank land, Robb Street, High
Street, Regent Street, Camp
Street, Church Street.
TELEPHONE 226-8148/625-
1624.
AMELIA'S WARD river side
- Plots of land. Ideal housing,
agriculture, cattle, shipping.
25, 50, 100 & 600 acres plot.
Note $65 000 per acre.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
QUEENSTOWN land -
61'/160'. Ideal 4 house lots, 4-
storey luxurious hotel/
apartment, foreign mission,
church/school. $22.5M.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
ONE square mile of
registered gold and diamond
land claim. Easy access to
water for all-year work. Ideal
for land dredging operation.
Minimal vegetation. Mining
will not affect environment or
cause river pollution.
Location: Imbaimadai Area -
Upper Mazaruni. Interested
persons please Phone: 614-
9709.
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
OFFICE 2ND FLOOR, 34
NORTH ROAD & KING STS.,
GUYS & DOLL BUILDING,
OPP. ST. GEORGE'S
CATHEDRAL. TELEPHONE:
227-1988, 623-6431, 270-
4470 "HAVE FAITH IN CHRIST,
TODAY". Malgre Tout $1.5M;
Imax Gardens $1.5M;
Friendship (EBD) $2M;
Annandale $2.8M;
D'Andrade St., Kitty $3.9M;
Chateau Margot (3 lots and
house) /$3M/$4M/$11M;
Melane Public Rd. $4M;
Ogle $5M; Happy Acres -
$7M/$14M; Duncan/Garnett
Sts. $12M; Campbellville/
Continental Park $11M; Water
St. $13M; $10M: Brickdam -
$25M; Le Ressouvenir $22M;
Bel Air Gardens $35M/$60M;
Church St. $60M: Mahaicony
(agricultural land) $60M;
Atlantic Gardens/Vryheid's Lust
Public Road $11M; Lusignan
- for Gas Station $30M.



FURNISHED flat to let.
Overseas visitors. Telephone
226-0242.
ROOM for single work-
ing female. Telephone:
227-0928
TWO (2) HOUSES TO
RENT. TEL. # 220-3346 OR
220-4839.
ONE-BEDROOM
cottage in Central
Georgetown. Telephone
226-3968.
SHORT-TERM RENT-
ALS FOR OVERSEAS
VISITORS. PHONE 225-
9944.
ONE-BEDROOM
apartment for student or single
person. Furnished. Call 223-
4545, 226-1933.
BEL AIR PARK fur-
nished executive house on
double lot US$1 500. #.
223-5204/612-2766.
2-BEDROOM bottom'
flat.to .re.nt, Third Street
Montrose. Preferably a
couple. Call 220-5439.
BOTTOM flat with 2
bedrooms in Da Silva St.
Corltct Geeta 616-9349
or .616-5804.
ONE small apartment .at.
207 Barr St., Kitty. Contact
'MissShlaw --'624-1864.
ONE bachelor
apartment at 182 Barr St.,
Kitty, Contact Miss Shaw
at same address.
SINGLE female to share
furnished apartment. No
flooding, low crime area. $12
000. Telephone.233-2915.


1.1 iii I I






- - - - - - -- - - - - - - - -


* u1ImIIT Ir~frLJIMIL. r' l[i-'i


2-BEDROOM apartment,
unfurnished. Call 233-6022.
ONE three-bedroom
house for rent in Eccles HIS,
EBD. Contact Len 227-3247.
BUSINESS place at Parika
- 33 000 sq. ft. of space.
Contact Len's. Telephone 227-
1511. 227-2486.
1 RESIDENTIAL self-
contained apartment. Also
one stall for sale or rent.
Call 227-8858.
O N E- B E D R 0 ",
p?-,,ti nI Tor decent
working people. No
children. No flooding. Call
225-7611.
EXECUTIVE, furnished
and unfurnished houses
and apartments, offices,
bonds, etc. TEL: 226-
8148/625-1624.
FURNISHED ROOM -
DECENT, SINGLE WORK-
ING FEMALE. TEL: 226-
5035 (08:00 17:00 HRS).
24 000 sq. ft. office
space of rent at 18 23
Eccles Industrial Site, E B
Dem. Contact 233-2783,
233-2475.
2-BEDROOM bottom
flat $45 000 monthly at
Prashad Nagar. Serious
enquiries only. Telephone
225-8088.
DO You need an honest,
reliable & efficient Real
Estate Agency? Call:
UpToTheMinute Realty. #
225-8097/226-5240,
2-ONE bedroom
apartment $12 000 per
month. Contact Kissoon
Kaika. 8 Second St.,
Chateau Margot, ECD.
FURNISHED American-
styled apartment ideal for
a couple or a single person
- $3 000/$4 000 per day. Call
622-5776.
ONE lower business flat
situated at Lot 1 Non
Pariel. Area A, East Coast
Demerara. Apply It
., ,,,i r-reaericks at same
location.
ROOMS to rent
monthly self-contained -
Le Rich Luxury Rooms 25
Princes Street $25 000
monthly. Call # 227-3067.
1 BOTTOM flat, '5A'
Garnett Street, Newtown,
Kitty, formerly Sea Town
Restaurant. Phone number
227-6004,
SPACE FOR RENT.
BARBER CHAIRS AND
MIRRORS FOR SALE. Tel. #
231-2726 ROSE.
ONE complete furnished
cozy apartment to let; 2 motor
bikes (Verago) for parts; used
books for sale (cheap).
Telephone 227-4422.
FURNISHED two-
bedroom apartment. Ideal for
a couple or single person.
US$450 per mth. and US$20
per day. Call 227-3546 or 624-
1881.
1 3-BEDROOM furnished
bottom flat, from April 11s,
2005. Phone 226-4692 10
am 12 noon, 4 pm 6 pm.
No Agents.
APARTMENTS to rent at
117 611 Street, Cummings
Lodge. Ideal for UG
Students. Tel. 222-4333
anytime after 12 noon.
BAR in Georgetown -
all new modern equipment,
including Pool table -
G$200 000 month.
UpToTheMinute Realty -
226-52401225-8097
SPRIME area commercial
Property, walk in, 35' x 55'.
recently renovated building,
two floors available. Call 226-
2334 or 623-6096.
ONE two-bedroom
apartment situated at 2E21
Second Street, Cummings
Lodge. Contact Dolly on
telephone # 617-3632.
COURIDA PARK -
furnished 1-bedroom $40
000; Bagotstown 3-
bedroom top flat $30 000;
Creem St. 3-bedroom top
flat $45 000; D'Urban
Backlands furnished 3-
bedroom house US$800;
S/R/ furnished 3-bedroom
house $55 000; Prashad
Nagar 3-bedroom house -
US$1 200; Bel Air Springs,
executive house US$2
000. N. P. Financial
Services. 223-4928, 623-
3751 ... ...


2-bLD _. UrHUUl1 apat [. e11 tnt II.
237 Independence Boulevard.
La Penitence. Telephone 231-
6731, 626-8822. Michael.
QULEENSTOWN- 3-bedroom
2 toilets and baths, phone and
parking, upper flat, semi
furnished. US$550 per month.
233-2968/613-6674.
BEL AIR PARK individual
houses, fully furnished US$650
to US$1 700; Bel Air Village 3-
bedroom unfurnished US$500
per month' Bel Ai' p',,iT nade,
-.uroorn house by itself -
US$500. unfurnished. 233-2968/
613-6674.
EXECUTIVE rental 2
bedrooms, AC. phone, parking,
24 hrs security, washer/dryer,
filtered water, hot and cold, fully
meshed. Very clean
environment. US$1 200 per
month. 233-2968/613-6674.
FULLY furnished 3-bedroom
apartment, South Ruimveldt Park
- US$750 long term, US$1
000 short term per month with
parking; 1%-bedroom apartment
and 1 two-bedroom apartment,
MURRAY'S PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT SERVICES.
231-3302.
RESIDENTIAL and
commercial properties -
furnished and unfurnished,
Prices ranging from $35 000 to
US$3 000. Contact Carmen
Greene's Realty. Telephone
226-1192/623-7742.
ONE bottom flat, two-
bedroom semi- furnished
apartment. Located at 25 Sandy
Babb Street, Kitty. Contact Carol
on telephone no. 227-6410.
COMPLETE 3-storey
building. Ideally suited for
school or offices. Camp St. area.
Excellent location. Call Richard
- 624-0774/233-2614 home.
ONE top flat semi-furnished
three- bedroom over head tank,
enclosed garage, two toilets, one
bath. Bel Air Park. Telephone
225-8986, 225-1206.
CHECK out Sunflower Hotel
& other apartme ont l,
uiimortable self-contained
rooms. Call 225-3817 or 223-
2173 ask for Margaret or
Loraine.
TWO (2)-bedroom
apartments $25 000 each. Lot
27 Hugh Ghanie Park,
Cummings Lodge. Preferable
couples or students. Telephone
222-6558.
TWO-BEDROOM
modernised apartment to rent in
Annandale North. Fully grilled,
light, water, phone, parking. $25
000 per month. Call 220-9477.
1 3-BEDROOM apartment,
upstairs, with toilet and bath; 1
2-bedroom apartment,
downstairs in LBI; 1-bedroom and
2-bedroom apartments in Mon
Repos. All self-contained.
Contact Kishan. Telephone 220-
0979, 220-4739.
EXECUTIVE houses -
Kingston, Bel Air Gardens,
GuySuCo Gardens (Turkeyen),
Lamaha Gardens, Bel Air Park,
Eccles. TELEPHONE 226-81481
625-1624.
ONE 2-bedroom unfurnished
bottom flat apartment, 61" Street
Cummings, Lodge Greater,
Georgetown $20 000 per month.
Telephone 222-2718, 628-1124.
A & R REAL ESTATE &
AUTO SALE 231-7719, 223-
8663. Furnished and
unfurnished house,
apartments from $30 000 -
US$500. 5-bedroom house -
US$800.
QUEENSTOWN, fully fur-
nished 1 & 3-bedroom apart-
ment with parking space to
rent. Suitable for overseas
visitors on short term basis.
Tel. # 226-5137/227-1843.
Bottom flat Duncan
Street, formerly Video World,
also top and middle flats and
art of bottom flat in Regent
Street. Tel. 226-2260, 25-
2873, 619-5901.
TURKEYEN 3-bedroom
executive type house, 1 self-
contained room, fully grilled,
alarm system, water treatment
filter, 4-car parking. US$12 000
monthly. Ederson's. 226-5496.
LUXURY furnished 4-
bedroom house Eccles. Fully
air-conditioned, fully screened/
grilled, large fitted kitchen, 3 fully
tiled bathrooms, laundry room,
3-bay car parking space, large
verandah and garden. Wash
machine and generator. No
flooding. US$2 000 per month.
Telephone 233-2491, 233-2492
E-mail: tfft@gq!,net.gjy.


FOR immediate lease on
Northern Hogg Island 200
acres of cultivated rice land
jI.. i with rice mill complete
i drying floor and dryer.
Also tractor, combine, bull-
dozer for sale. Contact:
626-1506/225-2903. Seri-
ous enquiries only.
T1 RIULMPH, ECD,
ie!'nnhlkinql the Atlantic -
residential furnished d luxurio10'
3-bedroom S35 u00 monthly
Aiso furnished 2-bedroo0rn
apartments, luxurious $25 000
monthly, plus patio for
entertainment. Ederson's, 226-
5496,
ONE furnished two- flat
four-bedroom house, master
bedroom included two-half
bathroom, spacious kitchen,
living room and dining room,
laundry room, servant
quarters and garage. Use for
office and living quarters.
Telephone 225-8986, 225-
1206.
ONE three-bedroom top
flat, Lamaha Gardens $75 000;
one five-room middle and top
flat for business and residence,
Central Georgetown -
US$1000; one five-bedroom
furnished house, Section 'K' -
US$1 000. Wills Realty 227-
2612, 627-8314.
REGENT STREET,
bottom corner, 40 x 60 $200
000 neg.: Kitty, two-bedroom
bottom $35 000; South Park,
three-bedroom, bottoms $30
000. Roberts Realty First
Federation Life Bldg. 227-
7627 Office, 227-3768 -
Home, 629-9914 Cell.
NEW Ranch type building
- over looking the Atlantic -
modern amenities, spacious
lawn, remote controlled garage,
quiet neighbourhood. Ideal for
retire/Entrepreneur overseas or
local $75 000. Fully furnished
house $55 0010,Non Pariel,
ECD. Jewanram Realty 227-
1988, 270-4470, 623-6431.
LIFETIME list wif,- y-
pro -..rti'. in: North Road,
Bourda commercial space
with bond (optional) -
US$700: Robb Stre'_t top
flat for business Or residence
- neg.; S.CO ion "K" C/ville -
execiut.'ve house US$2 000;
South Ruimveldt, self-
contained studio apartment
long term) neg.; Alberttown -
60 000; Kitty $50 000 and
many others. Contact us on
Tel. # 225-7268/225-3466 or
23 North Road, Bourda,
Georgetown.
KITTY $35 000; C/ville $40
000; Kitty, new bottom $45 000;
Bel Air Park US$700: Section
'K' US$800; New Haven -
US$1 100; Queenstown for
office and RESIDENCE US$1
100; Lamaha Gardens, Section
'K' brand new, Subryanville,
others. OFFICE SPACE/
BUILDING: Main Street, Middle
Street, Church Street, Regent
Street Lamaha Street, others.
Mentors/Singh Realty 225-
1017, 623-6136.
US$450. BEAUTIFUL WELL
APPOINTED EXECUTIVE
CATEGORY GROUND FLOOR
CONCRETE ELEGANTLY
FURNISHED FLAT. IDEAL FOR
BACHELOR OR SPINSTER OF
EXECUTIVE STATUS,
NOTWITHSTANDING OVERSEAS
DOCTOR AND WIFE TWO
BEDROOMS, ETC. ADEQUATE
PARKING SPACE. TELEPHONE
AVAILABLE. AREA. BOURDA.
NELSON'S. 226-8937.
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
OFFICE 2ND FLOOR, 34
NORTH ROAD & KING STS., C/
O GUYS & DOLLS BUILDING,
OPP. ST. GEORGE'S
CATHEDRAL. TELEPHONE
227-1988, 623-6431 270-
4470. "HAVE FAITH IN CHRIST,
TODAY." Montrose $25 000;
Vigilance $25 000; Imax
Gardens $30 000; Chateau
Margot $30 000; Kitty $30
000/$40 000/$80 000/$100
000; Charlotte Street $38 000;
LBI $40 000; Mon Repos $60
000; Courbane Park $75 000;
East Street $85 000; Camp
Street $120 000; Happy Acres
- US$500/US$1 200/US$2 500;
Queenstown US$500/US$1
000; Kitty, fully furnished -
US$500; Nandy Park US$600;
Atlantic Gardens US$800/
US$1 000/US$1 500; Lamaha
Gardens U$900; Bel Air -
US$1 000; Eccles 'AA' US$1
000; Caricom Gardens/
GuySuCo US$1 000; New
Haven US$1 200; Bel Air
Gardens US$1 500; Le
Ressouvenir US$2 500;
Shamrock Gardens US$2 500.
Office spaces, bond spaces -
Good Hope.


ONE top flat self-contained
3-bedroom apartment with
verandah and turn-step, situated
at 30 South Better Hope, ECD.
Rental $40 000 per month
Contact Ramesh. Telephone #
220-3934.
CALL VISH REALTY for rental
of properties, apartments, iorge
office buildings and h ,';;;'-s
premises. i;Ces from S40 000
to US$2 500. Telephone 227-
4890, 225-9780, cell 614-5717,
2-BEDROOM apartment
(downstairs) 189 D'Urban
Backlands $45 000 monthly.
Upstairs (4) bedrooms. (2)
bathrooms $50 000 monthly.
Available April 1, 2005. Call:
June # 233-2175/623-1562 or
227-3067.
SHADES AND SHAPES.
APARTMENTS and houses. Bel
Air Park top flat, fully furnished
- US$700; Bel Air Park top flat
US$500, semi furnished:
Subryanville bottom flat 3-
bedroom $50 000; Lamaha
Gardens bottom flat $40 000;
Brickdam top flat 3-bedroom -
$55 000; Alberttown 3-
bedroom bottom flat $45 000:
apartment in South singles -
$25 000. HOUSES: Section 'K-
Campbellville 3-bedroom, AC
- US$750; Bel Air Park 3-
bedroom. AC US$750;
Lamaha Gardens 3-bedroom -
US$1 000; Cummings Lodge -
3-bedroom US$500; Courida
Park 3-bedroom, AC, yard
space USS1 000: Bel Air
Gardens executive US$1 000:
Eccles- executive house US$1
000; Queenstown executive -
US$1 800; Bel Air Park 3-
bedroom, executive USS1 500:
Prashad Nagar US$1 000.
APARTMENTS: Bel Air Village -
executives $1 500: Bel Air
Springs; Subryanville US$400:
Bel Air Gardens US$200.
Blygezight US$500; Camp
Street US$600: Er-' *
US$500. SH4r- Tes -
APARTM' -- .. 1 TERM
,L- ..,cNT COMPLEX.
-,(jRT TERM ROOMS -
Quoenstown. Executive property
'\ale as low as $20 million.
Commercial spaces. Starting
your business spaces are
available North Road. Kitty
Public Road, Church Street.
Camp Street. Bond and Land for
sale/rent. Agent Christopher
Goodridge. Telephone 226-
1808, 642-8725, 614-2073.
Location 20 Bel Air Gardens.
HOME SEEKERS OF
EVERY INCOME BRACKET.
SELECT SUITABLY. HOWEVER,
NOT FOR THOSE ENUNCIATING
THUS VIZ., "WAITING FOR,
MONEY FROM "U.S.A", ETC.,
LIKEWISE PAYEES BY
CHEQUES, UNLESS IN
EXCEPTIONAL CASES. HERE
WE GO. BRAND NEW, ONE,
TWO ALSO THREE-BEDROOM
FLATS $28 000; (GENTLEMAN)
ONLY (THOMAS ST.) $30 000;
COUPLE ONLY (THOMAS
STREET) $35 000; NO
RESTRICTION (D'URBAN
STREET, WER-EN-RUST). $40
000 (KITTY) QUEENSTOWN $50
000 (NEW). WORTMANVILLE
$75 000 (NEW). CHARLOTTE
STREET (RENOVATED) $30 000.
SUBRYANVILLE $50 000.
HOUSES (PRESTIGIOUS), VIZ
SUBRYANVILLE US$550.
PRASHAD NAGAR US$750,
BEL AIR PARK (3 YRS OLD)
BEST IN SECTOR. HUGE FOUR
BEDROOM. AVAILABLE SPACE
FOR ERECTION OF A SIMILAR
NUMBER US$3 000. SOUTH
CUMMINGSBURG FOUR-,
STOREY (MANSION LIKE) US$3
500. BEL AIR PARK CUTE
EXECUTIVE TWO-STOREY
US$2 500. CHARLESTOWN.
SIZEABLE FIVE- BEDROOM
BUILDING US$500. BONDS
(KITTY BRAND NEW) ALSO
OTHER NOT SO NEW, $200 000.
EACH. ONLY A TOTAL OF
THREE PROPERTIES SHALL
BE SHOWN TO PROSPECTIVE
CLIENTS (HIGH OR LOW).
WANTED. SMALLPROPERTIES
LAND) ONLY OR LAND WITH
UILDING(S) THEREON NOT
WITHSTANDING LARGE
PROPERTIES. FINALLY.
TWELVE (12) SMALL VACANT
LOTS ARE NEEDED AT
KINGSTON! KINGSTON!
KINGSTON. SELLERS
NEEDING SPEEDY SALE
AGAINST A BACKDROP OF
DYING REAL ESTATE
BUSINESS ARE ASSURED OF
SWIFT ACTION IF THEY ARE
PREPARED TO DO BUSINESS
WITH INVESTORS WHO ARE
EXTRAORDINARILY TIGHT IN
BARGAINING, THEY BEING THE
MOST CHANCE TAKING
PERSONS AMIDST
FRIGHTENING SOCIO-
ECONOMIC CONDITIONS.
HUMPHREY NELSON'S. 226-
.8937.. .. .. ..


1 HOUSE lot with 4
houses: Persons interested
please call 333-2420 Price
negotiable
3-BEDROOM wooden
and concrete house 53
Sarndy Babb St Price neq.
Telephone 276-3351
5_L P'ARK vacant
2-storey concrete 7-
bedroom mansion $S16.9M.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
DOUBLE-LOT 3-
bedroom property for sale
in Amelia s Ward. Linden.
Price negotiable. Call: 223-
4938.
COMMERCIAL property.
rime area, 35' x 55'.
recently renovated
building, three floors. Call
226-2334 or 623-6096.
(2) TWO-STOREYED
business/residential proper-
ties in Robb St., Bourda. Tel:
225-9816, Monday Satur-
day (08:00 17:30 hrs)._
TWO properties Lot
80 $11M, Lot 114 $14M,
both at Vreed-en-Hoop,
West Coast Demerara.
Phone 233-5755.
ONE 2-storey building.
business and residential
property at 182 Barr Street.
itty. Price S16 million neg.
Telephone 905-619-8783.
D'URBAN ST..
Wortmanville. between
Hardina St. and Louisa Row.
Back building itself or as
package. Telephone 622-
6000G.
ONE two-apartment
building and land for sale -
(2) bedrooms each. Prie $3
million. Call 27_,-1940/624-
2658.
FOR sale transported
house and land in the
Pomeroon. Contact Eddy on
telephone # 616-5757 or 223-
9162.
REGENT Street. America
Street. Camp Street.
Queenstown. TELEPHONE 226-
81481625-1624.
SOUTH CUMMINGSBURG -
5-bedroom wood/concrete -
S10M negotiable. Telephone #
613-5735 or 263-6043.
KINGSTON, Queenstown.
Lamaha Gardens, Eccles,
Subryanville, Oleander
Gardens. Atlantic Gardens. Kitty,
Cummings Lodge. TELEPHONE
226-8148/625-1624.
LOW INCOME HOMES.
WE build middle & low
income homes. Mortgage
financing available. Please
call 227-2494. 227-2479.
LOT 8 Princes St., Werk-
en-Rust. 2nd building North
of Camp Street suitable for
any business your dream
home going cheap. Call 226-
6017.
TWO-STOREY 5-bedroom
house in East Street (second
house), vacant possession.
$8.5M neg. Contact Roydon -
231-7719. 621-2639.
CORNER lot Bird's Place
and Cane View Ave. Suitable
for residence and business.
Asking $9M neg. Telephone
218-0117, 619-5344.
BUSINESS/BUILDING,
rime location 218 Camp
S Lamaha Sts.,
Georgetown. Contact
Robert. Telephone number
226-1240, during working
hours 8 am 4 pm.
ATLANTIC Gardens two-
flat concrete property (two
dwellings) 3 bedrooms upper
flat. 2 down. Fully grilled. 8
min. from GT. Phone no. 220-
2408. No agent.
GOED FORTUIN 3-
bedroom wooden house on
huge tot. Phone, light, etc. $5M
neg. Telephone 226-1192/623-

SAMANTHA Point S5.5M;
Aubrey Baker, Bid. $14M;
Eccles $5.25M: South
Ruimveldt $12M S14M;
Shamrock Gardens S30M.
Many more. N. P. FINANCIAL
SERVICES. 223-4928. 623-
3751.
KITTY $7M: Civille -
$13M neg-: Bel Air Park $18M
& S25M; Prashad Nagar $16M
neg., Queenstown $13.5M;
Lamaha Gardens $22M;
Eccles 'AA' $20M; Meadow
Brook $8.5M; Regent St. -
$45M: Sheriff St. $45M.
Contact Carmen Greene's
Realty. Telephone 226-1192/
623-7742.. .. .. ,


CHARLESTOWN
Charles!Sussex Sts.. near
school, vacant front building
& land. Ideal internet cafe.
mechanic shop, taxi $4M neg.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
NOOTENZUIl FC('
',n. z-storey 5 bedroom
concrete & wooden i..i,j.r
laid 60'/117' . r.,i, i
another house. $3.5M.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
ECCLES, Residential, AA
- vacant 2-storey concrete 6-
bedroom mansion, grilled.
meshed, parking cars. alarm.
Land 507/100'. $23M neg.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
GIFT New Market St. -
Doctors. Investors ideal for
hospital, beer garden/food
restaurant, 2-storey concrete &
wooden building, from road to
alley. $17.5M (US$85 000).
Ederson's. 226-5496.
ROXANNE BURNHAM
GARDENS vacant 2-
bedroom wooden house with
concrete garage. Land to build
another house. $5.5M neg.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
GIFT Kuru Kuru active
business property with 3
freezers, pool table, music set.
chicken pen can
accommodate 3 000 birds on
22 acres of land. Ideal mini-
resort. $10M neg. Ederson's.
226-5496.
Mc DOOM RIVER SIDE -
River side, land 47'!218'.
Ideal wharf large ship, auto
sales, 4 stores, mini-mall.
suDermarkift ') C. not
Ederson's. 220-5496.
KINGSTON near seawall
vacant 3-storey 6- bedroom,'
office mansion. Ideal luxurious
hotel, executives offices. 8 cars
parking. If qualified move in
tomorrow. $40M neg.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
CAMPBELLVILLE
vacant 2-storey concrete 4-
bedroom mansion, 3 toilets &
baths, large sitting, library, 4-
car parking. Inspection
anytime. $16M. Ederson's.
226-5496.
SUBRYANVILLE vacant
2-storey 5- bedroom concrete
& wooden mansion, garage.
area at back for children swing.
arden. $15M. Ederson's.
26-5496.
URGENTLY needed -
commercial, residential
buildings for sale or rent. Kitty,
South Ruimveldt,
Campbellville, Subryanville,
Prashad Nagar, Bel Air Park.
Lamaha Gardens. Atlantic
Gardens. Also land.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
CRANE/La UNION
PUBLIC ROAD, WCD vacant
2-storey wooden & concrete 4-
bedroom property $5M; back
2-storey 4- bedroom concrete
building $4M. Package $7M
neg. Ederson's. 226-5496.
ONE (1) newly reno-
vated 3-bedroom house -
telephone facility, over-
head tank, car park for (2)
vehicles Drysdale Street.
Charlestown. Tel: 225-
9816. Monday Saturday,
(08:00 17:30 hrs)
ONE two-storey wooden
and concrete 4- bedroom
house, South Ruimveldt
Gardens Contact Ronald on
662-5033 or Samantha on
624-1370. No reasonable
offer refused. Vacant
possession.
1 EXECUTIVE 5-bed-
room master room, three toi-
lets, three baths, fully filtered,
insect-proof, generator, air-
conditioned, large yard space
with beautiful gardens, etc. -
Bel Air Park. # 225-9816.
QUEENSTOWN $30
million to $50 million; Bel Air
Park $18 million; New
Providence $35 million:
Providence $14.5 million;
Nandy Park $12 million $28
million; Eccles $7 million -
$29 million. 233-2968/613-
6674.
TWO newly built large
concrete buildings 3 500 and
1 250 square feet each,
situated on 2 acres river side
site at Caledonia, EBD. Road
side access and large frontage.
Flood free. Security doors and
grilled work, concreted floors
and yards. Suitable for lumber.
cement, bond, gas station or
poultry farm. Serious enquiries
only to telephone 233-2491
or 233-2492 E-mail:
tff@gol.net.gy


- -2"3







24 SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3, 2005
I


MEADOW BANK 4-
bedroom house with 2-
bedroom cottage $10 million
negotiable. 233-2968.
TWO-FLAT concrete and
wooden .uji.1,in North
,- '... Excellent
condition. $12M neg. r-...-
bedroom concrete and
wooden building. Excellent
condition. Section 'K' C/ville
- $18M neg. Wills Realty -
227-2612, 627-8314.
FOR sale by owner 2-
storeyed fully concrete house
- bedrooms, 2 full
bathrooms, eating, kitchen,
built wardrobe, central air-
conditioner, car garage, front
view to-Public Road Lot 6
Nandy Park EBD. Interested
person only to call. Day 226-
7806, evening 225-81 0.
POULTRY FARMS Gar-
den of Eden and Craig Plan-
ning for a bigger yield? We
have pens that can accom-
modate 15 000 birds and lots
and lots of running water we
are situated near to a creek,
1 Machine Shop Industrial
Site with an extra lot. Call
SUCCESS REALTY 223-6524/
628-0747
BEL AIR PARK (highly
residential) $15.5M;
Queenstown $35M &
$22M; Regent Street -
$55M; Eccles 'AA' $20M;
New Amsterdam $10.5M;
Camp St. $13.5M & (land)
- $80M; Subryanville -
$45M; Nandy Park -
$12.5M. Vish Realty 227-
4890, Cell 614-5717.
PROPERTY FOR GOD.
Favourite Realty in
partnership with the Lord has
below: Earnest for buyers with
faith like a mustard seed.
Queenstown $11M; South
Ruimveldt $8M; Kitty -
$8.5M: Prashad Nagar $9M;
Republic Park $12M;
Lamaha Gardens $15M;
Oleander Gardens $14M.
Land as low as $5 million.
Phone 231-2064. E-mail:
godfavorite@hotmail.com
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
OFFICE 2ND FLOOR, 34
NORTH ROAD & KING STS.,
GUYS & DOLL BUILDING,
OPP. ST. GEORGE'S
CATHEDRAL. TELEPHONE.
227-1988, 623-6431, 270-
4470. "HAVE FAITH IN
CHRIST, TODAY", Non Panel
- $5M/$6M/$8M/$10M; Imax
Gardens $5M/$6M/$8M;
Mon Repos $6M; Roraima
Trust $6M/$11M/$20M; La
Grange $6.5M; Courbane
Park $9M; Kissoon Park/Good
Hope $9.5M; Alberttown/
Covent Gardens $12M;
Stewartville $13M;
Queenstown $17M/$12M;
Eccles 'AA' $17M/$22M; 'BB'
- $6M/$20M; 'CC' $10M;
Duncan St. $21M; Bel Air
Park $22M/$25M; Happy
Acres $26M; Section 'K'
Campbellville $30M; Lens -
Parika $160M; UG Caricom
Gardens $32M; Courida Park
- $42M; Atlantic Gardens -
$35M/$20M/$18M; Camp St.
- $55M; Garnett St. $35M/
$12M/$10M/$9M/$8M;
Carmichael St. $28M.



CLEAN DRY EARTH FOR
SALE. CONTACT 611-0881.
ORIGINAL INDIAN DVD
AND CD. CALL 231-4208.
ONE 3-PIECE SUITE,
ONE WALL DIVIDER. CALL
227-8858.
EARTH FOR SALE.
DELIVERY TO SPOT. CALL 626-
7127.
BRAND new Generac
generator 7750 watts.
telephone 220-6770.
FOR sale used computer
parts. Telephone Calvin 220-
2603, 617-4288.
DIESEL water pumps -
2 and 3 inch, brand new
from UK. Call 261-5403 for
details.
HYUNDAI Elantra sold as
parts. Also brand new Hyundai
parts. Telephone 269-0258.
POOL Tables. Locally
made (new). $200 000 each.
Call 629-7419 ...(Monty).
ONE KE 70 Toyota Corolla
- mags, music. Private. Price neg.
Call 660-8500.
1 KELVINATOR freezer.
Price $45 000. Contact
Seeram 619-2084.
ONE 4-cylinder Bedford
portable welding plan, D.C.
Key start. Tel. # 265-4217.
Call .#621-4_417. ...


EARTH for sale. Delivery to
spot. Excavating, grading and
leveling of land. Contact 621-
2160, 229-2520.
NEW Honda generators
from UK manual and key
start, 2500 watts to 6000 watts.
rnntact 233-5500.
SALE!!!! Giant Liquidation
Sale. Auto Spare Parts and
some Hardware. Call 226-2334
or 623-6096.
1 BEDFORD Dumper never
worked, 1 3306 Caterpillar
engine (Turbo). Telephone 229-
6527, 660-7530.
LABRADOR and Ridge back
mixed pup. Telephone 223-
5034, 226-7846, time 07:00 h -
19:00 h.
DACHSHUND PUPS.
WEEKS OLD. $8 000 EACH.
PHONE 223-6533 OR 226-7360.
SLIGHTLY damaged
corrugated sheets; DVD Player.
Tel. 226-7054, after hours 225-
7565.
LARGE quantity truck tyre
liners, size 20, Good Year Brand.
$1 000 each. Call 621-4928.
1 LONG base open back
Canter tray. Aluminium sides,
metal bottom. 260-2806, 621-
2859.
IMPORTED white overcoats
- $2 000. Plastic aprons $400;
sanitary gloves $300. Contact
Francis Persaud. Telephone 220-
3064.
ONE brand new computer
with CD Burner, CD Walkmans,
car si;,1 GC' d DVD Player.
Contact 225-4112, 626-9264.
ARGON/Co2 mixed gas. Also
shock i,'iatment for swimming
pools. Phone ~7-4857 (08:00 h
- 16:00 h), Mon. to i-t.
1 30 ft. flat bed trailer D4D
Bulldozer dumper with
hydraulic dump. All in
excellent working condition.
Call 623-3404, 222-6510.
1 FLOOR model PLASTIC
SEALING machine, 1 PORTABLE
ELECTRIC air compressor in ex-
cellent condition Tel: 222-4507/
623-7212
PARTS for washers/dryers,
thermostats knobs, belts,
pumps, motors, splines, etc.
technicians available. Call
622-4521, 622-5776.
GAME Boy advance SP with
five cartridges plus one cartoon
network video pack. Price $25
000. Call # 618-2679.
27" TELEVISIONS,
Nintendo, Super and
PLAYSTATION Systems, Games
and Accessories, Micro Chips,
Compaq Lap Top. 223-0713.
4 SENSOR Security lights -
$5 000 each; 8 Outdoor Security
lights $1 000 each; New
Kenmore gas stove $100 000.
Call 227-3339, 623-1195.
STALLS for sale, prime
business spot. Price negotiable.
Contact Sharon's Boutique,
Stabroek Market. Telephone
225-8986. 225-1206 after 6 pm.
ONE 150 HP & one 250 HP
Yamaha Outboard engines.
Price $700,000 & $1,200,000.
Also parts for 150 HP & 250 HP.
Call 629-6651 anytime.
MOUNTAIN bicycles- 26"
18-speed $8 998; 20" 18-speed
- $6 985; 16" 18-speed $5 998;
12" BMX $3 398. Anands/
Avinash Branch Stores.
COMPAQ Note Book,
Pentium III, 1.2HZ, 512KB,
256MB, DVD Combo, Internet,
Sharp 27" Televisions,
PlayStation Games. Telephone
223-0713.
3306 D1 Caterpillar engine,
like new condition; 8V-92 Detroit
diesel marine engine; Honda
2500 PSI pressure washer. Call
218-1469 or 623-1003.
ONE Bedford 7-ton
deferential complete with brakes
system $195 000. 1 front axle
7-ton complete with brakes
system. Contact 227-1923, Cell
616-5679.
HEAVY-DUTY air compressor
(less motor) $50 000; sheet
metal bender $40 000; rolling
machine $300 000; Vertical
drilling machine $30 000,
electric hand operated concrete
vibrator $100 000; Tools
cupboards $20 000/$10 000;
lots of steel pipe fittings/valves -
$25 000; 50 feet 1" high pressure
hose $20 000; 400 and 1 500
Ib oil pressure gauges $1 000;
auto electric switches $500/$1
000; lots of plastic straps $15
000. Contact Francis Persaud.
Telephone -22-0-3064.- -------


FREON gas: 11, 12. 22, 502.
134A & 404A. Also Nitrous Oxide,
Argon gas & Helium for balloons.
Phone 227-4857 (08:00 1 16-00
h), Mon. to Fri.
PITBULL PUPS- pure bred.
red nose, 3 months old,
vacc;-iaiteu & de-wormed.
Excellent for security and
breeding. Cc;,,!ct Ray @ 264-
2911, 617-2231.
1 HONDA pressure washer,
brand new; 2 drills; 1 saw; 1
Jialing motorcycle, next to new;
1 amplifier; 1 truck pump: 1 bat-
tery charger; 1 bicycle. Tel.
265-5876.
QUALITY SWEET POTA-
TOES available in large quan-
tities at very good prices. Place
your orders early for prompt de-
ivery. Contact: 621-0371/226-
3563.
ONE 19 inches Gold Star
colour television with remote
control. Perfect condition.
Owner leaving country. $30 000
or best offer. Phone 618-9250 or
265-3350.
2-SEATER Sofa with 2 arm
chairs, newly recovered in
European design fabric. Owner
leaving country. $30 000. Phone
618-9250 or 265-3350.
ONE 5000 Watts
Cummings generator pull
and press start, on wheels, 2
Phase,. 60 cycles, gasoline.
Excellent condition. Selling
cheap. Negotiable $110 000.
Call Lemuel @ 613-3478.
OXYGEN and Acetylene
Sases. Fast and efficient service.
0 11 Mc Doom Public Road,
EBD. Phone 223-6533 (08:00 h
16:00 h), Mon. to Fri., (Sat. -
08:00 h to 12:00 h)
MIXER, CD Player, Cross
',,r, equaliser, power amplifier,
speaker 12" ,15", etc., Bullet
tweeter, horn. nor more
information, call 220-,', -
619-9313 Anil/ Roseana.
SKY Universal for the
best offer in Phillips digital
dish. View up to 125 chan-
nels including Pay Per View
channels and also Direct TV.
Contact: Gray on Tel. 227-
6397/227-1151 (0), 616-95
CAUSTIC SODA: 55-lb $3
600, Alum: 55-lb $4 000, Soda
Ash: 100-lb $8 000, Sulphuric
Acid: 45-gal $45 000, Granular
Chlorine, Chlorine gas. Phone
227-4857 (08:00 h 16:00 h),
Mon. to Fri.
FOR all your hard to get
spares, visit Motor Spares & Co.
Ltd Engine Parts, Suspension
Parts, Oil Filters, Brake Pads and
Liners, Bulbs, Electrical Parts,
Gaskets and much much more.
Located at 35 Robb & King
Street. Telephone 226-3071.
CATERPILLAR D 343
Generator (350 KVA). In
excellent condition. Always
professionally maintained, only
500 hrs since complete
overhaul. Presently in operation
and can be load tested. Price -
$2.5 million (negotiable). For
inspection, call 269-0025/269-
0026.
A quantity of galvanised
frames for dry wall $30 000; 2
18 000 BTU Split AC Units, 240V,
complete with remote $75 000
each; 1 5 000 BTU Window Unit,
110V $25 000: 3 12 000 BTU
Window Units, 240V $25 000;
1 18 000 BTU Window Unit,
240V $25 000; 1 Security
System with monitor and
camera, 110V $40 000; 1 new
25 pieces Y-inch Drive Draper
Silver Drive Socket Set. AF/
Metric $12 000. Owner leaving.
621-4928f611-8766.
WATCH AND CALCULATOR
BATTERIES, MAXWELL SILVER
OXIDE, BUY ONLY THE BEST.
FREE INSTALL ALSO SALE ON
ALL CELL PHONES. CHECK US
OUT AT GUYANA VARIETY
STORE, NUT CENTRE, 68 ROBB
STREET, LACYTOWN.
OPPOSITE SALT AND PEPPER
RESTAURANT. TELEPHONE
226-4333.
FOR sale. Refrigerator
(Brown, 21 ft3); Refrigerator
(White, 18 ft3); Ice Maker; Key
Cutter; Television (Sharp); VCR
(GE); Lights (1 000 watts);
Sewing machine; Amplifier
(Yamaha); Double Cassette
Player (Optimus); CD Recorder
(Sony); Speakers (Aiwa);
Amplifier Speakers (Traynor);
Single Cassette Player
(Panasonic); Singer Sewing
Machine. Contact Laurence
Jafferally. 1 Nabacalis, Middle
-.Walk._TeJepho.ne.229-2292._ .


ONE 36-inch RCA
television, remote, 110 240V
along with lar(e TV stand on
wheels $170 000 neg.; one
large AKITA fridge double
door, 2FDW x 6 ft.-H 11OV, 7
mronthls old $85 000: 1 Presto
warmer or roti pan cooker, 110V
- $15 000; one large Gold Star
microwave, turntable, 110V -
$22 000; one medium Sharp
micrGWa2,eS, turntable, 110V -
$15 000; one large wail di vldCr
with compartment for TV,
Stereo. music set and computer,
etc., USA-made, in two parts -
$50 000: one new tent,
enclosed to accommodate 4
persons over night, hunting or
camping, USA- made $25 000;
cne Land Ranger cycle, 24 rims,
excellent features $10 000;
one plastic round table, 4 plastic
chairs, one large umbrella and
stabler, all $15 000; one
TOSHIBA Combination tape
recorder, radio and CD Player,
110 240V $15 000; ten
Meridian phones M7310 and
M7324 from 5 to 10 lines $15
000 and $20 000 each; 2
Canon Photocopy machines,
large, NP 7210 $155 000, NP
7130 $105 000; Printers -
Hewlett Packard Desk Jet 810C
- $20 000, 1600C $15 000,
612C $10 000, Canon BJC
2000 $20 000; 12-piece wall
divider 4 x 6 for office $50 000;
1 Canadian heavy-duty large
shredder, fully automatic, 110V
- $20 000; 2 secretarial and
typist adjustable chairs on
wheels $5 000 each; 4 4-
drawer filing cabinet $15 000
each and 2 2-drawer $10
000 each: two computers
complete with monitors, CPU,
printers, key board, APC, smart
ups, mouse, voltage regulator
with conditioner, star billing
machine, scanner and stand, all
cables, power pack and one
computer desk, all for $205
000; 2 new white ceiling fans,
- .0 -clna with lighting shades
- $6 000 each, b C 'o,"rds
,USA, at $15 000 each; 3 wash
rooni sinks $6 000 each. 621-
4928/61 -85766. Owner
migrating.
30 5-GALLON paiis carpet
adhesive paste for sale at $i0
000 per pail; 1 15KVA Kubota
water cooled diesel generator
custom-built with security
casing, sound proof, no noise or
vibration, casing wall insulated,
hardly used, crank or battery
start. Mint condition. Must see.
Very economical, easy to
operate, press button start, 12V
- 110 240V $800 000 neg.;
1 heavy-duty welding
transformer 240 320 440V.
no cables, on wheels $50 000;
1 Ark welding 225A transformer
- 240V. with cables and helmet
complete $50 000; 1 Ark
welding 125K transformer -
240V with cables and helmet
complete $40 000; 2 Yale
English chain hoists 1-ton $25
000 and'/2-ton $20 000; 1 12-
speed drill press adjustable
table, 110-240V $45 000: 1
band saw 110- 240V, 1 HP-
50/60 HZ $50 000: 1 6-inch
belt sander. Delta 110 240V
- $25 000; 1 Edger sander to
sand any surface wood 110 -
240V $45 000; 1 skill Mitre
adjustable angle saw on stand -
110V $40 000; 1 circle rip saw
(Dayton) 110 240 on metal
stand and metal table,
adjustable $55 000; 2 STIHL
FS 160 brush cutters, hardly
used, both $110 000; 1 large
Sears water pump, 1-inch bore -
110 240V $25 000; 1 large
Sears water pump, 1-inch bore
with pressure tank and automatic
switch, works automatically
when tap turn on or off 110-
240V $40 000;1 Dayton indoor
and outdoor dry vacuum,
industrial and commercial use
on wheels with large dust
collector bag, USA made, 110V
- $35 000; 2 security panels for
hook up alarm systems for
building, store, or factory, both -
$30 000; 3 bench metal lathes,
English type with lot of spares,
240V, all for $300 000; 1 large
machine to do tool sharpening
and grinding adjustable, 240V
- $150 000; 2 crankshaft
grinders, 240V $150 000 -
both; 5 large oxygen cylinders
full with oxygen, privately
owned, no rental $105 000; 1
Honda EB 1400, AC- DC Honda
generator, oil shut off alert, shut
off brakes $105 000; 50 brand
new Good Year wheel liners for
truck, size 20 $1 000 each.
611-8766 or 621-4928. Owner
leaving.- -


JUST arrived from the U.K.
are Perkins Industrial Turbo
,. ..... with power take-off over
lip. ; 4236 and 6354 Turbo
and non Turbo engines starters,
radiators, cylinder heads,
crankshafts, etc. Heavy duty
woodworking machine; planers,
band saw resaws, rip-saws,
suitable for chain saw lumbering;
wood laihes, shapers, mortisers,
and Esterer gang saw 28" gate.
Metal lathes, shapers, milling
machines, drilling machines, air
compressors, hack saws,
generators and welding plarnt.
iso in stock is (1) one 30-ton low
loader trailer, gear boxes, springs
and differential for Leyland.
Bedford, and model M 4x4. Tyres
- 1500, 1400 x 20, etc.
Bulldozers, rollers, idlers,
sprockets, segments, track chains.
etc. for 215, 320, 312 excavator
and D4, D5 & D6D bulldozers.
Contact 220-2034, 220-1787



1 BEDFORD MODEL
M TRUCK. TEL: 455-2303
1 NISSAN Caravan E 24,
excellent condition. Tel. #
220-4782
ONE Bedford TL 7-ton
lorry (not dump). Tel: 227-
1923/616-5679.
ONE Toyota RZ mini
bus. In excellent condition.
$800 000. Call 629-6590.
TOYOTA RZ mini bus.
Working condition. Price neg.
Contact Mikey 220-7096.
1 AT 150 Toyota Corona
car in good working condition.
Contact Mohan on 220-9801.
TOYOTA AT 212/AT 192.
Both excellent condition.
Phone 226-9316, 619-9187.
1 HONDA Prelude right
hand drive. Good condition.
Call 227-1346.
1 RZ minibus BGG series.
Immaculate condition. 260-
2806, 621-2859.
"'" Mitsubishi Lancer MX
"*Jll ,+ /N-'I 'via^
Touring. Fully loaded. uLai i.-
0041, 621-5407.
ONE Toyota Tacoma 4 x 4
Pick Up. 2000 Extra Cab. 225-
0460, 624-7222.
ONE Camry SV 40. PJJ
series. $2 700 000 ne g.
Telephone 617-1300 or 621-
5944._
ONE Nissan Pathfinder
and Toyota Tundra. Both fully
loaded. 619-0063/624-8959.
ONE five-seater Toyota
Hilux Surf in excellent
condition. Telephone 223-
2060 or 621-8318.
NISSAN Laurel model
C33, fully loaded, mags, sound
system. Call 629-7419 (Monty).
4-WD RANGE Rover -
Land Rover with alloy rims &
Sony CD player. Priced to go. #
621-7445.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter (3
tons). enclosed. Contact Tel. #
263-5404 after 16:00 hrs, 618-
9602, anytime.
ONE AE 81 Toyota Corolla
motor car 5-speed, manual.
Excellent condition. Telephone
220-1574 or 621-9101,
ONE (1) Toyota 4 x 4 Pick
Up and one (1) Nissan Pick Up.
Both in excellent condition.
Call 220-2366.
1 AT 192 Toyota Carina.
Excellent condition. $1 250 000.
Telephone 623-3323, 225-0628.
ONE TT 131 CORONA in
good condition ma g rims,
stick gear, tape deck. Tel:
626-6837 after hours # 220-
4316.
ONE AA 60 Carina. in excel-
lent working condition, needs
body work tape deck, AC etc.
Tel. 617-4063/225-0236.
ONE 600cc Suzuki Katana.
Price $220 000 and 150 Jialing
Rebel type (Crash bike). Call Tel.
Alvin 223-6596. --
1 HONDA car for sale -
automatic transmission.
Excellent condition. Contact
611-9979, 227-5965
3 RZ minibuses in excellent
condition, fully powered, etc. No
reasonable offer refused.
Telephone 269-0258.
1 SV 30 Toyota Vista Camry
- PJJ series, 2000cc, fully
powered, mag rims, etc.
Telephone 621-6464/223-2899.
ONE KT 147 Corona wagon
in good condition, good rims,
etc. $380 000. Telephone 265-
6665/628-2789. -


1 TOYOTA 4-door Pick Up -
diesel engine, 2000 up model.
Price neg. Contact 225-6759
during working hours.
HONDA Civic four-door,
alarm, CD, sun roof, etc. Excellent
condition. Call 225-8971 or 614-
8872.
1 TRUCK/van Driver with 2
yrs. experience, preferably from
East Coast. Appy in person to
Len's, 136 Sheriffand Fourth Sts.,
C/ville.
ONE Mazda MIATA 2-door
'nnvertible car. Good
condition. No reabu,,' .ff..r
refuse. Contact Telephone
225-8986, 225-1206.
1 DUMP truck, 1 water
tender and 330 Timber Jack
Skidder all are in good working
condition. For more informa-
tion Contact: 264-2946.
ONE double Axle Leyland
DAF flat bed truck in good working
condition for immediate sale.
Telephone 225-5360 or 626-
2990.
AT 192 Carina, AE 100
Sprinter & Corolla, Marino, EP
82 Starlet Turbo, Lancer 2001,
Levin Sports. Amar 227-2834,
621-6037.
TOYOTA Dyna truck, 14B,
AC, 17 feet tray, like just off the
wharf. Immaculate condition.
Must be seen. 98 Sheriff Street,
C/ville. 223-9687.
1 TOYOTA Hilux Single Cab
4 x 4 with mags, bars, off road
tyres, etc., GHH series. No
reasonable offer refused.
Telephone 619-1053.
NISSAN Cefiro Sedan -
luxury model, automatic, fully
loaded, showroom condition.
Owner leaving country. Phone
618-9250 or 265-3350.
TOYOTA Corolla KE 70, 1
Sunny Datsun, 1 AA 60 Carina.
Terms can be arranged, easy
monthly installments. Tel. 621-
2472 Shameela.
3 AT 192 Carinas. All fully
powered, AC, Mags, Music, ALuto. $"
325 000 $1.5M. All prices neg. A
& R Real Estate & Auto Sale. Tel.
'"1 -7719.

AE 100 Sprinter- white, CU,
automatic. Excellent condition.
$975 000 neg. Credit available. A
& R Real Estate & Auto Sale. 231-
7719.
AE 100 COROLLA EFI,
automatic, fully powered, AC,
deck, crystal lights front and rear.
Excellent condition. 622-0112,
226-8226.
ONE Toyota Sprinter -
PGG 9815, fully powered,
Candy red, with 17" alloy rims.
$1 250 000 neg. Contact #
615-2717, 640-0724, 231-
3460.
One Mitsubishi 2-ton
canter, double back wheels. In
immaculate condition. Price -
$1.5M neg. Call 337-4819 or
337-4007. Serious enquiries
only.
ONE AE 91 Sprinter -
automatic, fully powered, mags.
tape deck, etc. Excellent
condition. Never worked hire.
Telephone 270-4465, 623-8700.
A& R REAL ESTATE &AUTO
SALE 231-7719, 223-8663. AE
91, AE 81, AT 170, AT 192, RZ,
AE 100, '..V,:,.n, Mark 2. Vehicles
as low a;: 3'.:- 000.
ONE (1) TOYOTA Hiace
Super GL 14-seater mini
bus diesel engine, four (4)-
wheel drive dual air condi-
tioned, CD deck, BJJ 1995.
Call 225-5274/226-7665.
AS IS Nissan 4x4 Land
Rover Long Base Series 3
GMC. Tow Truck, never used.
1100 x 20 American truck tyres.
Call Richard 624-0774, 233-
2614.
3 AE 100 Corollas. All
automatic, fully powered, AC,
music, etc. 1 AE 100 Sprinter
- automatic. Excellent
condition. $975 000 neg,
Some credit available. A & R
Real Estate & Auto Sale, 231-
7719.
1 TOYOTA Corona Station
Wagon ET 176 5-door, power
steering, front wheel drive, 3E -
12 valve engine, AC, adjustable
seats. 5-seater, fold down back
seat, mag rims, disc brakes, PHH
series. Private use. Good for taxi
service of personal family use.
Excellent condition. $800 000
neg.; 1 Toyota Hilux Pick Up long
tray 2 x 4, power steering, AC,
nag rims, Bed Liner, Disc brakes,
alarm system, CD and Radio
Player (JVC) 22RE EFI engine,
never open to do any major work.
Mint condition. Hardly work,
private use only. $800 000. neg.
Owner leaving. 621-4928 or 611-
S8766. ...


I ~












1 KE 70 Toyota Corolla
(Private). Excellent condition.
Automatic, AC, mag rims. Price
$400 000. Contact Rocky -
#225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma Extra
Cab (2000 model) GJJ series,
chrome rims, automatic, AC, CD
PlayerF. irrii ,C- 5 S, C t, ~ ) ht step
board, Immaculate condition. Bed
liner. Price $2.9M. Contact Rocky
- # 225-1400 or 621-5902.
JUST off the wharf, not
registered as yet 1 Nissan
Cifero, 2000cc, only 42 000 Kin,
Pearl white, automatic, fully
powered, dual airbag. air-
conditioned, CD Deck, right
hand drive. In immaculate
condition. Price at cost.
Vehicle can be seen at 79B
Cowan Street, Kingston.
Georgetown. Telephone 624-
8352/622-4554.
ARE you interested in
buying or selling your vehicle?
Then contact Rocky or Anita
at Anita's Auto Sales at 43
Croal & Alexander Streets.
Telephone No. 227-8550..
628-2833, 660-7448.'
Toyota Carina/Corona AT
212, AT 192, AT 170, AA 60;
Toyota Sprinter/Corolla AE
110, AE 100, AE 91, AE 81;
Toyota Hi Lux 4x4 Single and
Double Cab. Toyota 3Y, RZ, E24
Caravan: Nissan FB 14, F13, FB
12, Honda Integra/CRV; Toyota
Camry GX 81, GX 71, GX 100;
Toyota RAV 4.
TOYOTA 4-Runner, PHH
series $2 200 000 and $2
500 000; Tacoma $2 600
000 and $3 000 000; CRV -
$2 900 000 and $3 300 000.
RAV 4 $3 300 000; Prado -
$8 500 000; Alexes van $8
000 000; Double Cab $2 200
000; Extra Cab Toyota SR5,
like new, 50 000 miles $2
200 000; 4x4 $900 000, $1
400 000. Contact David at
Pete's Auto Sales, Lot 10
Croal Street. Telephone
223-6218, 612-4477, 226-
9951, 660-2815, 226-5546.
AT 192 CARINA, 212
Carina, ST 190 Corona, SV
30 Camry, AE 100 Corolla and
Sprinter, AT 170 Carina and
Corona, AE 91 Corolla and
Sprinter, AT 150 Corona and
Carina, AE 81 Corolla and
Sprinter, Toyota Mark II GX 81
and GX 90, Cressida Mark II,
Ceres and Marino, AA 60
Carina, KE 30 Corolla $160
000. Driving excellent. Contact
Pete Auto Sales, 223-6218,
612-4477. 226-9951, 226-
5546, 623-7805, 660-2815.
Vehicles selling as low as $250
000 deposit. No interest on
balance.
JUST ARRIVED NEW
SHIPMENT RECONDITIONED
VEHICLES: Cars: Sprinter AE
110; Starlet Glanza Turbo EP
91; Carina AT 192; Lancer CK
2A; Cynos Sports Coupe EL
54: Toyota Cynos Convertible.
WAGONS: Corolla AE 100 G-
Touring Mitsubishi RVR N 23.
fully loaded. PICKUPS: (4x4)
Toyota Hilux YN 100.
TRUCKS: Mitsubishi Canter 2-
ton freezer: Canter 2-ton open
tray. DEO MARAJ AUTO
SALES, 207 SHERIFF AND
SIXTH STREETS,
CAMPBELLVILLE. 226-4939.
A NAME AND A SERVICE YOU
CAN TRUST.
MITSUBISHI RVR N23W,
Toyota Hiace RZH 112 minibus,
Toyota Hilux Surf YN 130 & RZN
185, Toyota Hilux RZN 174,
Toyota Ipsum 5XM10, Toyota
Hilux Extra Cab LN 172 & LN
170, RAV 4 SXA11. Corolla &
Sprinter AE 110 .& AE 100,
Mitsubishi Truck FE 537. Toyota
Hilux Double Cab RZN 167,
Carina AT 212, Honda CRV RDI,
Mark 11 GX 100 & GX 90, Toyota
Hilux Single Cab LN 167 & LN
106, Toyota Land Cruiser Prado
VZJ 95 & RZJ 120, Toyota Hilux
2x4, YN 86 and many more other
cars. Toyota Ipsum SXM10, Toyota
Hilux RZN169 & LN165, Mark II
GX110, Toyota Corolla NZE121,
Honda Civic ES1, Toyota Vista
AZV500. Toyota Hilux YN107,
Toyota Carina AT192. Please
Call or come into our office -
Rose Ramdehol Auto Sales,
226 South Road, Bourda,
Georgetown. Office tel: 226-
8953. 226-1973, 227-3185, Fax
227-3185. We give you the best
because you deserve the best,
RD5, CRV Honda Jeep, ZCA26,
RAV 4, MCU10 Harrier Prado,
Land Cruiser, RZJ95 Prado, RVR
Jeep N23W.


1 AA 60 Toyota Carina (back
wheel drive) automatic. mag
rims. Never in hire, Hardly used.
Price $525 000. Contact
Rocky #225-1400 or 621-
5902.
1 TOYOTA RZ (15-seater)
Short Base minibus. Manual,
mags, music. Immaculate
con itd!Oinn Price $1.1M.
Contact Rocky .225- !400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA (4 X 4) Single
Cab Pick Up (20R) gear, mag
rims. Excellent condition.
Hardly used. Price $900 000.
Contact Rocky #225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 HONDA Vigor (executive
type motor car) automatic, fully
powered, A/C, spoiler, alarm.
SRight hand drive). Price -
1.3M (mag rims). Contact
Rocky #225-1400 or 621-
5902.
1 TOYOTA (EP 82) Starlet
(GT Advance) manual/
automatic, fully powered, mag
rims. Immaculate condition.
PHH series. Price $1.1M (neg.)
Contact Rocky #225-1400 or
621-5902.
NISSAN Canter 2-ton truck -
$600 000. Toyota Bus. Can be
used as private, (9) seats. In top
condition. AT 150 Toyota Carina
car $250 000. Contact Bobby
- 336-6625. Cell 661-2804.
1 NISSAN Pathfinder (V6 -
4 x 4) PHH series, automatic,
crash bar, 2-door (5 seats).
Excellent. Price $1.9M.
Contact Rocky #225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma Extra
Cab (2000 model) GJJ series,
automatic, AC, chrome mag
rims, CD Player, crystal light.
Immaculate condition. Price -
$2.9M. Contact Rocky #225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 RX7 (First Generation) 2-
door Sports car gear, mag rims,
AC, new 3Y engine, spares
included. Price $850 000. (Like
new). Mint condition. Must see.
Contact Rocky #225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 AE 81 TOYOTA Sprinter
(Private) automatic, mag rims.
Excellent condition. Price $525
000. Contact Rocky #225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Mark II (GX81).
Mint condition. Automatic, fully
powered, AC, mag rims. $1.3M.
Contact Rocky #225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA RAV-4 (came in
brand new not reconditioned) -
5-speed gear, fully powered, AC,
chrome mag rims, roof rack,
crash bar. Immaculate condition.
(Low mileage). Price $3.2M.
Contact Rocky #225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma (2003
model) GJJ series, (new),
manual, AC, mag rims. CD
Player, 16 valve EFI.
Immaculate condition. Low
mileage. Price $3.4M (neg.).
Contact Rocky #225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA RZ (15-seater)
Long Base minibus manual,
mag rims, music, crystal light.
(Carburettor). Immaculate
condition. (BHH series). Price -
$1.3M. Contact Rocky #225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 RZ (15-seater) Toyota
Long Base minibus automatic,
mag rims, music, crystal light,
(EFI). Immaculate condition.
Price $1.4M. (Hardly used)
Contact Rocky #225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 AT 171 TOYOTA Corona.
(Excellent condition).
Automatic, mag rims. (Price
$800 000). Contact Rocky -
#225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Lite Ace (9-
seater) minibus. Automatic.
Excellent condition. Price -
$550 000. Contact Rocky -
#225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Hilux Surf -
enclosed, (late PGG series),
automatic, fully powered, AC,
mag rims, crash bar.
Immaculate condition. Price
$2.4M. (Hardly used). Contact
Rocky #225-1400 or 621-
5902.
1 AT 212 iOYOTA Carina -
(PHH series), automatic, fully
powered, AC, crystal light.
Immaculate condition. Price -
$1.7M (crash) neg. Contact
Rocky #225-1400 or 621-
5902.


1 AT 170 TOYOTA Carina
(Private) 5-speed gear. fully
powered, AC, mag rims,
spoiler Excellent condition.
Price $800 000. Contact
Rocky #225-1400 or 621-
5902.
1 B12 NISSAN Sunny -
(PGG series). Hardly used.
Auitoni,:tic, fully powered, A(..,
tape and radio. Price $575
nno000, Contact Rocky #225-
1400 or 62 1-5902
I SV 40 TOYOTA Camry -
(PliH Series automatic, fully
powered, AC, chrome mag
rims, CD and DVD Player, TV,
air purifier, Price $2.1M.
Contact Rocky #225-1400
or 621-5-002
TOYOTA RZ, GEE series -
$900 000; Toyota RZ buses,
Long base BHH $1 450 000
and $1 800 000 neg.; 3Y
buses $450 000: Nissan
Caravan $475 000: stick gear
Toyota Tacoma Ace $650
000; automatic Toyota Lite
Ace $575 000. Contact
David at Pete's Auto Sales,
Lot 10:Croal Street, Stabroek.
Telephone 223-6218, 226-
9951, 660-2815, 226-5546,
612-4477. Credit can be
arranged. No interest.



SALESGIRLS. CALL
TELEPHONE 227-0406.
HANDYMAN. CALL
TELEPHONE 226-7414.
HIRE CAR DRIVERS. CALL
227-7101-2.
TRAINEE upholsters and
joiners. Call 222-4318.
DRIVERS for car. Telephone
222-3481, 625-0354.
ONE GENERAL DOMESTIC.
PLEASE CALL 222-4507.
1 LIVE-IN Domestic, 40-50
years. Telephone 642-8781.
HOMES WANTED! $$$$.
KEYHOMES # 223-4267
ONE TAXI DRIVER.
CONTACT Z. KHAN 226-
7948.
3 MACHINISTS. Apply
18-23 Eccles Industrial Site,
E B Demerara.
2 EXPERIENCED
backhoe Operators. Call
222-6510, 623-3404.
HOSPITALITY Manager
with experience. Call Tel.
#s 223-7847, 223-7848.
ONE JOINER AND ONE
APPRENTICE JOINER. CALL
627-7185.
PERSON or persons to do
leather works. Contact Pam -
614-1107.
1 mature live-in Domestic
to work in Georgetown.
Telephone 629-4679.
ONE strictly live-in
general Domestic. Mature and
honest. Apply urgently. Phone
225-9201.
GENERAL Domestic Help -
3 days per week. Between 18
and 30 years. Sharmile 225-
2598.
WANTED urgently
Waitresses to work at Vee Bee's
Bar, Sandy Babb St.. Kitty.
Attractive salary.
ONE live-in Babysitter,
between 30 and 45 years.
Please contact Safraz -
615-4332. Attractive salary,
ONE Domestic to do
light work. Must know how
to cook and wash. Call
227-0026 or 225-3307.
REGENT STREET.
ESTABLISHED COMMERCIAL
BUILDING. HUMPHREY
NELSON'S REALTY. TEL: 226-
8937.
APARTMENTS flats,
houses to rent from $25 000
to US$2500 in/around
Georgetown. Prestige Realty
- 231-5304
ONE Arc and Acetylene
Welder. Must know grill work.
Contact: 21 Broad Street,
Charlestown. Tel: 225-2835.
SALESGIRL, kitchen
staff, live-in girl from coun-
try area. Nazeerna Deli 318
East St., N/C/ Burg. 226-
9654/618-2902
EX PERIENCED
Waitresses and Cooks. Apply
in person. Must have Food
Handler's Certificate. Call
222-6510, 222-6528.


WANTED urgently
Porters to work on Canter
Truck. Hutson's Wholesale
Ser vice, Industry Front.
Telephone 222-4650/623-
5317,
MORA Liumber wanted in
squ areas. Mill cut a n d
chainsaw cut. 6' x 6", 2" x
6", 8"x 8", etc. Contact 226-
3563
PORTERS, Night Cook,
Salesgirls and Cleaner. Apply
at Survival, 16 Duncan St.
and V'inlcgen Road.
ONE experienced Driver,
between the ages of 35 and
45. Must have Police
Clearance and
recommendation. Call 225-
2535.
1 HANDYBOY to work in
yard, Apply to Singh, Lot 2
Gordon Street & Stanley
Place, Kitty. Telephone 227-
1346.
DRIVERS & contract cars
to work 24 hours. Must have
hire car Licence. Contact
Pacesetters Taxi Service.
Telephone 223-7909, 223-
79 10.
ONE RZ minibus short
base EFI. In reasonable
condition. Call 220-6586 or
615-8121.
ONE SALESGIRL. Must
have Secondary Education.
Age 18 26 and one boy to
do general work. Call 220-
6586 or 615-8121.
Live-in staff to do semi
clerical work from out of town.
Application: Personal
Manager, Lot D Lama
Avenue, Bel Air Park,
Georgetown. Call # 225-
9404 or 225-4492.
WANTED. DOMESTIC, 4
DAYS A WEEK. NO
COOKING. 18 TO 24 YEARS.
WORK LAMAHA STREET.
TELEPHONE 223-1610.
MANAGER to work at
Hotel Purple Heart
Restaurant and Bar, Charity,
Essequibo, Coast. Must have
knowledge of Night Club and
Hotel. Call 225-2535.
COOK, Cleaners, 30 45
years. Contact TAJ
Restaurant, 228 Camp
Street, next to Plaza Cinema.
Walk with handwritten
application, between 10:00
h and 18:00 h.
SMALL PROPERTIES IN
THE HUNDREDS ARE
NEEDED BY SMALL
PERSONS ON PURCHASING
BASIS THROUGH
HUMPHREY NELSON'S
REAL ESTATE AGENCY.
TELEPHONE 226-8937.
DOMESTIC to work 3 half
days and 3 whole days per
week. Bring or send
application to: True Value
Store (Furniture Section),
124 King St., Lacytown,
Georgetown. opp Esso.
PORTER BOYS,
BETWEEN THE AGES OF 16
AND 22 YRS. APPLY IN
PERSON, PARSRAM
DISCOUNT STORE, 21
WATER ST., STABROEK.
GASOLINE and diesel
Mechanic with at least three
years (3) experience. Phone
227-2052, between the hours
of 8 am and 12 noon.
EXPERIENCED sewing
machine Operators. Apply in
person to Caribbean
Clothing Ltd., 27 Lama Ave.,
Bel Air Park (next to the
Chronicle).
WAITRE S S E S.
Bartenders and one live-in
Maid. Night Bird Liquor
Restaurant, 189 Barr Street,
Kitty. Contact Tel. 225-1923,
626-1006.
EXP E R I E NCE D
Hairdresser. Must know to do
manicure, pedicure, facial
and hairstyles, etc. Also
chairs to rent. Please contact.
Tel. 223-5252 or 628-3415.
DRIVERS, Truck Drivers
for heavy and light duty
trucks. Attractive
remuneration package
offered. Cleaner. Apply in
person with application, two
Recommendations and
Police Clearance to: The
Personnel Manager, National
Hardware (Guyana) Limited,
17 19A Water Street, South
Cummingsburg. Georgetown.


EXCAVAI OI Operators
to work in the Interior. Must
have experience. Call 225-
2535.
1 HANDYBOY to work in
Interior. Musl know to
handle live birds. Age 18 6
25 yrs. Accommodations
provided. Telephone 223 -
1609, 624-2653.
1 EXPERIENCED
Mechanic to work in Interior.
Must have knowledge of
Perkins and Bedford engines.
Telephone 223-1609, 624-
2653, 777-4126. 623-2605.
ONE live-in Maid to assist
in home. liMUi h-e from the
country area, Age between 25
and 35 years. Apply in person
to 305 East Street, South
Cumrmingsburg, Georgetown.


WANTED


RATES
8"x10" $40. each
12"x12"- $76. each
16"x16" $85. each

with knowledge & experience
to service telephones cables
TV antennas, etc.
Contact:
Kamal 624-3164, 220-5547
Ramdeo- 623-8651/220-5547

2 WAITRESSES, 1 live-in
Maid. Contact Bibi Jameel's
Restaurant and Bar, 14
Vryheid's Lust Public Rd.
Telephone 220-5244, 612-
2076 ask for Shafraaz or
Fezo.
TWO live-in Domestics
between the ages of 17 and
20 years from the country
areas. Also one live-in boy
to do Handyman work around
yard and bond. # 621-4928.
1 ASSISTANT to Pro-
.duction Manager, 1 Machine
Operator to work night shift
and 1 Machine Operator to
work day. Call 615-9752 be-
tween 13:00 and 16:00 hrs.
PORTERS TO WORK IN
GEORGETOWN. CALL 223-
5273 OR 223-5274 OR COME
IN TO 16 MUDLOT KINGSTON,
GEORGETOWN.
WANTED one (1)
Pharmacist to work on
Saturday from 09:00 h -
16:00 h. Telephone 220-
0852 (h) from 07:00 h to 09:30
h, (w) 220-0210. from 11:00 h
to 16:00 h.
ONE general Cook/
Housekeeper. Apply in person
at 48 Bel Air Gardens within
the hours of 10:00 h to 15:00
h. Please walk with (two)
references & valid Police
Clearance.
ONE Family to work and
live on a ranch up Mahaicony
Creek and to take care of a
house. $20 000 a month. Free
house to live in. Contact 192
Duncan St.. Newtown, Kitty.
Tel. 225-6571.
ONE full-time Domestic,
reliable and honest. General
chores. One live-in Domestic.
(Country & interior people also
can apply). Contact Mrs.
Khan, RK's Security. 125
Regent Rd., Bourda..
EXPERIENCED Cashiers,
Roti and Purl Makers; Curry
Cooks, Cleaner. Assistant
Cook. Apply in person with
written application to Hack's
Halaal Restaurant, 5
Commerce Street,
Georgetown.
ONE Mechanic to work in
interior. Must know to repair,
Perkins Bedford Excavator
engine and hydraulics and
pick up. Full knowledge of
excavator would be an asset.
All accommodation provided.
Call 223-1609 and 624-2653.
EXPERIENCED Driver.
Must have valid Driver's
Licence to operate one
Canter truck. Police
Clearance and
recommendation required.
Must be 30 years and over.
Please apply in writing and
person to Medical Arts
Center Limited, 265
Thomas St., North
C u m m i n g s b u r g ,
Georgetown. Telephone
number 227-3340, 22'6-
2556.


WANTED urgently Security
Guards and Ice Plant Opera-
tors. Must have (2) recent Ref-
erences, valid Police Cleai
ance, Identification and NIS
cards. Apply in person to: The
", r BM Enterprise Inc.,
F I r.,-, Houston, East Bank
Demerara.
INDIAN family of 3 needs
a live-in Domestic in Trinidad.
to cook, wash, iron, and clean
house. Must be single, 23- 28
years. Salary negotiable.
Contact telephone
number 333-5850 or
Trinidad: 646-1855,
between 09:00 h and
17:00 h or Email:
z o b e a a ho o cornn
WANTED urgently one
Bedford Model M Truck
Driver/Mechanic and one
heavy-duty Mechanic to work
in the Interior. Drivers must
have a valid Driver's
Licence. Attractive salary.
Living quarters provided with
meals. Contact Ramjit at
telephone # 225-4500, 225-
9920 or Johnny Phillips -
777-4065.
WANTED AT
TRADITIONALLY KNOWN
AREAS OF
RESPECTABILITY A LARGE
NUMBER OF VACANT
POSSESSION SIZEABLE
HOUSE LOTS AT
REASONABLE PRICES.
PROSPECTIVE
PURCHASERS
(INVESTORS) ARE AT
READY HAND. HUMPHREY
NELSON'S. 226-8937.
WANTED ON THE BASIS
OF IMMEDIATE VACANT
POSSESSION. SMALL
PROPERTY NOT
EXCEEDING $5.5M AT
KITTY, PETER'S HALL,
DIAMOND, ECCLES OR
ALBERTTOWN .
PROSPECTIVE
PURCHASER IS PREPARED
TO PAY 50% DOWN
TOWARDS ASKING PRICE.
NELSON'S. TELEPHONE
226-8937.
W A N T E D
APPLICATIONS ARE
INVITED FROM SUITABLY
QUALIFIED PERSONS TO
FILL THE FOLLOWING
VACANCIES: 1 MECHANIC -
3 YEARS EXPERIENCE; 2
M E C H A N I C A L
ASSISTANCE; 1
EXPERIENCED ARK AND
ACETYLENE WELDER; 1
FABRICATOR MUST KNOW
TO MAKE MUFFLERS,
BEND PIPES AND
ASSEMBLY SYSTEMS; 1
STORE KEEPER/STOCK
CONTROLLER; 1
CARPENTER/JOINER. THE
F O L L O W I N G
REQUIREMENTS WOULD
BE NEEDED TO ACQUIRE
THE JOB:- RECENT POLICE
CLEARANCE, 2
TESTIMONIALS OR
RECOMMENDATIONS, ID &
NIS CARDS, 2 RECENT ',2
POSE PHOTOGRAPHS.
APPLICANT MUST BE IN
PERSON FOR AN
INTERVIEW. CONTACT
PAUL'S MUFFLER MOTOR
SPARES. LOT 70 GARNETT
STREET, C/VILLE,
GEORGETOWN, EAST OF
SHERIFF STREET.
W A N T E D
APPLICATIONS ARE
INVITED FROM SUITABLY
QUALIFIED PERSONS TO
FILL THE FOLLOWING
VACANCIES: 1 MECHANIC
- 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE: 2
MECHANIC CAL
ASSISTANCE; 1
EXPERIENCED ARK AND
ACETYLENE WELDER, 1
FABRICATOR MUST KNOW
TO MAKE MUFFLERS,
BEND PIPES AND
ASSEMBLY SYSTEMS; 1
STORE KEEPER/STOCK
CONTROLLER; 1
CARPENTER/JOINER. THE
F O L L O W I N G
REQUIREMENTS WOULD
BE NEEDED TO ACQUIRE
THE JOB:- RECENT POLICE
CLEARANCE, 2
TESTIMONIALS OR
RECOMMENDATIONS, ID &
NIS CARDS, 2 RECENT %
POSE PHOTOGRAPHS.
APPLICANT MUST BE IN
PERSON FOR AN
INTERVIEW. CONTACT
PAUL'S MUFFLER MOTOR
SPARES. LOT 70 GARNETT
STREET, C/VILLE,
GEORGETOWN, EAST OF
SHERIFF STREET.


s~cPBKirY9~~~hi~p~ B~_00_of


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"





26 SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3, 2005


Fairness and transparency


must be reciprocal


N. c~b

C ~


By Desmond Haynes

FIRST I wish to congratulate
Captain Shivnarine
Chanderpaul and Wavell
Hinds on their magnificent
performances in th r.- in-
nings of the first Test against
South Africa. This has been
achieved within a climate of
controversy and tension
which makes their contribu-
tions quite outstanding.
This is of no surprise to me
because of the quality and tenac-
ity of our players on and off the
field and how they have dealt
with difficult situations in the
recent past. They have had to
contend with the current con-
tract controversy and, contrary


to what have been promoted in
certain quarters the players
have always been focused on
acting in a mature and respon-
sible manner and putting re-
gional cricket first.
Taking this on board.
know that the players' repre-
sentatives have at all times en-
deavoured to represent all of its
members and the interest ofi
West Indies cricket. To do so.
it has always recognized that the


WICB is a pivotal part of this
process and WIPA has tried to
engage in meaningful negotia-
tions in accordance with ac-
cepted practice and the spirit t.
partnership.
Unfortunately, the widely
known historical adversarial re-
lationship between the players
and WICB. and more recently
WIPA and WICB. has hampered
the type of progress and ap-
proach to resolutions that
should exist between the two
entities which is so vital for the
harmonious running and future
of West Indies cricket.
This is imperative espe-
cially given the current need
to protect the West Indies
cricket brand, to improve our
competitiveness and ensure a
successful World Cup event
in the Caribbean.
WIPA and WICB have
agreed to quarterly meetings and
WIPA will be proposing formal
protocol mechanisms for future
negotiations and consultations.
The former was discussed at the
meeting of March 24. 2005.
called by WIPA with WICB in
Barbados.
At this meeting that I at-
tended, I am of the view that
WIPA also proposed that spe-
cific arbitration within a particu-
lar time frame be undertaken
with regard to the C&W per-
sonal endorsement contracts of
players and the WICB/Digicel
contract.
This WICB/Digicel contract
has a direct bearing on the issue
since this contract is at the heart
of the WICB's actions with re-
gard to making players eligible
for selection or not and is re-
ported to contain causes di-
rectls afiecting players' per-
sonal rights. i:-r alia.
The i WIC decisions on
whether or nr' the C&W con-
traci' arc illn ilnaIuc of per-
sonal endorse. nt contracts and
the decision lt the C&W\V


contracts are in conflict with the
WICB's obligations and players'
obligations to their main team
sponsor hav' !',cc;' imide on the
vicee of WICB lawyers alone
(according to the WICB's state-
ment) and an independent as-
sessment must be in the best
interest of all concerned and in
the interest of transparency and
fairness.
Remember that, through-
out this 'sponsorship con-
tracts' issue, WIPA has con-
sistently acted in good faith
whether submitting to and
abiding by the rulings of Mr
Justice Saunders, acting on
the recommendations of the
CARICOM Prime Ministe-
rial Committee on Cricket,
responding to the reasonable
requests of the WICB and
other persons attempting to
mediate.
During this period WIPA
has had to keep its members fo-
cused on the present series and
informed as to all unfolding and
impacting events. But it has
done so without any disruption
to team preparation in or out of
camp and mindful of their re-
sponsibility to the game. There
would have been strong feelings
by WIPA members on the im-
passe over the 'sponsorship
contracts' issue and these and all
views were canvassed and all
options at WIPA's disposal were
considered.
In this regard, WIPA's
members have taken an initial
decision that there should be no
disruption to the Digicel Home
Series against South Africa at
this time but, I am assured that
WIPA will continue to protect
the rights of its members vigor-
ously. Just as WIPA has shown
respect for the negotiation pro-
cess and those participating in
it. WIPA. as an organisation.
c\p icts riecip'rocal coiduIcl I roil
those partners.
As most will be aware,


W1PA has been negotiating w;'ith
WICB on the players' behalf,
regarding several outstanding
.att'crs alluded to by the WICB


President in his regional address
besides the sponsorship con-
tracts issue and WIPA is com-
mitted to finalising same and
reaching speedy conclusions.
I believe this can be accom-
plished as well as the arbitration
and the other matters previ-
ously requested by W1PA may
be thrashed out.
I know that WIPA has reit-
erated its commitment to the
development and welfare of the
game and its call upon the WICB
to create and promote a profes-
sional environment in which all
parties (players, administrators,
sponsors and fans) may co-ex-
ist and act within known param-
eters for the long-term benefits
of cricket in the Caribbean. It is
my belief that such an accord
can be achieved with the coop-
eration and matuIriVty t all in-
volved.
Desmond Haynes is a
former West Indies batsman
who played in 116 Tests and
238 ODIs for the regional
side. He currently serves us
secretary of the West Indies
Players' Association. (Carib-
bean Cricket.com)


- 0


-


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


SA still not acclimatised ...
(From page 31)
have scoffed at the notion that they were not sufficiently
acclimatised to Caribbean conditions. Coach Jennings did
admit that their stay at the Jolly Beach resort in Antigua
and the lure of the Caribbean weather and beaches might
have slackened their focus somewhat but Captain Graeme
Smith was adamant that the team preparation was quite
adequate and that South Africa had been playing a lot of
cricket in the past few months.
How then does the South African captain account for a dis-
mal batting performance on a Bourda track that he admits is
still good for batting?
"We are aware of the low bounce." he said. "We just haven't
executed our skills very well. At times it looks as if we're still
playing in South Africa and we need to get our minds focused
on the pitch we're playing on". he added, alluding to the bouncier
nature of South African pitches and highlighting even more the
need for practice matches and proper acclimatisation.Referring
to his specific role as opener Smith pulled no punches regard-
ing the role of the top order. "We need to get through that new
ball with little cost and today it cost us too much. Its now up
to the others to salvage something from this innings." he stated.
Coach Jennings also added a note of warning about pitches.
"If pitches are too bouncy a bowler beleives he can put the ball
anywhere and gel wickets," he said, adding that the other ex-
treme (dead and lifeless tracks) gave batsman a wrong sense of
other performances.
Itn the coach's opinion more care tiust be taken in the prepa-
ration of pitches so as to properly evaluate the performances
of both howlers and batsmen.
Fans will be eagerly anticipating the last two days of
the first Test anxinos to see the 'underdogs' biting deeply
while not barking.


Ai.


SIn ing and
cherns:ed memory
of our beloved one
DR. JASON
ANDREW E W
TROTMAN, who
died by accident
on A nil 1. 2002 in
the USA.
Death leaves a
heartache no one
can heal
Memories are
treasures no one'
.- can steal
Some may forget you r:cw that you are nne
But we will remember no matter how k1
Deep in our hearts you w.,ill always stay
Loved and remembered in every way
No tears, no words can ever say
But with the love within our hearts
You will remain with us forever
Sadly missed by his wife, children, father,
^ brother, sisters and other relatives.
,' ,- ?.


- . -- ^ .. .. . .... .. . .. . -.. *. -.. .


In cherished
a n d o v i n a
tie 'ory of cur dear
son Q UINC Y
JAMES FOO of 17
L y n g St r e et.
Charlestown, who died
on March 30, 2004.
Death leaves a
heartache no one can
heal
Memories are
treasures no one can


steal
Some may forget you
now that you are gone
But we will remember you no matter how long
Deep in our hearts you will always stay
Loved & remembered in everyway
No tears, no words can ever say
How much we miss you everyday
Sadly missed and will always be
remeintbered by his loving parents Perry'
and Miureen Foo sisters Alici?
Aidrea and Pauline Obrotlicr
Joel. niece Khela, nephew Zaine, '
brothers-in-law Lennox -.nd -.
John aunt. uncles, cousins a,ld .
other relatives and friends ..


I-


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./


/flhj/,/ijv/*r ,LJ/'fl/


1 Tii,: ,, ath is announced of SVEN CONRAN
I", CHARLIE) STAYERS who died on January 4,
2005 in the United Kingdom, He leaves to mourn
il his children, Sven, Simone, Colette. Catherine,
'| Jenny, Claude-Joseph (CJ) and Jonathan.
,i He was the husband of Deborah of Trinidad, son
1 of the late Claude and Sylvia of Guyana, brother
,,/ of Yolande of Guyana, Bernice and Gloria of the. '.
ULSA, uncle of Nicola and Astrid Foo and Ki'k irk
'' Jones of Guyana, Sharon, Brian, Catherine and ",,
Carol of the USA, cousin of Maurice Vigilance, A
SWendy Rudder of Guyana and others, Patrick
IBoyceof the USAand others. i'ric
l, The funeral of the late Sven Conran (Charlie) wi
it.' Stayers was held on January 12, 2005 at East e to
Il' Hampstead Park Crematorium, Bracknell, United aKKingdom,
F7, A memorial service will be held at the Cathedral of
the Imn naculate Conception,
Brickdam,n ,oorgetown on April 5, 2005 at 4pm.
ni .


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Remaining four matches

to be played today
KEEN and intense rivalry will unfold at the Cliff Ander-
son Sports Hall, today, when the remaining four matches
in the East Bank Demerara Football Union Sterling Cup/
Banks Milk Stout inter-ward five-a-side football competi-
tion concludes the round-robin play-off.
In the feature match of a Group B encounter, unbeaten
group leaders Alexander Village, on nine points from three con-
secutive victories, play Laing Avenue who have six points from
two wins in three matches. Kick-off time is 21:15 h.
The Villagers will be led by Sham Porter, Sheldon Gurrick
and Leon Yaw all capable goalscorers. Lennox Younge, Alistaire
Charles and Jermaine Alleyne form the core of the Avenue's
attack. With both teams fielding experienced players, a thrilling
encounter is expected.
At 20:30 h in the supporting match a Group A affair -
another thriller is anticipated when unbeaten group leaders
Kingston, on six points from two consecutive victories from a
similar number of matches and ahead on goal difference, meet
East Ruimveldt who are also on six points but have one loss in
their three matches.
The opening encounter from 19:00 h pits Lodge Vegas
against Werk-en-Rust who have four points and are jointly third
with West Front Road in Group C.
Lodge Vegas with seven points are unbeaten and currently
occupy the second spot behind unbeaten group leaders Berlin,
who have completed their quota of matches to end on ten points.
Unbeaten Group D leaders, Lodge Housing Scheme on nine
points, are expected to secure their fourth consecutive victory when
they play bottom-of-the-table Meadow Brook who are winless and
without a point after three matches, at 19:45 h in game two.
The knockout part of the competition begins when play
continues on Tuesday at the same venue with four first-
round matches.


Schools'
neiwal

starts

today
DEFENDING champions
East Ruimveldt Secondary
will greet newcomers
N e h e m i a h
Comprehensive in the
opening game of the
Inter-secondary schools
netball championships.
The tournament, which
has attracted seven teams
from six schools, will shoot
off this afternoon with a
march past of the teams at
15:00 h to be followed by
the first match.
The National Sports
Commission-sponsored
competition, to be staged at
the Cliff Anderson Sports
Hall and the National
Gymnasium, has also
attracted May Rodrigues
Vocational, Ascension
Community High,
Queen's College and two
teams from Tucville
Secondary.
In addition to the
winners' trophy there will
be one for the runners-up as
well as seven individual
prizes.
The first five matches
of the competition will be
played at the Sports Hall,
followed by three at the
Gymnasium before they
return to the Sports Hall for
the completion of the
tournament next Sunday
April 10.
Tomorrow Tucville
One play Ascension and
on Tuesday it will be
Queen's College up
against May Rodrigues
Vocational.


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By Vemen Walter from off-spinner Jason Sripaul
i in the 38th over to Williams in
WICKETkeeper/batsmal a solitary slip position, Port
Gobin Narine and al. Mourant had already recovered
rounder Rajiv Ivan shared somewhat to 152.
an 89-run seventh-wick .' Sixteen-year-old Parsram
partnership to inspired Po E Tilkinram joined Narine and
Mourant to a resounding 1,added a further 31 In the next
runs victory over Bermine 8, hlch carried the score to
the final of the 2005 Bus 183 before Talkuram was
Champion of Champions run-out for 15.
Overs first division cirdc Rajendra Latcha, 3 not out,
competition played I was with Narine when the overs
Wednesday at the Area expdied.
Ground in Rose Hall Town. Choy's two wickets cost
Narine, who represented him 34 runs While Henry sup-
the West Indies in the inaugu ported well with 2 for 39, both
Lombard Under-15 Cric from their 10 overs. There was
World Cup held in England also wicket each Gordon, Wil-
1996 and eighteen-year-old 20 lianis and Sripaul.
Berbice GTM Under-19 captain Needing to score at a rate of
Ivan, batted with tremendo 4.26 runs per over, the young
intelligence after they came t Bermine team that defeated the
gether with their team disas big boys, Albion and Young
trously placed on 63 for 6 in.t Warriors, on their way to the fi-
16th over. nal, were never in the hunt
Scores in the match wer against a Port Mourant bowling
* Port Mourant 212 for 8 fro attack that wag made up of only
* their allotted 50 overs, Berminiti spin except for the first over,
122 all out in 39.1 overs. which was of medium pace.
Both batsmen played som' Tappin with 29 and Choy
superb shots all around th! 23 were the only batsmen to of-
wicket and rotated the strike' fer any meaningful resistance,
beautifully. Narine, later n having shared in a 40-rnm third-
man-of-the-match, struck elev wicket partnership after coming
-eeni'unbeten b9tiat came o Maxie De Younge, Anthony D'
121 balls and lasted 136 mi' Andrade and Sripaul all back in
utes while the left-handed Ivan the.pavilion with just 20 runs
stroked a positive 41. on the board.
Port Mourant found tl : De Younge, one of five
going rough after winning iBermine batsmen getting into
the toss and taking firstg.. double figures, made 16,
strike on a two-pace pitcl&. D'Andrade 0 and Sripaul 4.
against some hostile bowlini Once Tappin and Choy
from fast bowlers Jerem were separated,. the Port
Gordon and Kellon Henry. : Mourant spinners ensured a
Henry removed Mosheit> steady procession to and from
Perkhan 4, caught at short back-. the pavilion with just time
ward square by Andrew Will- needed for a Port Mourant
iams and number three baiuman victory.
Rohan Tulsic caught behind by' Williams 11 not out and
Reiaz Kassim for 8 in his ec-. Danxt Benny 10 were the other
ond and third overs. while. Gor-. batsmen to pass 10.
I don accounted for the deini -Off-spinner Rajendra
Roopnarine Ramgobin 4. edgitg; Lat6ha started with the ball,
to Maxie De Younge at second&- getting excellent figures of 3
slip in his third over to reduce for 11 from 7.3 overs. He re-
Port Mourant to 16 for 3 in the ceived good support from fel-
7th over. low off-spinners Ramgobin 3
West Indies Under-19 all- for 31, Rajendra Bolo 2 for
rounder Zamal Khan then came .-25 and Ivan 1 for 21, all-from
out and belted quick-t'ire 29- their 10 overs.
ball 30, having .Mared in a 40-. At ihe presenti~4t cer-
run fourth-v icker partnerhip-c.. g0.-'. which fo'we nera
with former (;W ana atsnman.' Manager of the-Gluyaik er-
Homchand Poo.in that look the.' age Cornpan%. Robert ,elmah
score to 59 in th 3th o er he-' congratulated the winners and
fore he drove .iaiht into thi,. said that his company was very
hand of Rol.,' ,n Tappin ate" lapp. with the way the td~r-
short cover in !he lirei oer. inuwent which attracted the top
bowled by ,I- pinner \\ ill- eight teams in the Ancient
iams. . Counrt. was organised.
In the neMt ner itlhout' He praised the organiser
any addition to the score, Rose Hall Town Youth and
Pooran, on whom nimich had Sports Club and urged other
depended for Port Mouraint, clubs and cricket boards to
went to a catch by 1%illiants emulate them.
in the gully off Cyril Clih. Port Mourant received the
Choy, who bowls off- lour runs later bowled Dillin ..0t)0) it le Bernnine collected the
Samiaroo for a duck, at which-; runners-up Trophy nid $25
stage Narine and Ivan t'.nted '000.
up n t j$it rce', act. Naritney oikthef-tnis-of-the-
lri'"l her on 4.with the "match a s t batsman in the
score on 70 in the 18th over of- final awards while Late re-
fered a simple return catch to ceived the hbt bowler t;r e,
Choy, one that hi" badly missed, Other inclnti es wEll
tis Port Mourant were allowed' handed over to Rose"'i11
to get off the h.,ok. aided by Town's .ndrePercivA4af i
some questionable howling most runs in the comipetliio
changes from the Bennine skip- before the final 83 ahd Boll
p,'r Tappin. of' PrtMouraii-tforiiiikfng
When Ivan edged a wide ball up 8 wickets.
I.M" N.{:' t-


*


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Cr






SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3, 2005 29


* Sport Chronicle a


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NATIONAL Under-17 chain-
pion Kristian Jeffrey contin-
ued his unbeaten run in the
Smalta Easter Junior Team
squash tournament, leading
Babelon to third-round vic-
tory over Conquerors, Friday
evening at the Georgetown
Club.
In round two, Thursday
evening, he dropped just one
point in his round-two match,
but his team Babelon still went
down to Who's Next. On the
opening night, Wednesday, Jef-
frey spearheaded victory for
Babelon over Equilibrium.
Some six teams of seven
players each are battling for top
honours, with players compet-
ing against opponents of their
own skills level. Play is in a
round robin format.
According to coordinator
Robert Fernandes, this will be
the final warm-up tournament
for the junior players before the
National Junior Championships
scheduled for next month.
Jeffrey triumphed over the
older and more seasoned Ryan
Farnum, needing four games to
inflict the defeat in the first-
string battle.
However, Babelon suf-
fered second, third and fourth
string defeats. Kimberly Jef-
frey went down to Chantelle
Fernandes, Daina King lost
to Robert Hiscock and Talia
Fiedtkou bowed to Selwyn
Daniel.
Babelon secured victory as
fifth string Alysa Xavier de-
feated Victoria Arjoon. sixth
string Nyron Joseph disposed
of Steven Xavier and seventh
stringRenec Rici-... iook carp
Who's Next and Assassins
who emerged early favourites
were still undefeated after round
three. Who's Next defeated
Blazers 4-3 and Assassins tied
with Equilibrium 3-3, with the
deciding match between Lee
Fung-A-Fat and Dominique De
Groot fixed for last evening.
Playing for Who's Next,
Deje Dias continued his good
form this year by creating the
upset of the tournament
when he defeated National
Under-15 champion Daina
King 9-7, 9-5 in their 3rd
string match-up in the second
round and was in winners'
row again in round three
with another upset, this time
over Dominique Dias.
Other winners for Who's
Next were Alex Arjoon, Oliver
Kear and Joven Benn, while


Stanley Marcus, Gabriella
Xavier and Alex Fiedtkou had
victories for Blazers.
Wins for Assassin came
from fourth string Jason Khalil,
sixth string Rafael Lewis and
seventh string Ashley De Groot,
while first string Tariq Williams,
second string Kristina King and
third string Joshua Abdool pro-
duced victories for Equilibrium.
In second round results
on Thursday, Who's Next de-
feated Babelon 5-2, despite
the easy win by first string
player Kristian Jeffrey who
put away Jason Simon 9-0, 9-
0, 9-1. The other win for
Babelon went to Alysa Xavier
who put away Shem Marcus.
Victories for Who's Next
came from second string player
Alex Arjoon who defeated Kim-
berly Jeffrey, Deje Dias, fourth
string Oliver Kear, sixth string
Joven Benn and seventh string
Marzana Fiedtkou.
Assassins defeated Con-
querors 4-2, with the clash be-
tween first stringers Marvin
Dannett and Ryan Farnum
played the following evening,
but would have had no effect on
the results. Farnum won.
Second string Raphael De
Groot defeated Chantelle
Fernandes, while other wins
for Assasins came from
fourth string Jason Khalil,
sixth string Rafael Lewis and
seventh string Ashley De
Groot.
For Conquerors, third string
Robert Hiscock beat Nicholas
Narain. and fifth string Victoria
Arjoon defeated Dominique Dc
Groot.
-..--r .U '. Ott Equilib-
rium 4-3. with the experienced
Stanley Marcus Jr leading the
way. He defeated Tariq Will-
iams. Victories also came from
fifth string Gabriella Xavier,
sixth string Roger Peroune and
seventh string Alex Fiedtkou.
Equally experienced,
Kristina King fought back for
Equilibrium with a victory over
Andy Gouveia in a second string
encounter. Joshua Abdool and
Darren McDonald also pro-
duced wins for the team.
On the opening night,
Wednesday, Babelon triumphed
over Equilibrium 4-3, with
Kristian Jeffrey spearheading
the victory. Conquerors and
Who's Next tied 3-3, and Assas-
sins were ahead of Blazers, 3-
2.
The tournament is due to
conclude today with the pre-
sentation of prizes at 14:00 h.


Taurus United Football

Club elects office-bearers
TAURUS United Football Club will elect office-bearers on
Wednesday, during the annual general meeting (AGM) at
the East Ruimveldt Secondary School.
The club is at present being administered by a Steering Com-
mittee and, with the agreement of members, will convene the
AGM at 16:30 h.
Presentation of the Secretary's Report as well as the Fi-
nancial.Report will be on the 11-item agenda.
Affiliation will also. be up for consideration.


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30 SUNDAY CHRONICLE April 3, 2005


WP e
A;.4









ratio
Shivnarine Chanderpaul,
for your debut Test as captain of
7 the West Indies Team.

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'Rec alle

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By Allan La Rose
RECALLED fast bowlers
Darren Powell and Reon
King took two wickets apiece
to propel the West Indies into
a strong position at the end
of a shortened third day in
the first Digicel Test at
Bourda, yesterday.
Both pacers who have been
out of the Windies side for the
last two years were determined
to return to the team.
"It's been hard work in the
past year and a half." the Jamai-
can bowler told reporters.
"After being dropped I
thought I brought on a lot of
pressure on myself by trying
too hard to get back in the
side."


ter. Playing cricket in South
Africa certainly helped me to
achieve that goal and then
coming to the WI training
camp in December where
coach Bennett and his team
have brought us all to some-
thing similar to what there is
in South Africa."
Despite their success in tak-
ing wickets all three pacers, in-


REON KING


DARREN POWELL


"This season I talked to
my coaches, Andy Roberts
and Michael Holding, who
both told me that I should try;
and focus more on what is at!
hand and once I produce at'.
Regional Cricket I'll make it,
back in the WI side and that's
what I did."
On the other hand King
attributed his recall to getting
fit. "One of the things that
realliU worked for me is obvi-
ously getting myself a lot fit-


cluding Pedro Collins who also
got a couple of wickets, were
guilty of overstepping the
crease.
Speaking to the media. King
stated that perhaps they were
trying too hard, though with
him it was a case of his rhythm
coming and going. The Guyanese
added that during the camp no
bowler delivered a no-ball so it
waskind of upsetting to coach
Bennett when 20 were delivered
xesterdal !
On his recall 'to Test
cricket Powell, who turns 27
in two weeks, said, "It's a
good feeling to be back in the
WI team. I was a bit nervous
at the start but getting a
wicket or Iwo at the begin-
ning of my spell kind of lifted
my confidence."


"Copyrighted Material -


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


'Mt


King Franki/Franklin
Francis
Graeme Smith's South Af-t
rica opted not to have a prac-
tice match prior to the start
of the 2005 Digicel Carib-
bean series and a number of


fans and pundits have sug-
gested that this is one of the
factors tarnishing the cutting
edge of their team in the
three days of the first Test at
the Bourda ground in
Guyana. Not that the Carib-
bean fans mind that a new-
look WI team is functioning
so efficiently. despite all pre-
dictionis of gloom and doom.
After the 'e days of play and
a total of 190 overs the visi-
tors' fiid themselves staring
:dbonthe barrell of a gun, tot-
lerinig on 130/6 in reply to a
record Wesl Indies score of
543/5 declared. And all this
against youbung team miss-
ing'several experienced stal-
warts aind carded as the de-
cided underdogs.
,Both Coach Ray Jennings
and captain Smith however,
(Please see page 26)


-


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I


Sport Chronicle




Windies pacers leave




South Africa reeling


~;







SPORT



CHRONICLE


-Ji


-Page 31


THE experienced Mark Boucher executes a shot in his unbeaten 32.

Edward B. Beharry & Company Ltd.
Poe Tel: 227-1349, 227-2326


C'2714s , q*t
All "IN
The Real Thing -Now


lie
_gag- =J
ANOTHER of South Africa's top batters Herschelle Gibbs walks back slowly to the pavilion
after being adjudged lbw to Pedro Collins for 5. (Winston Oudkerk photos)


SOUTH Africa's top batsman Jacques Kallis has his stumps disturbed by pacer Darren Powell as the tourists slump to





A D 1 14 f A .4 W 1 N N


AN--_-lJlLLA-ANTiGUA -ARUBA -BAHAMA.; -BARBADOS -BELIZE -BERMUDA -CAYMAN ISLANDS -CURACAO -DOMINICA- GRENADA- GUYANA -MONTSERRAT
NEVIS- PANAMA- ST. KITTS- ST. LUCIA- ST. MAARTEN- ST. VINCENT- SURINAME- TRINIDAD & TOBAGO- TURKS & CAICOS- U.S. ViRGIN ISLANDS


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Mil~i i~


FEETTUccIN.i


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Group Health & Life
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A Member of the C L FINANCIAL GROUP


Prinli:tt and Published by Guyana National New~spapers L~imited, LumnaAvenue, Bel Air Park,Georgetown. Telephone226-3243-9(Gencral); Editorial: 227-5204, 227-5216. Fax:227-5208


-* *^*WWK


SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005


-. .. . .- .. ..


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I had the opportunity to interview Dawna Walter, a well
known journalist who showed the nation how to declutter
their houses in The Life Laundry. In her new book,
Dejunk Your Mind, she showed me that just like physi-
cal clutter, we all have mental baggage too, some of which
needs to go in the crusher. Just think what might happen if
you could let go and free your mind of old attitudes and be-
liefs that reinforce other people's impressions of who you are;
negative behaviour patterns; parental baggage, relationships
that have no positive impact on your life and fear of change.
Here's a few simple solutions this week for positive thinking.
I have a really simple view of life. We're here for a good time,
not a long time, so make every minute count. By making each minute
count, it doesn't mean that you have to achieve something each
waking moment. And it doesn't mean that you have to continu-
ously work yourself to death towards some magic time in your life
when you feel that you are finally able to take a break or do the
things you really want to do. What it does mean is that you find
things in every moment that delight you and make you feel good.
The only thing that prevents you from doing this is the mental bag-
gage you carry around with you, which prevents you from seeing
things clearly due to an old pattern and beliefs. So where does the
mental baggage come from? Like the physical clutter in your home,
mental clutter slowly creeps up over the years without you even
noticing. It starts with attitudes and beliefs that you learn as a child
that shape how you view yourself in the world. It is compounded
by habits that develop over time whereby you take your eye off
the ball and go through the motions rather than truly experience the
moment. And it is made worse still by the self-destructive cycle of
carrying the negative experiences that have happened in your life
and using them as a basis to judge future experiences.
Everyone has mental baggage, but it doesn't have to stop you
dead in your tracks. We live in a society where we turn on the news
and see death and destruction and read papers that warn us of glo-
bal catastrophes. Not only do we worry about current events in
the world, we worry about the events that happen during our
parent's lifetime and their parents' lifetime. We worry about the
food we eat, the people that are around us and all these things
weight your down and prevent you from finding new and excit-
ing ways to life your life to fullest.
There are so many social norms that we feel we have to live
up to, and with each expectation that we feel the need to meet,
rather than the desire to have, will feel like a burden. If you are
expected to be a doctor because everyone in your family is a
doctor, it's fantastic, if that is what you really want to be. But if
you choose to be a doctor in order not to disappoint those around


M M -


you, you will never express your true personality and may never
feel happy and satisfied in what you do. The same is true for sexual
preference, marriage, children, career and any decision that you make
based on other people's expectations. How many times do you
make choices that don't feel right in order to get approval and fit
in? If you make them, how often do you think, "What if I had
chosen differently?"
We judge ourselves by other people's success and feel bad when
we haven't lived up to someone else's dreams. We worry if a col-
league gets a pay rise, if our house isn't as nice as someone else's
or when friends get married and have babies and we are still single
and childless. Rather than focusing on what you don't have, which
always make you feel bad, you can learn to harness your energy to
get the things you truly do want out of life by clearing your mind
of negative energy patterns.
It always feels better to dream about the things you want rather
than think about the things you don't have. It is absolutely aston-
ishing what you are able to see when you look for it. If I told you
to go outside and find a spot in nature that you think is beautiful,
you wouldn't think twice, because you know what beauty is and
can see it and find it when you want to. And even if I told you to
think about your favourite spot in the world and create it in your
mind, you could do that as well, because when you enjoy an expe-
rience, it feels good and it lasts a lifetime. How often do you look
at the beauty that surrounds you each day? How often do you
think about all the wonderful experiences that you have had and all
the people who love and care about you?
However, if I told you to look in the mirror and list your
most beautiful features, could you do the same? If I asked
you to make a list of twenty things you do best, would you
find it easy to do? If I asked you to write down 50 reasons
why you are loveable, how would you rate? Do you look for
the best you have to offer or do you look at the things you
think are faults? What do you think feels better?
You know what, we all have stuff! Each and every one of us
has had experiences that we would not choose to have again. We
have experienced loss and disappointment and physical injuries or
aches and pains. We succeed at some things and are not so good at


Good news in battle against


cervical cancer


thousands of PATH ,an international non-
the world's governmental organisation based
women dying of in Seattle and one of the ACCP
cervical cancer every year, a partners working on the new
new report highlights innova- prevention approaches. "An
tive approaches for reducing important reason for the higher
the impact of this preventable incidence in developing coun-
disease particularly in devel- tries is the lack of effective
oping countries, where 83 per screening programmes to detect
cent of the world's new cases precancerous conditions and
and 85 per cent of all cervi- treat them before they progress
cal cancer death occur. to cancer."
In developing countries, If it is not detected and
women faces many barriers to treated early, cervical cancer is
early detection and treatment of nearly always fatal. Altogether,
the disease, and in many of the disease kills 274,000 women
these countries, cervical cancer every year. The regions hardest
is the leading cause of cancer hits are among the world's poor-
deaths among women, according est. Central and Soutrh America,
to the report. Titled Preventing the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Af-
Cervical Cancer Worldwide, the rica and parts of Oceania and
S24-page report lights research Asia have the highest incidence
conducted by the five-agency rates over 30 per 100,000,
Alliance for Cervical Cancer women. These rates compare
Prevention (ACCP) on the with no more than 10 per
safety, reliability and cost-effec- 100,000 women in North
tiveness of new prevention and America and Europe, according
treatment techniques. to the report, published by the
"Cervical cancer has a ma- Population Reference Bureau in
jor impact on women, particu- collaboration with the ACCP.
larlyio developing countries," Cervical cancer result> from


Bestselling author of The Life Laundry

Dawna Walter







DE-JUNK

YOUR

MIND =!!
Sunple solutions ." i
fotr posWtve lhv ng s t ,






'. ,, *- .-









others. We have all done things that we wish we hadn't, said things
in the moment without thinking, and that is what makes us
human. All these things happen in a moment in time that you
cannot revisit. What you can do is look at what you learned
from the experience and choose different next time you are
faced with a similar situation.
De-junking your mind is easier than you think. It doesn't
take years of therapy to try to understand what has happened
in the past, for how can you ever understand other people's
motives, or events that happen that are out of your control?
All it takes is to re-examine some of your ways of thinking
that junk up your mind and keep you reliving the same un-
pleasant experiences over and over again. By forgiving your-
self and others for all that has happened in the past, you free up
space in your mind to allow in new things. Once you look at each
minute and see what the minute has to offer, you will never look
back.
Starting at this very moment, you can choose to focus on a
thought that uplifts you rather than drags you down. You can take
action to get the things you want right now in the moment, and
when you string all of these moments together you will find that
you feel good, accomplish more and have a lot more fun in the pro-
cess. It always feels better to take a small step forward than to
worry about achieving the bigger goals that can easily overwhelm
you.
Next week, we will discuss your reasons for holding on to
things and how to break the cycle and release the older pat-
terns of behaviour. Stay with me now; don't miss out

W.
E, ".70


the abnormal growth and divi- HPV when they are young, cer-
sion of cells at the opening of vical cancer is most likely to de-
the uterus or womb the area velop in women 35 years or
known as the cervix. The main older. Prevention of HPV infec-
underlying cause is the human tion would sharply reduce cer-
papillomavirus (HPV), a sexu- vical cancer rates. Therefore, an
ally tranmined infection that's HPV vaccine, now in the late
often without symptoms. No stages of development, would
cure ecsts for eHPV And while contribute greatly to preventing
the infecuon remains stable or new cases of cervical cancer.
becomes undetectable in most Traditionally, global
cases, HPV can lead to precan- efforts to prevent cervical
cerous conditions that progress cancer have focused on
to cancer over time.
While women may contract'"'' (Please'tui' to page XXJ













UNCOMMON VALOUR 1


D ~idIk


-9rbodosl


111111


.. I i~s.


It was an average quiet,
sunny June afternoon
in Barbados. Guyanese
contract worker in
Barbados, Randy Sherwin
Daniels was riding his bicycle
along the sidewalk of the
Spring Garden highway just
outside the capital of
Bridgetown.
Randy. 26 was on his way
to his rented room. ht figured he
would lime a little under the
grape trees on the adjoining
Brandon's beach. Suddenly, as
he descended the slope from the
sidewalk onto the beach, he
tumbled off his bike and went
sprawling.
His arm was bruised so he
decided to walk a hundred
metres down the beach and go
for a swim at the 'Hot Pot'
swimming area near the island's
Spring Garden generating plant.
Little did he know at the
time, that the decision would
lead to him receiving Barbados'
highest honour for bravery.
Part of the plant's cooling
system utilised water was
afterwards let go into the sea
from massive pipes. There,
dozens of Bajans and visitors


Birtnnday greetings gc' out toI
SHERIZA KHAN .aso lnou.rtn
as BABY of 35: Mreriliel
,reel V'/indsor Forezt W .;i t
Coas Denlerara Gu',,ana

35' O r'iil n .. 1 t3 .-i
Greehtngs are ironri her io.,ir,
daughter and son Raziet.-'.
and Nazir. parents. Mlr .
Mrs Karrnm. three brothel;
other rear',,'es and, inrirnd:_.
especially Rabindra Lall ,.,ho
cares for you on this special
day with love and kisses
May you live to see many
more birthdays with Allan's
richest blessings.


to the islands usually swim
the warm waters which
considered to have heal
properties. That day, Randy
he had done many times bef
went to join them.
A former footballer with
Conquerors Football team in
Under 17 division in Guy
and a mason by trade, he
about to-enter the water w
he heard a cry of 'Help!" f
a young woman on the bea
Randy went quickly to her
she explained excitedly that
father and younger brother w
experiencing difficulties in
surf about 75 metres offsh
They were drifting out to
And fast.
Without hesitati
Randy sized up the situat:
He grabbed a fibregl
surfboard lying on the be
and drove into the beach v
it. He had learned to swim
a youngster in the section
the Lamaha Canal called
Blacka, and off the seaw
while growing up in Tucv
Terrace, La Penitence.
paddled out to the father
son, whom he later


informed were British visitor
Ricardo Hinds and seven year
old Theodore.
"It was real hard to paddle
going out, with the waxes
breaking. I brought in the son
first on the surfboard and that
is when I had to battle the
current coming in...the other
fellows on the beach helped me
then. Shortly after. I went out
to the father and brought him
in," Randy related modesild
The Uaiers .uound the 'Hot
Poi" ha\e plannedd ,e% erall l %e,
Aboutl ifle \ejar, .ao. ihree
\oungt.er- \'cre ,%,epl .out i,
sea and their bodies never
n in found. The Barbados
are government body responsible
ling for the lifeguard system on the
y, as island's beaches, the National
ore. Conservation _Commission has
erected a sign near the area. It
ithe reads, in four languages:
i the "WARNfNG- Dangerous
'ana current- Do not swim here".
was The Barbados Light and Power
vhen utility company which operates
rom the generating plant has also put
ach. up "Danger- No Swimming"
and signs.


her
were
the
ore.
sea.

on,
ion.
ass
ach
vith
i as
n of
the
vall
'ille
He
and
was


, ,M i .!&




^ .
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"4 *


However, some of the
regulars who bathe in the hot
waters near the outflow from
the utility company contend in
interviews with the Barbados
press, that it is not dangerous
there but nearby areas. This
was where the British visitors
got into difficulties, they point
out.
For his bravery. Randy.
who attended East Ruimveldt


Secondary, was given the
Barbados Bravey medal at last
November's Independence Day
celebrations.
The citaton reads in par:"
The Award... is given in
recognition of hlum placing his
life at nsk and rescung a father
and seven year old son-
Bnritish visitors in Barbados "
Randy was later informed
by Mr Hinds. a bus inspector
in Manchester. th.a he would be
giten a free round irip to
End :.d
R.AnJd\ .iltl'. in Gu .A11.1
includini- ;creit inti [i dr.
Brown who raised him trom a
child is very proud of him.
On a visit to the Guyana
Consulate in Barbados to
renew his passport in
preparation .for the trip.
Randy proudly showed
Consul Norman Faria his
medal. Consul Faria said he
was heartened by Randy's
quick response and his
unselfish attitude to what
could have been a tragic
situation. "Randy came to
Barbados as a contract
worker and this act of bravery
underscores the contribution
Guyanese here are making
not only to their homeland
through the sending of
remittances but also to host
country Barbados. Randy did.
not ask who was out there or
what he would get out of
it...They were two human
beings who needed rescuing
and he acted."


GUYANA REVENUE AUTHORITY

"wot'0 P &fAPM 0^ t9eVedozpmKt "






Mr. Khimraj Ramkelowan of
Ramkelowan Transport Service and
formerly of 54 Station Street, Kitty, is
asked to contact the Guyana Revenue
Authority immediately, in person or on
the following telephone numbers:

226-1256 or 227-8632



.. Sa taur ............
i,- K. Sattaur


Daniels shows consul Faria a feature of his medal.




COSTUME BAND AND FLOAT PARADE

All organizations or agencies interested in participating in the Costume
Band and Float Parade Competition being hosted by the Ministry of
Culture, Youth and Sport as part of the 2005 Independence
Celebrations are asked to note that the closing date for registration is
April 16, 2005. Registration forms can be uplifted from the Ministry's
Head Office, Main Street, Georgetown,
Government ads can be viewed on *. *... i.jr. .:' '.



professional
I accredited
I .3 Certificate |
8or Diplomar
5 orAward.

| Invest in -c\.- ,-. "'..-C ..-.^ ,-. ,c and skills'to j
secure a bright : .:'. career and high pay, .
j ..: ,~,; .. need for success is pro,,d.t,
ST .;; .'i Guidance, Fi..r.s. Award.
International Diplomas (130 or ..65'320,
IA,.: *'j Hotels. Tourism. Computers. _-"l.
business Management, .- I
SAdvertising. irsurance, Secretary Purchasing, PRi
Advariced, Nonours & Graduate Diplomas and MBAs
SBusiness, Account. Mar Finance, Personnel
For a '- -.- .. book contact'

:. 53, .. : S014 OYP, Brian
Fax:+44 2380 337200
Website: www. .; indgecollege.co.uk !
mail: infofo cambridgetraininP .com
or fill in and post this s',cion wtth your name address & age


I" [ ........... .....I..... ... ............. i ,

I''PrOfessinonaIaccitedie B f Car 'rrinn'
L w w w o wm = n c u a m n lw,


N Chronicle April, 6


1 ~:! -


Page III


S 11


. I"?-


--.-


kr







Page IV sunday Chronicle April 3,2005


PATTERN





RECOGNITION


I've been dating my
boyfriend for two
years. When 'our
relationship began, I
was completely dedicated to
him, and he was a complete
jerk who fooled around on me
more than three times. We
both realized it was because
we never communicated.
Since then we've become
best friends and built a strong
relationship. However he ogles
other women while I'm with
him, and it hurts. During one of
the times we were broken up,
he allowed me to read his
journal which explained what he
thinks about when he checks out
other women's body parts. He
actually wrote he would love to
fool around with them and see
how they feel.


I am an extremely attractive
girl. I feel insulted when I'm
dressed up and he checks out
less attractive girls who are just
wearing jeans with their hair
thrown in a ponytail. When I
say something about it, he
makes it seem like 1 made it all
up. He yells at me as it' I have
done something wrong.
He talks about marrying me
after we graduate from college
next year, but I'm not sure. Am
I overreacting and paranoid, or
is he lying when he says he is
sure about us?


Nicole, how do you
smart woman feel st
calling her stupid an


attention to women who
aren't as smart as she is. How
do you make a woman
tolerate physical abuse? By
diminishing her self-esteem
and making her feel she
deserves the treatment she
receives. How do you make
an attractive woman doubt
herself? Read your own
letter.
Imagine we introduced you
to a man in boots wearing a
Stetson hat, with a kerchief
around his neck and chaps over
his jeans. You look closely at the


man and see his hands are
callused and his face weather-
NICOLE beaten. Then we ask.
"Do you think this man is
u make a a hairdresser or a rancher?"'
:upid? By You would tell us he is a
id paying rancher, and you would be right.


VACANCY

WWF-GGMC Small and Medium Scale Gold Mining Management improvement Project
Consultants for Tailings Management

Mining Environmental Regulations will soon be enacted and tailings management to
reduce the turbidity of effluent released to environment will be a major issue as the tailings
effluent quality will be regulated. The consultants will be required to assist miners to
prepare for the new regulations and to address important aspects which include the
construction of tailings ponds and recycling of water.
The short term consultant will be required to:
1. Systematically characterize the watershed and operational features related to tailings
management.
2. Review miners preparedness for compliance and advise on specifications and
features of tailings and settlement ponds and devices.
3. Determine and/or advise on chemical treatment coagulation and flocculation
processes to settle fine clay prior to discharge or recycling.
4. Give practical advice on removal of sediment and dewatering/reclamation of
recovered fine clay sludge and report on same.
5. hold and participate in Meetings and Workshops with Miners.
The incumbent will work closely with GGMC Field Officers, miners and other Consultants.
The incumbent will be required to spend much of the time working in the fields at Small
and Medium Scale Gold and Diamond mining operations.
Duration: Sixteen (16) weeks
Job Requirements
The incumbent must have an M. Sc Degree in Mining Engineering, Geology, Mineral
Processing, Environmental Sciences, Geography (Natural Resources Management) with
at least five years experience working in the mining industry.
Or
B. Sc Degree in Mining Engineering, Geology, Mineral Processing, Environmental
Sciences, Geography (Natural Resources Management) with at least eight (8) years
experience working in the mining industry.
Experience in working with small and medium scale placer gold and diamond mining
operations and in establishment of small settling ponds will be an asset.
Applications should be addressed to the Administrative Manager, Guyana Geology and
Mines Commission, Upper Brickdam and close on April 8,2005.
For further details contact the Project Officer, WWF-GGMC Project, Guyana Geology and
Mines Commission.


How did you know?
Because you have a pattern
built up in your mind of what a
rancher looks like and what a
hairdresser looks like. Patterns
like this are called heuristics,
and accurate heuristics help us
navigate through life.
Now think about the
couples you know who are
closest to each other, who never
undermine each other, who
genuinely love each other. Some
of these couples may be your
age, some may be your parents'
age, and some may be your
grandparents' age. These
couples forn a heuristic for you.
They illustrate the pattern of
love.
That is not the pattern of
your relationship. There is no
reason for you to settle for your
boyfriend. You know what you
want, you know what you
need. and you know this man
cannot give it to you. Why not?
Because he does not fit the
heuristic you have in your mind
of what love looks and feels
like.
He fits the heuristic of a
man who is still looking.

WAYNE & TAMARA


A






























Authors and columnists Wayne and Tamara

Mitchell can be reached at
www.WayneAndTamara.com.
Send letters to: Direct Answers, PO Box 964,
Springfield, MO 65801 or e-mail:
DirectAnswers @ WayneAndTamara.com.


GUYANA GOLD BOARD


NOTICE TO ALL CLIENTS OF THE


GOLD BOARD










Whilst utmost care has been taken to ensure that the
information quoted is correct, the Guyana Gold
Board will accept no responsibility for any mistakes,
omissions orfor any action taken in reliance thereon.

The London First and Second Fixes as well as other
rates will be ascertained, and transactions corrected
if necessary, within 48 hours of publication.

Management
Guyana Gold Board


Sundayy Ch~rohliole Appdl 3; 2005


Page IV






'Sunday Chronice April 3, 2005 ,' ,7: 7



I wo murerers /ooe






failed to cheat the gallows



____Appdte3ou??f38 cnvitin nd sntnc


ByGeorge Barclay


TWO bandits Peter Adams At the scene, an iron safe wa:
and Michael Archer who found open and its contents re
were sentenced to death for moved. According to the hus
the brutal murder and rob- band it contained $5, 000.00 ii
bery committed on a cash, jewellery, transports
Corentyne housewife in passports, identification cards
1987, made a desperate bid to and letters.
cheat the gallows...a move About 9.30 a.m. the same
that failed, nevertheless, to day, Morris Henry who also
influence the Guyana Court lived in Alness Village and wh(
of Appeal. happened to be walking home
On the 27th May, 1987, along the public road in the vi
Mohamed Abbas Khan, who cinity of the deceased's house
lived with his wife Rasheeda in saw the two appellants and an
a two-storeyed house at Alness other man walking towards the
Village, Corenyne left home at front of the deceased's house.
about 8.45 a.m. for Black Bush Whilst at home he heard ai
Polder. His wife was alone and alarm and went onto the public
was then engaged in household road where he learnt about the
duties. Shortly after he left his death of Rasheeda Khan.
brother, Yussuf Khan, who lived Meanwhile, both the
in the same village, stopped his deceased's husband and brother
motor car on the public road in-law had also heard the dis
outside the house and spoke dressing and horrific news
briefly with his sister-in-law. Yussuf quickly organised a
An hour later Rasheeda search party which includes
Khan was found dead in a pool Henry. They went to the Alness
of blood in the house. The race course where they wern
cause of death, according to the joined by others.
pathologist's report, was from The party proceeded north
asphyxia due to strangulation. wards across a trench and in the


direction of the beach. After
crossing the trench they saw
two men whom Henry identi-
fied as two of the three persons
he had seen earlier. The men ran
in different directions.
Henry, Yusuf Khan and oth-
ers pursued one of them, the
first appellant, Adams, who had
a knife and a bag. He was even-
tually caught and dealt several
blows. The bag was searched
and found to contain money
and gold jewellery and letters
which were identified by the
Mohammed Khan as part of the
contents of his safe. Adams
was handed over to the police
but because of the injuries that
he had suffered from the blows
administered to him, had to be
hospitalized.
Later that same day, at
about 6.45 p.m., the Yussuf
Khan, still in the company of
Morris Henry and others, was
driving along the Manchester
public road when. he was
stopped by a crowd. The sec-
ond appellant, Archer. was
among the persons in the crowd.
He was arrested and taken to
the police station where he was
searched. A sum of $2,880.00
and gold jewellery were found
on his person.
Aside from the above evi-
dence the only other evidence
led by the prosecution which


Is

5e
io
to


ie



S-
eI
A-


Foreign Exchange Market Activities
Summary Indicators
Tuesday, March 29, 2005 Thursday, March 31, 2005
1. EXCHANGE RATES


Buying Rate Selling Rate
A. US Dollar NOTES OTHER NOTES OTHER
Bank of Baroda 197.00 198.00 201.00 203.00
Bank of Nova Scotia 189.00 198.00 201.00 204.00
Citizens Bank 192.00 197.00 203.00 204.00
Demerara Bank 195.00 197.00 201.00 202.00
GBTI 190.00 195.00 201.00 201.00
NBIC 198.00 198.00 202.00 204.00

Bank Average 193.50 197.17 201.50 203.00

Nonbank Cambios Av. (5 largest) 200.00 203.20 -


BoG Average Market Exchange Rate: US$1.0 = G$199.75

B. Canadian Dollar

Bank Average 133.33 143.17 148.33 158.17

C. Pound Sterling

Bank Average 318.33 347.67 349.83 369.17

D. Euro

Bank Average 216.75 236.67 243.25 254.67
E. Selected Caricom Exchange F. LIBOR- US$ G. Prime Rate
Rates London Interbank Offered
Rate For Thur., Mar. 31. 2005
FT$ = G$ 28.73
Bdos$ = G$ 92.13 3 months 3.10000% US 5.7591
J$= G$ 4.45 6 months 3.39000% Guyana 14.54%
EC$ = G$ 65.76 .. ,,,- , .. .
Belizc$ = G$ 94.31


c international Department Bank of Ci, .i,


implicated the appellants were
the caution statements that each
had given to the police on the
27th May, 1987.
The first appellant's state-
ment was made in the New
Amsterdam Hospital between
6.15 and 6.45 p.m. and the sec-
ond appellant's between 9.35
and 10.25 p.m. at the Central
Police Station. Each was admit-
ted into evidence after a voir
dire (a trial within a trial) as to
its voluntariness had been held.
In his statement, Adams ad-
mitted that he, Archer and an-
other unnamed accomplice had
planned to 'lick up' a house at
Alness in which there were
jewellery and money and which
had only two occupants.
About 9.30a.m.on the 27th
May they went to the Khans'
house. He and the other man
remained downstairs whilst Ar-
cher went up the front stairs of
the building. There, according
to Adams's statement, Archer
spoke to the deceased and en-
quired about the whereabouts of
her husband. She replied that he
was not at home.


Archer then entered the
house and 'vice the lady round
her neck'. Thereafter he went
into a bedroom and by means of
the key that was in the lock
opened the safe that was there.
He then proceeded to remove
the money and jewellery that
were in it. About this time the
third man entered the house.
All this time Archer was still
restraining Rasheeda Khan. All
three of them then cuffed her
and she began to bleed. They
left her on the floor and fled
from the house, he Adams -
and the Archers running to-
wards the riverside.
He also told of he and the
second appellant being chased
and eventually being cornered,
and that the latter had managed
to make good his escape.
In his statement Archer also
told of going into the deceased's
yard on the day in question. He
said that it was Adams who
suggested that he Adams en-
ter the house by means of the
back stairs whilst he, Archer,
took the front stairs in order to
gain access to the building.


Contrary to Adams statement
however, Archer stated that it
was Adams who was first to
enter the house.
Archer said that on entering
he saw the Rasheeda Khan on
the floor of the kitchen, bleed-
ing from her head and Adams
with a knife in his hand. He pro-
ceeded to the bedroom where he
saw an open safe. He took the
money and some letters that
were in it which he placed in a
bag, and before he left Adams
gave him a pair of gold jingles.
According to Chancellor
Kenneth George, "On this evi-
dence the appellants were in-
dicted for murder. The
prosecution's case was based on
the felony murder rule. In short
the prosecution contended that
the deceased met her death at
the hands of the appellants
during the course of their com-
mission of a felony of violence,
viz., robbery with violence.
"The appellants led no
evidence but they each made
a statement denying their
(Please turn to page XII)


-mm - - - - -


|AM


I
I




I
I
I


I






I


QUESTION
I am a NIS Clerk employed in a major organisation.
Our employees are paid full salary when they arelll, as
such we do not submit NIS medical. Is this the right
thing to do?

ANSWER
No. All medical should be submitted to NIS.
However, for your record, you can duplicate and keep
a copy. Submission of medical to NIS is not only
important for receiving payment, but also for
establishing one's medical history. This is very
important in relation to continuous ailments
(chronic illness) eg. Diabetes, High Blood Pressure
and Asthma.
Having established a medical condition that is likely to
be continuous, remember one can always receive'
Medical Care coverage even if one is out of
employment or over 60 years of age.
Please, do not complicate the contributors right to
make claims to NIS by withholding their medical for
whatever reason.


I
I


4,
I
-~~-1
-"S
'"I


Do you have a question on N.I.S ? Then write/cal
NS MAIL BAG
CIO Ms. Dianne Lewis Baxter
Publicity and Public Relations Officer (AG)
National Insurance Scheme
Brickdam and Winter Place ,
P.O. Box. 101135 ._.
.Te-ltai:w, i.,h f ... .... ...... ...,t ... ... .... ....
E-mall: prnilssolution2000.net : .... "
S" -- -- --- --- ----- -


t






Page~'


- .- - -.- -w -- -- Z M. i .-.-
IMM-; el= ,,a


I -credible as it may
seem. normal sal5vaa
contains thirty one dif
ferent proteins plus
twenty other substances most
of which comprises a wide
variety of metallic particles.
Many of the proteins and
other constituents of this
fluid protect the soft and hard
tissues of the oral cavity. The'
salivary mucins (slime) coat
and lubricate the surfaces of
the oral mucosa (lining).
These are larger molecules
which prevent bacterial,
adherence and colonization,
defend the tissues from
physical abuse and allow
them to resist temperature
change.
Some of the proteins, like
lysozyme, have the ability to
degrade the cell walls of
bacteria, while others such as
histatin, lactorferrin aad
lactoperoxidase, inhibit
microbial growth. Some


constituents such as the salivary
antibodies may protect the teeth
against decay.
When the mouth is
inactive, saliva flows at the
rate of about one table spoon
every ten minutes.
Conscious or unconscious
the flow never stops. While
chewing gum the flow rate of
saliva averages one table
spoon every three minutes.
The most remarkable finding
of all studies is the enormous
variability of flow rate for
both basal (resting) and
stimulated (chewing)
secretions. These may up to
30 fold range. Thus, it is
clear that a wide range of
saliva production can allow
normal oral functions.
A dry mouth is experienced
when the salivary flow is
reduced by a least 50%. The
oral symptoms of xerostomia


(dry mouth due to glands not
functioning properly) are: these
persons are often thirsty, have
difficulty with swallowing,
speaking and eating dry foods.
need to frequently sip water
while eating, have difficulty
with wearing dentures and often
do things to keep the mouth
moist.
Other signs and
symptoms of the disease
include burning or tingling
sensations of the tongue,
abnormal taste perceptions
and fissures (cracks) and
sores at the corner of lips.
General symptoms may also
involve a dry throat, blurred
vision with burning, itching
or sandy feelings in eyes; a
dryness of the vagina in
addition to a recurrent
history of vaginitis. Also seen
are dry skin and nose apart
from frequent constipation.


Many of these symptoms may
also present in patients without
xerostomia, but they are much
more common with those with
it.
Various other factors cause
xerostomia in addition to the
more than 400 drugs that can
result in a decreased secretion .of
saliva. Without doubt, the worst
agent capable of causing the
syndrome is the radiation used
in this treatment of oral and
thyroid cancer. As far as
possible the glands should be
shielded from the full dose of
radiation.
Included in the diseases
that may cause salivary gland


hypo function are. the
rheumatoid conditions
(including AIDS), and certain
common diseases such as
high lood pressure and
diabetes-. and certain
common diseases such as
high blood pressure and
diabetes. Decreased chewing
because of the constant liquid
diets and in patients, whose
jaws are wired when broken,
can induce gland atrophy
(shrinkage) leading to dry
mouth.
The ability to psychic
states to depress the tow of
saliva is well known.
Nervousness while giving a


spoecwh msy be lreisedib 5y
sigpmng water. Dnqaesivse side
emas f; a iide and fear Tcan
result in lasting epi'sodes of dry
molanlf .art ewurnccag
cah be fommC i3 a nainent s
troublesome oral drymess, be
should oe arise a cnsEmst a
pwsydxlogiiM=-arpsydhmiagriinto
cxpioE possible psychologist
or a tlreatmlt using
antidepmessant drugs tend to
aggravate the degree of oral
driyess3
Refief can be had also
wh SB free ma ad the
eoante ase r aidbiagiam
selpfaram am nd ierarpine
HCL.


THE SOIL ENGINEER


-THE EARTHWORM L


Ministry of Housing and Water

..Central Housing Planning Authority





The Construction of Roads. Drains and Structures

A. HopelDochfour Housing Scheme East Coast Demerara
B. Block 'B' Non-Pariel Housing Scheme East Coast
Demerara
C. Pin. Tain Housing Scheme Corentyne, Berbice
D. Kilcoy/Chesney Housing Scheme Corentyne, Berbice
E. Secondary School and West Indian Association Housing
Schemes Bartica

1. Interested Contractors are invited to Bid for the above mentioned
projects in the stated housing schemes.
2. The Bid Documents can be purchased from the Cashier's cage
located on the ground floor of the Ministry's Building, Lot 41
Brickdam and United Nations Place for a non-refundable fee of
$10, 000. (Beginning March 29, 2005)
.3. Bids must be accompanied by the following:


A. Valid NIS and GRA Certificates
B. Registration of Company/Firms
C. List of equipment to execute the works
status of same
D. A Bid Security of 1% of the tendered sum
the Bid Document


and the current

must accompany


E. A comprehensive work programme for the execution of the
works
4. Bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes bearing no identity
of the Bidder and clearly indicate at the top left-hand comer the
Title of the project.
5. Bids must be addressed to the National Board Of Procurement
and Tender Administration, Ministry of Finance, Main & Urquhart
Streets, Georgetown.
6. Bids must be deposited in the Tender Box located on the first
floor of the Ministry of Finance on or before Tuesday. April
12. 2005 at 09:00h at which time they will be opened in the
presence of the bidders/representatives who wish to attend
7. Bids which do not comply with the stated instructions would be
regarded as non-responsive.
8. The CH&PA reserves the right to reject any or all Bids.

Chief Executive Officer
March, 2005
L''.^ ..


Many agriculturalists have
attached a priceless value to
earthworms especially those
that burrow deeply into the
soil. Their movement to
transport faecal material to
the soil's surface facilitates
the transportation also of
certain elements to the
surface from deep in the
profile. According to
scientific data, it is evident
that concentration of
exchangeable sodium,
magnesium, potassium and
available phosphorus and
molybdenum are higher in
earthworm casts than in the
surrounding soils.
Soil enrichment is also
achieved by speeding up


materialization of organic manner
two to five times by
earthworms. The earthworm
ingestion causes an increase in
surface area of the organic
wastes. Ingestion removes
senescent bacterial colonies and
stimulates new bacterial growth.
Nitrogenous excretions from the
worms enrich the soil formed
from organic waste and
burrowing enhances oxygen
penetration.
The effects of earthworms
on plant growth may be due to
several reasons. It is considered
that the earthworm releases into
the soil certain vitamins and
similar substances. Though the
NPK value of the vermnicasts is
always lower than any standard


chemical fertilizer, several
experiments have jm pm thai
wonncasts cam pumomte lush
plant growth due to the
presence of plant growth
elements sda as cytbinms and
auxins growthh hormones)
prest in casvs.

(Please Vtn
topagvXVm)


VACANCIES

Applications are invited for suitably qualified persons to f hee owing
vacancies:


A. ANIMAL HEALTH SUPERVISOR -GuyanaZoologicalPark

The successful applicant must have:

1. A Diploma in Agriculture/Animal Health
2. Three (3) years' experience as a Livestock or Animal Health
Assistant
3. Proven computerskifls
4. Good interpersonal and communication skills


B. ZOOKEEPERS- Guyana Zoological Park

1. A sound Secondary School Education with at least three (3) CXCs
including English Language andAgricultural Science.
2. Three (3) years'experience in agriculturalwork with animals
3. Good interpersonal andcommunication skills
The successful applicants will be part of a team that exhibits full
appreciation for animals, their nutrition, health and environment
Interaction with the visitors to the Zoo will also bea key pointintheservice.
Interested persons are required to submit curriculum vitae, names of two
referees and their written applications not later than April 8,2005 to: The
General Manager, National Parks Commission, Thomas Road. Thomas
Lands, Georgetown.


MMAEUNM Ma'6






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Montgomer) Clift
uas one of
Holly w good's
greatest actors
between the 19'4U's and the
end of the lIll's. Clift made
I" films before d)ing of alco-
hol and drug abuse at the age
of 46 in 1966. Howjeer. "e
must not judge or condemn
Clift for his personal weak-
nesses. or %e ma> miss the
%ital point that it is his film-
roles %which contain the
moral strength and kind
maltk values of this brilliant
actor. It is Clift's film-roles
which he carefully chose and
constructed and left as pre-
cious examples of sensitive
and benevolent human
behaviour. %\hen Holl,,%ood
gossip columnists and hack
writers discovered Clift's
scandalous and devastating
personal life, which he did
not trN to hide, he was ridi-
culed and called a "has-
been" eien before his earlI
death. Few critics focused on
Clift's art on screen, prefer-
ring to bury their noses in the
dirt of his personal life, with-
out caring about its real
causes.
Monty Clift's screen-roles
became the model of a


rJe q7 ip


L II


li t' "


By Terence Roberts


ienert niiin in the I 5 ', iLAld O'.
. h it tihbc ere mni.ile. 're
c.iither loaderi,. titel', i.ii lored
Uou-u er_ .idn c-hi t '.- i .'r-. -shed
_hierl if dthes i ere femi le. ,'.o.,re
looI e skirt, ii2hi little lhirti
annd bi,..u e<. .arid llaii h.-.e' \ithi
lile l.UcJd cilo.' urc'd ,',.k' The
thing is. the,, \ere intellect.dl.Jl
inclined. read ',,,od nh.,idern
n,:.'cl,. poetri .ind >.l i. crs
\ dluable % ei pleaCur.Ible ltilhn ol
that er.i Thi st', Ie .nd JillitdeC.
S hiLch .ij, rebelliou, in i
correct no.n-iag re'-i\ e %j.%\. %a
very much present in British
Guiana and early post-
independent Guyana, which
accounts for the low rate of
crime, or crude uneducated
behaviour among Guyanese of
that era. The style is rapidly
returning however among


',otilh. o[ NN, h -Ill.in c.. .iind
L rope % lh> .FrL h ,LI 1 i t'ii-2
nu1 led b, endle "nc ," n ..cil,
.and co'n-unI, er iifld' i Sn1.1
GU\N iCeIe o1 1:'d. I 'iuI d i .LL

.\mazingl. ii was Cliuft'
role aJ a 1 young ensiti-'e
cowboy in "Red Ri'er" of
1948. one of ihe be-i
ie,'terns e'er made. which
established himn as an actor
with adoring young fan-s. Clift
in this role showed strength
without being aggressive, but
defensive, which he would
repeat in one other film:
"From here to Eternity" of
1953, another masterpiece of
classic cinema. In both these
films Clift represented the
quiet man whose strength
lies in his personal character,


r-ilher ihan in his -
plh'-i'ial -'Ideions. ;
I his st le was,
contrasted nicel %
\with John \\V.i new's
stubborn aggression
in "Red Rier"":
\\%a le %%a, soa H
surprised at Clift's,
skill .uid confidence as
an actor. he is reported .
to hate ivferred to (in l
.so: "Thllt urmgunt little
bastard" while making
"Red
(Please turn to
page XII)


L



....l t~


MONTY CLIFT relaxing in an old plantatinhousesn
American South during the filming of Raintree County" in
Americn SOU1957.


REGISTERED NURSE

TRAINING PROGRAMME

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to be trained
over a three (3) year period with Universal Emergency Care School of
Nursing to become a Registered Nurse.

Applicants must be 18 years and over and should possess:-

* High School Diploma or GED (US applicants).
* Four (4) subjects GCE/CXC.
* Otherforeign qualification would be evaluated.

Training would be done on a part time basis on Monday to Friday,
1800 hrs to 2100 hrs and Saturday 1000 hrs to 1600 hrs.

Applicants must pass, an entrance examination and pay a non-
refundable fee of two thousand dollars ($2,000.00).

The cost of training is three thousand dollars (US$3,000.00) per year.
Scholarships are available from the Khan Award, the Mercy Award or
the UECT Award.

Successful trainees shall be certified on conclusion of training.

Applications, along with curriculum vitae and copies of certificates
can be sent to:-

Universal Emergency Care School of Nursing
P.O. Box 1322
'Georgetown
Guyana

Closing date for applications is Friday May 13, 2005.

Serious inquiries can be made at telephone # 592-226-6244
between 1000 hrs and 1700 hrs.

,.~ = ]tlL ,.,.$.L+=, ,.---mmm


sunaa~v lWPfftl6 PRnI Wa 2005


z I.-


c:.


Clitt-







SGuyana Chrc


-" To be a poet is to
make a judgement.
Farro is a poet. "-
Martin Carter.


One of the few living icons of
a booming intellectual era in
Guyana, Ivan Forrester seems
to have been forgotten. His
paintings and poems which
were once household and na-
tional treasures now seem to
be nothing but forgotten
fables.
Ivan Forrester now lies sick
and frail in a humble two
bedroomed house in the
backlands of Turkeyen. His
days in the public limelight long
gone, he is now secluded in blind
darkness as he lies on the bare
hardwood bedroom floor, his
eyes squeezed shut as he pon-
ders the writer's request for him
to tell his life's story.
The static of a small battery-
operated radio on the floor next
to him punctuates the silence as
the fallen hero fights the effects
of time and tries to revisit his
youth.
He nervously touches the
pages of one of the Watchtower
magazines strewn nearby, the
remnants of an abandoned read-
ing session with an attentive
granddaughter.
"Now as you can see, I am
old and sick and really can't re-
member a lot. I seem to have lost
my poetic streak," he remarks in
his still authoritative voice as he
struggles to recall his days at the
peak of success and find the
words to tell the tale of his long
journey to stardom and the hard
fall from the summit.
Again the static flares as
the silence once again em-
braces the atmosphere.
"In painful reminiscence
An evening shadow lurks
A Kaleidoscope of memories
Hurries across a faded
screen of life
As a weary warrior hopes
vainly
For another sun to rise..."
reads Ivan's poem Finis of Ef-
fort.
In the moments that follow,
the distant sounds of a small
television join the soiree of static
that is coming from the radio, fill-
ing the void of sound that per-
vades the humid atmosphere, as
Ivan finally breaks the solemn
silence.
"1 was )born at Manchester
i/ c ug;." o il C irn ictec'i( c "
'5This *|]; c ie ii CCl appc r-
r-hdv sp1 ks c 1erics of iicl'in -

1'.vidy recout hins b yvI'tIod.
'i ci.i hoodd c )a ;d
oY, ,. h. cccid


A HUMIIBLE BEGINNING
Farro as he was popularly
known in literary circles was
born on February 5, 1929 at
Manchester, Corentyne, Berbice,
the sixth child of ballata bleeder,
Joseph Forrester and his wife
Priscilla.
Farro says his childhood was
permeated with the fear and
deprivation that many Guyanese
who grew up during World War
I can identify with. He says he
can remember having to go with-
out lights at night for fear of air-
raids which were prevalent since
the pro-USA Caribbean was a
prime target during the war.
"We lived on very little
food because ships were being
intercepted by the German U
boats in the Caribbean and it
was hard for supplies to come
in," he told the writer.
"The nights were filled with
curfews, tramping soldiers and
planes overhead." Farro says as
pained look creeps up on his
usual passive facial expression.
"We had cassava bread, too
much ground provision and no
salt in those days, it was a ter-
rible time indeed."
He says he discovered his
love for art- painting in particu-
lar- quite early in his youth. It
was when Farro was just ten
years old that he made his first
attempt at. creating a piece of art.
By the time he was fifteen years
old Ivan Forrester had devel-
oped apt skills for painting and
decided to take the hobby a little
more seriously.
"I remember opening a book
- Who's Who in Guyana and
seeing a picture of the "kissing
bridge" in the Botanical Gardens.
I immediately fell in love with
the scene and decided to attempt
to reproduce it. First I started
with crayons then I used water
colours then oil paints and when
it was finished it looked lovely
to me."
Farro said he kept that piece
for quite some time but as a re-
sult of his having to move from
village to village in Berbice dur-
ing the war, it was misplaced.
All was not easy for Farro
academically either. After strug-
gling to send him to the
Manchester Scott School to ac-
quire a primary education, his
parents could no longer afford to
pay for his education. Hence. he.
did noi clt the opportunity ol
atlincid a higl school.
cThelc,: wa, siiil h'pc ) o
wever. When his parents coud ;
Ic'M" ii. icey would buy Icos
,or taspiriln scholar a u l ;d ;
W1' L''tvcd"i'i at home by a cci
i" 't!, l ae n lber s as i,,i.
Sii',i;;. free:,: oi' ,os. I was li1,


perse.eranceh b l\an and hi%
family that led to him doing the
Junior Cambridge Examination.
His older brother had to sell
some of his belongings to get the
money to pay for the examina-
tion and though he was not a
student of the Berbice High
School he was allowed to sit the
exams there.
This qualification eventually
led him to a career as a meteoro-
logical field assistant. He was
subsequently dispatched to
Guyana's interior where he was
given the chance to finally widen
his horizons and paint creative
original pieces rather than hav-
ing to replicate artificial scenes.

THE INTERIOR
Farro continuously painted
the Hinterland scenes that he
had become so used to admiring
while on his long tenures in the
interior. Some of these can still
be seen on the: walls of many na-
tional buildings and quite a few
homes.
Some of his more famous
works include pieces such as
Mazaruni, a depiction of the
Upper Mazaruni area with de-
tails such as plush greenlands, a
canoe moored on the Mazaruni
River and a small cottage in the
distance. Farro says this piece
which was painted in 1973 has
sentimental value to him because
he lived in that little cottage and
travelled in that canoe.
Light on Terrain is another
of Farro's more popular pieces.
This is a depiction of a landscape
at Mazaruni below Apaikwa.
Farro says he created the mas-
terpiece by playing with dark
colours as well as brilliant light
colours. 11 consists of a brilliant
sunset with dark trees against a
bright sky with a dark fore-
ground. This was created in
1966.
Another of Farro's bril-
liant works is .. -: Waka Poe
Landing, a scene where a
clearing begins to climb the
Pakaraima Mountains.
The inherent artist who had
had no forb l itraininrig fell in love
with not orly hi vo'k. but the
subject is p; e Guyana's
!linleri;;ni; bh i'i:, he saw n
f11 itto c l 1 ,' i c a-
son i ci : ident ii
though' h I- ; .. r, O'D \cm i
rai.; 'i 'c ulr.iri w ii
furn' c "." :,r b :,i' apprc,,


like that of \\' lon H.mrn. trul%
from the heart of the Mother-
land."
It was while Farro was idly
awaiting supplies to create more
magnificent pieces of art that he
found his true calling. During the
long wait for a boat to come
from Georgetown with the sup-
plies that he needed, he decided
that necessity was indeed the
mother of invention and used his
available resources a pen and
some paper to constructively
occupy himself.
" I




:Ei2if


\\ h n lie performed a: le% o0
these at a cultural presentation
in Bartica, also in Essequibo,
then Deputy Prime Minister and
watchful guardian of Guyanese
culture.Dr. Ptolemy Reid was
impressed and asked to see the
others. Amazed at what he read,
Dr. Reid offered to help Farro
get his poems published. He
agreed and days later the "bush
man" was in Georgetown
finalising plans for his first book
of poems to be published.
According to Farro, then


book of poems.
Having lived in the tur-
moil of the early 1900s and
the harsh lands of the inte-
rior, Farro has indeed walked
these hard roads.
However, there was a time
when this frail, blind old man
was considered a Guyanese
"hero". He was renowned not
only in his native land but in the
Caribbean and United Kingdom
as well. Buyers of not only his
art pieces but his poems as well
included foreign diplomats,
prominent members of the busi-
ness community and tourists to
Guyana.
He passionately per-
formed his poems for audi-
ences around the Caribbean
and more often than not
wooed local lovers of the arts
at various cultural presenta-
tions.
One such presentation was
the National Awards Ceremony
of 1985 where Farro received a
Medal of Service (MS) for his
outstanding contribution to the
literary development of Guyana.
He says he can clearly remem-
ber the ceremony and how
happy he was to have received
recognition for his work.
He proudly states that he
was a member of the Guyana
Writers and Artists Guild
which also presented him with
an honorary award during his
active years as a writer and
artist.
Having had no formal train-
ing as a writer or artist Farro
considers these to be very spe-


lA s -. .


Sa.



FARRO being read to by his granddaughter at his home in Sophia. (Delano


wrote many initial pieces but of
course they were my first at-
tempt and were not the best to
be had. but eventually I im-
proved my skills and I was im-
prcssced wi'iii mv own work," lie

The idea tllrned out to be
ver C Isii'Cive udccted as IFarro
neo cecd h' cirst sibs'tailtiai lit-


(';L: : :';.)PF! P :)ccce L,c
:11: ; v, ,,' ': > : ": : cI'''


Minister of Nat
opment Mr. A.J
helped him to ge
work published
Newx WVrilings c
bean.
"Through da
subju'igation
'through iti l
Ihai dlowni lie so
Through c whitl
. 'and llh ,


c ,..


tional Devel- cial accomplishments that he
Sey'mou1r also wants to share with not only his
et some of his family but the world as a whole.
in the book. His poems and his paintings are
of the Carib- his legacy to (Guyana.
FI arro says thal his writing
rk iijungles of balances his art so he cannot
in. ever separate thie \\ o things.
lung swms He also acknowidges that
lr l giving in ili' HMinteri.ad and
estreesi l ire being suddenly ejected onto
l, '" ,:'70 t a ,',' ," t'lhe


c o n.' -


t .: M in-







inicle April 3, 2005,


AN UNBREAKABLE
COMRADERY
"I met Martin Carter in
1952 so in a sense I met Martin
before I met his work," Farro
says of his late comrade and col-
league.
He says he met Carter in
Guyana's Interior where he was
a hydrometerological technician.


come to the interior on several
occasions subsequent to their
first meeting. Mrs. Carter says
that on one such occasion Farro
and Martin returned from the in-
terior and Farro presented her
with a painting. The painting -
which still hangs on the wall of
the Carter living room is a por-
trait of man fishing on the bank


SHEIK M, SA


by Petamber Persaud


Carter, already an established
poet, had accompanied his
friend, writer Wilson Harris -
then a land surveyor on a joy-
ride on Harris' new boat when
they encountered Farro at
Mazaruni.
Eventually the three men be-
came very good friends but Farro
and Martin shared a special
bond, they both had a passion
for poetry; Harris, on the other
hand, eventually left Guyana in
1959 to establish a respectable
fiction career in England.
Mrs. Phyllis



--.-





CA_ i

"NowL


-~ a
-4


Williams photo).


Carter, widow of the late Mar-
tin Carter says she can recall the
close friendship Martin and
Farro shared. She says Martin
and Farro who had become
very close associates would
frequently read and discuss po-
etry at the home she and Mar-
tin shared. She says she can even
remember the pair drumming in
the living room. Farro and Mar-
ti had ro', h son.': '.' .nca 1



c r-. .
,1I :


of a river at sunset.
According to Mrs. Carter, it
was not until a few years ago
during one of Farro's visits to her
home that he told her the iden-
tity of the man in the painting.
His name was Martin Carter.
Farro explained that while he
and Martin were at Kamaria in
the Cuyuni he painted the por-
trait of Martin while the latter
was fishing, oblivious to the fact
that he was the subject of the
work.
The two remained comrades
until Martin's passing in 1997.
Farro says of his friendship with
Carter, "Martin and I were very
very good friends until he died
there [sic]."
Mrs. Carter still has a copy
of Farro's poem Revolution and
the Waves which was published
in the Kaie magazine for
Carifesta 1975-1977.

A HERO FORGOTTEN
Today, tragically, this former
icon of Guyanese culture seems
to have withered from the minds
of the old and young alike. Now
a staunch Jehovah's Witness,
Farro is resigned to the fact that
he may never again receive rec-
ognition for his work. He is un-
able to attend his usual meetings
at the Plaisance congregation but
the members of the congregation
frequently visit him and take
tape recordings for him to listen
to.
Many persons might even
be surprised to hear that Ivan
Forrester is still alive. About
three years ago a rumour had tra-
versed the grapevine, a rumour
that Farro was dead. Even Farro's
dear friend Mrs. Carter Sister
Phyllis as he called her had
peddled the tale. Sadly, even then
nobody attempted to verify or
nullify the rumour. It seems
Farro just isn't important enough
anymore.
However, this writer was
able to uncover the source of the .
tiding. About three years ago a
man about Farro'. age and also
named ivan Forrester had passed
away. The m'an lived in Agricola
where Farro had also lived for a
long time. !Hence, the misconcep-
tion was born and Farro was
presumed dead.
Farro says he is content to
know that hei made a contri-
bution to the development of
Guyana and when asked what
he wanted .o teli the world in
addition to what his work has


te o'.'.*,.:


I.':"


Born in the rustic se
renity and beauty of
the island of
Wakeenaam, asleep
in the mighty Essequibo
River, to serve in the buzz and
insecurity of the Royal Force
Air during World War Two,
Sheik Sadeek wore many hats
in his ultra active lifetime.
Sadeek was born on January







". "









SHEIK SADEEK

9, 1921, one of a handful of writ-
ers produced by the largest
county of Guyana and the most
distinguished of the grouping.
As a writer, he was as pro-
lific as he was versatile, going on
to win numerous accolades. He
was a scientist as a writer, ex-
perimenting with various genres;
capable of transforming one
story idea into poetry, short
story, essay or play for stage or
radio. He was adaptable as flex-
ible as portrayed in his two col-
lections of almost identical sets
of poems, 'Reflections and
Dreams' and 'Dreams and Re-
flections', also rewriting his
novel 'Bundarie Boy' for use in
school.
As a publisher, Sadeek holds
a record that is unmatched even
unto today in a fast-paced elec-
tronic world. Many of his pub-
lications including his three nov-
els totalling some six hundred
pages rolled off of duplicating
machines.
Hard work that moulded his
character and commitment to his
dream took him to the 1op1 of his
game. He knew the taste of
poverty early in life, forced by
prevailing economic
circumstances into child labour.
Only Juslt out of the tluis'l
Dicren Primary School, he was
caught up in the backbreaking
ordeal of sugar cane and rice
production. But he managed ti
break ou! of this vicious cycle
by seeking' his lortmunc as
prospecloi'/porkn l 'f n ,ci.cr, a
Onlyju ,'out of the is't
DicrenPrimar Scoo he w


Tocf) Company (Demtoco),
Sadeek employed his hand at
writing, making optimum use of
the quietude and seclusion such
a job offered.
Despite and in spite of his
hardship, Sadeek started writing
as early as age 17, perhaps to
hold unto to his sanity, ap-
proaching this novelty with a
passion, experimenting with vari-
ous genres of writing poetry,
short story, the novel, essay,
screenplay, radio play and stage
play.
Sadeek graduated from
the Palmer Institute of
Authorship in the USA.
During the late 60s and early
70s, he was the secretary of
the Guyana Centre of
International PEN which
included names like Sheila
King, Evadne D'Oliviera,
Doris Harper-Wills, Cecile
Nobrega, Rajkumari Singh,
Joyce Sharer, Henry Josiah,
Donald Trotman, John
Campbell. (Perhaps, the first
time women outnumbering
men in a writers' group!) That
organisation produced 'An

- a4 i -,


a republic, working with Andrew
Salkey, Sam Selvon, Austin
Clarke, Earl Lovelace, Edward
Braithwaite, Robin Ravelas and
numerous Guyanese writers.
In 1972, Sadeek along T.
Anson Sancho, Donald Trotman,
Rooplall Monar, Bertram
Charles, John Campbell et al
travelled across Guyana laying
the foundation for the staging of
the first Caribbean Festival of
Arts.
My first meeting with
Sadeek was a student/tutor rela-
tion during a creative writing
course offered by the National
History and Arts Council in
1976. Subsequent visits to his
home at 100 D'Andrade Street,
Newtown, revealed to me how
committed he was to his writ-
ing, a good example I was never
able to inculcate in my career as
a writer.
Sadeek was the winner of
four consecutive National Liter-
ary Awards, the Cheddi Jagan
Gold Medal for Literature. Two
of his three novels, 'Song of the
Sugarcanes' and 'Bundarie Boy'
were winners of that prize in
l---^I "BH-ha'iUKMl~-i --


SADEEK receiving the Jagan Gold Medal in 1964, from Janet
Jagan for winning the Festival Week Literary Competition.


Anthology: Voices of Guyana"
edited by Donald Trotman
and published by Sadeek.
Attached to the National
History and Arts Council,
Sadeck worked with his
contemporary, A. J. Seymour,
on miany national i(iier;iry
projects. Those two lviterary
giants, working to ether.
separated' *n,:, f'' '11: n i ,;ii!c /a,


1959 and 19 I 9 rspecli\ ely.
Sadeek was a pioneer in lo-


cal publishing, he printed and
published almost all of his
books and was responsible for
showcasing the works of many
lesser known and budding writ-
ers like Cyril Dabydeen Cyril
Kanhai and Leila Sukhu.
An examination of the bibli-
ography of his writing showed
his import as a publisher, reveal-
ing an amazing production of
eight publications in the year
1974. And by 1976, ten years as
a publisher, he had already pro-
duced eighteen books.
The idea of establishing a na-
tional publishing house he dis-
cussed in f970 with Henry
Josiah, Jocelyn Hubbard and
Michael Gilkes but sadly noth-
ing came of it.
As a playwright, he was the
most prolific of his time, going
on to win the Theatre Guild
award on two occasions for his
plays 'Namaste' and
'Porkknockers' a gold medal
for 'Fish Koker' (1960) and a
number of Inter-School Drama
prizes.
Sadeek made use of every
publishing opportunity; his
short stories could be found in
the Argosy, the Chronicle, the
Mirror, the Caribia, the
Chronicle Christmas Annual,
Kaie and Kyk-over-Al.
'In Guyana Wilds', a travel-
ogue/story was aired in 1959 on
B.B.C. Caribbean Voice.
Sadeek also wrote the
screenplay for the first locally
produced Indian movie, Anmol
Bandhan (The Precious Knot),
adapted from a story by Chandr
Paul Persaud.
For his writing and for his
contribution to Guyanese litera-
ture, he was awarded a Medal of
Service in 1975.
Sheik Sadeek is regarded as the
first local writer to explore 1, ie smell
and taste of the grass root. the folk
culture of the ordinary man. In fact,
in 1977 when he migrated to Min-
nesota. USA. he continued to col-
lect Guyanese folkloric ,-aterial,
even unto the time of his death in
1987.


During his short :
in the USA, Sheik M.
lectured and taught ,
writing, literati to t
end of a satisfying lift


journ
5adeek
eative
Very


References:
* Publication & miscellaneous data from his boo;
Bibliography of Indo-Guyanese Imaginative Liter. lure
published in 'They Came in Ship'. edited by ioel
Benjamin et al
- Interview wit Steve Narine, Donald Trotman and' itla
King
SEmail from Evelynr C i 2
Registry ol Births & C

Responses to this ., i!, by ; 4. ci,: ., --.'.
F.,-,..- .-, 11 ; ,i,@ yeahoo.com


'%F~











Two -ffrderer



& robbers failed



to cheat...

(From page V)
participation or having given the caution statement attributed to him. They were convicted of
murder and sentenced to death. Now they have appealed to this Court against their respective
convictions", the Chancellor had said.
In his judgment, Chancellor George pointed out that in his main ground of appeal, counsel on
behalf of the first appellant contends that the learned trial judge ought to have exercised her discretion
to exclude the caution statement because there was evidence that it had been obtained by oppressive
means. He referred to the 1964 Judges' Rules which recognize that one of the fundamental conditionali-
ties for the admission of any statement given by an accused person to the police must be that it was
obtained without oppression.
In support of his submission, lawyer for the appellants, Khemraj Ramjattan, had cited a number of
legal authorities in support of his contention. However, the Chancellor said that he found the evi-
dence that the lawyer relied upon in support of his submissions to be quite insubstantial and uncon-
vincing.
Having rejected both the submissions by counsel for the No. 2 Appellant, Archer,, the Chancellor
who dismissed the appeal, adding,
"Before leaving this case I think that I should make some reference to acting D.P.P.'s third submis-
sion, which is that in any event the second appellant, as a principal in the second degree, would inevi-
tably have been found guilty of the offence of murder because he must have foreseen the use of vio-
lence by his partr er in the joint enterprise.
"In amplification of this submission he pointed to the fact that the dwelling was
not empty, and that the strong inference from the appellant's statement is that they
knew this to be.
"Therefore, he.argues, both parties must have foreseen the possibility that. during their presence
in the house; they might have been detected, and accordingly that some force might have had to be
used in order to avoid such detection or to make their escape from the dwelling house.
"In this regard he drew attention to the case of Chan Wing-siu v.R' (1984) 3 All ER 877.
The Chancellor concluded, "This was a clear case of the continued participation by the appellant
in a joint unlawful enterprise to steal with full knowledge from the circumstances that violence had just
been used.
"For the reasons that I have given earlier I would dismiss the second appellant's appeal. In
the result the appeals of both the appellants are dismissed and their convictions and sentences
are affirmed".




PROPERTIES

FOR SALE
AT AUCTION AT THE INSTANCE OF THE
REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT


* 20 years agricultural lease land (20.5 acres)
situate at Plots Nos. 28 and 29, Lookout, Right Bank
Essequibo River (approx. 2 km from Parika Old Road).

* Residential land (approx. 5000 sq ft) with one flat
wooden building (600 sq ft) situate at Lot 11 Section B,
Woodley Park, West Coast Berbice.

* 25 years agriculture! lease land (21.8 acres) situate at
Plot 36, Tempe, West Coast Berbice.

* Residential land (approx. 3000 sq ft) with one flat
wooden building (143 sq ft) situate at Lot No. 122
Section D Bush Lot, West Coast Berbice.

* Residential land (5032 sq ft) with two storey wooden and
concrete building (800 sq ft) situate at Lot 22 Second
Street, Craig Village, East Bank Demerara.

* Residential land (3790 sq ft) with two flat wooden
building in fair condition situate at Lot 80 Guyhoc Park,
Georgetown (top flat 655 sq ft; bottom flat is enclosed
with lattice work (1060 sq ft).

* Prime residential land (4804.67 sq ft) situate at Lot 238
Munipur Street, Area 'H' Prashad Nagar, Georgetown.

TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 2005, at 13:00 HRS
STATE WAREHOUSE, KINGSTON, GEORGETOWN
For further information please contact telephone numbers 227-8167/226-0718


aPI~ldll-- IBY~


(From pa.e I i
Rhier". 1%hen Clift acted as
the younger boxer in the US
Army stationed in Hawaii
during the Second World War,
his refusal to box in support
of his Company leads to his
unjust treatment by
superiors in "From Here to
Eternity". But it is his falling
in love with Donna Reed in
her Oscar-winning role as a
sweet and caring prostitute
searching for true love, which
stole fans hearts while
watching this film.
The key to Clift's
unforgettable roles in classic
films like "A Place in the Sun":
"1I Confess": "Raintree County";
"The Young Lions": "Suddenly
Last Summer": "Wild River":
"The Misfits": "Judgement at
Nuremnburg": and "Freud". lies
in his ability to insinuate
himself into your mind. Clift
had first mastered stage
performances, but understood
that over-dramatics with loud
voices and false tones were far from
true and effective acting. By using
the original idea of cinema,
which was to convey direct
sensory effect, Clift developed
the ability to convey and
sustain emotional and
intellectual values by gestures
with his eyes, his smiles, his
hands, his mouth, etc. He was
indebted to the silent screen era
of movies, and not surprisingly
was a close and good friend of
Charlie Chaplin, the comic
genius who coached him
unofficially.
Clift's constant


.ippc.ir.ince in % hal eerned
dunit'. .awkJ.ird eCen idi.ltic
tilm-roles, wtas no fluke or
coincidence, but a skill
nurtured by his lifelong
balancing of the physical and
mental powers within him.
This is the reason why he did
not pursue serious
psychological or religious
counselling for his personal
and social problems, but
chose to work them out in
screen-roles, which anyone
could learn from. Clift was
not a "Film-star" trying to be
rich and famous and
glamourous, but a genuine
artist who left precious
valuable films behind long
after he left this world. Of
the many great film Directors
he worked with, Edward
Dymtryk was one who knew
and understood him well, and
said this of him one time: "If
someone kicks a dog ten miles
away, Monty feels it." Clift's
personal life was not really
unhappy or reclusive as it may
seem; be partied quiet a lot, and
shocked the world by being
found passed out with an
empty whisky bottle in a
New York gutter early one
morning at the peak of his
success and fame; there is a
famous photo of him in
crumpled trench coat and
sunshades in his hand, telling
a crowd of reporters: "I'm
sick and tired of everybody
analysing me." But when we
look behind the public
photos of this gentle man we
see someone alone at the dead
of night in his apartment,


engros-ed in reading great
,ork- of literature b,
profound writers like Katka,
Kierkegaard, Chekhov, D.H.
Lawrence, Camus, etc.
Some of the most
beautiful accesses, like
Elizabeth Taylor, Marilyn
Monroe, Donna Reed, Hope
Lange, Lee Remick, all
doted on Clift. Taylor was
a life-long close friend, and
Monroe tried desperately
to seduce Clift during this
making of "The Misfits",
one of Clift's most
beautiful and memorable
roles not to be missed ever.
Clift was too Gay to really
get it on with any of these
women' but he was not one
to hide in the closet,
unlike other great male
stars loved by women, like
Rock Hudson and Tyrone
Power. What had really
damaged Clift's sensitive
personality from his youth was
an oppressive and possessive
family, and especially America's
social and racial bigotry of the
50's and 60's. One of Clift's best
films is "Wild River". Directed
by Elia Kazan, in which he
played a frustrated
administrator in the Tennessee
backwoods who demands
equal treatment for exploited
poor blacks and whites. Up to
his last film Clift chose the
roles he wanted, at one time
rejecting 163 film scripts.
Monty Clift was a beautiful
American, a beautiful
man, and a brilliant actor
whose films will never be
forgotten.


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Page XV


April 3, 2005
ai-wni'aws~KWBBBM~ia~a'.'rdl.'* fo~ rrO atitmtic


r~A


Af


d -


Like many things
around us, we
seldom appreciate
what is plentiful
and easy to obtain. And what
could be more plentiful than
water? To get water all we do
is just turn on the tap and it
is there, ready to use. But
think again -- the water we
use doesn't just magically
appear.
Treated water is a carefully
manufactured product which
appears in your home only after
travelling through many miles of
pipeline and lengthy treatment
processes. It's a valuable
resource that shouldn't be
wasted.
This article is about water
conservation, and what we can
do to reduce the use of one of
our most precious, yet
undervalued, resources water!
We need to retrace our
attitudes about water, and
water conservation. We use


water everyday at home and
at work in so many situations
that we take it pretty much
for granted.
Water passes through our
households, cooking our food,
bathing us, washing our clothes,
watering our lawns and carrying
away the various by-products
of our day-to-day lives. We
return it to the environment,
often to the same body of water
it came from, usually in a much
poorer state.
Following the four golden
rules of water conservation -
reduce, repair, recycle and
retrofit we can easily cut our
water use nearly in half.

REDUCE
It's surprising how much
water gets wasted. We just let
it run down the drain. Become
conscious of the amount of
water you're using and look for
ways to use less whenever you
can.

REPAIR
A pipe leaking one drop
of water per second will
waste 10 000 litres of water
a year. Most leaks are simple
to find and easily fixed, at
low or no cost.
RECYCLE
Recycling water involves
thinking of ways to reuse water
at an accepted level. Take for
example. Water used for
washing vegetables, fruits, etc
can be reused in the garden for
example, or can be used to
water plants in or around the


-Ti-

r h. I*
17 ~.,


house instead of being thrown
down the sink. You can also
think of other ways you can
work with to recycle water in
the home. You can even water
the plants with your old fish
tank water. Your plants will
love it.

RETROFIT
Retrofit means adapting or
replacing an older, less water
efficient fixture or appliance
with one of the many water
saving devices now on the
market. You can install a few
simple, inexpensive devices in
the bathroom that can save a lot
of water with no change in your
lifestyle or your present habits.
Many hardware and plumbing
supply stores stock these items.
This rule may surprise you with
it level of adjustment that it
brings to your home, work or
wherever.
REDUCING WATER
CONSUMPTION IN THE
HOME
In the home the generally
use of water for our everyday
activities takes a pattern of this
sort. (See table above)
Toilets (while consuming
nearly one quarter of our
municipal water supply) use
over 40% more water than
needed.

IN THE KITCHEN
There are many small steps
you can take that add up to big
water savings in the kitchen.


VACANCY


WWF-GGMC Small and Medium Scale Gold Mining
Management Improvement Project
Short Term Consultant Skills/Motivation Assessment,
Concession and Compliance Monitoring and Field Training of Miners

The short term consultant will be required to work closely with GGMC Staff, Miners'
Representatives and the Consultant in Tailings Management in executing the following
tasks:

1. Document the legal requirements for Small and Medium Scale Gold mining and
prepare documents for in-field assessments of miners' knowledge of and attitude to
legal requirements and environmental and OHS management and state of
preparedness for compliance with impending regulations, notably with respect to
tailings management and mercury use.

2. Undertake assessments and prepare a simple pocketbook for Small and Medium
Scale Miners.

3. Prepare and deliver training programme for Miners and Community Representatives in
critical aspects of environmental monitoring of turbidity and tailings impoundments.

Duration: Sixteen (16) weeks

Qualifications:

BSc. in Mining, Geology, Mineral Processing.
At least 5 years experience in Small and Medium Scale Gold mining including
experience in mineral processing and/or design and/or testing of gravity based
gold recovery systems.
Good communication and interpersonal skills.
Applications should be addressed to the Administrative Manager, Guyana Geology and
Mines Commission, Upper Brickdam and close on April 8,2005.
For further details contact the Project Officer, WWF-GGMC Project, Guyana Geology and
Mines Commission. -- .


'.'..,,"' Li a g n,' ',. Water Usage (%)
Home
Laundry 20
Cleaning 5
Showers Et Bath 35
Toilet flushing 30
Kitchen ft Drinking 10


These range from how you cook
to how you clean up.
Ways to reduce water use in


the kitchen
Take foods out of the
freezer early to allow plenty of


"^""~ll""liYI~UUIPYIIY-


POST TRAINING OFFICER


EMPRETEC GUYANA

Empretec Guyana is part of an international network of enterprise development institutions
and programmes under the UNDP and UNCT AD Empretec programmes. It is being
promoted by a consortium of local and international sponsors, including UNDP Guyana,
Guyana Private Sector Commission and the Guyana Manufactures'Association.

Empretec Guyana is a business support initiative, designed to develop a cadre of
Entrepreneurs among small and medium enterprises (SMEs) through a comprehensive
range of business development services including entrepreneurship and management
skills training, business advisory services, the facilitation of access to finance and export
markets. Empretec Guyana is targeted at high growth-oriented small and medium
companies.

The programme sponsors are looking for a (post)-training officer who will support the
Executive Director of Empretec Guyana in creating and conducting its training
programmes, particularly the creation of a post-training programme that provides
systematic follow-up services to entrepreneurs.

The duties and responsibilities of this officer include, among others:

Defining the post training requirements of entrepreneurs who undergo Empretec
Guyana training programmes and recommending the appropriate actions to be
taken.
Assisting target companies in determining their business development needs and in
evaluating their project ideas.
Providing technical assistance to client companies in the preparation of business
plans.
Dealing on a continuous basis with any operational bottlenecks that may be
identified in assisted companies.
Assigning and supervising local consultants to provide on-going' managerial and
technical supporttoclient companies.
Identifying source of financing for Empretec Guyana client companies and assisting
them to negotiate the terms and conditions.
Establishing and maintaining working relations and strategic partnerships with key
service providers, including local financial institutions and other SME assistance
programmes.

Qualifications and experience:

At least five (5) years experience, preferably in a management position;
Post graduate Degree preferably in Business Administration, Banking, Finance or
accounting. Professional certification in a relevant field will be a plus;
Knowledge and specific experience in the private sector, particularly in working
hands-on with small and medium companies is essential;
Si. Prior experience in a banking environment or a management consulting firm will be
an added advantage; and
Must have strong interpersonal communication skills, be analytical and have a good
sense of judgement.

Interested candidates are invited to submit a cover letter and curriculum vitae by 12 April,
2005, to the following address either by courier or post (Ref: Empretec Guyana):

The Office of the Resident Representative
UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENTPROGRAMME
42 Brickdam, Stabroek
GEORGETOWN

Previous applicants should not re-apply.

Interviews for short-listed applicants ill be scheduled to take place at the UNDP GOfice on
20 April, 2005.

Please visit website: www.undp.org.gy to find detailed Terms of Reference (TOR)


loagWx -
Ap -!-
,fta 3


time to thaw. Thawine frozen
goods under a running tap
wastes water.
Clean fruits and
vegetables in a partially filled
sink or container and rinse them
quickly.
i When boiling
vegetables, use only enough
water to cover the foods.
Steaming uses even less
water while conserving more
(Please turn.
to page XVIII)






--. : 3 ,i .-Sroriu' .,- ,,pi 3, 2005

_u j -. 0? -fl *~i S


Keith David


therefore is
that the
earth's atmo-
sphere is composed of several
layers of which the tropo-
sphere is closest to earth's
surface and extends no fur-
ther than fifteen kilometers
upward. What is even more
fascinating about this layer
immediately above our heads,
is the presence of more than
eighty five percent of all at-
mospheric gases and par-
ticles. Essentially, this is the
region most significant, most
influential to weather and
climate.
Characteristically, the
density or concentration of gases
and particles in the troposphere
decreases from the earth's
surface towards space.
Subsequently, the troposphere's
ability to retain heat as well as
the force it exerts on the earth's
surface (otherwise referred to as
pressure) reduces in a similar
direction of movement. This is


why mountain tops, even those
around the equator, are cold and
may be covered with snow.
Additionally, because
temperatures decline to about
minus sixty degrees Celsius and
air concentration is at its
minimum at the top of the
troposphere, human beings
cannot exist beyond five
kilometers above sea level
without adequate breathing
support.
In light of these character-
istics, water vapour and winds
rising from the earth's
surface loose much of their
energy in the frigid region of the
upper troposphere. Upon cool-
ing, winds become heavy and
water vapour condenses. In the
end, and via the transformation
of energy, air circulation and
clouds immerse as important
components of global weather
patterns.
If therefore, the atmospheric
occurrences of our time are part
of a delicate balance of energy
towards maintaining a planet
suitable for man's existence,
why then are we periodically or


seasonally ravaged by extreme
changes or natural disasters?
Before we explore the mys-
teries of abnormal rainfall pat-
terns and associated floods, it is
critical for us to ex-
plore why seasons
occur as well as the
emergence of wind
patterns.

From the diagram
we see that seasons emerge from
the revolution of the earth along
an elliptical path around the
sun. Through this annual
movement, the intensity of the
sun's energy is focused on
different parts of the earth's
surface. The greatest amounts
of energy are can be found
around the equator by virtue of
the spherical nature allowing for
the equatorial regions to be
closest to the earth and the Polar
Regions to be the farthest.
Tracking the concentration or
focus of the sun's energy
therefore, we see a path starting
east of the equator heading
north, back to the equator in the
west and then south before


*oltct,0,,


ENVIRONMENTALPROTECTIONAGENCY

B1 avaca Ncv
G'"yan ,
The Environmental Protection Agency, in collaboration with the Caribbean
Regional Environmental Programme (CREP) invites applications from dynamic
and highly motivated persons for the position of Demonstration Project
Manager (DPM)

The position of Demonstration Project Manager is a full time one. The
Demonstration Project Manager will report to the Executive Director or his
designated representative and will be responsible for:
Communicating regularly with the Environmental Protection Agency on
matters pertaining to the project.
Assisting with, and ensure, coordination of project logistics to deliver project
aims and objectives
Maintaining financial records and copies of all project related receipts and
documents
Assisting in monitoring project expenditure in order to help keep it within
budget
Giving relevant technical advice into the project as appropriate given his/her
experience
Assistingin the selection of participants in training courses and programmes

Qualifications and Experience
The consultant should possess:
A minimum of a BSc degree in Sociology, Management or a related field with
at least three (3) years experience or an M.Sc. degree in Sociology with two (2)
S years experience. Candidates with field experience and in Project
Management would have an advantage.
He/she must have the ability to communicate effectively and must possess |
good interpersonal skills.

Duration of Consultancy
One (1) year
Commencement Date
May 1, 2005

All applications should be addressed to:
Mr. Doorga Persaud
Executive Director
Environmental Protection Agency
IAST Building
UG campus, Turkeyen
..GrLer peorgetown ..... ..
ija.kI Nr'v L f. 'u------>'---.-
II I:f, A,, r .


I


returning to initial equatorial
point. The extremities of this
cyclic movement give rise to the
Tropic of Cancer and the
Tropic of Capricorn (23.5)
north and south of the equator.


)ecember 21


arch 20


When the sun is directly
over an area (as can be
observed along its path of
concentrated movement) it
supplies enough energy to
heat the air masses over that
area. When it moves or as the
earth continues to revolve
around the sun creating this


apparent movement, the.
energy passed unto that area
heats up the air and water
bodies. Evaporation follows,
naturally, cooling then occurs
as the air rises and clouds
form via condensation. Hence
the saying 'the cloud behind
the sun along its path'.
Subsequently, there is the
emergence of the four
unique seasons in the north


and south and the two
seasons we experience in
Guyana and the Caribbean.
As we look at these
occurrences we will see that
when there is winter in the
north there is summer in the
south and equatorial places
such as Guyana, are caught
in between, wet, wet, wet.

To be continued...


VACANCY

WWF-GGMC Small and Medium Scale Gold Mining
Management Improvement Project


The short term consultant will be required to work closely with GGMC Staff,
Miners' Representative(s) and millwright to complete the following tasks:

1. Review alternative gold recovery techniques which minimize or eliminate the
use of mercury and prepare documents/proposal on alternative practices and
methods for review by GGMC and Miners' representatives.
2. Undertake laboratory tests of the preferred process or processes and,
depending on the result, discuss with GGMC and Miners' Representative(s)
the requirements for setting up of a demonstration plant at an agreed location.
3. Order equipment for plant, and coordinate the construction of the
demonstration plant.
4. Test and commission the demonstration plant.
Reports are to be prepared at each transition point.
Duration:
Mineral Processing activity is scheduled to take place over a period often weeks.
The consultant's engagement with the project is expected to be for a total of four
(4) weeks spread over the ten weeks of mineral processing activity.

Qualifications:

B. Sc. In Mining Engineering, Geology, or Mineral Processing,
A minimum of 5 years experience in Small and Medium Scale Gold
mining including experience in mineral processing and/or design and/or
testing of gravity based gold recovery systems.
Good communication and interpersonal skills.

Applications should be addressed to the Administrative Manager, Guyana
Geology and Mines Commission, Upper Brickdam and close on April 8, 2005.

, ,F further details contact the Project Officer, WWF-GGMC Project, Guyana


e XV!


I il 1 -7:4 :1 A Ar,# cl


..eptemb
A ..... ..Septemb
." ....


EARTH'S REVOLUTION AROUND THE SUN
AND THE EMERGENCE OF SEASONS


r~s~6aw~r~pa~f~


DGRAPHY

TODAY




er 22













S : ., : ? un 21







Sunday C~Iii~I~Af~dl 3. 2(~)5 Page XVII


udlP- D -IP


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l "Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"
A-


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GUYANA POWER & LIGHT INC.


_____ 0 40mo mM da














ad w m q P S G SP


Guyana Power & Light (GPL) is inviting applications from suitably qualified
persons to fill the position of STOREKEEPER in the Garden-of-Eden Stores.


# Supervising the stock checking activities.
# Verifying the authenticity of Material Requisitions and related
documents.
# Ensuring that the security and fire protection facilities are adequate for
stock and premises.
Training and supervising subordinates.


# Bachelor's Degree in Supply Management/Business
Management/Accountancy.
# At least five (5) years experience as a Supervisor in a large organisation.
/ Computer Literacy.
, Ability to take initiative on behalf of the Company.
y Ability to multi task and balance competing priorities.
# Familiarity with current Safety and Environmental Legislation.
Compensation will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Applications with detailed resumes should be sent before Friday 8th
April, 2005 to the:
The Deputy Human Resources Manager .
GUYANA POWER & LIGHT INC.
257/9 Middle St.
Georgetown
Fax: 226-9821 "". -'
..Poweing Tnieforel


4<,



C.\


WWF-GGMC Small and Medium Scale Gold Mining Management
Improvement Project
Short Term Consultant
Environmental Education and Awareness

The short term consultant will:
1. Develop and deliver education and awareness programme and strategies to address
issues affecting health and safety of miners and communities impacted by mining,
environmental management in mining; raising awareness of requirements of the
Mining Environmental Regulations,
2. Prepare simple illustrated reading handouts and other products on selected topics on
Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Management in mining,
highlighting safe mercury use and usage minimisation; alternative gold recovery
techniques; tailings management, for the reduction or turbidity in mining effluent
releases to the environment, recycling of water; the impending mining environmental
regulations, malaria and other illness impacting Small and Medium Scale Mining in
Guyana.

3. Delivery and evaluation of Awareness and Education programme in Georgetown and
in the field with the training of field operatives.
The consultant will be required to work with GGMC staff and Miners Representatives and
will be required to coordinate with the regional Education and Awareness programme in
mining of the WWF Guianas.
Duration: Six (6) weeks
Qualifications:
1. B. Sc. in Mining Engineering, Geology, Mineral Processing or Environmental
Studies/Science.
2. At least three (3) years practical experience with the Small and Medium Scale
gold mining industry in Guyana.
3. Good written and oral communication skills.
4. Computer literacy with respect to Microsoft Publisher, experience in preparing
newsletters and brochures, and experience in working with miners and
hinterland communities will be a distinct advantage.
Applications should be addressed to the Administrative Manager, Guyana Geology and
Mines Commission, Upper Brickdam and close on April 8,2005.
For further details contact the Project Officer, WWF-GGMC Project, Guyana Geology and
Mines Commission.


sunclav-0" jgd'oW' 13,2WS,


Page XVII







Page XVIII


THE SOIL ENGINEER..


(From page VI)
agriculture production, I
systems that promote the
conservation of earthworms
might be important.
According to research
conducted the earthworm is
not merely a consequence of
high soil fertility, but the
contribute to its buildup and
maintenance.
For the effective utilization
of the soil eco system in
agriculture, the use of
vermicompost, earthworm,
mulch and plant root (VEMP)
interaction is essential. The
possibility of root hairs
interacting with nitrogen fixing
organisms may be increased by
VEMP interaction. It is known
that earthworms prefer low


o- GUYANA LANDS AND

SURVEYS COMMISSION
,-'! .22 UPPER HADFIELD STREET
'i D'URBAN BACKLANDS, GEORGETOWN

GENERAL NOTICE

CORRECTIONSAND OBJECTIONS TO LAND CLAIMS
To Claimants and anyone who has a valid interest in Agricultural State Lands within the
following areas along the Bonasika River and its environs:

Right Bank, Bonasika Riverfrom its mouth to Kasienath's residence about
1 1/4 miles above Waramia Creek.

S* Left Bank, Bonasika River from Mole Island to opposite Kasienath's
residence.

You are hereby notified that a Preliminary List and Draft Plans of land claims submitted
for the above stated areas during the Land Tenure Regularisation claims registration
exercise are posted for scrutiny at the following locations:

Guyana Lands and Surveys Commission's Field Office on the Right Bank,
Bonasika River

Guyana Lands and Surveys Commission's Sub-Office at Crane Village, West
Coast Demerara

Bibi's Shop and Mahindranauth's Shop ak Black Boy's Shop, Bonasika-River

Lower Bonasika Primary School

Claimants are encouraged to visit the above stated locations to ensure that their claims)
are correctly listed and annotated on the Preliminary List and Draft Plans. Claimants
may then submit any correction to the list in relation to errors in their Names, ID number,
etc. and/ or their land parcels. Also any person who wishes to make Objections to the
land claims listed and/or counter claims may do so on the prescribed forms provided.

Submissions for corrections, objections and/or counter claims to the Preliminary List will
be accepted as scheduled below:

Guyana Lands and Surveys Commission's Field Office on the Right Bank
Bonasika River from Wednesday, March 16, 2005 to Friday, April 15, 2005
during the hours of 8:30am-4:30 pm daily (except on National Holidays).

Guyana Lands & Surveys Commission Sub-Office at Crane, West Coast
Demerara, Wednesday, March 16, 2005 to Friday, April 15, 2005 during Office
hours on Mondays to Fridays.

A similar exercise will be conducted at a later date for the remainder of the Land Tenure
Regularisation Area previously advertised for the Right Bank, Bonasika River and its
environs.


ANDREWR. BISHOP
qM MISSIONFRiOV ANDSAND SURVEYS, ,
DATED: i arclY 13l2005 1


levels of lignin and tannin, and enhancing waste
green maturing younger plants degradation, its activities can
are recommended for ploughing also to a lesser extent
in for effective release and damage crops either by
uptake of nutrients, seizing fallen leaves of live
While the earthworm can plants and pulling them down
minimize the pollution or by uprooting delicate
caused by organic waste by seedlings.


. '<-,..II 1 11 V ,


L. Cobjah .*.. *
Deputy Clerktte National Assembly
15 March. 29 ..


- I


(From page XV)
nutrients. '
Turn your taps off tightly but gently so they don't drip. And repair any leaks in and around
your taps without delay
IN THE BATHROOM
,/I The bathroom accounts for about 65% of the water used
inside the home. Since we waste the most here, it's also the area
where potential water savings are the greatest and, the easiest
to obtain.
...-- ll REDUCE
SA few water-wise habitswill save you thousands of litres of
S water each year.
Sa You can save 10 to 20 litres of water each time you
S shave by filling the basin or a container, instead of letting the
'- water run continuously.
1 / Turn off the tap while brushing your teeth, and use
.1 short bursts of water for rinsing.
-' Turn off the taps tightly but gently so they do not
_" If you prefer the bath, don't overfill the tub; 1/2 full
should be enough.
Flush the toilet only when necessary. Never use it as a wastebasket for tissue etc., and never
flush paints, solvents or other chemicals down the toilet.
Avoid prolong showers which uses up more water than you would usually require. A four-
minute shower can use as little as 40 litres of water, while a bath needs 230 to 270 litres.
If you are building a new home or remodelling an old one, consider installing "low flush"
toilets. These toilets use 5 to 9 litres per flush instead of the 10 to 20 litres used by conventional ones.
They are readily available and, although they cost more, they can save you a lot of money in the long
run through decreased water and energy use.
These are just a few examples. The more aware you become of your own water using habits, the
more room you'll find for improvement. Conservation will help maintain an adequate water supply for
our community and reduce your water service costs and lost of natures' precious resource. There is
only a certain amount of fresh, clean water available..Finding new sources of water, using less water
where we can. and minimizing pollution are important ways to use our water resources wisely.
In many parts of the world, water is extremely scarce. Certain areas are also occasionally
hit with droughts. For people living in these places, water conservation is a fact of life. Many
communities are working together and trying things like planting native plants instead of grass
and using drip irrigation systems on farms. There are many easy and creative ways that people
everywhere can conserve water. Remember that you can share your findings and ideas with us
by sending your letters to: "Our Environment", C/o EIT Division, Environmental Protection
Agency, LAST Building, Turkeyen, UG Campus, GREATER GEORGETOWN.







PARLIAMENT OFFICE
A g e : ofCi 4 : o4, jiN ,

Invitation to the Public for Written Submission
The Age of Consent Bill 2004 (Bill No. 22/2004) has been committed to a Special
Select Committee of the National Assembly. This Bill seeks to amend the Criminal
Law (Offences) Act, Cap. 8:01, in order to increase the age of consent from thirteen
(13) years to sixteen (16) years. It also seeks to amend the Marriage Act, Cap. 45:01, to
say that a female of sixteen (16) or seventeen (17) years of age may petition the High
Court for permission to be married.

The Committee has begun its work but wishes to receive from members of the public,
individuals as well as organizations, their views on the age of consent.

The Committee is, therefore, extending an invitation to members of the public to
forward written submissions of their views on this matter not later than 15 April
2005.

Individuals and organizations who are willing to appear before the Committee to give
oral evidence should indicate this in their submissions.

All submissions must be'iddressed to:

| The Clerk
Special Select Committee on the Age of Consent Bill 2004
(Bill No. 22 of 2004)
Committees Division
Parliament Office
Public Buildings
Georgetown







Sunday Chronicle April 3, 2005
.. . .... o:. 7


TUV


HAENALNGIOMAS AND
HAEMATOMAS
Haemangiomas of the skin
and soft tissues are benign
proliferations that closely re-
semble blood vessels.
Whether these are neoplasms
or malformations of the
blood vessels is still unclear
and no scientifically accept-
able criteria exist that would
ensure a valid differentia-
tion. We usually encounter
Haemangiomas in dogs (and
sometimes in cats) on their


trunks and extremities.
Some breeds like Boxers and
Airedales and some Setters
and Terriers seem predis-
posed to this ailment.
Usually a Haemangiomas
presents itself as a single or mul-
tiple, circumscribed, often com-
pressible reddish-blackish nod-
ule. Sometimes this "bump" be-
comes ulcerated. Usually its ap-
pearance is like a blister that is
filled with blood. These type
tumours are not life-threatening,
but because they ulcerate and
can grow to be quite large they


should be surgically removed.
A Haematoma (sometimes
written Hematoma) is a collec-
tion of blood beneath the skin.
Small Haematomas may disap-
pear spontaneously while large
ones have to be opened and
drained. Very often the cause of
the Haemotoma is a physical
trauma (a blow or a contusion).
In dogs (and cats to some ex-
tent) the most common form of
a Haematoma develops in the
flap of the ear.

EA.R HAEMATONL


CAN you imagine that scientists can do this to our furry friends? "Vivisection is barbaric,
useless and a hindrance to scientific progress" says one Animal Rights Activist, Dr Werner
Hartinger.


7 ,, ''-

Welcome to the 339'" edition of
K "Champion Cookery Corner", a
weekly feature giving recipes an
tips on cooking in Guyana.




In 1935, the chef of the Hotel Esplanade in Perth, Western Australia, Herbert Sa
created the Pavlova to celebrate the visit of the great Russian ballerina, Anna Pa'
Whilst it has been suggested this dessert was created in Ncw Zealand, it has be
recognized as a popularAustralian dish.

Pavlova is a lovely, light dessert made in a meringue shell. The -.
meringue is topped with fresh cream (available at out local "" 9" .
dairies) and fruits any of your favourites may be used,
although we recommend soft fruits such as mango, banana, '
paw paw etc. If fresh cream is unavailable why not try
substituting chilled custard made with Champion Custard:
Powder. Simply follow the packet instructions, allow to
cool and then chill in the refrigerator before topping your
Pavlova-enjoy!


These are fluid-filled swell-
ings of the car flap. They de-
velop quite suddenly. The fluid
is really blood that has escaped
from damaged blood vessels in
the ear. As the trapped blood
separates into serum and the
blood clot, the swelling becomes
quite turgid.
The causes of the blood
vessels bursting are manifold.
The more obvious cause is a
blow to the ear flap. On other
occasions, mites in the ear cause
dogs (especially those with
floppy ears) to shake their
heads with such ferocity that
the centrifugal force alone is
enough to rupture the blood
vessels in the ear. Scratching and
general rough handling of the ear
could also result in damaged
blood vessels.
Sometimes a client, seeing a
swollen ear, thinks that he/she
is dealing with an abscess or
even a growth of some sort. Yet
vet will advise at a glance what
it really is.

TREATMENT

In the absence of known
trauma to the ear, predisposing
factors (infections, irritations)
should be looked for and
treated.
Blood should be released
from the Haematoma to pre-
vent ultimate scarring and
deformity of the ear. Remov-
ing it with a needle and sy-
ringe usually is not effective
as serum accumulates in the
space formerly occupied by
the blood clot. Surgery, the
treatment of choice, involves
the removal of a window of
skin to provide open and con-
tinuous drainage. The ear is
then bandaged over the head
until it heals.


,"pinch salt


d 4-6 egg whites
8oz castor sugar / sugar (equal parts)
1 teaspoon white vinegar
S /2 teaspoon vanilla essence
2 level teaspoons cornflour
achse,
vlova. Preheat oven to 400F (200C). Lightly grease
come oven tray, line with baking paper or use non-
stick cooking spray.

Beat the whites of eggs with a pinch of salt
until stiff (until peaks form). Continue

vanilla, until of thick consistency.

SPONSORED BY THE MA

Baking Powder
Custard Powder PAST


Page XIX










Please implement disease preventative measures
(vaccinations, routine dewormings, monthly anti-
Heartworm medication, etc) and adopt-a-pet from the
GSPCA's Animal Clinic and Shelter at Robb Street
and Orange Walk, if you have the wherewithal to care
well for the animals. Also find out more about the
Society's free spay and neutering programme by calling
226-4237.


Lightly fold in cornflour. Pile mixture into
circular shape. making hollow in centre for
filling. (Mixture will swell during cooking)

Electric oven: turn oven to 250F (130C) and
bake undisturbed for 1 V2 hours.

Gas oven: bake at 400F (200C) for ten
minutes, then turn oven to 250F (130C) and
bake a further hour.

Turn oven off, leave pavlova in oven until
cool.

Top with whipped cream (or chilled custard)
and decorate with fruit as desired.


NUFACTURERSOF


'Black Pepper


Commission took
its Film Festival to
members of Youth / 0
Challenge Guyana last Tb I

ing, they were asked
by the ERC facilita-
tor about what could be done
to improve race relations in
our country.

Here are some of the answers:

: Encourage inter-racial marriages
: Teach everyone to respect each other's religion and
culture
: Stand up to your friends who make racist jokes and
discriminate against others, letting them
know that this is bad
: Talk to younger siblings about the ills of racial dis-
crimination:
: Policies in place for the distribution of house lots and
the awarding of scholarships should be strictly adhered to,
and
: In distributing house lots, the agency concerned
should do this so that Indo-Guyanese will be
neighbours with Afro-Guyanese. In this way they will
get to know each other, and they will become friends.


--


' k .- ; '
* / .' *









V


.,v t~.


Miss Sartica Regatta 2004. Sonjie
last d v of her reign.

Ix


I




Ii


Referee Dianne Ferreira-James a native Bartican and her sonRomario enjoyingsome


detteE Re secondd from right) and her sister came home after a long while
ClPudette Eklund-Reis (secoht.)and hLouists Holder. In the background
to enjoy Regatta with spouses Gunnar Eklund and Louis Holder In the background
centre is their brother, chairman of Banks DIH, Mr. Clifford Reis.



Good news in battle...
(From page II)
screening women for abnormal cervical tissue, treating the condition before it advances,
and providing appropriate follow-up care. To date, screening efforts have relied largely on :
the Pap smear, a test that has long been used to detect abnormal cell changes. However,
while the test has achieved tremendous success in industralised countries that offer periodic,
high-quality screening, Pap smear programmes are complex and costly to run and have failed,
to reach a significant proportion of women in countries where health systems and
infrastructure are poor.
But cervical cancer can be prevented at low cost, notes the report. Health providers can use
relatively simple technologies to screen women for precancerous conditions and treat abnormal tis-
sue early. The ACCP's work demonstrates promising approaches that have the potential to reduce
the impact of cervical cancer even in the poorest countries.
"The ACCP's research has found that programmes can safely and effectively screen and treat
women in just one or two clinic visits, using low-cost techniques," notes PATH's Sherris. "In many
settings, prevention programmes can be integrated into routine health services, assuming adcquaie
resources are available."
Through its projects in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and South Asia over the past five
years and with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the ACCP has studied screen-
ing and treatment approaches particularly for women in their 30s and 40s.
*search has I ..... i. p ..p' i1. 1 ,.., .11 / increase women's access to prevention services. Among
the i st promising alternatives to the Pap smear are visual screening methxls that require simple vinegar or
iodii solutions and the eye of a trained health provider to spot abnormal issue. Anotlicr altemalive involves
testi:i women for HPV on their services. While lchi'se approaches atre still being evaluated, all have the poten-
lial t(; save more lives at lower cost than traditional approaches using Pap simaris.
1 ood prevention programmes for cervical cancer ashrc a niaumb il) key siia ics:. They use
oca, unidepood messages to incteas t '.avn icss of lh disease: ro;'c! :' ailicnt pi'(i ol
v'on 1 in uhl r 3()s and 40 ": mnoival iai ; a i, g.'t csel at least one ; ]i;k it lit ii I'i li!c
w*id available: and an; n.e i pp'inp'.i' ii v;-i-up care'.
-ps to preen claie ,,, ni ii. i ;-,ii : i a c ilS over l ratcgy o ia i cis ,on ai's health ; .i to
!ro;ioltec equity a,' I a high quality C iari thnrou'iii priImaryv health care systerIms. i l11c 1ipoil.
In addition io PATH, the ACCP comprises EngenderHea!h. 'he international Agency'
research on Cancer, 1.. !1 4 ,and the Pan American Health Oriuanisation.


visiting Guyana


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