Title: Guyana chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00009
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Alternate Title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown Guyana
Publication Date: March 13, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088915
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text

The Chronicle is at http://www.guyanachironicle.eco


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- PAHO boss

commends Guyana on

flood diseases fight


'...sometimes (you) don't get much credit
when you have saved many lives and you
have reduced pain and suffering, but it
takes a lot of work to keep an outbreak
contained...'
DR MIRTA ROSES


PAHO PRAISE: President Bharrat Jagdeo meets
PAHO Director Dr Mirta Roses at State House
Friday night Winsion Oudkerk photos


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 13; 2005


PAHO boss

commends Guyana on

flood diseases fight


By Shawnel Cudjoe
WASHINGTON-BASED Di-
rector of the Pan American
Health Organisation
(PAHO), Dr Mirta Roses
Periago, yesterday com-
mended the Health Ministry
for controlling the outbreak
of diseases here after the di-
sastrous January floods.
"What really matters is that
we have been able to reduce the
suffering, reduce the pain. reduce
the lives lost and people have
been able to get access to food.
medicine and critical health
care", she said.

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At a press conference in
Georgetown with Health Min-
ister, Dr Leslie Ramsammy. she
commended the ministry's post-
flood response in coping with
various diseases.
"I am also pleased that the
ministry has been able to re-
spond and to really organise
very quickly and deliver sup-
plies to the persons that suf-
fered so much...sometimes we
don't get much credit when you
have saved many lives and you
have reduced pain and suffering,
but it takes a lot of work to
keep an outbreak contained."
Dr Roses said the fact that
the affected people were taken
care of was most important.
The United Nations esti-
mated some 300.000 people
were affected by the floods
which forced the government to
declare disaster zones in three
coastal regions.
As fears of an outbreak of
diseases mounted during the
floods, President Bharrnat Jagdeo
appealed for international help
and for doctors from overseas
to back the government's health
response to the crisis.
Cuba deployed a 40-mem-
ber medical brigade and the
United States, Canada, Venezu-
ela, the European Union and


t i

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Sthe sorrowful
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41


BRFAHMA KUIMARIS


GOOD JOB: from left Renee Franklin Peroune of the local PAHO office, Sonia Roopnauth, Permanent Secretary in the
Health Ministry, Dr Mirta Roses, Health Minister Dr Leslie Ramsammy and Dr Bernadette Theodore-Gandhi, head of the
Guyana PAHO office.


others flew in specialists to
help.
Dr Ranisanmmy has hailed
the support from PAHO and
other agencies in the battle on
the health front and said their
efforts helped his ministry to
keep fatalities down and contain
any major outbreak of diseases.
Roses noted that Lep-
tospirosis, the bacterial disease


reaction has been the right one
to contain the outbreak", she
said.
Ramtsammy explained that
three levels of testing were done
for the disease and while some
results are available, his minis-
try was analysing these and this
will take sometime.
Roses left the country yes-
terday morning after a brief visit


... sometimes (you) don't get much
credit when you have saved many
lives and you have reduced pain and
suffering, but it takes a lot of work to
keep an outbreak contained...'


that triggered widespread fear
after several infected persons
died, is common during flood-
ing.
She said although it was un-
fortunate that persons died, the
Health Ministry took the right
steps to contain the outbreak.
"Leptospirosis is one of the
known characteristics of flood-
ing and I think that people have
been given the right treatment
and those who have, unfortu-
nately, been late to get the
treatment...died. but I think the


DR MIRTA ROSES
which included a call on Presi-
dent Jagdeo at his official State
House residence Friday night
when he hosted a farewell for
the Cuban medical team.
The PAHO Director was in
Suriname for a meeting and said
she came here a first hand look
at how the country was coping
after the floods.
She told reporters that
PAHO has been mobilising re-
sources for countries such as
Guyana. Haiti, Nicaragua. Bo-
livia and Honduras which were


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all selected as states that needed
assistance.
PAHO's first objective is to
ensure that the National Health
Development Plan is progress-
ing and the Ministry of Health
has the capacity to explore that
national development.
She added that to ensure
that public health is made a pri-
ority in a country. religious in-
stitutions, non-governmental
organizations and civil society
need to participate in the devel-
opment process.
She also stressed the impor-
tance for organizations such as
PAHO having persons on the
ground and not waiting for a di-
saster.
PAHO's immediate and ef-
fective response to Guyana's
call for help during the floods
must be credited to the constant
communication there was at the
country level, she said.
She noted that coining here
allowed her to see the current
situation and get an idea about
the reconstruction plans.
"We cannot predict disas-
ters, but we can work to reduce
the effects of them on the
people", she added.
Ramsammy said Guyana
and PAHO have had a long
working relationship and the


organisation played an integral
part in the recent disaster.
He commended PAHO for
its work.
"A significant part of the
success belongs to PAHO; they
were there to help us through
every step of the way", he said.
He explained that Guyana
received moral support from-the
health organisation but it also
responded eagerly to the call for
assistance.
"...many organizations gave
moral support from the very
first day of the flood, but we
needed more than moral sup-
port in those initial days. and
PAHO was in a position to pro-
vide concrete assistance from
the very first minute."
Apart from the assistance
during the flood. PAHO has al-
ways been assisting the health
sector in a number of ways,
Ramsammy said.
"PAHO is involved in
Guyana in every aspect of
health, sometimes, more areas
than others...malaria, maternal
child health, HIV, and
immunisation."
He said it has contributed
to the delivery of services to
the people and in helping to
establish systems and capac-
ity building in the sector.


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 13, 2005 a


Show the



CANU urges U.S.


THE Customs Anti Narcotic
Unit (CANU) has shot back at
a United States government
claim that it may have been
infiltrated by drug rings and
has challenged it to produce
the backup information.
"CANU questions why the
evidence to support these alle-
gations has not been presented
to the Government of Guyana
for the appropriate action to be
taken and anxiously looks for-
ward to this development", the
agency said in a press release.
CANU's challenge followed
the International Narcotics Con-
trol Strategy Report the U.S.
Bureau for International Narcot--
ics and Law -Enforcement Af-
fairs released just over a week
ago.
It confirmed.that Guyana is
a transshipment point for South
American cocaine destined for
North America, Europe and the
Caribbean.
The report said joint U.S.-
Guyana operations in combat-
ing narcotics were "quickly
compromised due to corrup-
tion", triggering a growing inter-
est and involvement here by the
U.S. Drug Enforcement Admin-
istration (DEA) over the past_
-year.
It says there is corruption
within the Guyana Police Force
and CANU.
"It is believed that CANU
has been penetrated and could
be corrupt at every level", it said
and revealed that the.DEA was
"providing vetting for some
counter narcotics personnel."
But CANU said its manage-
ment "has striven assiduously
to eliminate corruption and
guard against penetration of its
operations. This is evidenced
by the fact that over the past
year four officers, were termi-
nated for acts inimical to the in-
terests of the unit."
The U.S. bureau also re-
ported that a 2004 DEA effort
to work with CANU on a drug
interdiction project was com-
promised before it could be
made operational.
The local agency, however,
declared that it was "palpably
unfair to blame CANU for the
abandonment of this joint
project when all the factors
which led to its abandonment
are dispassionately examined."
"In relation to information
sharing, CANU has always en-

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gaged in the information sharing
process with other U.S. law en-
forcement agencies through the
USDEA", it said.
DEA WITHHOLDING
INFORMATION
CANU also accused the
DEA of withholding requested
information.
"...there is a disparity in
the flow of information, as on
several occasions CANU re-
quested information through the
USDEA and none was released.
CANU supplies information in
a prompt and keen manner (but)
this is not reciprocal."
It said it had raised this is-
sue "unsuccessfully... with the
USDEA on many occasions."
CANU said the U.S. claim
that there was mistrust between
its officers and those in the Po-
lice Force "is totally false".
"CANU and the GPF col-
laborate and share information
on a regular basis and frequently
conduct joint anti-narcotic in-
vestigations and operations
with intelligence emanating from
both agencies."
CANU also called for
"more tangible support in the
-forumof-assistance (to) he given
to the unit."
"This support from U.S.
law enforcement agencies to
CANU has decreased signifi-
cantly over the years", it said.
It said that although the
U.S. report "impacts nega-
tively" on the relationship be-
tween CANU and the USDEA,
"CANU will steadfastly con-
tinue to collaborate with the
USDEA and other U.S. law en-
forcement agencies in the uphill
fight to effectively counter the
narco-trade in the interest of
both countries."
The U.S. report also drew
a sharp response from Presi-
dent Bharrat Jagdeo last week.
He told the opening of the
annual Army officers conference
that the Guyana Government
has appealed to the U.S. to
share information on known
drug traffickers but is still
awaiting a response after mak-




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ing a formal request
a year ago.
He reiterated
commitment and will
fight narco-traffickir
cared that the U.S. h
more in the battle again
licit scourge.
He stressed tha
was willing to wor
with the U.S. in'the
said there should be
ment from them to r
that willingness to he
of putting out "one-
ports that do not capt
facts.
NO RESPONSE FR
Mr. Jagdeo report
wrote U.S. Assistant
of State for the West
sphere, Mr. Roger No
ing him it was time th
and Guyana have a
agreement through w
can share valuable in
on drug-trafficking a
laundering.
"In December 2
Noriega wrote me a
support for the meet
time) in Mexico on s
guage for corruption
him back and said we
port this but I think
time that the United
Guyana have a bilate
ment on sharing infor
illegal accounts or acc
in either of the two co
anyone public or pr
cials who have gai
proceeds from illegal
their by money launde
dealing or tax evasion
"Until today, I ha
a response for that
agreement," he annou
President Jagdeo
that he found the re
"strange" since he req
U.S. Government mc


dope

year ago to do a complete poly-
graph (lie detector) testing of
"every single member of
CANU from the head to the
more than cleaner" but was told by the
U.S. authorities that it was "too
Guyana's costly".
ingness to "Itf it's costly for them,
ag but de- what do you think it will be for
as to help us? They have a nine trillion
inst this il- dollar economy and yet it is too
costly then what will it be
t Guyana to us as an economy of 700 mil-
k closely lion dollars?"
fight but He noted, too, that when
a commit- the issue of extradition of local
eciprocate drug traffickers came about, it
;lp instead was rumoured that the Guyana
sided" re- Government did not want this.
ure all the The President said this was
never the case since his govern-
ment found out about the extra-
ZOM U.S. edition issue from a report in a
ted that he newspaper in New York.
Secretary There were reports that the U.S.
ern Hemi- authorities might ask the
riega, tell- Guyana Government to extra-
at the U.S. dite as many as 16 persons but
bilateral President Jagdeo said only three
vhich they names (persons) were re-
iformation quested.
nd money "There are three, but I think
the Commissioner of Police is
2003, Mr. looking for those three persons
asking for because I think they disap-
ng (at that peared," he said.
strong lan- He pointed out that many
n. I wrote times "we lost cases in the
e will sup- courts because some agency
that it is from the U.S. could not send
States and their people here to lead the evi-
eral agree- dence".
mation on "So when I see these re-
ounts held ports at the bottom when
iuntries by they talk about corruption
ivate offi- (they should write) that the
ined these Government of Guyana has
means, ei- requested a bilateral agree-
-ring, drug ment but we (the U.S) have
1." not responded, and when
ve not had they speak about CANU be-
bilateral ing compromised they should
nced. say also that the Government
indicated of Guyana has asked the U.S.
port to be to polygraph all the members
juested the of CANU but we thought it
ore than a was too costly," he declared.


Berbice cambio


dealer shot

cops hold three

A BERBICE cambio dealer was attacked and shot as he
headed to a toilet in his yard early yesterday morning but
residents, reacting quickly to the attempted robbery, helped
police nab three suspects.
Mohamed Yusuf, 42, a cambio dealer at the Skeldon Mar-
ket, was reported stable in the Skeldon Hospital yesterday af-
ternoon.
He was shot in the left side of his chest but the bullet
passed through the body, about an inch from the heart, a rela-
tive said.
Another bullet grazed the back of his head, the relative told
the Chronicle.
The businessman was attacked at about 06:00 h in his yard
at Narine Datt Avenue, and was shot as he grappled with the
three men.
Residents and relatives rushed to his aid after hearing the
gunshots and the men fled.
Two of them were, however, recognized and police who were
quickly on the scene, swooped on a house at No. 79 Village
where they held them, the relative said.
Residents said police arrested another suspect at No. 53
Village and were looking for a fourth.
The relative said Yusuf fought with his attacker although
shot but collapsed after they fled and was rushed to the hospi-
tal.
Relatives commended police for their work in arresting the
men...
Police said that at the house in No. 79 Village where
they held the two men, they found a Bulldog special .38
revolver; four live matching rounds, two spent shells, a pair
of camouflage pants, a camouflage jacket, three masks and
a quantity of clothing.


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GUYANA SUGAR CORPORATION INC.


The Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc. invites
suitably qualified contractors to tender for the
dismantling of the Rose Hall Factory
Boiling House and installation of a New
Steel Framed Building in its place.
A site visit on 16" March, 2005 where the scope
of works and tender document will be read, is
mandatory for prospective tenderers.
The site visit is arranged for 10:00 a.m. at the
Factory Manager's Office, Rose Hall Factory,
Canje, Berbice.
Tenders from contractors who did not
attend the site visit will not be accepted.
Place sealed envelope marked "Tenders for
Dismantling and Installation at Rose Hall.
Factory" in Tender Box #10 at the
Corporation's Head Office, Ogle, East Coast
Demerara, by April 5, 2005, at 2:00 pm.
GUYSUCO does not commit itself to accept the
highest or any tender submitted.
J.. J, Y.,j


Invites you to


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SUNDAY ICIHICLE, IP Marc lh 12005


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Compehesiveproramm fo


toursm dvelomentconfrenc


BRIDGETOWN, Barbados -
The Caribbean Tourism
Organisation (CTO) has
unveiled a comprehensive and "
impressive programme for its
Seventh Annual Caribbean
Conference on Sustainable
Tourism Development (STC-
7) which takes place April 26-
29, 2005 at the Hilton Tobago
Golf & Spa Resort in
Scarborough, Tobago.
The programme includes
general. sessions at which
participants will discuss
pertinent sustainable tourism
issues relating to the conference
theme, 'Keeping the Right
Balance Sustainable Tourism
Through Diversity:' highly
interactive and stimulating
workshops to complement the,
general sessions; and exciting
study tours through which
participants will explore the
diversity of Tobago.
"The programme is designed
to focus attention on the many
initiatives taken in the Caribbean
to contribute to the sustainable
development of the tourism
industry and the potential use
of ecotourism as an instrument,
to achieve this goal," said
Mercedes Silva., CTO's
sustainable tourism specialist.
The general sessions will
deal with the question of
whether the Caribbean desires
tourism growth or tourism
development, Ms. Silva said.
She added that conference
participants will learn the
economic benefits of creating a
sustainable tourism product as
well as how to develop, market
and communicate the goals of
developing as a destination that
is committed to sustainability.
Issues to be covered at the
general sessions include the need
to develop quality service
guidelines when creating a
sustainable touri! pprogdtand"
revisiting ecotoi'sm %e '


sustainable tourism
development.
Simultaneous workshops.
which were introduced at the
STC-6 in Havana, Cuba last
year to very positive responses,
will again form part of the
conference programme.
Participants can look forward
to workshops on business
opportunities in the region and
intersectoral planning among
others.
"The introduction of
workshops to the
Sustainable Tourism
Conference proved to be a
great success in Cuba
because they allow for more
dedicated discussions on
particular issues related to
the overall theme of the
conference and they give all
the delegates the opportunity


to participate and contribute
to the conference," said
Karen Ford-Warner, CTO's
acting secretary general. "We
anticipate an equally
enthusiastic response to this
year's workshops."
Conference organizers
have put together two special
presentation sessions that
will provide delegates with
the opportunity to hear how
two previous host countries
are faring since hosting past
STC conferences.
Representatives from St.
Kitts and Cuba will share tho
advances each country has
made since hosting the
Sustainable Tourism
Conferences in 2003 and
2004 respectively.
Registration for the
conference includes


attendance at all conference
sessions, study tours and
events; copies of conference
proceedings; and all
sponsored meals on the
Conference programme.
Conference information and
registration forms are
available at
www.onecaribbean.org.
This year's conference is
organised in collaboration with
the Association of Caribbean
States (ACS) and the
government of Trinidad and
Tobago.
The annual Caribbean
Conference on Sustainable
Tourism Development is part
of the information
dissemination and regional
awareness component of
CTO's Strategy for
Sustainable Tourism.


~VVRYCI


-


- o db





U6 -!iUPAY; COMMsMM' tgjQQ5


Editorial )


GOING BEYOND

CRITICISMS
IN THE battle against the massive narco-trafficking
trade and' related evil of money laundering,
information-sharingis'a most.vital ammunition for
societies grappling with the very challenging
problems of supply.and demand.
The United States of America, reputedly the single
* biggest consumer of illicit drugs, needs and deserves
;the practical cooperation it can muster to deal with
the problems of narco-trafficking and money
laundering. Together,..these problems have spawned
Widespread corruption, at various levels, including law-
enforcing agencies.
It is, therefore, quite surprising to have learnt from
SPresident Bharrat Jagdeo that for all the criticisms
against Guyana's state institutions and agencies in
the recently published International Narcotics Control
Strategy Report, the U.S.A. has not been forthcoming
on his request for specific mutually satisfactory
cooperation arrangements.


It is all the more surprising when it is considered
that such a request was officially made .back in
December 2003 to the\U.S. Assistant Secretary of
State for the Western Hemisphere, Mr. Roger Noreiga.
It remains unanswered up to. this time, even as
Guyana and its CARICOM partners continue to be
committed to working with the U.S.A. in the war
against illegal drugs and international terrorism.
Mr. Noreiga may well be burdened with a'heavy
workload, or simply forgot to respond to Mr. Jagdeo's
request for a bilateral agreement on information-
sharing focused on legal or illegal accounts, held
either in the U.S.A. or Guyana, by public and/or private;
officials that could be traced to-money laundering, !
drug deals or tax evasion.
In the circumstances, the unconcealed anger of
the Guyana President over what.he regards as "one-
sided" reporting and lack of reciprocity, seems quite
appropriate and should not be misinterpreted as an
excuse for claimed corruption. It is clearly in the
mutual interest of the U.S.A. and Guyana for corrupt
elements, public or private, to be exposed and brought
to justice.
Whether or not he was aware of it at the time of
his written request to Mr. Noreiga, President Jagdeo's
initiative for a bilateral U.S.-Guyana information-
sharing pact could be placed in the context of the
1997 'Bridgetown Accord' between the U.S.A. and the
Caribbean.
Specifically, the spirit and letter of the provisions


Blindness


of


of that Accord deal with "combatting attempts to
corrupt officials" and "combatting money laundering"
(pages 27-29).
This latest International Narcotics Control Strategy
Report and President Jagdeo's public response as
declared in his address Wednesday to the annual
conference of the Guyana Defence Force have
served to further underscore the complexities of the
problems at hand.
,Now, therefore, new, creative initiatives must be
pursued by the relevant U.S. and Guyana authorities
to overcome the problems so that the drug.dealers
and those engaged in -money laundering-,nd tax
evasion can be -exposed and effectively.dealt with
according tOlaw. I


CHRONICLE


Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Sunday Editor: Nichelle Nurse 4
Editorial: 227-5216; 227-5204: 22-63243-9
Sports: 225-7174
After hours 226-3243-9
'Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is at Awu.guyanachronicle.com
e-mail address sundayedilor@dgu)anachronicle.com
Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown, Guyana.


U.S.A.


to

THE UNITED States of
-America has long been served
by administrations in
Washington that admit to no
wrongs of their own but plenty
in other nations. Just follow
their rhetoric and judgements
on human rights and
democracy.
In the case of the George W.
Bush presidency, this attitude is
being institutionalized as a fine
art, with a preponderance of
rightwing conservatives on
board serving an administration
whose leader swaggers around
speechifying as if armed with a
divine mandate. to reshape the
world into his Republican image
and likeness.
There really seems to be no
limits to the arrogance and
hypocrisy of this -Bush
administration when it comes to
lecturing the world on human
rights and democracy in
complete disregard forAmerica's
own human rights violations at
home and abroad.
Latest example of this came
with the release earlier this
month of the U.S. State
Department's global human
rights survey that freely knocks
at the doors of all considered
guilty without any evidence or
remorse over its own record of
violations.
This, mind you, in the face
of rebukes that have been
increasingly forthcoming from
international human rights
organizations like the London-
based Amnesty International
(AI) and U.S.-headquartered
Human Rights Watch (HRW).
Caribbean governments and
representative civil society
6(ganisaniffofnWTS'eTSITr'flfe


its

accustomed to the selective
ratings in U.S. State
Department's 'country reports'
that comprise the annual global
survey, and which could be either
harsh or complimentary, based
on the perspectives of those
compiling them and passing
judgements.
Taking the moral high ground
as the "mother of democracy"
on human rights observance has
long been the posture of the
U.S.A. But after the horrendous
9/11 terrorist strikes, the brazen
arrogance of the Bush
administration has become quite
difficult to ignore in the face of
its warmongering politics, gross
human rights violations in Iraq,
Afghanistan, Guantanamo Bay
in Cuba as well as the erosion of
civil liberties of Americans at
home.
Wherever they occur, in our
Caribbean region or else, crooked
elections, police brutality,
unlawful executions, degrading
prison conditions, denial of press
freedom, human trafficking or
right of association must be
exposed and unequivocally
denounced, based on evidence.
In such a context, the U.S.
global human rights survey could
be a useful tool to whip
defaulters and encourage
observance of internationally
recognized human rights
standard.

THE REALITY
If, only, the U.S.A. could be
humble enough a quality not
associated with the current Bush
administration to also engage
in self-examination of its own
record. Particularly as it dares to
'Masffm'tit-rdTe"f-reTT"WtrIps


own


Oh,

chief cop and a very anxious Watch sa
"enforcer" against states of coerci
unilaterally deemed of a broad
"dictatorships" and "exporters rights prt
of terrorism". combatir
For all the commendable As i
features of the American people wounds
and the inspiring examples from investiga
sections of the mainstream media methods
and judicial system, the reality Iraq, A
is that U.S.A. is also very much Guantai
a country where political "clearan
interference with freedom of the technique
media, manipulations of the did not 1
judiciary, ghastly crimes, The fin
deplorable prison conditions, provoked


political and racial discrimination
and the-erosion of civil liberties
continue to be regular
occurrences.
In January this year, at
least six weeks before the
release of the State
Department's latest annual
human rights survey, Human
Rights Watch, in criticising
Washington's policies that
undermine global human
rights, said the U.S.A. "can
no longer claim the moral high
ground and lead by example".
Identifying gross human
rights violations by U.S. forces
at detention centres in places like
Iraq (Abu Ghraib) and


SGuantanamo, Human -Rlglft


aid: "Its (U.S.) embrace
ve interrogation is part
ader betrayal of human
inciples in the name of
ig terrorism..."
f to rub salt in open
, a Pentagon
nation into interrogation
at detention centres in
Afghanistan and at
namo Bay gave
ce" three days ago to
es used, claiming they
ead to prisoner abuse.
dings have already
d criticisms from human


rights campaigners and even
members of the Senate Armed
Services Committee.
Even now, as he demands the
withdrawal of Syrian forces from
Lebanon, President Bush is
finding it uncomfortable to
dismiss exposures of a U.S.
policy of "outsourcing torture".
As detailed in a
comprehensive article last month
in 'The New Yorker', a highly
credible news magazine, guess to
which countries suspected "evil"
collaborators have been secretly
despatched:
Yes Syria, Egypt, Morocco
and Jordan, according to a
penetrating analysis by Jane
"""P'yM'I fn "the sdttet'Histbo o


America's extraordinary
'rendition' programme".
The fact that Lebanon still
faces aggression from Israel
which is anxious for Syria to be
treated as a pariah state; or that
Iran and Syria are accused of
capabilities to produce weapons
of mass destruction, while Israel
fully enjoys protection of its
arsenal of WMDs, is all part of
the hypocrisy that characterises
U.S. foreign policy. The moreso
under George Bush's watch.

HAITI'S CASE
In seeking to escalate
pressures against Syria, George
Bush is happy to be singing from
the same hymn sheet of France's
Jacques Chirac who he was
deriding right up to the last
November's presidential
election.
But, as was the case in their
military intervention in Haiti that
coincided with the coup against
Jean Bertrand Aristide, there is a
convergence of American and
French interest to now force
Syria's withdrawal from
Lebanon.
In Haiti, at the moment, a
U.S.-installed interim regime
has been holding for months
among its political prisoners
a former Prime Minister and
an ex-Interior Minister of the
deposed Aristide government
in complete defiance of the
rule of law that requires those
accused of serious crimes, like
murder, to be charged and
placed before the courts.


Republic of China and Cuba that
frequently come in for official
U.S. human rights bashing, have
gone on the offensive against the
latest State Department global
survey.
In its own assessment,
China points to significant
levels of poverty and crime in
the U.S.A.; gross abuses
abroad by its military and
intelligence forces; and has
dismissed America's electoral
system as "a contest of
money".. China claims that
Washington was "consistent
in its hypocrisy" in
condemning human rights
conditions in other nations
while keeping silent on its
own sins.
For its part, Cuba has
documented numerous instances
of U.S. violations of its
sovereignty; gross human rights
abuses by America at home and
abroad.
Last week Cuba's Foreign
Minister Felipe Perez Roque
said in London that the Bush
administration "has no moral
authority" to judge the human
rights record of other nations
after the scandals over treatment
of its war prisoners, such as
those at Guantanamo Bay.
Yesterday in New York,
representatives of various U.S.
associations were scheduled to
meet to express their
condemnation of the new
restrictions on travels by
Americans to Cuba as
imposed in 2004 by the Bush


wrongs


or a little humility!


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Cana san

Visas:
Paid Representative


The new regulations state that paid representatives must be
authorised: Authorized, paid representatives may only be:
*. Immigration Consultants who are members in
good standing of of the Canadian Society of
Immigration Consultants;
Lawyers who are members in good standing of a
Canadian Law Society.
Members of the public are therefore warned that they should only
deal with Authorised representatives. If you are paying a fee to a
representative and that representative is not authorised, your
application will be rejected or returned to you, even though you
may qualify for Permanent Residence.
Verify a Representative by visiting the Canadian Government
website, www.cic,g.,.a
This is a public service announcement from:
Balw4t Persqud & As piate .
? '" d Sp ocie of


We haridle Refugee I
Workers, Students,
Self Employed etc.,,,
We are the only'.C
Authorized to repress
.accordance with Cana


as a paid Representative in


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BFF 8263 or PFF 8263 Grey Nissan Mini Bus
BEE 1226 White Nissan Caravan Mini Bus
BDD 5565 White Hiace Mini Bus
PGG 2208 Brown Nissan Pathfinder
PGG 4222 White Nissan Sunny Car
PHH 5571 Burgundy Toyota Starlet Car
PHH 5047 Dark Green Toyota Corona Car
PFF 335 Green AT 170 Toyota Carina Car
PEE 8255 White Toyota Car
PEE 7177 White Toyota Corona Car
PFF 7399 Blue Toyota Carina Car
PEE 3625 Toyota Car
HA 9946 or PGG 9273 White Toyota Carina Car
PFF 9285 Black Honda Prelude Car
S .. 4488 . ;, ,.. ., Motor ,., ,
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8 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 13, 2005


Supercomputer guru


out of Africa

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, into future

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BANK OF GUYANA


The Bank of Guyana is inviting applications from suitably qualified persons to fill the
following vacancies in its Information Services Department.
PROGRAMMER (ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL) INFORMATION SERVICES DEPARTMENT
Minimum Qualification Requirements
* Degree in Computer Science, Information Systems or related field
* Degree in Mathematics, Accountancy, Finance or Management and at least one (1)
year relevant IT experience preferably in programming.
* Diploma\in Computer Science, Information Systems or related field and at least
two (2) years relevant IT experience preferably in programming.
COMPUTER TECHNICIAN (SENIOR CLERK) INFORMATION SERVICES DEPARTMENT
, Minimum Quailfication Requirements
* Ordinary Technical Diploma (OTD) and at least one (1) year experience servicing
computers and peripherals.
* A+ Certification and at least one (1) year experience servicing computers and
peripherals.
* At least five (5) subjects at one (1) sitting or six (6) subjects at two (2) sittings at
GCE/CXC Examinations which should include English Language and
Mathematics with Grades A, B, C, or I and 11 and least two (2) years experience
servicing computers and peripherals.
Copies of the job description for these positions could be obtained from the Human Resources
Department of the Bank. Applications along with a detailed Curriculum Vitae should be
submitted to the Bank not later than TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 2005 and should be addressed to:
THE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
HI M %N RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
BANK OF GUYANA, P. O. BOX 1003,
I CHURCH STREET & AVENUE OF THE REPUBLIC,
GEORGETOWN.
We regret that responses will not be sent to applicants who do not satisfy the Minimum
Qualification Requirements for these positions.


fta- 4b owlso
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- 40.0 .MIS .404


THE UNIVERSITY OF GUYANA
AMERINDIAN RESEARCH UNIT
in collaboration with
THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, USA
present
GUYANA AMERINDIAN SOCIEfI lb:
An Ethnography of Village Communities
.4 Slumber course 1itl a d fiff'reniceC
Come and experience Cultural Anthropology
while you interact with the
llakushi of Region )
and students and ;tafft'ot'he Lini\'ersit. of Virginia
Five exciting \\eeks 2 in the Rupunuini

REGISTER NOW
Course cost ( Field Trip) G$40,000
For further information contact:


The Amerindian Research Unit
F-27 (Top Floor)
School of Education & Humanities
Turkeyen Campus


. .t






SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 13, 2005 9




Spotlight on wife, mother





and teacher par excellence


by Stacey Bess

INTERNATIONAL Women's
Day was observed globally
last Wednesday.
In Guyana debate persists
in governmental and quarters of
civil society on the status of
women; achievements, failure,
gaps and future goals. Whatever
their current national standing.
there is evidence that over the
decades, many women have
asserted their womanhood.
without defying their traditional
role as homemaker and
supporter of the men folk. who


for one year, before enrolling as
a full-time student at the
University of Guyana (UG) to
read for a Bachelor of Arts
Degree in French. She graduated
in 1975 as a French major.
Spanish minor.
A born-again Christian since
she was 17. Mrs. Heywood
combines teaching French with
sharing Jesus, wherever she
goes.
"For me, to teach French
and not share the Gospel is
unfinished business," she
posited.
"When 1 wash clothes and


'I spent all my life in Guyana. Teaching
is the only job that I know, apart from
being a housewife.' Mrs. Claudia
Theresa Heywood


are usually the ones taking the
spotlight.
Mrs. Claudia Theresa
Heywood is a fine eximnple of a
woman who, in addition to being
a dedicagC wife and mother.
has carved for herself a ninCh in
society. For 24 years she has
been tutoring secondary-level
students in a foreign language -
French.
In 2001, as a part-time
teacher at Queen College, she
prepared her largest group 39
students for the Caribbean
Examinations Council (CXC)
French examination. Thirty-
eight of those students
succeeded and their outstanding
accomplishment contributed to
Guyana topping the Caribbean
in French at CXC that year.
"I spent all my life in
Guyana. Teaching is the only
job that I know, apart from
being a housewife," Mrs.
Heywood told the Sunday
Chronicle last week.
Mrs. Heywood was born in
Friendship, East Coast
Demerara. The youngest of
eight siblings, she was raised in
the city by her mother, a
housewife, and her father, a
businessman. She spent periods
of her life in Alberttown and
Wortmanville.
Her French teacher at
Tutorial High School made
learning the language so
enjoyable that after attaining her
Ordinary Level qualifications
there, she pursued Advance
studies in French, Spanish and
English at Bishop's High School.
Even as she mastered all three
of these languages, she
,ie;,'loped a special liking for
Frenchi. W 'A' Level tutor in
the subject did not jake it easy
for her to release this keeniiss
for French; her guidance made
learning the language almost
effortless.
"I don't know what it is
that really made me like French
so much, perhaps it's just the
.... :^ ^ .o +1 ----.^ 1. . . --
IIUbuIL uS n1 L11i uai aluu
Science was just not my thing,"
she said. Her older sister, also
did French, and that aided her
interest in the subject.
Mrs. Heywood began her
career.in education, by teaching
Ie French at TAtQrial,,igh,S.choo,oJ..


dishes, 1 am ministering; when
I ensure that my family's meals
are ready on time, I am
ministering: when I sit beside a
puzzled child and help him/her
to unravel a difficult assignment.
I am ministering; when I listen
withoi ;,".!rrupting and allow
.my husband to unuL.;den
himself. I am ministering." she
added.
Her students surely felt her
love and appreciation for them
as individuals, as it was one of
her past students who
recommended that her
contribution in education and
personal development of youth
be underscored in light of the
annual international recognition
of women.
Throughout her teaching
vocation she has advanced Bible


Clubs in schools. She started
tis Cl'!tom at St. Stanislaus
College, where shi, soent 12
years. Being pregnant with her
fourth child she resigned to be a
stay-at-home mom. She later
taught French at Queens College
for five years. All the while she
was strengthening the Bible
Club movement at the school.
At Mae's Secondary, where she
is now a full-time French
teacher, she brought into
existence the Bible Club culture.
With a tone of satisfaction.


ATTENTION

All Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Technicians

the Institute of Applied Science &
Technology (IAST)
in collaboration with UNEP and
Hydromet Service,
is currently hosting one-day workshops
on




Venue: Government Technical Institute
(GTI), Woolford Avenue, G/T
Theoretical & Practical Training by
Specialist Consultant.
Participants will be issued with Certificate.


Mrs. Heywood says that her
life revolves around home.
school and church. as she
"supports her husband who is


out and about."
Claudia Theresa Cromwell
became Mrs. Heywood on
December 26, 1977, when she
exchanged wedding vows with
Loris Heywood. Her husband is
a former national chairman 1of
Inter-School/lnter-Varsity
Christian Fellowship (IS/IVCI).
He has maintained involvement
in youth meetings, youth
camps, and Bible Clubs. He is
an Elder at Bethel Gospel Hall
- Christian Brethren Assembly,
taught at the secondary level
for 14 ears and since 1986 has
pursued a career in
Development Administration.
He is now a senior staff member
at the CARICOM Secretariat.
with assigned responsibility for
development projects.
They have two daughters
and four sons. who have all
followed their father in attending
Queens College. Their first
daughter and first son are
studying in the United States of
America. Her daughter Marise
has completed a Bachelors in
French and Latin Americ;an
Studies at New York State
University. and is pursuing a
higher-level degree. while Luke
is on his way to becoming a
lawyer at City University.
Brooklyn College. Their third


PUBLIC AUCTION OF MINERAL PROPERTIES

The General Public is hereby notified that.there will be a Public Auction of Mineral
Properties on Wednesday, March 23" 2005 at 10:00 hrs in the Boardroom of the
GGMC.

The following properties will be auctioned:

1. Prospecting licence blocks at Pashanamu, Kaburi, Lower Iroma,
Cuyuni, Shararin, Kartuni and BHP Reconnaissance Permit area.
2. Certain Mining Permit Blocks on topographic Stock Sheets 4SE, 10NW,
10NE, 35SE and 43SE.

Successful bidders will be required to pay the winning bids plus 3% Auction Dues
immediately at the end of the Auction. Application for Prospecting Licences consist
of the following elements:
Filling out the prescribed 5D Form
Payment of US$100 application fee
Work programme and Budget for the first years activities
Proof of Financial and technical Capability


(The GGMC will provide the required maps and description)

All applications for prospecting licences and mining permits must be submitted by
April 29,2005.


Technicians from outlying Regions
ar. urged to participate in this Interested persons must consult the relevant maps which are on display at the
FREE tri ",ng opportunity. GGMC, GGDMAand Bartica Mines Office to ascertain their areas) of interest.
Transportation expiG;1es will be
subsidized for Participants You are invited to a brief presentation of the Prospecting Licence auction
Su Ri n I - on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 at 14:00 hrs in the GGMC Boardroom
from outlying Regions. r ae,,-
Limited spaces are available
Please call 222-4212/4214 from 8:30 4:30 Commissioner
for registration and enquiries,


I


* .- 't >
\ :.. "
-



Mrs. Claudia Theresa Heywood


child, Joel is an Electrical
Engineer student at the
University of Guyana. Loria-
Mae, David and Christopher are
still completing their secondary
education at Queens College.
During a pregnancy, and
with a three year-old and a two-
month old Mrs. Heywood
studied for a Diploma in
Education, graduating in 1985.
As a graduation pre-requisite
she completed a two-month
National Service stint at
Kimbia. This experience she
published last year in her
second-book titled "I Was There:
My Stint in the Guyana
National Service'.
Mrs. Heywood has also
exploited her mother tongue
and studies in English
Language, which she
portrays in poetry. She
published 'Reflections', a
book of poetry in 1994.
"Faith in, and strength from
God. and living one day at a
lime" has mdc her a successful
wife. mother and teacher.
She advises children to
"stay focused, don't give up
easily," and to parents she
says, "children need to be
given attention, they perform
better when parents focus on
them."


II


'






10 SUNDAY CHRONICLE U ikh -'OO1



Embrace


additional


models of


counselling, .


testing


U.S. Ambassador


O RGANISATIONS
in the drive to
reduce the spread
of HIV/AIDS in
Guyana must look beyond
client-initiated testing and
embrace additional models of
counselling and testing in
order to reach more persons
who are most likely to
require HIV care and
treatmpnnt.
This is the view of
United States Ambassador to
Guyana, Mr. Roland Bullen
who indicated that one such
model is "provider-initiated
counselling and testing" where
providers in health care settings
routinely discuss and offer HIV


Sharing skills

Changing lives


counselling and testing to
persons most likely to benefit
from prevention messages and
access to HIV care and
treatment.
The Ambassador made
the remarks Wednesday at the
launching of a Voluntary
Counselling and Testing
Services unit at the West
Demerara Regional Hospital.
Among those who
would benefit from such
counselling and testing are
pregnant women in antenatal
clinics and labour and delivery
wards; clients of STI clinics, and
persons with tuberculosis.
"The increasing
availability of treatment and


A nurse cuts ute riUUIin ui Lte vI sIm
Leslie Ramsammy, second from right.


prevention of mother to child
transmission services has
resulted in more people
.CCe.in" testing in order to
know their HIV status. Yet, it
is estimated that only 20 per
cent of HIV positive persons are
aware of their status. Hence, the
need for an increased focus on
counselling and testing," the
ambassador said.


VACANCY

i I i.i.' Al


The Guyana HIV/AIDS
Reduction and Prevention
Project (GHARP), the
USAID's flagship project, is
supporting the Ministry of
Health to develop counselling
and testing approaches that are
cost-effective, pragmatic, ethical
and adaptable, ba- mn various
need, nhi settings. The model
that is currently being used is
client-initiated testing at stand-
alone or mobile voluntary
counselling and testing sites.
The unit's launching
brought the number of facilities
equipped to offer counselling
and testing services to seven,
including sites located within
four non-governmental
organizations.
According to
Ambassador Bullen, it is
envisaged that 15 fixed
counselling and testing sites
along with one mobile unit will


assador Roland Bullen, left, and Minister of Health, Dr.


be operational by March 31.
"The ultimate goal is
to make counselling and


testing available and
accessible to all Guyanese,'1
he said.


a0 10 I I


Copyrighted Material
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Available from Commercial News Providers"


VSO is an international development agency that works through volunteers to
fight global poverty and injustice. As Country Director, you will lead VSO's
country programme. With your passion and professionalism you can build a
better future in one of the poorest parts of the world.
A motivated development professional seeking a challenge, you will be an
empowering people manager, skilled networker and team leader, with a firm
belief in VSO's values and a commitment to combating disadvantage in Guyana.
You will have sound judgement, excellent problem solving skills, a commitment
to gender equity plus proven ability in participatory strategic planning. Human
resource and financial management are essential for this role.
In particular, you would be expected to command skills, capacity and practical
experiences within the areas of advocacy and rights based approaches, which
will be crucial to implement the current Country Strategy Plan. You would also
have broad experience in leading diverse teams from similar management
positions within development.


Closing date:
Preliminary interview date:
Final interview date for short listed candidates:


18 March 05
31 March 05
To be confirmed


VSO values a diverse workforce and welcomes applications from all sections of
the community.

Application forms, detailed job description and related information can be
uplifted from our office. Please contact Tara Persaud.

VSO, 106/107 Lamaha & Carmichael Sts, PO Boy ",
G,, .... 199 Ge-rgetown'
Telephone: I-fl'"' ," ..... ,aI
Tn -L'-U688/9, (592) 227-. Facsimile: 226-8613 Email:
Taramatti .r-ersaud@vsoint.org


Public Service Ministry
Notice of Award

The Government of Guyana in collaboration with the
Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan is offering a
limited number of postgraduate Scholarships in New Zealand for
the 2006 academic year.
Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for
consideration in the following priority fields:


Engineering
Veterinary Science
Dentistry


Applicants must have obtained a Bachelor's/Master's Degree
within the last five years with a G.P.A of 3.0 and above/ upper
second class honors in the relevant field of study.
Application forms and a detailed fact shet can be obtained from
the Permanent Secretary. P c Service Ministry, 164 Waterloo
Street, Geor*-,wn and/or the Scholarships Department,
...i. ng Division, Durban Street and Vlissengen Road.
Georoetown

Closing date for the receipt of applications is 31st March, 2005
and should be returned to either of the above addresses.
Permanent Secretary
Public Service Ministry


4ow OP
%-No






,SUNDAY CHmO10CL5E, AMtmbI 8rio~A --


President says




'thanks' to overseas




medical brigade


PRESIDENT Bharrat Jagdeo
Friday evening thanked the
members of the overseas
medical brigade who flew in
to lend assistance during the
devastating floods that swept
parts of Georgetown and the
ast and West Coasts of


experts) presence here made
a difference," President Jagdeo
told the medical team.
He noted that the Cuban
Government has always been
generous to the Government and
people of Guyana and pointed
to the many Guyanese students


any single country and its
support was "indispensable and
very excellent."
This is particularly so, the
Minister explained, because the
Cuban experts are familiar with
the health needs during a natural
disaster, as many. of them


Demerara. studying in Cuba on previously worked on such
The brigade, most of whom scholarships. missions, the most recent of
are Cubans, were hosted at a He expressed hope that the which was the tsunami disaster
farewell reception at State Cubans would return home with, in South Asia.
House. pleasant memories of Guyana, Cuban Ambassador to
The Cuban Government despite the hard work during the Guyana, Jose Manual Inclan
answered Guyana's call for floods, noted that the Cuban doctors
medical assistance and a. 40- Guyana has received much are satisfied with the
member medical team was support from the international hospitality of the Guyanese
dispatched. The team spent six community in terms of the Government and people and
R;i-.;,.-, ;..^.;^ -...' ,
^^**~~~.' fl_:tr


the Cuban delegation, said
they enjoyed their stay. He
noted that they have seen
more than 54,000 flood
victims and helped with
public education, particularly
on sanitation and hygiene. He
said that the experience would
enrich their lives and
hopefully improve the
relations between the people
of the two countries.
Among those present
during the ceremony were
Head of the Presidential
Secretariat Dr. Roger
Luncheon, Minister of Public
Service, Dr. Jennifer
Westford, Permanent
Secretaries Jennifer Webster
and Sonia Roopnauth and
Information Liaison to the
President Robert Persaud.


By Jeune Bailey Van-Keric
A PUBLIC hearing of the
New Amsterdam
Municipality's 2005 budget
which has a projected income
and expenditure of
$67,973,760, was held at the
Town Hall Friday.
Reflecting on the progress of
development programmes over
the past year, Mayor Claude
Henry said that while the Urban
Development Programme
(UDP) had undertaken to
construct roads at Vryheid, Lot
49 Stanleytown [west], and
Amsville access road, it is yet
to be completed because of
contractor's slothfulness. He
however assured those gathered
that with the penalty clause
imposed by UDP, works are
expected to be completed
shortly.
He noted that the UDP will
spend US$394,820 to repair 14.


streets.
The long overdue abattoir,
which was to have been
constructed under Phase One,
will be done during the next
phase, as the feasibility study
has been completed.
Over the years, there
were no increases in rates and
taxes and homes have
retained a value of $620,
$480, and $220, which is
based on a 1975 valuation.
He added that the true value
is in excess of millions.
The UDP last year
recommended a regime of
sustainability which included
the revision of valuation of
properties, increases in
municipality fees, revision of
by laws, preparation of-
business plans, formulating a
mission statement and a new
format for the preparation of
(Please see pagel2 )


President Bharrat Jagdeo with members of the medical brigade at the State House
reception Friday evening.


weeks in Guyana. According to
the Government Information
Agency (GINA), the Cubans and
two United .States doctors will
Peave-shortly. ,,
"I want to thank the
;Cuban Government for
responding so readily when
we needed help. Your (the


medical response.
"This has truly been a
collective effort withI the
international community
working with a small country like.
Guyana," he noted.
Minister of Health Dr. Leslie
Raimsainmy pointed out that the
Cuban brigade is the largest from


noted that the gesture is "his
Government's way of helping
a CARICOM state in need."
Speaking on behalf of his,
- colleagues, Epidemiologist
Jorge .Candlario Gonzales,
through an interpreter, Mena
Carter, who is the Ministry
of Health's Liaison Officer to


ii: Forensici


-i -


GOT'


RECRUITMENT
A rewarding career awaits y
when you Join the Guyana
Police Force.

can be Enjoy house, education, tradesjnan, plain clothes, .;
can be commutedovertirpeanddetectiiallowancestonameafew. '
t_ .h. Special promotional opportunities are' offered to persons '
'-technical skills and academic qualifications
Be pirt of an ofgWlisation whfch hlibeen serving this nation for over
165 years. Scores of men. and women stanr-testWrony to its
accomplishment.' We are proud'to offer you careers in the following
WU areas
Street Patrol, Defective, Crime Scene Invesigatiln, SoPal Work,
Marine Patrol, Cnrime Lab, Traffi, Administration, Information
Technology. Canine, Equitation and L'galAflairs among others.
ton There is only one way youcan be a polce'officer, take the entry test'
,...- nowl


'I C


The examiatlin wtl be written on Saturday March 19,
2005 at the following centres county wide between
08:00hrs 12:00hrs:


ADivision

B Division


m 'CDivision


S D Division
.. 3 .


E & F Divisions
G Division


St. Stanistaus College, Diamond Primary
School

New Amsterdam Technical Institute, Bush
Lot Secondary School, Corriverton
Prrmry School, Rosignol Secondary
School. Fort Wellinqon SecSondary
School
- Helena Primary School, Cove & John
Secondary School, Beterverwagting
Pnmary School

- Patenlia Secondary School, Vreed-en-
Hoop Primary School, Leonora Primary
', School, PankalSalem Secondary School


IUnden Technical Institute
Aroura Primary School. J C Community
High School, C V Nunes Primary School.
Charily Secondary School


;Appircant-, ;rrquld bse between lhe ages cil 13 V, yeorE. in
gr,c~d hrleth, 10. pc).;,e.;sonri l a so'irnd prirniarvlecond-J.ry
a~li roii and i ci3J, .fliblemivlueU rr I Prf:.tlurru-.3
P~i~bpccrtsize protociraph 1i) he mrcruilwei Ir' -m ci flrF,t to


~- - - -- --,~ ss,


3/12/2005. o


FOR SALE
"AS IS WHERE IS"

JOHN DEERE COMBINE
RegisIrolion Number: 17826 (nol working)

vehiclee can be \,iewed at
Recess Village, East Coast Demerara


Sealed bids must be marked 'Bid for Combine' and
sent no later than March 18, 2005 to:

THE OFFICER-IN-CHARGE
HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
GUYANA BANK FOR TRADE & INDUSTRY LIMITED
47-48 Water Street, Georgetown

I ',r luiiher i/lifoillinei n pi/t'ri call ./i26-0 Iinr 22 '"-8In
Th t Eol,. eertefes the right tio tefoe eThe t Iiheil or mn\ hd |


Ne Amsteda


Municialt



gbudge

g NNW


-- .1


I





12 SUNDAY CHRONICLE Miatchl 13; '2005


Salvation Army gets funds from


British High Commissioner


THE Salvation Army Friday
received a cheque for $935,000
from British High
Commissioner Steven
Hiscock at the organisation's
Men's Social Centre in
Water Street Kingston.
Noting that the
organisation provides a service
to the people of Guyana, the


High Commissioner said the
money is to be used to clean
and renovate the buildings that
house the Salvation Army's
drug rehabilitation centres
which were affected by the
recent flood.
The organisation has
received many such donations
from the British High


Commission in the past and the
Mr. Hiscock said another is
expected to be handed over next
week.
Receiving the cheque on
behalf of the Salvation Army,
Divisional Commander Mr.
Sinous Theodore said the
rehabilitation centres are
operating on limited resources
and as such, any assistance is


After Cel*Star donates...
GRC relieving more




disaster victims this week

GRC (Guyana Relief disaster victims. Norma Jones, Nadina
Council) will be making A press release said Taharally, Selwyn Bernard
donations this week to more the recipients would include and Angela Jordon, all of Bella




VACANCIES


Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the following
positions at the European Commission funded Micro-Projects
Programme Management Unit. The MPP Unit will be responsible for the
planning and monitoring of the micro projects to be funded under the
European Commission funded Micro-Projects Programme. The Unit will
be managed by an international consultancy company and the local staff
which are being advertised under this announcement, will be recruited by
the consultancy company.
The scope of services shall cover all aspects of the project cycle of micro
projects including identification, implementation and evaluation, and
capacity building of non-state actors. The overall objective of the Micro-
Projects Programme is to reduce poverty and social inequality in Guyana.
The project purpose is to improve the socio-economic conditions of
vulnerable groups of the Guyanese population through the development
of sustainable and participatory self-help schemes. The programme will
finance income generating micro-projects, micro-projects aimed at
training and awareness creation and micro-projects iin other socio-
economic sectors. The vacancies available are:
Project Manager
Community Development Officer
Accountant
Secretary
Driver/Office Assistant
Details of the job descriptions, requirements and format for the CV for the
above positions can be uplifted from the address listed below during the
period March14, 2005 to March 29, 2005.
The Delegation of the European Commission
11 Sendall Place
Stabroek
Georgetown
Tel No. 226-4004
Terms of Employment
Employment will be on a yearly contract basis with specific terms to be
agreed upon with the consultancy company managing the Programme
Management Unit.
Original applications together with resume and copies of certificates
should be sent to the above address to be received no later than 16.00
hours on March 31, 2005:
IMPORTANT: The cover envelope should clearly state "Application for
Micro projects programme management unit vacancy, not to be opened
before March 31, 2005". The cover envelope must not state the name of
the applicant.


appreciated.
He noted that there are
plans in place for a women's
counterpart to the Men's Social
Centre in Kingston to be
established, but the organisation
lacks the necessary resources to
realise this plan.
Also present at the
presentation ny was Major
V.M nsyoftheSalvationAnny.


Dam, Pouderoyen, West
Bank Demerara, who lost
their homes as a result of a
recent fire.
Other families
who suffered similar losses
and would be relieved are
those of Latchman
Jaggernauth from Berbice;
Arlene Thomas of Forshaw
Street, Queenstown,
Georgetown; Stanley
Richmond of Timehri Public
Road and Fiona Gangadeen
of Diamond New Scheme,
both on East Bank Demerara.
The announcement
about the disbursement was
made after Cel*Star Guyana
Limited, one of the many
agencies which supports its
work, donated to GRC.
"This
contribution to our work is
particularly appreciated at
this time when our resources
have been called upon to
meet some of the needs of
persons whose lives have
been devastated by the recent
floods and, at the same time,
provide assistance for those
persons who suffered loss
through fires," the release
said.
GRC said it is
profoundly grateful to the
many supporters who
channelled their assistance
through it for the benefit of
victims of the flood disaster.


..











THE National Gallery's Classic Thesdays film season continues
on March 15 at 18:00 h with The Woman in the Window directed
by the legendary Austrian director Fritz Lang and starring
Edward G. Robinson, Joan Bennet and Raymond Massey.
Edward GRobinson is presented not in his more familiar
villainous persona but as a mild-mannered professor who, with his
wife and family out of town, glimpses a painting of a beautiful woman
in an art gallery window. Returning later for a second look, he is
startled to find the woman in the painting has appeared next to him.
This is the start of a suspenseful and terrifying sequence of events in
which the professor finds himself enmeshed, and which New Yorker
film critic Pauline Kael described as "a thriller with the logic and
plausibility of a nightmare".
The film was made in 1944 and is approximately one
hour and 39 minutes long. The public is invited and is asked to
be on time for this screening which is free of charge.


New Amsterdam ...


(From page 11)
all municipal budgets.
The Mayor said a valuation
was conducted last year under
the UDP which recognizes that
the money received was
insufficient to sustain the
township.
Following the valuation,
$300 was added to the rates and
taxes but this sum is also
insufficient, the Mayor stated.
He told the gathering that
revenue intake from
Stanleytown and Savannah Park
which have more than 15,000'
citizens, amount to $500,000.
He noted that residents of
Savannah Park, particularly
those who live in condominiums
(range houses), will be
registered within this week with
the municipality, and will have
to pay the expected taxes.


PUBLIC SERVICE MINISTRY

The Governmnt of Guyana in collaboration with the
Organisation of American States is offering a limited
number of postgraduate scholarships for the 2005/2006
academic year.

Applicants are required to provide notification of
admission into a University for .the 2005/2006 academic
year.

Application forms can be obtained from the Permanent
Secretary, Public Service Ministry, 164 Waterloo Street,
Georgetown and/or the Scholarships Department,
Training Division, Durban Street and Vlissengen Road,
Georgetown.

Closing date for the receipt of applications is 18th March,
2005 and should be returned to either of the above
addresses.

Permanent Secretary
Public Service Ministry
Government ads can be viewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy


In addition, outstanding
revenues will be collected
through the Petty Debt Act,
which, provides for the seizure
of properties, movable and
immovable, to recover
outstanding rates and taxes
which are in excess of $20M.
The Mayor said the council
is hoping to garner $18M from
market revenue this year, up
from the $10M collected last
year.
He explained that the
increased revenue will be
realized from stall rentals which
are far below the required
amount.
Henry said that with the
resources available, canals and
outfalls were desilted and as a
result there was no flooding
during the rainy season, neither
was there any mosquito
invasion.
The Municipal Governance
Management Programme is
expected to plough $4.5M to
improve Esplanade Park,
roadways leading to the
National Insurance Scheme and
St Therese -Primary School,
among others.
The Social Impact
Amelioration Programme
(SIMAP) will be tapped for
funding for a new chapel in the
Stanleytown Cemetery, the
mayor said.
Among those attending
the three-hour presentation
were, Ms Sandra Hopper,
Consultant with the Urban
Development Programme,
Mr. Mahendra Istree, Chief
Municipal Service Officer, in
the Ministry of Local
Government, Mr. Aubrey De
Nobrega, Chairman,
Accountant and former
Councillor, Ms. Hyacinth
James, Deputy Mayor, Ms.
Cheryl John, Town Clerk,
Ms. Angela Collins, Finance
Officer within the
Municipality, Ms. Elize
Bailey, Officer within
the Municipal Governance
Management Programme,
Heads of Departments,
staffers, and interested
.citizens.






:SUNDAY CHRONICLE 'M s ft*,f .2005 ... ........ ...............................


Survivor



recalls deadly



Agricola



bandit attack


By Timica Forrester
MORE than two
years after 38-
year-old
Roxanne Seckle was
brutally murdered by gun-
toting bandits in her
Agricola home, her only son
- himself a survivor of the
ordeal is still trying to
come to grips with the loss
of his mother.
Having recovered from
the seven gun-shot wounds he
received during the incident, 21
year-old Clifton Seckle Jr. said
he could clearly remember the
events of that fateful night.
He recounted that at
about 19:30 hrs on January 13,
2003, he, his mother, and his
two younger sisters were
planning activities for the
celebration of his parents'
wedding anniversary. His
father was at the time in the
family's shop across the road
from their Second Street home.
Through the bedroom
window, they saw three
strange men enter the yard.
Roxanne then left the bedroom
to find out who they were and
what they wanted.
After several minutes
had elapsed and his mother
failed to return to the
bedroom, Clifton Jr. was about
to go outside to check on her
when he saw one of the men -
who were all armed with guns
- choking the struggling
woman. Upon seeing the
shocked son in the doorway
of the bedroom one of the men


shot at him, hitting him in his
left hand. Clifton ran back into
the bedroom but was followed
by the shooter who aimed at his
sister, Latoya, who was 17 at
the time of the attack.
"When he aimed at my
sister, I jumped in front of her
and he shot me instead," he

'She was always
happy and could
make anyone
laugh regardless
of how you were
feeling.' Survivor
Clifton Seckle Jnr.
says of his mother

recalled. The six subsequent
shots that were fired hit him in
the head, arms and torso.
"I was conscious all the
time. I heard one final shot and
somebody drop to the floor and
I knew it was my mother," the
young man recounted.
Another sibling, then 14-
year-old Shawanda
watched helplessly
from her vantage point on the
living room floor as the intruders
shot her mother. The men fled
after shooting Clifton Jr. and
Roxanne. A customer at the
family shop was also shot in the
leg during the course of the
attack.
The injured youth and
his unconscious mother were
taken to the Georgetown Public
Hospital Corporation where
Roxanne Seckle later died. The


still conscious son saw his
mother's corpse wrapped up
and taken away to the hospital
mortuary.
He spent two months in
the Intensive Care Unit of the
hospital but was allowed to
attend his mother's funeral a few
days after the incident. Clifton
does not have complete use of
his left hand and he bears scars
where the bullets pierced his
skin.
Two years after the
incident, Clifton still praises the
staff at the Georgetown Public
Hospital Corporation saying
that they did everything they
could to save his life and ensure
his speedy recovery. He also
thanks the ranks of the Guyana
Police Force for their timely
response to reports of the
incident on that fateful night and
their continued diligence in the
hunt for the perpetrators in the
subsequent months.
Asked what he misses
most about his mother the
smiling youth replied: "Her
cooking." He also misses her
joviality for which she was well
known.
"She was always
happy and could make anyone
laugh regardless of how you
were feeling," he says.
He says he misses the
liveliness that would prevail
when she was in the house as
well as the frequent excursions
on which she would usually take
the entire family along with
neighbours and friends.
The barber and aspiring
entrepreneur said that in the


VEHICLE FOR SALE

"AS IS"

EAGLE PRIMER CHRYSLER


Vehicle can be viewed at
GBTI Water Street Branch,
Monday to Friday between
08:00 hrs 16:00 hrs.


GBTI
"mf Vtl u


SURVIVOR: Clifton Seckle Jnr.


months following the ordeal he
was afraid to venture out in
public for fear that his would-be
killers would return to finish
what they had started. However,
since all three of his attackers
have since died- killed in separate
shooting incidents he now feels
much safer.


Once a budding electrical
engineer, the former
student of the
Government Technical Institute
(GTI) was forced to discontinue
his studies due to his physical
and emotional injuries. His
dreams died along with his
mother.


. Il A


The Government of Guyana has received a loan from the Inter-
American Development Bank (IDB) towards the execution of SIMAP III
Operations. It is intended that such funds be applied for payment of
contracts for projects undertaken by SIMAP Agency.

1. SIMAP Agency, now invites sealed bids for furnishing the necessary labour, materials,
equipment and services for the construction and completion of the following
projects:-


Construction of Parakeese Multi-Purpose Building Region 1
Replacement of Kariako Health Centre Region 1
Construction of Wax Creek Nursery/Primary School Region 7
Construction of Katoka Nursery School Region 9


2. Interested bidders can obtain further information and inspect the bidding documents
at: SIMAP Agency, 237 Camp St, Georgetown, Tel: 227-3554 (Contracts Dept.)

3. Bids from a Firm/Company must attach a copy of the business registration.
Mandatory submissions include valid TAX and NIS Compliance Certificates. Careful
attention must be paid to the Evaluation Criteria in the tender documents.

4. The cost of each Bidding Document is G$5,000. Payment can be made in cash or
by manager's cheque in favour of SIMAP Agency.

5. Bids must be accompanied by a Bid Bond of not less than 2% of the bid sum. The
Bid Bond/Guarantee must be in the form of a Manager's Cheque in favour of SIMAP
Agency from a Commercial Bank/Financial House/Insurance Company, using the
form supplied by SIMAP. Personal cheques will not be accepted.

6. Bids must be appropriately marked and delivered to SIMAP Agency Tender Box, at
SIMAP Agency 237 Camp Street, Cummingsburg, Georgetown on or before
1400 hrs on Tuesday, 5th April, 2005, at which time they will be opened in the
presence of the bidders/representatives.

7. SIMAP reserves the right to reject the lowest or any bid and is not obligated to give
any reasonss.

Executive Director
SIMAP Agency


Sealed bids must be marked 'Bid for Chrysler' and
sent no later than March 18, 2005 to:
THE OFFICER-IN-CHARGE
HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
GUYANA BANK FOR TRADE & INDUSTRY LIMITED
47-48 Water Street, Georgetown
The Bank reserves the right to refuse the highest or any bid.


Having instead'-
completed a course in barbering,
he hopes to someday establish
his own "state of the art" barber
shop at Agricola. When asked if
he feared a second attack were
his plans to become a reality, he
simply said: "If you look at
things that way, you would
never do anything."
Clifton Jr.'s sisters,
Latoya and Shawanda Seckle,
now 19 and 17 years old
respectively, have since left the
country as a result of the ordeal.
They are both reportedly doing-
well in their academic endeavours
overseas.
Unfortunately, their
beloved mother is not there to
witness their success. However,
says Clifton Jr., they both know
that she would have been proud.
Clifton Seckle Snr.
still prefers not to talk about
the tragedy that stole his wife.


If you

drink

don't]
Ou

drive


----- 1ICqlll*






14 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 13, 2005


President Jagdeo urging residents of Martyrsville yesterday to form'a Community
Development Committee to help address some of the problems facing their community.
(Cullen Bess-Nelson photos)


President Jagdeo greeting a senior citizen of Paradise yesterday when
to listen to issues of concern to them.


he met residents


President assures East




Coast flood victims of help


PRESIDENT Bharrat Jagdeo
has assured residents and
farmers on the East Coast
Demerara of his
government's commitment to
help all those who lost crops
and livestock in the recent
flood disaster.
He gave the assurance
yesterday when he inspected
conditions in Martyrsville and


Paradise and met residents to
find out about post-flood issues
affecting them.
Thousands were affected by
the floods spawned by
unprecedented rainfall between
December and January and
dozens of East Coast villages
were under water for more than
a month.
At Paradise yesterday,


residents and farmers recounted
their heavy losses, including
livestock which are essential in
supplementing their income.
Some said that even those
animals that survived the floods
are under threat because they are
undernourished and infected.
They said cattle and poultry
are among livestock threatened.
The President promised the


residents that a veterinarian will
be dispatched to the community
to deal with infections and
nutritional issues affecting
livestock, and help will be given
to restart their livestock farms.
He informed them that the
government was trying to get
some high-quality breeding stock
and use the opportunity to
upgrade the local livestock.
Residents of Martyrsville


want help to upgrade roadways
and alleyways which are in a
poor state and create great
discomfort, particularly for
school children.
The President urged the
residents to form a Community
Development Committee
through which assistance could
be channeled.
He said this was preferable
to hiring contractors.


Minister within the
Ministry of Local Government
and Regional Development,
Clinton Collymore, has been
designated to meet residents
Wednesday to establish the
committee which will be
assigned to executing the works
the residents have requested.
Residents also expressed
some reservations about the state
(Please see page20 )


Foreign Exchange Market Activities
Summary Indicators
F.... iday, March 04,-2005 --Thursday,-Mar-ch 10,2005
1. EXCHANGE RATES
Buying Rate Selling Rate
A. US Dollar NOTES OTHER NOTES OTHER
Bank of Baroda 197.00 198.00 201.00 203.00
Bank of Nova Scotia 189.00 198.00 201.00 204.00
Citizens Bank 192.00 197.00 203.00 204.00
Demerara Bank 195.00 197.00 201.00 202.00
GBTI 190.00 195.00 201.00 201.00
NBIC 198.00 198.00 202.00 204.00

Bank Average 193.50 197.17 201.50 203.00

Nonbank Cambios Av. (5 largest) 199.88. 203.28


BoG Average Market Exchange Rate: US$1.0 = G$199.75

B. Canadian Dollar

Bank Average 133.33 142.67 148.33 157.67

C. Pound Sterling

Bank Average 318.33 347.67 349.83 369.50

D. Euro
Bank Average 216.75 236.67 243.25 254.67
E. Selected Caricom Exchange F. LIBOR US$ G. Prime Rate
Rates London Interbank Offercd
Rate For Thur., Mar. 9, 2005

TT$= G$ 28.73
Bdos$ = G$ 92.13 3 months 2.98000% US 5.5%.
J$= G$S 4.45 6 months 3.22000% Guyana 14.54%
EC$ = G$ 65.76
Belize$ = G$ 94.30


41 Brickdam and United Nations Place


IDENTIFICATION OF LOTS

Central Housing and Planning Authority wishes.to inform the allottees of the
under-mentioned Housing Scheme that a Surveyorwill be on location to show
allottees their house lots as follows:


Scheme

Wisroc I B


Date Time
! t


March 17and 18, 20051
; [


9:00am


Allottees are asked to do the following:

To assemble at the entrance of the Housing Scheme at
9:00am

Walk with your Allocation Letter, Agreement of Sale and
Rf'ceipts of payments.

To walk with pickets to place on lot when it is identified.


Chief Executive Officer
Central Housing & Planning Authority

Marchlo00 ........"





SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 13, 2005





I:



ft


WELL DONE LADIES!! Chef Antonelle Byer of the Barbados Hospitality Institute congratulates his students at the
closing ceremony of the culinary course. On display are some of the delicacies they produced under his tutoring.


- !- ,-' h


t4z


UNI representative Australian scientists prove


assessing CCWU/

NCN problem

THE Union Network International (UNI) has dispatched
its Caribbean representative, Mr. Hayden Hernandez to
Guyana to assess the problem that currently exists
between the Clerical and Commercial Worker Union
(CCWU) and the National Communication Network.
At a press conference yesterday at Clerico House, the
CCWU's headquarters, General Secretary, Mr. Grantley Culbard
reiterated his union's stand on the ongoing conflict with Chief
Executive Officer of National Communication Network
Incorporated (NCN), Muhamed Sattaur, over the deduction
union dues from reporters' salaries.
Culbard said the union informed its international associate,
the UNI, of the dilemma. Hernandez is to make the assessment
then report on his findings to the UNI's headquarters in
Switzerland.
Culbard said if the situation is not corrected after this report
is made, the UNI and CCWU will then determine what kind of
international campaign will be waged against local authorities.
The CCWU is contending that the actions of the CEO of
NCN are contradictory to a Memorandum of Understanding
(MOU) signed by the union and Government of Guyana on
January 29, 2004.
He said in keeping with the MOU the parties began
negotiations in 2004 for a Collective Labour Agreement, which
were later stalled when NCN unilaterally removed reporters
from the bargaining unit.
The union continues to insist that the reporters are entitled
to the same union representation they received in the two former
entities, the Guyana Broadcasting Corporation (GBC)" and
Guyana Television (GTV). Then severance of this right, it says,
contravenes the Trade-Union Recognition Act of 1997.
The CCWU union dues continued to be deducted from
reporters' salaries even after the merger and the union is now
* questioning why this procedure has been halted.
According to Mr. Culbard, NCN said the reporters were
removed from the bargaining unit because they were given salary
increases consistent with a status beyond the Bargaining Unit.
However, the CCWU said that NCN did not officially
inform the union of its decision to cease deducting the
union dues.


A-y- r *r t-e *-. OI
"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Women's Art at the

National Gallery

THE National Gallery marked International Women's Day with an exhibition of works by
women artists from the National Collection in its main first floor gallery.
The exhibition includes paintings, sculpture, ceramics and textiles by Merlene Ellis, Josefa Tamayo,
Leila Locke, Stephanie Correia, Marjorie Broodhagen, Maylene Duncan, Bernadette Persaud, Maggie
Dookun, Anna Correia, Irene Gonsalves, and Betsy Karim among others.
The public is invited to view this exhibition which continues until April 2 next.


( The Charity Shop


Please donate your unwanted items
that may be useful to sell for Charity.
Such as:
. Toys
Hardware
. School Books
. School Uniforms
. Household Goods
* Good Condition Clothing
. Anything else that may be useful

You may take goods directly to the
Charity Shop or to any of our Stores
nationwide. ,,


afF '







r~M^t~fh


Sponsored by S Addings value EVERY day

34 B East Street, South Cummingsburg Tel.No. 227-5453


A SIMPLE closing ceremony
at the Carnegie School of
Home Economics yesterday
marked the end of a Culinary
Arts Intermediate Preparation
and Presentation course
made possible by the Tourism
and Hospitality Association of
Guyana (THAG) in
association with the
Caribbean human resource
development Progamme for
Economic Competitiveness
(CPEC).
THAG project coordinator,
Ms. Kalpana Seodat, speaking
on behalf of the organisation said
the course was one in a series
aimed at improving the standard
of human resources in the
tourism industry. She said a
similar programme was
conducted a year ago while
another was conducted last
January at lwokrama.
Instructor of the course,
Chef Antonelle Byer of the
Barbados Hospitality
Institute said the students


received tutoring in menu
planning, creating new dishes
with local produce, the
history of Caribbean cuisine,
blending of local spices to
improve their taste,
identifying specialty cuts of
meats and their uses and the
hazard analysis critical
control point (HACCP)
which is the standard used to
judge the level of sanitation
and food safety in the food
industry internationally.
The students who were
selected after responding to an
advertisement for the
programme completed a five-
day course and will receive
certification from the
Barbados Community
College.
Speaking on the student's
behalf. Ms. Grace Hinds
expressed their appreciation
to Chef Byer and wished him
well after which she presented
him with a gift from her
colleagues.









The International Labour Organisation was created in 1919 and brings together
governments, employers and workers of its 177 member states in common action
to improve social protection and conditions of life and work throughout the world.
The International Labour Office in Geneva is the permanent Secretariat of the
Organisation. ..


.---- - -- - ------ -- --- -- -
For more information please contact the ILO/USDOL Office, 56 Main and
New Market Streets, Georgetown, Guyana. Telephone number: 226-8899




Message by Minister of


Labour, Human Services
d S eyond the glare of publicity and in areas that ra
and Socialf Se ur tourism to telecommunications, a tenacious group (
n curi t y is quietly waging war against stigma and discr
e B associated with HIV/AIDS in the workplace here in Guyana.
Dr lPersons from a combination of public and private entities ar
with the International Labour Organisation (ILO) to raise th
,! ,O N WEDNESDAY December 1, 2004, awareness of HIV/AIDS through a workplace education prograrr
SGuyana joined the rest of the world in reduce risk behaviours among targeted workers.
observing World AIDS Day. Enough Tasked as it were with ensuring acceptable levels of employmei
cannot be said or done to focus attention on this, the natural progression for the ILO to ensure workers are not disc
worst ever epidemic in the history of humankind. against with regard to HIV/AIDS. The ILO/AIDS global program
The rate of infection with HIV and the deaths created in November 2000 with the mandate from its Director Gc
resulting from HIV/AIDS have reached horrendous Juan Somavia for all programmes and units to identify
proportions. It is not too much to say that if the mainstreaming AIDS-related issues into their ongoing work tc
pandemic is not checked the future of humankind comprehensive approach to the developmental implication
may be at stake, epidemic. The three critical objectives of the programme are to:
The age group worst affected internationally is the 1 prevent transmission of HIV through education;
15-49 age group, the active working population 2 reduce the impact of the epidemic on workers, fat
maill. whose contributions to the family the communities;
economy and the society jrc sernouslN and negatively affected. Intcrnanonally, 3 ensure the protection of human rights. The recent sta'
over 20 million workers are li\ tn \ ith HIV/AIDS and the .ugma and paint a frightening picture of the toll the disease is taking or
discrimination the disease attract> B the ,ear 2020, thesize e l'the world' iand worldwide and the acknowledgement that Guyana can ill
Guyana's) workforcewill 'e .ignificanil. reduced.Hthepandenuc it not checked,. decimation of its workforce, have spurred local enterprises to
HIV/AIDS infects people and affete. their files if aborbs resources. \% which education programme that carries an underlying message of co
might otherwise be used in social economic and comunnitn de'. elopnient.is i li s and an ultimate goal ofinforming national policy on HIV/AIDS.
serious consequences for the aged and young dependants of people in fccted by The programme in Guyana began in October 2003. Funding sup
and living with HIV/AIDS. It affects business and indusir. The world of work 1s tune of US$397 000 is being provided by the US Department
affected in many ways: stigmatisation, discrimination in employment, disruption (USDOL) for three years. The Ministry of Labour, Human Set
and reduction of production, threat to occupational safety) and health and pressure Social Security, employers and workers' organizations and Fami
on social security and insurance systems. International, are among the entities that are in close collaboration
Let us all, workers and employees, trade unions and business organizations, ILO/USDOL programme.
government and citizens, civil and religious groups join together in the war against
HIV/AIDS. HIV/AIDS A WORKPLACE ISSUE


'Message by


United States

Ambassador to

Guyana,

Mr. Roland Bullen
W orld AIDS Day was observed on
December 1. It marked an important
time when the world reflected on the
pandemic occasioned by HIV andAIDS and sought to
reaffirm its commitment to eradicate this epidemic.
This year's World AIDS Day theme, 'Women,
Girls, HIV and AIDS illuminates the growing
feminisation of AIDS and its profound impact on
women and young girls.
In our communities and workplaces, the need to
address the interplay between gender and
%ulnerabilit. to AIDS i, imperatime, and our
programmes should reflect a gender-based approach
The work environment is a critical focal point and
largely vulnerable sector. It is therefore crucial that the private sector in Guyana
respond to the epidemic because of the direct impact on profitability and
productivity.
A few businesses have begun to recognize that there is a need for appropriate
corporate policies on HIV/AIDS, and that workplaces can be effective centres
for prevention education and reduction in stigma and discrimination. I want to
applaud these businesses for taking the lead and encourage others to get
involved.
Every year. as World AIDS Day is observed we are more optimistic that the
world can look forward to the day when we are finally free from HIV.'AIDS. It
is our goal.
I want to pledge the continued support of the U.S Government and my
personal commitment as Ambassador to supporting Governments, civil society
and the private sector in the fight against AIDS. We are very optimistic that we
are on the right track, but it will require a coordinated sustained effort from all
be.suc ,s ... *
Y<^ ~ ~~~~ ~~~ .h .- ,-.Q.. .111* ii.11'*'; :


Md

Congri
. V /AIDS re
| arecurre
.H~aIV/AIDS
mainstay offamilies, comr
The pandemic is cha
development. Experience


a,.


asI


rnge from
of persons
imination

e working
e level of
ame and to

nt, it was a
;riminated
imme was
general. Mr.
ways of
o ensure a
is of the

nilies and

tistics that
n societies
afford a
enter the
passion,

port to the
of Labour
rvices and
ily Health
n with the


HIV/AIDS.
Securicor, another firm involved in.
ahead with the education programme
its workers who are living with
discriminated against in any way. The
condoms.
In a similar manner, Property
importance of condom use and safe sexu
about 90. The constant provision of inf
and the employees recognition of their
for even more knowledge on the part of
had serious feedback on the educatit
person at the PPS is also particularly cc
the disease is having on them, and has.
how valuable they are to the society, and
United Associates Security and Se
participate in the education program
related deaths of some of its employee
exposed to different environments w
participate in the programme.
At RK's Security Firm, where there L
awareness and education is taken very
exposed to informal talks on the disease
they have recently begun attending sem'
Professional Guard Service, which h
the deadly disease at every conceit'
participate in the ILO/USDOL educate
picture the HIV/AIDS statistics paint oi
management's compassion for staffers.
to the programme.


SERVICE SECT
A t Le Meridien Pegasus. th


In Guyana, where workers spend at least 37 hours each week at their / provided literature in an F
place of employment, the epidemic is taking a toll on persons in the A department had put up an
productive stages of life. The most affected persons lie in the 15-49 management two years ago and is now
age group. More women here, as in other parts of the world, have become programme. It has mandated its Heal
susceptible to the virus. Their susceptibility lies primarily in unequal gender support to promoting training and o
status which makes them dependent on males, as well as in the growing level HIV/AIDS. At orientation, new worker
ofviolence against women. the firm's HIV/AIDS
Some local enterprises have voiced concern over the A. / C .[d L Z-L ..L- nature of the business.
plight of their majority female workers who may be source of challenge for th
coerced into providing sexual gratification to their male L. -U.-- its message across to its 195 em'
superiors in return for the latter's silence on each month.
misdemeanours the females may have awareness
committed. Their concerns are well founded. Loss of income and now being
The ILO has stated that at the workplace, employee benefits The Gu'
women may be exposed to the risk of J mandated
sexual harassment and abuse, and they Committee
face the pressure to have sex in return for Tl_. fStigma and to its mort
being hired or promoted, or to avoid t: n k s discrimination began part,
dismissal. In addition, in a climate of largely you
daily violence against women, just the reassure on tamlles it is comml
anticipation and fear of violence may prevent them from refusing e re on tam es, senior M
sex, or from insisting on the use of condoms or another safer sex th t problem j y recepof
method. orphans no reported
Cognisant of the statistics on HIV/AIDS in general and its effect on Bearing in
the workforce in particular, 19 entities, with a combined workforce in accompany HIViAIDS, the GRA has
excess of 7 000 have engaged with the ILO/USDOL HIV/AIDS Workplace training on other diseases, including tul
Education Programme. to be fully operational by early this year.
Twelve have prepared draft workplace education policies that have been Forward thinking, coupled with the)
submitted to the ILO Headquarters in Geneva. The drafts have been returned unchecked it can have a debilitating efi
with recommendations for modification. In the meantime, education business, the Guyana Post Office Corp
committees have been established and representatives have attended a one- ILO/USDOL programme. Its education
week training programme for focal persons from December 6-10, 2004. in May, has gained momentum to t6
Those sessions will help ensure the enterprises develop and implement effectiveness, it has established a ce
structured HIV/AIDS workplace policy and programme, committees in Linden, Berbice and-
Though many of the firms do not have such a policy, several of them have programme has also exposed other vult
incorporated HIV/AIDS awareness and education into their regular training the organisation has established a 'hel
programmes. Others have used unorthodox means of getting their Though the programme targets employee
employees to listento the messages. families of employees as well as to thect
Guyanese are going down the drain
SECURING THE NATION if measures are not put in place to ha
rior to becoming involved in the ILO programme, the MMC exists here will be further entrenc
Security Firm has been benefiting from sessions conducted by a members of the local workforce that
representative of Lifeline Counselling Services. their organisation may no longer reqa
The firm scheduled the 90-minute sessions for 'pay day' when most of its imperatives that have guided the Guy
staffers would be at one location. The employees are very receptive to the to get on board with the ILO with reg
sesi6iisi-'rad hive ,been engaged ih *verq. inere.4iing disctiSio onSt or -',''ikplce'peoliey on HIV/AIDS, wlil







SUNDAY CHRONICLE, September 12, 2004 1


;sage by Guyana Trades Union

ss President, Mr. Andrew Garnett


resents a crucial workplace issue. There
more than 43 million people living with
lost are working men and women, the
unities. enterprises and economies.
aging the labour force and jeopardising
skilled workers arc dying. children








curity in Guyana, is moving full steam
e company says it is very supportive of
V/AIDS, ensuring that they are not
irm continues to provide counselling and

otection Services (PPS) stresses the
al practices to its relatively small staff of
,rmation on HIV/AIDS by management,
vn lifestyles have served to elicit a thirst
the employees. The company said it has
na programme. The programme's focal
ncerned about the youths and the impact
stressed the need for them to understand
how critical they are to the workforce.
rvices Inc. (UAS&S) volunteered to
. against the background of HIV/AIDS-
s. The fact that its 1 400 employees are
s also a key factor in its decision to

also a majority female staff, HIV/AIDS
seriously. For years workers have been
and about methods of prevention, and
nars conducted by the ILO.
is been lecturing to its employees about
'able opportunity, was compelled to
on programme in the face of the bleak
i the one hand, and on the other, through
'The 300-odd workers are very receptive


OR MOMENTUM
- Human Resources Department has
WVAIDS comer for staffers. The
IIV/AIDS awareness proposal to z.
fully involved in the ILO/USDOL
"' and Safety Committee to give full
her components of the fight against
are made aware of
programme. The
at the hotel is the
e department to get
loyees, but an hour
for HIV/AIDS
'and education is
opposed.
jana Revenue Authority (GRA) has
as Occupational Health and Safety
to pilot the AIDS awareness programme
than 800 employees. The Authority
-ipating in the programme because of its
g, female majority workforce to which
ed to carrying the 'We Care' message.
agement of the public entity has been
ve to the programme and there has been
negative feedback from other workers.
ind the opportunistic infections that
moved a step further to incorporate
'rculosis. The 'packaged' programme is

knowledge that if the disease continues
ect on the service-oriented nature of its
ration has become fully involved in the
and outreach programme, which started
e point where, in order to maximise
tral committee, as well as three sub-
Essequibo. The outreach HIV/AIDS
erable groups in the GPOC family, and
list' to address the needs of staffers.
es, GPOC envisions its role extending to
immunityy as whole.
as far as HIV/AIDS is concerned and
t its spread, the poverty that already
ed. In addition, there are fears by
f they become infected with the virus,
ire their services. These are the major
na Telephone and Telegraph Limited
ard to HIV/AIDS education. GT&T's
h Geneva has endorsed, w1l ensure


have to work and the burdens women bear are being increased.
Additionally, discrimination against people with HIV/AIDS threatens
fundamental principles and rights at work, and undermines efforts for
prevention and care.
The workplace represents an ideal forum for tackling the
epidemic/pandemic. It is place where people come together on a regular



that workers understand management's sympathetic posture. The
phone company's next step is to put measures in place to expand its
peer education programme.

DOING 'GOOD BUSINESS
Barama's 500-strong staff is very receptive to the awareness
programme and the company is now in communication with
the workers' union on its proposed workplace policy. The
company is particularly keen on training and the art of counselling
those who may have been infected and affected by HIV/AIDS.
With a non-discrimination policy in place since 1969, AH&L Kissoon
Limited felt that things should be no different with respect to HIV/AIDS.
Geneva has already sanctioned its workplace policy. Management at the
enterprise is of the opinion that understanding the disease and how it is
spread, is critical to its prevention. A.H. & L. Kissoon entered the
ILO/USDOLprogramme in March2004.
Using the economic factor as a basis for fighting the spread of the disease,
management feels that there should be a budget that would cater for
sensitisation, the provision of free diagnostic and treatment centres. The
authorities must ensure these things are in place today because it will cost
them tomorrow, management says.
Like many of the other enterprises participating in the programme, the
Demerara Distillers Limited (DDL) uses every opportunity to sensitise its
workers about HIV/AIDS, since the firm's management is of the opinion
that HIV/AIDS cuts across all barriers, and that in the not too distant future,
the disease will impact on its workforce. Though its draft workplace policy
has not been dispatched to Geneva, the enterprise has trained peer
educators and its employees are very receptive to its sensitisation
programmes.
Though the HIV/AIDS education programme is a priority for LINMINE
and Omai Gold Mines Limited, their policies are now in limbo as a result of
the business environment in the mining sector. Omai, which closes in
August, has taken control of LINMINE. LINMINE's policy was prepared
prior to the takeover and will be incorporated into the new entity's health
and safety mechanism. With maximum production, efficiency and profits
as goals of any entity, LINMINE feels it is good business to get involved in
an HIV/AIDS education programme.
Condoms have been
L IImade available for the
C'LLL-LZ I:--L L -L workforce.
OSS Ot SKills and 1 Omai plans to resume its
^ experience focus on the HIV/AIDS
ep nJe education awareness
Sedulced supply of programme early this year.
labour IAs a good corporate citizen,
I it has committed to pursuing
Rising labour costs the programme. At present,
*I the firm does not
Failing productivity discriminate against any
Falling productivity employee regardless of their
illness. An HIV infected
educed profit and employee is entitled to all
investment his/her benefits at the
enterprise.


CONSTRAINTS
Though the benefits of the ILO/USDOL HIV/AIDS education
programme are enormous, there are some hurdles that facilitators
must overcome. In spite of the glut of information on the disease,
several entities have noted that staffers continue to maintain an indifferent
disposition towards the subject, or else they treat it as a taboo subject.
Many are faced with comments such as 'AIDS has nothing to do with me,
or 'AIDS can't ketch me'.
There is also the constraint of time, both in the sense the facilitators feel
there are not enough education sessions on HIV/AIDS, as well as in terms
of employees being so caught up with looking at the economics of life that
they don't have time to think about HIV/AIDS, according to one official.
HIV/AIDS destroys human capital built up over years and weakens the
capacity of workers to produce goods and services for the economy. Isn't it
the very economics that would be affected if workers don't listen and
change their behaviours?

GET ON BOARD
n the short period the enterprises have been involved in the
ILO/USDOL education programme, they have come to appreciate its
manifold benefits and have indicated that it is their hope that the
programme is replicated in each workplace throughout the country.
While many see such a replication as solely aimed at halting the march of
a deadly disease, others are convinced that with the involvement of more
enterprises, a collective approach can be made to local insurance
companies to review their policies with regard to,coverage of persons
infected with HIV/AIDS.


basis;
communication systems are in place for Enterprises and public information;
and existing structures and facilities can be used for prevention, care and
support programmes.
The hidden costs ofHIV/AIDS forbusinesses are only now becoming apparent.
Enterprises in many communities are reporting increased absenteeism, staff
turn over, and recruitment and training costs. Other reported costs include those
relating to medical care, insurance coverage, retirement funds and funeral fees. For
example business studies in East Africa and Zimbabwe showed that absenteeism
accountedforup to 54 percent ofAIDS-related company costs.
Against this backdrop of reduced revenues and profits, enterprises across the
world have developed 'Strong Business Responses' in the form of cost/effective
interventions which seek to mitigate the epidemic's spread and impact.

Trade Union Action Against HIV/AIDS
Similarly, Trade Unions across the world have joined forces in combating this
raging pandemic. This is not new as Trade Unions have always tackled major social
and economic issues. For example, traditionally, trade unions have:-
Organised workers and represented their interests, protected their rights and
combated discrimination;
Ensured safe and healthy working conditions;
Promoted access for all workers to a fair income, social insurance and basic
health care.
And participated in social dialogue on national issues affecting employment,
the labour market and human resources.
Today, with an estimated 26 million workers inclusive of trade union leaders
and activists in their productive prime living with HIV/AIDS, Trade Unions are
responding to the epidemic by mobilising their extensive network and contacts;
negotiating and implementing communication systems are in place for enterprises
and the general public workplace HIV/AIDS agreements/policies; and building on
their influence in the communities and with Governments.

S TThe National Trade Union Risponse
I In Guyana, the HIV/AIDS prevalence rate is
estimated at between 3.5 and 5 per cent of the population.
This is reported to be second only to Haiti in the
Caribbean.
The Guyana Trades Union Congress and its affiliated
Unions in maintaining their own challenge to the epidemic
have organised, over the years, training and awareness
Seminars/Workshops for workers.
We are, however, convinced that a critical need exits
\i for a national coordinated and sustained workplace
response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Guyana.
We firmly, believe that the workplace and its tri-partite constituents are ideally
placed to effectively do so.
It is our considered opinion, that the recently launched USDOL/LO HIV/AIDS
three-year workplace education project is indeed a timely intervention.
We have not merely endorsed but ha, e accepted partnership in this project.
Today, the GTUC can emphatically state.that we have a Policy and Plan.of
Action in HIV/AIDS in the workplace. Addionally. we have established a
specialised Department in Occupational Saler, and Health and HI'V'AIDS to
execute our Plan of Action -
We will shortly commence training of focal-point persons drawn from
affiliated Unions to work with the plan.
All are involved, all are consumed. Let us join In the universal struggle to"
combat HIV/AIDS.

Message by the Consutative Association of

Guyanese Industries ftd, Executive

Director, Mr. David Yankana

The spread of HIV/AIDS has become a crucial fight in Guyana.
Based on Information contained in the
Guyana strategic plan on HIV/AIDS
2002-2006, there have been significant
increases in reported HIV/AIDS cases, particularly in the
last three years.
In general, the majority of cases have been among
persons of ages 15-49, which constitutes the largest part
of our work force. Employers should therefore become
involved in the fight against HIV/AIDS.
Every where in the world. employers aie recognizing
that HIV/AIDS has a negative impact on business.
Illnesses among the infected lead to increase absenteeism
and therefore a loss of skills. Employers are therefore forced to increase theievel
of employment to take care of shortage of skills giving rise to additional co for
training, retainingand induction.
Experience in high prevalent countries has shown that no sector of the
economy escapes the impact and businesses have noted declining productivity,
declining profits and increased social cost. Should Guyana become a high
prevalent country, employers can expect no less declining results.
Many private businesses in Guyana have therefore been participating in
workplace education programmes to develop practical guidelines for enterprises
in key areas of prevention through education, in non-discrimination and
protection of workers rights, eventually developing programmes for care and
support and voluntary counselling.
Employers are therefore conscious that there is a need for dialogue with the
.. other social partnerst.to aim for a healthy and safe environment, within a, .4'.
...............-..-..






18 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 13, 2005


Guarding


Dr.Jagan's



Legacy


THE nation is currently
celebrating the life and work
of the late President of
Guyana and father of the
Independence movement, Dr.
Cheddi Jagan. There are
various activities which put
the spotlight on all facets of
Dr. Jagan's work as a
political leader, a
humanitarian and an
internationalist. These
events remind the nation of
what Dr. Jagan stood for and


his enduring legacy.
Importantly, at the time
of Dr. Jagan's departure, there
were many goals he had set for
his Government and Party
which were unaccomplished.
These are part of the work plan
and programme of successive
PPP/C governments and the
leadership of the party he
founded and led for 47 years.
Every year,. tributes
paid by those who occupy the
seat of government and the


leadership of the governing
party contain a reaffirmation to
continue the legacy of Dr. Jagan.
These are not empty
statements.
In continuing Dr. Jagan's
work, there would be differences
of approach and style of


leadership remains a practical
guide, not a dogma. There is no
indication of wavering on the
broad goals of attaining human
development, equity, prosperity,
transparent government and
national unity. Look at all the
policy initiatives, programmes,


Few in that party speak about
the legacy of Forbes Burnham.,
Between 1985 and 1992, there
was the systematic
dismantling of anything and
anyone who had to do with
Forbes Burnham. It must be-
said that there were also good


Weekly Viewpoint by Robert Persaud


leadership. Prime Minister Sam
Hinds as President had his
unique style and so too did
former President Janet Jagan.
Current President Bharrat
Jagdeo has brought his own
inimitable and energetic style to
the Presidency.
While style may be
different and emphasis change
in keeping with international
and internal realities, the overall
framework for development
crafted under Dr. Jagan's


projects and public statements and
one can see consistency. In some
areas, there has been so much
progress that these might have
exceeded Dr. Jagan's initial
expectation in terms of
development, especially social
advancementcn.
The PPP/C maintenance
of Dr. Jagan's legacy is in stark
contrast with the PNC regime in
office when that party suffered
the loss of its "founder leader."
There was total abandonment.


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reasons for doing so.
The PPP/C remains
proud of Dr. Jagan's legacy
and work. His outlook on so
many issues continues to
inspire many to build a
society based on respect.
tolerance, prosperity,
compassion and unity.
Admirable too has been the
inhumanities and injustices
borne by Dr. Jagan which were
beyond anyone's imagination.
When his opponents thought
they were wearing him down.
they had the opposite effect -
a stronger resolve. He showed
that every hurdle could be
crossed.
Certainly the
framework Dr. Jagan has left
does not contain all the
illitli.,-i T;I- ai: d cm cr in.


problems. President Jagdeo has
shown the'ibility to'adjustfand
govern the affairs of the nation
that has kept it on a path of
growth and prosperity. These
have fit with the framework set
by the late Dr. Jagan. It must
also be recalled that the late
President was not dogmatic and
was flexible in his approach to
national issues as seen during his
tenure as President of the
Republic.
Unfortunately, there are
now a few who seek to
desecrate the name of Dr. Jagan
by misrepresenting his legacy
and even invoking his name for
their own personal political
agendas. Many of these during
his lifetime opposed and even
sought to embarrass him. People
are no fools. They take umbrage
at hypocrites who sing the name
of Dr. Jagan but do not believe
in the basic principles he stood
for.
To those who say the
PPP/C is deviating from Dr.
Jagan's legacy they would do
well to recall Mrs. Janet Jagan's
comments on March 6 at the
Babu John event.
Guyana in 2005 is
certainly a different place than
in 1997. The country has
continued its forward movement
as we build on the foundation
laid by the late President. The
new obstacles are being ably
confronted and the country is
being prepared and modernised
for present and future
challenges.
The past is instructive
and a guide or reference for the
future. And Dr. Jagan's legacy
remains a guiding framework for
overcoming obstacles and
conquering the new horizons of
progress.
For certain, this
country and its leaders are
ii t .I iit'.h in th.. na. r.


"Copyrighted Material
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Available from Commercial News Providers"


Fox- 227-2921


CAMP STREET Ml: 226-4911, 223 7433,226 3231 ox: 226-4846
'.1 Si REEI Tel: 26-726- 726, 226/851,2264-7,6W lx: 2267 269
VREED-EN-IlOOP -Tel: 264-2605, 264-2367, 264-3106-8 Fox: 2641-2605


UIN DEN
ROSIGNOL


- Tel: 441-6951, 6952, 6090, 6001
-Tel: 330-2219, 2680, 2683 -


ROSE HALL Tel: 337-4300, 4500, 4550, 4075
CORRIVERION Tel: 339-2700,..' ',., 2750


Frx: 144-6008
Fax: 330-2681
Fax: 337-4424
[ox: .114


NEW AMSTERDAM Tel: 333-2633, 333-2639, 333-2706 Fox: 333-3432


ANNA REGINA -Tel: 771-4171, 4778, 4779


Fox: 771-4085


Email: email@nbicltd.com Website: www.nbicgy.com







SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 13, 2005 19


Regional



leadership



makes



integration



possible


would be equally accepted by all.
This is one of the most delicate
tasks since it involves highly
dissimilar countries, in terms of
resources and capacity to
promote the projects of the ACS.
This last aspect can be
counteracted by ensuring that
efforts undertaken by the ACS
remain focused on the four
priority areas (sustainable
tourism; transport; trade and
natural disasters), since this
would emphasise the
advantageous results of
cooperation for both the strong
and weak states alike.
On different occasions,
mention has been made of the
inconsistencies existing within
the ACS as one of the obstacles
that complicate the deepening of
cooperation among its members;


nevertheless, despite such
inconsistencies, it cannot be said
that these are structural or
antagonistic; thus, they can be
overcome. In that respect, it
must be borne in mind that every
country has its own political
idiosyncrasies and does not have
to emulate each other in
everything done internally or
even abroad. The commitment is
to act together on the issues
chosen for the partnership. It is
a question of sovereign nations
that decided to join forces
concerning well defined common
objectives.
Today, considerable
work is being carried out toward
expanding the sphere of
integration of the different
Caribbean and Latin American
schemes. As a matter of fact,


there is a strong upward and
downward movement that seeks
to expand that integrating sphere
in both directions.
Those great
movements ultimately
developed by the Region's
principal leaders make it
possible for the ACS to play
its role as a space for
increasing co-operation and
supporting integrationist
efforts.
Dr. Ruben Sili6 Valdez is
the Secretary General of the
Association of Caribbean
States. The views expressed
are not necessarily the
official views of the ACS.
Feedback can be sent to:
mail @acs-aec.org


By Rub6n Sili6
THE ACS is not an artificial
creation, neither is it
something casual. It is, in fact,
a reality that encompasses the
needs of a set of countries
which, although they coexist
within a "cultural mosaic"
characterized by diversity,
have put their regional
affinities and common
historical ties first. There is
the awareness that we are
facing. imminent
incorporation into
globalisation, based on
economic competitiveness and


strong regional integration
schemes, in terms of negotiating


The Greater

Caribbean This Week


an international institutional
framework which, with every
passing day, is becoming more
and more influential on the
institutional systems of
countries themselves.
There is the growing
conviction that international
cooperation requires increasingly


capacity, the size of populations
as well as the size of markets.
Even though optimum
levels of confidence have not yet
been attained among the states
that constitute it, the ACS tends
to be a regional space where a
set of procedures and practices
have been developed toward


coordinating efforts horizontally
and without any hierarchy
among countries. This has not
really been a tough task since it
involves a group of States which,
in order to make contact with one
another, have chosen the
advantages of cooperation over
the difficulties of conflict.
The preceding notions
have undoubtedly contributed to
enhancing the quality of relations
among States; facilitating the
opportunity to create joint
diagnoses; having developed a
future perspective regarding
issues that are relevant for the
Greater Caribbean.
These outstanding
features of the ACS are those
which, in my opinion, are
indicative of its historical
relevance; we must therefore
reinforce them in order to deepen
cooperation objectives, whose
point of departure is
commitment and the clear
definition of a pattern of
relations based on reciprocity.
In this respect, perhaps
it has failed to more closely
harmonise interests and
objectives that would produce a
common position regarding a set
of issues characteristic of the
Greater Caribbean, so that they


~- .




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GUYANA LANDS AND

SURVEYS COMMISSION
22 UPPER HADFIELD STREET
D'URBAN BACKLANDS, GEORGETOWN

GENERAL NOTICE

CORRECTIONSAND OBJECTIONS TO LAND CLAIMS
To Claimants and anyone who has a valid interest in Agricultural State Lands within the
following areas along the Bonasika River and its environs:

Right Bank, Bonasika River from its mouth to Kasienath's residence about
1 miles above Waramia Creek.

Left Bank, Bonasika River from Mole Island to opposite Kasienath's
residence.

You are hereby notified that a Preliminary List and Draft Plans of land claims submitted
for the above stated areas during the Land Tenure Regularisation claims registration
exercise are posted for scrutiny at the following locations:

Guyana Lands and Surveys Commission's Field Office on the Right Bank,
Bonasika River

Guyana Lands and Surveys Commission's Sub-Office at Crane Village, West
Coast Demerara

Bibi's Shop and Mahindranauth's Shop ak Black Boy's Shop, Bonasika River

Lower Bonasika Primary School

Claimants are encouraged to visit the above stated locations to ensure that their claims)
are correctly listed and annotated on the Preliminary List and Draft Plans. Claimants
may then submit any correction to the list in relation to errors in their Names, ID number,
etc. and/ or their land parcels. Also any person who wishes to make Objections to the
land claims listed and/or counter claims may do so on the prescribed forms provided.

Submissions for corrections, objections and/or counter claims to the Preliminary List will
be accepted as scheduled below:

Guyana Lands and Surveys Commission's Field Office on the Right Bank
Bonasika River from Wednesday, March 16, 2005 to Friday, April 15, 2005
during the hours of 8:30am- 4:30 pm daily (except on National Holidays).

Guyana Lands & Surveys Commission Sub-Office at Crane,.-West Coast
Demerara, Wednesday, March 16, 2005 to Friday, April 15, 2005 during Office
hours on Mondays to Fridays.

A similar exercise will be conducted at a later date for the remainder of the Land Tenure
Regularisation Area previously advertised for the Right Bank, Bonasika River and its
environs.



ANDREW R. BISHOP
COMMISSIONER OF LANDSAND SURVEYS
DATED: March 13"' 2005
- r .M TTjnr i- ~ - - - - - - - - -- --------- - ..- -----. - -






20,DAYJCHqqICE,,rlac .3,A


Anniitaitin,,i sho'iuld be .nhbnitted no later than !tMarrchi 22. 2005


UNITED NATIONS ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME
in collaboration with the
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY


|vacavNCIES
The United Nations Environment Programme in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency invites
applications from experienced, dynamic and highly motivated persons for the following short-term positions:
1. Short Term Consultancy for Review and Assessment of Existing Mechanisms for Harmonization of
Biosafety-related Legislation in Guyana

Qualifications and Experience
The Consultant should possess:
At least an LLB (Bachelor of Laws) degree with at least two (2) years post qualification experience.
Postgraduate qualifications will be an advantage
PLUS
Asound knowledge of natural resources laws/legal instruments including international Conventions, Treaties
and Agreements related to natural resources, biodiversity and or biosafety. Some prior international
experience in this will be a distinct advantage
OR
A Master's Degree in Natural Sciences, Agriculture, Environmental Studies, Forestry, Natural Resource
Management with at least two (2) years post-qualification experience AND a sound knowledge of natural
resources laws/legal instruments including international Conventions, Treaties and Agreements related to
natural resources, biodiversity and or biosafety. Some prior international experience in a similar or allied
consultancy will.be a distinct advantage
PLUS
Relevant knowledge of national, regional, and/or global issues relating to Science and Biotechnology
capacity building, research and development issues

Asound understanding of methods of data retrieval/sourcing

Sound knowledge of basic biodiversity issues is also relevant.

2. Short Term Consultancy for Survey of the Existence of National or Regional Risk
Assessment/Management Capacities and Recommendations for Mechanisms for Harmonization in
countries of the Latin America and Caribbean sub-region.

Qualifications and Experience
The Consultant should possess:
At least a Master's Degree in Natural Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Earth Sciences or Ecological
Sciences with minimum two (2) years post-qualification experience
OR
A Bachelor's Degree in Natural Sciences, Ecological Sciences, Earth Sciences or Environmental Studies
with at least four (4) years post-qualification experience
PLUS
Relevant knowledge of national, regional, and/or global issues relating to science and practice of risk
assessment, environmental impact assessments, strategic environmental assessments, technological
impact/risk assessments.

A sound understanding of methods of data retrieval/sourcing. Some basic knowledge of Spanish may be
helpful in data sourcing.

3. Short Term Consultancy for Survey of the Existence, Extent and Impact of the Release of LMOs and
related Commercial Products in Guyana

Qualifications and Experience
The Consultant should possess
At least a-Master's Degree in Biotechnology, Agricultural Sciences, Biological Sciences, Life Sciences, or
Forest Sciences with at least two (2) years post-qualification experience. Experience in studies relating to the
development and use of biotechnology and molecular biology and related products will be an advantage
OR
A Bachelor's Degree in Biotechnology, Agricultural Sciences, Biological Sciences, Life Sciences, or Forest
Sciences with at least five (5) years post-qualification experience.
PLUS
Relevant knowledge of research and development in biotechnology, global trends in the biotechnology
industry in all sectors including agricultural biotechnology, environmental biotechnology, food technology,
medical & pharmaceutical biotechnology and industrial biotechnology. Basic knowledge of economic botany
and/or zoology and industrial product development.

Asound understanding of methods of data retrieval/sourcing

Instructions for applicants
1. Envelopes should be clearly marked at the top right hand corner "consultancy for state name of
consultancy" and should be deposited in the tender box located in the Office of the Executive Director
or must be registered post at the address below.
2. Submissions without application letter will not be considered
3. Applicants applying for more than one consultancy must submit separate applications for each

Details for these consultancies and TORs can be downloaded from the EPA's website at
http://www.epaguyana.org or can be uplifted from the Human Resources Officer at the EPA, IAST Building, UG
Campus, Turkeyen, Greater. Georgetown

All applications should be addressed to:
Mr. Doorga Persaud
* Executive Director
Environmental Protection Agency
IAST Building, UG campus, Turkeyen
Greater Georgetown


* "Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"




r -


Prsien ssre Es

Coat foodvicims..


(From page 14)

of the primary school in the
community, but the
President urged them to
ensure that their children
attend school and not to use
excuses for not sending
them.
He said he had examined
the conditions at the school
and was satisfied that it is
habitable.
However, he noted that
some head teachers have
indicated to him that some
teachers are using the
situation as a means of not
working and are discouraging


children from attending school
under the guise that the buildings
are not in a habitable condition.
The President also urged
residents to help clean up their
community and to dispose of
garbage in a healthy and
environment-friendly way to
help reduce stench and the
possibility of spreading diseases.
In this respect he
requested Collymore to help
provide garbage bags to the
residents so that they would
be able to properly dispose of
garbage and keep the village
in a tidy manner.
(CHAMANLALLNAIPAUL)


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I
'~1 ----


MTV CHANNEL 14
CABLE 65

06:45 h Sign On With
Bhajan Melodies
07:00 h Dabi's Musical
Hour
07:30 h Bhakti Bhajans
08:00 h Christ For The
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10:00 h Death
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13:00 h The Diary
13:30 h-Avon Video &DVD
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14:00 h President Bharrat
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15:00 h Movie
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18:00 h Birthdays & Other
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18:15 h Death
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18:30 h Weekly Digest
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19:30 h -IBE Highlights
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20:45 h Indian Movie
23:30 h Sign Off

CNS CHANNEL 6

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06:30 h Deaths & In-
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08:00 h Geetmala
09:00 h English Movie
12:00 h Deaths & In-
Memoriam
12:30 ..h .-. Radha Krishna
Mandir Satsang
14:30 h Sanathan Dharma


15:0 h End Times With
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15:30 h Maximum Vibes
16:30 h Cartoons
17:00 h Greetings
17:50 h Viewpoint By Vibert
Parvatan
18:00 h Indian Cultural
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18:30 h Eye On The Issue
19:00 h Deaths & In-
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20:25 h Interlude
20:30 h Voice Of The People
21j00 h Deaths & In-
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22:00 h Viewers Choice
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00 00 h English Movie
02:00 h English Movie
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VTV CHANNEL 46
CABLE 102

07:00 h Full House
07:30 h Movie
09:00 h Movie
11:00 h Movie
1300 h Movie
15:00 h Movie
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19:00 h Majesty 1 Music
Lesson Live With Mark
Britton 20:00 h Sports
21:30 h Movie
23;50 h- Sign Off

NCN INC. CHANNEL 11

02:00 h NCN News
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02:30 h Late Nite With
GINA
03:00 h Movie
05:00 h Hour Of Potter
05:30 h Newtown Gospel
Hour
06:00 h NCN News
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0700 h CNN News
07;30 h Feature
08'00 h Lifting Guyana To
greatness
08:30 h The Fact
09:00 h Anmol Geet


"Weather

SWatch 45

TODAY'S FORECAST: Dry conditions are expected to continue
apart from brief, isolated showers mainly in the vicinity of hilly
areas.
WINDS: Will vary between the Northeast and Southeast at 2 to
7m.p.s.
WAVES: Slight to moderate reaching 1.1m in open waters.
HIGH TIDE: 05:41 h at (3.1 Om) and 18:27h at (2.97m)
LOW TIDE: 12:07h at (0.50m)
GITOWN TIMEHRI N. AMSTERDAM MABARUMA
SUNRISE: 06:00h 06:01 h 05:57h 06:07h
SUNSET: 18:04h 18:05h 18:01h 18:11h
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE: 31-340'over near inland and inland
regions & 30.5-32C along the coast.
MINIMUM TEMPERATURE: 22.0 24.0C over inland and interior
locations. & 25.0-26.5C along the coast.
RAINFALL: Nil
RAINFALL ACCUMULATED : 3.7mm
MARINE ADVISORY: Fishermen pnd other marine users
are advised not to damage or interfere with the ocean
platforms, whose data are vital to the provision of the
weather information and warnings for the safety of
the marine community.
HIGH TIDE ADVISORY: Nil
SPRING TIDE ADVISORY: The Spring tide advisory
continues until 15th March, 2005.

FOR WEATHER RELATED QUERIES
PLEASE CALL --- 261-2216, FAX 261-2284


10:00 h Homestretch
Magazine
10:30 h Sangeet Sansar
11:30 h Weekly Digest
12:00 h Press Conference
With Cabinet Secretary
13:00 h Info. For Nation
Building
13:30 h Breaking The
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14:30 h Catholic Magazine
15:00 h Agri. Digest
15:30 h Presidential Diary
16:00 h Family Forum
17:30 h Guysuco Round Up
18:00 h NCN 6 O'Clock
News Magazine
18:30 h Kala Milan
19:00 h One On One:
Complaints Against Police
19:30 h Rotary Club
International 100 Years
20:00 h President Jagdeo's
Address To GDF Officers'
Conference
21:30 h Islam For Guyana
22:00 h Global Perspective
23:00 h Movie

NTN CHANNEL 18
CABLE 69

05:00 h Sign On With The
Mahamrtunjaya Mantra
05:10 h Meditation
05:30 h Quran This
Morning
06:00 h R. Gossai General
Store Presents Shiva
Bhajans
06:15 h Jetto's Lumber Yard
Presents Shiva Bhajans
06:45 h Timehri Maha Kali
Shakti Mandir Presents Ma
Ki Shakti Amrit
07:00 h Ramroop's
Furniture Store Presents
Religious Teachings
07:30 h A&S Enterprises
Presents Shiva Bhajans
07:45 h Kennav Holdings
Ltd. Presents Shiva Bhajans
08:05 h SA RE GA MA
(Musical Notes) A Live Call-
In Program
09:30 h NTN Indian
Musical Interlude
10:00 h Sunday Morning
Services By Pt. Reepu Dama


Persaud
11:00 h To Be Announced
12:00 h Death
Announcement & In
Memoriam
13:00 h DVD Movie:
AMRAPALI (Eng. Sub.)
Starring Sunil Dutt,
Vyjantimala, Premnath & K.
Singh
16:00 h Gurukula Sandesh
16:30 h Teaching Of Islam
17:00 h IPA Presents... Shiv
Mahapuran (Eng. Sub.)
17:30 h Kishore Local
Talent
18:00 h Mere Awaaz Suno...
Karaoke Live
19:00 h Birthday Greetings/
A n n i v e r s a r y /
Congratulation/ Death
Announcement & In
Memoriam
20:00 h Shri
Ramcharitamanas Katha By
Shri Praskas Gossai In
Corentyne, Berbice
22:00 h DVD Movie: YEH
HAI JALWA Starring
Salman Khan, Amisha Patel,
Rishi Kapoor & Rinky.
Khanna
02:00 h Sign Off With The
Gayatri Mantra

WRHM CHANNEL 7

06:30 h BBC News
07:00 h CNN News
08:00 h Today
10:00 h CBS Sunday
11:15 h Rotary 100 Years
Of Service
12:00 h Hilalgo
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19:00 h Eyes On The Issues
19:30 h NBC News
20:00 h 60 Minutes
21:00 h The Contender
22:00 h Law & Order
23:00 h Boston Legal
00:00 h-NBC New

RBS CHANNEL 13

09:00 h Hope For Today
10:00 h Revival Crusaders
Hour


DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE CLOSURE TO ROAD
TRAFFIC FOR SUNDAY, MARCH 13,2005


For Ocean Going Vessels & Trawlers 05:30
For Trawlers -t10:30
For Ocean Going Vessels opening lasts about 1-1"2hrs


10:30 h Movie
13:00 h TBN
14:00 h Charlotte Street
Wesleyan
14:30 h Methodist Church
In Guyana
15:00 h Church Of God In
Guyana
15:30 h Faith & Truth
16:00 h PGA Golf
19:00 h- CNN
20:00 h Dateline
21:00 h The Contender

LRTV CHANNEL 10/17/
CABLE 68

02:00 h Movie
04:00 h Movie
05:30 h TBN Gospel Hour
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Magazine
10:00 h Movie
12:00 h Lenten Movie
15:00 h Light From The
Word
15:30 h Real TV
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16:30 h Aaj Gurkula
Sandesh
17:00 h Empertec Guyana
Forum
19:00 h In Memory &
Dedications
19:30 h Death
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Dedications
20:00 h Islam The Way To
Paradise
20:30 h Final Revelations
21:05 h The Bible Speak
22:00 h Movie
00:00 h Movie

DTV CHANNEL 8

08:55 h Sign On
09:00 h Sunday Mass: Our
Lady Of The Angels
10:30 h Sabrina Animated
11:00 h Family Matters


12:00 h DTV'S Festival Of
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Lenten Season: The Big
Fisherman
15:00 h Homeward Bound
The Incredible Journey
17:00 h Eloise At The Plaza
19:00 h Greetings &
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19:30 h Faith In Action A
Catholic Series
20:00 h Musical Interlude
20:30 h A Return To God's
Biblical Foundation
21:00 h Nature
22:00 h Hidalgo
00:20 h Sign Off

HBTV CHANNEL 9

05:50 h Death
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06:00 h Bishop W.D Babb
Presents
06:30 h Gospel Speaks
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14:00 h Dalgety's Africa
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15:05 h Swansea
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17:30 h Mystery Of The'
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18:00 h -Sports Show
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19:05 h Rotary 100 Years
Of Service
19:37 h Sitcom
20:00 h Soul Spectular
(R&B Musical(
21:00 h People Of
Distinction
22:00 h Death'
Announcement
22:10 h Movie


GUIDE SUBJECT

TO CHANGE

WITHOUT NOTICE


S60A~tOUNICL 'M'a ch-'18-'-6b 21










- 7- For customer service call
IMF-"",vTel: 226-3243-9,225-4475
Fax: 225-0663 or

come into to us at
#,plymn "Lama Avenue
Be Air Park

P eh dy eorgetown

Please check your ads on the first day of appearance. For queries call Pratirna on Tel: 226-3243-9


C-TECH COMPUTERS
SERVICES. Repairs, upgrades,
Data Recovery and Installing
and Maintaining of Networks.
Telephone 611-4929. Contact
Rickey 226-8234.
FOR PROFESSIONAL
COMPUTER Repairs, Sales &
Services Call Kersting's Computer
Repairs & Sales Centre @ 227-
8361/618-8283. Home & Office
services available. 24 hrs.


ESCAPE Bodybliss
massages. Alleviate headaches,
insomnia, muscular pains,
tension and stress. Certified
Massage Therapist Ulelli
Verbeke # 226-2669/615-
8747.
NEED to activate your body.
and mental.strength? Come for
a well-balanced health
massage, shower available. Call -
Mrs. Singh (daily). Tel. 220-
48421615-6665.


USA GREEN CARD.
LOTTERY. Live & work in the
USA. Family application: $4
000. Contact 227-33391623-
1195
A day care that caters for
the physical intellectual social
and emotional development of
our child. Call 641-0569 ,
218-4002 (H).
TECHNICIANS available
for appliances repairs washers,
dryers, microwaves, stoves, deep
fryers, etc. Call 622-4521, 263-
0050.
TECHNICIAN on call for all,
your television; VCR and
microwave repairs. We provide
home service. Call Ryan # 265-
2634/615-7361.
HELLO! the doctor is back.
Have your gas stove repaired
and serviced, also your kero
range change to gas.
Telephone 220-0730, 220-
4073.








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dinners, corporate, etc:

Catering for your dream
cakes and a miscellany
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Sales:,
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ALL
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THINKING of renovating or
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architect. Call' MURRAY'S
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CANADIAN IMMIGRATION
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Cadact .227-3339/623-1195.
GENERAL Mainterian- *.
Renovsiions on home, build;'

Le e J !- -. Ow 1- 1i
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FOR all your telephone
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equipment, rewiring, adjacent,
etc. Contact Qualified Technician with
over 35 years experience. Don't delay
Telephone 226-2766/617-0427
anytime.
ALL TYPES OF PRINTING -
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U.S.A IMMIGRATION
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Processing, Petitions,
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Appointments etc.
LLOYD WILLIAMS & ASSOCIATES
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[ Between Cummings &
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TeI#:(592)-223-8115
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E-maIl-
crucible@guyana.net.gy



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Beginners to professional levels.
Call Sharmila 225-2598/627-
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JEAN offers courses in El-
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DO you need someone to cut
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JEAN offers courses in
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embroidery, hand embroidery,
plastic canvas, smocking, floral,
craft, cake decoration. 159 Barr
St., Kitty # 226-9548.



CAT 317 EXCAVATOR,
AVAILABLE FROM 9/03/05.
CALL 261-5403


ANITA'S Auto Rental. Fully
powered luxury cars clean and
tidy, lowest deposit, flexible rates
for long term. Anita@231-7719

_29TBSELPNG


you cursed.
depressed,' demon possessed
OR need finance? Call
Acsiee Randolph Williams -
.# i)-6Q,50 (20:0, h 23:00
Ax ,.- ;; *::,.


~s~~p ltg3


BUILDING, renovating or
doing any kind of construction
work? We give free estimates.
Prompt, reasonable and reliable
service. Call 622-0267/629-
2239.


WHOLESALE prices for
potatoes, onions, garlic, split
peas, channa, milk powder, jar
oil Steve's Trading, 35 William
St., Campbellville. Tel: 624-
6414/225-0688/223-1122.



GREEN House Restaurant, UG
Road. Special Creole lunches and
dinner daily for UG & College
students. Free glass of juice with
meal $395. Telephone 222-6528/
222-6510.



HERBAL Medicines skin
infection, asthma, impotency,
cholesterol, blood pressure, weight
loss, gallstone, stricture pain,
diabetes, internal cleansing and
many more. Appointment # 220-
7342/614-5650.



DESERT Rose, Norfolk Pine
Christmas Trees, Orchids (Den,
Once, Cat, etc.), hanging basket
Fern, Cactus and lots more.
Telephone 226-2882. 195 C
Camp Street, at the back of the
Key & :Lock shop.



INDRA'S Beauty Salon, 122
Oronoque Street for cold wave,
straightening, facial, manicure,
scalp treatment and design on
nails. Also Beauty Culture
available. Tel. 227-1601.
DOLLY'S Hairdressing Salon,
175 Middle Street, C/burg,
Georgetown for Cold-waving,
Straightening, Styling Colour,
Streak, Cut, Blow-dry, Scalp
treatment, Manicure, Pedicure,
Facial, etc. Phone 227-2428.
NAYELLI .School of
Cosmetology is now enrolling
students for cosmetology classes
that begin on April 4, 2005.
Limited spaces are available.
Call us at 226-2124 or visit at
211 New Market, Street, North
Cummingsburg.



MAGAZINE Worldwide Pen
Friend. Information? Send
stamped enveloped CFI, PO
Box: 12154,. Georgetown,
Guyana.
SINGLE, decent, educated
ladies in the late 50s and early
sixties looking for gentleman of
same calibre for long term
relationship. Call Telephone
223-8217. 09:00 h -18:00 h.
SINGLE Christian male
seeks single female, aged 17 -
21, for a faithful relationship.
Write ito: Adesima Browne, 3345
Home Place, South Ruimveldt.
Telephone 223-2871.
SINGLE, decent, educated
ladies in the late 50s and early
sixties looking for gentlemen of
same calibre for long term
relationship. Call telephone
223-8237 09:00 h 18:00 h.
COMMUNICATE .with
interested persons by telephone for
friendship or serious relations. Call:
CFI Telephone Friendship Link:
261-5079, Sunday to Saturday,
07:00 to 21:00 h.
DON'T miss the chance of a
lifetime. Meet that special
someone now. Call The Junior/
Senior/Singles/Dating Service
18-80 years. Telephone 223-
8237, Mon. Fri. -- 08:30 h -
18:00 h, Sat. -- Sun. 10:00 h -
14;00 h.


NOVELS, Story Books, Text,
etc. Also Novels and other Books
on sale from $20 up. Telephone
223-8237.


ENROL now at D & R Driving
School, 95 Hadfield Street, Werk-
en-Rust, Georgetown. Telephone
660-4216/226-6454.
ENROL now at Shalom
Enterprise, Lot 2 Croal Street,
Stabroek, Georgetown. You could
also obtain an International Driver's
Permit. For information call 622-
8162, 611-9038, 227-3869.


WORK from: home for
US$$$$$ weekly. Information?
Send stamped envelope to:
Nicola Archer, PO Box 12154,
Georgetown, Guyana.
WORK from home.
Information? Send stamped
envelope to: Bibi Farid, 65
Public Road, Eccles, East Bank
Demerara, Guyana.
CONTROL your income
working from homhome filling 100
envelopes for US$500 or more
weekly. For information, send
stamped self-addressed
envelope to: Nathaniel Williams,
PO Box: 12154, Georgetown,
Guyana.


Ts, voice training and
piano classes. Call 626-
804/225-8447.
AIR OFFERS. KEYBOARD,
GUITARS VOICE TRAINING
AND PIA0N CLASSES. CALL
626-5804/225-8447.
BSI is offering Computer
Classes for adults. Individual
attention guaranteed. Certified
Tutor. Call 227-8143 or 624-
8084.
JOIN THE PHONICS CEN-
TER. We teach your child/children
the art of reading. See them de-
velop into good readers. Call 618-
2068.
1 FULL-TIME CXC English
A & B & 1 full-time QXC POA
teachers for next 'term. Monar
Educational Institute, 60 Light
Street, Alberttown, Georgetown.
Telephone 223-7226/227-4798.
PHONICS Reading Classes
Mon. Wed. 16:00h 18:00
h. English Classes -Thurs. Sat.
16:-00 h 17:00 h. Contact
MAGS 263-6184, 218-0514.
'Learning can be fun'.
EARN a Certificate, Diploma
or Degree, in any part of the word
in' theeld of your choice; studying
\from home THROUGH
'CORRESPONDENCE. For-
information, call CFI Global
Education Link #261-5079. .
ATTENTION PARENTS/
GUARDIANS Is your child/
loved one 7 years and up
struggling with simple addition
and subtraction, etc.? BSI can
help. We use Hooked on-Maths.
Ca I 227-8143 or 624-8084,
between 09:00h and 12:00 and
14:00 h and 16:30 h week days
09:00 h 11:00 h on Sat. and
08:00 h 10:00 h on Sundays.
PRACTICAL electronic
course beginning 12!" April,
2005. Learn to repair TVs,
Microwave ovens, Power Amps,
combinations stereo systems;
monitors etc. Logical and
systematic troubleshooting
techniques (aught by qualified
instructor with more than.21 years
experience, get started on your,
career now! Call Abdul's
Electronics 225-0391 226-
6551. 349, East S'treet,
Georgetown.
EVENING Classes. CXC
Subjects for Forms 3 & 4, Adults (16
30) Principles of Accounts,
Principles of Business, Office
Procedures Mathematics,,
Information Technology, English A,
Social Studies, Biology &
Integrated Science. First Federation
Building, King & Croal Streets. $1
000 per subject. Individual tuition
'also available at- $3 000 per'subject.
Contact (Miss Chandra), 227-7627,
(Mrs. Roberts), 227-3768, (Sir
Roberts), 611-4997.


EARN your computer
Certificates and Diploma now at
Computer Training Centre.
Certificates/Diploma courses
Microsoft Windows, Word, Excel
Access, PowerPoint, FrontPage
2003, Adobe Photoshop CS,
Corel Draw, Publisher Diploma in
Computerised Accounting
QuickBooks Accounting,
Peachtree Accounting, AccPac
Simply Accounting, Repairs &
CompTIA network, A+Certificates,
Information Technology.
Computer courses for children
ages 7 12. We also repair and
service computers at a low cost.
Software & Games for sale. Visit
our Office at 58 Upper Robb &
Oronoque Sts., Bourda,
Georgetown. Telephone No. 225-
,1540



WANTED DANCERS FOR
HOUSTON. CONTACT 227-3339.
ONE Truck driver. Contact
R. Narlne, 49 Public Rd., Kitty.
Telephone 227-1923/616-
5679.
ONE Domestic needed.
Contact P. Ramroop and Sons,
Lot 65 West Annandale, ECD.
Telephone 220-2171.
ONE %' day experienced Cook,
with valid Health Certificate and ID.
Contact number 226-2299, 227-
0331.
1 INTERIOR truck Driver, 50
male/female labourers, 2 trainee
Bee Keepers. Lot C Eccles.
Telephone # 233-2423.
COMPUTER Trainee
Technician (female). 3 Subjects
CXC. Accommodation provided
ifinecessary. Telephone 227-
0060 (Jenny).
PORTERS from East Coast
Demerara area. Contact P.
Riamroop and Sons, Lot 1C
Orange Walk, Bourda. Telephone
227-1451 or 227-2254.
: SALESCLERK 20 30
years, (2) years experience and
must be good at Maths & English.
Apply to Lens, Sheriff & Fourth
Sts., C/ville. Tel. 227-2486.
2 -ACCOUNTS Clerks, Driver/
Mechanic, Trainee Machinist,
Machinist Welder/Fabricator. Send
application to 172 East Field Dr.,
Nbndy Park, E B Dem.
1. 1 *COUPLE to work in shop,
1' Handyman, 1 Security Guard.
Vacancies exist in the interior
Middle Mazaruni. Persons
interested call during office
hours. 225-7118.
VACANCIES exist for one Night.
Cook, Bill Clerks and Porters. Apply
16 Duncan St. & Vlissengen Rd., N/
town. Telephone 227-8505. Must
submit application and 2 passport
size photographs.
VACANCY exists for
experienced Spray Painter to spray
cupboards, floors, walls, etc. and one
Sales representative, between the,
ages 18 and 30. Attractive salary
offered: Call 231-7567 from 09:00
,h to 16:30 h.
VACANCIES exist for -: two
persons for Marketing, Security
Guards (male 30 55), Carpenters,
Masons, Salespersons,
Receptionists. Cell Phone
Technician and Technician,.
Cleaners at MURRAY'S TEMP
AGENCY. Contact number 231-
3302.
IMMEDIATE vacancies exist for
the following positions: 2 Washers,
ages 40 55 years; Security Guards
30 52 years; 1 Handyman 20
40 years. Apply in person to K &V
C Hotel, 233 South Rd., Lacytown,.
with written application, Food
Handler's Certificate, Police
Clearance, 2 recent testimonials,.
passport-size: photo.
: VACANCIES exist in a'
reputable, stable, financial
organization for sales;
representatives. Applicants should
be mature in age and possess a
minimum of 3 CXC, GCE subjects
or an equivalent qualification. Send
application to: Unit Manager.'133:
Church' Street, South'
Cummingsburg, Georgetown.
Telephone nun-ber: 622-0307.


Maid between ages 17 and
30 years old, live-in or live out.
Knowledge of Indian dishes
would be an asset. Secretary/
Personal Assistant to-manage
small professional office. No
experience, training will be
provided. Apply in person:
Canadian Immigration
Service, 58 Upper Robb and
Oronoque Sts., Bourda ( near
Bourda Cricket Ground). No
telephone calls please.
Guyana Employment
Agency, 37 Croal Street.
Phone 227-3339. Vacancies
exist for the following: Senior
Auditor, Industrial Electricians,
Florist, Driver, Fitter/
Machinists, Insurance Sales
Reps, Babysitters, Security
Guard, Waitresses, Barman,
DJ, Female Dancers, Editors,
Cameramen, Transmission
Operators, Numbering &
Printing Operator, Cook/Pastry
maker (ECD), 2 to Live-in
(Berbice) (EBD), P/T Maids &
Cooks, P/T Salesgirl.

Vacancy
One Cashier

Two Machine Operators/
Customer Service Clerks
Regi.emenr;
.- Smra Inteliect
.Teom Pkwer
-A Smng Face
Moths & Englsn .

Two Computer Operators
Requrernents:
ftrolencv In, Microsol Word &
Coietaw 11.0
-Excelient key/boctng Sks
Cteatlve & Srrot
-Team Piw
Appyto: o
Executive Office Services
82 Albert Street & Regent Rood,
BoudoO, Georgetown.



ECCLES PUBLIC ROAD.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.,
LAND FOR SALE OLEAN-
DER GARDENS 89 FT BY
152 FT. PRICE $25M. CALL:
612-0349.
CRANE PUBLIC ROAD -
$15M; BESIDE GAS STATION.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.'
REPUBLIC PARK-$4;5M;
CONTINENTAL, PAPRIKA,
SOESDYKE, EBD.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.'
CRANE $3M; Meten-
SMeer-Zorg $3M; Nandy Park
- $5.5M; Republic Park $5M.
KEYHOMES.- 223-4267.
PRIME commercial land
for sale 115. ft x 3:1 ft,
Charlotte Street, Bourda.
Contact owner 226-0683
(anytime). .
MOBLISSA: 10 acres
land, ideal Poultry and
general farming $3M.
person's Realty. Telephone
226-5496.
REPUBLIC PARK: vacant
transported land 50'/100'.
Build your dream home.
$6.5M. (US$30 000).
Ederson's. Telephone 226-
5496.
SUPPLY, EBD road to sea
75' x 1300' bulldozed and
cleared land ready for
construction. Price negotiable.
Telephone 225-4398.
TWO'transported adja-
cent lots in Earl s Court, LB'l
18 080 sq ft total. Please
telephone 623-7438 be-
'tween 6-8am, and 8-10'pm
for details. ,
17 VACANT, transported
house lots to be sold in one
parcel at Blankenburg,
public Road, West Coast
Demerara. Call 225-2487/
627-3806.


r






10*jDAYCHRONICLE '1i Y bj5


TWO Transported house
lots light, water available,
area free from any flood going
for $1.8M situate at Best,
WCD. Telephone: 254-0101 -
Singh.
TWO LARGE PLOTS OF
PRIME COMMERCIAL LAND
WITH HOUSE ENMORE
PUBLIC ROAD. Telephone
220-9199. No reasonable
offer refused.
UPPER Demerara River:
Plots of land ideal housing,
agriculture, cattle, shipping;
25, 50, 100 & 600 acres plot,
note $65 000; per acre.
Ederson's. Telephone 226-
5496
DORA MISSION RIVER
SIDE 88 acres of land. Ideal
- Shipping, Ware House, Bond,
Cattle, General Farming -
$15M. Ederson's Realty.
Telephone 226-5496,
DUKE STREET
KINGSTON: 2 large house
lots, 48'/117'. Ideal school
luxurious hotel, apartments,
storage bond. $9.5M.
Ederson's. Telephone 226-
5496.
HIGHWAY- 105 acres, 70
acres 47 and 10 acres or
together 227 acres.
Residential land GuySuCo
Gardens, (Turkeyen) Lamaha
gardens, Atlantic Gardens.
TELEPH6NE 226-8148/625-
1624.
GATED community with (24)
hours security. Exclusively
residential lots at PIn. Versailles,
West Bank Demerara size 6 000
- 12 000 sq. ft., priced from
$3.9M. Immediately
Transoortable. Contact Seetaram
- # 264-2946/7.
REPUBLIC Park $4.8M;
Continental Park $5.4M: NZw
Providence, Mead.. Brook -
$7M, Pr.,aa Nagar $7.5M;
ie $4M; Happy Acres $6M.
Buy land and visualise your
dream home. Call Tony Reid's
Realty, 225-2626, 231-2064.
ONE square mile of
registered gold and diamond
land claim. Easy access to
water for all-year work. Ideal
for land dredging operation.
Minimal vegetation. Mining
will not affect environment or
cause river pollution.
Location: Imbaimadai Area -
Upper Mazaruni. Interested
persons please Phone: 614-
709.
BEL AIR GARDENS.
MASSIVE RESIDENTIAL
LAND. APPROXIMATELY 26
000 SQ FT. WELL FENCED.
OFFERING ATLANTIC OCEAN
VIEW. SIZE 200 X 130. IT IS
MAGNIFICENT FOR A
MILLIONAIRE. HUMPHREY
NELSON'S. TELEPHONE
226-8937.
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
"HAVE FAITH IN CHRIST,
TODAY". Malgre Tout $1.5M;
Imax Gardens $1.5M;
Friendship (EBD) $2M;
Annandale $2.8M;
D'Andrade St., Kitty $3.9M/
$3M/$4M/$11M; Chateau
Margot (3 lots and house);
Melanie Public Rd. $4M;
Ogle $5M; Happy Acres $7M/
$14M; Duncan/Garnett Sts. -
$12M; Campbellville/
Continental Park $11M; Water
St. $13M; $10M; Brickdam -
$25M; Le Ressouvenir $22M;
Bel Air Gardens $35M/$60M;
Church St. $60M; Mahaicony
(agricultural land) $60M;
Aflontic Gardens/Vryheid's
Lust Public Road $11 M; LAND
Lusignan for gas station -
$30M. Jewanram. Contact
270-4470, 623-6431
FUTURE HOMES REALTY.
227-4040, 628-0796, 616-
7840. Camp Street, land $80
million; Carmichael Street,
land $80 million; Eccles,
land SR million- Irna double
lot on corner Church -Street -
$33 million; North Road, land
with foundation $20 million;
CZimpbellville, back lot with
walk way $2.8 million;
Yarowkabra residential lot
100'x 200' $800 000 neg.; 5
house lots Cummings Street -
$33 million; Continental Park,
land $5.5 million, Republic
Park, double lot $12.5
million- Pomeroon, 100 acres
land $7 million; Ha py Acres,
2 lots 110 x 120- $18 million;
Happy Acres, 100 x 60 $7
million; Kingston, land $17
million; Atlantic Gardens $6.5
million $16 million; Supply,
land $40 million, Diamond,
land with concrete fence o
i uii, ccies Industrial land
- $16 million; Water Street,
New Market Street $25
million; Sheriff Street, land 2
lots $26 million; Church
Street, land $73 million neg.;
Croal Street, land 110 x 60
$29 million neg.; Quamina
Street, land $30 million.


ROOM for single working
female. Telephone: 227--
0928
2-BEDROOM apartment.
Contact number 625-4383.
FURNISHED bottom
flat to rent Shell Road,
Kitty. Call: 223-7812.
ONE room for decent
working female. Telephone 231-
1786/613-2413.
LONG term apartments from'
US$400 monthly. Call 227-3336
or 227-0902.
1-BEDROOM apartment for
single person. Telephone 223-
4051..
FOR overseas visitors,
furnished flats Kitty. Phone
227-2995.
ONE-BEDROOM situated at
31 William Street,
Campbellville. Phone 225-7777.
HOUSE to rent in Alberttown
- top and bottom flat. Call Joy.
Telephone 223-1093.
ROOM to let at Eccles for
female student or working girls.
Telephone 233-2249.
SHORT-TERM RENTALS
FOR OVERSEAS VISITORS.
PHONE 225-9944.
ONE one-bedroom in Kitty.
Call Mala -226-6568, 227-8998,
621-9048, 227-8998.
ONE flat 2-bedroom Nandy
Park, EBD. For overseas visitors
only. Ring 227-2693.
'CAMP STREET BUID -

KEYmHCI uS$3 500.
2-BEDROOM house to rent
in Charlotte Street. Telephone
621-3410.
FOR 9 months lease from
April 15, 2005 2-bedroom
upper flat in Subryanville. Call
226-6663.
SINGLE working female to
share apartment in good area.
Telephone 233-2541 or 615-
5839.
BEL AIR PARK fur-
nished executive house on
double lot US$1 500. # 223-
5204/612-2766.
2-BEDROOM bottom flat to
rent, Third Street Montrose.
Preferably a couple. Call 220-
5439.
ENTIRE bottom flat or part
for.any suitable kind or business.
TELEPHONE 226-8148/625-
1624.
FURNISHED and
unfurnished residential houses,
apartments, offices, bonds, etc.
TELEPHONE 226-8148/625-
1624.
BEAUTIFUL GROUND floor.
Business restaurant/boutique,
etc. $240 000 neg. KEYHOMES
- 223-4267.
BEL AIR SPRINGS $90
000. KEYOHMES 223-4267.
QUEENSTOWN US$1200.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
SOUTH RUIMVELDT $40
000. KEYHOMES 223-4267.
$35 000 ECCLES; $40 000
- ECCLES. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
ECCLG E.XEC'JTIVE -
US$2 000. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
US$1 200 EXECUTIVE.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
BEL AIR PARK US$700.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
r:.li FS. BUSINESS -
US$2 000. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
WHOLE HOUSE $60 000.
NANDY PARK. KEYHOMES -
223-4267.
OPPOSITE AMERICAS
EMBASSY. US$2 ,000
negotiable. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
ALEXANDER STREET,
BUSINESS US$1 000,
BOTTOM. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
SUBRYANVILLE
UPSTAIRS BEAUTY SEMI
FURNISHFA FC 9o o000.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
EXECUTIVE, furnished
and unfurnished houses and
apartments, offices, bonds,
etc. TEL: 226-8148/625-1624.
2-BEDROOM bottom flat -
$45 000 monthly at Prashad
Nagar. Serious enquiries only.
Telephone: 225-8088.


FURNISHED ROOM DE-
CENT, SINGLE WORKING FE-
MALE. TEL: 226-5035 (08:00 -
17:00 HRS).
HOUSES to rent. Wanted -
experienced Driver over 30
years. Telephone 222-3481 or
625-0354.
WHAT a gift for (3) fully fur-
nished bedrooms only US$15,
per day prime location.
Phone: 225-0230 or 223-6900.
DO You need an honest,
reliable & efficient Real Estate
Agency? Call: UpToTheMinute
Realty. # 225-8097/226-5240.
ONE lower business flat
situated at Lot 1 Non Pariel,
Area A, East Coast Demerara.
Apply to Jerome Fredericks at
same location.
ROOMS to rent monthly -
self-contained Le Rich
Luxury Rooms 25 Princes
Street $25 000 monthly. Call
# 227-3067.
1-BEDROOM bottom flat
apartment at A 37 Barima
Avenue, Bel Air Park. Semi-
furnished. Contact 225-5904 or
629-5941.
INTERNET Cafe and Office
spaces along UG. Road. Prime
location, spaces suitable for any
business. Call 623-3404/222-
6510.
ONE two-bedroom
furnished or unfurnished hooim'
residential area prashad
Nagar. Cont,;1 Nalini 227-
31 2R
ROOMS and apartments for
short term rental. Priced from $3
000 daily. Call 227-3336 or 227-
0902.
BUSINESS spaces 1 400
sq. ft. and 600 sq. ft. at two (2)
prime areas. Contact telephone
# 223-1229.
1 BOTTOM flat, Camp
Street area. Ideally suited for
school or offices. Call Richard -
624-0774. 233-2614.
TOP flat $45 000; house
by itself $60 000. Phone 225-
2626/231-2064 or E-mail:
tonyreidsrealty@hotmail.comr
ONE three-bedroom upper
flat house for rent $45 000
monthly. Triumph, ECD.
Telephone 220-5173 or 641-
1913.
ONE-BEDROOM house with
fridge, toilet, electricity, water,
telephone, fruit trees, etc. at
Soesdyke. Telephone 261-
5706.
ONE 1-bedroom apartment
and one 2-bedroom apartment.
10 Middle Street, Vryheid's Lust.
Telephone 220-0698 or 626-
4715.
2-BEDROOM bottom flat,
situated in Tucville,
Georgetown. Water, light,
telephone, etc. Contact
telephone 223-5717/ 226-7839.
BAR in Georgetown all
new modern equipment,
including Pool table G$200
000 month. UpToTheMinute
Realty 226-5240/225-8097
PRIME location. Self-
contained apartments, along
UG Road. Suitable for overseas
visitors. Long and short term
basis. Call 623-3404/222-6510.
RESIDENTIAL TOP Flats.
Eccles, Subryanville, Bel Air
Park. Queenstown. Apartment for
foreigners. Caall ,- 5. 8. 614-
2073 Christopher.
TWO-BEDROOM bottom
flat situate at 106 Regent.Road,
Bourda, (B/B) $30 000 per
month. Contact Kevin at
telephone 225-3214.
I ARGE bottom flat
spacious toilet/bath/kitcnen.
All concrete and grilled at
Lusignan, secured parking.
Telephone: 220-2472.
1 FURNISHE-D 2-
bedroori, upper flat
apartment in Kitty, 2 toilets
and baths, water and lights
included. Price $80 000.
Telephone # 225-7109.
CHECK out Sunflower
Hotel & other apartments.
Cool, comfortable self-
contained rooms. Call 225-
3817 or 223-2173 ask for
Margaret or Loraine.
SUBRYANVILLE 2-
bedroom a pm,'",n: fully
furnished, grilled, mosquito
mesh. For overseas visitors.
Short term rental. Telephone
226-5369.
VACANT t'""-
apartment ..u-Dedroom
Tel ,I Kitty. $30 000.
-, none # 226-3033 betWeen
Spm. and 5 pm. Also household
it'ms. No flooding yard.


2-BEDROOM bottom flat,
fully furnished, AC, hot and cold
water, fully grilled and parking.
For overseas guest. Telephone
218-0287, 263-0392.
NEW flood proof concrete
house; (2) large 2-bedroom
apartment BV/Triumph $20
000 monthly. Telephone 220-
8946, 220-3173 Mr. McKenzie.
SOUTH RUIMVELDT
GARDENS: furnished rooms $15
000 each monthly. Ideal -
students, teachers, nurses.
Ederson's. Telephone 226-
5496.
NEAR Kitty Market, vacant 2
21'x 75' spaces. Ideal internet
cafe, pharmacy, supermarket -
$120 000 neg. each monthly.
Ederson's. Telephone 226-
5496.
1 BUSINESS place situated
at 48 Princes & Russell Sts. Ideal
for Internet Cafe, Variety Store,
etc. Telephone 226-6603/621-
8526 between 08:00 h and 17:00
h.
QUEENSTOWN, fully fur-
nished 1 & 3-bedroom apart-
ment with parking space to rent.
Suitable for overseas visitors on
short term basis. Tel. # 226-
5137/227-1843.
Bottom flat Duncan Street,
formerly Video World. 3 ro
and middle fist and part of
boqttC nat in Regent Street. Tel.
226-2260, 225-2873, 619-5901.
PRIME business spot
(dimension: 14 ft x 45 ft) for
showroom, office above Plaza
Hang Out Bar (opp. Sankar's Auto
Spares), Lot 245 Sheriff Street,
C ville. Call: 227-8576.
ONE two-bedroom
apartment to rent in Annandale
North bottom flat, filled, grilled,
with phone. light, water and
parking space $25 000 month.
Call 220-9477.
OVERSEAS visitors two-
bedroom apartment, US$50/
US$60 daily, with all modern
conveniences. Excellent
location. Call 227-0289/222-
6996.
APARTMENTiFLATS (1-
bedroom) $20 000 $25 000;
2-bedroom) $25 000 $45 000;
rashad Nagar house $45 000
& $80 000 furnished: rooms -
$10 000 & $12 000. Call 231-
6236.
RESIDENTIAL and
commercial properties -
furnished and unfurnished.
Prices rangin from $35 000 to
US$3 000. Contact Carmen
Greene's Realty. Telephone
226-1192. 623-7742.
2-BEDROOM apartment,
Industry; executive houses -
GuySuCo Gardens (Turkeyen)
Kingston, Section 'M'.
TELEPHONE 226-8148/625-
1624.
FOR SALE/RENTAL 1 5-
BEDROOM executive styled
house 2 self-contained rooms,
all modern conveniences, fully
secured, garage. Telephone
227-3861.
ROOMS from $10 000. $15
000; apartments $30 000; flat -
$45 000; house by itself $100
000; apartment fully furnished -
US$700. Call 225-2709, 225-
0989, 623-2591.
3-BEDROOM apartment, fully
furnished, South Ruimveldt Park,
driveway. US$700. MURRAY'S
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT &
QERVICES. Telephone 231-3302.
SHADES AND SHAPES.
Interior D6cor/Remodeling
Cleaning Services Maids.
Contact Christopher. Telephone
614-2073, 226-1808. Email:
Theserviceexpets@yahoo.com
STATUS 0110 RIIII mnimN
FROM US$650- RUNNING INTO
US$3 506; FLATS FROM $40
000 TO $70 000. HUMPHREY
NELSON'S. TELEPHONE 226-
8937.
SHADES AND SHAPES.
Executive ocean view 4-
bedroom houses for rental or
sale; 8-bedroom, class house,
furnished. Call 226-1808, 614-
2073. Agent Christopher
Goodridge.
SHADES AND SHAPES
REALTY. To the Diplomatic
community. 20 Bel Air Gardens.
Telephone 226-1808, 614-
2073. Agent: Christoohl-
Goodridge.
Theservicp."- EmaIl:
,-A^pets@yahoo.com
FURNISHED and
unfurnished houses and
apartments from $30 000 to
US$4 000. Short and long term
rental. 2-bedroom lower flat $30
000. A & R, Real Estate & Auto
Sale. Telephone 231-7719.


1 NEW unfurnished 2-bedroom
apartment second and third floors
in one, 2 toilets and baths, modem
kitchen, fully grilled, electricity,
water, in Kitty. Telephone number
225-7109. Price $53 000.
NEW self-contained 1-
bedroom apartment with own
telephone, semi-furnished. Near
University. Call 222-3962
between 09:00 h and 18:00 h.
$38 000 per month, with all
utilities included in rent.
ONE two-bedroom apartment.
Located at 161 Pike and Alexander
Streets, Kitty, Georgetown. For more
information, call # 225-9249 or visit
us between the hours of 17:00 h
and 19:00 h Monday to Friday.
ATTRACTIVE 3-bedroomed,
Queenstown house with
telephone with additional self
contained one bedroom
apartment downstairs suitable
for office, clinic, or business,
available from 1" April.
Telephone: 222-2347 any day
after 12:00 noon.
ONE 2-flat house in
excellent condition. Upper flat
3-bedroom, 1 master and 2
single lower flats. 2 sinna! t-oms,
hot water -y;iem, wall to wall
Carpet, overhead tank, parking,
phone, fully grilled $100 000.
Ideal for companies. Contact #
222-3461, 225-9882.
2-BEDROOM apartment
(downstairs) 189 D'Urban
Backlands $45 000 monthly.
Upstairs (4) bedrooms, (2)
bathrooms $50 000 monthly.
Available April 1, 2005. Call: June
- # 233-2175/623-1562 or 227-
3067.__
FOR immediate lease on
Northern Hogg Island 200 acres
of cultivated rice land along with
rice mill complete with drying
floor and dryer. Also tractor,
combine, bulldozer for sale.
Contact: 626-1506/225-2903.
Serious enquiries only.
SHADES AND SHAPES.
Business and commercial
property for rent suitable for any
nature of business (large office,
bond, supermarket, internet,
boutique, restaurant, disco, bar,
fashion, furniture, etc. Call 226-
1808, 614-2073. 20 Bel Air
Gardens. Agent Christopher
Goodridge.
COURIDA PARK, beautiful 1-
bedroom $40 000; D'Urban
Backlands furnished 3-bedroorn -
US$800. Creen Street 3-bedroom
- $50 000. N. P. FINANCIAL
SERVICES. TELEPHONE 223-
49281623-3751.
QUEENSTOWN three air-
conditioned, one self contained
rooms, large bottom flat office,
living area: kitchen fly meshed,
grilled and very secured. Clean
yard, painted and with beautiful
otted flowers. Rental US$1
600 negotiable. Telephone
225-4398.
KITTY $35 000; C/ville -
$40 000; Kitty, new bottom $45
000; Bel Air Park US$700;
Section 'K' -US$800: New
Haven US$1100; Queenstown
for office and RESIDENCE -
US$1 100; Lamaha Gardens,
Section 'K' brand new,
Subryanville others. OFFICE
SPACE/BUILDING: Main Street,
Middle.Street, Church Street,
Regent Street Lamaha Street,
others. Mentore/Singh Realty -
225-1017, 623-6136.
VERY breezy, one new semi-
furnished executive two-flat
concrete house, Atlantic
Gardens, ECD, upper flat large
balcony three (3) self-contained
bedrooms, (Jacuzzi in one
, .,,y/, liicot'l IUUIIn luily air-
conditioned. Ground floor -
spacious living .room and
balcony, large kitchen, spacious
dining and living rooms, study,
laundry room, maid room, (fully
tiled), entire building mosquito
proof, fully grilled. Telephone
and standby generator. Will be
available April 1, 2005. For
enquiry, call telephone 624-
6527.
KITTY $35 000; Campbellville
- $40 000; CAMPBELLVILLE -
THREE BEDROOMS .T _
Queenstown 000: -
Backl"'- ..,u uoO; D'Urban
-..us furnished $95 000;
E-XECUTIVE PLACES -
SUBRYANVILLE, Queenstown, Bel
Air Park, Bel Air Gardens, Lamaha
Gardens, Happy Acres, Prashad
Nagar; OFFICE BUILDINGS -
Kingston, Main Street, Camp
Street; BUSINESS PLACES:
Sheriff Street, Regent Street Croal
Street and others. MENTORE/
SINGH REALTY 225-1017/623-
6136.


FUTURE HOMES REALTY.
227-4040/628-0796/616-
9698/611-3866. Bottom flat for
business, Duncan Street $65
000; bottom flat for business
Alexander Street $120 000;
top flat for business Regent
Street $100 000; Office -
large, lower North Road -
US$1 500; bottom flat, North
Rd., Kitty US$1 500; store
spaces, North Rd., Robb Street
- $40 000 to $100 000; bottom
flat, North Rd., Waterloo Street
- $100 000; 3-storey business,
North Rd., Waterloo Street -
US$1 000; Huge office in
Queenstown US$2 000.
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
270-4470, 623-6431. "Have
Faith in Christ, today."
Montrose/Lusignan/Non Panel
- Kersaint Park, LBI/Imax
Gardens $30 000; Charlotte
Street $38 000; Kitty $60
000; $80 000, $100 000/$150
000; Nandy Park $40 000/
US$600; Vreed-en-Hoop
Public Road $50 000 -
Courbane Park $75 000/$30
000; Le Ressouvenir with
swimming pool US$2 500;
Happy Acres UR2 5G
US;1 2C0, u1S$500; Atlantic
Gardens US$1 500; US$1
000; US$800; 'AA' Eccles -
US$1 000; Bel Air Park US$1
000. OFFICES: Vreed-en-Hoop
- $60 000; Camp Street $80
000; New Haven US$1,200;
Bel Air Gardens US$1 500;
Caricom Gardens/UG US$1
000.
FUTURE HOMES REALTY.
227-4040/ 628-0796/ 616-
9598/ 611-3866. Two-bedroom
top flat, unfurnished, East Bank
- $40 000; two- bedroom
bottom flat, unfurnished, South
- $45 000; two-bedroom bottom
flat, semi furnished, Prashad
Nagar $45 000; two-bedroom
top flat, fully furnished, Sheriff
Street $60 000; two-bedroom
bottom flat. unfurnished $45
000, Prashad Nagar; two-
bedroom bottom flat fully
furnished. Prashad Nagar -
$100 00: two- bedroom, bottom
flat, fully furnished BIygezight
Gardens US$525: two-
bedroom bottom flat, fully
furnished, South $55 000;
two-bedroom house,
unfurnished Prashad Nagar -
$120 000; two-bedroom house,
fully furnished, Prashad Nagar
- $140 000: two- bedroom
bottom flat, semi furnished,
Camp Street $50 000: three-
bedroom top flat unfurnished,
Lamaha Street $60 000; two-,
bedroom bottom flat,
unfurnished,. Subryanville $50
000.



PROPERTY FOR SALE
AND REMOVAL. CALL 624-
1450.
GIVEAWAYS $3M -
$40M. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
TURKEYEN. BEAUTY.
$15M. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
ONE flat house, three-
bedroom, Cove and John.
Contact number 625-4383.
1 HOUSE lot with 4
houses: Persons interested
please call 333-2420 Price
negotiable
BUSINESS property at
Vlissengen Rd. and Garnett
Street. Pric-e negotiable.
Telephone 225-4398.
PROPERTIES for sale- one
wooden and concrete building,
located, at 50E Sheriff Street. Tel.
223-1529.
DOUBLE-LOT 3-bedroom
property for sale in Amelia's
Ward, Linden. Price
negotiable. Call: 223-4938.
ONE transported house
and land for sale located at
Industry. Telephone 619-5381.
$2.5 million.
ECCLES AA $22M;
Eccles PUBLIC Road for
BUSINESS $40M.
KEYHOMES 223-4a'0
NFI^' .-
-" .. 2-floor CONCRETE
EXECUTIVE property
unbelievable by now.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
ANNANDALE $3.53M;
KITTY $8M; good SOUTH -
$8M. KEYHOMES 223-4267.
CARMICHAEL Street -
$28M; ROBB Street $45M;
Beauty, new concrete $$$.
KEYH MES 223-4267.
HAPPY ACRES $19M;
double lot TURKEYEN $30M;
EXECUTIVE. KEYHOMES -
223-4267.






Ri K DAMPMAYIMQN1CML WOJA3 A


JOHN STREET, C/VILLE
- $9M. KEYHOMES 223-
4267
ECCLES PUBLIC ROAD,
DOUBLE LOT, 100 X 100 -
$25M. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
REPUBLIC PARK $8M.
We deliver the goods. $$$.
KEYHOMES 223-4267,
RESIDENTIAL &
commercial properties in and
around Georgetown.
TELEPHONE 226-8148/625-
1624.
DeKINDREN $1.5M,
$2.5M DeWillem $7M:
Ultvlugt $3M. Urgent sale,
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
GOED FORTUIN 3-
bedroom wooden house on
huge lot. Phone, light, etc.
F 1.- 1 ,-,.,.- Telephone 226-
"i I _: n -'. 7742.
PROPERTY for sale
between Cummings and
Quamina Streets. Also close
out sales on VHS Video Tape
with movies. Contact 225-
4007.
TRANSPORTED nrnoerty
for sale by owner. Lot 8 Hluis-
T-Dieren, Public Rd.,
Essequibo Coast. Contact
615-6596, 231-8855.
(2) TWO-STOREYED
business/residential proper-
ties in Robb St., Bourda. Tel:
225-9816, Monday Satur-
day (08:00 17:30 hrs).
2-FLAT concrete and
wooden building at Kitty -
$9.9M neg.: ,3-bedroomn
upstairs, 2-bedroom
downstairs. Telephone 225-
8088. '
LOT 8 Princes St.,
Werk-en-Rust, 2nd building
North of Camp Street suit-
able for any business your
dream home going cheap.
Call 226-6017.
40% REDUCTION on all
properties from $8 million
upwards. Telephone 225-
2626/231-2064 or E-mail:
tonyreidsrealty@hotmail.com
ONE 3-store, c.,jiiu,.i,
business and "e.i,.-on'i, l
property at 182 Barr Street,
Kitty. Price $16 million neg.
Telephone 226-6013, 223-
1682, 905-619-8783.
LARGE plot of land -
(approx 4 acre) with house at"
lot 23 2"n St. Liliendaal, ECD.
Contact Jean at 226-7567
after 17:00 h weekdays.
Normal time weekend.
QUEENSTOWN $7.5M;
Kitty $3.6M & $5M;
Quamina Street (corner) -
$9.5M: Barr Street $14M;-
Land Diamond $350 000;
Kitty & Alberttown $3.5M;
Queenstown $65M & $7M.
Call 231-6236.
ONE (1) newly reno-
vated 3-bedroom house -
telephone facility, overhead
tank, car park for (2) vehicles
- Drysdale Street,
Charlestown. Tel: 225-9816,
Monday Saturday, (08:00 -
17:30 hrs)
ONE two-storey wooden
and concrete 4- bedroom
house, South Ruimveldt
Gardens Contact Ronald on
662-5033 or Samantha on
624-1370. No reasonable
offer refused. Vacant
possession.
1 EXECUTIVE 5-bed-
uoom master room, tmcee
toilets, three baths, fully fil-
tered, insect-proof, generator,
air-conditioned, large yard
space with beautiful gardens,
'4-P- 1o Air Park It 925-9R16.

17% ACRES of
agricultural land suitable
for rice and cash crop
cultivation along with
house at Industry, Mahaica
Creek. No reasonable offer
refused. Serious enquiries.
Call: 226-2963/220-0636/
222-6910.
CHARLESTOWN:
Charles/Sussex Streets near
I vacant front building
scnu,., 'a"'- internet
and land. lu,. taxi.
cafe, mechanic ship, .
$4M neg. Ederson's.
Telephone 226-5496'.
www.edersonrealty.com
URGENTLY needed:
Commercial, residential
buildings for sale or rent.
Kitty, South Ruimveldt,
Campbellville, Subryanville,
Prashad Nagar, Bel Air Park,
Lamaha Gardens, Atlantic
Gardens. Also land.
Ederson's. Telephone 226-
5496..


MODERN detached two-storey
house situate at Lot 252-253
Cedar Court. Lamaha Gardens,
-,., Telephone 226-8518
h, ,i-I,_. I 1:' negotiable.
GIFT: Queenstown: wise
investment 3- storeyed concrete
building top/middle 2 & 3
bedrooms luxurious apartments
for overseas visitors, bottom -
sitting, toilet & bath 4 cars
garage. $18.5M neg. Owner will
give $7.5M financing.
Ederson's. Telephone 226-
5496.
CAMPBELLVILLE vacant
2-storcyed concrete 4-bedroom
mansion, 3 toilets & baths, large
sitting. library, 4-car parking.
Inspection anytime. $16M
Ederson's. Telephone 226-
5496.
KINGSTON near Seawall:
vacant 3-storeyed 6-bedroom/
office mansion. Ideal luxurious
hotel. executive offices,
insurances. 8 cars parking, If
qualified move in tomorrow
$40M neg. Ederson's
Telephone 226-5496.
OVERSEAS/LOCAL:
owners of buildings four sale/rent.
Welcome to our general
r management Services paying,
insurance., taxes, general Irf airs.
Call now for further information.
Ederson's. Telephone 226-
5496.
REGENT & CUMMINGS
STREETS 2- storey business,
top vacant. Ideal general
business, future 4-storeyed mall/
stores. $33M. Ederson's.
Telephone 226-5496. Website:
www.edersonsrealty.corn
CRANE/LA UNION Public
Road, WCD: residential vacant
2-storey wooden & concrete 4-
bedroom property $5M: back
2-storey 4-bedroom concrete
building $4M. Package $7.2M
neg. Land 5,786 sq. ft.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
ROXANNE BURNHAM
GARDENS: vacant 2-bedroom
wooden house/concrete -
garage, land to build another
house. 39'x 90' $5.5M.
Ederson's 226-5496.
GIFT: Kuru Kuru active
business property with 3 freezers,
pool able, music set, chicken
pen on 22 acres of land. Ideal
mini resort. $10M neg. (US$50
000). Ederson's. 226-5496.
GIFT: New Market St. -
Doctors, Investors: ideal for 3-
storey hospital, pharmacy,
restaurant, 2-storey concrete &
wooden building, from road to
alley. $17.5M (US$85 000).
Ederson's. 226-5496.
MC DOOM River Side: note
road to river, land 47'/218',
ideal wharf, large ship, auto
sales, 4 stores, mini mall,
supermarket. $22.5M neg.
Ederson's. 226-5496.
SUBRYANVILLE: over
looking the Atlantic, mansion -
swimming pool, large roof
garden, generator, grilled/
meshed, Sunday overlooking
new area, big lime, drink, food
fair. $35M; (US175 000).
Ederson's. 226-5496.
KITTY $7M, Campbellville
$9M, Bel Air Park $16M &
$27M, Prashad Nagar $15M,
Queenstown $13M, Lamaha
Gardens $25M; Regent Street
$45M; Sheriff Street $45M.
Contact Carmen Grana,'-;
Realty. Telephone 226-1192,
623-7742.
ECCLES $16M- & $20;
Charlotte Street $4.5M;
Iamantha Point $5.5M; Happy
Acres $30M; South Ruimveldt -
$12M & $14M; Shamrock Gardens
$30M; Nandy Park $10M many
more N. P. FINANCIAL SERVICES.
TELEPHONE 223-4928/623-3751.
POULTRY FARMS Garden of
Eden and Craig Planning for a big-
ger yield? We have pens that can ac-
commodate 15 000 birds and lots
and lots of running water we are situ-
ated near to a creek, 1 Machine
Shop Industrial Site with an extra lot.
Call SUCCESS REALTY 223-6524/
628-0747
"' F- 2-storey building
1 Hu ... 8M; 1 2-
in Paradise, ECD '"'
storey building in Queenstow.,,
giveaway price $6.8M; 1
sizeable land in Pike Street,
Kitty $3.5M; 1 new 2-storey
concrete property in Golden
Grove/Diamond $10M; 1 3-
bedroom property in Diamond -
$3.9M. Telephone .6.1793>,'-


OVER 5 200 SQ. FT. THUS
BEING SUITABLE FOR LUMBER
YARD, BIG TIME TAXI SERVICE,
ERECTION OF GUEST HOUSE,
ETC. LOCATION BENT STREET,
NEWBURG. TRANSPORTED
PROPERTY BUILDING
THEREON. PRICE $18M
NEGOTIABLE. HUMPHREY
NELSON'S SOLE REALTOR.
TELEPHONE 226-8937.
LET orl Ihouglits ind
action be that we are GCod's
favourite. Prices on the East
Coast are r .Ill,,,, I 40%, while
on the East i ,i ,. is 5% rise.
Prashad Nagar $9M; Lainaha
Gardens, on double lot reduced
from $26M to $18M: Section K'
- $12.5 M Subrvanville over
looking the sea $23M; Bel Air
Gardens and Spring $36M;:
Happy Acres $14M;
Queenstown $11M: Oleander
Gardens $13M: Republic Park -
SIOM: South Ruimveldt $9M.
Phone 225-2626 or 231-2064 or
E i a l I :
tonyreidsrealty(v@hotmail.corti
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
"HAVE FAITH IN CHRIST,
TODAY". Non Pariel $5M/$6M/
S8M/S10M; Imax Gardens -
$5M/$6M/$8M: Mon Repos -
$6M; Roraima Trust $6M/$11M1/
$20M; La Grange $6.5M;
Courbane Park S$9M: Kissoon
Park/Good Hope $9.5M:
Alber- Convent Gardens -
S12M: Stewartvnl $13M:
Queenstown $17M/$5i,'
Eccles 'AA' $17M/$22Ml: 'BB' -
$6M/$20M; CC $10M; Duncan
St. $21M; Bel Air Park $22M/
$25M: Happy Acres $26M:
Section 'K' Campbellville -
$30M: Lens Parika $160M:
UG Caricom Gardens S32M:
Courida Park $42M: Atlantic
Gardens S35M/$20Mvl/S18M:
Camp St. $55M: Garnett St. -
$35M/$12M/$10M/$9M/$8M,
Carmichael St. S28M. Contact
270-4470. 623-6431.
FUTURE HOMES REALTY.
227-4040, 628-0796, 616-9598,
611-3866. Section "K'
Campbellville $20 million to
$35 million; Lamaha Gardens -
$19.5 million to $30 million; 3
houses. Albouystown $12
million; Sheriff Street, property
- $28 million; Non Pariel $5
million: Republic Park $40
million; Queenstown $14
million to $45 million; Bel Air
Park $16 million to $40 million;
Regent Street US$850 000;
Kitty $6.2 million; Annandale -
$7 million; Alberttown $6.5
million to $40 million; Eccles -
$5.5 million to $24 million:
Prashad Nagar $9 million to
$30 million: South $12 million
to $15 million; Enterprise $7.5
million; Pomeroon $3.5 million
to $5.5 million; Stewartville -
$3 million; Continental Park -
$25 million; Atlantic Gardens -
$19.5 million; Better Success,
ECD $2.5 million; Providence -
$9.5 million; New concrete
(modern) in Grove $14M:
Republic Park $11M $1$13M:
Camp Street $7.5M.
WHERE DEVELOPMENT
WORKS WOULD BE TAKING
PLACE,. BUY AHEAD OF THE
MOVEMENT. BERBICE: LANDS
FOR HOUSING, COMMERCIAL,
INDUSTRIAL AND
AGRICULTURAL PURPOSES.
NEW AMSTERDAM/
STANLEYTOWN. SUITABLE FOR
WHARFAGE, WAREHOUSE A
WELL-DEVELOPED PARCEL
OF LAND MEASURING 160
'FEET X 500 FEET, HAVING ALL
.E..ETMAL SERVICES. BUY
YOUR OWN HOME; IT IS A
SOURCE OF HAPPINESS. IT IS
A SOURCE OF CASH. CANJE:
A GATED COMMUNITY WITH
ATTRACTIVE FAMILY
HOMES.ALSO HOUSE LOTS
WITH ALL AMENITIES AND
SERVICES. SHEET ANCHOR:
46 SURVEYED AND
APPROVED HOUSE LOTS
ALONG THE CANJE CREEK ON
10 ACRES OF LAND. SUITABLE
FOR ANY APPLICATION. JUST
A STONE THROW FROM NEW
AMSTERDAM. HIGHBURG/
BERBICE RIVER: 62
EMPLODERED ACRES.
SUITABLE FOR AGRICULTURAL
PURPOSES AND MORE LANDS
FOR EXTENSION WITH RIVER
FRONT. TRANSPORTED.
PALMYRA VILLAGE:
BUSINESS AS A GOING
CONCERN WITH LARGE BOND
SECURITY, STOCK AND
AN,- INVESTMENT
EQUIPMENT AT
OPPORTUNITY
PREDRILLING PRICE. GIVE Ua
A CALL ANYTIME ON
TELEPHONE 226-432, .TQ
ARRANGE FOR INSPECTION.
SUGRIM'S REALTY.


REGENT STREET, corner -
$50M; Civille two-storey $16(M;
South Park & Gardens $8.5M:
'AA' Eccles $20M; Hutson Ville
$7.5M: Kitty $8.5M; Ninses -
7.5M; Section 'K' C/ville -
$18.5M: Sheriff Street &
Mandela Avenue. Roberts
Realty, First Foderation Life
Bldg. 227-7627 office, 227-
3768 home, 629-9914 .- cell
WONG'S REALTY, Lot 242
So,0th l-Ruinrveldi Gardens
(Ca r VIew). loliephol e It 218-
3953 Cell It 623-5197.
PROPERTIES FOR SALE.
RESIDENTIAL and commercial
plot of land with two-storey house
in the Coverden, Soesdyke
' .i, ,1, District. LAND- 9443:80
Su. f-1. $18M neg Land in
Kingston $8M neg.
1 HUGE concrete complex
with 12 AC units and a laige
II I I 1. I h) run entire compleo x,
to park 10 12
containers, single and 3-phase
current, deep water harbour.
ideal for a factory or load of
point fro.. .. -..;....I B razlt,
on the EL-' :.'-- 1. i1 l neq.
Future Homes Realty. 227-
4040, 628-0796. 611-3866.
SHERIFF STREET
ESTABLISHED BUSINESS
CORCERN FOR SALE, IN
CONJUNCTION WITH
ADJOINING TWO-STOREY
PROPERTY. LAND SPACE OF
BOTH BEING 80 X 50.
ALTERNATIVELY BUSINESS
CONCERN SELLING ALONE.
LjIIMPHREY NELSON'S.
TELEPY.NE 226-8937.



ORIGINAL INDIAN CDS
AND DVD. CALL 231-4208.
DACHSHUND PUPS, 6
WEEKS OLD. PHONE 227-
6202.
1 MOTORISED
TREADMILL. CALL
TELEPHONE # 227-0924.
ONE 450 Night Hawk, motor
bike. Contact Nalini 227-3128.
BRAND new Generac
generator 7750 watts.
Telephone 220-6770.
2 COMPUTERS, brand new.
Contact telephone number 225-
6401.-
TWO fully reconditioned
big Ford tractors for sale. Contact
623-0957.
1 ELECTRICALLY
powered cement mixer, (used).
Contact 616-7495.
1 COMPUTER, used,
complete system. Contact
telephone number 225-6401.
4 POOLS Table, locally
made. Call number 629-7419.
Monty. $200 000 leg. ___
DIESEL water pumps 2
and 3 inch, brand new from UK.
Call 261-5403 for details.
INTERNET CAFE.
EQUIPMENT COMPUTERS -
INTERNET READY. CONTACT
226-0058.
1200 BTU, 220 volts, Peake
AC Window Unit. Call 624-
1450, 226-9451.
HOUSEHOLD furniture and
articles. Everything must go.
Call 641-5060 anytime.
CHEAP brand name
clothes. Jeans, T-Shirts. tops -
$600 $2 500. Telephone 226-
3883, 619-6863.
TWO five-discs and one
four-disc plough and one trail
harrow. Ideal for rice. Contact
623-0957.
ONE 4-cylinder Bedford
portable welding plan, D.C.
Key start. Tel. # 265-4217. Call
_A 1- 7 1

NEW Honda generators, UK
standard key manual start,
2500 watts to 6000 watts. Call
233-5500._t
EARTH for saie. Delivery to
spot. Excavating, grading anid
leveling of land. Contact 621-
2160. 229-2520.
ONE (1) 4 X 4 Pick Up (V6)
Extra Cab $94M. Good
condition. Contact telephone
number 277-3573.
FERNS in hanging baskets.
Large concrete plant pots.
Telephone 226-1757/225-5641
24 Belvoir Cnt r r.
.. ..... ...... .... . .1 ..............
ONE brand new computer
with CD Burner, CD Walkmans,
car stereo and DVD Player.
Contact 225-4112, 626-9264.
ARGON/Co2 mixed gas. Also
'"-Ant for swimming
shock tr.at... "' (08:00 h -
pools. Phone 227-4ba,
16:00.h), Mon. to Fri.


BRAND new Coleman
Generator 6250 Watts with
S" -.1 and Stratton engine -
I ', 000. Call 660-8105 or
227-5800.
1 TOYOTA Diesel Land
Cruiser, 1 portable diesel
welding plant, 1 large industry al
cement mixer. Telephone 227-
3861.
MERCEDES BENZ 190E,
miscellaneous parts, wind
shield, bumper, engine parts
and body parts. Call 624-8402,
225-2503.
150 GALLON Aquariumn 4
ft. x 2 ft x 18"--2 filters, 2 water
fall pumps and ornament, and
fishes. All for $160 000. Very
nice. Call 624-8402, 225-2503.
SEADOO Jet Ski 600cc.
Needs engine with trailer $125
000. Sold as is, Kawasaki Jet
Ski 600 with trailer, working -
$275 000. Call 624-8402, 225-
2503.


0- - - - -


27" SHARP Televisions. 3
piece suite, bed frame, bicycle.
video games and accessories,
micro chips. Telephone; 223-
0713.
ONE pair custom-made
speaker boxes with 8-inch
speakers, mid range tweeter,
etc. $30 000. Telephone 622-
0267/629-2239.
KENMORE gas stove $140
000: 4 Motion sensor lights -
$6500; 8 150W security lights -
$1 000. Contact 227-3339, 226-
8800.
125 E7 Motorcycle engine.
Price $48 000 and motorcycle
seat $8 000. Fuel tank $7 000.
Contact Crawford. Telephone 771-
5261-2.
BRAND new 9 000 & 12 000
BTU Split ACs. one window 18
000 BTU AC. Telephone 226-
4177,231-7938, 226-9029, 619-
8225.
FAIT tractors and Land
Rover spares, motorcycle tyres.
Truck liners. Leyland cylinder
head gasket. Contact Nassar.
Telephone 270-4126.
1 FLOOR model PLASTIC
SEALING machine, 1 PORTABLE
ELECTRIC air compressor in
excellent condition Tel: 222-
4507/623-7212
ORIGIN.A1.. FiiUd name
clothes frorn USA. Jeans $2 000
- $3 000, shirts/tops $1-000 -
$1 500. Sale. Telephone 220-
3410 (NATALIA).
OKI Fax 2350 Facsimle and
transcener FX 151-B 4.4
Amp, 120V-AC, 240W, 50/60
Hertz. Telephone 99_>-7 7
OKIDATA.
ONE five-piece circular
suite in good condition. Price -
$45 000. Telephone 227-6893
between 08:00 h and 12:00 h.
ONE 150 HP & one 250 HP
Yamaha Outboard engines. Price
$700,000 & $1,200,000. Also parts
for 150 HP & 250 HP. Call 629-
6651 anytime.
FREON gas: 11, 12, 22, 502,
134A & 404A. Also Nitrous Oxide,
Argon gas & Helium for balloons.
Phone 227-4857 (08:00 h 16:00
h), Mon. to Fri.
2 iASSEY F:farison (1)
175, (2) 290 Tractors; 1 Bob
Cat, 1 Forklift, 1 15 KVA Lister
generator. Contact Ishri 225-
7732, 227-0195, 626-2615.
PARTS for DAF Leyland
95-310 ATI Truck Atherican
made, 1100 x 20 tyres, electrical
lathe, Fisher stereo set. Call
Richard- 624-0774 or 233-2614.


CLEARANCE SALE on all
lingerie and clothing. Kindly
call 225-4495 or 226-8800 for
appointment.
1 HONDA pressure washer,
brand new; 2 drills; 1 saw: 1
Jialing motorcycle, next to new:
1 amplifier; 1 truck pump; 1 bat-
tery charger; 1 bicycle. Tel. 265-
5876.
QUALITY SWEET POTA-
TOES available in large quanti-
ties at very good prices. Place
your orders early for prompt de-
livery. Contact: 621-037'1/226-
3563.
ONE pair 400 Watts, 15"
B. K. Spk & One Black Widow
15" Spk. 600 Watts $55 000.
One Sharp Microwave $18
000. Telephone # 615-2222.
MALE and female pure
bred German Shepherd pups
four months old. View at 324
Wills Street. Republic Park,
EBD or call 233-5783 for further
details.
QSC AMPLIFIER RMX
series, 800, 1 400 watts,
Celestion Frontline 11 18"
speakers- 2 800 watts; Numark
Juggler CD package.
Telephone 615-1203/231-
2893.
1 15-SEATER fibreglass
boat 150 Horse Power
Johnson engine. Working
condition. Price $950 000.
Contact Reginald.
Telephone 623-4861/225-
0746.
FOREIGN shampoo sink,
pump-up Barber chair, steam
dryer, facial machine, blow
dryers, small photocopy
machine and restaurant
e,;ioment. Phone 225-7648,
Mon no0.. 09:00 h 17:00
h.
OXYGEN and Acetylene
gases. Fast and efficient service.
0 11 Mc Doom Public Road,
EBD. Phone 223-6533 (08:00 h
16:00 h), Mon. to Fri., (Sat. -
08:00 h to 12:00 h).
RANISAT Inc. announces
its grand opening sale in all
sky and parbolic dishes. Best
offer and lowest package rate.
Call 227-5167 or come in for
more information at 235 South
Road, Lacytown, Georgetown.
1 JIALING 150 T
Motorcycle 12 000 Km: 1
Sonny 3-disc stereo set: 1
wedding dress; 1 Jura Jamma.
Telephone 225-1651/223-
9582/265-6076 John/Vicky.
1 MUSIC set, 6 base, 18"
speakers. 6 15" mid range
speakers, 1 1200 watts Crest
audio amp, 1 7 watts QSC
amps, 1 800 watts German
amps, 2 horns, 2 ballet
tweeters. Telephone 229-
2273, 626-0136.
SKY Universal for the best
offer in Phillips digital dish. View
up to 125 channels including
Pay Per View channels and also
Direct TV, Contact: Gray on Tel.
227-6397/227-1151 (0). 616-95
COMPUTER Training
videos: COMPTIA A+,
Network+, MCSE. Office 2003,
JavaScript. Mac OS 10.3 plus
QuickBooks Accounting
software. Call Brian at 6.60-
0845 for details.
CAUSTIC SODA: 55-lb $3
600, Alum: 55-lb $4 000, Soda
Ash: 100-lb $8 000, Sulphuric
Acid: 45-gal $45 000,
Granular Chlorine, Chlorine
gas. Phone 227-4857 (08:00 h
16:00 h), Mon. to Fri.
FOR all your hard to get
snareq visit Mntnr Snares & Cn
Ltd Engine Parts, -uspension
Parts, Oil Filters. Brake Pads
and Liners, Bulbs. Electrical
Parts, Gaskets and much much
more. Located at 35 Robb &
King Street. Telephone 226-
3071.
John Deer Diesel
Generator, 30KVA, like new.
Also Bay Linder Speedboat
with Yamaha 115 HP outboard
engine, large antique China
Cabinet, with matching dining
set, 3500psi with 13 HP engine
(new). Tel. 225-2319, 225-
2873, 660-1061, 660-1060.
5 000 watts portable
Craftsman generator in
excellent conoiIon i DIu vuv,
Maytag washer, and dryer in
new condition (but needs some
repairs). Sold as is $75 000
for both; steel frame double
bunk (queen size) bed with
ladder $25 000. Call 624-
8402, 225-2503. .


24slI CI I


24 -


IL-t







2525


SWWAV "Mfg W~E i~a"Mq rrjA, 1 54rV-,


Brand new 64 JVC flat screen
TV PIP, Xerox 5028 Photocopier
Machine, like new. Split A/C units,
(new). Also Saniserv Cone
Machine one-spout.and three-
spout, like new. Yanmar diesel
Generator, Honda 5000 watts key
start Generator Tel. 225-2873,
225-2319, 660-1061, 660-1060.
HOUSEHOLD items; 1 Sony
Stereo System; 1 20" Sharp
television set: 1 Sofa bed; 1
Admiral Heavy Duty Washing
Machine; 1 General Electric water
cooler; 1 Lexmark Printer, Scanner
& Photocopying machine; 1
Mahogany 2-drawer filing cabinet;
1 Sansui VCR & DVD Player; 1
single bed. Telephone 615-4069,
218-1647.
OXYGEN bottles, 100 Ib
Propane Bottles, Hoses and
Torches including Trolley $80
000, Vertical Drill;-,i Machine -
$40 000, ,:,ii,. Machine -
$300 000, Electric Concrete
Vibrator -$100 000, '/ ton Chain
Hoist $15 000, Oil Pressure
Gauges $1 000, Auto Switches
- $1 000, Ridge Reamer $10
000, Plastic Straps $6 000,
Steel Pipe Fittings and Valves -
$15 000, Miscellaneous
Machine Shop items. Contact
Francis Persaud 220-3064.
A QUANTITY of office wall
dividers $30 000; 3 rolls
upholstery material $16 000; 1 -
new tent enclosed to
accommodate (4) persons over
night, hunting, U.S.A.-made -$25
000; 1 Canadian heavy-duty
shredder -fully automatic, 110V -
$20 000; 1 large wall divider -
U.S.A.-made beautiful $50 000;
2 secretarial and typist adjustable
chairs on wheels -$5000, each; 1
- executive large writing desk chair
on wheels $20 000; inverter -
12V to 110V,. 400 to 800 watts -
$22 000; 1 Land Ranger cycle
for boy excellent $10 000; 1 -
combination Panasonic double
tape and 5-CD player set along
with (2) speaker boxes and remote
control $55 000 110V-240V; 1 -
large thick egg-shaped carpet -
$15 000; 1 4-burner gas stove
(SINGER) with oven and bottle
complete $25 000; 1 piece
10 x 12 carpet for office $11
000; 1 Whirlpool freezer $45
000 110V; 6 plastic chairs
with 1 round plastic table and
umbrella $15 000; 6 used 4-
drawer filing cabinets -$15 000,
each; 4 used 2-drawer filing
cabinets $10 000, each; 3 -
security Mercury Vapour lamps
- 110-240V, complete $5 000,
each; 1.- Sharp turntable
microwave 110V $13 000; 1
- Toshiba combination tape
recorder, radio, tape and CD
player 110-240V $15 000; a
quantity of 50 Meridian phones
- M 7310 and M 7324, from (5)
lines to (20) lines phones,
bargain for the lot, could work
hotel, offices, etc.; one new
Peak split AC unit -18 000 BTU,
complete; 2 18 000 BTU Peak
window units $25 000, each.
Owner leaving. # 611-8766/
621-4928.
ONE 15 KVA Kubota water-
cooled diesel generator -
custom-built with security sound
proof casing, no noise or
vibration, hardly used, crank or
battery start, 12V, 110-240V,
mint condition $800 000, neg.;
one 5-ton hydraulic pallet ift
with new spare wheel -$55 000;
two Yale chain hoists: 1-ton -
$25 000, V2-ton $20 000 -
English-made; two small
pornable welding plants: 150k -
40V -$40 000, 75k 110V -
$30 000 complete with rod
holder and head goggles;
plumber tool one electrical
drain and pipe line cleaner for
blockage 110V, 50-60 Hz, %1
Hp motor complete kit for $40
O00 U.S.A.-made; one STIHL
FS 160 brush cutter hardly
used, with spares $60 000; 1 -
Drill press 12-speed,
adjustable table, 110-240V -
$45 000; 1 large 1-in bore
Sears pressure pump with pressure
tank, 110V-240V $35 000; 3 -
metal English bench lathes: (2) 5-
ft $100 000, each and (1) 8-ft -
$150 000; 1 4-ft width sheet metal
roller on steel stand heavy-duty,
manually operated, English-made
$105 000; 1 Dayton indoor an
outdoor dry vacuum industrial
and commercial use, on wheels,
large dust collector bag, U.S.A.-
made $35 000; 1 6-in Delta
-electric belt sander on stand -
110V, for wood work $30 000; 1 -
machine to do tool shaping -240V
$200 000 (large); 1 machine to
do cutting of crankshaft 240V -
$200 000; 1 -heavy-duty arc-
welding transformer 240-320-
440V $50 000; 1 compressor
and air tank 100 Ib, 110V $40
000; 1 5-ft aluminum ladder with
2-ft by 18-in'platform, U.S.A.-made
$15000. Owner leaving. # 621-
4928/611-8766. A quantity of
electrical panels with circuit
breakers heavy-duty switch-over
,panels 110-220V.


JUST arrived from the U.K.
are Perkins Industrial Turbo
Engine with power take-off over
200 Hp: 4236 and 6354 Turbo
and non Turbo engines starters,
radiators, cylinder heads,
crankshafts, etc. Heavy duty
woodworking machine; planners,
band saw resaws, rip-saws,
suitable for chain saw lumbering;
wood lathes, shapers, mortisers,
and Esterer gang saw 28" gate.
Metal lathes, shapers, milling
machines, drilling machines, air
compressors, hack saws,
generators and welding plants.
Isoin stock is (1) one 30-ton low
loader trailer, gear boxes, springs
and differential for Leyland,
Bedford, and model M 4x4. Tyres
- 1500, 1400 -x 20, etc.
Bulldozers, rollers, idlers,
sprockets, segments, track chains,
etc. for 215, 320, 312 excavator
and D4, D5 & D6D bulldozers.
Contact 220-2034, 220-1787.



1 BEDFORD MODEL
M TRUCK. TEL: 455-2303
1 NISSAN Caravan E
24, excellent condition.
Tel. # 220-4782
ONE Bedford TL 7-
ton lorry (not dump).
Tel: 227-1923/616-5679.
TOYOTA Extra Cab, V6,
fully powered. $1.3M neg. Tel.
254-0387.
ONE 2000 Yamaha RI go-
ing cheap, legal documents -
226-6527 /623-3122.
BMW Convertible leather
interior, everything original.
Telephone 662-5036.
ONE Toyota RZ minibus.
In excellent condition. $800
000. Cell 629-6590.
ONE Toyota Camry, PGG
series, SV 41. Call 226-0935 after
18:00 h.
TOYOTA AT 170 Corona, AE
100 and AT 192. Call 225-7126,
226-3693.
FOR sale by tender 1 (one)
Mitsubishi Gallant, PJJ series.
#225-9153.
3Y minibus. Very good
condition. Any reasonable offer.
Central Auto Sale. 614-8908.
ONE Toyota Cammi.
Excellent condition. PHH 5974.
Phone 618-9261 or 269-0273.
1 RZ mini bus, long base; 1
AT 150 Corona. Both excellent
condition. Phone 627-6242.
1 TOYOTA AT 150 Corona.
Excellent condition. Telephone
# 227-5296 or 616-5547.
FOR Sale by Tender 1
(one) Damaged Mitsubishi
Galant PJJ series, at GCIS,
47 Main Street.
ONE Toyota Camry -
automatic, four-wheel steer and
mag rims, etc. Contact 220-
7556.
1 NISSAN Laurel Model C
33 fully loaded. $750 000 neg.
Contact Monty. 629-7419.
1 RZ Long Base. Excellent
condition. Music, mags, spoiler,
etc. Telephone 220-0571, 617-
2641.
4-WD RANGE Rover -
Land Rover with alloy rims &
Sony CD player. Priced to go. #
621-7445.
4-DOOR Honda Civic -
sunroof, CD, AC, etc. Excellent
condition. PEE series. Call 614-
8872, 263-5776.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter -
(3 tons), enclosed. Contact
Tel. # 263-5404 after 16:00
hrs, 618-9602, anytime.
2 TOYOTA Tacoma 2001
& 2002 Models, 3 RZ & V6 to be
registered. 3.5-ton. Telephone
442-3244.
TOYOTA DOUBLE CAB Hilux
(PFF series) $1.4M. Telephone
226-3883, 619-6863.
ONE Toyota Corona AT 170
EFI, fully powered. Price $925
000 neg. Telephone # 623-7684.
TOYOTA AT 212 Carina, AT
192 Carina, AE 110 Corolla. All
excellent condition. Phone 226-
9316/619-9187.
TOYOTA Carina AT 170,
Corolla AE 91, Corona AT 170.
Contact City Taxi Service.
Telephone 226-7150.
AT 192 CARINA, AE 100
Sprinter & Corolla, EP 82 Starlet
Turbo, Marino, Lancer (2001).
Amar 227-2834, 621-6037.
ONE TT 131 CORONA in
good condition mag rims, stick
gear, tape deck. Tel: 626-6837
after hours # 220-4316.


ONE AA 60 Carina, in ex-
cellent working condition, needs
body work tape deck, AC etc.
Tel. 617-4063/225-0236.
ONE Nissan Sunny car.
Excellent condition. Price $450
000. Contact Trevor on
Telephone # 225-9018, 625-
1492.
ONE Toyota RZ mini bus.
Excellent condition Mag rims.
BGG series. $1.5 million
negotiable. Contact number 627-
3811.
1 4-DOOR Toyota Starlet
EP 82. Excellent condition.
Great on gas. Telephone 226-
9029, 226-4177, 231-7938, 619-
8225.
2 TOYOTA pick ups, 1 2-
door and 1 4-door at reduced
prices. Contact 225-6759, 274-
418 after hrs.
1 F3 CBR Motorcycle; 1 GT
Starlet Turbo; Toyota 4 x 4 pick
up. Reasonable prices.
Telephone 218-0287, 263-0392.
1 PGG minibus 9-seater,
PGG (automatic). 1 Carina car -
PHH, (automatic). Phone 611-
0162, 260-0021.
TOYOTA Corona station
wagon, back wheel drive. Price
- $a550 000. Call 640-1318/628-
2910.
AT 212 Carina fully
powered, PJJ 2015, 8 months
old first owner $1.9M. Price
neg. Telephone 254-0101.
1 SV 30 Toyota Vista Camry,
PJJ series, 2000cc, fully
powered, mag rims, etc.
telephone 621-2899.
STARLET Turbo (EP 71) -
automatic, 2-door, 1300cc top
condition $725 000 neg.
Telephone 621-5130, 266-2105,
615-6349.
1 DUMP truck, 1 water
tender and 330 Timber Jack
Skidder all are in good working
condition. For more information
Contact: 264-2946.
1 MAZDA 4 x 4 pick-up.
Excellent condition. Going
cheap. 1 Jet ski 1100 cc.
Telephone 226-4177, 231-7938,
226-9029, 619-8225.
1 TOYOTA RAV 4 -
automatic, fully powered, CD
Player, auto start alarm.
Excellent condition. -or more
information, call 774-5031
Diesel Isuzu Canter 1.5-
ton, GHH 9542. Good working
condition. Telephone 231-6587
or 226-4198 or 616-1609 ask.
for Andre or Brian.
FORD Cortina MK 11 car;
Nissan 4 x 4 Pickup; GMC Tow
Truck; Series 3 Land Rover..Call
Richard 624-0774 or 233-2614
home.
1 TOYOTA Hilux -
(automatic), PHH 4980, colour
Burgundy. Excellent condition. 3
000 kilometers. Call 218-3843
(H), 624-5331
1 AE 81 TOYOTA Corolla -
(manual) needs minor repair.
Price $250 000. Contact Rocky
# 225-1400 or 621-5902
1 AT 192 CARINA -
automatic, PHH series. Excellent
condition. Mags, spoiler, music
system, etc. Price -1.5M (neg.).
Telephone number 223-3399.
ONE (1) TOYOTA Hiace Su-
per GL 14-seater mini bus die-
sel engine, four (4)-wheel drive
dual air conditioned, CD deck,
BJJ 1995. Call 225-5274/226-
7665.
NISSAN Sunny FB 12 $395
000 negotiable. Air-conditioned
power steering, manual
transmission. Call Dexter 226-
0176(0), 623-5926, 226-
0362(H).
CARINA AT 170 $750 000;
Sprinter AE 91 $700 000; AE
100 $1.2M; AT 192 $1.3M; RZ
buses (work & pay)- $10 000
weekly. Call 231-6236. -
NISSAN Pathfinder SE-V6 -
automatic, fully powered, mag
wheels, CD Player, auto start,
alarm. Excellent condition in
and out. Must see. Cash $1.4
million. Call 624-8402.
ONE SAAB 900 Turbo car -
automatic, fully powered, never
registered, needs minor work, will
register by owner. Sold as is.
$950 000. Call 225-2503, 624-
8402.
1 NISSAN Laurel.
(Excellent condition). C32,
automatic, mag rims. Price -
$700 000 (neg.); Nissan single
cab and double cab Pick Up -
manual mag rims (4x4). Price -
$8 (n.) and 550 000
(neg.), working condition.
Contact Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma Extra
Cab (2000 model) GJJ series,
chrome rims, automatic, AC, CD
Player, music set, crystal light, step
board. Immaculate condition. Bed
liner. Price $2.9M. Contact Rocky
# 225-1400 or 621-5902.


1Mo02 M
1 TOYOTA Celica (2-door
Sports) automatic, fully
powered, AC, CD Player. Price
$1.3M. Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 AE 81 TOYOTA Sprinter
( private. Excellent condition.
utornmatic, mag rims. Price -
$525 000. Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 AE 100 TOYOTA Ceres -
(PHH series) automatic, fully
powered AC mag rims, spoiler.
Immaculate condition. CD
Player. Price $1.2M. Contact
Rocky -_#_225-1400 or 621:5902.
1 NISSAN Pathfinder (V6)
- 2-door (5 seats), automatic,
crash bar, 4x4, PHH series.
Excellent condition. Price -
$1.9M. Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 AT 170 TOYOTA Carina
(private) manual, fully
powered, magrims, spoiler. Price
- $800 000. Contact Rocky #
225-1400 or 62105902.
1 TOYOTA Starlet (EP 71)
- 2-door (Turbo charge),
automatic, AC, maq rims. Clean.
Price $725 000. Contact Rocky
- # 225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 SV 40 TOYOTA Camry -
(PHH series), automatic, fully
powered, chrome maE rims,
CD Player, DVD and TV, air
purifier, mint condition. Price -
$2.1M. Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 AE 100 TOYOTA Sprinter,
(private) automatic, fully
powered wAC. excellent
condition. Price $1.3M. Contact
Rocky # 225-1400 or 62.1-
5902.
1 TOYOTA (4X4) Single
Cab (GHHseries), manually 3Y
engine, crash bars. Excellent
condition. Price $1.3M. Contact
Rocky # 225-1400 or 621-
5902.
AE 91 TOYOTA Corolla
(White). Immaculate condition.
Automatic, fully powered, AC,
mag rims, spoiler, CD Player with
music set (300 watts). Price -
$800 000. Contact Rocky #
225-1400 or 621-5902.
I NISSAN (U13) Bluebird
(new model) private,
automatic, fully powered, AC,
mag rims (Chrome). Price -
$1.TM (neg.). Contact Rocky #
225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 AE 91 TOYOTA Sprinter
(private) automatic, fully
powered, mag. rims, needs spray
lob only, no body work. Price -
$700 00O. Contact Rocky #
621-5902 or 225-1400.
1 TOYOTA RAV 4 (came in
brand new) low mileage,
manual, fully powered, AC,
Chrome mag rims, roof rack,
crash bar. Immaculate condition.
Price $3.1M. Contact Rocky -
# 225-1400 or 621-5902.
1- HONDA Vigor (4-door
executive type car) automatic,
fully powered, AC, Spoiler,
alarm. Immaculate condition.
Price $1.3M (Right hand drive).
Contact Rocky # 225-1400 or
621-5902. (Spares available).
1 TOYOTA RZ Long Base
(15-seater), hardly used.
Immaculate condition. Manual,
maP rims, clean seats. Price $1
35 000. Contact Rocky # 225-
1400 or 621-5902.
1 AE 100 TOYOTA Ceres -
(PHH series), never in hire,
automatic, fully powered, AC,
Chrome mag rims, music. Price -
$1 425 000. Contact Rocky #
225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Land Cruiser (5-
door enclosed) manual, power
steering, AC, mag rims, crash
bar, roof rack, CD Player, straight
6 engine and wench. Price -
$4.2M (neg). Contact Rocky #
225-1400 or 621-5902.
1 GX 81 TOYOTA Mark 11.
(Excellent condition). Automatic
fully powered, AC. Price $1.3M
(neg). Contact Rocky # 225-
400 or 621-5902.
VEHICLES to purchase and
sell. Our commission fees on
motor car is only $25 000, large
vehicle $40 000. Quick safe.
Hurry. Call G & I Auto Sales. 218-
1095, 625-9947, 622-5853 or
660-1267.
FOR sale (owner leaving
country) (2) Kawasaki (ZX 600)
Ninja motorcycles in excellent
condition, like new, with
accessories cat eye low
mileage. Call # 642-3722/223-
1885.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma 4 x 4 Extra
Cab pick up 2 000 model; 1
Toyota Previa mini van. Excellent
family vehicle. Telephone 226-
4177, 226-9029, 231-7938, 619-
8225.
AE 100 COROLLA mags,
AC, music. Immaculate
condition. (One owner). $1 275
000; KE 70 Corolla automatic,
AC $375 000. K and N Auto
Sales. 227-4040, 628-0796,
616-7840. -


A & R REAL ESTATE & AUTO
SALE. Telephone 231-7719. AE


AE 100 Corolla. All prices neg.
HONDA Accord Inspire -
mags, AC, music, fully powered.
Down payment accepted. Price
neg. AE 81 Corolla $375 000
neg. AT 170 Carina $850 000
neg. A & R Real Estate & Auto
Sale. Telephone 231-7719.
1 AT 170 fully powered,
automatic $825 000, Carina;
1 AT 170 fully powered,
automatic $550 000- 1 Hilux
pick up Single cab. Excellent
condition. $750 000. Call 260-
2355/222-3459.
Yamaha R1, cat-eye, like
new. Price to go. Yamaha XT
600cc Dirt bike Scrambler, also
Yamaha Banshee Four-wheel
drive Sports bike, Honda 250cc
Rebel, Honda 90cc ladies
Motorcycle. Tel. 225-2873, 225-
2319, 660-1061, 660-1060.
Honda Delsol Sports Car, PJJ
series, like new; Toyota Ceres, fully
powered, AC, like new; GMC Sierra
Exta Cab diesel 4x 4 pick-up, 1998
model, like new; Land Rover 110
County diesel Turbo, Nissan
Pathfinder. Tel. 660-1061, 660-
1060, 225-2873, 225-2319.
HYMAC 580 C & D LONG &
SHORT BOOM HYSTER ROAD
ROLLER CAT D6 & D5
BULLDOZER 22RB DRAGLINE,
CAT 330 EkCAVATOR JCB
BACKHOE HITACHI
EXCAVATOR. Call 222-2628 or
220-9199. No reasonable offer
refused.
ONE TOYOTALAND CRUISER
4 X 4 MODEL FJ 62 3F ENGINE,
RIGHT HAND DRIVE GASOLINE,
EXCELLENT COND ITON. IDEAL
FOR INTERIOR. EQUIPPED WITH
WINCH OFF AND ON ROAD
FRONT DISC BRAKES, 4-SET
LEAF, SPRING, MANUAL GEAR
BOX, POWER WINDOWS, POWER
STEERING, ETC. CALL 223-5273
OR 223-5274 FOR FURTHER
INFORMATION.
TOYOTA Celica with 2T
engine; Toyota Corolla with AE
81 engine; body parts,
windscreen, etc. for Celica
Corolla and Datsun 120Y; Mli
290 Tractor in parts; Ford 3 000
tractor in parts; 4-wheel arches
for Hilux 4x4; Mercury 40 Hp
outboard engine, suitable for
pails. All going cheap. As is,
where is. Telephone 265-6058,
629-1515.
JUST off the wharf, not
registered as yet 1 Nissan
Cifero, 2 000cc, only 42 000 Kmin,
Pearl white automatic, fully
powered, dual airbag, air-
conditioned, CD Deck, right hand
drive. In immaculate condition.
Price at cost. Vehicle can be
seen at 79B Cowan Street,
Kingston, Georgetown.
Telephone 624-8352, 622-
4554.
FOR the best factory
reconditioned Japanese vehicles:
1 RZ EFI, Cat eyes; AT 192, AT
212, fully loaded Toyota Carina; J
100 4 WD, SR5 Pick-up fully
loaded, Hilux Surf 4 Runner. Trade-
in and credit terms available at
Paul Camacho Auto Sales, 111
Croal St., (between Albert and
Oronogue Streets). Telephone 225-
0773/621-5869.
JAGUAR XJ6 executive car
leather interior and. oak
finished interior. You have to see
it to believe its price. Toyota
EP 91 Glanza (4- door) $1.5M
neg. Toyota EP 82 Starlet (4-
door) $1M. Toyota EP 82 GT
Turbo Starlet (manual), PHH
series $1.2M. Nissan March,
looks like EP 82 Starlet
automatic $795 000. K and N
Auto Sales. 227-4040, 628-
-0796, 616-7840.
1 AT 192 AUTOMATIC, AC,
ETC. $1.3M; 1 G-Touring
Wagon automatic, AC, etc. -
$1.1 million; 1 Mercedes Benz -
$1.5 million; 1 KE 76 Corolla
Wagon $525 000; 1 Jialing
Motorcycle $125 000 neg.,
Toyota 4-Runner (PHH series) -
$2.7 million; 1 F 150 Ford
Hydraulic suspension $6.5
million. All vehicles can be
inspected at Lot 28 'BB' Eccles,
New Housing Scheme, EBD.
Telephone 233-2336, 617-8944
or 623-9972. CREDIT
AVAILABLE.
JUST ARRIVED NEW
SHIPMENT RECONDITIONED
VEHICLES: Cars: Sprinter AE
110; Starlet Glanza Turbo EP
91; Carina AT 192; Lancer CK
2A; Cynos Sports Coupe EL 54;
Toyota Cynos Convertible.
WAGONS: Corolla AE 100 G-
Touring Mitsubishi RVR N 23,
fully loaded. PICKUPS: (4x4)
Toyota Hilux YN 100. TRUCKS:
Mitsubishi Canter 2-ton freezer;
Canter 2-ton open tray. DEO
MARAJ AUTO SALES, 207
SHERIFF AND SIXTH STREETS,
CAMPBELLVILLE. 226-4939. A
NAME AND A SERVICE YOU
CAN TRUST.


BEDFORD MODEL "M"
DUMP TRUCKTOYOTA T100
PICK UP ISUZU DIESEL PICK
UP LEYLAND LOWBED
TRUCK AND TRAILER,
LEYLAND BOXER TRUCK,
17.5 X 24 TYRES. Call 222-
2628 or 220-9199. No
reasonable offer refused.
YEAR 2000 Double Cab
Toyota 4x4 Pick Up $7M;
Toyota Double Cab Pick Up -
$2.5M; Toyota Single Cab
(solid diff.) 4x4 Pick Up- $1.3M
neg; Toyota Tacoma tra Cab
4x4 Pick Up (year 1999 make) -
$3M; Toyota (2L) Diesel Xtra
Cab 4x4 Pick Up $3M; Toyota
Xtra cab SR5 4x4 Pick Up -
$1.8M; Toyota (Surf), automatic
and manual, PHH and PJJ
series, call for more information
$2.3M $2.6M; Mitsubishi
Pajero, automatic and fully
powered, leather interior, crash
ars, new tyres and ma s.
Immaculate condition. $7.8M.
K and N Auto Sales. 227-4040,
628-0796, 616-7840.
NEW Model 110 Corolla
(1998 make), Crystal lights,
automatic $1.8M; AT 212
Carina, PJJ series- $1.9M neg.;
AT 192 Carina, manual gear
box $1.3M neg.; AT 192
Carina, automatic $1.6M, EV
13 Bluebird (Ark), very
spacious, new model $1.1M;
SV 30 Camry $1.5M neg.;
Honda Civic Fiero. Immaculate
condition. (1993 make) -$1.4M;
Toyota Vista $1.8M; Toyota
(Sports car) MR2, GTI-16
manual) $1.8M; Toyota 110
Sprinter $1.4M, AE 100
Sprinter $1.3M, Mazda
(executive) Saloon car fully
powered $1.5M, GX 81 Mark -
$2.1M, GX 90 Mark 2 $1.9M;
AT 170 Corona (full lite),
private, automatic $875 000
neg.;AT 170 Carina (manual) -
$825 000; AE 91 Corolla
automatic $725 000; AA 60
Carina (automatic) $475 000.
K and N Auto Sales, 227-4040,
628-0796, 616-7840.
HONDA* CRV $3.1M;
Toyota RAV 4 (2-door) $2.2M;
new model Jeep Cherokee,
immaculate condition $9.5M;
Toyota four-runner (3-door) -
$1.6M; Mitsubishi Pajero -
$2.9M; Toyota T 100 with 20-
inch nickel mags, (immaculate)
$3.5M; Toyota Thundra Xtra
Cab 4x4 Pick Up $6M; Ford F
150 Xtra Pick Up $3.3M and
$5.5M; Toyota Land Cruiser.
wagon $1.9M neg. year 2000
Toyota mini van'(family) -.$3M;
Toyota Single Cab fully
refurbished $875 000; Ford
4x4 Tractor $3.7M; Jeep
Cherokee automatic $795
000. K and N Auto Sales, 227-
4040, 628-0796, 616-7840.
MITSUBISHI RVR N23W,
Toyota Hiace RZH 112 minibus
Toyota Hilux Surf YN 130 & RZN
.185, Toyota Hilux RZN 174,
Toyota Ipsum 5XM1O, Toyota
Hilux Extra Cab LN 172 & LN
170, RAV 4 SXA11 Corolla &
Sprinter AE 110 & AE 100,
Mitsubishi Truck FE 537
Toyota Hilux Double Cab RZN
167, Carina AT 212, Honda
CRV RDI, Mark 11 GX 100 &
GX 90, Toyota Hilux Single Cab
LN 167 &LN 106 Toyota Land
Cruiser Prado VZJ 95 & RZJ
120, Toyota Hilux 2x4, YN 86
and many more other cars.
Please Call or come into our
office Rose Ramdehol Auto
Sales, 226 South Road,
Bourda, Georgetown. Office tel:
226-8953, 226-1973, 227-
3185, Fax 227-3185. We give
you the best because you
deserve the best. RD5, CRV
Honda Jeep, ZCA26, RAV 4,
MCU10 Harrier Prado, Land
Cruiser, RZJ95 Prado, RVR
Jeep N23W.
1. MARK 11 Grande $1
975 000; 2. Ceres $1 200 000;
3. AE 91 Sprinter, excellent
condition $575 000 neg.; 4.
AE 100 Sprinter, excellent
condition $1 200 000 neg.; 5.
Nissan Sunny FB 13 $750 001;
6. Nissan Sunny FB 12 $500
000; 7. AE 91 Sprinter,
excellent condition, fully
loaded, PJJ series, mag rims -
$750 000; 8. AT 170, stick gear,
PGG series $650 000,
giveaway; 9. AT 170 Corona,
straight light, EFI $975 000;
10. Lancer full works $2 300
000; 11. AE 81 Sprinter, mags,
music, spoiler $475 000 neg.;
12. and many more at best
prices on town; 13. 4 x 4 Hilux
Pick up, 32 diesel Single Cab
mag, GHH series $1 400 000
neg., $950 000, $850 000, etc.
14. One long tray 3-ton canter
truck $950 000 neg.; 15. AT
192 fully powered, PJJ series -
$1 550 000 neg.; 16. AE 91
Corona wagon -$700 000 neg.
Come in while stocks last at
Harry & Sons Auto Sales, 185
Maraj Building, Charlotte &
King Streets or call telephone
no. 227-1881, 227-0265, 628-
0439.


Q{lulldniAViUMnnliuir.i pnMh 4Q o-.rm






26 SUNDAY CHRONICLE MarclT'3,'2005


ONE DOMESTIC. CALL
227-1726.
JOINERS WANTED.
CONTACT 627-1233.
HOMES WANTED!
$$$$. KEYHOMES #
223-4267
1 LIVE-IN Domestic. Call
614-6053 or 625-5534 or 222-
4208.
JOINER with experience.
Call 614-6053/625-5534/222-
4208.
ONE part-time Domestic
and Salesgirl. Contact 227-
8366.
ONE hire car Driver to work
taxi. Contact Z. Khan 226-
7948.
EXPERIENCED Driver.
Contact telephone no. 227-
1881, 227-0265.
ONE experienced and
reliable taxi Driver. Call 226-
8630.
(1) Live-in Maid. 16 Public
Road, Kitty. Telephone 226-
1531.
ONE part-time Gardener.
Apply in person Spicy Dish,
53 David Street, Kitty.
ONE EXPERIENCED
HAIRDRESSER. CONTACT
TELEPHONE # 225-5426.
ONE live-in Apprentice
Mechanic for Bedford T.L. 500
Lorry. Telephone 228-2480/
613-8554.
REGENT STREET.
ESTABLISHED COMMERCIAL
BUILDING HUMPHREY NELSON'S
REALTY. TEL: 22648937.
ONE Cook to make Roti
and Puri. Hours: 18:00 H to ?
Call 226-0283 or 226-1933 ask
for Rada.
WANTED one Driver for
hire car. Contact by phone 225-
4160 after 16:00 h and
onwards.
ONE fully experienced
wheel-type Crane Operator. Tel.
no. 623-0957, 233-2774.
LAYOUT Layer birds to buy.
Contact telephone number 223-
1229, 227-8863.
DRIVER/SALESMAN.
Apply 16 Duncan St. &
Vlissengen Rd., N/town.
ONE experienced
Salesgirl. Visit Roxie's
Fashion, 122 Merriman's
Mall, Bourda.
1 DRIVER. Apply in person
to 2 J's General Store, 148 East
Half Regent Rd., Bourda.
CARPENTER to do
general repairs and Painters.
Apply 68 Robb Street. (Nut
Centre).
ONE live-in Babysitter,
between 30 and 45 years.
Please contact Safraz 615-
4332. Attractive salary.
URGENTLY needed live-
in Bartenders and Waitress to
work in bar. Attractive salary.
Contact: 618-8375.
ONE Arc and Acetylene
Welder. Must know grill work.
Contact: 21 Broad Street,
Charlestown. Tel: 225-2835.
ONE live-in Maid to take of
elderly woman in Nickerie,
Surname. Age over 40 years.
For information 337-4323.
SALESGIRL, kitchen
staff, live-in girl from coun-
try area. Nazeema Deli 318
East St., N/C/ Burg. 226-
9654/618-2902.
APARTMENTS flats,
houses to rent from $25 000 to
US$2500 in/around Georgetown.
Prestige Realty 231-5304
PART-TIME Gardener. 224
Phase 1, Republic Park, EBD..Call
in person. Monday Satutdave.


ONE experienced and
skillful Computer Operator one
Salesman or woman with Driver
Licence plus education Phone
231-2064

Waitresses and Cooks Apply
in person. Must have Food
Handler's Certificate. Call
222-6510, 222-6528.
TRUCK Drivers & Labourers.
Apply in person to Dalip Trading
Ltd,. 11 14 Broad Street.
Charlestown. Telephone 225-
0239.
SALESBOYS and girls.
Apply Anand's Regent Street,
Athina's by the East Coast car
park and Avinash Complex -
Water Street.
1 WAITRESS, Bar
Attendants, 1 live-in Maid.
Apply in person to Night Bird,
189 Barr Street, Kitty.
Telephone 626-1006 or 225-
1923.
WANTED urgently Porters
to work on Canter Truck. Hutson's
Wholesale Service, Industry
Front. Telephone 222-4650/
623-5317.
ONE Security Guard. Apply
with written application to
Regent Household Electronic,
143 Regent Road, Bourda.
Telephone No. 227-4402.
EXPERIENCED waiters.
Apply in person with written
application. Hack's Halaal
Restaurant, 5 Commerce Street,
Georgetown. 09:00 11:00 h.
1 LIVE-IN Domestic from
30 years old to 45 years. Must
be able to cope with kids.
Telephone 226-4177, 226-
9029, 231-7938, 619-8225.
DRIVERS & contract cars to
work 24 hours. Must have hire
car Licence. Contact
Pacesetters Taxi Service.
Telephone 223-7909, 223-
7910.
2 WAITRESSES. Apply to:
Plaza Hang Out Bar (Flat Shop),
Lot 245 Sheriff Street, C'vil e.
(opp. Sankar's Auto Spares).
Telephone No: 227-8576.
EXPERIENCED Hairdresser.
Must know to do manicure,
pedicure, facial and hairstyles,
etc. Also chairs to rent. Please
contact. Tel. 223-5252 or 628-
3415.
BODY work men. Should be
able to full, spray and weld to
effect full body work on vehicle.
Apply to 68 Robb Street,
Guyana Variety Store. Ask for
Johnny.
TWO live-in Domestics
between the ages of 17 and 20
years from the country areas.
Also one live-in boy to do
Handyman work around yard
and bond. # 621-4928.
LIVE-in staff to do semi
clerical work from out of town.
Application to Personal
Manager, Lot D Lama Avenue,
Bel Air Park, Georgetown. Call
# 225-9404 or 225-4492.
EXPERIENCED
SALESGIRLS. APPLY IN
PERSON: PARSRAM
DISCOUNT STORE 21 WATER
AND AMERICA STS.
STABROEK.
WANTED WELL-KEPT
PROPERTIES OF EVERY
DESCRIPTION AT
REASONABLE PRICES, ALSO
VACANT RESIDENTIAL AND
COMMERCIAL LANDS.
NELSON'S. TELEPHONE 226-
8937.
1 ASSISTANT to Produc-
tion Manager, 1 Machine Op-
erator to work night shift and 1
Machine Operator to work day.
Call 615-9752 between 13:00
and 16:00 hrs.
MECHANIC with own tools.
Must have general knowledge
of all repairs on American &
'.Japanese vehicles. Apply to 68
na Variety


Digicel outlines difficulty


THE following is a statement
released by
telecommunications company



PORTER BOYS, BETWEEN
THE AGES 16- 22 YRS. APPLY
IN PERSON: PARSRAM
DISCOUNT STORE 21 WATER
AND AMERICA STS.,
STABROEK.
ONE Mechanic to work in
interior. Must know to repair, Perkins
Bedford Excavator engine and
hydraulics and pick up. Full
knowledge of excavator would be
an asset. All accommodation
provided. Call 223-1609 and 624-
2653.
WANTED urgently Security
Guards and Ice Plant Operators.
Must have (2) recent References,
valid Police Clearance, Identifica-
tion and NIS cards. Apply in per-
son to: The Manager, BM Enter-
prise Inc., GFL Wharf, Housrn, East
Bank Demerara.
WANTED urgently- Mechanics
who must have valid Truck Drivers
Licence, and (1) one Excavator
Operator. Must have experience in
repairing both gasoline and diesel
engines. Contact: Ramjit or Johnny
on Telephone No: 225-4500/
225-9920/777-4065.
SALESGIRLS/PHARMACY
ASSISTANT. Previous experience
in a Pharmacy will be a great
advantage. Apply in person with
written application to:
PHARMACHEM DRUG STORE,
322 NEW MARKET STREET.
(OPPOSITE GEORGETOWN
HOSPITAL).
ONE worker to work at Pete's
Music and Video Club, Anna
Catherina, West Coast Demerara.
Must have a good Secondary
education. Computer knowledge,
and over twenty years to thirty
years of age. Apply in person to
Manager at Pete's Video Club.
Lot 2 George Street, back of the
Catholic Church in Brickdam.


Digicel, Friday, after meeting
with the Caricom sub-
committee chairman on
cricket, Keith Mitchell, in
Grenada.
Digicel, proud sponsors of
the West Indies cricket team
together with the WICB, WIPA
and Cable & Wireless met with
the Prime Minister of Grenada,
Honourable Mr Keith Mitchell
who chairs the Caricom sub-
committee on cricket in
Grenada on Monday, March 7,
in an effort to try to resolve the
difficulties which face West
Indies cricket.
Having decided not to
match the unprecedented five-
year US$20M sponsorship
package which Digicel was
prepared to undertake and while
negotiations were taking place,
C&W deliberately signed six
players to personal sponsorship
contracts coinciding with
Digicel taking over as title
sponsor of West Indies cricket
team. C&W did this in the full
knowledge that their actions
would create great difficulty for
the WICB, the six players and
the title sponsor, Digicel.
In regard to Mr Brian
Lara, Digicel, concurrent
with its negotiations to take
over the title sponsorship of
the West Indies cricket team,
approached representatives of
Mr Lara and offered Mr Lara
an enhanced individual
sponsorship contract when
his existing contract with


C&W was due to end in
September 2005.
This approach to
representatives of Mr Lara was
made in an effort to solve the
contract issue and in the interest
of West Indies cricket.
Unfortunately these efforts
were not responded to and in
2004 Mr Lara extended his
C&W contract to a period


beyond 2005.
Rather than supporting
the further growth of West
Indies cricket, C&W have
chosen to invest US$500 000
in sponsoring a select group
of individual players in the
full knowledge that this is
unacceptable to the title
sponsors Digicel and would
comprise their welcomed
investment in West Indies
cricket.
Digicel does not accept the
arbitration process as suggested


by the Prime Ministerial Sub-
committee on cricket pertaining
to items a, b, c, d, e and f.
This was conveyed to the
committee last Monday, as this
will only allow continued
ambush marketing by Cable and
Wireless of the title
sponsorship rights that Digicel
has in its contract with the
WICB and yet another extension
of this situation.
The WICB have taken
responsibility to create,a team
structure that preserves the
integrity of the game and
provides value to the
organizations and fans that are
supporting West Indies cricket.
We are hopeful that the
West Indies Cricket Board's
actions will help move West
Indies cricket forward in a
positive manner. As both parties
continue their discussions, we
remain respectful of the process
that works towards a resolution
and continue to be engaged in
constant dialogue in an effort to
assist a positive outcome.
As always Digicel remains
committed to providing the
necessary resources to develop
West Indies cricket to its true
potential so everyone from the
fans to the team can enjoy its
true benefits.
We are very excited
about our first ever Digicel
2005 Home Series which
promises to be a rewarding,
fun and memorable
experience for the team and
fans and our commitment to
the entire team is
unwavering.


I mft


NEED A LIVE-IN MAID FOR
BERBICE. CONTACT 227-3339.


2-BEDROOM bottom flat -
122 Crane Street, Queenstown,
Corriverton, Berbice. Toilet, bath,
ark facilities. Telephone 339-
221.
UPPER flat of two-storeyed
building for business purposes -
located in Coburg Street (next
to Police Headquarters). Call
Telephone # 618-6634.


CIRCUIT City Internet Cafe
and Computer School, Lot 2
D'Edward Village, W/C/B. All
Internet facilities,
photocopying, Scanning and
ax Services. Tel. # 330-2762/
2830 or 625-7189.


TV/VCR Repairs.
Rosignol Market Stelling
Road-. Telephone # 621-
2256



USA Green Card Lottery.
Live & work in the USA.


Family application $4 000.
Contact 227-3339.


DANZIE'S: BrandMI*
name footwear for all.
Stall # D 9 N/A Market. oft -
Tel: 333-4685 "Copyrighted Material -

Syndicated Content -
WOODWORKS Door
Store, panel doors, cupboard Available from Commercial News Providers"


doors, windows and
mouldings. Pitt Street &
Republic Road, N/A.
Tel.333-2558.

PRPRTE ORSL


- .oda400 __41 4

49 UA 411I 0 _d* w 4
qbee e m


fl R STYpp.y In Ask for
-at The 'Odystey
s'Bt~trant, 207 Barr Street ONE'a lJ t -ii 1 -
:-*bt after 11:00 h small or e.tO.bch. Withi
Computer n4 1, abl- tardard cramn shaft and head;
NOW OPEN Executive to work with minimum all sizes of 3-phase motors;
Cuts. Wanted Barbers. Lot 12 supervision. Basic knowledge of cutting torch; one complete
Camp Street, next to NY Car Accounts will be an asset. Call gas welding set; one 371
Wash. Telephone 627-0230. 218-1806 or 218-0663. GM engine .Tel: 333-


0 miflfdr?m !ee m
tTel. 327 --
OM w b lo- _._40 MO


CLASS I I EDAD
IPlease contact:
Mr. G. Wynter on 333-3154/333-6628
or Mr. Clifford Stanley on 618-6538/232-0065


I


Abod-


U"sot








. Sport Chronicle .


---'. T -


taking on Jets instead of
Kings.
The Kings' win was over-
turned by a protest upheld -by
the association as Kings had at
least one player whose eligibil-
ity to play without a valid
transfer was questioned.
But the Kings on-the-court
win was sparked by the return
of former national player and
Caricom All Star player Auric
Tappin who was simply bril-
liant in getting 22 points. Na-


WICB: C&W



players...

(From back page)
view, the basis of discussion has to be to field the best team in
the circumstances and not the best team at all costs. Teams
selected by the West Indies Cricket Board must assist West
Indies Cricket on its future path.
The Board is confident that its association with Digicel by way
of its Master Sponsorship will provide the resources for a secure
financial launching pad for the stabilisation of West Indies Cricket
and the development programme on which the Board must embark
to develop the future generation of cricketers in the Caribbean.
The Board now looks forward to welcoming South Africa
and Pakistan for the Digicel 2005 Home Series commencing
in Guyana at the end of this month. (CaribbeanCricket.com)




-* In lo.'ing memory of GEORGE


SAMUEL WONG who died
on the 11' March 1997
Loving memories never die
As years roll on and days pass
S by
in our hearts a memory is kept
Of the one we loved and will
never forget

Lovingly remembered by his
d_ wife, children, relatives and
close friends.
,.. : ,


.1I r rl I---


ce


In loving memory of PATRICIA
SAMMY who died on March 7,
;2004.
God saw your pain was getting too
much
A cure was notto be,
So He put His arm around you and
whispered"Come with me".
With pain-filled hearts and tear-filled
eyes
We watched you fade away.
Although we lovedyou so dearly
We couldn't make you stay.
God kept His arm around you in
Hislovingcare,
Made up forall you suffered
And all that seemed unfair.
A golden heart has stoppedbeating
Hard working hands are at rest.
God has broken our hearts to prove to us
"He only takes the best"
It tears could build a stairway and
memories a lane,
We will walk right up to Heaven
And bring you home again.


. i .








Sadly missed by
mother Marie,
daughter Naddi,
son Nicky, 9 sisters,
2 brothers and
husband Bat.


tional player Marvin Hartman
12, Nolan Johnson 11 and Ray
London six were the other con-
tributors for the Kings who
won 67-63, after Jets held sway
at halftime 23-22.
For Jets, Allister Webster
*netted 14 points and grabbed 12
rebounds and five blocked shots
and Oscar Adams contributed


VICTORY Valley Royals and
Kashif and Shanghai Kings
recorded splendid wins in the
semi-final matches against
Alleyne's Retrieve Raiders
and Amelia's Ward Jets re-
spectively at the Mackenzie
Sports Club hard court Fri-
day night.
But the final of the Lin-
den Amateur Basketball As-
sociation Flood Relief knock-
out tournament will be con-
tested tonight with Royals


10. The Kings were penalised
for not following the procedures
regarding player's transfer.
Tappin's experience and com-
posure, qualities which made
him the premier player of his
time, went to naught, as the Jets
had protested the presence of at
least one player in the Kings'
line-up.


Lelwrl:ttm


k;


No more in our lives to ;. '
share
\..'[ n, ic J, :, oir',- ., '1li ,1,-
years

His care
Each time I see your picture
You seem to smile and say
Mom don't ,:,r m 'oliii -',i '.
Though all our way and every day
Beloved, c- :I ,;. n. 3i'ted
Bethisour ;.' ,: ... ....' 1.
In Jesus Christ Our Lord


J-II


n -MAe m
Im


Always will be
remembered by your
mom Hyacinth, aunts,
uncle, cousins, God-
mother, God-sisters., God-
children and friends.


loridm


SINGH In loving
everlasting and cherished
memory of a beloved
husband, father,
grandfather, son, brother -:
DHANNY SINGH also
known as FATMANI
APPLE MAN of 4 Austin
Street,Campbellville, who
passed away so quietly on
March 15" '1997.
Seven years today since
that sad day
When our beloved one was
called away.
It was a sad day in our lives. -
No more in our lives to share.
Now God will keep you in His care.
He eased your pain, but broke ourhearts,
For your love was true, your heart was kind a better
person we ,cannot find,
Always loving, caring and wanted to do so much for us.
To get together in the same old ways would be our
dearest wish today,
With silent grief and tears unseen.
We wish your absence was just a dream
Living our lives without you is the hardest thing of all.
You are the best and the greatest
Only those who have lost can tell the pain of parting,
Tears will flow and tears will dry,
But memories ofyou will neverdie.
There comes a time for all of us when we must say good
bye.
Sadly missed by his loving wife Lena, sons Vishnu
and Vinod, daughter-in-law Stacy and Nado, grand
daughters Amanda, Adena, grand sons Akash and
Amit, father Fred Singh of Austin Street, Brother
Ranol and Raj Singh, sisters Baab Sharani, Kamla
and Shoba, also your cousins, nephews, nieces and
close friends.


LABA officials at the end
of the game then awarded the
win to Jets who play Royals
in the, final this evening at
20:00 h. Jets' reprieve now
places them against a red-hot
Victory Valley Royals line-up
which disposed of Linden
champions Alleyne's Re-
trieve Raiders in the other


semifinal game Friday mght.
They won by ten points 74-
64, and must be favoured to win
th6 championship game tonight
against the Jets.
Anson Durant was the
player with the hot hand for
Royals scoring 23 points with
Alwyn Wilson gaining 10 for
the winners.


HFNK. YOU -
The wife Hardai Moses,
children Yvonne, David and "
Karen, grandchildren Jevin 1
and Jason and other relatives
of the late
DEONARINE MOSES
aka HENRY DOUGLAS
of Crown Dam, Industry, ECD,
would like to thank everyone
for their kind expressions of
sympathy and support.

Special thanks to Rev. Dale
Bisnauth and members of
Ogle Presbyterian Church, Dr.
Villani and staff of Queens ,
Hospital Center N.Y. and Dr.
Surendra Persaud and staff of
St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, ,'4
Guyana.

Our sincere thanks.
.,,., .s .,- z .P.f .r- .';, "'*/.ib.' %


I-'.


p_61


p.m S A


*


fa _- -.---_ .-- 9
The family of the late
DORIS ISOLA FRASER wish to thank all
those who attended her funeral, sent wreaths,
cards, messages or in any other way
sympathised with us in our time of sorrow. The
out pouring of love has helped to reassure us
that we are not alone. The Frasers, Lynch's,
Gaul's, Pollydore's, De Leans'. Special thanks
to Pastor O'brian Welch and the members of the
New Covenant Church of Lodge.

Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee,
Except a man be born of water and of the
Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.
That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that
which is born of the Spirit is spirit. Marvel not 1
that I said unto thee, Ye must be born again.J

,.May her soul rest in peace., .I


iR


L o~ .'.iz~ V~ C~l '* *~ c ~.vr...


~ D)


1'


I~yl toIm tJt n lo eiffnl


Da COSTA: Treasured
memories of my loving
only child :SHARON
ALICIA (Jacquey), Lt.
9533, GDF Admin.
Officer, Maritime Corp
and Technical Records
Officer, Air Corp who was
called to eternity on
March 4,1990.


tt A$J~entfortam


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Castrol Under-15 Cricket ...


Berbice



whip



Essequibo



by eight



wickets


AN efficient all-round dis- figures. However, what was
play from Berbice enabled very surprising is that
them to a one-sided eight- Essequibo, despite having six
wicket victory over Essequibo wickets in hand in the last ten
in their Castrol Under-15 in- overs, showed no indication to
ter-county cricket match improve the scoring rate.
played yesterday at the Leg-spinner Jonathan Foo
Uitvlugt Community Centre led from in front with excellent
ground on the West Coast of figures of 2 for 17 from his 10
Demerara. overs while fellow leg-spinner
The win ensured the An- Jermain Ramsey supported well
cient County's unbeaten run in with 2 for 33 and left-arm spin-
this year's tournament follow- ner Amit Singh 1 for 17 also
ing their thrashing of the hap- from their ten overs bowling for
less Essequibo the day before at Berbice.
the DCC ground in Queenstown In reply, Berbice were
by 153 runs. given an early scare when
They now join defending fast howlerSamirnnA-rnpad--
champions Demerara on four opener Seon Hytmyer lbw for
M points, both from two matches a duck in his first over with
4 against Essequibo who failed to the score on 2. That paved
record a point after the comple- the way for Keno Gravesande
tion of their four matches in the to join Leon Williams and
tournament, the pair proceeded to put to-
S4 After winning the toss gether 106 for the second
and deciding to take first wicket.
strike on a good batting track Both batsmen played beau-
and a heavily grassed out- tiful shots on both sides of the
n field, Essequibo were re- wicket much to the delight of
* stricted to a paltry 133 for 6 the small crowd who watched
i from their allotted 50 overs of the day's proceedings. Williams
which Berbice replied with who hit (81) the day before at
134 for 2 off 24.5 overs. DCC again impressed with a
Essequibo suffered an early fluent (42) before he was dis-
setback when opener Norwayne missed in the 21st over with the
Fredericks who scored an attack- score on 108.
ing (80) the day before against Gravesande on the other
Berbice had to retired hurt on hand completed a well-played
(20), having-suffered a pulled unbeaten (53) which contained
thigh muscle, two fours from 75 balls and
Fredericks' injury prevented along with his skipper Steven
him from resuming his innings Latcha (5) not out ensured that
after looking dangerous yet they were there at the end.
again. Dillon Heyliger (34) not Sampson and skipper
out also looked good in his stay Royston Alkins, who bowls off
at the crease as the Essequibo spin had 1 for 21 each, bowling
batsmen found runs very hard for Essequibo.
to come by against a spin-based The Berbicians will have
Berbice bowling attack. a rest day today before tack-
Narendra Mandolall (15), ling rivals Demerara in back-
opener Jamal Hussein (12) and to-back matches tomorrow at
Oyono Sampson (10) were the Everest and Tuesday at
other batsmen reaching double Bourda.


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ESSEQUIBO innings
N. Fredericks retired hurt 20
J. Hussein c Ramsey b Latcha 12
N. Mandolall c Kalimootoo
b Ramsey 15
R. Alkins c La Fleur b Singh 8
D. Heyliger not out 34
P. Nell Ibw Ramsey 0
0. Sampson c Kalimootoo
b Foo 10
R. Harry Ibw Foo 3
K. Smith not out 3
Extras: (b-1, lb-5, w-21) 27
Total: (6 wickets, 50 overs) 133
Fall of wickets: 44, 65, 74, 74, 104,
114.
Bowlina: J. Rose5-0-15-0(w-3). E.


La Fleur 10-0-38-0 (w-4), S. Latcha 5-
2-7-0, A. Singh 10-2-17-1 (w-4), J.
Ramsey 10-1-33-2 (w-6), J. Foo 10-3-
17-2 (w-4).
BERBICE innings
S. Hytmyer lbw Sampson 0
L. Williams c Daniels b Alkins 42
K. Gravesande not out 53
S. Latcha not out 5
Extras: (lb-4, w-26, nb-4) 34
Total: (2 wickets, 24.5 overs) 134
Fall of wickets: 1-2, 2-108.
Bowling: 0. Sampson 4.3-0-21-1 (w-
9) K. Smith 3-0-15-0 (w-6), NW
Mandolall 4.3-0-8-0(w-5), S. Daniels
3-0-13-0 (w-3), K. Angad 6-0-42-0 (w-
3). R. Alkins 3.5-0-21-1.


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Sport Chronicle


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By Imran Khan

WHAT unfolds today at
Hampton Court will give a
good indication as to how the
tenth round Carib Beer Se-
ries match between Guyana
and the Leeward Islands, both
desperate for maximum
points, will conclude.
After two days at the
Hampton Court ground,
Guyana have maintained the
upper hand. scoring a formi-
dable 448 when at one stage
they appeared in danger of fall-
ing for under 200.
The Leewards have not
simply rolled over, no one ex-
pected them to, but they have
found runs a scarce commodity
as they closed yesterday on 82
for 1 from 56 overs.
Guyana's captain
Shivnarine Chanderpaul was the
main rescuer after they were
160 for 6, hitting a massive and
majestic 194. The left-handed
batting force was ably aided by
Neil McGarrell who, while add-
ing 192 for the seventh wicket
with his captain, blasted 84.
Chanderpaul, the left-
handed fighter, started the day
on 118 and with Guyana on 320
for 6, hit 25 fours in total be-
\fore he cruelly fell six runs short
of the season's third double cen-
tury.
Chanderpaul, who did not



GUYANA first innings (o/n 320 for 6)
S. Chattergoon c Mitchum
b Sanford 12
D. Daesrath Ibw Jeremy 16
R. Sarwan c Jeremy b Sanford 47
N. Deonarine b Jeremy 0
A. Fudadin c sub. (Stephanie)
b Banks 24
S. Chanderpaul c Joseph
b Jeremy 194
L Cush c & b Banks 10
N. McGarrell b Jeremy 84
M. Nagamootoo c Cornwall
b Sanford 2
V. Nagamootoo c Sanford
-b Cornwall 23
R King not out 1
Extras: (w-7, nb-14, b-4, lb-5, p-5) 35
Total: (all out from 124.5 overs) 448
rpll of wickets: 1-29, 2-37, 3-37, 4-
103,5-136,6-160,7-352,8-372,9-444.
Bowling: Sanford 32-5-127-3 (w-5),
Simon 22-6-58-0 (nb-2), Jeremy 18-
5-40-4 (nb-3, w-1), Banks 38-4-154-2
(nb-6), Cornwall 11.5-0-50-1 (nb-3, w-
1), Joseph 3-1-6-0.
LEEWARD ISLANDS first innings
S. Jeffers retired hurt 26
J. Mitchum not out 34
R. Morton c Chattergoon b Cush 8
S. Joseph not out 8
Extras: (nb-2, b-1,lb-3) 6
Total: (for 1 wicket from
56 overs) 82
Fall of wicket: 1-60
Bowling: King 7-2-20-0 (nb-2),
Daesrath 5-2-13-0, McGarrell 14-9-9-
0, Cush 17-7-23-1, Nagamootoo 9-5-
5-0, Deonarine 2-0-5-0, Sarwan 2-0-3.


match doubles made by the
Trinidadian pair of Daren Ganga
(265) and Lendl Simmons (200)
faced 382 deliveries and ben-
efited from only one chance,
wicketkeeper Ridley Jacobs
putting him down in the first
over in the morning off the me-
dium pace of Wilden Cornwall
and when he had not added to
his overnight total.
While the Leewards would
have been looking to close off
the Guyana innings early on, the
Guyanese refused to budge,
batting until just after 13:00 h
and taking lunch at 413 for 8
with Chanderpaul as solid as he


first regional century loomed he
had his stumps rocked by Kerry
Jeremy.
Jeremy. bowling with a nig-
gling groin injury, completed the
innings with 4 for 40 from 18
overs after picking up two wick-
ets on the first day.
The pacer stuck to a good
line and length and was re-
warded with the top bowling
effort for the Leewards. His
compatriot Adam Sanford,
who was not afraid to pitch
short on a slow pitch. got 3 for
127 while Omari Banks, who
struggled to maintain a con-
sistent line, had his 38 overs


SHIVNARINE CHANDERPAUL


has ever been on 170.
Four runs after the
Guyana captain went, at 444
for 9 the Guyana innings was
wrapped up after Vishal
Nagamootoo (23) was su-
perbly caught, one-handed by
Adam Sanford at wide mid on.
Chanderpaul and
Nagamootoo, who responsibly
partnered his skipper, added an
invaluable 72 runs for the ninth
wicket.
Neil McGarrell who stroked
84, his second best score at the
regional first class level follow-
ing 88, added a monumental 192
runs for the seventh wicket with
Chanderpaul to resuscitate the
Guyanese innings after their
team had faltered to 160 for 6.
McGarrell went to bed on 64
and added 20 runs in the morn-
ing but just as thoughts of his


costing 154 runs and lie also
picked up two wickets.
The Leewards started their
innings watchfulilly but then
Shane Jleflers exploded, hitting
Iive boundaries on the tro.t to
put the pacer Reon King and
medium pacer Damodar
Daesrath out of the attack. The
introduction of ithe Guyanese
spinners slowed the proceedings
and it remained the miode of op-
eration until the bails were
lifted.
Jeffers, who was put down
in the first over by McGarrell
at third slip off King, had to de-
part after a stomach ailment.
which caused him to vomit ont
field, became unbearable.
He retired hurt for 26 but
his fellow opener, pint-sized
right-hander Junee Mitcham,
played patiently lor 34 fromn


177,


CARICOM'S attempt to bro-
ker a truce in the West Indies
sponsorship dispute fell flat
on its face Friday night when
the two companies at the cen-
tre of the storm both rejected
recommendations handed
down by Grenadian Prime
Minister Dr Keith Mitchell.
Just hours after Mitchell
outlined a list of suggestions/rec-
ommendations from the


188 deliveries in just over
three hours of batting.
At the close captain
Sylvester Joseph, on 8 from 51
deliveries, was his partner as the
two refused to allow the prob-
ing spinners to delve further in
their batting line-up by playing
obstinately in defence.
The only wicket to go was
that of Runako Morton who
was caught at silly point by
Sewnarine Chattergoon off the
bowling of off-spinner Lennox
Cush. While the appeal for the
catch was confident. Moriont
appeared displeased, indicating
before he left the crease that
the ball did not in fact hit
the bat. but rather came
off his pads.
Cush bowled 17 overs
for 23 runs with one wicket
while McGarrell wielded his
arm for 14 overs for a mere 9
runs and Nagamootoo sent
down 9 overs for an even
more miserly 5 runs.
With an in-form Leewards
batting line-up to tackle, inclu-
sive of Stuart Williams who
scores runs virtually at will in
this sort of cricket, the spinners
can expect to have a challenge
on their hands. Williams (705)
and Jacobs (616) are the lead-
ing run-scorers this season and
if ever their team needed them
to produce hundreds it would be
today as they hunt first innings
points, first of all, and then an
outright victory later on.
They will need to also get
past 299 to avoid being asked
by Guyana to bat a second
time.


PRIME MINISTER DR
KEITH MITCHELL

Caricom sub-committee on
cricket. Digicel and Cable &
Wireless issued separate state-
ments to spurn the offer.
"Digicel does not accept the
arbitration process as suggested
by the Prime Ministerial Sub-
Conunmmittee on cricket pertaining
to items a. b. c, d. e, and f. This
was conveyed to the committee
last Monday. as this will only
allow continued ambush mar-
keting by Cable and Wireless."
Digicel declared.
Moments later, Cable &
Wireless' reaction was issued
with the key line: "As for the
contract terms suggested in the
Prime Ministers' statement, we
believe we can reach agreement
on many. However, we cannot
accept those proposed conces-
sions that undermine our ability
to support our World Cup 2007
sponsorship. or our commit-
ments to all our contracted
players."
Cable & Wireless said it


Wortmanville/Werk-en-Rust halt


Lodge/Meadow Brook unbeaten run
DEFENDING champions Wortmanville-Werk-en-Rust are through to the final of the
Georgetown Classic Inter-ward basketball championship as they stopped the unbeaten run
of Lodge/Meadow Brook Friday night with a comfortable 87-78 points victory at the Cliff
Anderson Sports Hall.
They now face the winner of last night's other semi-final between East Bank and North
Ruiinmveldt.
The tournament, organized by Courts Paccsetters and sponsored by Smalta. saw Kurt Elias
spearheading the win for the champions with 23 points, Rovston Siland managing 16 points, eight
rebounds, rour steals and two blocked shots. Nciland Loncke chipping in with 12 points and
Devon Cameron scoring 10 points, four steals and a similar a1nmount1 of assists.
Pelham l)oris had 18 points, four rebounds and three steals for the losing semi-final-
ists with Jermaine Matthews netting 18 points, Martin Williams 13 and Dayne Kendall 12
points and nine rebounds.
In the supporting game of the third division Georgetown Amateur Basketball Association com-
petition. Ravens won against Bounty Colts 72-56 after leading by ten points at the break 36-26.
Yusuf Edghill had 19 points for the Ravens as Ryan Stephens got 15 points, nine rebounds'and
three steals. For Colts Joel Griffith scored 15 points and Sandy Gordon 14.
The Leo Club of Georgetown won their game against the Red Cross Society 53-48 after lead-
ing at halftime 26-15.
Mark Trotz was the top-scorer for the Leo C(lub with 21 points and Pablo Cupidore and
Colin Hope each netted 15 points for the Red Cross. (Joe Chapman) I .,


ct

-m"",


5'-.


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- SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 13, 2005bo


S31


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. "2<,


would however agree to meet
with the proposed independent
assessor to further discuss the
contract terms.
Digicel accused its bitter
rival of "deliberately" inking
personal sponsorship con-
tracts with six West Indies
players after walking away
from sponsoring the team.
"C&W did this in the full
knowledge that their actions
would create great difficulty
for the WICB, the six played,
and the title sponsor, Digicel.
"In the midst of its negotia-
tions with the WICB for the
title sponsorship Digicel said it
approached Brian Lara and of-
fered "an enhanced individual
sponsorship contract" when his
existing contract with C&W was
due to end in September 2005.
"This approach to represen-
tatives of Mr Lara was made in
an effort to solve the contract
issue and in the interests of
West Indies cricket. Unfortu-
nately these efforts were not re-
sponded to and in 2004, Mr
Lara extended his C&W contract
to a period beyond 2005," the
company slid.
Digicel also made it clear
Cable & Wireless chose to in-
vest US$500 000 in sponsoring
a select group of individual play-
ers in the full knowledge that
this was "unacceptable".
For its part, C&W said it
welcomed sections of Caricom's
position. particularly the insis-
tence that the WICB "'... no
longer exclude the seven play-
ers with Cable & Wireless con-
tracts from the squad selected to
prepare for the impending
tours."
"We believe that to de-
prive the fans of West Indies
cricket from seeing a team
including the best players
available was a shortsighted
act. And to deprive those play-
ers of the ability to earn their
living as punishment for sign-
ing totally legal and accept-
able personal endorsement
contracts was completely un-
acceptable," Cable & Wire-
less said. (Caribbean
Cricket.com)







SPORT


l T.JD ix~i i.


Firt es*ta9to e- eeced- March 1


Cricket Board
(WICB) is sticking
to its guns, an-
nouncing, yesterday, that
seven leading cricketers in-
cluding Brian Lara,
Ramnaresh Sarwan and
Chris Gayle will not be con-
sidered for selection until
their private contracts with
Cable & Wireless are prop-
erly inspected.
In the face of increasing
pressure from Caricom to select
the team on cricketing merit
only, the WICB refused to back
down. "In the Board's view, the
basis of discussion has to be to
field the best team in the cir-
cumstances and not the best


SHELLS Ki~~f-lAAG
ELBOWS l












4.t



A' .


team at all costs," the WICB
said in a statement.
The WICB did not say
when the legal perusal of the


BRIAN LARA


(H C)VVM D N
S t-'A4. Fi -I EYIl
VERMICELtLI


d, I


contracts would be completed.

EXCERPT OF THE WICB
STATEMENT:
The Board has noted
various comments and
recommendations made on
behalf of the CARICOM Prime
Ministerial Sub-Committee on
Cricket issued in a statement by
the Chairman of that sub-
Committee on the evening of
March 11, 2005. The Board
also noted public statements
issued by parties involved.
From these statements, it is the
understanding of the Board that
the recommendations outlined
in the Prime Ministers'
statement have not been agreed
to by all of the parties.
The Board wishes to thank
the Prime Ministerial sub-Com-
mittee on Cricket for its inter-
est in West Indies Cricket and
wishes to assure the Prime
Minister that its comments and
recommendations will receive
due consideration while it con-
tinues to work with the West
Indies Players' Association to
resolve several outstanding is-
sues..
In this regard, the Board
looks forward to meeting with
the Prime Ministerial sub-Com-
mittee so that it can fully un-
derstand the intent of the
Committee's various recommen-
dations and determine the po-
tential impact on the Board.


b,



St
St


Conscious, however, of the
Board's constitutional obliga-
tions as have been established in
the Memorandum of Associa-
tion and Articles of the West
Indies Cricket Board Inc. and
the responsibilities of the Di-
rectors to manage the business
and affairs of the Board, the Di-
rectors, at ,. meetingg of Sat-
urday March 12, 2005, have
made the following decisions:
1. Based on commitments
received from all 22 players in-
vited to make themselves avail-
able for selection for the Digicel
2005 Home Series, the tours to
the Caribbean by South Africa
and Pakistan will proceed as
planned.
2. The Selectors will be in-
structed to name the squad for
the first Test Match on Thurs-
day March 17 and those se-
lected will assemble for the pre-
tour camp scheduled to com-





: ... .. -
-"; .''f .,
DANB- AV
.





DWAYNE BRAVO


RAMNARESH SARWAN
mence on Wednesday March 23.
3. The Board will, through
its attorneys-at-law, commence
inspection of certain contracts
pertaining to Cable and Wireless
contracted players which were
provided late on Friday. March
11, by Cable and Wireless to
the Board's counsel once the
Board has received in writing a
waiver from each of the affected
players so that the Board is not
involuntarily in breach of any
confidentiality clauses in those
contracts.
The purpose of the Board's
inspection of the contracts is to
ensure that the contracts do not
impose on the players any ob-
ligations, which could cause
them or the WICB to be in
breach of the sponsorship con-
tract, which has been executed
between the WICB and Digicel.
4. While the above examina-
tion is in process, the players


CHRIS GAYLE
who hold personal endorsement
contracts with Cable and Wire-
less Messrs. Bravo, Edwards,
Gayle, Lara, Rampaul,
Sarwan and Dwayne Smith -
will not be considered for se-
lection to the West Indies
Team until the Board satis-
fies itself as to the nature of
those contracts.
The Board repeats its as-
surance to the people of the
West Indies that it is commit-
ted to develop West Indies
cricket for the benefit of the
fans and all players throughout
the region.
The Board's primary con-
sideration is what is best for
West Indies cricket and its fu-
ture. This is the critical base
from which all else moves.
Therefore, in the Board's

(Please turn
to page 27)


WIPA advises 22 to sign
rHE West Indies Players' Association (WIPA) has advised The association is inviting representatives of the WICB
members of the 22-man squad to accept the WICB's invi- to meet March 14 and 15 to "conclude the negotiations in
nations to make themselves available for selection. time for the 2005 Home Series."
In a statement welcoming the recommendations for a truce "WIPA repeats its assurance that it has always acted and
y Caricom, WIPA said it also expects the WICB to include will continue to act in the beit interest of is members and We-st
hie seven players with Cable & Wireless contracts. Indies Cricket as a whole and that we will continue % ith these
"WIPAhas always insisted that merit and cricketing ability negotiations in good faith.
should be the criteria for representing the West Indies and we Accordingly we have advised the original twenty-two
\pect that the West Indies Cncket Board will now include the (22) players who were invited by the Board to make them-
even (7) players with Cable and Wireless contracts in the squad selves available for selection to accept the invitation," the
ellecied to prepare for the impending tours." statement read.


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SUndlay Chironifle Marnh 1.^ 2005


By Sherry Bollers-Dixon


A FRO hair has
evolved over the
last ten years with
many young
women and men opting for a
more natural look, a trend
which speaks volumes about
our indelible mark on our
culture.
Good hair radiates beauty
and boosts confidence and
whether you chose to wear your
hair natural, relaxed, braided or
under a piece can go a long way
to set your mood.
But this trend is a long way
from those who pioneered 'eth-
nic hairstyles' in the racially
heated decades of the 1960's and
1970's. Then choosing to wear
your hair naturally was more an
affirmation of racial pride than
just purely for style reasons.
.Margot Rodway-Brown is
director of Adronment,
Europe's only major conference
on locks, natural hair, health and
beauty. Margot says: "The ex-
ponential growth in the num-
bers of women across the
Diaspora, who embrace natural
hair, is really testament to a
shift in consciousness. Not al-
ways political and cultural, but
certainly personal and often
spiritual. The magnitude of this
growth can't simply be ex-
plained away as style or fash-
ion. This is because, for most
Black women, tremendous pres-
sure and historical issues are at-
tached to their hair choices.
Therefore, any transition from
'processed' to natural hair re-
quires a conscious decision and
a level of personal awareness".
But even with this move-
ment many of the older genera-
tion still fear that employers and
mainstream society still link
natural hairstyles to radical or
militant behaviour while some
younger professional women are
often torn between the corpo-
rate workplace dress and ethics.

*Stephanie, a broadcast
journalist has been relaxing her
hair for the last 10 years. 'I have
been thinking about changing my
look for a while but in my pro-
fessipni.knoqw J caP'.t.WeYarq.ny,..
hair in twists because it just
wouldn't look right,' she says.


Stephanie's hair is shoulder
length, bone straight and shiny.
"I know that in my profession
I have to be seen in a certain
way and the only way to suc-
ceed is by assimilating.
But after visiting the Afro
Hair and Beauty Show,
Stephanie says she's thinking
about growing out the relaxer
but is not sure how she will be
able to look after her hair. For
those who want natural hair, the
secret of getting around the cor-
porate look is to use hair pieces
or wigs while growing out the
relaxer. This is something that
Natasha has been doing for the
last three years. A publishing
executive Natasha says her em-
ployer would deeply disap-
prove of her locks.
"I made the decision to go
natural after a friend of mine
went to an adornment show
and came back with all these
magazines and articles about
the possible harm I was caus-
ing myself by continually
processing my hair." Natasha
says that by this time her hair
was so damaged by processing
that it was no great loss to
chop it off. "I feel so free and
empowered wearing my hair
in its natural state. There is
no way I will go back to re-
laxing. And the great thing
about hair pieces is that it is
so easy to change my appear-
ance and get the look I want
at a short moment's notice."
The fact that thousands of
African Caribbean women have
stopped relaxing their hair is re-
markable as it shows that at last
'natural' hair, which has been
denigrated for thousands of
years, is becoming more accept-
able both within the black com-
munity and in mainstream soci-
ety. Afro hair, a symbol of ori-
gin from the Motherland is usu-
ally feared and usually spoken
about negatively: it is coarse,
hard to handle, difficult and gen-
erally not good hair.
Until the last decade or so
many women have spent untold
number of hours wasting a good
Saturday waiting to get their
hair to look 'good' i.e. to iron
out the natural woolly curls
frya, their hair ,until ,i is, ibpte
straight, limp and shiny.
So what has brought about


the change? The reasons are
many and not least among them
finances, scalp damage and in-
fluence from friends and family
and even celebrities sporting a
natural look.
Tollah has recently started
wearing twists after many years
of wanting a change. "Until a
year ago, my hairstyle was al-
ways the same relaxed and in a
shoulder length bob. But after 1
bought my flat I realized that I
couldn't afford to get my hair
treated every few weeks to keep
it looking good." Ironically
rather than making her unhappy
about this. Tollah says her new
look hairstyle has boosted her
confidence. "I notice the way
people look at me especially
other women. It's almost as
though they have respect for me
for daring to wear my hair in its
natural state." Elizabeth took
matters into her own hands af-
ter a bad experience at the hair-
dresser left her once thick hair
limp and lifeless. Now she
wears braids and underneath
them her hair is natural. "I plait
my own hair and once I decided
against using chemicals in my
hair I started to trim it every
time I took out the braids. Now
my hair is thick, curly and if I
want a break from the braids I
wear it in a fro."
However you choose to
wear your hair, stylists advise
that treating your hair with re-
spect is essential. This is be-
cause although it appears strong,
Afro Caribbean hair is actually
the weakest type of hair be-
cause of the degree of intensity
of its curl, so every pull, twist
and turn weakens it. And fol-
lowing some of these general
maintenance tips will ensure
that you can have hair that is
healthy and shiny and in good
condition.
Afro-Caribbean hair needs
careful management to restore
any loss of tensile strength and
maintain a natural balance of
moisture
Always use a good range
of products specifically aimed
towards your own hair type. A
good moisturising prime care
product is essential; well
.mnoissqtrisel. lyair wil, ibelp.pre-
vent breakage and the hair be-
coming brittle


If you don't want to
blow-dry you hair all the time
risking damage. use wrapping
lotion and comb the hair flat,
then go under the dryer. This
will result in sleek, straight hair
After having braids or
weaves removed from the hair,
always allow the hair to rest


first before relaxing the hair
straight and putting more stress
on it.
Steam treatments are rec-
ommended to deal with the dry-
ness of Afro hair. regular treat-
ments at your salon will enhance
the condition of your hair, lock-


ing in moisture and reducing
breakage.
A mild texturiser will
' tame excessively frizzy hair
and leave it with a more uni-
formed curl; this is much
more flattering, leaving your
hair looking healthy and well
maintained.


!NrN~


r- -- -.------------'----------
I I










CONTINUED FROM LAST WEEK
HIGH PROTEIN DIETS
Today, there is a growing craze for the use of high protein diets to aid weight loss. Although
providing an initial result, the long-term effects of these diets are not as admirable. A diet high in
animal protein also tends to be high in saturated fat and cholesterol, which are associated with
obesity and heart disease. Animal products such as meat, meat products and milk are the main
foods of these high animal protein diets. Although they are good sources of protein, these foods
also tend to contain large amounts of fat and cholesterol. Even in the leanest ground beef, about
half of the calories come from fat. There is also a limited carbohydrate intake in these diets, as well
as the restricted use of plant foods with high dietary fibre content. By replacing a major part of the
protein from animal sources with plant sources, we can cut down on the consumption of excess fat
without jeopardising our protein needs.
Legumes are a good source of non-animal protein and also contain very little fat. Whole grains
are another food product, which has a moderate protein and low fat content. Remember, when the
cereals are combined with legumes such as red kidney beans; pigeon/gungo peas) in the right pro-
portion. the protein quality is just as good as the quality found in foods from animals.
These days, it has become a widespread belief that eating a high protein diet and/or taking
protein supplements will help build stronger muscles. This is not true. It is a good exercise plan
that builds muscles, not excess protein. If you regularly take part in vigorous exercise, you may
need extra protein but only as part of an extra calorie requirement best obtained from dietary
sources. Thus, extra protein supplements are unnecessary.

CAN A PERSON HAVE TOO MUCH PROTEIN?
It is easy for a person to consume too much protein, as proteins are found in varying
amounts in a wide range of foods. However, it is of course easier for a person to consume
excess amounts of protein when on a high protein diet. Because the body cannot store sur-
plus protein, an over-consumption of protein offers no benefits and may even present nu-
merous health risks. Research has shown that women who consumer higher proportions of
protein (particularly from animal sources), suffer excessive loss of calcium from the body
and are therefore at an increased risk of bone loss. Excess protein intake (particularly in
people with micronephropathy) also places an extra burden on the kidneys, making them]
have to work harder, resulting in the faster -age-related decline of kidney function. (Nyam
L.News -.. ----...... .-...- -
L nII l ll I I I lmIll m luml~l mmIll-





FILMING




SOAP




OPERA HERE


"I want to
pitch it as
'Desperate
Housewives'
meets 'Young
and the
Restless',"
Shirvington Hannays.


SHIRVINIG1UN nannruysa iuui-II nIUlS '">" *
'Appearances'. (Picture by Winston Oudkerk)


By RUEL JOHNSON
S HIRVINGTON
Hannays has been
in love with acting
all his life. In an
interview with the Sunday
Chronicle, Hannays said that
he started out in the Theatre
Guild acting in local plays
around 1986, when he was 17
years old. He recalls being in
some of the more popular
plays in Guyana during the
mid-eighties and early nine-
ties, a time when local the-
atre was in its hey-day here,
acting in productions like
'One of Our Sons is Miss-
ing'; 'The Rope and the
Cross'; Michael Duff's 'No
Tricks. No Living 1'; and
something he remembers
well, playing a villain in
Duff's 'No Tricks, No Living
2'.
According to one review of
the latter play, Hannays used
comic caricature successfully as
the arch-criminal Killroy
,(appropriately named). He
showed promising versatility as
an actor able to manage
different type roles. During his
time in theatre here in Guyana,
Hannays picked up several Best
Actor and Best Supporting
Actor awards nominations for
his roles in various productions.
Unfortunately, like many
of Guyana's theatrical
talents, Hannays left the
country, heading to Jamaica
in 1995 to undertake work
with the International Red
Cross Society and at a
Jamaican hospice. While,
during that time, his work on


stage fell into a lull, it did not
cease completely. Hannays
said that he did a production
of 'One of Our Sons is
Missing' at University of the
West Indies' Mona Campus,
which picked up several
awards.,
In 1998, Hannays left
Jamaica for Canada. There he
began to work on expanding his
portfolio. Since he has been
there now permanently based
- he has been involved in
seemingly everything to do with
theatre, film and television
production and then some. He
continued his stage skills,
branching off into independent
production, something he
studied for at Toronto's
Centennial College. He has
appeared in various television
productions in Canada, picking
up somewhere along the line a
Degree in System Analysis and
Design as well a Diploma in
Business Administration.
He also founded SMAHO
ARTS Company and Guild in
August 2002, a not-for-profit
organisation based in Toronto
where actors minority actors
in particular can both showcase
and fine-tune their talents. He
also designed a SMAHO Boot
camp for visible minority actors
to better market their skills in
Canada.
Hannays also started writ-
ing inspirational articles which
he publishes both in magazines
and on his website,
www.smaho.com. He has also,
through SMAHO ARTS, pro-
duced some short films, includ-
ing one called 'The Importance
of Being Honest', about a


cap) filming a scene for soap opera,


Guyanese in Toronto who
switches his accents to suit
whichever of the two countries
- Canada and Guyana that he's
in.
APPEARANCES
Last year, he wrote his first
play 'Trial of an Angel', a dark
look at child physical and sexual
abuse. He has already written a
screenplay version of the play
and is currently pursuing grants
from various organizations in
Canada, including the Canadian
Film Centre, to start shooting it.
He said that even if they don't
get funding in time, they will
start shooting around mid-year.
Most recently, Hannays
was awarded a grant from Hu-
man Resource Development
Canada (HRDC) to start up an
independent film production
company, through which he in-
tends to produce 'Trial of an
Angel'.
Another project that
Hannays has embarked upon
came about, funnily enough,
due to the floods. Hannays
said, giving a bit of back-
ground, that he was here last
year to launch the 'GuyCarib
Film Festival' last November.
He told the Sunday
Chronicle that he hopes that
the film festival is a good way
to boost Guyana's interna-
tional profile and to bring in
revenues from a variety of
sources.
For one, filming against
Guyana's. landscape is an invalu-
able way of highlighting what
the country has to offer tourists
and film producers as well. He


Remembering Dr. Cheddi Jagan

The following is an excerpt of Dr. Jagan's writing:

II wish to see my country prosperous and
developing, its people happy, well fed, well
housed with jobs to do. Second only to my
passion for the independence of my people, is
this dedication to their economic advancement,
S> so that their lives may be more abundant. Now,
in this I am a socialist. By this I mean I am in
favour of the workers reaping the full fruits of
their labour through public ownership of the
means of production, distribution and
exchange."


foresees that with increased
filming here, an organised film
association can bargain for and
guarantee set quotas for local
representation on international
film crews and casts.
Hannays said that he left
briefly after the film festival
launch but came back to under-
take two projects at the National
Cultural Centre. Then the
floods came and swamped out
the Cultural Centre. He said
that the reopening of the NCC
kept getting pushed back due to
the extent of the water damage.
He said that he had a project he
was working on for Canadian
television and he had the idea
that he could attempt to produce
it here.
Friday before last,
Shirvington began shooting
the one-hour pilot for a soap
opera called 'Appearances'.
According to the actor/
screenwriter, he chose that
name because the word has
certain associations, connota-
tions that there might be
(Please turn to page XII)


EXTENSION OF LIFE OF THE COMMISSION OF
INQUIRY INTO ALLEGATIONS OF MINISTERIAL
INVOLVEMENT IN EXTRA-JUDICAL KILLINGS


His Excellency the President of the Republic of Guyana

has approved the extension of the duration of the

Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of Ministerial

Involvement in Extra-Judical Killings for one (1)
additional month that Is up to the 31 st day of March,

Two Thousand and Five




Roger F. Luncheon, .D.
Head, Presidential Secretariat


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1


-Page III


Sundav Chronicle March 13, 2005


.F. Canadian-based actor


,






P I Sunday Chi6ni'ci" Mad h' 13, '2O5 '


Sway he would wa
Treated, but my w
Si wasted.
"h1 I'm confused aboi
do. His girlfriend has
Member of our far
S- 1 comes over all the ti
feel guilty not tellin
,L,/ llal y 'truth. Should I tell he
I tell the other girl?
I stay out of it'? I d
Sani 22 and the oldest to be like my dad's fa
of four children. I have cover up infidelities f(
a brother, 17, who is I think I have a res
,the second oldest. He's ity to all women, since
a "committed relation- woman, to tell the tru
vith a girl, also 17. for feel the need to tc
o years. However, he is brother a lesson about
y speaking on the phone and how he should tri
her girls and going on What do you think I st


T



F



I
been in
ship" w
over tw
currently
with ot


dates with them.
Once a school friend told
my brother's girlfriend he was
seeing another girl. My
brother's girlfriend came to my
house, took my brother to the
other girl's house, and con-
fronted them both. My brother
denied everything and totally
painted another picture to his
girlfriend. She ate it up.
Needless to say, they are
still together, and he is still see-
ing another girl. I am bothered
by his lack of respect for
women. I've tried to speak with
him about treating women the


Sheila, where d
brother learn this be
Where most people l
behaviour from hi
Normally the advice
to give your brother i
either tell your girlfr
will tell her. In this insi
won't work. He is wil
when confronted, ai
willing to believe a lie.
You want your b
treat women better, bi
not capable of teach


All In


Lit you are
thing him


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ords are
ut what to that. As long as he experiences
become a pleasure in what he is doing, he
nily. She will continue doing it. Often a
me, and I man who cheats never learns the
ig her the lesson, because the pleasure for
,r? Should him is multiple women, and
Or should there will always be women who
on't want allow him to do this.
mily who If you tell either of his girl-
or years. friends, they may resent you,
sponsibil- not seek the truth about him.
ce I am a But the one thing telling does is
ith. I also to let your brother, his girl-
each' my friends, and your family know
it women you do not approve of his
great them. behaviour. Silence indicates ac-
hould do? ceptance, and you do not accept
this behaviour.
SHEILA Go ahead and tell. But do
not expect your brother to
did your change, his girlfriends to
ehaviour? thank you, or your parents to
earn their stand behind you. When
s family. people openly flaunt bad
would be behaviour, you damage your-
an option: self when you keep silent.
iend, or I Each time you speak up, you
tance, that express your character.
ling to lie Speaking up strengthens
nd she is your sense of self and makes
you less vulnerable to abuse
brotherr to by others.


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maintenance of electric


* An attractive package and conditions of service that include participation
in the Company's Group Life and Medical Scheme await the right person.

Applications together with Curricilum Vitae must be submitted to reach
the:

Human Resource Consultant
TOOLSIE PERSAUD LIMITED
GROUP OF COMPANIES
10-12 Lombard Street, Georgetown.
No later than Monday 14th March, 2005.


FROM

THE

HEART


W otii- 30tll weddim,
'1111livel's"ll'Y 11
M11V 'llid I-elleWill" 0:11*
111',11TIZIlle \10\\'S ill CllLll'C1l.
Thel-C will be zi I.CCCl)tioll'l1'-
tenvw-ds. We wotild like to
illdic'Ite ill tile illvit.1tioll we
WOUld lwel'ei- domaimis loa
'_ifts. W11,1t wof-dill- may
we Lise that wol.ild iiot
S01.111d illll)OSill". yet ell-
Colll'ILC LUeStS to 11CIII oth-
els ill lleCd?
INIACANDAILEEN
Nizic.md Aileeti. il'yoLi
WZ1111 voill"Lliests to dolizite
to zi cel'tlill Ch'll.it\% '.Zive
thelli (tic stol-V which lezids
theln to tilzil C011CILlsimi. Tell
thelli, h-olil yolll- liezil-ts.
Wily yoll feel plissiollitely
Amit tile cmise. Tell them
what it memis to voli. but
aive them the option to iVe
to a caLise which matters to
them.
In that way all the
gifts will be given in a
spiritual nianner which
commemorates the
spiritual connection
between the two of you.
Don't fuss about tile
wording. Write froin the
heart to connect with
other hearts.
rAI\IAk
SEND LETTERS TO:
Direct Answers, PO Box:
964, Springfield, MO
65801 or e-mail:
DirectAnswers@
WayneAndTamara.com.


THE ERCL





AND YOU,
I
There is a school of thought that race hatred is
a learned behavior. c J I

This is supported in I
the song, "You've Got ( l ERC :
To Be Taught", from i.
Rodgers and %nr.,3
Hammerstein's South
Pacific, written in 1949. I

I Here are the words of the song: I
I
You've got to be taught
To hate and fear,
You've got to be taught
From year to year,
I It's got to be drummed I
In your dear little ear I
I You've got to be carefully taught.

You've got to be taught to be afraid
Of people whose eyes are oddly made,
I And people whose skin is a different
I shade, I
I You've got to be carefully taught. I

You've got to be taught before it's too
late,
Before you are six or seven or eight,
To hate all the people your relatives hate,
You've got to be carefully taught! I

-__---------- -------------- --J


uage 4 & 17.p65


Pane IV


- n:- -


- 1v'UO UV uuly certified Elrectrician.


4






Sudvhrnce ac 1.205Pg


SIX-MONTH PRISON




SENTENCE SUBSTITUTED




FOR $375 FINE


bu1iet-note1I tubon olfie I eI Il" We


ByGEORGE BARCU
A GUYANA Full
Court in 1995
handed down note-
taking guidelines
for Magistrates after finding
that a Mabaruma Magistrate
had carelessly imposed a six-
month prison sentence on a
man who pleaded guilty to
assault, without recording
the facts of the case as nar-
rated by the Prosecutor.
This was discovered when
the man, Alfred Depaul, ap-
pealed against the severity of
sentence.
At the hearing of the appeal,
the Full Court constituted by
Chief Justice Cecil Kennard,
who later became Chancellor of
the Judiciary and Justice
Claudette Singh, allowed the
appeal.
The prison sentence was
substituted by a $375 fine.
All this happened because
the Magistrate, after recording a


plea of guilty to the of-
AY fence of assault, did noth-
ing else than to enter the
penalty imposed.
No mention was made about
the facts of the case as narrated
by the Prosecutor, nor did the
Magistrate ascertain from the
defendant his reaction to the
Prosecution's version of the
facts.
Therefore, the Full .Court
directed that in every case, a
Magistrate must take notes in
writing of the evidence or the
facts, whether the case is fought
out or not.
The President of the Court
noted too that where there was
a shortage of books for the tak-
ing of notes, as sometimes hap-
pens, then notes should be re-
corded on the case jacket.
At the hearing of the appeal,
Attorney-at-law, Mr.
Vidyanand Persaud, appeared
for Depaul, while Ms. Shalimar
Hack represented the respon-
dent Police Sgt. 8684 Lloyd


Bisrett.
According to the facts of
the case, the appellant had
pleaded guilty before the Mag-
istrate for committing the of-
fence of assault, contrary to
Section 21 of the Summary Ju-
risdiction (Offences) Act Chap-
ter 8:02, and was sentenced to
a term of imprisonment of six
months, from which he has ap-
pealed.
According to the Chief Jus-
tice who delivered the judge-
ment of the Court, the appellant
had applied to be granted bail
pending the hearing of the ap-
peal but pointed out that it was
decided to hear the appeal in-
stead because it was one which
relates to sentence only, and
which could properly be dealt
with without the Magistrate's
Memorandum of Reasons.
As a result, the appeal was
fixed for hearing on June 9,
1995.
Chief Justice Kennard noted
that a perusal of the case jacket


WANTED






CARAVAN



DRIVER

*MINIMUM THREE (3) YEARS EXPERIENCE
DRIVING CARS AND VANS.
MECHANCIAL EXPERIENCE WILL BE AN ADVANTAGE


SALARY: VERY ATTRACTIVE AND DEPENDING ON EXPERIENCE

Apply in person with written application to:


TWINS MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS
Sa30 IrdustriaJLEswtt, RuimvlvedL-


and the Magistrate's Minute
Book revealed that the only
notes by the Magistrate were
those recorded on the case jacket
and this related only to the plea
of the defendant and the sen-
tence imposed on him.
The Chief Justice went on
to say that there was nothing to
indicate what were the facts re-
lated by the Prosecutor nor the
answer made thereto by the ap-
pellant, if any.
Justice Kennard added:
"This omission flies in the face


of what was said by the Full
Court in Canterbury -v- Joseph
(1964) LRBG 11.
"In that case, the defendant
had pleaded guilty to the of-
fence of unlawful possession of
a bicycle. As in this case, all the
Learned Magistrate had re-
corded were the following:-
Defendant pleads guilty.
Sentenced to 6 months im-
prisonment.

In that case, Justice
Crane, as he then was, said:
"Magistrates are statutorily
enjoined to take notes of evi-
dence in all cases before them,
for it is only by the taking of
proper notes of evidence can the
cause of justice be served on a
review of their decisions in
the Court of Appeal. It is im-
portant to observe that a Mag-
istrate must take notes in every
case, that is to say, whether the
case is fought out or not. 'Evi-
dence' means evidence which is
sworn or unsworn, and includes
facts narrated by the Prosecu-
tor and the statement of a de-
fendant on a plea of guilty.
"This duty cannot be
whittled down by the fact that
the defendant has pleaded guilty
to the charge; it is the effect of
the Ordinance above men-
tioned."


BANK OF GUYANA



The Bank of Guyana is inviting applications from suitably qualified persons to fill
the following vacancies within the Security Division and the Research-
Department.

DRIVER
Applicants are required to bring along the following:
* Written application (in applicant's handwriting)
* Recent Police Clearance
* Two (2) recent testimonials
" Birth Certificate or Passport
* Evidence of academic qualifications
* Valid Driver's Licence
Applicants should have attained a sound secondary education. Preference would be given
to persons who have gained passes at the CXC/GCE examination and possess driving
experience no less than five (5) years.
Benefits include an attractive salary, insurance (group life, medical and personal
accident) coverage and contributory pension scheme.

ECONOMISTS
Minimum Qualification Requirements
* Degree in Economics, Accounting, Banking & Finance OR
Other relevant Diploma or equivalent professional qualification (e.g. in Banking
& Finance, Management, etc.) and at least two years relevant work experience
in a bank or financial institution.
Copies of the job description for these positions could be obtained from the
Human Resources Department of the Bank.
Applications should be submitted no later than Friday March 18. 2005 and addressed
to:
TIlE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT
BANK OF GUYANA, P. 0. BOX 1003,
1 CHURCH STREET & AVENUE OF THE REPUBLIC,
GEORGETOWN.
\W c regret thilat rtpon.ss .ii nod'nthe' ''iflb'll',pl0'6int hib do nuot :iliisfy the, Miniinunit
i t Le '


Reacting to the above,
Kennard said: "What His Lord-
ship was referring to is Sec. 28
(5) of the Summary Jurisdiction
(Procedure) Ordinance; (Now
Act) Chapter 15; (now Chapter
10:02) which provides:-
"The Magistrate, shall, in
every case take notes in writing
of the evidence, or so much
thereof as is material ...."
Referring to the case of
Ghunram -v- Ghunram (1964);
LRBG 320 Chief Justice
Kennard explained:
"Then there is Sec. 28 (2)
of the said Act which reads:-
"If the defendant says he is
guilty and shows no cause or no
sufficient cause, why an Order
should not be made against him,
the Court shall make such Or-
der against him as the justice of
the case requires."
Kennard added: "The com-
bined effort of the above re-
ferred to subsections is that on
the recording of a plea of guilty
the defendant should be asked
by the Magistrate for his reply
to the facts stated by the Pros-
ecutor as recorded by the Mag-
istrate and such reply also re-
corded.
"There can be no short
cut to the laborious task of
(Please turn to page XV)


Sun~day'Chmnicle-March 13, l 3..2005


Page- V






Page VI -SundayChronlcle March 13,2005-


TFYOU fear going to tie tfw f amid going to the den-
S. dentist, you are not f ti4stecasea fansiefyorfear.
Alone. Between mine ASll R tists expect their pa-
.. per cent and 15 per ~et ients to fede s ne degree of
of persons visiting ma pratite apprehensian in the dental
clinic for example, sate th chair and that is quite nor-





GOVERNMENT TECHNICAL INS i U ar
GtUKGtm t OWN, GUYANA
COURSES COMMENCING SEPTEMBER 1, 2005

1. Craft Courses

1.1 Agricultural Mechanics (Full-time or EveliT))
1.2 Bricklaying and Concerting (Fill-timae Eeing))
1.3 Carpentry and Joinery (Full-time or Eyeitirn))..
1.4 Electrical Instillation (Full-time, Day-Release am Eemi.!g)
1.5 Fitting and Machining (Full-time, Day- Retiease and Evaei )
1.6 Motor Mechanics (Full-time, Day- Release or EvTiMig')
1.7 Plumbing (Full-time or Evening)
1.8 Radio and Electronics Servicing iFuli-rr e or E,,eningi
1.9 Refrigeration and Air Conditioning iF.uliumie .or E erringg I
1.10 Welding (Full-time or Evening)

2. Technician Certificate Courses

2.1 Architectural Drawing (Evening Cr-ni,
2.2 Building & Civil Construction Day-Re -ase'
2.3 Electrical Engineering (Day-Release)
2.4 Mechanical Engineering (Day-Release)
2.5 Telecommunications (Evening ONy)

3. Technician Diploma Course

3.1 Building and Civil Engineering ,m' :._ ..ii-:,-,-
3.2 Electrical Engineering (Two years F'uI,.-i.,e.
3.3. ...Mechai cal Engineeri-g (Two year Fu Time'
3.4 ScenceTwvo years Full- ime).

4. Business Education Course

4.1 Ordinary Diploma in Commerce (Two Years Fwl- Tie))
4.2 Secretarial Science Diploma (Two Years FuilT- Tiiri))
4.3 Secretarial Science Certificate (Two Years IE ,ner,,ria
4.4 Ordinary Certificate In Commerce fTac, Years EEmiing)

5. Information Technology Courses

5.1 Diploma in Computer Studies 2 x (Two Years FIl Timne))

Registrations commence February 24th 2005, andl ill ionditde m a ipil 22nd 2)E5.

Entry Requirements

1. Applicants must be at least (15) years old on the 3Ti. .u.gut ''i5b, to be egr'oie to taienr
Full-time Courses and eighteen (18) years d4id by the said date., to atlmde Day Release or
Evening Courses.

2. For Craft Courses, applicants must have sooessMlly iopleted e Sectnlary School
Proficiency Examination Part I and II, or atadiiedi a sornd Seamrany Educatior, most
preferably up to 4th Form.

3. For all other courses, applicants must possess at lease dltee ((3)) sul~et at the G.C.E 'O'
Levels or C.X.C General Proficiency Leve.

S. Khan .
Principal mm.ricam'iewewom


I&LI



B,








maL People with dental anxi-
ety always have a sense of
uneasiness about upcoming
dental appointment. They
may also have exaggerated
worries or fears.
However, dental phobia is a
more serious condition that
leaves people panic-stricken and
terrified and this condition is by
no means normal. People with
dental phobia have an aware-
ness that the fear is totally irra-
tional but are unable to do much
to change this. They exhibit
classic avoidance; that is, they
will do everything possible to
avoid going to the dentist.
People with dental phobia usu-
ally go to the dentist only when
forced to do so by extreme pain.
Other signs of dental pho-
bia include: trouble sleeping the
night before dental exam, feel-
inmgs of nervousness that escalate
while in the dental office wait-
ing room. crying or feeling
physically ill at the very thought
of visiting the dentist, intense or
uneasiness at the thought of, or
actually when objects are placed
in your mouth during the den-
tal appointment or suddenly
feeling like it is difficult to


The Dentist Advises
''*"""" ""i|i:4;la f*l:CH1vltt t:Mil>l}l:


breathe.

WHAT CAUSES DENTAL
PHOBIA AND ANXIETY?
There are many reasons
why some people have dental
phobia and anxiety: Some of the
common reasons include:

Fear of pain. Fear of pain
is a very common reason for
avoiding the dentist. This fear
usually stems from an early
dental experience that was un-
pleasant or painful or from den-
tal "pain and horror" stories
told by others. Thanks to the
many advances in dentistry
made over the years, most of
today's dental procedures are
considerably less painful or even
pain free.
Fear of injections or fear
the injection won't work. Many
people are terrified of needles,
especially when inserted into
their mouth. Beyond this fear,
others fear that the anaesthesia
hasn't yet taken effect or
wasn't a large enough dose to
knock out any pain before the
dental procedure begins.
Fear of anaesthetic side
effects. Some people fear the
potential side effects of anaes-
thesia such as dizziness, feeling
faint, or nausea. Others don't
like the numbness or "fat lip"
associated with local
anaesthetics.
Feelings of helplessness
and loss of control. It's common
for people to feel these emo-
tions considering the situation -
sitting in a dental chair with
your mouth wide open. unable
to see what's going on.
Embarrassment and loss
of personal space. Many


people feel uncomfortable about
the physical closeness of the
dentist to their face. Others
may feel self-conscious about
the appearance of their teeth or
possible mouth odours.
Should I Talk to My Den-
tist About My Dental Phobia?
Absolutely! In fact, if your
dentist doesn't take your fear
seriously, find another dentist.
The key to coping with dental
anxiety is to discuss your fears
with your dentist. Once your
dentist knows what your fears
are, he or she will be better able
to work with you to determine
the best ways to make you less
anxious and more comfortable.
Sometimes the dentist's tech-
nique to have you cooperate
may even include the appear-
ance of his/her being forceful.
If lack of control is one of
your main stressors, actively
participating in a discussion
with your dentist about your
own treatment can ease your
tension. Ask your dentist to ex-
plain what's happening at every
stage of the procedure. This
way you can mentally prepare
for what's to come. Another
helpful strategy is to establish
a signal such as raising your
hand when you want the den-
tist to immediately stop. Use
this signal whenever you are un-
comfortable, need to rinse your
mouth, or simply need to catch
your breath.
You should always bear in
mind that your treatment is
for your benefit and not the
dentist's. The dentist's role is
to help you overcome your
fear as much as possible but
the final decision is always
yours if you are an adult.


INVITATION FOR BIDS

Guyana Water Inc. invites sealed bids from eligible bidders for te






to GWI locations countrywide.
Interested eligible bidders may obtain further information from and inspect the
bidding documents at the office of Guyana Water Inc., 10 Fort Street, Kingston,
Georgetown, Guyana, Ph: 592-225-0471-5, Fax: 592-225-0478.
The bidding document (and additional copies) may be purchased by interested
bidders at the Guyana Water Inc., Cashier, Shelter Belt, Vlissengen Road,
Georgetown, Guyana for a non-refundable fee of $2,000. dollars.
Bidders must submit, as part of the bid, valid Inland Revenue Department and
National Insurance Scheme Compliance Certificates.
The completed bid comprising of one (1) Original and one (1) copy must be
submitted in a sealed envelope which does not in any way identify the bidder and
must be clearly marked on the top, right-hand corner as follows:
Guyana Water Inc. Board Tender Box
Guyana Water Inc.
10 Fort Street, Kingston, Georgetown
Supply of Security Services to GWI location Countrywide
All bids must be placed in the tender box Guyana Water Inc., 10 Fort Street,
Kingston, Georgetown on or before the closing time of 14:00 h, March 29,2005.
Bids will be opened in the presence of the bidders or their representatives who
choose to attend at 14:'00h on 'ilarch2 2, 200$ in the Compary's Training 'Room
(same address as above). ,


_--r


-- -- ----






Sunday Chronicle March 13, 2005


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Suda Croil Ma__~ __rchrm.a~~~-m-~ m 13,-UIU 2005-~ Page I


- ,


lot


I'tN I'" .I "Iilli
the misfortunes
oft' life, the in
stinctive re-
sponses of humankind is to
become depressed and bitter,
to quit, or permit dreams to
be shatters. Doom can reign
for months, years, sometimes
forever.
Not with Camille Goliah-
Basdeo!
When her natural sight was
cut off she retorted with pure
optimism. and confidently
reached for the stars.
"I feel comfortable with
blindness. It never bothered me.
It is not a challenge, just a slight
inconvenience," she told the
Sunday Chronicle recently.
This philosophy has pro-
pelled her to engrave on
Guyana's cultural plaque the
mark of being only the second
calypsonian in the nation's his-
tory to secure two consecutive
victories in the National


1 .1 1 1 t1 1 1r1, i 11 ,. ,- 1 i' ,.1.1 0
tion, in at least the last 15 years.
"I was hoping that I could
do it and I did. But it was still
a shock. 1 was in a daze when
people came and told me where
I was backstage, standing near
a generator. Then it just started
to sink in and I became excited
and began to experience the
usual glow you feel when you
succeed," is how Tempest de-
scribed retaining her National
Calypso crown in the 2005
contest held at Bartica, Region
Seven (Cuyuni/Mazaruni) last
month.
In 1993, Camille, as part of
her breadwinning plan, assumed
the name Tempest and dropped
her career as an Accountant. She
stormed into the music industry
and onto the calypso platform.
This move reflected her family's
love of music. Her father played
the banjo, guitar, mandolin, pi-


- i .i1, i 1 1 11 1 .l , ii i
"He would have us arou ,I
especially on Sundays. It \\ a
happy time," she recalled ol .. ,
childhood.
Her mother was the sin.,
in tile family.
"My mother could sing. I
remember her singing 'Tiny
Blue Transistor Radio' and she
had a little blue transistor radio.
I feel great now when I hear my
songs on radio," she said, add-
ing. "You get a good feeling."
Tempest said, though, that
her greatest inspiration comes
from God.
"I do lots of praying. God
shows me the way and I de-
pend on Him for guidance in ev-
erything that I do." she said.
The accomplished
calypsonian also praised her
mother, siblings and offspring.
"They are supportive of
everything that I do. Their love


In the last five years. Oliver
Michael Basdeo. to whom
Camille has been married for the
past four years, has arranged
her music. According to Tem-
pest. Michael grew up in the
Police Force Band. travelled a
lot, plays the trumpet and the
keyboard, and founded Pete's
Caribbean Fusion. He is also a
musical instructor at the Band
Corps of the Guyana Defeince
Force.


"I fell in love with what I
heard. He is deep and sincere.
Blind people have vision, are
just as talented as persons with
sight. and they can fit well into
society," she said.
She recalled that not having
a song, kept her out of the 1999
contest. Michael encouraged her
to write. Through depression
and tears she pleaded with God
for insight to complete the feat.


The next day she wrote her
2000 competition piece, which
earned her fifth place and stung
her with motivation in the song-
writing endeavour.
"Every year I would ask
my husband what to write
about, and then I would pon-
der on it for some time. This
year he told me to sing about

(Please turn to centre)


A>





GUYANA REVENUE AUTHORITY


NOTICE



RENEWAL OF LICENCES
The public is hereby informed that licences for Motor Vehicles, House Agents, Hucksters,
Betting Shops and other business places will be on sale from Monday 14th March, 2005
at the Licence Revenue Office, located at Smyth & Princes Streets, Georgetown and
Certifying and Regional Offices around the country.

Persons renewing their Motor Vehicle Licences are required to present their Registration
Certificate, Certificate of Fitness, Insurance Certificate and Licence forthe previous year.

Applicants of renewal of Trade Licences should produce their previous year's Licence, proof
of Address and Identification (ID Card or Passport).

A three months' grace period to Monday 13th June, 2005 will be granted. Applicants are
therefore urged to fully utilize the three (3)months' grace period to purchase the relevant
licences.




Khurshid Sattaur
Commissioner-General
Guyana Revenue Authority


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Fax: 225-0956


3/11/2005. 6:38 PM


Camille Goliah-Basdeo


Looking for a
RECONDITIONED
Sl I TOYOTA VEHICLE


Page IX


Sunday Chronicle March 13, 2005


d
' i


" '


4~.:j


HEPESTS


ii







-~ .*--- _-._--_-- -_~~_ -_ -_ '.-'3 -Guyn.-a C


4AF

.-'a671


MACARTHUR


LAWRENCE


1896 1942

by Petamber Persaud

'0 beautiful Guyana
0 my lovely native land
More dear to me than all the world
Thy sga-washed, sun-kissed strand
Or down upon the borders
Looking down upon the deep
The great Atlantic
Blown into a fury or asleep
At morn, at noon or better
In the crimson sunset's glow
I love thee, Oh I love thee.'
Words by Walter MacArthur Lawrence,
music by Valerie Rodway.


READ it again, sing
along, feel the throb
of patriotism. Be
proud of Guyana's
sons and daughters writers
and artistes; be cognisant of
what Guyana's sons and
daughters can be!
Lawrence belonged to a tiny
cluster of poets making up the
Aesthetic movement that upheld
'the epiphany of national pride'.
This movement comprised of a
protracted group of early
Guyanese poets whose work
(sonnets, rondeaux. epics, odes,
and lyrics) lent itself readily to
music. Other such poets whose
work found its way into the na-
tional repertoire of music were
W. Hawley Bryant ("The Song
of Guyana's Children'), Vere T.
Daly ('Hymn for Guyana's Chil-
dren'). and J. W. Chinapenr
(,Arise. Guyanu').
He is also credited with an-
other song, .1 Guyana
Eldorado'. the words of which
were so good that Inore than two
musicians were moved to score
it differently.
Walter MacArthur Lawrence
was born on January 16, 1896
in Georgetown. His father, John
MacArthur Lawrence, was an
accountant and sawmill manager
and his mother, Mary Alice
MacArthur, was the daughter of
a Congregational minister, J. W.
MacArthur.
Lawrence grew up in a soci-
ety governed by pervading reli-
gious influence and of a people
coming to grips with itself two
generations after emancipation
but still under colonial yoke.
This meant that the education
system was coi. pal: .
He attended St. Thomas'
Scots School. The 'Tiger Bay'


Academy' as it was labelled at
that time was headed by the
famously insidious Dan
Sharples who had a "peculiar
predilection for training and
tormenting youth", believing
"that the destruction of the
body was a necessary prelimi-
nary to the reconstruction of
the mind". Parents would
readily sacrifice their chil-
dren to his regimental repu-
tation. And he never failed the
parents and the students never
failed.
Later at Queen's College,
that training stood him in good
,stead. Lawrence now entered a
society with much more free-
dom. freedom if not harnessed
could be a liability. Lawrence
cherished the freedom to think
becoming a disciplined thinker.
Lawrence took this disci-
pline into his writing. A. J.
Seymour remarked that you
could see evidence of Lawrence
painstakingly setting "out on
paper the metrical base, the mu-
sic of the poem he was going to
write, putting down little marks
to indicate the syllables he
wanted to emphasise".
Such a base propelled him
into early fame. In 1920, the
Daily Chronicle published his
first poem, commemorating the
arrival in the colony of H. R. H.
the Prince of Wales.
In 1929, he published
'Meditations' with a subtitle
'Thoughts in the Silence',
solidifying his position on the
landscape of Guyanese
literature. In fact, at this
period, it would seem he ruled
the roost. There were other
versifiers who failed to make
'it to public attention. N. E.
'Cameron in his 'Advenlitres


in the field of Culture' sited
the sad cases of A. R. F.
Webber and S. E, Wills who
died before their respective
collections of poems were
published. Both writers felt
that their collections should
precede their poems been
anthologised (by Cameron)
and not the other way round.
(A word of advice to emerg-
ing writers: market your work
any and every where and at ev-
ery opportunity, the book will
come eventually.)
Two years later, in 1931,
Lawrence produced 'Threnody',
a song of lamentation for his
dead son, exploring trauma as
part ofhis heritage a healing
poem. The following year, 1932,
his 'delightfully nostalgic' poem
'Unreclaimed' was published in
the Chronicle Christmas Annual.
By 1933, H. IR. Harewood.
Editor. of the Chronicle. in his
weekly literary column, 'Ran-
dom Remarks', declared that
Lawrence is 'far and away the
best of our poets today'.
The 1930s was definitely
the most notable of Lawrence's
short life. During this period, his
poetic output was remarkable -
long sentences and very long po-
ems in Greek and Latin tradi-
tions, examples in titles of po-
ems like 'Threnodv', and
'Meromi'. In 'Meromi'.
Lawrence displayed an uncom-
mon gift of telling a story in
verse, minatching Keats' 'Isabella'.
Tennyson's -Princess' and Egbert
Martin's 'Ruth'. Also in
'Meromi', he employed a tech-
nique that has become quitc use-
ful in Caribbean poetry --bor-


," C -.. "'






(From -,. IX)
children. I usually trust his
judgement. He reads the
newspapers and keeps abreast


with current affairs," Tempest
pointed out.
At her husband's urging and
with memories of the times she
enjoyed with her own father,
birthed 'Hand of the Father' a
social commentary spurning the
actions of truant fathers and en-
couraging them to re-assume
their true manhood and author-
ity in the nuclear family.
Tempest, basking in the
glory of her historic win, said
that she will bank her half mil-
lion-dollar prize money and later
ponder its spending. Some of it


rowing and modifying; lie trans-
posed .a local heroine into the
Garden of Eden.
During lhis poetic out)pourin,.
Lawrence found employment at
the New Daily Chronicle. got
married, and started a family be-
cause 'our homes the centre of
our lives should be/Froin them
should spring and rise and radi-
ate/Such solid thoughts that
none should hesitate/On them to
found a State'!
He also found time to
socialise, becoming a founder/
member of the British Guiana
Literary Society headed by N.
E. Cameron. This body included
Peter Ruhomon, S. E. Wills, and
K. H. Cregan among other
known literati of that period.
However, he was unable to give
much more support to such a
society because of his sickly dis-
position which would make him
resort frequently to the
Essequibo for nature cure. There
is another more wholesome rea-
son for Lawrence frequenting
that region. In his poem 'Call of
the Wild'. he claimed 'I am
weary of the city/And its hot
dust-laden air/I am dying in the
mufti/l am here supposed to
wear'!
Dr. Ian McDonald in an
article, 'The Unsteady Flame:
A Short Account of Guyanese
Poetry', interestingly placed
Lawrence in the context of
such a literature. McDonald
posited, "in a strange sort of
half-way post stands Walter
MacArthur Lawrence'"
Lawrence fell between the
(Pl'easeC turn to pasce XVI)


From Amanda Wilson in
London

PICTURE this: a state-
of-the-art venue al
most in darkness. It's
8.30 pm on February
26 in Zimbabwe's capital and
thousands of locals and for-
eigners sit eagerly awaiting
the start of the international
pageant that had created a
buzz since January in the
southern African country.
The quietness is suddenly
shattered with a pre-recorded
greeting: "Welcome to Miss
Tourism World 2005 live from
Zimbabwe." Then loud lively
beats filled the large Harare In-
ternational Conference Centre
and the switch was thrown on
red, blue and white lights.
Eighty-six beautiful young
women from around the world,
flawlessly made-up and dressed
in colorful national costumes
made their way on stage. The
crow d went wild.
Guin an's delegate, Bernice
Ni eoi, \\ ore :' Derek Moore


b s --








most certainly will be spent on
the production of her first al-
bum. which she says will com-
prise calypsos that she has sung
over the years. The album is to
be launched latcr this year.
She is also 'i _. to compete
at an international calypso con-
test for the disabled billed for
Barbados in April.
Tempest extends gratitude
to the management of Ocean
View International Hotel, who
has been sponsoring her
since 2001. She also thanks s
the Guinness Bar, Pete's Car-
ibbean Fusion, Full Range
Record Bar, Munchkin's Bou- 71
tique, Jack's Music House, .,
Juice Power, Nigel Worrell t
and Swansea. (Stacey Bess)


costume, depicting Guyana's
lush Savannah, unrivalled natu-
ral minerals and, of course, the
magnificent Kaieteur Falls. With
no-nonsense strutting, she made
her way to the front of the stage
and the audience showed her
plenty of love.
For the five feet, eight inches
24-year-old city girl, it was a
great start to her first interna-
tional pageant.
"My highest point of the
entire two-week experience in
Zimbabwe is the night of the fi-
nals. It was so exciting.,
I was not nervous be-i ... I
cause the people made juSt
it most comfortable. Of -
course their support bett
was biased because they
had a local queen. but pag9
they were also support- this
ive of all the girls. I was
surprised to hear them" pag
chelicering for all the girls
they thotight looked grOL
good," she told the Sun- the f
day Chronicle after the ,
pageant.
Bernice was in the


WALTER


ORLI


PAGEA



REVlSr


&


'Tempest' on stage.


~ -r~lr~e~pgEllL IM4






Cle March 6, 2005 __


SM
















NT I






FED

'looking-good' group. She got bead
more love when she appeared in of cc
her evening gown. She had tants
donned another Moore creation sign
for that sequence a cleverly cut taini
elegant white dress, accessorised
with silver jewellery. segn
'"That dress was out of this a jul
world. I felt like royalty," in m
Bernice said over tea in the
Sheraton Hotel cafe the morning spen
after the big night. hittii
The former Miss UG also the S
looked fit in tiger print shorts top
and tank top, completed with conte
did my best and this was
the results. I'm definitely
-r prepared for the next
.ant. At first I felt a bit lost,
being my first international
sant, but I got my feet on the
nd firmly before the end of
rst week.'


uyana's delegate at the Miss Tour
World pag


rism
eant


Bern
placing

best
suits.
defin
next
lost.
tiona
on th
end c
Zuzai
queen
Miss
loca
was
Miss
Olyl
Shel
and
respi
dent.
at all
She
caus
intel
Zimt
Bern
TI


this






the







- ls l s.


ted chain and bracelets mad:
iconut shells. All the contes-
s wore the fun-outfit de-
ed by Moore for the enter-
ment piece of the night.
"It was absolute fun for that
aent," she laughed. "It's like
ngle look. That outfit too is
y suitcase."
After the show, Bernice
t a few hours packing before
ng the after party scene at
stars Club, one of Harare's
spots. She and the other
estants danced well into the
next morning in the city
that never sleeps.
Now, she's dressed
for London's harsh
weather. The young
Guyanese is on the morn-
ing flight to Gatwick Air-
port with the rest of the
contestants. Looking
around the posh Sheraton
Hotel, Bernice grinned. "I
will miss this place. espe-
cially my room."
The hotel's foyer is
busy with contestants
checking out 'and saying
goodbye to local friends.
Of course I had to ask
ice hok. she felt about not
ng.
'What ca. 1 say: I didc my
and this was just the re-
." she is serious now. "I'm
itel.y het'cr prepared for 1iie
pageant. At first I Echf l bii
this bei cg my first intcrna-
1 pageant. but I got my-feet
he ground firmly hlefo' tiHc
f the first week.c
Miss Czech 1 .. mbliHc
ana Piutaia .'a is the new
en. Firs< uanner-up was
s Spain Raquel Aonso;
I queen Oslie Muringai
second runner-up, while
s Ukraine Oleksandra
nyk and Miss Nigeria
ley Aghotse were'third
fourth runners-up,
actively.
Oh, she was always confi-
I wasn't surprised she won
. She is a really nice person.
will make a good queen be-
e she has personality and
ligence to promote
babwe's, tourism industry,"
ice said of the queen.
'he aim of the pageant was


to show the world that Zimba- It's being used as a promotional
bwe is a safe place to vacation tool for the country's tourism
and or host international events, industry.

'Everything went smoothly. We had no
problems. No matter where we toured
the people are peaceful and very
hospitable. I was not surprised that
Zimbabwe will host next year's pageant.
It will be even better and Guyana's next
representative will be better prepared
because I will tell her what to expect.
Hopefully, now the world will see the
good side of Zimbabwe.'
Bernice Nichols


"Everything went smoothly.
We had no problems. No matter
where we toured the people are
peaceful and very hospitable. I
was not surprised that Zimba-
bwe will host next year's pag-
eant. It will be even better and
Guyana's next representative
will be better prepared because
I will tell her what to expect.
Hopefully, now the world will
see the good side of Zimbabwe."
Now, the low points in Zim-
babwe. Bernice gave me a
crocked smile.
"I had more good times than
bad time. Actually. I wouldn't
even say bad times. It was just
a bit stressful during the last
week. We practised most of the
day many' times. Your feet ached


the next day, but you had to head
back to practise."
She also became an on-the-
spot travel agent for her home-
land.
"I told everyone about
Guyana's tourism sector. People
mistook us for Ghana so I just
had to make it clear where and
what we have to offer for tour-
ists. Zimbabwe has Victoria Falls
which is great, but we have
something that is just as grand -
the Kaieteur Falls. We just need
to promote our industry inmore."
Bernice spent a few days
in London with family before
returning home. Watch out
for her at upcoming interna-
tional pageants. She has her
eyes on Miss Guyana World.






Sunday Chronicle March 13, 2005


(From page 111)

something more under the surface than what we can see.
"i \\at:it to pitch it as "Desperate llousc\is es meets 'Young
and the Resues'," ,said HannaNs.
in the s 'p, Hannays said that he wanted to explore ilhe
characters, see them relate to adult crises. In the first episode.
titled "Peeping Tom meets the Pussycat'. a man 'the peeping
torn' meeis the object of his voyeuristic desires. What ensues
bet ii'n then is completely unpredictable and thle audience
will learn that the two people, the 'peeping iton' in particular;
are not wihai they seem.
Hannan\ said that he initially had problems casting, particu-
larly because local actors were accustomed to stage as opposed to
being on camera. He finally settled on Je.nifer Thomas, Rajan
Tiwari, Henry Rodnev. Andre Wiltshirc,. Kirk Jardim,. and relative
newcomers Ivelaw Campbell and Becerly Hinds.
He said that the actors have become increasingly comfortable
in front of the cameras now and filming is going along great. Hannays
hopes to air the soap locally. but he also intends to carry it back
with him to Canada. If he can sell the pilot to a Canadian television
station the best bet being one with a minority focus he hopes .to
continue filming here.
Hannays said that there are several advantages shooting a soap
opera in Guyana for Canada but the primary one is the cost factor.
Producing programmes locally is much cheaper than producing them
in Canada.
"With the price [it takes to shoot] one episode in Canada." said
Hannays, "we could shoot an entire series here."
Hannays said that he hopes that this soap if he can
continue with it will lead to the development of better
production standards in local television. He said that it can
also help with his intent to highlight Guyana as a location
both for tourism and filming. He said that the first episode is
shot primarily indoors, but that further episodes would be
shot in exterior locations.
Hannays said he intends to wrap up everything in a month
or so, but before he leaves in April, he would like to host a
workshop either in screenwriting or acting.


AXOLOTLS (WALKING
FISH/WATER DOG)








T his week, let us
look at a very
amazing and inter
testing creature.
O)n firstt sight of this crea-
lureI, mIIn\ oft us might ak the
question \hat is this strange
thing? \An Axolotl, of course!
I'he Axoiotl is a salamn1ualdr and
its stctieutti tic ttaimti iis Ami-
VStolmaine meC\icaILlnm. Thi' l'rr;i-
[itIe is tLituttI e to soltiC AI't.'.is of
Mexico.
Most Axolotls are a dark-
ish ,rav. and some have brown
and white splotches. Axolotls
of various coliours occur ini cap-
tiv\'ity, including gre\. shades of
brown, leucistic (whlitc with
black eyes). golden albino. white
albino, as well as other variet-
ies, such as the melanoid (a
near-black animal). The common
axolotl or, the "wild type", can
be near-black or even creamy in
colour, and anywhere in be-
tween. There are even "piebald"
axolotls in various colours, and
a variety that is piebald in more
thIan one colour, known as tihe
"harlequin".
The name Axolotls origi-
nated from the ancient Aztec
language Nahuatl, Literally, it
means "water dog." although it
can apparently be translated a
number of ways. "Water sprite"
and "water player" are just a
couple. The axolotl takes its
name from Xolotl. the rather di-


FISCAL AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAM (FFMP)
EXECUTING AGENCY: MINISTRY OF FINANCE (MOF)
VACANCY PROGRAM MANAGER

The Government of Guyana (GOG) has recently concluded a Loan Contract # 1551-SF/GY
(US$29.5 million) with the. Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). Part of the proceeds of this Loan
will be applied to the financing of the implementation of the Fiscal and Financial Management Program.
The FFMP consists of three sub-components namely:

(i) Tax Policy and Administration;
(ii) Public Sector Financial Management; and
(iii) Fiscal and Fiduciary Oversight.

The overriding aim of the FFMP is to build effective and sustainable executive and oversight capacities
inthe Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA), the Ministry of Finance (MOF), the National Assembly
(Economic Services Committee (ESC) and Public Accounts Committees (PAC) and the Public
Procurement Commission (PPC). To this end the MOF is required to establish and staff a Program
Coordination Unit (PCU) which in turn is required to establish and staff the PEU at the Guyana Revenue
Authority and National Assembly.

The PCU hereby invites applications from suitably qualified candidates for the position of PROGRAM
MANAGER Subcomponent 1- Guyana Revenue Authority.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ABOVE POST:

1. Masters Degree in Management, Economics, Accounting, Computer Sciences or equivalent
professional qualification;
2. Minimum of Six (6) years experience in the management of financial sector reforms;
3. Minimum of Three (3) years experience in design, execution, review of customs and tax reform
programs and project; and
4. Knowledge of IDB procedures, information technology data bases, project/program management,
capacity building, etc.

Detailed Terms of Reference for the post referred to above may be obtained from:

Confidential Secretary/Administrative Assistant
Fiscal and Financial Management Program
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets, Georgetown
Telephone No. 225-0742

The closing date for all applications is Wednesday 16th March 2005.
S- Government ads can be viewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy


verse Aztec god of games. mon-
strosities, and the dead and res-
urrected.
Another question we might
\atil to ask is \\hat arc thosc
things oln its head? ThFe\' ie
gills.

IUnlike most salannailders,
the Axololl never leaves tltc wi-
ter... as long as it has gills. ait
least. Axoloits are said to hbe
necoicnous: i.e., they can live and
breed in what is really a larval.
lmore or less undeveloped form..
Ordinarily, amphibians undergo
i(metamorphosis iron) egg to
lit\ .a (the tadpole in lrogs is it
lt\ ai. anid finally to dull oit in.
[Cile A\ololt along \\ iitih nam-
her o olother aml phttians. re-
mialns in its liarvat iolm throi L h-
oul its life. I is imel i n tlli t it
retains its gills iaid fins and it
doesn't develop tle protruding
eNes, eyelids and characteristics
ofl other adult salamanders. It
grows much larger than a nor-
matl larval salamander, and it
reaches sexual maturity in this
larval stage. Another term to de-
scribe this state is
"perennibranchiate". Many sala-
manders have gills when they
are very young, but as they ma-


appear. Axolotls are thought to
have evolved from ap bystoma
tirinu. t the tiger salamandesr-
pretty convincing when you
consider that larvaxolotl tiger sala-
manders look so much like baby
axolotls that it's nearly impos-
sible to tell them apart!

RESEARCH
Despitudy due to its angered sta-
tus, the use of the Axolotl as a
laboratory animal should ensure
the species' survival, if only in
captivity. It has long been
known that the Axolotl is a wor-
thy study due to its amazing
healing/regeneration abilities.
Normal wound-healing in ani-
mals occurs through the growth
of scar tissue, and this also
means that most animals won't
re-grow a lost limb. However,


the axololl is fully capable of
complete limb rc-growTh. The
animal has the added scientific
attraction of having especially
large embryos, making it easier
to deal with under laboratory
conditions. Its embryo is also
\cr\ rohust. and can be spliced
and combined with different
pal ts at otlier lx.olotll embryos
iitih : high degLe, c of success.
The AC ololl is 1 fascinating
c 1 tuAlr fo isra nIllmlbher of reasons,
including its grotesque appear-
ance, its ability to regenerate.
The animal is completely
aquatic, and although it does
possess rudimen-
tarV lungs, it SYR. TIT
breathes primarily
through its gills and
to a lesser extent, its
skin.

LIFECYCLES
Axolotls can
breed when they are
about six months '
old. The male axolotl
deposits packets of
his spermn around the tank and
then leads the female over them.
She takes some of the sperm
into her body through an open-
ing called a cloaca. Inside her
body the sperm mixes with her
eggs. In the next day or two, the
female lays her eggs on leaves
of plants or on rocks in the
tank. When they hatch, in about
two week's time. the young
axolotls are about a centimetre
long and look like frog tadpoles
with legs.

FEEDING
Axolotls are carnivores.
which mean they eat meat. e.g.
frogs and small insects. They
find their food by sight and by


scent. Some axolotls will eat
fish food pellets.
There are many mysterious












and equally amazing creatures
and we might not be able to
identify all of them, so feel free
to share your findings with me
on any other amazing creatures,
which you may encounter.

Remember that you
can send your com-
ments, suggestions
and ideas on the
articles to "Our Envi-
ronment," C/o EIT
Division, Environmen-
tal Protection Agency,
IAST Building, UG
Campus, Turkeyen,
Greater Georgetown.


''' 's i V iI^ H i]J :. 11[l.ll ; l [iE

A) PRODUCTION SUPERINTENDENT, Ready Mix Concrete Plant
Minimum Requirements:
Degree or Diploma in Mechanical and/or Electrical Engineering.
o Considerable experience in concrete works.
SAbility to manage a Ready Mix Concrete Plant.
a At least five (5) years relevant work experience in a production
plant.


A



I"
~
N, ''I
~ s"~


ii "I






ii
-ii
5', I
'I,


- i' ,I
'Ii'


B) CARPENTER CONTRACTORS
o Must have at least 10 years experience in building construction,
including carpentry, Masonry and plumbing



HEAVY-DUTY MECHANICS
Good knowledge of Caterpillar machines, engines, transmissions
and hydraulic systems. City and Guilds or equivalent in
mechanics and/or training at a recognized Technical Institute or
Trade School would be a definite advantage. Must have a least
seven (7) years relevant practical experience with a reputable
Industrial Establishment or recognized Workshop.

Applications together with Curriculum Vitae,Police Clearance and
two (2) References should be submitted to reach the:
Human Resource Consultant
STOOLSIE PERSAUD LIMITED
GROUP OF COMPANIES
' B 10-12 Lombard Street, Georgetown.
No later than Monday 21st March, 2005.


Page XII


nDuululln~-a~--urr~~B1S~f9~1-~nsa


Page XII


1. J .


A M A Z''T N G



CREATURES







Sunday Chronicle March 13, 2005


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0


I


Sn n B ii | | offender shall be liable to a fine of one thousand dollars or to
S Imprisonment for nine months."
I -M I II"Our difficulty, however, is that we do not know what
were the facts narrated by the Prosecutor before the Learned
PRIS O N S N T E Magistrate and are, therefore, In no position to determine
for ourselves whether or not the assault complained of is of
P RI S O S EN EN C an aggravated nature and thus justifying the imposition by
the Magistrate of a term of imprisonment of six months.
S U B ST IT U T ED "At one time we were inclined to send the case back for trial
de novo before another Magistrate but declined from doing so for
S BI UDthe reasons that the Courts in the area are held once every quarter,

(From page V) the appellant had been in custody from the date of his conviction
on the 30th May 1955 to today's date, approximately ten days
recording of evidence in any case. A proper note in writ- and that he had admitted in his petition for bail that he had merely
ing must always be taken if the injustice which is patent slapped the victim, which constitutes the elements of the offence
on the record of these proceedings is to be in the future, charged.
"In this case, it is purely a matter of speculation as to "In the circumstances, we would allow the appeal and vary
what were the facts narrated by the Prosecutor to justify the the sentence imposed by the Learned Magistrate by removing the
imposition of a custodial sentence on the appellant. It is to be six months term of imprisonment and substitute therefore a fine of
noted that the Magistrate had imposed a sentence of six months $375 which is the maximum monetary penalty prescribed by law.
of imprisonment when the maximum sentence authorised by In imposing that penalty instead of imprisonment, we bore in
the section under which the applicant was charged is three mind that the appellant is a first offender and had not used any
months imprisonment. weapon, according to the only available evidence.
"It may be that the Learned Magistrate had utilised Sec. The judgement added: "It is important to note that what
22 of the Summary; Jurisdiction; (Offences); Act Chapter 8:02 is important to us in this appeal is what was stated in Court
which provides:- to the Magistrate by both the Prosecuting Officer and the
"Where anyone convicted of an assault upon any appellant at the time of the trial and not what the Magistrate
male child or upon any female, and the assault is in the opinion might state subsequently in his Memorandum of Reasons,
of the Court of such an aggravated nature that it cannot be when, as in this case, there is nothing to aid him to recollect
sufficiently punished under the last preceding section, the what had been stated before him."



Make more money and even..



Be vour own boss


THE EFFECTS


OF


FLOODING


ON THE SOIL
he recent flood
along the
Coastland of
Guyana has im-
pacted tremendously on the
agricultural sector. For some
farmers, agriculture is their
sole source of income gen-
eration for their families. *S
Regrouping their livelihood t
is a colossal task and would
require much endurance and
courage.
One of the most important
lessons learnt during the period ,,^
of catastrophe was related to
the care of our environment, which is an important element in
the sustainability of agriculture. The huge piles of garbage, drain-
age systems clogged with weeds and other obstacles were no-
ticed and are evidence of our irresponsible waste disposal sys-
tems, excessive usage of synthetic fertilisers and other chemi-
cals, which have all contributed to this natural catastrophe.
The aftermath of the disaster is devastating but as the ad-
age goes once there is a will, there is a way'. Many cash crops
and ornamental plants and in some areas, even perennial plants
were unable to survive the harshness of the excessive waters.
During flooded conditions within half day in warm weather
the average concentration of free oxygen drops to near zero.
Convectional mixing transfers oxygen through water standing
above the soil. Rice and many marsh plants can transfer oxy-
gen rapidly through spongy tissues in their stem and roots. Con-
sequently, the top most centimetre or so of the soil remains
aerated. In the aerated zones, nitrate and sulfur remain in their
oxidised forms, and oxidized iron, may colour the soil red. In
the rest of the soil, reductive processes dominate, and the soil
becomes dark coloured or in some cases blue green, the color of
ferrous salts. At this stage, the anaerobic microbes take over.
Restricted to fermentation as their energy source, they decom-
pose organic matter partially so that organic acids, alcohols, car-
bon dioxide, methane and hydrogenaccumulate.
Mineralised nitrogen remains reduced as ammonium,
which becomes a major exchangeable cation. Ammonium
is more mobile than in aerobic soil, because its high con-
centration in solution and high water content allow it to
diffuse,rypidl.
lb ganous and ferrous irins both increase in concemntraton
in thie' sol solutid.n and become imporiant e'\hjrngoeble caltions.
displacing ammonium and otherr ion itnto soluuon and erh.,nc-
irng their sct adlabies- to plants. As iron oxide is reduced and,
dissolved, the phosphate absorbed is released into solution arid
made more available to plants.
During flood conditions, the pH of the soil moves towards
neutrality. If the pH was initially high, it is lowered by car-
bonic acid from trapped carbon dioxide. If the pH was initially
acid, it is raised by denitrification.
Apart from soil pH, flooding also corrects other soil prob-
lems such as: P deficiency, cation deficiencies, water stress and
weed competition. It also allows nitrogen release from organic
matters at C/N rations that would be too high for aerobic soil
and encourages nitrogen fixation by blue green and anaerobic
bacteria. Most crops cannot exploit these benefits because they
cannot maintain an aerobic rhizosphere or are sensitive to anaero-
bic microbiological products.
Clay soils will tend to become more compacted as a result
of flooding. Consequently, it is advisable to add organic ma-
nures to the upper 15 cm of the soil, which will aid in the soil
becoming looser and prevent crusting. Soils that tend to crust
will not allow for good seed germination and entry of water.
It was also noticeable that the earthworm population
was decimated by the flood. Earthworms are important in
many ways. They help to turn organic matters into com-
post and let air into the soil. When,there are lots of earth-,
worms, this shows that the soil is in good condition. It will
be necessary for farmers to reintroduce earthworms into
their farms.


Sunday ronce arc ,


Y"!',l!'\ Cn .s\,.y ',\ v tr t o, ...n \, (", i ', ,\\r .t in,'-,l '.. '.e l \. ,ul( v mu ,, I to 1 1in. i t .. < 1'
the ,skills \ uLI neeCd 1to do it. \o\\ \OLIu can. idu.LIKt WI -)H 1 (Al' t otflQrs aL-1hoimc triinin g th:iI t c(,tn 1i\+
')LIou IIe k i)\\'l\l(d e VOLI Ikvd to i 1mVIkg.t more mIny., get ;i pri" oion, or ()I' 1 etliv" \our o [n oS.
"ltI can ( ',llgiAdK.Ie ICwith \, o 1v'oul I t.,r iln s little is \two Ve..'s, o Vou coU ld t ir \Cin our .t.i .
) il',om~ in Is little t;s six m1or'tIIhs. All colorss .- matrii :uvr \wriTe.n in elcasv. c' L\:Idiy Xl"n li..
,ini, .0,,' ,ii ,,t -i}ti '" ,l > i r It C, u hih 'l i :'.+< ,', o t g .t tl tu t -a i .n , o - Q .
\\' i ,; !1 t \ tn i n ho\ ir i t imi\ mi'i! m o'.!-!l o'o u ,r- !io ri'
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S .... : 4! ;"" 100 g
; I.i., .... :. ^ -^ ea,~ tte;w ,An-~l.W ,(: . ':..- . .- .-. ;

ASSOCIATE IN SPECIALIZED CAREER DIPLOMA COURSES 381 Medical .... and Billing,- NEW
BUSINESS DEGREE PROGRAMS 32 Artist 23 Medical Otfice Assistant
61 Ac-miniln- 158 Auto Body Repair Techm+-'ai 3 9 Medical Tanscr ptcnist
64 1 l .i n :mpuer Science 4 Auto ReDair Technician 27 PC Repair -NEW
I N
60 Business Management 2. Basic Electronics 38 PC Specialist o
406 Criminal Justice- NEW 104 Carpenter 84 Pharmacy Technician
405 Early Childhood Education NEW 59 Catering/Gourmet CookiNa 146 Physica! Therapy Aide
81 Finance 3 Child Day Care Management 151 Plumber
80 Marketing 24 Dental Assistant 13 Professional Secretary .
401 SParalegal Studies NEW 55 Diesel Mechanics 160 Professional Bridal Consultant NEW
ASSOCIATE IN SPECIALIZED 395 Don Obedience/Trainer Instructor 70 Small Business Owner
42 1 ,, 1 I.l & Desion 26 Teacher iAde
TECHNOLOGY DEGREE PROGRAMS -R Electrician 387 Telecomnmunications Technician
63 Civil Engineeing Technology 79 Electronics Tecnnician 35 Tiavel Agent
404 E-Conimerce Administration NEW 400 English: -,. "i.,, & Wlting 87 TVNVCR Repair
65 Electrical Engineering Technology 94 Fitness & Nutditior 7 U.S. High School Diploma
403 Internet Multimedia 30 Floral Design 88 Veterinary Assistant
and Design NEW 145 Home Remodeling & Repan 83 Web Pace Designer
66 Industrial Engineering Technology 5 -.. I F. ., Manatement 22 WildlifeEorestry Conservation
62 Mechanical Engineering Technology 14 HVAC Technician COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
402 Web Programming NEW 12 Intetioi Decorator 8O-PUJaval
1 1 ... i-,ia in BASIC
(;ct Free Infiornation --- Mail Entire Ad loday or ;Fax to -O0-3.i3-8 62. 37 , ,NET
Write the number of tlhe one career that interests Nou. 3G 1 JET
(Pleaso pnal clotlyl
M R / M RS / M ISS .. .. .. ......... .. . ... ... ... . AGE...............
ADDRESS;
CIH Y,'COUNIRY ..P... .. ..... OSTAL CODE .................. ..
P'll OU N F F- M A II m ..C...E -
ACCREDITATIONS AND APPROVALS. i,i,d.linn i ll a.i n ma inu ,, t l i, id, ,.i ,i h.lin , i,,,, ; ,En..qpr,,pi ;' !ACET .
,I tl ; ",-' .P h'Li-lI'-I-ll h 1, -------------------------- ------" "


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Pa-ge-XV





Sunday-hronicle March 13,-2005


$40,000.00 "SHOULD-BE-WON"

CHRONICLE CROSSWORD PUZZLE


WALTER


MACARTHUR


LAWRENCE


1896


NAME-NAME-
ADDRESS- ADDRESS'


ACROSS:
1. Leptospira organisms
have been found in
cattle, horses,
rodentss and
wild animals.
4. Persons with
symptoms suggestive
of Leptospirosis
should a
health care provider.
6. Word used as a
homophone, ie, a
word that is
pronounced in the
same way as another
but spelt in a
different way and
has a different
meaning.
7. Direction.
8. Outbreaks of
Leptospirosis are
usually caused by
exposure to water
contaminated with


the ***** of infected
animals.
12. Male personal
name.
14. is included as a
symptom of
Leptosirosis.
15. South American
country.
16. River on the Left
Bank of the
Essequibo River in
Guyana.
20. Comb. form relating
to the earth.
21. Synonym for the
verb, bother.
22. Acronym for "Water
Closet" (Restroom).
DOWN:
2. Acronym for
"Government
Resolution".
3. Word used as a
homophone.
4. A fact or piece of
evidence used to solve
a crime, or that seems


A new "Should-Be-Won"
puzzle for $40,000.00+ is
now presented to you. Note
well, this Pre-Easter "S-B-
W" competition will be
drawn on Friday, March 18,
2005. The rules for this
competition will remain the
same, except, that where
there is one error, the prize
money is $25,000.00 and for
two errors the prize money
is $15,000.00. If there is
more than one winner the
prize money will be shared
among the winners.


to reveal something.
5. Word used as a
homophone.
7. South Africa (Abbr.)
9. Acronym for
"Research Officer".
10. Direction.
11. Leptospirosis is
by laboratory testing
of a blood or urine
sample.
13. Country on the
African continent.

I-


17. University of Guyana
(Abbr.)
18. "Behold I will do a
*** thing, now it
shall spring forth;
shall ye not know
it? I will even make
A way in the
wilderness and rivers
in the desert".
19. International Olympic
Committee (Abbr.)

*^-*-m-Pn


Bolivia, clue, confirmed, consult, contact, depress,
Deo, diarrhea, disrupt, disturb, dogs, Ecuador, geo, -
GR, IOC, Leo, Mazaruni, NE, new, NW, Nigeria,
pigs, real, reel, RO, Rupununi, SA, SE, sea, see, Seo,
Senegal, Siparuni, Somalia, SW, tale, tail, UG,
urine, Uruguay, validated, vomiting, WC.


you play the greater is the
possibility of winning. The
amount of entries submitted
must be covered by the
relevant sums of money or
they will not be judged.
Then place those entries in
a Chronicle Crossword box
at a location near to you.

If you need coupons just
purchase a copy of the
Sunday or Wednesday
Chronicle. For extra
coupons, purchases can
be made at our offices in
Linden, New Amsterdam
dl Eu / YI LJtVVI Y. %L I I


or Wednesday Chronicle.

Players are reminded that
they need to write legibly for
the judges to understand.
No entry is opened before
12.30 pm on the day the
puzzle is drawn and judging
does not begin before 4.30
pm when the last entry is
opened. The solution to the
puzzle is not known before
that time.

This apart, our general rules
apply.

We continue to be


anU UI eorgeowLUnI I. lU anll
The additional incentives of also obtain extra coupons optimistic that our many
$1,000.00 and $2,000.00 for fr om Mr Vincent fans and residents affected
the, 40+ and 80+ entries Mercurius of D'Edward by the flood situation would
groupings are in effect. Village e, Rosi no n experience quick relief and
Berbice. They cost $20.00 resolution to this crisis.
If you play .smart, .as Mr. each or. $40.00. for, two as ,
;. Ch4pman did. you can win this i teSnaThanrs '- ''
Fff $47UO.O0. r he more avsword ComthNnidt- "
,6ff pf74UU0.....0


1942


(From centre page)
first recorded outpouring of Guyanese poetry consisting the
likes of the 'Colonist', Thomas Don, Egbert Martin also
known as Leo, T. R. F. Elliot, S. E. Wills et al and second
blossoming of poetic expressions after the second world war
comprising of A. J. Seymour, Martin-Carter, Ivan Van
Sertima, Wilson Harris, Wordsworth McAndrew et al.
McDonald closed his exposition this way: "despite
Lawrence's large output and poetic dedication, it does not
seem to me that he is essentially part of modern Guyanese
poetry. His language was too coloured by Wordsworth and
Swinburne; his impulses were still uncomplex and
traditional; his themes even his Guyanese themes were
too impressed by memories of how men and women had
written of the old temperate lands. His roots are deep in
the Victorian context. I believe his is a forerunner not a
part of modern Guyanese poetry".
Which is a significant position to hold for his work could
be found in landmark collections through the ages.
First of which was 'Guianese Poetry' edited by Cameron
in 1931. 'A Treasury of Guyanese Poetry', 'Themes of Song'
and 'Fourteen Guyanese Poems for Children', all edited by
Seymour. 'Sun is a Shapely Fire' edited by Elma Seymour, this
anthology is of great value to researchers in that it provided
biographical sketches of writers sited therein. Of great
importance is the anthology, 'Caribbean Verse' edited by 0. R.
Dathome who placed Lawrence alongside Derek Walcott, Martin
Carter, Eric Roach, Frank Collymore and John Figueroa among
others.
The story surrounding the publication of 'Fourteen
Guyanese Poems for Children' is instructive to emerging local
writers deprived of editorial advice and publishing mechanism.
Seymour who edited that collection said in 1953 teachers at the
Teachers Training College were invited to prepare their own
anthology to use in schools. They also contributed financially
to its printing. It was a most satisfying venture to all concern.
Lawrence died on October 6. 1942. experimenting with
modern verse, shaping his thoughts into a contemporary vogue
but never forsaking the older forms.
'Poet of Guyana', a posthumous collection of his poetry
was published in 1948 by the Daily Chronicle, Main Street,
Georgetown, with an introductory biography by P. H. Daly
who also collected and edited the work.
Lawrence will always be remembered for his masterpieces
'Ode to Kaieteur', 'The Woodlands' and 'Meromi'.
P. H. Daly wrote that Lawrence's last poem, 'Lorelei' siren
of the Rhine, "published about two months after his death, was
a superb swan song, encompassing the congregated experience
of the years."
Lawrence lived a rich life, his work filled with many
influences Victorian, Greek, Latin, Biblical, German, French
and modern. It's a pity he didn't get a few more years to fulfil
his dreams but he died leaving those behind to redeem the years:
'My Guyana, time's unfolding, more and more thy
destiny, to redeem in lasting splendour, all the years had
lost to thee'!
References:
Introductory Biography by P.H. Daly in 'Poet of
Guiana'.
'Introduction to Guyanese Writing' 'Kaie',
December 1971
'The Making of Guyanese Literature' by Seymour
'Sun is a Shapely Fire' edited by Elma Seymour
'The Unsteady Flame: A Short Account of Guyanese
Poetry' by Ian McDonald
uyara hron:olo 1000

pm, m en ii '? contact this au tKfy
te lor .mall:


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SU'6day'h6eiciIed Marchl Y, 2bO5"


Page XVII


7 "Copyrig hted Material




f Syndicated .Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"


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GLOBAL FUND/ GUYANA HIV/AIDS PROJECT
GRANT# GYA-304-G01-H
MINISTRY OF HEALTH
HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT UNIT




Objective:

The Global Fund for the fight against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has approved
funding for the fight against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in Guyana. The objective
of this project is to reduce the spread and impact of HIV/AIDS by reducing the transmission
of HIV, reducing the morbidity and mortality and mitigating the social and economic impact
of the epidemic in Guyana.

Requirement:

Towards this end, the following consultancies are required to develop appropriate
messages, and to disseminate these messages into a format and manner appropriate to
reduce the spread and impact of HIV/AIDS:

Develop and implement behaviour change campaign to reduce stigma and
discrimination related to HIV/AIDS
Develop and implement behaviour change interventions directed to the general
population to increase community involvement in HIV/AIDS prevention
Develop and implement targeted behaviour interventions to increase positive
sexual practices and encourage early STI/HIV diagnosis and treatment among
high risk groups (youth, CSW's, MSMS)
Develop activities to encourage early HIV testing
Expand condom social marketing programme
Implement activities to increase use of quality STI/HIV/AIDS diagnostic and
treatment service

A detailed job. requirement for each consultancy including objectives, characteristics,
selection criteria, list of activities and expected results can be uplifted from:

The Executive Director
Health Sector Development Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Compound
East Street
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel: 226-2425
Fax: 225-6559
Email:mohgog@networksgy.com

Closing date:

All proposals are to be submitted to the address below not later than 09.00 hrs on March
22,2005:

The Chairman
National Board for Procurement and TenderAdministration
Ministry.of Finance
Main and Urquhart Street
Georgetown
Guyana

Proposalswill.be opened shortly thereafter on the same day, March 22,2005.


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M A L D L P E P S D R T E S C L
T I 0 A R A A C S E N O S V O B
B O D I I S I L N E H O T R O S
H
G L E N S C A R L A R C D S T L
R A A C
Y S 01 1 Y E X U C N S R A A C L


T A 00
H N D R


G I
F H


P N
0 S


B N IT U H P
M R I T R H E


L J T S I S I T Y E O E I S R C
K E E C E S W H M N C S Y R B I
B EUNNNN ES AT I EAGA


R R E
C E C W


Y ID
A A U


PA I S
E A T N


D V N R A
S I R D P


B S T T Y R D N W E KG W V E S
A M R S P L S I L H R J E E S S
N E O L A A A R U S N M TA N LI
C P E T D E C H P F T A L I F E


I


\"i -- i, :- I

QUESTION 4s1
I was issued a p4 by NIS to uplift my mother's pension order book to'ca sh
her pension vouchers. .

After I collected the last book and went to NIS to have the p4 updated,
NIS clerk took the p4. I was informed that my mother had changed he ee.-:o
Can I still cash the vouchers in my possession? How can the nominee be
changed without my consultation?

ANSWER
SYou cannot change your mother's vouchers without her approval o a0prova4rpm I
NIS and therefore you should surrender these vouchers in your posses to Ni
or your mother.

The pension belongs to your mother and not to you or anyone else. ',

Your mother has the right to change her nominee as she sees fit. Tsis ..isig n
made by her would first be verified by an NIS Officer to ensure that it is lndfed your'
mother's will to have any change made and to ensure that she is benefiting
from her pension.

Do you have a question on N.I.S ? Then write/ca,.1
NIS MAIL BAG
C/O Ms. Dianne Lewis Baxter .
Publicity and Public Relations Officer (AG) I
National Insurance Scheme
Brickdam and Winter Place
P.O. Box. 101135
Tel: 227-3461
E-mail: prnis@solution2QOO.net...


ABSTINENCE
ADVENT
LENT
ASCENSION/
EASTER
ASH/
WEDNESDAY
BETRAYAL
BLOOD/
.SWEAT
BURIAL/
TOMB
CALENDER


CERTAIN/HYMNS
CHRISTIANS/LOVE
CHURCHES
CRUCIFIX
GOOD/
FRIDAY
HOLY/
WEEK
MID-NIGHT/
MASS
NEW/LIFE
PASSION


PASTOR
PRAYERS/
LORD
PRIEST/
PURPLE
PURGING
SAD/
LOSS
SPECIAL/
SERVICE
STATIONS/CROSS


GUYANA POWER & LIGHT INC.




Guyana Power & Light (GPL) Inc. invites sealed bids from eligible
bidders to conduct the following:

i ctle Of In Concrete Cradle
Ia Power Station Compoumd
cllon Of Concrete Guard Hut
ren-of-Eden, East Bank Demerara
feeding Of Compounds

The schedule of works could be obtained from the office of the Contracts &
Supplies Manager, GPL, 40 Main St. Georgetown.

All bids must be accompanied by valid Certificates of Compliance from the
Inland Revenue Department and the National Insurance Scheme, and
submitted to the address above at 09:00 hours on or before Friday 18 March,
2005.

Bids must contain a proposal for execution of the works, including the
commencement and completion dates.

Bids will be opened at 2:30pm on Friday March 18, 2005 at the same
location in the presence of bidders and, or their representatives.


I


Page XVIII


Sunday Chronicle March 13, 2005






Q.inrlv ChroileMarc 13.2005


THE


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.,,:-.


PROTECTED Irom the flood by a caring owner. 14-Vear-old
'Gorda looking quite disconsolate from her kennel on the
verandah.


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ich.plip nc '.lll .iid tII
.1Ibl7- '1 1 uhljeCtl ie1'.' Ii '
column was started 10
years ago. Cancer. like AIDS I
suppose, is known to every
person: and everybody knows
someone who has had the ail-
ment. On top of that, we hear
how (life-ending) cancer can be.
This deluge of calls and letters
has made me wonder if I have
done the right thing. Have I
stirred up an emotional issue
that is disturbing people? Am I
creating a panic when surely
this was not my intention? Af-
ter much thought I am sure that
it is in the animal's best inter-
est to expose all the aspects of
this disease. I almost wrote
"dreaded" disease. But the
point I wish to bring across is
simply that this ailment need
nt be drei'ded Sure it '::in he
lell. I, buh t in J 'o.- .1- II P rp"

it he uolc t.kh. ii, i'' pl .111.
(I e .ii n .i le C .11fli' i .1
not ine.ni pr'l', n.' ,d ,ull,.nl -
and .in,,.n, C.iicei doe, 1t
nie.in de.iah' In .1 -'iih-.,quenl
colum n. I ill be a[in og .,b,.'ut
ireatirient po ihilihtie, Right
no% let', lo'k i at some of the
geiiL I'.il *.I.t, cancer '- lihi it-
self in I ur pelt
About hlfl' the cal.l:C,
occurring in dog< and L.it, arc
visible a., grov.hs 01 : | :oi, I.-In
ile outer suiface ot ile bhodi'
Ion or beneath ithe kin. n tilhe


110
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Copy righted Materia
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers


CHAMPION


Cookery Corner
Welcome to the 336th edition of
"Champion Cookery Corner", a
weekly feature giving recipes and
tips on cooking in Guyana.


For the next few weeks we will be featuring international recipes that are J p .
part of different nations Easter celebrations, but that can also be enjoyed
any time of the year.
This week we feature the Scandinavian country of Sweden. Most of
the Easter celebrations in Sweden take place during the Holy Week >
preceding Easter Sunday. On Maundy Thursday (or in some regions ,'
Easter Saturday) little girls dress up as Easter Hags: witches wrapped
in aprons and dark shawls with bright red lips and cheeks who travel
from door to door (Halloween-style) handing out handmade pictures in exchange for
sweets. This tradition stems from an old Swedish folk belief that witches were most
powerful and destructive during the Holy Week. Upon its establishment in Sweden, the
Christian church worked hard to rid the country.ofwitches. Come Easter Sunday, after a ,
'r hard'weeafdo'drgiglanW'atli'sf.ifng lttre' tths,' t Ii. pe pl areIeadv
for a large morning meal full of eggs, breads, sweets, and coffee!


I Swedish Easter Nut Cake


2 cups white sugar
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 eggs
iA cup chopped walnuts
2 teaspoons Champion Baking Powder
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 (20 ounce) can crushed pineapple with
juice or freshly crushed pineapple
1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese
1 3/4 cups confectioners' sugar
'2 cup chopped walnuts
/2 cup butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

SPONSORED BY TH

Baking Powder
Custard Powder . F
Black Pepper I


E MAN


DIRECTIONS:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
Grease and flour a 9 x 13 inch baking pan.
In a large bowl, mix flour, sugar, ' cup nuts
and Champion Baking Powder. Add eggs,
pineapple and 2 teaspoons vanilla Beat until
smooth and pour into 9x 13 inch baking pan.
Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 40 to
50 minutes.
For the icing: In a large bowl, cream butter or
margarine, cream cheese, 1 teaspoon vanilla
and confectioners sugar until light and fluffy.
Fold in /2 cup nuts.
Spread icing on hot cake.
VUFACTURERS OF

G Curry Powder
y ..Garam Masala


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Page


'Sunda~v Chronicle March 13, 2005


.,i


perianal area, in the mouth, and
in the breast tissue). Signs that
a tumour can be a cancer are
visible growth. ulceration of the
skin with bleeding, and a sore
which does not heal. One
other sign is a lump or knot
in a place where none should
be (e.g. the breast. If you
observe any of these signs, be
sure to discuss them with your
veterinarian.
Some tumours occur internally
where detection is neither easy nor
obvious until they were quite large.
Early detection of these cancers
rests upon a suspicion that a
symptom caused by some inter-
nal disorder could be due to a
cancer. Since two out of every
three such cancers develop in the
gastrointestinal and reproductive
tracts, you should consider the
possibility of cancer when your


J9"


Please implement
disease preventative
measures (vaccinations,
routine dewormings,
monthly anti-Heartw orm
medication, etc.) and adopt-
a-pet from the GSPCA's
Animal Clinic and Shelter
at Robb Street and Orange
Walk, if you have the
wherewithal to care well for
the animals. Also, find out
more about the Society's
free spay and neutering
programme by Calling:
226-4237.


dog has difficulty eating and digest-
ing his food, or when he has an un-
explained bowel disturbance,
stich as constipation or the pas-
sage of blood. Cancer in the
reproductive tract of females
causes few signs, but you
should 'look for vaginal discharge
and bleeding.
Next week, we will
discuss some of the surface
tumours (a tumour is a
swelling and not
necessarily cancer) like
cysts, warts, papillomas,


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 13, 2005


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4


rT wo months after the floods began, Minister of
Health Dr. Leslie Ramsammy has declared that
the major health danger from the flood is over, but
he and his staff are still vigilant.


"In terms of the health im-
pact of the flood," Dr.
Ramsammy, "we believe that we
have overcome all of the chal-
lenges that have been posed by


Ministry of Health and Ministry of Housing and Water
Removal of Remaining Black Tanks

The Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Housing & Water have been working together to monitor
the quality of water in the flood effected areas.

The static black tanks filled by GWI are no longer required, and Phased Two of the withdrawal of
the tanks along the East Coast will now take place.

All remaining GWI tanks along the East Coast will be withdrawn on Monday 14th March 2005.
Tanks in the Sopia area will also be removed

Customers are advised of the current pumping schedules:

All villages served by GWI along the East Coast are pumping 24 hours a day (subject to downtime
for repair / maintenance), except the following areas

Treatment Plant Villaqes Served Pumping Schedule
Sparendaam Goedverwagting 0500hrs to 2000hrs
Sparendaam,
Piaisance
Better Hope Better Hope 0500uuhrs to 000hr.. &
Atlantic Gardens 1400hrs to 1800hrs
Vyrheids Lust North
Montrose N,.,rth
Mon Repos Belerverwagting 0500hrs LO 1 100rs
Mon Repos Block 8
-. Mon Repos Block CC
Martyr's Ville
Mon Re Reppos Mon Rp h o1:300nrrs to 190ioirir
Good Hope
Lusignan Paslure
Easrvllie
Arnriandale West
S Friendship Friendship 0500hrs to 2000hrs
BuWlon
Vigilance
Strathspey

- The MOH advises all citizens that, to protect the quality of water within the home, the same
.precautions taken with handling and using piped water during the floods should still be followed.
Piped water for personal consumption or food and drink preparation should be either boiled or
disinfected according to the following guidelines;

disinfect a bucket of water by 'adding 1/4 a teaspoon of household bleach, covering and
leaving for 30 minutes
disinfect a 5 gallon bottle by adding 1/2 a teaspoon of household bleach and leaving for 30
minutes
boil for 15 minutes

In particular, take special care not to waste water by not leaving taps open or not fixing leaks.

The removal of black tanks will take place on Monday 14th March Until that lime Water Marshals,
: will remain in place


the flood waters. We've had for
several weeks now, no new
cases of leptospirosis."
During the immediate post-
flood period, over 300,000
people in Georgetown and along
the East Coast Demerara had
been treated with prophylaxti
doxcyclin to guard against lep-
tospirosis infection as officials
tried to stem an outbreak of the
disease. Leptospirosis has been
suspected as the cause of death
in at least twenty of the thirty-
four flood-related fatalities
across the country.
In February, Ramsammy
had commented that while
many Guyanese were preoccu-
pied and worried about lep-
tospirosis, other diseases were
expected to surface such as
pneumonia, tuberculosis and
dengue fever. Today, incidences
of these too seem to have been
held in check.
"We continue," said
Ramsammy. "not to find any
cases of hepatitis B and typhoid
and so on. We do have a few
dengue cases but the numbers
are not different from what we
normally would get after any
rain falls... We have made the
determination that in terms of
health, the situation is under
control."
However, even with the
major health crisis over,
Ramsammy said that his minis-
try is still proceeding with cau-
tion in the administering of its
flood-related public health exer-
cises.
"We are not taking any
chances; the medical teams are
still working, just in case, and


will conunue working for sev-
eral more weeks."
According to Ramsammy,
one area of focus for the outgo-
ing medical teams during that
time will be schools.
"Now that the schools have
reopened," he said, "we have
constituted various medical
teams who will be visiting the
schools. This does not mean
that every school will have a
medical outreach but we will
visit the schools, talk to the
teachers and so on and we will
let them know which is the clos-
est location of a medical team or
a health centre in case they need
help."
Ramsammy said that he
feels the concerted medical out-
reach carried out by the Minis-
try of Health and the various
agencies and international medi-


cal teams helped avert what
could have been a major health
disaster.
"The surveillance team is
now looking at the incidence of
diarrhoea and so on that we did
find and comparing it to what
we would have had if we hadn't
intervened at the time and come
up with the groundwork. We
think at the moment that sev-
eral hundred lives were saved."
He added: "In the case of
leptospirosis, as examples in
India and Indonesia, post-tsu-
nami, are showing we could
have had many, many more
deaths and [cases of] severe
illness, given the widespread
nature of the flooding and
[our] concentrated population;
over 400,000 people were ex-
posed. So I think the early in-
tervention has worked for us."


I.'
,~,..
<~g...'




C

-'V.


1-


Minister of Health Dr Leslie Ramsammy taking medical
supplies to the Enmore medical outreach.


>SECRETARY/



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SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 13,2005 3


lepto


through


one month


of terror

Undoubtedly the biggest health scare in
Guyana for decades was that caused by the
flood related disease, leptospirosis. With the
rains dominating much of the new throughout
January, February became the month of Lepto.


' 4 . If < ', . ..







On February 3, Guyana Chranicle published the
full text of an announcement by Minister of Health, Dr.
Leslie Ramsanmmy in which he stated that:
"There have been reports of deaths due to lep-
tospirosis in the hospitals. Several persons have been
treated for Leptospirosis, based on a high suspicion in-
dex for leptospirosis due to the flooded conditions and
based on clinical presentation (since the symptoms of
Leptospirosis were present)."
Dr. Ramsamnmy stated that the disease was one of
the expected outcomes of the flood and that his Minis-
try was on the watch for all suspected cases. This was
the week during which the word "leptospirosis" first
entered the public lexicon.
According the Chronicle report, the symptoms
present in those persons were also consistent with other
disease conditions. Confirmatory tests are being done
in order to obtain differential diagnosis. Confirmatory
tests were to scheduled to be done at the Caribbean Epi-
demiology Centre (CAREC) in Trinidad and the U.S
Centre for Disease Control (CDC) based in Atlanta.
Georgia.
This treatment doxycycline prophylactic
programme began that day. The prophylactic treatment
was based on the presumption that leptospirosis was
part of the expected clinical conditions associated with
flooding. It included providing a single treatment with
200 mg doxycycline to all persons above eight years
old, excepting pregnant women.
(Please- turn to page four)


Minister Ramsammy consults with PAHO (Guyana) Director
Dr. Bernadette Theodore-Gandi at a joint press conference during
the flood.


Kanhal's Elestrical & Electroni


Store


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and confidence you have placed
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PVC 2 x 1.5 4 x 16mm iR T.P.CB'S MEM 30- 800 Amps. AC/DC Adaptors Oster
Single & Double Wires Cable Transfer Switches 30- 8100 Amps. Electric Door Locks *Iron* Blender Wall
TirTY &. D leixt 1ines lAWire. i n ,.i:P- O ....har Wireless Door Chime *Hair Drver* Juice Extractor Lights


Armoured Cables- all sizes
3 CORE & 4 CORE 2.5mm- 240mm
Spade Clips, Tower Clips &
Contactors- all sizes
Energy Savers- Daylight & Colour
Sodium Vapour Lamps
Emergency 2ft. Fluorescent Fixtures
2ft. & 4ft. Fluorescent Lamps &
Bulbs 110- 240V &
4ft.& 2ft colour tubes
12V Battery Lamps .
Halogen Lamps -,
Mercury Vapour Lamps
Fairy Lights .-. ....m


ar vvWaxer & Polunser
Industrial Motor Starters
Circuit Breakers- all sizes
Switches & Switch Fuses
Drill Kit- Rechargeable & Cordless


Battery Load Tester
Coleman Inverter
Starting Capacitors
Surge Protectors
Load Centres
Transformers
Switch Gears
Lithi


Rotating Antennas
Down Lighters- all sizes
Fans- all types & sizes
Portable P.A System c'.
Duracell Batteries .....,.
12V Small Alarm Batteries
Domestic Tools, Stove Elements
Cordless Telephones & Telephone &
Television Accessories


RUSTOLEUM AND CRC PRODUCTS
CRC SPRAY TYPE, 226-Power Lube, Engine Degreaser,
um Grease, Battery Cleaner, Clear & Red Varnish, Silicone.


Toastmaster
* Mini Food Chopper
* Coffee Grinder
Black & Decker
* Iron *Crock Pot
G.E Telephones **
Proctor Silex -
*Toaster *Oven-Coffee Maker
Hamilton Beach
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Panasonic Recorders


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IL~' ~C~s~L~ ~L~Li`-~B -eQL~IIL~-Ll~lsllDIIs II I I II .~.~ ~.l;n~ h`







4 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 13, 2005


(From page three)

This prophylactic programme
was intended to reducing the
impact of any possible out-
break of Leptospirosis. At the
time, similar surveillance work
was being done with other dis-
eases. but no indication of anyt
unusual and unexpected out-
break had presented itself.
By February 5. Ranmsammy
had reported that more than
80.000 people in Georgetown
and along the East Coast
Demerara had been treated with
medicine to guard against lep-
tospirosis infection. He said
they have been given prophy-
lactic doxycycline capsules and
hundreds were queuing up at the
Georgetown Public Hospital
Corporation (GPHC) for the
treatment as fears of an out-
break of the disease mounted.
Ramsammy had noted that
while many Guyanese were pre-
occupied and worried about lep-
tospirosis, other diseases are ex-
pected to surface soon such as
pneumonia, tuberculosis and
dengue fever. He indicated that
six persons may have died from
the disease and dozens more
appear to have been infected
but the Ministry was awaiting
confirmation from tests of blood
and urine samples sent over-
seas. By this time, the samples


\were already sent to CAREC
and the CDC to determine ift
there waas an outbreak of the
disease here.
Ratnsamnimy said that oni
January 30, four persons were
admitted to the GPHC, based
on an "index of suspicion"
which was extremely high and
indicated that they were in-
fected with the disease. He said
two of the four had died on the
day of admission at the hospi-
tal. while a third died the follow-
ing day. Ranmsamnuy said that
three persons were also admiit-
ted at the St. Joseph's Mercy
Hospital on January 31 and by
the next day, two more died,
He said a sixth person died
at the Woodlands Hospital but
it has not been ascertained that
this was from leptospirosis.
"Our information is scanty
and we are not quite sure in terms
of the categorisation of that petr-
son." he had told reporters.
He said that the post
morteinm results of four of the six
persons added to the index of
suspicion and specimens from
these patients have been sent to
CAREC for further testing.
These were the first noted cases
of leptospirosis infections dur-
ing the flood.
He added that later five
more persons had been admit-
ted at St Joseph's, four of
whom had tested positive for


leptospirosis; and that the Min-
istry was also monitoring six
persons admitted at the Wood-
lands Hospital, two of whom
had tested positive. He said,
too, that one person had tested
positive at Prashad's Hospital
and that person was also doing
well.
He said 48 patients at the
GPHC were being tracked fort
thile disease.
HIe referred to the substantial
health response to thlle flood ri-
sis and noted that there are more
than 350 health outreaches in
the affected districts of
Georgetown and the East Coast
of Demerara.
Ramsammy said fewer than
8% of those treated had diar-
rhoea, although this is a major
outcome of associated with
flooding, adding that this was
because the Health Ministry
took action early.
He said many people took
the ministry's advisories seri-
ously and boiled water and used
bleaches in the water. Rashes,
itches and fungal infections were
the main infections in the wake
of the flood.
Ramsanmmy had told report-
ers that leptospirosis "not a
new disease that has come to
Guyana because of the floods"
but was a bacterial disease that
"has always been here in the
past and we have had occasional


, ,. _
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Coast Demerara




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Block VII, Zone Right Bank

Essequibo River il


Interested persons are asked to submit a written offer addressed to:

The Receiver
c/o RO Box 10631,
.. Georgetown

.' 61 fOi spection2!plMqsec6ta hZel:,Nos: 226 92;4 225.2 'ext 283 or 238.'

: *; ,


cases of lcplospirosis.'"
"We have been prepared."
Raiasaninsy had said. fromoi day
one lor whatever copies ;and
w\'hilst things have been lhapplen-
intg as \\'vc have anticipald. hey
have not been happening in hlie
nIituLtbers \\Ce anticipated."
Dr. BIcriadette Theodore-
Gandi, lead of PAHIO in
Guyana spoke to this paper's
Wendella Davidson aboul the
health situation in Guyana. In
the interview, published in the
Smiutlay Chronticle of February
6, Dr Theodore-Gandi had
noted that preliminary tests
conducted after a surveillance
system was set up., showed
"there is some evidence that
soine cases seen are that of lep-
lospirosis disease."
Noting that PAllO had ex-


pected the disease "to come at
this timee. she said: "VWe now
know through the surveillance
system that leptospirosis is
here through preliminary tests."
Confirmation is, however.
needed and this can only be done
by sending blood cultures to an
overseas laboratory. as Guyana
only has facilities in place to
conduct rapid or preliminary
tests.


well, as they too would have
been exposed to the infection.
In those circumstances, she had
advised, the entire household
needed to seek medical atten-
tion as well.
The Ministry of llHealtlh
had according to Dr. Theodore-
Gandi already moved in that di-
rection and health teams have
visited households where per-
sons had been treated for the
disease.
Dr Theodore-Gandi. during
the interview alluded to the nu-
merous health messages being
put out to sensitise the popu-
lation about the serious health
hazard and what they should do
to prevent contracting lep-
tospirosis or any other water-
borne disease.
On February 8,


Ramsammy reported that six-
teen deaths had been attributed
to leptospirosis and that the
victims are not from any one
particular area. He said five
deaths were due to drowning,
three to gastro-enteritis and one
to a throat condition unrelated
to the floods.
Ramsanmmy said there is
continuous testing of suspected
cases of leptospirosis but this


Dr Theodore-Gandi further is not used as the basis for
pointed out that the disease, treatment, as the bacterial dis-
which is not common among the case has a cluster of symptoms
general population, is an occu- similar to other diseases.
national hazard for persons Once those symptoms ap-
working in sugarcane fields and pear, treatment is administered
cleaners of sewers. Of course, as if it is a leptospirosis case,
with the waters from the flood- he stressed.
ing washing through villages. "The disease mimics several
cane fields and sewers alike the other diseases," he reiterated.
disease was soon set to break He said tests from 81
out into the general population. specimen samples that had
She had advised that under been sent to CAREC, results
the then current conditions, all had confirmed that 16 patients
persons who had to traverse had the disease.
daily through the flood waters He said there was therefore
are clearly at risk, in particular no doubt about an increase in
those with broken skin. The the incidence of leptospirosis
disease, which can be treated but by then some 300,000
once it is diagnosed early, pre- people had received prophylac-
sents itself with flu-like symp- tic (preventive) treatment -
toms such as fever, headache 250,000 through the Health
and the most characteristics of Ministry and about 50,000
all, pain in the calves, through the private medical sec-
She had said that because of tor.
the resemblance to influenza, Dr. Keith Carter son of
persons do not usually take the poet Martin Carter from the
early signs of leptospirosis se- PAHO office in Washington,
riously. had also cautioned that persons
The Ministry of Health had who have returned from the in-
by then already put in place the terior, where malaria is preva-
mechanism to provide medical lent, might have wrongly be-
access and treatment to infected lieve they are suffering from
persons. leptospirosis because of the
Reiterating that once the similarity of symptoms be-
disease is diagnosed early it can, tween the two diseases. Dr.
be treated, Dr. Theodore-Gandi Carter had pointed out that dis-
had further noted that that eases such as leptospirosis are
should someone from a house- .in existence before floods which
, .'holdbe affected by the disease, aired only thde ageits.'of' spread"
h* nthehiothe-members oPth'e same .ng'. y ...theil.. ',. 'K .'. .,
household.are .clearly, gtjisk as .... By, this time,,Kaieteur-News


reporter, Joseph Thomas, also
known as the calypsonian 'Lil
Joe', had become the most famous
of lepto fatalities. Thomas, who
had covered the flood extensively
for hiis paper, was hospitalized -
and later placed in the Intensive
Care Unit after lie took a turn for
the worse; hlie succuinbedto the dis-
ease about a week after lie first be-
catlme symptomatic.
Information Liaison to the
President, Robert Persaud, in a
statement expressed sympathy
to the family and friends of Tho-
mas.
"It is a blow to our local
inedia pool and his death has left
a void," Persaud had said.
Editor of Kaieteur News,
Mr. Adam Harris described
Thomas as one of the few re-
porters on the staff he consid-


ered versatile. Harris said the
death of Thomas has created a
void in the staff pool at Kaieteur
News and the media fraternity
in Guyana.
Joseph was buried on the 4'
of February. with members of
the media including Guyana
Press Association (GPA) Presi-
dent Julia Johnson turning up
along with family and friends to
pay their last respects.
"The media fraternity in
Guyana is relatively small,"
Johnson had said, "so every loss
is felt and understood. We hurt
when death strikes in our midst.
We are shocked, we are stunned.
Because of the size of the media
corps, we tend to know every-
one. A death is like a loss of a
family member. Joseph Thomas
was a member of that fraternity,"
By February 28, the situa-
tion had begun to abate and
Ramsammy had hailed the over-
whelming response to the flood
disaster as "a truly Guyanese
effort" but said that the health
response must continue to avert
dangers.
He noted Friday that sup-
port from the private sector.
non-governmental organizations
and international agencies was
vital in providing relief for the
flood victims.
He cautioned that the health
response must continue for sev-
eral months as "many dangers
are lurking out there".
His warning came at the
presentation to his ministry of
medical supplies from the
Georgetown Chamber of Com-
merce and Industry (GCCI)
and the Canadian-based
Guyana Relief Committee to
boost the post-flood dean-up
exercise and medical response.
Ramsammy pointed out that
' international, agbtsies had
anded ihe'144al response to
the flood relief efforts.


Persons receiving the Doxy pill at the Georgetown Public Hospital.






SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 13, 2005


TOYOT


Chinese medical team at Goedverwagting. Medical teams from Guyana's international
friends proved invaluable in combatting the spread of diseases during the flood.


An East Coast man disposes of an animal carcass during the flood.
threatened to pose a major health hazard.


Dead animals


A Cuban doctor attends to a patient at the Industry Health Centre. Cuba was one of the
countries that sent medical teams to Guyana.


A pile-up of rubbish at Buxton. Another potential health hazard.


TWQ; 'AYSEMDU CATIQN

Jm M Ss BN'10Ni



DATE: 27th & 28th April, 2005
VENUE: NIS Roof Garden (Brickdam & Winter Place)
COST: Free
Limited Space Available
DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION Wednesday,20th April, 2005


N.B. Participants are awarded certificates
completion of training session.


on


Registration forms available from the Publicity and
Public Relations Unit NIS, Brickdam,;
*. : .*, -*'*:-,^^'.


Simone Roopnarine of D. Singh and Sons presents some tablets to Minister of Health
Dr. Leslie Ramsammy. Many, local companies helped in relief efforts by donating or
procuring drugs to assist the Ministry of Health in dealing with public health problems
arising from the flood.: , ,, .


i1---





SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 13. 2005


-I


SSterling improves


, 1, Mighty Foam for


,rj4 j ,| flood cleanup
. ... .. .. .......:, a ,V I _' :?


MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS AND COMMUNICATIONS
WIGHT'S LANE, KINGSTON
GEORGETOWN

FOR SALE BY TENDER

Tenders are invited for the Purchase of the following vehicles etc.

1. One Nissan Patrol PCC 9844
2. One Cherokee Jeep PCC 7755
3. One Honda Motor Car PCC 8953
4. One Land Rover POD 6746
5. One Suzuki Samufai PEE 5443
6. One Air Cooler Engine -
7. One Fuel Tank -

Vehicle one (1) can be inspected at the Ministry of Public Works and Communications work
shop compound Water'Street, Kingston.

Vehicle two (2) and four (4) can be inspected at the Ministry of Pu lic Works and
Communications compound Wight's Lane.

Vehicle three (3) canr be inspcted at the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority compound, 82
Premniranjan Place, Prashad Nagar, Greater Georgetown.

Vehicle five (5) can be inspected at the Ministry of Public Works and Communication
Compound, Sea Defence Office, Project Executing Unit, Mud Lot Water Street, Kingston.

Items six (6) and seven (7) can be inspected at the Ministry of Public Works and
Communications compound at Fort Street, Kingston. Inspection of articles can be done on
Monday to Friday between working hours 08:00hrs to 16:00 hrs.

Tenders must be addressed to the: "

Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Public Works and Communications
Wight's Lane Kingston,
Georgetown

-And placed in the Tender Box on or before 9:00 hrs on 31st March, 2005

Tender must be marked "TENDER FOR UNSERVICEABLE VEHICLE, ETC" on the right
hand of the envelope.

The Ministry reserves the right to reject any tender without giving a reason.
Government ads can be viewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy


Sterling Products Limited
General Manager Ramsay
Ali, left, hands over a pail
of the specially formulated
Mighty Foam to Chairman
of the Civil Defence
Commission Colonel
Chabilal Ramsarup. The
new detergent was
created specifically for the
post flood clean up efforts.


Sterling Products Limited
iSPLi has developed a ne-w
cleaning agent to enhance
cleaning efforts during the
ne\l pha.e iof the flood recov-
ern effort: the cleaning up .
.-\:,hlrin o [f a rre .iaie frorn
SPL the o'nip.,n h. ",d,Jded
pine Uill it ii. p I'p l. ii i in
l ii L -II'' iII 0 .n,.il r..1crI
rt el.i [l Il priJd. i, Pine Inll
[ '. .1 % -1 lilt ,li _-,'.l il'.ul l in n l.til%
1 1u,.h. II I lr ll'l d III 0 .II11 1, 0 d -'. k
., ,i pure' Ljt i-, ancI lu- 11, JIit d -
il-ri'C .IIIn pr n.i.pi l Iic,
SPL CGeit.i.il Man.jr er.
R nj.:,'_l, -ll .aid thai thc jddi-
nli.ri .t pin, <,il h, Mrh ht;. Fojnm
iN n,,l .1 piart of the u ual lor-
nilullion; for the Jdeiereni but
I' .1 Jdrc t re'ponl.e [o the clean-
ing;, chjllen n,. pres-nte, b',
receding flood waters.
According to the release,
"Mighty Foam with Pine Oil is
an economical, fast-acting, mul-
tipurpose cleaning agent de-
signed to safely and effectively
remove dirt and muck left be-
hind by the receding flood wa-
ters. This product is tough on
Dirt, Bacteria and Odours as it
cleans, disinfects and
deodorises. When cleaning tasks
are completed the pine oil will
leave a fresh pine fragrance that.
will linger to provide residual'


deodorizing protection.
Ali recently\ handed ower,
100 pails of the improved de-
tergent to Colonel Chabilall
Ram.arup. Chairman of the
Ci'. l Defence Comninis'ion
(CDCi at the CDC Headquar-
ter' in Thomrna Land'. The SPL
c.ec|UImIe ,aid ihat etero'nc i,
c',n crn'd.i boul[ t inl[IulnIrr ithe
spreadd wIt dieae a.nd efll:cctl
clcanini i' Ione _infmlicinti ornm-
prnent in returning t. heaill.:,
CondlIllOili
Colonel R:m-.irup. on re-
Lelin- the' don'aioni s.' d the
product 'ill be put t' Uliumled,-
ite use M nce the CDC s clean up
ha_ already% begun trn man, area
Raumi'arup :ud th.t the pr,:'dui
shouldd pro%'e e.pecikll, u.eftul in
the cleAning up ot ichooi
In addition it the donatinorn
to the CDC and ,iher ja.gncte:
working in flood hit areas, SPL
will make some quantities avail-
able for sale to individuals and
organizations for their specific
clean up efforts.
In the earlier stages of
the flood response SPL do-
nated margarine to several
organizations to be included.
in food hampers. In addition,
Bakers Pride shortening was
donated to bakeries that sup-
plied bread for shelters and
other forms of free distribu-
tion.


LINDEN ECONOMIC ADVANCEMENT PROGRAMME

S(EAP)

INVITATION TO TENDER

The Government of Guyana (GOG) with the support of the European Union has allocated funds
towards the cost of rehabilitation of portion ofthe Moblissa Road for theresidents at Moblissa and
farmers of Region 10. The Moblissa Road is located approximately six (6) miles from Linden and is
east of the Soesdyke/Linden Highway. It is intended that a portion of these funds will be used for
eligible payments under the Contract for which this Invitation to Tender is issued.
The Project is being implemented by LEAP (Project 8APC GUA009)
LEAP now invites Contractors with the relevant experience to tender for the rehabilitation of the
Moblissa Road.
As of Thursday March 24,;2005, Tender Documents may be uplifted at the LEAP Office at Casaurina
Drive, Mackenzie, Linden for a non- refundable fee of five thousand dollars ($5,000)
The works will include:
I. Filling of potholes and depressions along the, existing, road during the rehabilitation
of a fair-weather road.
II. Transporting, placing, shaping and compacting latente as the wearing course for the road
surface.
Tenderers are required to submit three (3)sets of the Tender (ne original and two copies)
Acompulsory site visit will be held on Wednesday March 30" 2004 at 10:00 hrs
All tenders must be addressed to:
Linden EconomnicAdvancement Programme
Thru The Central Tender Board
Ministry of Finance
Main &Urquhart Sts.
Georgetown
And deposited in the Tender Box at the Central Tender Board on or before Tuesday April26"', 2005
at 9:00 hrs
Tenders must be clearly marked at the top left hand corner, "TENDER FOR REHABILITATION OF
MOBLISSA ROAD" and at the top right hand comer "DO NOT OPEN BEFORE APRIL 12th, 2005 AT
9:00 hours"
Tenders will be opened in the presence of those Tenderers or their authorized representatives who
choose to attend at 9:00 hours on Tuesday April 12", 2005 at the Central Tender Board.
LEAP is not obligated to accept the lowest or any Tender







11' SINACHUIL Mac IO5


Le to's deadlier


While lepto fever in both -actually a group of viruses
the literal and figurative has been around for centu-
sense of the term -swept over ries, possibly millennia, its
Guyana, leptospirosis has a most deadly manifestation,
far more dangerous counter- Hantavirus pulmonary syn-
part, hanta, which is shared drome (HPS) was only dis-
by the same vector (carrier covered in 1993 in the United
animal), rodentsWhile hanta States.


Hanta


Like lepto, hanta is a disease
transmitted by infected rodents
through urine, droppings, or sa-
liva. But while leptospirosis in-
fection comes primarily through
contaminated water, HPS has a
far more fearsome way of get-
ting around: aerosolisation.


Aerosolisation occurs when
the virus gets carried into the air
through, for example, by wind
picking up dry, powderised rat
droppings which can then be
breathed in by humans. Like
lepto, hanta and here we will
deal primarily with HPS at-
tacks the human body quickly.
HPS is characterized by fever,
chills and muscle aches, followed
by the abrupt onset of respira-
tory distress and shortness of
breath. The muscle aches are se-
vere, involving the thighs, hips,
back and sometimes the shoul-
der. Other symptoms include
nausea, vomiting, and abdominal
pain.
How safe are we here in
Guyana from HPS? Accord-
ing to PAHO's disaster manage-
ment website, www.disaster-
info.net, one of the principal
diseases that should be of con-
cern to Caribbean countries dur-
ing the time of flood is hanta.


While 'HPS was discovered in
the U.S., the disease has been
detected all over the world, from
Asia .Where tamer hanta-re-
lated diseases have been known
for centuries to South
America, the most notable out-
breaks occurring during Argen-
tina in the mid-nineties.
To get a sense of how
quickly HPS travels and how
infectious it can be, we can trace
one outbreak which started in
the Argentinean town of El
Bols6n a small town in the
province of Rio Negro, near the
Andean foothills.
On September 22, 1996 a
man let's call him Pedro fell
ill with HPS. Critical patients
from El Bolson were usually
transferred to the larger town of
Bariloche, some 150 kilometres
away for treatment.
Twenty-one and 20 days,
respectively, after Pedro became
ill with HPS symptoms, his 70-
year-old mother, Elena and one
of the doctors who had treated
him. Dr. Sanchez contracted the
disease.
Dr. Sanchez was subse-
quently died. The doctor's
spouse, also a doctor, became ill
with HPS 27 days after her


husband's first symptoms. 19
days after his death. She trav-
eled to Buenos Aires for media
cal care. In a Buenos Aires hos-
pital, an admitting doctor spent
one hour taking a clinical history
and 6eamining her. That doctor
- w hose only other contact with
Dr. Sanchez's \ife occurred 2
days later %vhile briefly visit-
ing the hospital's intensive care
unit to attend to another patient
- becamnie ill with HPSS twenty-
four days later.
Another doctor at the
Buenos Aires Hospital,. a friend
of the Sanchez' who had at-
tended Dr. Sanchez's funeral be-
came ill. This outbreak of HPS
spread from the initial carrier
Pedro to 20 people, within the
course of two months; doctors,
their housekeepers, traveling
companions. Before the situa-
tion was arrested half of those
persons had died.
What remains peculiar
about that outbreak as weJl
as several others during a pe-
riod of about three years is
that the virus traveled from
person to person without any
blood contact or open wounds
as leptospirosis would have
needed to. Additionally, in-
vestigations proved that there
were no significant popula-
tions of the vector, rats, in all
the locations where the dis-
ease hit. The only common
link was the original patient,
Pedro.


Like with leptospirosis, rats are the main carriers of hanta.



GUYANA POST OFFICE CORPORATION



INVITATION TO TENDER





Tenders are invited from eligible contractors for the construction of
a POST OFFICE AT MELANIE DAMISHANA, EAST COAST
DEMERARA.

Copies of the tender documents can be purchased from the Office
of the Postmaster General for a non-refundable fee of three
thousand dollars ($3,000).

Tenders must be enclosed in a sealed envelope bearing no identity
of the Tenderer on the outside.
The envelopes must be clearly marked on the outside,
"TENDER FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF MELANIE
DAMISHANA POST OFFICE"

A valid certificate of compliance from the Commissioner General,
Guyana Revenue Authority and Certification of National Insurance
must be submitted with each tender.

Tenders mustbe addressed to.-':
., ;The Postmaster General
G.P.O. Building,
Robb Street.
Georgetown.
and deposited in the Tender Box located in the Office of the
Postmaster General, G.P.O. Building, Robb Street, Georgetown no
later than 10:00 hours on 8"tApril, 2005

..


GRACE, KENNEDY REMITTANCE SERVICES (GUYANA) LTD.
Seeks to recruit suitably qualified can(lidalcs lor hile position of:


ACCOUNTS ASSISTANT
Reporting to the Chief Accountant, Payment Services, the Accounts Assistant
will have some responsibility for the execution of all financial information
for Payment Services through an effective system of riport. and controls.
The successful candidate will be required to support the qtrategiic
planning and implementation process and implement information
systems in an effort to automate various functioil aiin proce4c's related
to the accounting and financial reporting.


Candidate should possess:
* Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting/Finance or comlletedtACCA level 11
* At least five (5) years working experience in an .Lco'ur'lmin environment, with
three (3) years at a supervisory management level.
* Accounting experience in a.financial service company.
* Decision making and problem solving skills, and have ,t ony ianal, ic.al financial
skills.
* A high level of personal initiative, integrity and r.initiiin:il kilkll ,
* A strong customer orientation and the ability to work asa :teait.
* Excellent communication, sociall and interpersonal il .
* Have a keen sense of responsibility and confidentiality. :vnd a in iicui uii,
approach to work.
* Proficiency in MS Office applications and .,mlindi'i ....'ntLinL' 'ofwvare.
* Working knowledge of Platinum Accounting software is: ai -,ct
* Must be self-motivated.

Qualified applicants are invited to submit their resumes in con fidedike by
Thursday, March 24th. 2004 to:

The Human Resources Man,.iei
"Accounts Assistant"
Grace, Kennedy Remittance Sei ices Lt1d.
19C \vulei Sticel
Georgetown
Fax: 227-5137
e-mail: ca.riili.' liladri.i'vkel I con

Only those candidates who have been short-listed will be contacted.


FiE600 DISASTER REVIEWf~


suMPAY-CHeRmwr [CL E Mdr bh TgO-2j0







SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 13. 2005 it'


Some post-flood cleaning up tips


With the last of the flood wa-
ters receding, and many per-
sons especially along the


East Coast of Demerara still
engaged in cleanup mea-
sures, proper precaution


needs to be taken when han-
dling food and food utensils.
The following list of proper


Government of Guyana/Inter American Development Bank
Urban Development Programme
LO- No.1021/SF-GY

Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development


NEW VALUATION DIVISION

The Government of Guyana through the Urban Development Programme of the Ministry
of Local Government and Regional Development is executing a Loan from the IDB which
is aimed at enhancing the capacities of the Urban Centres in Guyana to improve and
sustain the delivery of services to their citizens. The Project is funded by the Government
of Guyana and the Inter-American Development Bank. Under this programme the
Valuation Division of the Ministry of Finance will be restructured and strengthened. The
Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development is now inviting qualified
persons to apply for the following positions:

Chief Valuation Specialist (1)

Vacancy exists for one (1) Chief Valuation Specialist to work with the Change
Management Committee and the Valuation Division during the transition of the Tax
Reform Component of the Project Execution Unit to the Valuation Division of the Ministry
of Finance.

Qualifications and Experience:

The successful candidate must have attained the level of a Fellow through the direct
membership examination of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors; or holds a
Diploma or BSc. Degree in Estate Management or related fields from a recognized
university or college, together with Fellowship of the Royal Institution of Chartered
Surveyors; or other equivalent qualification in related fields, certification and membership
of appraisal organizations such as the International Association of Assessing Officers,
The American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers, the Society of Real Estate Appraisers,
Appraisal Institute of Canada, American Society of Appraisers, plus at least twelve (12)
years post-graduate experience in a managerial capacity.

The position also requires strong public relations, excellent communication (written &
oral), organizational, and management skills. Knowledge in Computer Assisted Mass
Appraisal (CAMA), computer literacy and knowledge of different office environment
software packages would be a distinct advantage..


Assistant Valuation Officers (2)

Two vacancies exist for energetic and team oriented individuals to work with the Change
Management Team and the Valuation Division of the Tax Reform Component of the PEU
to the Valuation Division of the Ministry of Finance.

Qualifications and Experience:

Successful candidates must have as a minimum a Diploma in Architecture, Civil
Engineering or other related fields, at least two (2) years relevant experience in real
property assessment practice.

This position also, requires excellent interpersonal, communication (written and oral),
organizational, and management skills; in addition a high level of computer literacy
including knowledge of different office environment software packages would be distinct
advantage.

Competitive compensation packages would be offered for these positions.

Further information can be obtained from the Project Coordinator, Urban Development
Programme on telephone # 592-225-2062, email: UDP @ networksgy.com.

Applications along with a detail resume, clearly identifying the position sought, should be
sent to the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Local Government and Regional
Development, Fort Street, Kingston, Georgetown, Guyana by March 24, 2005.
Applications can also, be sent by email to UDP@networksgy.com.


Ganga Persaud
Permanent Secretary
MLG&RD
Government ads can be viewed on http://www gina gov.gy


cleaning measures should be
helpful in ensuring that your
family stays healthy.

1. Ensure that utensils used
for food preparation are
clean and safe. In the
event that they have
made contact with flood-
water:
a. Wash all items in strong de-
tergent solution, brush clean
and rinse in hot water.
b. Glass, porcelain, china and
plastic should be immersed
in a hot, 10% chlorine
bleach solution.
c. Silverware and metal pot
and pans should be boiled
for 10 minutes. Utensils
should be air-dried.
d. Soft, porous plastic and
wooden items, inundated
by floodwater should be
discarded.
e. Storage areas such as cup-
boards that have been ex-
posed to floodwater should
be sanitized with bleach so-
lution before dishes are re-
stored to them.
2. The following food items
should be discarded if
they have come into con-
tact with floodwater:
a. Fresh produce, meat, poul-
try, fish, eggs,
b. Food in open containers
and packages,
c. Submerged, unopened glass
jars that have cardboard lid
liners, or
d. Home canned jars with bro-
ken seals,
e. All food in cardboard
boxes, paper, foil, cello-
phane or cloth,
f. All food in canisters e.g.
spices and staples such as
sugar, and cans that are
dented, leaking, bulging or
rusting
3. Food in cans and glass
jars can be used if these
storage vessels are first
sanitized by:
a. Marking the contents with
indelible ink then removing
labels,
b. Washing and scrubbing ves-
sels with a brush in strong
detergent solution,

". /


I.,I': ,,: 1,1,,



air-dried before opening
4. Citrus fruit should be
washed and sanitized in
a light bleach solution,
and peeled before con-
sumption.
5. Peas, beans, tomatoes,
peppers etc., should be
washed, then soaked in
weak bleach solution (as
described above), then
cooked thoroughly prior to
consumption.
6. Mature root crops e.g. car-
rots and potatoes may be
consumed after they have
been sanitized, peeled and
cooked.
7. Leafy greens such as let-
tuce, spinach, cabbage and
soft berries must be dis-
carded due to difficulty
with removal of silt.
8. Raw fruits and vegetables
should not be consumed,
even if they have been sani-
tized.
9. Discard the following fro-
zen or refrigerated items if
they have been warmed
above 40 degrees F for
more than 2 hours: meats,
seafood, milk, soft cheeses,
eggs, and prepared food.
10. Discard food items that
that have grown mould,
have an unusual odour or an
unusual appearance.
11. Refreeze food that is
wholly or partially frozen.
12. Uncooked meat, fish or
poultry that has been com-
pletely thawed may be re-
frozen if there is no off
odour.
13. Thawed but cold juices,
baked goods and dairy
items may be refrozen.
14. Frozen vegetables that have
been thawed to the point
that ice crystals have
melted, should not be refro-
zen, but cooked and con-
sumed if there is no off
odour.
15. Combination dishes e.g.
stews, should be discarded.
16. Where possible, use simple
field kits to determine food
safety such as phosphate
determination kits.
17. Food should be cooked
thoroughly to temperatures
of at least 70 degrees C,
particularly animal prod-
ucts. For spot checks at


-'.^ '..


h .I, 1 I. I, .
1 I i ,I I i ,iitlld
, I I r -
pared, while the food is still
hot. before bacterial prolif-
eration that will occur at
room temperature.
19. Ensure that food that is not
consumed right away
(stored for more than four
or five hours) is either kept
hot (at or above 60 degrees
C) or cold (at or below 10
degrees C).
20. Large quantities of warm
food should not be stored
in the refrigerator given the
possibility that the core
would not reach tempera-
tures below 10 degrees C
and that can lead to bacte-
rial proliferation.
21. If food is to be reheated, it
should be ensured that all
parts of the food should
reach temperatures of at
least 70 degrees C.
22. To eliminate the possibility
of cross contamination, raw
and cooked foods should
never come into contact
with each other. Utensils
used with raw food should
also not be used with
cooked food before washing
thoroughly. Hands should
be thoroughly washed as
well after handling raw food
and before handling cooked
food.
23. It should also be ensured
that food handlers wash
their hands frequently dur-
ing food preparation, after
every interruption and be-
fore handling different
types of foods.
24. Food handles with wounds
on their hands should have
it bandaged securely.
25. Ensure that the food prepa-
ration area is free of animals
such as pet cats, dogs, birds
etc.
26. Ensure that all spills and
crumbs are immediately
cleaned up because they
can harbour microorgan-
isms. Surfaces should be
cleaned frequently, includ-
ing floors. Cloths used to
clean surfaces should be
changed frequently and
boiled. Those used on the
floors should be washed as
well.
(Source, www.disaster-info.net,
a PAHO-run disaster manage-


rV


A medical outreach doctor checks a young patient's heart-rate. Failure to take adequate
cleanup measures can lead to a greater risk of falling ill.




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