Title: Guyana chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00008
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Alternate Title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown Guyana
Publication Date: March 6, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088915
Volume ID: VID00008
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text
The Chronicle is at http:/www.guyanachionicle.crm


* 4


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Available from Commercial News Providers"
L ydcte otn


ARGETS


President
in Berbice


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Page 14


GETTING A FEEL: Deputy Police Commissioner E.
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Bharrat Jagdeo in Angoy's Avenue yesterday afternoon.
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2 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


By Renu Raghubir
PRESIDENT Bharrat Jagdeo
was disappointed after travel-
ling 15 miles from the city to
Paradise, East Coast
Demerara, only to find the
school there tightly shut.
As part of a scheduled tour
of flood-hit schools Thursday
afternoon, he went to the Para-
dise Primary School but found
the doors and windows closed
and no one to greet him.
The President. accompanied
by Minister of Education. Dr
Henry Jeffrey and members of
the media, entered the compound
as the gate was open, expecting
to be greeted by officials of the
Region Four (Demerara/Mahaica)
administration and teachers.
To everyone's surprise,
there was no one there.
Mr Jagdeo told reporters
that regional officials had ad-


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vised him they were going to
await his arrival.
"They said they were going
to be here but they are not and
I wanted to come to this school
in particular because this was
the largest shelter (for flood vic-
tims) but now we can't get in."
The President said he could
not understand why the school
was not reopened since Mon-
day as the compound seemed to
be in good condition and, from
the outer appearance of the
school, everything looked intact.
"I came out to see for my-
self why so many schools were
still not reopened. I wanted to
see what was the
situation...schools should not
have taken so long after the wa-
ters receded to open," he said.


By Terrence Boston


THE decline of the once
booming beef industry in


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The contingent then exited
the empty school compound
and headed to St. Paul's Primary
school in Plaisance, also on the
East Coast Demerara, where the
President met teachers and the
few students who were present.
Mr Jagdeo was shocked
when Rodwell Lewis, a teacher
at the school, said he was asked
by regional officials to use his
money to pay for water for
clean up efforts.
"No teacher should spend a
cent from their pocket to pay for
these things. I will ensure that
you get your money back...this
is the government's responsibil-
ity," the President said.
He instructed Minister Jef-
frey to invite head teachers from
all the affected schools and find


Rupununi, Region Nine (Up-
per Takutu/Upper Essequibo)
during the early 1970s influ-
enced farmers of the region
to intensify efforts on cash
crop farming.
Peanuts, which grow.easily
on the sandy loam soils of the
Rupununi, had become the new
industry and leading money
earner for r residents there.
For more than three de-
cades, the bulk of the Rupununi
peanuts were being produced on
the rich soils round at the loot
hills of a branch of the Pakaraima
Mountain Range in the
Aranaputa Valley of the North
Rupununi.
Other communities of the
region in the Central and Deep
South Savannahs have also re-
corded significant production of
peanuts over the years.
During the late 1970s. pea-
nut cultivation in the Rupununi
had reached projection levels.
recording some 800,000 pounds


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2. Contractors to do repairs extensions re-roofing and painting.
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out what were their immediate
needs.
He also enquired from the
minister about the possibility of
giving allowances to the schools
that are still not open, adding
that the government will have to
hire professional cleaners.
According to Mr. Jagdeo,
furniture from all the affected
schools will be replaced, but the
main focus at this point is en-
suring that children are not home
when they should be in school.
The Head of State then
visited Cyril Potter College
of Education and University
of Guyana which were also
flooded after the heaviest
rains in more than 100 years
swamped dozens of coastal
communities in January.


at a market price of between
G$5 and G$6 per pound.
In early 1980s,
GAIBANK began offering ag-
riculture loans at interest rates
(Please turn to page 15)


DOMESTIC problems plagu-
ing a Wismar household
ended in brutal murder Fri-
day night.
A thirty-four-year old con-
stable with the bauxite industry
at Linden is in police custody
after allegedly brutally murder-
ing his wife at the home in Blue-
berry Hill. Wismar. Linden.
The man, a member of the
Omai Constabulary, reportedly
chopped and stabbed his wife
Rhonda Wong, aged 30, to death
in the presence of their one
year-old baby son Rodwell. He
then called the police.
According to relatives, on
Friday afternoon, Rhonda took
three of the couple's four chil-
dren to their grandparent's home
in Silvertown, Linden, to spend
the evening. Her father, Robert
Flatts, told the Chronicle that
as soon as he saw the children,


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though President expected


he asked his wife to telephone
their daughter "and ask her
what going on".
He said after his wife placed
the call. Rhonda visited his
home and spent about half an
hour. An hour later, at about
20:00 hrs, she was dead.
Mr. Flalts said his daughter
worked with the Demerara Bak-
ery on Burnham Drive,
Wismar, Linden, as a supervi-
sor and had finished working
around at 18:00 hrs on Friday.
He said Rhonda and her
husband were "having a bit of
a family problem. My advice to
them was that they should re-
turn to church because they
were baptised members of Vic-
tory Valley Assembly of God
Church." The constable report-
edly said he was willing to re-
turn to church, but Rhonda did
not respond.


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RHONDA WONG
Mr. Flatts said the problem
now is that in his old age he is
tasked with raising his four grand-
children. His wife. Esleen, told
this newspapers that Rhonda told
her that she had something to tell
her and that she would return
"tomorrow" (Saturday).
The couple who were married
in April 1996. had four children
Kurt (Jnr) aged 11. Kevin eight,
Kyle six and Rodwell one year old.
The police at Linden are
continuing their investiga-
tions and a post mortem is to
be done on the body tomor-
row. (Joe Chapman)


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08 12 18 11


President



in Berbice
PRESIDENT Bharrat Jagdeo 3esterda) afternoon visited
the Mount Sinai and Angoy's Avenue squalling area on
the outskirts of New Amsterdam, Berbice iihere he was
briefed on developmental projects there.
During I.,t year, following ., request from a communit',-
based group. the government had allocatedd $51mlM No impr .:
infrastructure in the depressed area which ha, a population ot
about 12,000.
The President, while e-presing satisfaction over the works
done, yesterday said much more was needed to tmprote con-
ditions.
He said the remaining $2M will be released to assist in sand
filling and constructing six 'cross streets' in the area.
Six main access roads have been completed.
MrJagdeo explained that though the government intervened,
the area was not under the Regional Administration but under
the Town Council which has, over the years, neglected the com-
munity.
Issues raised by the residents included having to pay for
the construction of their streets, lack of electricity supply and
the high incidence of crime.
The President said residents must try to get the area
regularised so they can become holders of titles and transports,
which will be an inheritance for their offspring.
He said this will ensure electricity supply and all weather
roadways will be accessible.
Responding to the crime concerns, the President said that
Deputy Police Commissioner Edward Wills, who has been as-
signed to East Berbice, will help strengthen the fight against
crime and will return to the community to meet the people this
week
The Police Force last week announced that Wills was be
(Please see page three)


)i.,

Domsti problem


The Rupununi peanut

industry at crossroads,






SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


Guyana see





waiver from


PRESIDENT Bharrat Jagdeo has asked the Gov
ernment of Trinidad and Tobago to forego debt ser-
vice payments for 2004 and 2005 in light of the Janu-
ary 2005 natural disaster, the government here an-
nounced yesterday.


The Government Informa-
tion Agency (GINA) said Mr
Jagdeo has written Trinidad and
Tobago Prime Minister. Mr
Patrick Manning asking that the
Trinidad and Tobago Govern-
ment forego the debt service
payments as Guyana will be in
a difficult position to meet
these in light of the devastating
January floods.
Mr Robert Persaud. Infor-
mation Liaison to the President,


told the agency that Mr Jagdco
noted that the Government of
Guyana has been finalising debt
agreements in the context of the
Paris Club Agreed Minute of
January 14. 2004. with much
success.
"He said, while Guyana has
not concluded such an agree-
ment with Trinidad and Tobago
as yet, negotiations are at an ad-
vanced stage", the agency re-
ported.


President in ...


(From page two)
ing dispatched to Berbice to
oversee a revamping of the po-
lice division amid mounting
crime concerns in the region.
The announcement came
after President Jagdeo met Po-
lice Commissioner Winston Felix
and followed a visit to Berbice
by Crime Chief Henry Greene
to look at restructuring and
strengthening the police division.
The Police Force, in a press
release, said that stemming from
the Greene visit, and "revelations
made", Wills will be dispatched
to the division for six months.
It said Wills will oversee the
management of the division
while certain adjustments are
made, and energisee law en-
forcement activities throughout
the division."
He will also promote the
development of strong and ef-


fective community/police rela-
tions; develop law enforcement
strategies that would effectively
curb criminal activities, and
"implement such changes for
the effective management and
operations of the division as he
sees fit", the force announced.
Vice President of the
Angoy's Avenue Housing Com-
mittee, Mr Phillip Rose, in an in-
vited comment, said residents are
unable to access their transports
/titles because the Co-operative
Society has filed an injunction
against the Central Housing and
Planning Authority and the mat-
ter is pending in the courts.
Among those visiting the
area with the President yes-
terday were Regional Chair-
man Mr. Kumkarran
Ramdass, Members of Parlia-
ment, Ramesh Rajkumar and
Zulkfikar Mustafa. (JEUNE
BAILEY VAN-KERIC)


Qualification:
*Degree in Marketing or similar qualification
from a reputable institution
*A minimum of two years experience in the
cargo shipping industry
*Must have good communication skills and
be computer literate
Applications should be submitted to:
The Personnel Officer
Shipping Agency
P.O. Box 12400 Georgetown.
On or before the 15th March, 2005


"President Jagdeo pointed
out to the T&T Prime Minister
that this relief is crucial in that
the infrastructure of the affected
areas has been severely dam-
aged. with many schools, hos-
pitals and other buildings unin-
habitable and many roads im-
passable. He pointed out that
the (East Dnemerara Water)
Conservancy Dam, which niay
have been weakened by the
fIlood, iLusl be i mmediately
strengthened before the May/
June rainfall". GINA said.
It added that Persaud also
said that President Jagdeo cx-
pressed gratitude to Trinidad
and Tobago for the drainage
pumps it sent to drain water
from flooded villages.
"President Jagdeo has since
spoken to Prime Minister Man-
ning on the requestt, GINA said.
A five-member team from
the United 'Nations Economic
Commission for Latin America
and the Caribbean (ECLAC) is


here to assess.the full impact of
the floods in the various sectors.
The mission, headed by Mr
Erik Blommestein, is assessing
the impact on the productive.,
agriculture, infrastructure, health
and housing sectors.
Secretary to the Cabinet
and Head of the Presidential
Secretariat. Dr Roger Luncheon,
announcing the arrival of the
mission at his routine post-cabi-
net media briefing last week.
said the assessment will form
the basis under which the gov-
ernment \ ill compile a supple-
mentar y budget. expected by
mid-\-ear_
After we have received all
the data and report from
ECLAC. specific measures \\ill
be announced on governmentI s
recovery plan." Dr. Luncheon
said.
.He said that in addition to
the assessment, the Gbuyana
Government has undertaken a
comprehensive programme tar-


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EXTENSION OF LIFE OF THE COMMISSION OF
INQUIRY INTO ALLEGATIONS OF MINISTERIAL
INVOLVEMENT IN EXTRA-JUDICAL KILLINGS


His Excellency the President of the Republic of Guyana

has approved the extension of the duration of the

Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of Ministerial

Involvement in Extra-Judical Killings for one (1)
t o.'i' tr i:l month that is up to the 31st day of March,

Two Thousand and Five




Roger F. Luncheon. M D.
Head. Presidential Secretariat


ks


geting each of the affected areas
as part of its post-flood recov-
ery interventions.
This includes a massive
clean-up exercise with particu-
lar attention on the northern
and southern approaches to the
city. Georgetown itself, the East
Coast Demerara public road, the
railway embankment, and
wit hin the affected
NeighbIourhood Democratic
Councils (NDCs).
The Guyana Citizens Initia-
ti\e for Flood Relief (GCIFR)
headed by retired Major-Gen-
eral, Joe Singlit said
Bloonmestein explained that


their mission is aimed at help-
ing Guyana, like any other simi-
larly affected country, to attract
much needed resources to im-
prove the livelihood of those
affected by the disaster.
He said too, the discussions
were all part of the process of
consultations, which is ongoing.
A GCIFR press release is-
sued after the group met the
team, quoted ECLAC's Social
Affairs Officer, Dr Asha
Kambon as saying. "The reason
a government would ask us to
come in and do an objective as-
sessment is that they want some
validity to ask for resources."
GCIFR said the team
commended the organisation
for its work in communities
and its systematic gathering
of important data about the
impact of the flood on health,
sanitation, and livelihoods.


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VEHICLE FOR SALE
110 LANDROVER DEFENDER
(DAMAGED)
The British Hi-h Commission is offering for sale by
scaled bid one damaged 110 Land Rover Defender.

The vehicle may be viewed in the High
Commission compound at the following times:
Monday Friday 0800 14000

Please submit your written bids by 24 March 2005
to:

The Management Officer
British High Conimission
44 Main Street
Georgetown
Sale is on an "as seen" basis


We've noticed some of you push our parts post generally accepted limits.
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E-mail: srogers@telsnetgy.net


debt


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4 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005



Italy hostage flies home



from Iraq after shooting




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Appli, vi':ns are invited for the positions of

Senior Pastry Maker
(1 Full-time position)
Requirements:
* A sound secondary education
* Formal Training from a recognized institution
* 5 years experience working in a high volume
commercial kitchen
A valid Food Handlers'Certificate
Two (2) references from previous employers
Good leadership qualities

Kitchen Assistant
(1 full-time position)
Requirements:
* A sound secondary education
* 4 years experience working in a high volume
commercial kitchen
A valid Food Handlers' Certificate
Two (2) references from previous employers
Send application to
Maggie's Catering
224 New Market Street
North Cummingsburg
Georgetown
on or before March 15, 2005.

Only suitable applicants will be contacted for an
interview.


S . .* . .. -Snackette / C rtiqSer vie


ECCLES/RAM-lSBURG
NEIGHBOURHOOD DEMOCRATIC COUNCIL
Peter's Hal,Il East Bank Demerara
Tel: 233-5515; Fax: 233-5915
Motto: Working Together For A Better Community

VACANCY
A vacancy exists at the above named Council for the
following:


QUALIFICATIONS
Three (3) subjects at the GCE/CXC/CAPE
Ordinary Level Examinations including English
Language and Mathematics.
Experience in Local Government procedures,
knowledge of Accounting and Computer literacy
are definitely assets.
Must be disciplined and be able to efficiently
execute tasks with minimum supervision.
Should be between the ages of 18-40 years.
Curriculum \it ie must include copies of proof of
qualifications, experience, references and other relevant
documents, and must be addressed to:
The Chairman
Eccles/Ramsburg NDC
LotZ Peter's Hall Public Road
East Bank Demerara
to reach not later than Friday, March 18, 2005.
Persons who may have applied any time previously ae
welcome fo-eappl.-' . .. ,",............ "


-
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INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK
SALE BY SEALED TENDER
'The Inter-American Development Bank is offering for
sale by sealed tender items, which include:
165 Kva Geierator
Canon Photocopier
Television
Miscellaneous items
Interested persons are invited to bid for these items,
which may be viewed from Monday. March 7 Friday.
March 18. 2005 between 8:30 am 4:30 pm.
K id Ni i l b Ie mI_ ll l i I li ii l> l dl ;.1-- lJ
I .I ", .. IeC > L i I II
Administrative Coordinator
Inter-Anmerican Development Bank
47 High Street, Kingston
Closing date for Bid is MNkI !.9 .2 5 .
;*' *.* '*< i '' ." 1 / i


page 4 & 29.p65


r






SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005 5


St. Lucia's Anthony pleads for


jailed ex-Haiti Prime Minister


By Rickey Singh
B RIDGETOWN-St.
Lucia's Minister,
Kenny Anthony, said
yesterday he was "deeply
concerned for the health and
rights" of the jailed former
Prime Minister of Haiti, Yvon
Neptune.
It was "simply inconsistent
with the rule of law ", said An-
thony, that Neptune could be
held a prisoner for some eight
months now on allegations of
murder without being formally
charged and placed before a
court in Haiti.


Anthony, who has lead re-
sponsibility for Justice and
Governance within the Carib-
bean Community, told the Sun-
day Chronicle that the Haitian
authorities "must speedily place
him before the court or release
him, especially in view of re-
ports about his deteriorating
health in prison..."
The St. Lucian Prime Min-
ister was responding to reports
out of Port-au-Prince this past
week that Neptune, Prime Min-
ister in the deposed government
of exiled President Jean
Bertrand Aristide, went on a
hunger strike since February 19


in protest against his incarcera-
tion, deprivation of his basic
rights and attempts on his life.
Neptune is one of the bet-
ter known influential represen-
tatives of 'Fanmi Lavalas', the
party of Aristide who is cur-
rently in exile South Africa,
monitoring the situation in Haiti
where there are frequent demon-
strations for his return home.
According to news reports
out of Port-au-Prince and also
from the United States-based
Haiti Information Project (HIP),
doctors had to be summoned
last week to Neptune's cell fol-
lowing expressed concerns of


Family mnimbers over his dete-
riorating health condition
The reports also highlighted
continuing incidents of violence
and killings, some involving
clashes between supporters of'
the deposed President.
While CARICOM main-
tains a position of "no collec-
tive engagement" with the US-
installed interim regime of Prime
Minister Gerard Latortue in
Port-au-Prince, and point to "a
climate of violence and fear".
Prime Minister Anthony said
that all those who believe in the
nile of law should be concerned


over the health and rights of
Neptune.
The Chronicle has learnt
that CARICOM's Council for
Foreign and Community Affairs
(COFOR), currently chaired by
Barbados' Foreign Minister
Dame Billie Miller, may seek to
ascertain what interest, if any,
US Assistant Secretary of State
for Western Hemisphere Af-
fairs, Roger Noriega, has in the
Neptune case.
At their 16th Inter-Ses-
sional Meeting in Suriname last
month, CARICOM leaders
commented on the prevailing


tv i1


i.


inappropriate climate in Haiti
bfor upcoming new presidential.
parliamentary and local govern-
ment elections, and noted:
"The proliferation of ille-
gally armed groups and their
activities constitute a major
obstacle to stability. Disarma-
ment and integration", the
Community leaders said,
"must be given priority atten-
tion to create a security en-
vironment conducive to open
campaigning and credible
elections..."


0 1 b


I a d I W Ir* Itoa I i* r a t e
Venezwiar oiffold0


"Copyrighted Material



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SALESBOYS & SALESGIRLS
Apply:
Anand's Regent Street,
Athina's by the East Coast Car Park
& Avinash Complex Water Street
Tel: 226-3361/227-7829


NATIONAL LIBRARY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to
fill the following vacancy

GENERAL ASSISTANT/DRIVER

Minimum Requirements:-
A sound Primary Education, a valid
Driver's License for car, van & lorry.
Experience:- Five (5) years
Salary:- Attractive

Applications stating name, date of birth, qualifications and
including two (2) recent testimonial and a copy of a Police
Clearance must be submitted by March 24,2005 to:

The Chief Librarian
National Library
76/77 Main and Church Streets
P.Q, .px,1.02,4,0,, .
-QGDJiIQ!L.m '. ' -'


INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE FIELD
PROGRAM -2005
The Inter-American Development Bank invites
proposals from interested persons/groups to
participate in its 2005 IDB Cultural Center's
Development in the Field Program.

The objectives of this IDB Program are to: support
the development and achievement of artistic
excellence for the youth of Latin America and the
Caribbean; support the activities of progressive
cultural centers and encourage local and regional
artistic manifestations a large community, over the
long term and contribute to their sustainability.

Proposals must be submitted to the IDB High Street
Office no later than Monday, March 14, 2005 and
addressed:
Cultural Development in the Field Program (CDFP)

Guidelines can be obtained from IDB's Country
Office; .
47 High Street, Kingston, Georgetown ,


VACANCIES


OF)~uI


TUG CAPTAIN
Qualified and experienced Captains are urgently
,,i :d for Toolsie Persaud Quarries Inc. operations
at Providence, East Bank Demerara.

Candidates must have at least six (6) years relevant
,. perierti F plus the following:-

I *Valid Harbour Licence
*Certificate of Competency
*S.T.C.W. Certificate

A valid PoFi', Clearance Certificate ill be required
before ": l, iin [ .

Applications should be made in )erson direct to:

SMarine Superintendent
Toolsie Persaud Quarries Inc,,
TPL Providence Complex
East Bank Demerara
Tel: 265-4973-7 Ext. 39







SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


Those travel



advisories


FRIENDLY governments with embassies in
Georgetown, cannot be unmindful of the constant pleas
coming from representative quarters for a lifting of the
advisories issued to their nationals against visits to
Guyana.
What may have been done in accordance with
official policies as a temporary measure, in the wake of
the worst floods disaster this nation has experienced in
living memory, should now be urgently and objectively
reassessed.
From the Guyana Tourism Authority (GTA) as well
as Tourism, industry and Commerce Minister Manzoor
Nadir, have come stirring pleas for the governments of
United States of America, Britain and Canada to drop


the warning advisories they maintain on their
respective websites.
Minister Nadir, the GTA and the Tourism and
Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG) have all
pointed to the serious consequences of the advisories
for the tourism sector.
It cannot be that the locally-based diplomatic
representatives of these friendly governments are
insensitive to the importance of helping Guyana to
recover, as speedily as possible, from the ravages of
the floods.
On the contrary, they are known to be quite
concerned over the problems Guyana faces and have
been quite cooperative in various areas. Their own
governments' emergency assistance have been
helpful in the relief outreach to the flood victims.
While post-flood rehabilitation and reconstruction
assistance programmes are being pursued, it is felt
that lifting of the travel advisories from the websites
of the three countries concerned, would be a practical
response in helping to arrest the downturn in the
tourism sector.
In 2004, tourist arrivals in Guyana totalled 125,000
and the projection for 2005, before the floods came,
was for a 20 per cent increase. But the travel


advisories have combined to deal a rather hurtful blow
to the tourism industry.
It is to be hoped that the diplomatic missions of
the USA, Canada and United Kingdom would spare no
effort in helping to expedite the removal of the travel
advisories, in view of the significant progress already
made for a return to normal life along the affected East
Coast villages.


CHRONICLE


Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Sunday Editor: Michelle Nurse
Editorial: 227-5216; 227-5204; 22-63243-9
Sports: 225-7174
After hours 226-3243-9
Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is at www.guyanachronicle.com
e-mail address siindayeditor@guyanachronicle.com
Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown. Guyana


Reflections of daughters on two icons

who died within an hour of each other


EIGHT YEARS ago
today, two of the
Caribbean region's
most outstanding political
leaders and heads of
government died within an
hour of each other on March
6,1997.
First. came the passing
of Guyana's President Cheddi
Jagan at 12.23 am following
post-cardiac surgery at the
Walter Reed Medical Centre.
USA. He was 78. and second
Guyanese Head of State to has
. -f--ToiTnn-eart ailment.
First was President Forbes
Burnham in 1985.
By 11.45 pm on that
same day. Jamaica's Michael
Manley. retired Prime Minister.
died after a long bout with cancer.
at his Kingston home. He w.,as
72.
Both charismatic,
robust politicians and prolific
writers, their respective
democratic socialist and
Marxist ideological
persuasions had often proved
controversial at home and
abroad.
Their final battles have
been chronicled by their
respective daughters who share
their innermost feelings as
witnesses when the 'grim
reaper' came.
I have considered it both
relevant and appropriate to
share with readers today some
excerpts of Rachel Manley's
very moving book of 2000,
'Slipstream A Daughter


IL


DR. CHEDDI JAGAN AND DAUGHTER NADIRA
JAGAN-BRANCIER


of one man's enormous heart
and undying spirit that is both
intimate and universal..."
Lloyd Searwar, a
recognized Guyanese expert on
international relations and
former Foreign Affairs Officer at
the CARICOM Secretariat.
provides an assessment of
Nadira's presentation of a make-
over of what had originally
appeared as her dad's
autobiographical work. 'The
West on Trial'.
"It is", he wrote. "a
great deal more than a labour of
love...It is an important
contribution to the
understanding of the many
voices of Cheddi Jagan of which
so little is known, except the
political..."


Remembers': and that of Nadira
Jagan-Branciers memorable
photographic edition of 'Cheddi
Jagan-My Fight for Guyana's
Freedom', published in 1998. For
both, the daughter-father bond
was extremely strong.
The Barbadian novelist,
Austin Clarke, in commending
the work of Rachel, an
accomplished writer and eldest
child of Michael Manley, feels
she has achieved in 'Slipstream'
the "unusual portrait in words
that photographs and the
recorded voice cannot touch for
its effectiveness..."
A publisher's blurb
points to a work "lovingly told
with poetic eloquence", and
which delivers "a shining portrait


FOND REMEMBRANCE

For the people of
J.lllai c! anlld Guylanlla \\ho
IoIndl\ eemCl bei. as well as thI.
poulicale parties of Mianlev and
Jaan no\\ engaged in
'entinib aniuCe acti\'illes on this
\\'eek death anniversary ofl
Mio fallen icons of (aribbeanl
polil'.,, here fI ollows soN ei
brief iioienlts of reflections b\
Rachel and Nadira. datiglhlu,ti,
\\ ho dil\ ide ileir lti e betwCeen
Canada. M here they live, and
i heir respective nali e lands
+RACHEL MANLEY:
"....At tile momnent of his death.
shortly after inidnillght, my
father \\as looking at a picture
on thie far wall. It was drawn
by his mother. The simple line
drawing, red chalk on an aqua
page. showed a nude woman
cupping her hand to her left
breast as though indicating
what was in her heart...
"He died looking at
that picture, and I was
looking at hinm. I was holding
his hand. There we were, my
late grandmother, my father
and me. It occurs to me now
--iare the bonds that link the
generations; how a family
uarks its own landscape like
a nlountain range, but the
shape that others see was
formed bN some .gradual,
unrelenting continental
drift..."
"In the final six months
of his illness. I felt a great need
to be near my father. To help
him. if I could....After a lifetime
of chasing my father's attention
like a fleeting phantasm, I
needed to be with him now.
When the time came for him to
go. I would send him safely to
his parents.
"My grandmother
(Edna Manley) would have
wanted me to clear things tiup
afterwards, to ensure his legacy
as best I could, as she had done
for my grandfather, as my
father and I had tried to do for
her...
"1 aim still in the room.
My father is sleeping above
sleep...My father is perfect and
proud. and his light has
accumulated into a journey-
line...He needs nothing here, no
air, no heat, no glass of water -
no light if I move the blinds..."


IMPRESSIVE BLEND

+NARIDRA JAGAN-
BRANCIER. In her offeinm ool
a most ilpressl i e blend otl
\\ords and photographs of tile
life and titcte o l anty political
leader of Ite CARI'OM NIregion,
gives a gliip'se ol hei li atlcI
i Idulo ;i it l i'i otI ist si he
eIC ountlited le peCILd i. )beClt en
Febliuiars 14 I \I leuine I I )l)


when lie suffered a massive Iheart
attack at the President's official
home, and 12.23 a.m on March
6 when lhe passed away...


Nadira and her brother
(Cheddi Jagan Jnr.) were in the
hospital room where, as she
has recalled: "I kept telling
my father that lie had done all
lie could, had lived a good life,
that we would all be okay and
that it was alright for him to
go....
"After my father
passed away, I took on the
task of packing his personal
belongings, books and writings.
This was very difficult but
rewarding...1 amn not planning
here to write a book about imy


personal mcmori es (she said in
her introduction). That wi!l
come later. I hope...
In her concluding
chaintcr. 'I aircweli Dearesi
Ia!hC:'. .\aNadi.ira provide.,
detailed accounts of the
agonisinie da\s or her nothel.
former l'esidLent Janel Jacan.
brother and aill imelberrs of llth
extended Jaan aamil., as thic
monitored the reports on the
liuctuatlne conditions ol a


dying Head of State.
"When he passed
away 1I had to get morn, who
had been resting in the room


close by....We all remained in
his room for a long time after.
Joey cut two small pieces of
dad's beautiful white hair and
I took one. It is a difficult time
to write about..."
But her collection of
gripping photographs speak
for themselves more than
words can tell from the
"growing up years" to the
end of a political era as it
would have been, also. for
Jamaica with the passing of
Michael, son of Norman
Manley.


MR. MICHAEL MANLEY


..






SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005 7


The




Final



Day



-Reflection on the


death of President


Cheddi Jagan.


By Odeen Ishmael
TIME is an interesting
commodity.
Just when you think
you have a lot of it in hand, it
gradually slips away. But as
time rushes on, some events
remain deeply rooted in the
memory, especially those in
which you were personally
involved.
For me, it is as if
President Cheddi Jagan died
only yesterday. Every year
since 1997, whenever early
March comes around, my mind
automatically relives the events
surrounding his death on that
cold, early morning of March 6,
eight years ago.
Those of us who
watched over him clung to hope
as he lay in hospital for almost
three weeks, but after Monday,
March 3, as his lung
complications worsened, we all
began to face reality. The
inevitable was about to happen.
Death was certainly
approaching.
On Tuesday. March 4.
the doctors informed me of how
critical his condition was and
how very little they could do
for him at the time. By then he
was put under heavy sedation
and went into a deep sleep.
When I returned to the
hospital that evening Dr. Marina
Vernalis, the chief cardiologist,
said they were all amazed at Dr.
Jagan's resilience and
determination to survive.
Indeed, he was a true fighter,
even as he neared the end.
I And throughout it all,
Mrs. Janet Jagan never
surrendered hope. "If the
chances are one to a million for
survival, Cheddi is that one,"
she told me and her daughter


Nadira with confidence.
That night the situation
weighed heavily on my mind
and I slept very little. Besides,
my telephone rang continuously
as Guyanese nationals,
government functionaries,
reporters, and others called for
an update on the situation.
I remember Wednesday,
March 5, 1997 vividly. Shortly
after daybreak, after battling the
Washington beltway traffic, I
arrived at the Walter Reed Army
Medical Center. I went up to
Ward 40, on the fourth floor,
where President Jagan rested in
an unconscious state.
Mark Brancier, Nadira's
husband, was sitting just
outside the room and he
immediately informed me that
the situation was grim. Soon
after Mrs. Jagan came by and
relayed that the doctors said it
was just a matter of time.
Disheartened, I left for
the embassy and phoned the
Minister of Information Moses
Nagamootoo to give him the
latest medical bulletin. I then
briefed my staff on the
President's deteriorating
condition and, immediately
after, rushed off to the Pan-
American Health Organisation
headquarters for the opening
session of the Summit
Implementation Review Group
(SIRG) meeting at 10 o'clock.
And since the OAS Permanent
Council was also convening at
the same time, I sent another
member of my staff to
represent me there.
The SIRG meeting
debated the follow-up of the
Action Plan of the 1994
Summit of the Americas. But
interestingly, the delegates from
the 34 countries, who were
aware of the President's illness,


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suspended the discussion and
asked me for an update of his
condition.
Meanwhile, telephone
calls kept pouring in at my
residence and the embassy.
Everyone was anxiously
awaiting some news. And the
minute I stepped into my office
at around one o'clock, media
personnel from Guyana,
England and across the United
States understandably called for
the latest information. Among
those was the late Patrick
Denny of the Stabroek News
who in his quiet, probing way,
sought answers from me and, in
turn, gave me a description of
the Guyanese nation's
demeanour at that time of
national distress.
After that I telephoned
Mrs. Jagan who said the
doctors had removed the
sedatives to wake up the
President. But because his
response was negative, they
decided to sedate him again.
1 returned to the S1RG
meeting around three o'clock,
but decided after an hour to go
back to the hospital. There I
found Nadira and Mark sitting
quietly outside the President's
room.
I proceeded to his bedside and
noted that his eyes were
Closed and he was breathing
through a respirator. Further,
his blood pressure kept
fluctuating. And though his
breathing was evidently softer,
he continued to fight the claws
of death. He was still hanging
on.
The attending doctors,
Dr. Jennifer Callagan and Dr.
Vernalis, were there as well and
they checked in on him from
time-to-time.
Over the period of the
President's hospitalisation, I
became closely acquainted with
both of these doctors, and with
many of the other 23 physicians
in the team assigned to the


President, and they impressed
me tremendously with the
commitment and medical care
they provided.
Mrs. Jagan, who had
been resting in a nearby room,
came in and all of us, including
the doctors, sat and chatted for
a while. I had bought a few
packets of M&Ms on my way
to the hospital and I shared
them around as we talked about
various matters, including
information in the Guyanese
media about the President's
deteriorating condition, the
concerns of Guyanese nationals
over the President's illness, the
work of the doctors at that
military hospital, and Joey
Jagan's impending arrival.

ilk M


DR.ODEEN ISHMAEL


Joey who had
accompanied his father to
Washington had returned to
Guyana after about a week and
was returning to be by his
father's bedside. A member of
my staff was waiting at that
very moment at Reagan National
Airport to pick him up and rush
him to the hospital.
Joey's wife and three
children along with Nadira's two
children were expected to come
to the hospital later in the
evening.
As Mrs. Jagan
conversed with all of us. her


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ROAD CLOSURE

GT&T Services Development

The Guyana Telephone & Telegraph Company
wishes to notify to public that as part of its
cable maintenance programme technicians will
be involved in the excavation of the road and
laying cables at the junction of Vlissengen
Road and Hadfield Street.

To facilitate this exercise this junction will be
closed on Saturday March 5 and Sunday,
March 6, between the hours of 06:00hrs and
18:00hrs.


determined fortitude was ever
present. All through the period
of her husband's illness she
stood out as a beacon of dignity,
grace and courage. She never
wilted under the stress that the
situation presented, and she was
the one who continuously
inspired us with hope that,
despite the odds, her comrade-at-
arms would win this battle for his
life.
On many a late evening
when I dropped in at the
hospital I found her alone
where she sat for long hours to
keep watch over her husband.
She never broke down under the
pressure.
Around six o'clock I
looked in on the President again.
His face and eyes seemed
swollen; his eyes were closed
and he was breathing quietly. A
nurse was checking the monitors
in the room and from time-to-
time the doctors would observe
his condition. Then Mrs. Jagan
and Nadira went in and rubbed
his hands and feet for a while.
As the clock ticked away
and time was running out, I
decided around half past six to
leave the family together for
their final farewell. Mark
promised to call me as soon as
the inevitable happened.
I then proceeded alone
into the room to say my final
goodbye to my President, my
comrade, my friend. I held his
right hand and looked down into
his serene face.
Here was the father of
our nation, dying in front of me,
and I who, from since childhood
days, was nourished with his
ideas, could do absolutely
nothing for him. I could not help
being choked up with emotion as


1 looked at the living face of
Cheddi Jagan for the final time.
I walked away from that
room with a heavy heart, moist
eyes anrd feet of lead.
I stepped out through
doors of the Walter Reed Army
Medical Center into the cold
winter evening. The member of
my staff, sent earlier to the
airport to meet Joey, was
waiting on the kerb and he told
me Joey had only moments
before gone inside.
On arriving home, I told
my family that we were now on
the death-watch and that the
President would not live
through the night.
A radio station from
New York called to say it was
receiving calls from its listeners
that the President had already
died. Patrick Denny of Stabroek
News phoned for an update and,
soon after, so did Sharief Khan,
Editor-in-Chief of the Guyana
Chronicle. I remember telling
him that we were now waiting
for the inevitable.
"The flame that lit the
torch of freedom and democracy
in Guyana is flickering low," I
reported.
My wife, son and
daughter sat with me as we
waited for the sad news. And
each time the phone rang that
night we anticipated the call was
from Mark but it came from
elsewhere. Guyanese in the
U.S.A., Canada and the
Caribbean were phoning to say
they heard the President died
earlier in the day, and wanted to
know if this was true.
Midnight slipped in to
herald the beginning of a new
(Please turn to page nine)


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Photo Lab Printers
? At least two years experience operating a
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? Knowledge of lab maintenance and stock!
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Executive Secretary
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Data Entry Ch,'rA.s
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8 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


Multilateralism and Regionalism


By Luis Carpio

"Future generations
may well remember the
early 21st century as a
pivotal period in history.
We are living through a
time of unprecedented
threats to our planet and
to our collective hope to
live in peace, without
want or fear. And we are
searching .for a shared
approach to meet these
challenges and build a
safe future for all." (Kofi
Annan, UN Secretary-
General)

TkE Report of the High-
level Panel on Threats,
Challenges and
Change, including
restructuring of the United
Nations, appointed by the UN
Secretary-General, makes as
eloquent a case for the
International Community's
continued need for the world
body as it does for the urgent
call for reform, if the United
Nations is to fulfil its Charter


n the 21st Century:



1 Maximising potentials


role in promoting "social
progress and better
standards of life in larger
freedom".
The Report also makes
the important admission that,


as huge as the UN's potential is.
it cannot be expected to perform
miracles in a vacuum and thus
needs to strengthen not only its
own Regional Commissions
(ECLAC in our case), but it must


also "pursue greater
cooperation and
coordination with regional
organizations outside the
United Nations system".
This important
recognition on the part of
the panel is not isolated, as
it comes in the wake of the
outcomes of the major UN
Conferences of our time,
which have highlighted the
prerequisite of involving


countries held last year, not
only agreed on this very issue,
but also heartened the ACS
when it declared that the
Association of Caribbean States
is an important regional entity,
through which cooperation can
be deepened and strengthened
between the European Union
and the Greater Caribbean Area,
and recognized the progress
made by the ACS in
consolidating a Cooperation
Zone of the Greater Caribbean,
through political dialogue,
cooperation, consultation and
concerted action in trade,


The Greater

Caribbean This Week


V


MR LUIS CARPIO
MR. LUIS CARPIO


CARIFORUM STRENTHEI OF MEDICAL STORY SRVICESPROJET


regional and subregional
organizations, particularly in
sustainable development.
In renewing their
commitment to multilateralism
as the ideal mechanism for
facing global challenges in a
manner consistent with the
founding principles of
International Law, countries
have come to accept that there
is no contradiction between
multilateralism and
regionalism, including south-
south cooperation
mechanisms, as they
themselves constitute a very
sophisticated expression of
multilateralism.
The Guadalajara
Summit of European and Latin
American and Caribbean


sustainable tourism, transport
and natural disasters.
The growing emphasis
on the role of regional and
subregional organizations is also
one born out of logic and
practicality, particularly in our
comer of the world made up in
great part by Small Island
Developing States. Anwarul K.
Chowdhury, Under-Secretary-
General and High Representative
for Least Developed Countries,
Landlocked Developing
Countries and Small Island
Developing States told the UN
Commission on Sustainable
Development last year that
regional groups are often better
able to negotiate with
development partners as "they
know the region's strengths and


weaknesses. They know of the
region's capacities and
resources," he said. "They arc
also better placed to initiate and
push ahead with projects and
programmes with the
governments of the region".
Regional and
subregional organizations make
sense as an indispensable link in
the chain as they, amongst other
things, provide a forum for
discussion and make it less
costly for states to discuss
issues with one another; allow
governments to take a long-term
perspective, making them less
concerned about immediate
results; provide economies of
scale, maximising return on
investment of international
assistance as well as provide
greater transparency and
accountability for donors.
Furthermore, for small
countries riding the waves in a
globalised world, regional and
subregional arrangements are
powerful vessels in good
weather and safe harbours in
stormy seas.
"All of us grew up in
a world in which we looked to
the idea of world order, and
somehow our imagination
missed the fact that the world
order can only be built on the
basis of its components of
effective regional order".
(Luigi Einaudi, Acting
Secretary-General OAS)

Mr. Luis Carpio is the
Political Adviser of the
Association of Caribbean
States. The views expressed are
not necessarily the official
views of the ACS. Feedback can
be sent to mail@acs-aec.org


Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons from the European Union and African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) States (CARIFORUM) for the position described below, on the
European Union funded project entitled "Strengthening of Medical Laboratory Services in the
Caribbean". The successful candidate will be hired on a CARIFORUM contract.

The project's overall objective is to improve national and regional medical laboratory information in
CARIFORUM countries, resulting in improved patient management and disease prevention and
control. A higher level objective is to improve the health status of Caribbean populations.

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

SUMMARY OF POSITION

This position is responsible for the accounting activities fo the project according to the
EuropeanDevelopemtn Fund (EDF) rules.

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE

Professional Accounting qualifications such as CMA, CIMA or ACCA and at lease three (3) years
relevant experience in developing and implementing financial, project and cost management
accounting systems in a computerized environment. A background in Economics would be an asset.
Extensive experience and interaction with donors and donor funded/supported projects.

OR

Adegree in Accounting or Business Management plus ten (10) years in a senior accounting position
with project accounting experience. Extensive experience and interaction with donors and donor
funded/supported projects.

PLUS

Training in the use of software for finance applications and spreadsheets.

COMPENSATION PACKAGE

A competitive salary, in Trinidad and Tobago dollars (TT$), is being offered. Persons recruited from
abroad will be entitled to Home leave, relocation travel costs and settlement allowances.

The closing date for applications is March 18, 2005.

Applications and/or enquiries should be addressed to:


T ,. f,.t ri ger,
Human Resource Department,
aribbean Epidemiology Centre (CAREC)
P.O Box 164,
PORTOF SPAIN, TRINIDAD,
FAX 1-868-622-2792
r:. i r. :..L I ' ''


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ED A National Development Institution




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The Institute has for sale by tender the following items:

1. One Inboard Fishing Outfit complete with Engine, Seine and Icebox (62
feet x 15 feet x 7 feet).
2. One 18 inches Surface Planer
3. One 18 inches locally built heavy duty rip saw
4. One locally built circular rip saw
5. One Rockwell Delta circular saw
6. One 14 inches Rockwell band saw
7. One mortising machine
8. One drill press
9. One small metal lathe
10. One 40 KVA Generator without engine

Inspection of these items can be arranged and tender forms be made available by
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Georgetown, Monday to Friday within the hours of 08:00 h to 16:30 h.

Tenders are to be placed in sealed envelopes marked "Tender" on the top right
hand corner and addressed to:

The Administrative Manager
Institute of Private Enterprise Development
253 South Road,
Bourda, Georgetown

Closing date for acceptance of tenders is Monday, March 21,2005 at 16:30 h.

The Institute reserves the right not accept the highest or any tender, without
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paqe 8 & 25.p65


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


Fixing,



not



inquiring


DEALING with the
natural disaster
aftermath is a
gigantic task. The President
of Guyana has been working
closely with the private sector
and other groups to develop
an assistance package for
those who were the hardest-
hit by the January floods
caused by the historic level of
rainfalls. Rehabilitation and
recovery effort is now the
main preoccupation of the
Government.
But don't expect the
detractors to sit down and allow
these tremendous efforts, which


(From page seven)
day. Then just after 12.23 am,
on that clear, cold and quiet
winter day, the phone rang.
It was Mark. The
legendary life of Cheddi
Jagan was over.
(Note: Odeen Ishmael,
.--ently Guyana's
cu...- .'- V-nezuela,
Ambassador to ezue
was Ambassador to the


cost is still a mammoth
unknown figure, to go without
any hindrance. Failing to gain
any attention to their false
screams during the height of the
relief efforts, some of these
individuals are now calling for a
Commission of Inquiry into the
natural disaster. The intention
for the Inquiry seems less about
the cause, as this is public
knowledge, but more of an
attempt to create an atmosphere
where it will be difficult to
move quickly beyond the
disaster, restore normalcy and
fix problems that aggravated the
deluge.


United Staties a t'1 time of
Dr. Jagan's death. He and his
wife were the only non-
relatives, other than the
medical personnel, who saw
Dr. Jagan during his
hospitalisation. Within
minutes of Dr. Jagan's death,
a Reuters news report quoted
Ambassador Ishmael as
saying, "The President is
dead. The flame has now
out.")
gr"t-


In principle, there is
absolutely nothing wrong with
a Commission of Inquiry once
it is intended to shine light on
the unknown, point to
culpability and propose
remedial measures. For example,
the Commission of Inquiry
(Col) into the allegations against
the Minister of Home Affairs
was quite in order. There are
several examples where Col
have been enormously useful.
But a Col into the January
natural disaster will serve no
useful purpose.
The January natural
disaster is unique. Everyone
knows the cause the historic
level of rainfall which is far
above the capacity of the
nation's drainage system. This
was compounded, as the
President of Guyana pointed
out earlier, with a degree of
neglect by the local government
bodies and others tasked with
ensuring the drainage structures
were in perfect working order.
So it is clear the causes) for the
flooding has been fully
established.
regarding the response to
the disaster, the
Government's quick
action and persistent
involvement have been
recognized and declared to be
effective. The critics claimed
that the Government was even
too active anu a0 present in the
relief response. The President
was cfi, ;lid for his hands-on
approach. On the issue Wo O'?9d
relief response, given the
limitations and no prior
experience dealing with natural
disaster of this magnitude, the
Government in collaboration
with other groups handled it
extremely well.
And already the
President of Guyana has
disclosed that a rehabilitation
and recovery plan is about to be


rj Forejgn E4 c gf( et Activities

Friday, February 25,2005 Thursday, March 03,2005
EXCHANGE RATES
Buying Rate Selling Rate
A. US Dollar NOTES OTHER NOTES OTHER
Bank of Baroda 197.00 198.00 201.00 203.00
Bank of Nova Scotia 189.00 198.00 201.00 204.00
Citizens Bank 192.00 197.00 203.00 204.00
Demerara Bank 195.00 197.00 201.00 202.00
GBTI 190.00 195.00 201.00 201.00
NBIC 198.00 198.00 202.00 204.00

Bank Average 193.50 197.17 201.50 203.00

Nonbank Cambios Av. (5 largest) 199.80 203.20 -


BoG Average Market Exchange Rate: US$ 1.0 = G$199.75

B. Canadian Dollar

Bank Average 133.33 142.57 148.33 157.57

C. Pound Sterling

Bank Average 318.33 347.20 349.83 369.10

D. Euro

Bank Average 216.75 236.67 243.25 254.67
E. Selected Caricom Exchange F. LIBOR- US$ G. Prime Rate
Rates London Interbank Offered
Rate For Thur., Mar. 03, 2005
TT$= G$28.73
Bdos$= G$ 92.15 3 months 2.95000% US 5.5%
J$ = GS 4.45 6 months 3.20000% Guyana 14.54%
EC$S= G$ 65.75
Belize$= G$ 94.33

,Sourqg:,Jnternational Department, Bag 9f Quy.a. .


unveiled. This package would
contain assistance for
businesses, farmers and
residents who were severely
affected. The Government is
working with the United
Nations on an assessment of the
impact of the flooding. So here
again, there is nothing an
Inquiry can add to in terms of
rebuilding communities and
livelihood.
recently it was disclosed
that various drainage
interventions are about
to take place to correct
deficiencies and expand the


drainage system so as to better
prepare Guyana for the May-
June rains. Special attention is
being placed on enhancing the
Conservancy Dam and
preventing future flooding of the
Mahaica and Mahaicony
Creeks. The neglect is being
given central government's
attention especially Region
Four where the regional bodS,
failed so miserably. The task of
enlarging the capacity of the
nation's drainage system is well
underway with foreign technical
help and resources. The
President indicated that the
entire drainage system including
".' of Georgetown will have to
be revamped. The
recommendations of the Dutch
engineers and others are being
worked on. So what else can an
inquiry contribute, to improving
our drainage system,. which if it


had worked at 100 per cent,
could not have prevented the
January flooding.
With everything in the
open, all the relevant facts
known, all workable proposals
being implemented and no
resources being spared for
recovery and rebuilding, it is
unclear what would be the
scope of the terms of reference
of any Commission of Inquiry.
The Government has nothing to
hide. Anyone with additional
information is invited to put
this in the public domain. Any


new suggestion or proposal is
most welcomed. The President
has said that there will be a
retreat by the Cabinet and all
others involved to review the
response and develop a model
which the country can use, if
ever needed, to respond to
such a natural disaster.
T hose behind the
Inquiry call perhaps
seem to think that the
population is so naive as to
believe that a Col will predict
the next natural disaster.
Any Commission of
Inquiry at this time would
.... rIecovery and rebuilding
plans and activities in their
track. Help for families.
t usi si "': farmers and
industries will have to awail
the completion of this Inquiry.
The Opposition and other
detractors will use the Col for


sheer political rhetoric as they
did during the National
Assembly debate on the flood.
The national mood of working
together and moving our
country forward would be
spoilt by the antagonism and
futile exchanges that will blight
a Col on this issue.
The opposition and
others were invited to play a
role in the national relief effort.
No one has shut them out from
joining the national rebuilding
and recovery activities once
they are willing to play a


Sri-



MR. ROBERT PERSAUD


-uni-tu-t vc luic.
The President is
focused on helping people to
rebuild their lives, homes
and liveiiho6d. A!! of our
attention should be on
fixing, not inquiring.


PUBLIC AUCTION OF MINERAL PROPERTIES


The General Public is hereby notii,.C that there will be a Public Auction of Mineral
Properties on Wednesday, March 23rd 2005 at 10: n the Boardroom of the
GGMC.

The following properties will be auctioned:

1. Prospecting licence blocks at Pashanamu, Kaburi, Lower Iroma,
Cuyuni, Shararin, Kartuni and BHP Reconnaissance Permit area.
2. Certain Mining Permit Blocks on topographic Stock Sheets 4SE, 10NW,
10NE, 35SE and 43SE.

Successful bidders will be required to pay the winning bids plus 3% Auction Dues
immediately at the end of the Auction. Application for Prospecting Licences consist
of the following elements:
Filling out the prescribed 5D Form
Payment of US$100 application fee
Work programme and Budget for the first years activities
Proof of Financial and technical Capability

(The GGMC will provide the required maps and description)

All applications for prospecting licences and mining permits must be submitted by
April 29,2005.

Interested persons must consult the relevant maps which are on display at the
GGMC, GGDMAand Bartica Mines Office to ascertain their areas) of interest.

You are invited to a brief presentation of the Prospecting Licence auction
areas on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 at 14:00 hrs in the GGMC Boardroom

Robeson Benn
Commissioner


Weekly Viewpoint by Robert Persaud






10 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


Buea to
I 0


seiz



sustndr


cel phones



ote item


THE watchdog Guyana
National Bureau of
Standards (GNBS) says it
will seize substandard cell
phones and other items that
are flooding the local
markets and triggering
complaints from consumers.
It says only a few
importers were complying with
quality standards set for a range
of items and this "low response
has resulted in the flooding of
the local markets with goods of
unacceptable quality".


The agency said it was
monitoring 24 categories of
commodities, product by
product, under its compliance
programme.
These include domestic
electrical and electronic
appliances, tyres, Christmas
trees and decorative lighting
outfits, textiles, garments,
footwear, PVC pipes, scales,
weights and measures,
computers, and peripheral
devices, paints and paint
products, animal feeds,


I LII I II L ik I % ik l 11 t lii.', t .'
Li. arcltte,. a l'c't\ inalc n ,,.e
ilrt111h/cr ,cLt bt-ll I, llIiu rICCenI
lanp hiallai,,t. 'i iia II' Ln tapc,
and ruler,,s. 'lcl in Li, mileters.
V water ietcers. Ic\ cllery and
cellular phone .
The GNBS i- urging
importers. dealers and retailer.
to make immediate steps to
obtain the rele ant information
to help them comply with
regulations and guidelines in
national standards.
Failure to do so will result
in noncompliant goods being
seized and removed or placed on
'hold' by inspectors during
surveillance exercises, until
requirements are complied with.
it said.
In a press release, the
GNBS reminded all importers of
goods monitored under its
Standards Compliance
programme, that it is their
responsibility to acquaint
themselves with import
requirements, stipulations
outlined in the national
standards and ensure standard
compliant goods of acceptable
quality are available to
consumers.
Dealers and retailers buying
from importers have the same
obligation to acquaint
themselves with requirements
outlined in the i'aiional


tcponible for the quahtl\ of
go t olf red fur sale. tiK,
bhirti i sad.
lThe GNBS said that since
lthe progranmme began, as pall
of' the registration process 1
has issued copies of import
reqCuirements so that
importers are aware of the
criteria to be met, ensuring
quality goods are brought into
the country.
Posters outlining import
requirements are at the various
ports of entry around the
country, it advised.
The bureau said its staff are
ready to offer guidance and
advice on the selection criteria
for supplying standard
compliant goods when help is
requested by stakeholders, to
stop the influx of substandard
goods.
However, the GNBS
noted that only a few
importers have obtained
copies of relevant national
standards and are making
efforts to comply.
It said copies of the
relevant national standards
can be obtained from the
Technical Standards
Information Unit (TSIU) at
the bureau in the Snph:
EYh'.itiion Complex in
Georgetown.


STHE UNIVERSITY OF GUYANA


Appreciation


We thank the following organizations for their assistance in our FloodR and Cean-up
qE.ercises at the Trk -and ean-up
aGeorgetownpus.

Georgetown


Ansa McAl Trading Limited
Banks DIHI Limited
Bank of Guyana
Beepat & Sons
BEV Enterprise
Big G General Store & Restaurant
Campala Hotel
Canada Fund for Local Initiatives
C&F Meat Centre
Cevons Waste Management Inc.
Civil Defence Commission
COPS Guyana Limited
Demerara Distillers Limited
Eddy Grant Ring Band Foundation
Gafoors
Guyana's Citizens Initiative
Guyana Fire Service
Guyana National Newspapers Limited
Guyana Sugar Corporation
Guyana Water Incorporation
HBTV Channel 9
International Pharmaceutical Agency
King Solomon Enterprise
Mark Chandra Auto Sale
National Communications Network
National Hardware (Guyana) Limited


* National Library
* Neal & Massey Guyana Limited
* Nigel's Supermarket
* N&S Mattai & Company
* Prem Persaud Pharmacy
* Rals Variety Store
* Rotary Club of Georgetown Central
* Sterling Products Limited
* The British High Commission
* The Guyana Defence Force
* The Guyana Defence Force Coast
Guard
* The Management of the Sophia
Exhibition Centre
* The Ministry oflHealth
* The Public Health Department &
Solid Waste Management Section of'
the Mayor & City Council
* Toucan Industries Inc.

Berbice
* The Staff & Students of the University's Tain
Campus
* Contractors I lack & Hussain
* Nand Persaud Co. Ltd. Rice Complex
* R&S Shopping Complex


Perhaps you gave a donation
Perhaps you gave freely of your service
Whatever you gave, we express
Our Sincere Appreciation.

Office of Resource Mobilisation & Planning
University of Guyana.


Machine readable passport


Companies


invited to pre-bid


meeting


THE Guyana Government is
moving to replace the current
passports with machine
readable ones, and, to this
end, has invited three
companies with an interest in
printing the documents to a
pre-bid meeting.
But it has not yet
identified a printer to do the
job, Secretary to the Cabinet/

'I want to reiterate that
we have not contracted
any firms to print machine
readable passports. We
still have to look at
certain aspects before we
proceed." Head of the
Presidential Secretariat,
Dr Roger Luncheon


Head of th presidential
Secretariat, Dr. Roger Luncheon,
said on Thursday, while
dispelling as "baseless
speculations" rumours that a
printer has been identified in
Kenya to print the passports.
"I want to reiterate
that we have not contracted any
firms to print machine readable
passports. We still have to look
at certain aspects before we
proceed," he told reporters.
The Go".-
a,, -....iiment had
..cr tnis year announced that
it would be replacing the current
travel documents with machine
readable books.
Dr. Luncheon, who
had made the announcement at
a post-Cabinet media briefing,
had said then that the current
supply of passports that exist
in the system now will have to
be "phased out overtime".
He noted that the
move was in keeping with


regional and international norn
and added that it \\
convenient for travelling a
security purposes.
The new machi
readable passport will cont.
features that would allow t
bearer to be "unique
identified" through an electron
master database in Guyana.
The procurement of
passports would allow for I
creation of a database with perso
information of the holders. It a
involves the creation and t
establishment of passport issui
centres in Guyana, and oversi
missions where large numbers
Guyanese reside, especially in
United States, Canada and the L
"It woul!i also call
t'.he 'niaiiation of the necess;
technology at ports of exit
entry andI perhaps mi
importantly, it would call
extensive manpower training
give effect to the objectives
having machine readal
passports," he said at
weekly post-Cabinet ne
conference last week.
"The secur
implications are obvious
because of the reliance of t
personalised, unique a
retrievable database
security .P-- '
," .pects dealing A
passports' issuance and rene
would be taken to new high
he disclosed.
Dr Luncheon s
that Cabinet has alres
finalised the details of
tender document, include
the number of passports to
procured. Centres h.
already been identified
the preparation 2
distribution of mach
readable passports and p(
of exit and entry have a
been earmarked.


THE impact of the recent floods following unpreceden
rainfall from the second week of January has resulted in
unusual increase of 2.9 per cent in the price index of consu
items, the Bureau of Statistics has reported.
It said that as a consequence the price index value m(
from 194.4 in December last year to 199.5 in January. As s
inflation rate for the same period was 2.9 per cent and on f
January 2004 to January 2005. the Georgetown index rose by
per cent.
This unusual hike was fuelled primarily by a price incr
of 6.3 per cent in the food group which is the heaviest weig
category, the Bureau said.The highest price increases in the f
group were recorded in the sub-categories, vegetables and veget
products which saw a 37.3 per cent increase, and fruits and
products which recorded a 6.2 per cent increase. Pulses and p
products went up by 5 per cent, the Bureau reported.
Other categories which showed an increase w
condiments and spices 3.7 per cent; cereals and cereal produ
3.2 per cent, meat, fish and eggs 1.9 per cent; sugar, honey
related products 1.9 per cent; alcoholic beverages by 1.7 per c
non-alcoholic beverages 1.5 per cent; oils and fats 0.7 per c
tobacco and tobacco related products 0.55 per cent; milk and
related products 0.4 per cent and prepared meals 0.1 per cer
With respect to other goods and services, the foot\
and repair groups showed an increase of 1.4 per cent of whicl
sub-category. footwear, rose by 1.5 per cent.The furniture g
rose by 0.1 per cent of which the sub-category furniture decl
by 7 per cent because of special offers
There were also increases in the education
recreational and cultural services and miscellaneous gr(
of 4.7 per cent respectively, while the transport
communications group declined by 0.1 per cent with
category operations and personal transport (gasol
recording a reduction of 0.3 per cent, the Bureau reported






SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


es--t.e


oy and photographs by
Sandra Seeraj

11t' WAS a virtual outpouring
of love, respect and admira-
tion as many came froum near
and far to pay their last re-
spects to Sir John Patrick
Gregorio Carter. (Queen's
Counsel, Cacique's Crown of
Honour. Order of Roraima)
one of Guyana's most distin-
guished sons.
The large suburban Mary-
land church was filled to capac-
ity with relatives, friends. col-


f 5
'tg


i, w d ic 1 1 1' iitln\ t ]l i ll lt ie

ThIle S'!i 1.' \IC iC'o Illdt 'itledt
bi Rcv irL. i \ i iill V\, \ ill
\\ ho spoke ol Sit .lohlin as .1 nIiiiM
0) Irl'e;l h 0ll n, nol n hinc h l-M'; .
!1nd one \\ hose. inieg'it could
al\\ as he I ciled on.
\t the iend of the itieioriail.
the entire con,,regoatiton. in its fi-
nai. fitting tri hite. rose anil stinl


Saskcl, dr'pel in 1I; n >ldenI Ai-
]t>i\\'l.;ini i (t til\in;: was horn i
I un 1 lh iihurch is lvth. lilting
Irains ol Ihe po|,lkilr \Vesl inI -
diin blilad 'cllow Hitld' filled
Iie air. II \\as played on pan by
IMr. Keith Preddie on It.' steecl
palln.
l'olliowni tihe inierlnnlCt a
repaslt. Ieaturing" popular
Guyanese fare was provided. A
video tribute was falso shown. It


lie was quick to iWild advice in
iis \ipically simooth. thought-
itl C and compassionate w\av.
"I lis breadth of knowledge
was iiuniiatched. His past expe-
rience as being part of the glo-
hal, political intelligentsia made
him slta abreast of all current
events. No issue was too small
for him to digest. Not only
could he brief you on ihe latest
developments in world politics,
but he could casually inform
you that "PuIlff Daddy' had
changed his moniker to 'P
Diddy'... He was a man for all


Pallbearers accompanying the Casket.


leagues and acquaintances who
had braved the blustery chill on
Wednesday, March 2. 2005.
There was a distinctively
Guyanese flavour to the cer-
emony, as, in a fittingly digni-
fied memorial service, the life-
long legacy of the Guyanese
lawyer, politician and diplomat,
was remembered and celebrated.
Many and moving were the
tributes, which spoke of Sir
John's dignity of carriage, his


seasons..."
Speaking on behalf of Presi-
dent Bharrat Jagdeo, and the
Government and the People of
Guyana, His Excellency
Bayney Karran. Ambassador of
Guyana to the United States of
America. conveyed condolences
to Sir John's widow, lady Sarah
Lou Carter, and to their family
and friends.
He remarked that like most
of the notable sons and daugh-


Sir John's widow, Lady Sarah Lou, being escorted from the
church by a relative.

breadth of knowledge. his quiet teris who have sprung from
gentleness and his countless. Guyana's soil, Sir John emerged
thoughtful kindnesses to relative from humble beginnings, having
and friend alike, been born in the small rural
In a biographical tribute cap- connulnity of ('Cane Grove oni
touring the spirit of the man. his the lFast fCoasi of Demernraa.
family reflected: "We remember "llis was a profound mind
not only all of his outstanding whose public service encom-
accomplishments... but also the passed the boundaries of legal
important role he played in the practice, legislation, politics and
family. He was the Don of our diplomacy. lHe was an outstand-
.a, rily and. vas lovingly referred ing politician in lis,own right
to as,our Senior d. i .r W long beforilh . 'l.'.p.... "
turned to hi.n. on.cvry js so ,,. th wop,-parrty system in 'Brit-


ish Guiana. Ie \was a mietliber
of the People's National Con-
gress' delegation at (Guana s i
Independence talks in llondon.
His contributions to lie poliln-
cal evolution of Gutiana are loot
consequential and nuanced to be
totally discernible.
"Biut it is for his distinction
as a diplomat that he lhas come
to be best known. In serving as
our first ever Ambassador to
the U.S.. Canada, the United
Nations and in his 11an other
accreditations, he mentored a
generation of outstanding
Guyanese diplomats." the .\m-
bassador said.
Included in the distin-
guishel cadre of GuyItanese dip-
lonmats who benefited froin Sir
John's guidance, is Ms. CherYl
Miles, Ambassador to Venezu-
ela. who, in a letter to the laim-
ily, spoke of Sir John as a "be-
loved mentor."
Ambassador Karran also
conveyed condolences to the
family on behalf of. Minister of
Foreign Affairs. Dr. RludyC
Insanally, Sir John's long-stand-
ing colleague.
In a letter of condolence to
the Carter family, Sir Shridath
Ramphal, Guyana's Ifirst Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs. and a
former Secretary-General of the
Commonwealth, noted that Sit
John had brought extraordinary
diplomatic skills to his many
postings and appointments, and
was very influential in shaping
Guyana's image and advancing
its interests. His gifts of diplo-
macy were admired by his peers
and his contributions to diplo-
macy were imperishable,
Ramphal noted.
Mrs. Robin Marston. Sir
John's stepdaughter, in her trib-
ute, noted that lie was loved,
admired and revered by the
family, and that he provided a
sanctuary, "a safe place to fall."
She said that when her hus-
band died suddenly, leaving her
to parent three young children,
"Papa" was always there to
provide whatever support was
needed.
Sir John's sons, John Jr. and
Brian and his grandsons Stlart
Clarke and Jordache Marston.
also paid him tribute. Other rela-
tives, including his niece. Mrs.
Dorccn Moore, and his first
nephew .lusice ViberI Lampkin
did likewise.
Tributes from Dr. Rutdy
Insanally. Sir Shridalh Ramphal
and Dr. Chieryl Miles \cire read
by (1Granddaughter. Melanie
Marston, and daughlCers Jenni-
fer Carter-Clarke and Dr. Joan
Carter, respectively.
Hon. Mr. Maurice Charles.
a friend of Sir .John since their
college days togetherC in liondon,
spoke glowingly of his friend. A\
tribute wais also read on helialf
of Mr. Rob,.rt Corblin, Leader of
the People's National Congrless
Reform and Leader of the Par-
liamentary Opposition and thie
membership of that party.
amouiis Guyiinese musi- ,
cian, Wendell Bunyan piv'(idcd
musical accoiupanimlent


Vairtuai outpouri,.. h'q c)f lo e,.,


CARIBBEAN EPIDEMIOLOGY CENTRE CAREE)

Port of Spain, Republic of Trinidad & Tobago


. t /


administered by the Pan American Health Organisation
Regional Office of the World Health Organisation



CAREC, a Public Health Information, Service and Consulting organisation serving 21
member countries in the Caribbean, invites applications from suitably qualified,
experienced and dynamic persons to fill the posts listed below. An excellent opportunity to
contribute to the improvement of public health in the Caribbean region exists for the
selected candidates.

PROGRAMME COORDINATOR HIVIAIDS/STI

This position is responsible for the coordination of the operations and financial activities of
the Special Programme on Sexually Transmitted Infections (SPSTI). It stimulates and
participates in the planning of semi-annual work plans, production of semi annual technical
reports. It is responsible for the production of quarterly financial reports and it organizes
and participates in key coordination meetings such as planning meetings with partners.
annual review and joint evaluation missions as agreed upon with partner agencies.

LIBRARIAN/INFORMATION SPECIALIST

This position develops and coordinates the Centre's library and information services and
provides technical guidance to other CAREC divisions and programmes and member
countries on the development and management of information resources. This position
also assists in coordinating centre-wide information systems development and supervises
website and intranet development and specialized document production.

EPIDEMIOLOGIST

This position provides technical support and expertise in disease surveillance, research.
outbreak investigation and infection control. It also provides training for the development
of epidemiologic skills among public health staff in CAREC Member Countries (CMCs).

COMPENSATION PACKAGE

A competitive salary, in Trinidad and Tobago dollars (TT$), is being offered .' :-,:,:.
recruited from abroad will be entitled to Home leave, relocation travel costs and -.-- ,.i n,
allowances.

The closing date for applications is March 138,2005.

Applications andlorenquiries should be addressed to:

The Manager
Human Resource Department
Caribbean Epidemiology Centre (ClAiLC)
P.O.Box 164
PORT OF SPAIN. TRINIDAD
FAX: (868) 622-2792; Email: .. ug

VISIT OUR WEBSITEAT ,F .. FOR INFORMATION ON CAREC
L .. .. ..'


"eradto t s s
- ,Zi 5. 5 onnf t. n.t='~-.r~


hiad hn prodtiuced by the famn-
iliy In coninCiemorate Sir John's
tOih birlhdav, which he cecl-
chrm'il on .Januarv 26. 2005.
S l .ohn, sol-it -lla ', M. 'r.

ii: : l ili ,! ii! i '. [ll'miu | re








It se), ennifer. !Carter-

,oan ( Ca-ter); his sons John
r0 and Brian; grand-children
'Carlon, Richelle, Russell,
Stuart, Melanie, j Lez.
j ordache and Christian:
great-grand children, Tia and
Kayla; his sister, Violet
Carter-Braithwaithe and
many nieces and nephews.


dr






12 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005




Fire destroys three homes at Bella Dam


Some of the salvaged belongings of one family after the blaze. (Pictures by Delano Williams)


All that remained of one of the Bella Dam houses that were


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destroyed by fire.

THREE families are now
counting their losses after fire
swept through their homes at
Bella Dam, West Bank
Demerara Friday night
Some clothing and
appliances were the only items
that the victims were able to save
from the blaze that moved
swiftly through the premises.
It is unclear how the
inferno started.
Speaking with the
Chronicle yesterday. members
of the Taharally family said
the fire started between 19:45
and 20:00 hrs. The entire top
floor of their home was
destroyed. The lower flat;
which served as a kitchen, was
virtually unscathed.
Another two-storey


building, which was without
electricity and from which the
fire originated, was burned to the
ground. When this newspaper
visited the scene, all that
remained were smouldering
embers.
All that remained of the third
house was a concrete shell. A
relative of the overseas-based
occupants, Sunil and Toya Paul,
was stunned at the speed with
which the fire devoured the
building.
The residents
commended the Guyana
Power and Light for their
prompt action in
disconnecting the electricity,
but expressed disappointment
at the slow response by the
Fire Service.


Peceaker


ag


A 38-YEAR-OLD father of
one, Lawrence Gonsalves, also
known as 'Gambie', of 100
Leopold Street, Georgetown,
died after hlie as stabbed early
yesterday morning near his
home.
According to his relatives,


STABBED TO DEATH:
Lawrence Gonsalves


witnesses said Gonsalves,
a security guard at Kainiro
Motor Cycle Store on
Smyth Street, was on duty
when he saw a man he
knew and his girlfriend
arguing and he intervened.
They said that as
Gonsalves headed home
from work a few hours
later, the man rushed up
and stabbed him.
The security guard ran
towards his home but the
attacker caught up and
continued to stab the
helpless man.
The family said the
victim who died instantly,
was stabbed twice on an
arm land twice in his
throat.
Police have' held a
suspect.







SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005 13


St. George's Cathedral



pipe organist retires


after 17 years


By Wendella Davidson
he piano was one of
the treasured pieces of
furniture in the Davis
household, so it was no
wonder that sisters Daphne
and Inez mastered the art of
playing it. and later used
their finesse as a springboard
to specialise in playing the
pipe organ.
The sisters began their
exploring the world of music in
their pre-teen years and would
daily "try out" on their piano.
.Over the years, the girls
honed their skills at playing the
piano and became pipe
organists Inez at St. Andrews
Kirk on Brickdam, and Daphne,
subsequently replacing her there
before moving on to St.
George's Cathedral.
Daphne, now Scott,
resigned this year, after serving
for some 17 years at the
Cathedral.
In an interview with the
Sunday Chronicle at her
First Street, Alberttown
home last week, Mrs. Scott,
speaking of her love for music,
recalled that the she and her
sister began taking music classes
from her father's good friend,
Mr. Loncke, then an organist at
the Brickdam Cathedral.
She remembered that they
were not the only students of
Mr. Loncke, who was also the
headmaster of St Gabriel's
Primary School in Queenstown.
"I don't know if it was
my father's doing, but all I know
is that we started going to music
classes and were all very
excited, she recalled.
As she and her sister
excelled in the field, she
remembered how Mr. Loncke
would send them almost every
Sunday to play at various
functions.
As she moved on to the
higher grades in music, Mrs.
Scott said they were tutored by
Ms. Edna Jordan and Mrs.
Kerry.
For her hard work Mrs.
Scott said she earn a distinction
at the Grade Eight level and is
also the holder of an ATCL


performers Diploma.
The musical prowess of the
sisters soon became known and
the girls were "sought after" on
a regular basis to perform duets
at concerts and other functions.
Mrs. Scott remembers


'I just loved the
dynamics, the expression
of the pipe organ.'- St.
George's Cathedral pipe
organist, Mrs. Daphne
Scott
performing a duet at her fist big
musical concert held at a
cinema. She was then about 21
years old. The competition,
which was well attended, saw
the sisters losing out to a pair
from Berbice. The adjudicator


coliponentis of lie organ ll\hich
enable the player to bring out the
rich music.
According to Mrs. Scott,
she feels gratified whenever
church members approach her
to say "how they loved her
music."
S he recalled on particular
member telling her that
the music brings out a
special feeling in her whenever
she hears the organ.
In 1987. MIrs. Scott moved
over to St. George's Cathedral
where she earned the distinction
of being the first and only
female pipe organist at the
church.
"Through the years. the
post of organist at St George's
was always held by a man until
I got there." she said with pride.
It was hectic at St George's.
"First Sunday. Palm
Sunday. Ordination, Cantata anl
during Easter are all "very
terrific" occasions at St
George's, the music keeps you


Retired pipe organist, Mrs. Daphne Scott, explaining the
features of the pipe organ at St. George's Cathedral last week.
(photos by Delano Williams)


was invited here from England.
Similar festivals were held every
other year and Mrs. Scott said
she looked forward to
participating in them.
t was at St. Andrew's Kirk
that she began to play the
ipe organ, filling the void
left by her sister who had
migrated to England.
"I just loved the dynamics,
the expression of the pipe
organ," she said, pointing out
that it is quite a powerful
organ". She spoke of the swell,
grate, the console and pedals, all


tense and you have to always
be on the ball," she said.
"I like to play for the
congregation. I check on my
congregation to see what crowd
I have, as I always remind
myself I'm not playing for me,
I'm playing for the people who
are there to sing.
"My role is to play for
them to follow ... so I try not
to be above the congregation,
and over the years it (music)
has taught me to dispel... what
I like and please the people who
are there."


TREASURED MOMENT: Meeting with Queen Elizabeth at the Cathedral. At left is the Bishop
Randolph George.


"When they (members
of the congregation) are
singing lustily. I am glad,
then is when it brings out the
best in me and my music...
If you find the conllgregation
is half-dead, oil have to 'ind
a way to bring them alive,"
she said with a hearty laugh.
s Scott said sollic
ear s alo slihe held
IIIusiC classes Ior
soime 30 StuIdeCnts but today
has reduced the number to
about 12 because of a recent
illness.
She laments the fact that
with advanced technology,
the younger generation is
showing no interest in the
pipe organ, and fears that the
pipe music will soon become
extinct.
She regrets too that the
tradition will not be carried
on in her family as well.
Ms Scott loves "good
sentimental music", blut
disclosed that she also
enjoys steelband music as
well as a little soca.
Among Ms Scott's
treasured moments were
meeting with Queen
Elizabeth and Prince
Charles of Britain.
The pipe organ is


described on thie internet as a
musical instrument that
produces sound by air
vibrations created in an organl
pipe, which is controlled by a
musician from a keyboard.
The pipe organ has been
around for quite some time.,
much longer than the piano.
Sound is made by one
organ pipe producing one tone
at one pitch and since there is
just one pipe /fr each not, a
kyc hoard with 61 notes (five
octaves) would have 61 pipes,


one for each note. The one set
of pipes for each note on the
keyboard makes just one kind of
sound. The organ will have
several sets of pipes; each of
these sets of pipes is called a
"rank", .which can make
different sounds.
The pipes are arranged on
a wind-chest and typically only
the main Principal stop is
visible. The wind-chlest and
pipes are enclosed on the sides
and back by a case so that the
sound projects out the front
more clearly.


GLOBAL FUND/ GUYANA HIV/AIDS PROJECT
GRANT# GYA-304-G01-H
MINISTRY OF HEALTH
HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT UNIT





Objective:

The Global Fund for the fight against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has approved
funding for the fight against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in Guyana. The objective
of this project is to reduce the spread and impact of HIV/AIDS by reducing the transmission
of HIV, reducing the morbidity and mortality and mitigating the social and economic impact
of the epidemic in Guyana.

Requirement:

Towards this end, the following consultancies are required to develop appropriate
messages, and to disseminate these messages into a format and manner appropriate to
reduce the spread and impact of HIV/AIDS:

Develop and implement behaviour change campaign to reduce stigma and
discrimination related to HIV/AIDS
Develop and implement behaviour change interventions directed to the general
population to increase community involvement in HIV/AIDS prevention
Develop and implement targeted behaviour interventions to increase positive
sexual practices and encourage early STI/HIV diagnosis and treatment among
high risk groups (youth, CSW's, MSMS)
Develop activities to encourage early HIV testing
Expand condom social marketing programme
Implement activities to increase use of quality STI/HIV/AIDS c agn.j' tI: and
treatment service

A detailed job requirement for each consultancy 'nJi.ijiny objectives, characteristics,
selection criteria, list of activities and expected results can be uplifted from:

The Executive Director
Health Sector Development Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Compound
East Street
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel: 226-2425
Fax: 225-6559
Email:mohgog@networksgy.com

Closing date:

All proposals are to be submitted to the address below not later than 09.00 hrs on March
22, 2005:

The Chairman
National Board for Procurement and TenderAdministration
Ministry of Finance
Main and Urquhart Street
Georgetown
Guyana

Proposals will be opened shortly thereafter on the same day, March 22, 2005.


3/5/2005, 10'49 PM






14 'SUilDAY CHRONICLE, Michi 6, 2005


U.S.


Guyana


UNITED States drug agents
trying to stem the mounting
flow of cocaine and other nar-
cotics to that country are
keeping a closer watch on
trafficking rings here, accord-
ing to a report on the illegal
trade.
The report released last
week disclosed that joint U.S.-
Guyana operations in combat-
ing narcotics were "quickly
compromised due to corrup-
tion". triggering a growing inter-
est and involvement here by the
U.S. Drug Enforcement Admin-
istration (DEA) over the past
year.
It says there is corruption
within the Guyana Police Force
and the Customs Anti-Narcot-
ics Unit (CANU) but noted that
newly-appointed Police Com-
missioner Winston Felix is said
"to be doing his best to elimi-
nate corruption within the
force".
The report disclosed that a
2004 DEA effort to work with
CANU on a drug interdiction
project was compromised be-
fore it could be made opera-
tional.
"It is believed that CANU
has been penetrated and could
be corrupt at every level", it
says.
The report revealed that the
DEA was "providing vetting for
some counter narcotics person-
nel."
It said there was a correla-
tion between the increase in cor-
ruption and the rising narcotics
trafficking.
According to the report, al-
legations of corruption "are
widespread, and reach to the
highest levels of government,
but continue to go
uninvestigated."
It recalled that in Novem-
ber, a Cheddi Jagan International
Airport official, apprehended
upon his arrival at JFK Interna-
tional airport, was found to
have eight pounds of cocaine.
It says that crimes believed
linked to narcotics trafficking
are on the rise in Georgetown
and the informal economy (be-
lieved to be fuelled by drug
proceeds) is suspected to be be-
tween 40-60 per cent of the for-
mal sector.
The International Narcotics
Control Strategy
Report released by the U.S. Bu-
reau for International Narcotics
and Law Enforcement Affairs
confirms that Guyana is a trans-
shipment point for South
American cocaine destined for
North America, Europe and the
Caribbean.



It notes that while interdic-
tions and seizures of drugs be-
ing sent from Guyana to the
U.S., Europe and the Caribbean
increased significantly last year,
the economic, political and so-
cial conditions in this country
"make it a prime target for nar-
cotics traffickers to exploit as a


targets


drug


-report says CANU believed penetrated,


cites corruption in Police Force


transit point."
Guyana's ineffective drug
interdiction capability makes
the country an easy transit
point for cocaine trafficking
from South America to the U.S.,
Europe and the Caribbean, the
report notes.
It says the volume of traf-
fic passing through Guyana
(based on seizures) appears to
be significant in local terms and
seems to be growing.
Guyana is not unique in its
attraction as a target for drugs
rings and the report, which cov-
ers several other countries, says
many Caribbean islands are
growing transshipment points.
Among these are Barbados
and six other Eastern Caribbean
islands and Curacao and others
in the Dutch Antilles.
The Bahamas is also cited
as a major transit base for nar-
cotics going to the U.S. and Eu-
rope.
The amount of drugs going
from Guyana into the U.S. does
not yet appear in large ship-
ments. However, a recent
US$54.5M seizure of cocaine in
the UK and a US$20-40M sei-
zure of 155 kilograms of cocaine
in Baltimore highlight the grow-
ing capabilities of Guyana's
drug traffickers, the report says.
It states that the country's
remote geographic location and
limited law enforcement capa-
bilities, as well as high levels of
corruption, make the country a
prime location for exploitation
by drug traffickers.




According to the report, the
Guyana Government's counter
narcotics efforts are undermined
by the lack of adequate re-
sources for law enforcement,
poor coordination among law
enforcement agencies, corrup-
tion and weak legal and judicial
systems.
"There has been an increase
in crime believed to be linked to
narcotics trafficking in the past
year", the report points out.
It says that the appoint-
ment of a new police commis-
sioner last year was "a step
forward in the fight against nar-
cotics trafficking."
"However, a lack of politi-
cal will and a National Drug
Strategy within the government
has hampered the implementa-
tion of needed reforms to the
Guyana Police Force (GPF) and
other law enforcement institu-
tions."
The U.S. report found that
cocaine flows into and out of
Guyana through its porous bor-
ders and along its coast.
"Numerous clandestine air-
strips in the mostly inaccessib..


interior are used to facilitate traf-
ficking from Venezuela and Co-
lombia. Once inside the country.
narcotics are carried to
Georgetown by road. -\ aterway
or air and then s-ent on to the
U.S.. Europe and the Caribbean
via commercial carriers.
It is believed that most
flights from Guyana to the U.S.
carry illicit narcotics on board."
The report recalled that in
March last year. police at JFK
International airport conducted
an operation involving a major
New York-Guyana drug ring
that led to 13 arrests.




Narcotics are also being sent
via cargo ships either directly or
through intermediate Caribbean
ports to their destinations, it
noted.
In 2004, high profile sei-
zures in the U.S.. UK. and other
countries involved drugs origi-
nating in Guyana. Cocaine was
found in shipments of timber.
frozen fish. molasses, rice and
coconuts upon their arrival in
the U.S., UK. Belgium from
Guyana, the document states.
"Every commodity that
Guyana exports has been used
to ship cocaine out of the coun-
try", it concludes.
It notes that the
government's counter narcotics
efforts are hampered greatly by
the lack of adequate resources
for law enforcement.
"CANU is one of the main
agencies responsible for drug-re-
lated law enforcement but has
no real authority under the law.
Officially., the CANU is still a
department of Customs. al-
though it operates with consid-
erable autonomy.
It is unclear who holds ulti-
mate power over the unit. The
scope of the CANU's operation
is believed to be largely politi-
cally regulated and directed", it
says.
According to the U.S. re-
port, many CANU officers are
afraid to take independent ac-
tion for fear of losing their jobs,
resulting in minor effective in-
vestigation.
"There is also a great deal
of mistrust between CANU of-
ficers and the GPF and due to
this, there is a lack of informa-
tion/intelligence sharing", it
found.
It also states that law en-
forcement activity last year was
limited to numerous arrests of
individuals with small amounts
of marijuana, crack cocaine or
powder cocaine on charges of
possession of drugs or posses-
sion with intent to distribute.
The GPF Narcotics Branch
and CANU continued to arrest


drug couriers at Guyana's inter-
national airport en route to the
U.S. or Europe.
The report says Guyana
Government officials belie\c
that the government's counterI
narcotics agencies interdict onl\
a small percentage of the cocaine
and coca paste that transit
Guyana..
It noted that the Guyana
Defence Force Coast Guard
(GDFCG) continued to conduct
patrols with boats acquired.


from the U.S. but there have not
yet been any narcotics interdic-
tions at sea.
The U.S. bureau points out
that the Guyana Government
continues to express commit-
ment to both domestic and in-
ternational counter narcotics ef-
forts.
It says that in 2003. at the
invitation of the Guyana Gov-
ernment, OAS/CICAD


(Organisation of American
States/Inter-American Drug
Abuse Control Commission)
personnel visited Guyana to
assist in the preparation of a
national drug strategy. It
charged that ilti project \vas
sidelined but by' the end of
2004, acting Minister of Home
Affairs Gail Teixeira reported
thal work on the project was
complete and provided the
(U.S.) Embassy with a draft
copy.


"A finalized national drug
strategy has not been submitted
to OAS/CICAD."





The report said that with
material support from the
American Government, Guyana


THE report says that drug trafficking
and related crimes such as
money laundering, drug use, arms
trafficking, official corruption, vio-
lent crime, and intimidation have
the potential to threaten the stabil-
ity of the small, democratic coun-
tries of the Eastern Caribbean and,
to varying degrees, have damaged
civil society in some of these coun-
tries. "Regional and international
drug trafficking organizations
(DTO's) and various organized
crime groups have infiltrated many
of the Eastern Caribbean nations,
corrupting officials and contracting
the services of local criminal orga-
nizations, some of whom are now
sufficiently trusted by major DTO's


established a Financial Intelli-
gence Unit (FIU) in late 2003
but it was not staffed and op-
erational until July last year.
"Funding for operations is
still being sought for the unit.
By the end of 2004, the FIU
had conducted preliminary in-
vestigations on approximately
28 cases and is preparing drafts
of legislation related to money
laundering."
The report noted that some
marijuana is consumed domes-
tically and said the consump-
lion of cocaine powder,. crack
cocaine, ecstasy and heroin i,
increasing.
It says that Guyana's con-
tentious and inefficient political
environment and lack of re-
sources significantly hampers
its ability to pursue an effective
counter narcotics campaign.
"The apparent increase in
corruption and amount of drugs
transiting Guyana will make
combating narcotics a very
tough challenge. Assistance in
strengthening the GPF and
GDF's counter narcotics and in-
telligence capabilities through
U.S. funded training and equip-
ment will be critical to GOG ef-
forts.
Also important are U.S. de-
mocracy building programmes
that serve as a foundation for
good governance in Guyana. Ef-
forts in this area will need to in-
clude strengthening Guyana's
weak judicial system, law en-
forcement infrastructure and re-
forming legislation to help in
combating narcotics". the report
says.
It suggests that the U.S.,
along with other interna-
tional stakeholders. must
continue to press for thor-
ough reform.


to be given narcotics on consign-,
ment", it says.
It adds that there are reports that
Colombian nationals are residing in
some Eastern Caribbean countries and
organizing drug trafficking operations.
Some of the Eastern Caribbean
DTO's also have established contacts
amongst themselves to facilitate drug
distribution in the region. Local traffick-
ers often pay for services with drugs
and/or weapons to limit costs and to in-
crease demand and markets.
According to U.S. law enforce-
ment officials, the infrastructure built
by DTO's operating in the region and
other vulnerabilities that exist in the
region make it ripe for exploitation by
terrorist organizations.
xi, .i,


rings


Drug trafficking


threatens stability of


Eastern Caribbean states






SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005 -


The Rupununi peanut...


(From page two)

of 10 per cent to farmers who
were desirous of going into
large, medium and small-scale
peanut cultivation.
The Regional Democratic
Council at the time had also
thrown in its lot with the estab-
lishment of a committee which
was able to negotiate a selling
price of $10 per pound for
Rupununi peanuts.
This support encouraged
farmers to step up production.
However, these efforts were
short-lived due to a number of
factors which negatively im-
pacted on the industry.
Among these factors was
the cultivation of peanuts under
traditional, unscientific and
unmechanised methods.
For example, land prepara-
tion for crop planting was be-
ing done using the slash and
burn system with heavy input
of labour force.
This system was found to
be labour intensive and costly.
In addition, the absence of
a road link with coastal Guyana
at the time created a heavy de-
pendence on air transport to
ferry produce from the
Rupununi to coastal markets


which was also a costly exer-
cise. Further, while there wasn't
assured, reliable and stable mar-
ket prices for Rupununi pea-
nuts, farmers had to compete
with low prices paid for peanuts
imported into Guyana. Guyana
imports about 300,000 pounds
of peanuts annually from the
U.S.A. and China.
These negative factors influ-
enced a decline in the industry:
growers had realized that the
cost of production was greater
than the price they were receiv-
ing for their produce.
As a result, most farmers of
the Rupununi had returned to
the cultivation of staple food
crops such as cassava, peas,
corn, pumpkin and yams at sub-
sistence levels.
By the late 1980s, the
Lethem/Mabura road was estab-
lished. This development had
created renewed interest into the
production of peanuts, since
farmers now had access by road
to coastal markets and prices
paid for peanuts had risen to
between $50 and $60 per
pound.
In 1999, farmers of the
North Rupununi had organised
themselves into an association
named the North Rupununi
District Agriculture Producers
Association. This association


was born out of farmers' need
to increase acreage utilising
maiden savannah lands and
adopt modern and appropriate
technology into production to
achieve higher yields per acre,
and at the same time, lowering
cost of production. The farm-
ers also saw the need to nego-
tiate fair market prices for pea-
nuts.
It should be noted, how-
ever, that though there are large
expanses of savannah lands in
the Rupununi, these lands are
deficient in minerals and as such
need to be fertilised.
After the formation of the
North Rupununi District Agri-
culture Producers Association a
further need arose for collabo-
rative partnership which was
felt could play a crucial role in
assisting the association to
achieve its objective.
As a result, partnerships
were forged with Beacon Foun-
dation, National Agriculture Re-
search Institute (NARI), Inter-
American Institute for Coopera-
tion on Agriculture (IICA),
Ministry of Fisheries, Other
Crops and Livestock and the
Regional Democratic Council of
Region Nine.
Through the IICA, the


North Rupununi District Agri-
culture Producers Association
was able to garner technical and
scientific assistance from the
universities of Florida and Geor-
gia of the U.S.A. for the trans-
fer of technology into the
Rupununi peanut industry.
While this was so, the Na-
tional Agriculture Research In-
stitute was responsible for the
soil tests and Beacon Founda-
tion played the role of service
provider.
Research for cultivation to
be done on virgin savannah soils
were first conducted in the
North Rupununi. The success
of these trial plots were later ex-
tended to the Central, and South
Central and South Savannahs.
In the year 2002, some
450,000 pounds of peanuts
were produced in the Rupununi.
Production continued to soar in
2003 with a market price of $80
per pound paid to farmers.
In 2004, production in the
Rupununi reached a record high
of two million pounds. This
achievement was based prima-
rily on the price paid for pea-
nuts in 2003 coupled with the
new scientific approach farmers
had adopted in cultivation
which was learnt through the
Collaboration Research Support
Programme.


However, this success met
difficulties; farmers were agaun
faced with the harsh ijliii:, of
finding stable market prices for
their peanuts.'
While merchants had pur-
chased peanuts at $80 per
pound in 2003, they were offer-
ing $40 and $45 per pound for
peanuts in 2004. This situation
forced most farmers who had
reaped their crop before Christ-
mas 2004 to withhold their pea-
nuts hoping to bargain for bet-
ter prices.
Regional Chairman of Re-
gion Nine Mr. Vincent Henry
stated that the Regional Demo-
cratic Council took steps during
the market crisis to assist farm-
ers and said that they were able
to negotiate a selling price of
$50 per pound with local pea-


nut buyer Mr. Edward Singh at
Lethem for the purchase of all
the peanuts in the Rupununi.
Farmers are contending that
while they are appreciative of
the efforts made to negotiate
$50 per pound for peanuts at
Lethem, this price is not com-
mensurate with the cost of pro-
duction from which a profit can
be accrued.
The farmers stated that
Central Government has prom-
ised them a waiver of the con-
sumption tax on peanuts which
would have allowed manufactur-
ers to offer a better price to
farmers in the Rupununi; this
promise is still being awaited.
It was also said that sys-
tems should be put in place to
facilitate the export of peanuts
from Guyana. Some farmers said


that efforts were made to export
over one million pounds of pea-
nuts from the Rupununi to Eu-
rope, but due to the incapacity
oftthe health sector to issue afla-
toxin-free certificate of peanuts
in Guyana, this export could not
be done.
The future of the peanut in-
dustry in the Rupununi rests
with the farmers and other
stakeholders in the industry. Al-
ready, growers see the need to
fully organise themselves to ne-
gotiate better market prices for
their produce. It is being sug-
gested that a Regional Agricul-
ture Producers Association
should be established to assist
farmers. Farmers are also being
advised to intensify their efforts
towards adding value to this
produce.


Already Beacon Foundation
has taken steps to facilitate a
project that would see peanut
butter which would soon be
manufactured on a large scale in
Region Nine being used in the
Region's school feeding
programme.
If the project is successful,
peanut butter will be used on
cassava bread as part of the
school feeding programme in
Region Nine, which may negate
the use of biscuits, but retain the
use of milk.
For both the peanut and
vegetable farmer of the
Rupununi, the project is seen as
a form of hope for them. The
project will mean a ready mar-
ket for a large percentage of the
peanuts in the Rupununi along
with ready markets for cassava
tubers.
Finance will also find its
way into the hands of house-
wives who are the ones adept
at making cassava bread once
they are properly organised.


How to interpret your


GSM Postpaid bill


Thank you for choosing GT&T's Cellink Plus service We have now comment our mol
billing cycle which provides a billing formal wilh a great amount of details on your account.-.

This handout is intended to serve as a guide to the information contained iinthe bill.

The first page gives a summary ol chargesfor your account Under the summary of charges
comes your:

(A) Previous Account Activity

(B) Current Account Activitv
Monthly charges
Non-recurring charges -
Calling charges
Taxes, surcharges and regulatory fees
SMS charges

From the second page you will be given the following details:
"Previous Account Activities" gives your previous balance, payments made and..n
adjustnments done '

"Monthly Charges" includes a sumnia.ry ol rentals and features e.g. call iorwardln~- iting

"Non-Recurring Charges" gives details ol al3 one time charges, such as equipment,
ai:ceisories and certain servicee lees

"Calling Charges" provides details of all calls placed by your number

"SMS Charges" gives details of all te.sl messages placed or received

"Content Charges" details web site access placed by this number

"Taxes. Surcharges and Regulatory Fees" gives a summary of all taxes in accordance
prevailing law

"Call Summary" gives the accumulated total number of minutes on every type of cal
peak, of peak and free minute periods

Each customer has a unique Account Number which is used to identify
the customer and all his'her services with GT&T. This is located at the top ,
right corner of the bill.

Kindly tear off the bottom portion of the tirst page of the bill, which is the '
only part you will need to present during payment. ... '





SUNDAY CHRONICLE


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GUARANTEED ISSUE

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MEDICAL FORM


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MEDICAL QUESTIONS




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- bureau warns rice farmers


THE Guyana National
Bureau of Standards
(GNBS) is urging Region
Two (Ponieroon/Supenaam)


rice farmers to use only scales
it has certified to weigh
paddy.
In a press release, it stated


that scales verified and deemed
fit for commercial activities
should have the GNBS seal
affixed to the device, the


UNIVERSITY OF GUYANA



Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following positions:

(I) UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN

At least a Master's degree in Library/Information Studies plus -,nr.,iili with computer
applications in Libraries or a specialist qualification at Ph.D. or Master's level with experience in
the field of specialisation. Such specialist .pu-,il.: -i.ri .ul not only include specific academic
fields but such areas as book conservation, information technology, archival administration and
computer technology.
PLUS
Evidence of exceptional research ability and professional library experience with at least f i v e
years in administrative positions.
(Details could be obtained from the Pe i -niel Ei .i ; i -,

(ii) DEPUTY DIRECTOR
OFFICE OF RESOURCE MOBILISATION AND PLANNING

(i)Master's degree in Management, Planning or Economics with three years
senior management experience.
OR
(ii) Bachelor's degree in Management, Planning or Economics with six years
experience at the management level.
Ability in the use of computers, including statistical programmes is also
required. Project planning/development and project management experience
*.' lil r Ie di' : a do'vanri ge,

(Details could be obtained from the Personnel Division).

SALARY:
Placement on Salary Scale would be dependent on qualifications and experience.Benefits
currently include non-taxable housing and r.einr-g allowances, contributory medical and
pension schemes; gratuity (where :.,[ir.i:, W aniJnuaIl ., 1-ll.r .'ud -y btL..'i 31 leave
(whichever is applicable) and leave passage and book allowances.

Anyone recruited from overseas will receive up to four (4) full economy air fares (i.e. for self,
spouse and two (2) unmarried children up to eighteen (' ?i ye r :.f ,i'\ front p: irit of recruitment,
im i i3 renr-. l '. p.rns'-_ and an tl,_ ir..i allr-1:., 3ii l-

(lii) UNIVERSITY NURSE
Certificate of Professional Nursing and Midwifery as well as current registration with the General
Nursing Council of Guyana.

Training and/or experience in Public Health Nursing would be a distinct
advantage.

JOB SUMMARY
Assist the Nursing Officer to implement the Health Education Programme of the University of
G u y a n a re n d e r'-ir ., eiv el T ,i i i i I uii "n d e I rI ,-.i r IT- e l..: i -u r ,i e .- i r :ir l. re c irdi .:.f
clients/patients. (Details could be obtained from the Personnel Division).

SALARY:-
Placement on Salary Scale would be dependent on qualifications and
experience. Benefits currently include transportation allowance, provision of uniforms, non-
contributory Medical Insurance Scheme, Vacation Leave and Leave Passage Allowance.

Applications with Curriculum Vitae (3 copies) stating full name, date of birth, marital status,'
qualifications, (with dates and overall grades obtained), work experience (with dates), full names and
addresses of three (3) referees (one of whom must be your present or last employer where applicable)
must reach the Personnel Division, University of Guyana, P.O. Box 1011101, Georgetown, E-mail -
ugpd@telsnetgy.net, Fax No.592-222-4181, or Courier Service, not later than A.ri9,.20.05 (Tel. Nos.
222-418115271), website www.uog.edu.gy


signature of the relevant
inspector on the seal and a
verification certificate posted at
the mill.
The bureau said findings
from recent verification
exercises it has done in the
region show that scales at
certain mills have not been
verified.


To date, the sca
Mahaicony Rice Lim
Paradise, Essequibo and
Persaud of Bounty
Essequibo, have no
verified, as the nec
preparations and repai
not carried out by the m
facilitate the exercise by
personnel, it reported.
The bureau said the
did not comply even
they were given ad
notice of such activities
region.


New catalogue


supports


Caribbean


building products


THE advent of the Caribbean
Single Market and Economy
(CSME) towards the end of


.T~


the year will present even
bigger opportunities for doing
business with companies in


tOf


without joining long lines!

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JANUARY 2005 BILL IS


AND THE SECOND SUNDAY IN EVERY MONTH


__


the Caribbean Communi
(CARICOM).
In a move to bri
business closer, the first editi
of Caribbean Catalogue
Construction Products
Building Materials 2004-05, no
being distributed, seeks
showcase the wide range
building products either bei
manufactured in or distribute
from various CARICO
destinations.
The Publishers
Caribbean Catalogue
Mahmoud and Tracy Farrag sa
the inspiration behind Caribbe.
Catalogues was born out of
recognition of the absence of
well documented publication f
building industry profession;
in the Caribbean to source ;
specify products and service
"In internation
circles, it is natural for indus
professionals to refer
catalogues to stay inform
about products being sold or t
latest products bei
manufactured by companies
helping them to make a choi
about what to choose.
"Caribbean Catalogu
incorporating internation
standard system, seeks to f'
that gaping void by present
architects, engineers and build
with information they wou
require on varying product
either manufactured in tl
Caribbean or already import
into regional states," accord
to the publishers.
The Farrags, current
working on the 2006-20
edition of Caribbean Catalogu
said products manufactured
Caribbean countries have alreat
proven to be of premier quali
that can stand side by side wi
imported products and in soi
cases, have shown to be f
superior over those outside t
Caribbean.
"We know all too w
about industry professional
who have been forced to ,
outside the Caribbean to sour
products because they are n
aware that the same materials
readily available in the region ai
virtually within their reac
Reason being that there are i
reference documents detailii
current information on availab
products in the Caribbean."
The published
envisage Caribbean Catalogu
to be a one-stop directory foi
wealth of information regardii
the building industry in tl
Caribbean.
To get mo
information and to order
copy of Caribbean Catalogut
please e-mail the publishers
creativealliances@yahoo.co
0
caribbeancatalogues@tstt.net


ar4W .~ 1a~ .~~~


SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005

ales of It said too that the Regio'
ited at Democratic Council (RDC) s
Vincent located at Riverstown and t,
Hall, of Deonarine of Evergreen a
t been inaccurate.
cessary The RDC was given qui
rs were some time to fix the scale t
killers to this was not done, the GN
'GNBS said.
It is advising farmers n
millers to use any of these scales
though weigh their paddy since t
equate state of their accuracy cann
s in the be ascertained by the bure"
at this time.









rI,,'


., '


The late Lance Corporal Ramnarine Lachana.


II


Families still


trying to cope

One year after ber-

serk man killed cops

at Brickdam


NE year after a
former policeman*
went berserk and
killed two serving members
of the Force in a rampage at
the Brickdam Police Station
compound, family members
of the dead men are still
trying to pick up the threads
of their lives.
At about midday on March
1, 2004, Assistant
Superintendent of Police.
Richard Griffith and Lance
Corporal Ramnarine Lachana
were senselessly gunned down
by Solomon Blackman, a former
member of the Tactical Services
Unit (TSU). Blackman also
wounded two other policemen.
Griffith's son, Eon,
speaking from his Mc Doom.
East Bank Demerara (EBD)
home last week told this
newspaper that since last
November, his mother Pamela,
has been out of the country.
However, he pointed out that
she has found it hard to cope
with the loss of her husband.
He said that Blackman's
prolonged trial for murder and
attempted murder is extremely
painful for family members.
"If he (Blackman) is mad as
he claims, they (authorities)
should seek professional
counselling for him and
determine whether he should be
(place in an institution)."
He said that he spoke to his
mother on Monday night, and she
told him that she is still grieving and
is uncomfortable speaking about
her husband's death. She is
expected back in the country at the
end of the year.
Members of the Lachana
-family still have constant
nightmares.
Lachana's widow Rohini,
said that the family held a
thanksgiving service at their
Ruimveldt home on his death
anniversary. According to
Rohini, the family is still not


over the shock of losing the sole
breadwinner of their family in
such a brutal manner.
She said that stepping out
into the working world to
support her mother-in-law,
teenage daughter, Samantha of the
Brickdam Secondary School and
herself, has also been a challenge.
Thirteen-year-old Samantha
said that the most difficult part
of her life, is passing the
Brickdam Police Station on her
way to school on a daily basis.
Memories of sharing her
lunchtimes with him immediately
cross her mind.
Constable 18334 Kester
Cosbert and Corporal Clifton
Nelson who were wounded
during the shootout are back on
the job. Cosbert was shot once
in his right leg, while Nelson was
shot in the abdomen and
shoulder.
Cosbert whose gun was
wrested from him was the first
person Blackman shot. The
deranged man then went to the
lockups area, where he shot
Corporal Lachana in the head.
He then quickly moved to the
Enquiries Office, where he shot
Corporal Nelson in the abdomen
and shoulder, before he ran over
to the Traffic Office where he
shot Griffith twice.
Blackman last attended court
on the murder and attempted
murder charges on February 21,
but the preliminary inquiry (PI)
into the matters was again put off
because of his disruptive and
vulgar behaviour. At several court
hearings, Blackman loudly pro-
tested his incarceration and de-
manded to be released.
On February 21, he shouted
many obscenities at the
magistrate and, as he was being
removed by two policemen, he
made vulgar signs and gestures
towards the Bench.
Magistrate Adrian
Thompson rescheduled the
hearing for March 21.


- '., I,
I;
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Music by King Scorpion
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SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


...

.,n e,


44" *
/ _:"4 ,, -." "**-,,
". ,,, ; *, *:.
.^-; ~ ~.: ^
..........................................................,^ i -


Constable Kester Cosbert, after he was shot a year ago at the
hospital.


-------------------


'~~~"~~-"wca~l~~5f~aeas~s~P-~-l~la~~~







20 ........ . SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


Guyana Red


Cross gets


$1.3M from


Flood Aid


Concert

ein l Madhoo-Nascimento, (left) one of the organizers of the
recently held 'Guyana Flood-Aid' Concert at the National
Park, presents a cheque for G$1, 350, 672.00 to Red Cross
Head, Ms. Dorothy Fraser at the Red Cross Headquarters in
Kingston. With Madhoo-Nascimento are some of, the
organizers and artistes who pulled off the February 20 event.
In addition to a cast and crew of approximately 140
persons, the concert was graced with the presence of Rikki
Jai, world renowned Chutney King from Trinidad.


CDC head mulls



involvement of



regions, joint services


By Wendella Davidson
HEAD of the Civil
D e f e n c e
Commission (CDC),
Colonel Chabilall
Ramsarup, is proposing a
new arrangement in which
the administrative regions
and the joint services are
integrally involved in
disaster preparedness.
He is of the firm
conviction that each region
should possess the capability
to address an emergency from
the onset without having to
await orders or personnel from
the CDC's headquarters.


With such an
arrangement in place, respective
regions will be better able to
respond in a timely manner to an
emergency depending on the
gravity of the situation, he
posited .
To this end, Colonel
Ramsarup, whose appointment
came in the height of the recent
devastating floods that
inundated homes and caused
widespread destruction, says he
would like to see trained regional
officials on the ground in each
region. .
Emphasising that such
training should be ongoing and be
held preferably on weekends


using the resources of the joint
services, the new CDC head sees
an advantage in having all the
identified personnel from the
regions being coursed, under one
roof, on the rudiments of
disaster preparedness.
"In that case (the
CDC) can even act out mock
emergency disaster scenarios so
that the respective personnel in
the regions will know what role
they will play in such instances,"
he said.
Even though the CDC
is only activated in times of
disaster, Ramsarup still sees the
need for a skeleton staff at the
offices.


Yacancy

Industrial Electrician

M'1uinimum qM a8ifications
. t & u


Y &i Guilds or equivalent in Electronics. Training
Technical r;im or Trade School would be a definite advantage,

d Must bl hoedhden....a,,,va.-


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* Candidate must have considerable practical experience with power
generatorsnd m high c voltage systems, repairs and maintenance of electric
and motor control circuits,

SAn attractive package and conditions of service that include participation
in the Company's Group Life and Medical Scheme await the right person.

thrre, i ": with Curriculum Vitae must be submitted to reach


Human Resource Consultant
STOOLSIE PERSAUD LIMITED
GROUP OF COMPANIES
10-12 Lombard Street, Georgetown.

No later than Mondy 4t h y.March ... .. ...


a t :.


The colonel's new
appointment involved him
having to juggle his time
between his routine duties in
the army and overseeing the
work of the CDC.
He recalled that his
additional job evolved from
discussions he had with Chief
of Staff (COS) of the GDF,
Brigadier Edward Collins after
taking stock of the situation.
The discussion
subsequently led to the COS
volunteering to President
Bharrat Jagdeo. the services of
his top officer to man the CDC
which at that time was being
run by Minster of Public
Service. Dr. Jennifer Westford
with assistance from Minister
of Human Services and Social
Security. Bibi Shadick.
The role of the CDC
under its new head was to
better coordinate the relief


efforts which were being put in
place to assist those affected
which available data showed
was in the vicinity of 253. 000
persons and 21, 275
households.
It was obvious that the
CDC at the time of the flooding,
did not have the capacity to
deal with a disaster of such
magnitude, and had received
scathing criticisms from.
President Bharrat Jagdeo and
officials of the United States
Embassy.
According to Colonel
Ramsarup from what he saw on
January 17 two days after the
floods started following
unusually heavy rainfall he
concluded that the time was
opportune for the army
without further delay, "assert
itself to assume its national
role.".
As the rains continued
unabated and the flooding
worsened. President Jagdeo
declared the administrative
regions of Three(West
Demerara/Essequibo Islands);
Region Four (Demerara/
Mahaica) and Region Five (
Mahaica/West Berbicc) as
' disaster areas.* ,,e *" ".
The CDC undertook


to distribute water-and cooked
food to the suffering
households in the inundated
communities on the East and
West Coasts of Demerara and
Sophia.
This action was
boosted by the establishment of
a number of soup kitchens by
organizations and private
citizens, and the distribution of
food hampers. Guyana also
received tangible financial and
other support from several
countries, including Brazil.
Trinidad, French Guiana, the
United States, the United
Kingdom, and Canada. donor
organizations. and several
overseas-based Guyanese
groups.
Data compiled by the
CDC showed that from
January 23, 2004 to March 3.
2005. 80. 210 hampers were
distributed; 146. 458 hot meals
were handed out; 38, 300.000
gallons of waters were
distributed, along with 20, 236
cleaning kits.

GARBAGE DISPOSAL
According to Colonel
Ramsarup. now that the flood
waters have receded, the focus
of the CDC is on cleaning up
and recovery..
This massive clean-up
exercise is being funded by the
Government and to ensure that
a thorough job is done,
especially on the East Coast of
Demerara. the services of the
Neighborhood Democratic
Councils have been enlisted to
distribute garbage bags for
residents to use in the clean-up
exercise.
The CDC has also
distributed forks, rakes and
other implements to assist in
the exercise
Meetings were also held
with NDC officials to determine
what needs to be done as the
intention is to remove all evidence
of garbage, ensure that drains are
cleaned so as to bring about some
level of improvement to the
environment.
According to the CDC
head, the meetings highlighted
the need for professional help
to complement the work of the
NDC in the removal of the
garbage and this resulted in the
recruitment of two external
contractors. Cevons Waste
Management and Pooran
Brothers.
Col. Ramsarup pointed
out too that in instances where
the flood waters have "made
roads inaccessible to vehicles in
*isme.cQtnnujtIgls,, thepC, ..
would utilise the services of


residents within the
communities, or the NDC, to
have the garbage moved to a
more convenient area.
Two areas, behind the'
prison at Lusignan and in the
vicinity of Enterprise Airstrip
have been identified as possible
dump sites, and have been,
inspected by officials of the
Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA).
The CDC head
reiterated that the emphasis at
the moment is on cleaning up
households in the respective
communities.
And, in an effort to
restore the drainage of the
conservancy, dredging works ar&e
being concentrated on the canals
at Shanklands, Diamond, Land
of Canaan and Cuna on the East
Bank Demerara, so as to allow
for draining to take place into
the Demerara River.
This will eliminate any
possibility of having the canals
drained into the Mahaica and,
Mahaicony River, as had to be
done recently, to avoid a further:
flooding catastrophe.
The NDCs will oversee
the rehabilitation of roads and
drainage sluices, all in
preparation for the May/June'
rains.
According to the CDC
head. the agency continues to
receive donations and minimal
distribution is being done "to
only people who are in dire need
of food."
The agency continues to'
monitor areas such as Nooten Zuil
and Dazzell Housing Scheme, East
Coast Demerara and Sophia, which
are without water.
Noting that the number
of persons seeking medical
attention from the flood -
affected communities has
significantly decreased, Colonel
Ramsarup said most of those
seen now are found to be
suffering from chronic illnesses.
The spread of the
dreaded letospirosis which
claimed the lives of some 30
persons, including a popular
journalist/calypsonian, had
caused some uneasiness among
members of the populace,
particularly those from the East
Coast.
The CDC head was,
however, high in praise for the
"alertness" and "robustness" of
the Ministry of Health coupled
with timely support from the
Pan American Health
Organisation (PAHO) and the
United Nations Children's
Fund (UNICEF), which helped
to bring the situation under
control aud.,eliiniat thelefear
of people.


4






SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


MTV CHANNEL 14
CABLE 65


06:45 h Sign On With Bhajan
Melodies
07:00 h Dabi's Musical Hour
07:30 h Bhakti Bhajans
08:00 h Christ For The Nation
(Live)
08:30 h IQ (Islamic Quiz)Live
09:00 h Sunday Morning At
MTV With Renu (Live)
10:00 h Death
Announcements/ In Memoriam
10:05 h Indian Movie:
Shannilee
13:00 h Night Of Reflection
On The Late Dr. Cheddi Jagan
14:00 h Asian Variety Show
(AVS)
15:00 h Movie: First Daughter
17:00 h Travelers Extreme
Live With Brian
18:00 h Birthdays & Other
Greetings
18:15 h Death
Announcements/ In Memoriam
18:30 h The Dairy
19:00 h Weekly Digest
19:30 h IBE Highlights
20:30 h Death
Announcements/ In Memoriam
20:35 h Documentary On The
Late Dr. Cheddi Jagan
21:30 h Indian Movie
00:30 h Sign Off

CNS CHANNEL 6

05:00 h Inspiration Time
06:30 h Deaths & In-
Memoriam
06:50 h Arya Samaj Program
07:00 h GYO Relgious
Program
07:15 h Voice Of Hinduism
08:00 h Geetmala
09:00 h RBM Presents
"MAHA SHIVA ARATRI"
10:00 H English Movie
12:00 h Deaths & In-
Memoriam
12:30 h Radha Krishna
Mandir Satsang
13:30 h Jesus And The Shroud
Of Turin
14:30 h Sanathan Dharma
15:00 h End Times With
Apostle Das
15:30 h Maximum Vibes
16:30 h Cartoons
17:00 h Greetings
17:50 h Viewpoint By Vibert
Parvatan
18:00 h Indian Cultural Time
18:30 h Eye On The Issue
19:00 h Deaths & In-


Memoriam
20:25 h Interlude
20:30 h Voice Of The People
21:00 h Deaths & In-
.Memoriam
22:00 h Viewers Choice
English Movie
00:00 h English Movie
02:00 h English Movie
03:30 h English Movie

VTV CHANNEL 46
CABLE 102

07:00 h Full House
07:30 h Movie
.09:00 h Movie
,11:00 h Movie
13:00 h Movie
15:00 h Movie
17:00 h Memory Lane Live
With RY
19:00 h Majesty 1 Music
Lesson Live With Mark Britton
S20:00 h Sports
21:30 h Movie
23:50 h Sign Off

NCN INC. CHANNEL 11

02:00 h NCN News Magazine
(R/B)
02:30 h Late Nite With GINA
03:00 h Movie
-'05:00 h Hour Of Potter
05:30 h Newtown Gospel
Hour
,.06:00 h NCN News Magazine
(R/B)
07:00 h CNN News
08:00 h Lifting Guyana To
:greatness
08:30 h The Fact
09:00 h Anmol Geet
10 00 h Homestretch
Magazine
,10:30 h Sangeet Sansar
"11:00h-Caribscope
'11:30 h Weekly Digest
12:00 h Press Conference
With President Jagdeo
13:00 h Info. For Nation
Building
13:30 h Breaking The Silence
`14:30 h Catholic Magazine
15:00 h Feature
15.3I. h Presidential Diary
16 i1.i 1h Family Forum
16:30 h'- Reflections On The
Late Cheddi Jagan
17:30 h Guysuco Round Up
18:00 h NCN 6 O'Clock
SNews Magazine
18:30 h Kala Milan
19:00 h One On One
19:30 h Close Up
20:00 h 60 Minutes


"Weather

atchr

TODAY'S FORECAST: Fair weather conditions are expected
to prevail apart from brief, isolated showers, mostly over inland
and interior locations.
WINDS: Will vary between the Northeast and Southeast at 2 to
6m.p.s.
WAVES: Slight to moderate reaching 1.2m in open waters.
HIGH TIDE: 00:44h at (2.35m) and 12:59h at (2.68m)
LOW TIDE: 06:37h at (1.22m) arid 19:13h at (0.70m)
G/T6WN TIMEHRI N.,AMSTERDAM MABARUMA
SUNRISE: 06:03h 06:04h .06:00h 06:10Oh
SUNSET: 18:05h 18:05h 18 02n 18:11h
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE: 28-33C over inland and interior
locations & 28-30C along the coast.
MINIMUM TEMPERATURE: 21.0 24.0C over inland and interior
locations & 25.0-26.5C along the coast.
RAINFALL: Nil
RAINFALL ACCUMULATED : 0.8mm
MARINE ADVISORY: Fishermen and other marine users
are advised not to damage or interfere with the ocean
platforms, whose data are vital to the provision of the
weather information and warnings for the safety of
the marine community.
HIGH TIDE ADVISORY: Nil
SPRING TIDE ADVISORY: Nil

FOR WEATHER RELATED QUERIES
PLEASE CALL --- 261-2216, FAX 261-2284


21:00 h Islam For Guyana
21:30 h Movie

NTN CHANNEL 18
CABLE 69

05:00 h Sign On With The
Mahamrtunjaya Mantra
05:10 h Meditation
05:30 h Quran This Morning
06:00 h R. Gossai General
Store Presents Shiva Bhajans
06:15 h Jetto's Lumber Yard
Presents Shiva Bhajans
06:45 h Timehri Maha Kali
Shakti Mandir Presents Ma Ki
Shakti Anmrit
07:00 h Ramroop's Furniture
Store Presents Religious
Teachings
07:30 h A&S Enterprises
Presents Shiva Bhajans
07:45 h Death Announcement
& In Memoriam
08:05 h SA RE GA MA
(Musical Notes) A Live Call-In
Program
09:30 h Press Conference
With President Jagan
10:35 h Dr. Jagan's Interview
11:20 h Thunder In Guyana
12:10 h Perspective: President
Jagan
13:00 h DVD Movie:
SURAKSHA (Eng. Sub.)
Starring Mithum Chakraborthy
& Ranjeeta
16:00 h Gurukula Sandesh
16:30 h Teaching Of Islam
17:00 h IPA Presents... Shiv
Mahapuran (Eng. Sub.)
17:30 h Kishore Local Talent
18:00 h Mere Awaaz Suno...
Karaoke Live
19:30 h Birthday Greetings/
Anniversary/ Congratulation/
Death Announcement & In
Memoriam
20:00 h Perspective: President
Jagan
20:35 h Shri Ramcharitamanas
Katha By Shri Praskas Gossai
In Corentyne, Berbice
22:40 h DVD Movie: ROG -
Starring Irrfan, Suhel Seth,
Himanshu Malik, Murish
Makhija & Shyamoli Varma
02:00 h Sign Off With The
Gayatri Mantra

WRHM CHANNEL 7

06:30 h BBC News
07:00 h CNN'News
08:00 h Today
10:00 h CBS Sunday
11:30 h Face The Nation
12:00 h Pocahontas 2


14:00 h NBA Basketball
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Championship
19:00 h Eyes On The Issues
19:30 h NBC News
20:00 h 60 Minutes
21:00 h Cold Case
22:00 h Law & Order
23:00 li Cross Jordan
00:00 h NBC New

LRTV CHANNEL 10/17/
CABLE 68

02:00 h Movie
04:00 h Movie
05:30 h TBN Gospel Hour
06:30 h Voice Of Deliverance
07:00 h House Of Israel
07:30 h Revelation & Power
08:00 hi Cartoons
09:00 h NCN News Magazine
10:00 h Movie
12:00 h Lenten Movie
15:00 h Light From The Word
15:30 h Real TV
16:00 h Even Stevens
16:30 h Aaj Gurkula Sandesh
17:00 h Minister Baksh
Address To Resident In Berbice
17:30 h Headline News
18:00 h Empertec Guyana
Forum
19:00 h Birthday Greetings &
Dedications
19:30 h Death Announcement,
In Memory & Dedications
20:00 h Islam The Way To
Paradise
20:30 h Final Revelations
21:05 h The Bible Speak
22:00 h Movie
00:00 h Movie

DTV CHANNEL 8

08:55 h Sign On
09:00 h Sunday Mass: Our
Lady Of The Angels
10:30 h Sabrina Animated
11:00 h Family Matters
12:00 h DTV'S Festival Of
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Season: Ben Hur
15:00 h Full House
15:30 h Stuart Little
17:30 h Brandy & Mr.
Whiskers
18:00 h Everwood
19:00 h Greetings &
Announcements
19:30 h Faith In Action A
Catholic Series
20:00 h Musical Interlude
20:30 h A Return To God's
Biblical Foundation
21:00 h Nature


DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE CLOSURE TO ROAD
TRAFFIC FOR SUNDAY, MARCH 6,2005


..... ... r( ..: ,,,: -

For Ocean Going VWsiels & Trawlers 13:30
For Ocean Going Vessels opening lasts about 1-1"2hrs

,DS R ,A ,,. O NOT

SIT ON BRIDG RIL


SYDNEY, (Reuters) Prince
Charles's problem-plagued
wedding to Camilla Parker
Bowles would go ahead as
planned despite nine formal
objections to the union being
lodged in Britain, a spokes-
man for the prince said yes-
terday.
The two divorcees are due
to marry in a civil ceremony on
April 8 but plans have verged
on the farcical since the venue
was switched from Windsor
Castle to the local town hall and
Charles's mother Queen Eliza-
beth deciding not to attend.
BBC News reported that
nine separate objections, known
as caveats, had been lodged with
Charles and Camilla's local reg-
istry office.
The BBC said the unspeci-
fied objections had been referred
to the registrar-general and no
marriage certificate could be is-
sued until they were dealt with.
A spokesman for Prince
Charles, who wrapped up a
short visit to Australia yester-
day, said the registrar-general
would determine whether the
objections have any legal basis.
"1 am sure it will be abso-
lutely fine. Our position is that
we are very confident that these
issues can be worked through,"
spokesman Patrick Harrison


22:00 h There Eyes Were
Watching Go
00:00 h Sign Off

HBTV CHANNEL 9

05:50 h Death Announcement
06:00 h Bishop W.D Babb
Presents
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Ministries
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08:00 h Islam & You
09:00 h Entrcpreneurship
10:00 h House Of Israel Bible
Class
10:30 h Documentary
11:00 h Nation Watch


told reporters during a visit by
the prince to a property in
southern New South Wales.
'The objections need to be
legal ones to have any validity."
Constitutional experts in
Britain have already questioned
the legality of the couple's wed-
ding.
Judiciary head Lord Fal-
coner, the Lord Chancellor, has
issued a statement declaring that
a civil marriage for the future
monarch was legally valid. ,
The Australian visit by
Prince Charles, who left for
New Zealand yesterday, was
largely overshadowed by the-
presence in the country of Dan-
ish royals Crown Prince
Frederik and his Australian-born
wife, Crown Princess Mary.,
The raft of royals rekindled
a debate in Australia about
whether the former British
colony and constitutional mon-
archy should keep its 216-year-
old ties with Britain or become
a republic with a homegrowii
president.
The issue has been sim-
mering since a vote in 1999,
narrowly rejected a republic
because many Australians
want a popularly elected,
president, not one appointed
by parliament as proposed in
the referendum.


16 1520 30 hrs
"FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX"
with Dennis Quaid
plus
"THE PUNISHED"
with Tom Jane






13:45hrs ..
S "AITRAAZ" ".1
with Prnvaka & Kareena
16.30120.30 hrs
"BIG BOUNCE"
, ,vwillri Owen Wil -
i plus
"OCEAN'S TWELVE"
: with Brad Pitt, Matt Damon -
'Opp 0046 p 0,1401 i Mi l


GUIDE SUBJECT

TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE



Objections won't stop

Charles's wedding


spokesman


13:00 h ACDA Presents
14:00 h Dalgety's Africa,
15:00 h Birthday Request
15:05 h Expose
16:00 h From The Heart
Church Ministries
17:00 h New Life Ministries
17:30 h Mystery Of The
Gospel
18:00 h Sports Show
19:00 h Birthday Request
19:05 h Sitcom
20:00 h C-Span's:. "Not
Guilty: 12 Black Men Speak
Out" 21:00 h Message By
Hon. Minister Farrakhan
22:00 h Death Announcement
22:30 h Movie
00:00 h Sign Off














I ---------'*----- -.,:'*..


SUNDAYCHRONICLE March 6, 2005


t 4.".




AC ~


COURT OF JUDA":. URE.
C CIVIL JURISDICTION
BETWEEN: GUYANA BANK
FOR TRADE & INDUSTRY
LIMITED Plainuff and The
Proprietor or Proprietors,
Representative orf
Representatives of Lot A74 Bel
g Air Park, "- I-, -.
Demerara wit "n ,, :
and erections thereon as more
fully described in Transport No.
81 5A91 Defendant TO: THE
ABOVENAMED DEFENDANT.
TAKE NOTICE that a Specially
Endorsed Writ of Sunmntonrs was
on the 1" Vday of March 2005
issued against you rhe said
Defendant to appear before the
High Court of the Supreme Court
of Judicature at the Law Courts,
Geor--? .tnv.n in which the
F ia.-.-1 .:i- is for the sum
of S3.316.247: 'three million
three hundred and sixteen
thousand two hundred and forty
seven dollars) nith such sum as
. represents interestt thereon
compounded at the rate of
22.75% per annumn from I
January 2005 'o date of
payment, the amount
due under i certain Bond
and Deed of mort .' duly
executed by Prince ,,c (now
deceased) and Dexter Wills
(now deceased on 25 August
1993 before Carolyn Ramroop,
Deputy Registrar of Deeds of
Cu' "sr in favour of the Plaintiff
-,:, r,- sum of $2,000,000 (two
million five hundred thousand
dollars) with interest thereon at
the rate of 36.5% per annum
'with effect from 25 August 1993
which rate of interest was varied
on several occasions and finally
increased to 22.75% per
annum with effect from 2
February 2005 until fully paid
and vested with right of first
mortgage on: Lot numbered
A74 (A seventy four), being part
of a piece of land containingq
an area of 45.089 .i:.i-. .
decimal nought eight nine)
acres known as Bel Air Park. in
the City of Georgetown, in the
County of Demerara, in the
Republic of Guyana. the said
piece of land and the said lot
being shown and defined on a
Plan by D.C.S. Moses. Sworn
Land Surveyor, dated the 11'"
March 1952 and deposited in
the Deeds Registry on the 18"
June 1952, with the building
and erections thereon and on
all other buildings and
erections which may hereafter
be situate thereon, the property
of the mortgagors or either of
them. And secondly a certain
Bond and Deed of mortgage
duly executed by Prince Wills
S(now deceased) and Dexter Wills
(now deceased) on 7 January
1998 before Leon Stewart,
Registrar of Deeds of Guyana,
in navour of hfe Plaintilf for the
sum of S6 900.000 (six million
nine hundred thousandd dollars)
with interest thereon al rate of
37% per annum with effect from
7 January 1998 which rate of
interest was varied on several
occasions and finally increased
to 22.75% per annumrn with
effect from 2 Febrtuary 2005
until fully paid and vested with
right of seco-nd : : '
SLot numbered A. .
Sfour., beinc pr'r' :f a pece of
land i', area of
45.08d I o / decimal
noua 'tr eight nin n acr os known
as Bel Air Park. n the City of
Georgetow'n .r- the County of
Demorara, in the Reoublic of
Guyana, the s id piece of land
and the said lot i .!own
and defined oi, rI'ln by
D.C.S. Moses Swornr Land
Surveyor. dated il:e 11i March
1952 and d Iootsi'td in the
Deeds Registnq. o 1 :h I8' Joune
erectiho s t0'eeri and on fll
future bu.idinios'3 and erecnicns
which may I.e -:f.-r be ir;'.,tI;
thereon durinn' '.'c e.xi,tencu' of
this niortq 1, IIst Irop-rily oi
the mnortgagors o e',,ither 0o
titriem. If you desire to d(efendt
the said matter t- ou 'i.us r it
later than 3 3 prm in '
'2Uu .... .. .
Defence and ve'' i tut ,\I...r
before fthe High Court of the
S,"'e. rne Co-r ..;' fnal..sre aln


ihtO tI l lo lni i' t it 'tO '.'I,

,'c k in hine n iin n.' i ''
0 C11 1et 'I .''OI ,'
1.1 PI' Oed 1 ou t It S
1 n-' enT] o e -lve '

Sgd FOR R1e1'GIS'!'RAR .
2:t":0 N.a '58--S
DEMERARA IN THE HIGHl
COURT OF ITHE SUPREME
COURT OF JUDICATLRE. CIVIL.
JURISDICTION. BETWEEN:
NATIONAL BANK OF
INDUSTRY & COMMERCE
LIMITED Plaintiff and The
Proprietor of Proprietors',
Representative our
Representatives of Lot 63
Section A, Triumph Backlands in
the Tr,, ,,,,,,,-, i- -, ,,n,,,,i
L o c a l ( ,.- .. o ,, ,
Coast Demerara with the
building and erections thereon
as more fully described in
Transport No. 505/99. Defendant
TO: THE ABOVENAMED
DEFENDANT TAKE NOTICE
that a Specially Endorsed Writ
of Summons was on the 24"c day
of February 2005 issued against
you the said Defendant to
appear before the Higth Court of
the Supreme Court of Judicature
at the Law Co r'- .' q.'tt 't n- 'r.
in w h ic h th e F ..... i i 11 .. ,
for the sum of S9. 818.682. (nine
million eight hundred and
eighteen thousand six hundred
and eighty two dollars) with
interest on the sum of
$7.800.000. (seven million eight
hundred thousand dollars) at the
rate of 19.25% per annum from
26 January 2005 to date of
payment, being tile amount due
under certain Bonds and Deeds
of ,,.rr i'-i duIv'executed firstly
on i 'fi 1999 before Carolyn
Paul, Deputy Registrar of Deeds
of Guyana, by Drepaul Beharry
anrid Estardai Beharry in favour
of the Plaintiff for thIe surn of
$6.000,000: (six million dollars)
with interest thereon at the rate
of 4% per annum with effect from
19 April 1999 which rate of
interest was increased to 12.5%
per annum with effect from 30
June 2003. then increase to
14.75% per annum with effect
from 27 July 2004 then increased
to 19.25% per annum with effect
from 25 January 2005 until fully
paid and vested with right of first
mortgage on: Lot numbered 63
(sixty three) Section A, Triumph
Backlands, in the Triumph-
Beterverwagting Local
Government District, situate oni
the east sea coast of the County
of Demerara, Republic of
Guyana. the said lot being
shown on a diagram by L. M.
Nightingale, Sworn Land
Surveyor, dated 20"1 March, 1911
and deposited in the Office of
the Registrar now the Deeds
o"pn;r?'" at Georgetown on the
1t' Jiu 1912 and on the
,, a thereon but on all
future buildings and erections
which may hereafter be
constructed or erected thereon
during the existence of this
mortgage, the property of the
mortgagor. And secondly on 26
January 2000 before Leon
Stewart, F-'. .1, of Deeds of
Guyana. l '"] Beharry and
Estardai Beharry in favour of the
Plaintiff for the sum of
$1.800,000: (one million eight
hundred thousand dollars) with
interest thereon at the rate of 4%
oer annum with effect from 26
January 2000 which rate of
interest was increased to 12.'"%
per anlnurn vith effect from 30
June 2003, then increased to
14.75% per an'nutn with effect
from 27 July 2004, then
increased to 19.25% per annum
with effect from 25 January 2005
until fully paid and vested with
right of second n or Jae on: Lot
numbered 03 (sixty three)
Section A. Triumph Backlands.
in in e T ... . , ,
Local I ,
situaln oI it'il '' the Counti of Dem13'erara,
R piblr oI d ly;an;. Itllh' saidI lot
S;,nown on a ., .i y
S,' I, .. Sworn L nrid
.. ... i. i M arch, 1 )1
a-nd depoI siied in lhe Office of
h R. ni.tr, ,l r ,'ow th De(ods
p gomr<-r trl-r" on the
I .JU y. .i. i on the
buildingjs tlilieorn and on all
future buildings and erections
which may hereafter be
constructed or erected thereon
during the (existence of this


: ) t .r e Ihe p' tir, '' o t he
t qirt .1 l ihto So i e ': n CtI..oil '
. ti Si!teii .'-t the L CO I
orgeowLr V n on 1h1t 11 ,d" e '!t

,ii ', i iof in l rlrll'r'i "h
Or O V air 1 _'(){.I1,, t" ', I l

pril. 2005 at 9 o cluck in the
iorenoon. II ou tlail to file such
Affidavit of Defence or appear
as rnoresaid the Plaintiff may
proceed therein and Judgement
.1i t: .1 -r, .-iainst you in your
.. .1 the 24" day of
i obruary. 2005. Sgd. FOR
REGISTRAR.



INCR Ministries Prophet
Prayerful invites all to break
demonic curses, sicknesses
poverty, etc. Build spiritually
blessedd relationship with God
Telephone: 229-6547/628-4559(



FNROL now it Shalom
Enteiprise. Lot 2 Cloni Street.
Stabroek, Georgetown You
could :lso 'obtan ,
International Driver's Permit Fori
information call 622-16-2. 6o!1-
9038, 227-3869.
PRUDENTIAL SCHOOL cf
Motoring. "You traml to pass".
Telephone 227-1063, 223-7908
243 Forshaw & Oronoque
Streets.
ENROL now at D & R Driving
School. 95 Hadfield Street, Werk-
en-Rust, Georgetown. Telephone
660-4216/226-6454.



MAGAZINE Worldwide Pen
Friends Information? Send
stamped envelope CFI. PO Box:
12154, Georgetown, Guyana.
COMMUNICATE with
interested persons by telephone for
friendship or serious relations. Call:
CFI Telephone Friendship Link:
261-5079, Sunday to Saturday.
07:00 to 21:00 h.
PROFESSIONAL and other
employed males and females
for friendship, love, marriage.
Call the Junior/Senior/Singles
Dating Service. 18 80 years.
Telephone 223-8237 Mn -
Fri., 09:00 h 18:00 h Sat. -
Sun. 10:00 h 14:00 h.
(Immediate Link).
A MIDDLE aged. healthy,
educated and divorced male
seeks a relationship with a
female companion of the same
calibre for a serious relationship
leading to marriage. Only a
serious minded co-operative and
sincere individual would be
successful- Write to Rau. P.O.
Box 12351. Bourda.
Georgetown.



DESERT Rose, Norfolk Pine
Christmas Trees. Orchids (Den.
Once, Cat etc.), hanging basket
Fern, Cactus and lots more.
Telephone 226-2882. 195 C
Camp Street at the hack of the
Key <& Lock Shop.



I-IPRBAL Medicines skin
infection, asthma, impolency,
cholesterol, blood pressure, weight
loss, i i ., stricture pain,
diabetes, int. I I 1.I .n and
i n y i I i....... 220-
7342/614 -56550.

T, f HIiio',-" I. ,s', iu-ii .. G :
N'!: Ir- lol !se -c:! slaiu1 ai nt, UG
RoPtd S')eci;i l Cieole lunches ailnd
rinllne da;iiy for UG C &,, Colleijc
's-indents:. Fre |linss of juico with
meal rl- '$395 T eltphorn : 222-6528/
22:-2 5 ]0
NOW open 'I he Galrden
S l'te Rouslti.aullnl. Enjoy ho
finest Crenle & Chinese styled
dishes. Relax ill our cool. friendly
aiii cozy atmosphere. Home &
Office delivery available. 170
Barr Street, Kitty. Telephone
227-8440/ .


FOR PROFESSIONAL.
COMPUTER Repiias Sials '
i'e r'vices. ( il Kl t'l rli's Co'pull r
i-)ep[ Ils ,' S lo, e 't1 re 11 ?:ti 911 7
S.'aiv'cts .n\i. thibk' .,i :'i:-
PROIFESSIONAL CompuierI
iepirns sales and Networkkin,
Reduced prices on band new,
systems. Tel. 624-5659. 220-
6'262.
C-TECH COMPUTERS
SERVICES. Repair '., .,' ,.
Data Recovery and ,.' ii-, j, I
S.... ;..., a of Networks.
S ,i.-.,,e I'-4929. Contact
Rickey 226-8234.



USA GREEN CARD
LOTTERY. Live & work in the USA.
Family application: S4 000.
Contact 227-3339/623-1195
TECHNICIAN on call for all
youl television, VCR and
iicrowave repairs. \VWe provide
home service. Call Ryin r,* 2 .6;
2634/615-7361
A day care that cites for the
physical, intellectual, social and
emotional development of your
child. Call 641-0569 (C). 218-
4002 (H).
NEED AN EMPLOYEE?
Guyana Employment Agency
provides top employees with aI
road range of skills in a variety
of fields. Contact 227-3339.
REPAIRS done to TVs. VCRs,
radioitape/CD combination sets,
microwave ovens. etc. Free pick up
and delivery. Call Stanley -
Telephone No: 615-2546/218-
2465.
CANADIAN IMMIGRATION
PAPER WORK. We assist with
the paper work. Cost $6 000 for
ill i- l ,- -,nd consultation is
- Li-' i''.' 227-3339/623-
1195.
FOR efficient service and
repairs:- washing machines,
refrigerators, micro-wave ovens.
dryers, etc. Freezezone Enterprises,
6 'A" Shell Road, Kitty. Telephone
227-0060/616-5568.
WOULD you like to be free from
the stress of selling or renting your
property? We at Meg's Realty and
Information Establishment can do
it for you. Contact us on 613-5735
or 263-6043.






Hire only approved Canadian
I m m i v ra 0i i o n
I L"i'ns iS;'Cons'iin!-s3" ;0
Sp:epale yoi 1
papers. Skilled Workers.
S el f E mp I o y e d /
Businessmen. Farmers,
I i .. i J e



our .n :" e.' ',




{ 0 ,Olt 'y'. I

Balwant Persaud &
Associates Licensed i



Canandian Head




O. Of10ic0:.;mrtior .
;i ;': i'o" iii l '. ON it" "r

r ab I 1'"


. . '



-' ," CAT 317 EXCAVATOR.
*i -. AVAILABLE FROM 9/03/05.
CALL 261-5403.



O V E R S TE A S


-'
'n" r' -" ~- -


. ".- ,-' -. ^ .. .. -,':- : _,-.'.'


FOR all your telephone
e-ervices r epairs 'o cable
equipment, rewiring.
adjacmeni, etc Contact
Qualified Technician with over
35 years experience Don't delay.
Telephone 226-2766/617-0427
rinytitme
C(AKE DECORATION
SERVICES. For il your' cake
decoration needs, birthday Party.
Weddings, Am'niVt rs.v Call
St n Seivices on i'1letphone
inI!t)er 6t00I c )105 E-rnal!
A d d i s
scan sevices()allahoo com





i .S.A IMMIGRATION
Papers for National Visa
Centre
-, ,I' Petitions.
Adjustment of Status.
Case Follow-ups.
Enquiries, Consular
Appointments etc.
LLOYDl lL.LIA.'S trSSOCIATES
[ THE ,' U, '.'L 1'
105 Regent Rd., Bourda.
SBetween Cummings &
Light Sts.,
Georgetown.
Tel#:(592)-223-8115
Fax#:(592)-225-6496
E-mail-
crucible@guyana.net.gy


INDRA'S Beauty Salon, 122
Oronoque Street for cold wave.
straightening, facial, manicure.
scalp treatment and design on nails,
Also Beauty Culture available. Tel.
227-1601.
DOLLY'S Hairdressing Salon,
175 Middle Street, C/burg.
Georgetown for Cold-waving,
Straightening, Styling Colour.
Streak. Cut, Blow-dry, Scalp
treatment, Manicure, Pedicure.
Facial, etc. Phone 227-2428.



IMPROVE your designing and
dressmaking skills. .)erginners to
professional levels. Call Shannila -
225-2598/627-6306.
JEAN offers courses it n El-
ementary, Ilcimcdi(ae & Ad-
vanced rc .. also De1
sitni 1 ., K itty.
Tel. # '226-9548r

--'2 .' ..1 i rt itt. ,,
wkORK from home.
Information? S',nd .stamped
onv':'lopeo to. 9ibi Faid, 65 FPub'ic
Road o E'lc''I-i. .as Bimnk
!.'i(rarai Ouvi'
'i, in : si ('1rl;} t rl ll ,'. 0t
,' "K to.
\t l ',,rr ,' I' i\v iIsl r ' fiii'cll r fie I'"

Send sfti npd n:.!volope to.
Nicol, Aich;[I Pi'( tsox 12154,
Georetown, (.G'* ;;n!1 '.
CuNt. lr)N l v.ii r income
working fol in hon'i, filling '100
envelope's "or S,)I ol mol e
weekly For iiIl hr niitoili, sorld
stnl:m ed( sellIddiros'.sed envelope(
to. Nnithieri l w\i'll.in FP'O Box
12154. Ge-oriflowv, Gn. u ( '-ana


EMRLOYPAIED33@YAH


ARE you desirous of
rebuilding or
extending your ,."' ,:..-:-
call 227-2494. Mortgage
financing.



ARE you cursed.
depressed, demon possessed
OR need finance? Call
Apostle Randolph Williams -
f'261-6050 l20:00 h 23 00
h).



WE build middle and
low income homes Special
low income offer at S10 000
per I month Please call
telephone No. 227- 2 !0
227-2479. after hours 2_27-
5192.



WHOLESALE prices for
potatoes, onions, garlic. split
peas, channa. milk powder, jar
oil Steve's i F 3
W il;iam St.. C i..i:,'.., i -
Tel: 6246414/225-06881/223-
1122.


BUILDING. renovating or
doi any kind of construction
work We give free estimates.
Prompt, reasonable and
reliable service. Call 622-
0267/629-2239.



AIR offers keyboard,
guitars, voice training and
piano classes. Call 626-5804/
225-8447.
BSI is offering Computer
Classes for adults. Individual
attention -i.irnt"P.
Certified Tutor. .C ,ii 4
or 624-8084.
JOIN THE PHONICS CEN-
TER. We teach your child/chil-
dren the art of'reading. See
them develop into good readers.
Call 618-2068.
COSMETOLOGY classes ai
Sheer Magic Saldn. Affordable
cost. Teaching to suit your every
need. #i 226-9448/227-8737.
after hours e-mail:
bd sheermagic@yahoo com
EARN a Certificate Diploma
or . ;. an 1 part of he v"orld
it ':. I of a Your choice.
,, : ,. ., rf ... , THROUGH
,-, I- ti NCE. For
information. call CFI Global
Education Link #261-5079.
DID youW childr!ove' on'
do poor in his'her Xmas Terd
; 'estF7 think it is d1ii o
Poor .i'.. Sklls? Call BSI
on 227-.8143, or 24.-?0.-;
Pihonics Classes, for i 'hild:e'!
7 ears aind older. Individual
attention guaranteeo d.
JEAN offers course's i!n:
.dressmaking, tie dye fb'ro -
desigiiing, bedroom eiea|nce,
soft fulnisiing, soft toys, ctn tins,
cushions, "crochet, rihtlon
enhbroider,, hand o'11nIbro'!dt!!
plastic cany' 1,- -: .- l:al
cigaft. cake i. . S.
ISt.. Kitt\y # 2 P, :O-'M5h
EVENING Classes, CXC
.,: i I01 Formis 3 & 4 \,iultS
Si Principletof Accounts.
Pinciplbs ot Business. O ice
Procedures- MatO i mln,-i r .
hinrtorln lhion '" -' 1' I,
A, Soc l '
S . Building' i, Kin',
(C:lozl Ste.'oets. S1 tOO p0e' sub.lt ('l
ildl\iduail tuition also avnul,'hlo
it $3 Ot0 pel subioct Ccitictl
(Mss (h ndr,. '227-7 27.. "ivi'
Rolrorts), 2:'7-376S. (Sir Rooberts)
611-499 ,


~DMi


II


SUDYCRNIL March 6, 200







Z2


NOVELS, story books, text,
etc. Also novels and other
books on sale from S20 up.
Telephone 223-8237.



ONE Cleaner. Apply
in person to Lens ,
Sheriff & Fourth Sts., C/
ville.
WANTED Waitresses,
Barman, Disc Jockey and
Florist. Contact 227-3339.
ONE Truck driver.
Contact R. Narine, 49
Public Rd., Kitty.
Telephone 227-1923/
616-5679.
WANTED one Accounts
Clerk. Apply to P.O. Box
101374, Georgetown,
Guyana.
ONE experienced
Hairstylist/Nail Specialist.
Apply in person at Clippers,
Beauty Salon, 200 Camp
Street.
ONE Domestic needed.
Contact P. Ramroop and
Sons, Lot 65 West
Annandale, ECD.
Telephone 220-2171.
CARPENTER, Mason.
Apply in person t;. Ta--,-
Manaaer, Regency Suites/
h-otels, 98 Hadfield Street,
Georgetown.
1 WA.!T'.S, 1 part-
t1 Te Cleaner. Apply in
person at The Odyssey
Restaurant, 207 Bar St..
Kitty, after 11:00 h.
WAITRESSES. 18 22
years, to work in bar. Apply
in person to: Naka Pool
Mall, 64 Better Hope, ECD.
Telephone: 220-4298/617-
6100.
PORTERS from East
Coast Demerara area.
Contact P. Ramroop and
Sons, Lot 1C Oranrn "' ""
Bourda -- vvalk,
.. telephone 227-
1451 or 227-2254.
SALESCLERK 20 30
years, (2) years experience
and must be good at Maths
& English. Apply to Lens,
Sheriff & Fourth Sts.. C/
ville. Tel. 227-2486.
2 ACCOUNTS Clerks,
Driver/Mechanic, Trainee
Machinist, Machinist Welder/
Fabricator. Send application
to 172 East Field Dr.. Nandy
Park, E B Dem.
ONE experienced
Seamstress at least five years
experience. Must have sewn
at least 2 wedding gowns. Plus
one aggressive salesgirl. Call
622-4386.
A MERCHANDISING
Company is looking to recruit (5)
five ambitious, qualified and
energetic persons to do door to
door home selling. Send
applications now to P.O. Box
101334.
VACANCY exists for a
gang Foremen at the Little
Diamond/Herstelling, NDC.
Applicants should have
previous supervisory
experience. Closing date for
application is 15-03-2005.
Previous applicants need not
apply.
VACANCIES exist for one
Night Cook, Bill Clerks and
Porters. Apply 16 Duncan St.
& Vlissengen Rd., N/town.
Telephone 227-8505. Must
submit application and 2
passport size photographs.
BARMEN, Waiters,
Waitresses. Must be proficient
in Maths and English. Previous
experience will be an asset.
Send written application to
The Manager, Regency
Suites/Hotels, 98 Hadfield
Street, Georgetown.
SITE Surveyor/Site
Foreman needed. Must have
knowledge of Plan Reading,
Measurements and Quantities
of Building. Attractive salary.
Ages 19 30. Call 231-7567,
Mon. Fri., from 08:30 H to
18:00 H. Sat. 09:00 H to
12:00 H.
FEMALE General help.
Maid. Secretary/Personal
Assistant. Computer Tutors.
Apply in person with written
application to Computer
Training Centre, 58 Upper
Robb and Oronoque Sts.,
Bourda (near Bourda Cricket
Ground). Telephone 225-
1540.


ONE Office Assistant. Must
have knowledge of Payroll. NIS,
Filing and must be computer
literate. Must be between the
ages of 20 and 30 years old. Must
have knowledge of Maths and
English and at least two (2) years
working experience. Len's -
Sheriff & _Fourth Streets, C/ville.
OXYGEN Plant Operators.
Age: 24 years and older.
Preferably person .... on the
EBD. Qualifications *:. Maths
& English or Trade Certificate.
Knowledge of Workshop Practice
would be an advantage. Apply:
Friendship Oxygen Limited, 30
Friendship, EBD, between 13:00
h & 16:00 h.
VACANCIES exist in a
reputable, stable, financial
organization for sales
representatives. Applicants
should be mature in aqe and
possess a minimum of 3 CXC,
GCE subjects or an equivalent
qualification. Send application
to: Unit Manager. 133 Church
Street, South Cummingsburg,
Georgetown. Telephone
number: 622-0307.
GUYANA EMPLOYMENT
AGENCY, 37 Croal Street
(Opposite Banks DIH Camp Site).
Phone 227-3339. We have the
following vacancies Senior
Auditor, Pharmacist,
Trs,.;mission Operators, Editors,
Maid, Cameramen, Insurance
Sales Rep., lnrii.ijrial
Electricians. eiadener, Live-in
C,3 or Berbice, Printing &
Numbering Machine Operator,
Industrial Mechanics for Mill
Wright, Salesgirl For Boutique.
Cook/Pastry Maker from ECD.



CRANE PUBLIC ROAD -
$15M, BESIDE GAS STATION.
KEYHOMES 223-4267,
LAND FOR SALE OLEANDER
GARDENS 89 FT BY 1. 9-
PRICE_-$25M. CAiI' "- --r
12-0349.
-rKIME commercial land
for sale 115 ft x 31 ft,
Charlotte Street, Bourda.
Contact owner 226-0683
(anytime).
LAND for sale at Friendship,
EBD, brand new fence and sand
filled, new bridge. Telephone
629-6464 or 618-0192.
105 ACRES transported
land on Highway. Other land also
available. TELEPHONE 226-
8148/625-1624.
REPUBLIC PARK: vacant
transported land 50'/100'.
Build your dream home $6.5M
(US$30 000) Ederson's -226-
5496.
TWO transported adja-
cent lots in Earl's Court, LBI
18 080 sq ft total. Please
telephone 623-7438 between
6-8am and 8-10pm for de-
tails.
17 VACANT, transported
house lots to be sold in one
parcel at Blankenburg, Public
Road, West Coast Demerara.
Call 225-2487/627-3806.
PRICED for sale. New Year
Bargains. Parika, Blankenburg
(roadside), Canal Number 2.
Telephone number 225-0776,
227-0464, 624-8234.
TWO Transported house lots
- light, water available, area free
from any flood going for $1.8M
- situate at Best. WCD.
Telephone: 254-0101 Singh.
DUKE STREET.
KINGSTON: 2 large house lots,
487117' ideal school, luxurious
hotel, apartments, storage bond
- $9.5M. Ederson's 226-5496.
PRICED for sale. New Year
Bargains. Nandy Park, Grove
Public Road, Friendship 18
acres. Land of Canaan (road to
river). Telephone number 225-
0776, 227-0464, 624-8234.
PRICED for sale. New Year
Bargains. Ogle, Happy Acre,
Oleander Gardens, Le
Ressouvenir, Chateau Margot.
Telephone number 225-0776,
227-0464, 624-8234.
UPPER DEMERARA RIVER:
Plots of land ideal housing,
agriculture, cattle," shipping 25,
50, 100 & 600 acres plot, note -
$60 000 per acre. Ederson's -
226-5496.
TWO LARGE PLOTS OF
PRIME COMMERCIAL LAND
WITH HOUSE ENMORE PUBLIC
ROAD. Telephone 220-9199. No
reasonable offer refused.
RESIDENTIAL plots with small
buildings on, Kuru Kururu.
Residential and farm land at
Friendship, Supply and Coverden,
East Demerara; Parika, EB
Essequibo. Telephone 266-2111/
627-3606.


PRICED for sale. New Year
Bargains. High Street, Water
Street, Ave. Of The Republic,
Croal Street, Alberttown, Saffon
Street, Kitty. Telephone number
225-0776, 227-0464, 624-8234.
GATED community with (24)
hours security. Exclusively
residential lots at Pin. Versailles,
West Bank Demerara size 6 000
- 12 000 sq. ft., priced from $3.9M.
Immediately Transportable.
Contact Seetaram # 264-2946/7.
ONE square mile of
registered gold and diamond
land claim, Easy access to water
for all-year work. Ideal for land
dredging operation. Minimal
vegetation. Mining will not
affect environment or cause river
pollution. Location:
Imbaimadai Area Upper
Mazaruni. Interested persons
please Phone: 614-9709.



ROOM for single working
female. Telephone: 227-
0928
FURNISHED bottom
flat to rent Sa, Road,
Kitty. C I'i: 223-7812.
ONE room for dCcent
working female. T9ephone 231-
1786/R-13-2413.
LONG term apartments from
US$400 monthly. Call 227-3336
or 227-0902.
SELF-CONTAINED ROOMS
TO LET. TELEPHONE: 225-
1293.
QUEENSTOWN US$1200.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
BEL AIR PARK US$800.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
QUEENSTOWN ti ,,
KEYHOMES ^- .-t200.
--,. s-4267.
UNE (1) self-contained
apartment in residential area.
Call 227-8858
WHOLE HOUSE $60 000 -
NANDY PARK. KEYHOMES -
223-4267.
ONE-BEDROOM apt. for
rent in Georgetown. Call 226-
3330.
$25 000; $40' 000; US$500
- RESIDENTIAL/BUSINESS.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
TURKEYEN US$1200.
BEAUTY EXECUTIVE.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
TOP FLAT SEMI-
FURNISHED $90 000 -
RESIDENTIAL. KEYHOMES -
223-4267.
BEL AIR PARK- US$15 000
Generator, AC, etc.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
FOR executives Diplomats.
Embassy Officials lawns,
flowers, etc. KEYHOMES 223-
4267.
OFFICE space over 1 000
sq. ft Queenstown,
Georgetown. Telephone: 624-
4225.
SHORT-TERM RENTALS
FOR OVERSEAS VISI-
TORS. PHONE 225-9944.
HOUSE to rent in Alberttown
- top and bottom flat. Call Joy.
Telephone 223-1093.
WALES 3-BEDROOM
SEMI-FURNISHED. PHONE
613-5735 OR 263-6043.
SALON space. Located in
Central, Georgetown. For further
information, please call
telephone 226-1:227.
ONE 2-bedroom apartment,
Atlantic Gardens, Public Road -
$22 000. Telephone 220-7724.
BEL AIR PARK fur-
nished executive house on
double lot US$1 500. # 223-
5204/612-2766.
1 2-BEDROOM apartment
Industry $25 000, couple/small
family, etc. TELEPHONE 226-
8148/625-1624.
LODGING for students -
cooking/living facilities. No
flooding. No crime area $12
000 monthly. Telephone 233-
2915.
TOP flat $45 000; house
by itself $60 000. Phone 225-
2626/231-2064 or E-mail:
tonyreidsrealty@hotmail.corn
BEL AIR PARK US$1500
- GENERATOR, AC, LAWNS, 2-
CAR GARAGE, ETC.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
ONE-BEDROOM house with
fridge, toilet, electricity, water,
telephone, fruit trees, etc. at
Soesdyke. Telephone 261-
5706.


EXECUTIVE, furnished
and unfurnished houses and
apartments, offices, bonds,
etc. TEL: 226-8148/625-1624.
FURNISHED ROOM DE-
CENT, SINGLE WORKING FE-
MALE. TEL: 226-5035 (08:00 -
17:00 HRS),
WHAT a gift for (3) fully fur-
nished bedrooms only US$15,
per day prime location
Phone: 225-0230 oi 223-6900.
DO You need an honest.
reliable & efficient Real Estate
Agency? Call: UpToTheMinute
Realty. # 225-8097/226-5240.
ROOMS and apartments for
short term rental. Priced from $3
000 daily. Call 227-3336 or 227-
0902.
ONE lower business flat
situated at Lot 1 Non Pariel,
Area A, East Coast Demerara.
Apply to Jerome Fredericks at
same location.
ROOMS to rent monthly -
self-contained Le Rich
Luxury Rooms 2' 'rinces
Street S- Z u0 monthly. Call
227-3067.
1 BOTTOM flat, Camp
Str i r area. Ideally suited for
school or offices. Call Richard -
624-0774/233-2614.
FURNISHED American-
styled apartment ideal for a
couple or a single person $3
000/$4 000 per day. Call 622-
5776.
1-BEDROOM bottom flat
apartment at A 37 Barima
Avenue, Bel Air Park. Semi-
furnished. Contact 225-5904 or
629-5941.
.it 3BED ~QOM Cottage,
,.atIed at Sparendaam,
Housing Scheme, ECD. Call
Leroy on telephone number -
Cell 613-0217 or 227-5230.
SHORT-TERM and long-
term apartment. Call
MURRAY'S PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT SERVICES on
231-3302/614-3884.
VACANT two-bedroom
apartment in Kitty. Telephone 4#
226-3033 between 9 pm and 5
pm. Also household items. No
flooding yard.
ONE two-bedroom
unfurnished bottom flat apt.. 6
St. Cummings Lodge. Greater G,;
town. Telephone 222-2718 or
628-1124.
BAR in Georgetown all
new modern equipment,
including Pool table G$200
000 month. UpToTheMinute
Realty 226-5240/225-8097
SOUTH RUIMVELDT
GARDENS: furnished rooms S$15
000 each monthly. Ideal
students, teacher, nurses.
Ederson's 226-5496.
COLONIAL-STYLED
building (3) bedrooms upper
and or lower flats, parking and
telephone Queenstown. Call:
624-4225.
SMALL office space -
centrally located suitable for
Accountant or whole sale
business only. Telephone: 225-
3797.
INTERNET Cafe and Office
spaces along UG. Road. Prime
location, spaces suitable for any
business. Call 623-3404/222-
6510.
ONE two-bedroom furnished
or unfurnished house, residential
area Prashad Nagar. Contact
Nalini 227-3128.
2-BEDROOM apartment,
situated at Cummings Lodge.
ECD with inside toilet and
bathroom. Call Krishna on
telephone No.: 222-3036.
ONE 2-bedroom apartment
and one 1-bedroom apartment
at 10 Middle Street, Vryheid's
Lust, ECD. Telephone 220-0698/
626-4715.
FULLY furnished 2-bedroom
bottom flat modern
conveniences. Rent $35 000
per month. Old Public Rd.,
Eccles. Contact: 233-2182. .
OFFICES suitable for
Aid Missions a/c, generator.
alarm, H & C, etc. US$2 000.
UpToTheMinute Realty. 226-
5240/225-8097.
PRIME location. Self-
contained apartments, along UG
Road. Suitable for overseas
visitors. Long and short term
basis. Call 623-3404/222-6510.
CHECK out Sunflower Hotel
& other apartments. Cool.
comfortable self-contained
rooms. Call 225-3817 or 223-
2173 ask for Margaret or
Loraine.


SUBRYANVILLE 2-
bedroom apartment, fully
furnished, grilled, mosquito
mesh. For overseas visitors.
Short term rental. Telephone
226-5369.
1-LARGE two bedroom, self-
contained apartmrnent,
telephone, etc., in F-ourth Street,
Cummings Lodge. $35 000
monthly. Call telephone no.
222-3573.
OVERSEAS visitors -- two-
bedroonm apartment. US$50/
US$60 daily. with all modern
conveniences. Excellent
location. Call 227-0289/222-
6996.
1 BUSINESS place situated
at 48 Princes & Russell Sts. Ideal
for Internet Cafe, Variety Store,
etc. Telephone 226-6603/621-
8526 between 08:00 h and 17:00
h.
QUEENSTOWN, fully fur-
nished 1 & 3-bedronrol dpart-
ment with oat;,ig space tO rent.
_'.,,tuie for over5G-Is visitors on
short terlT basis. Tel. # 226-
5137/227-1843.
COLONIAL mansion in
Kingston US$3 000 ne g.;
Courida Park with pool US$3
500, etc. UpToTheMinute Realty
- 226-5240/225-8097.
EXECUTIVE Homes: Bel Air
Gardens US$1 700 to US$2
500; Lama Avenue US$1 000
to US$1 500, etc.
UpToTheMinute Realty 226-
5240/225-8097
Bottom flat .uncan Street,
formerly \ ',eo World, also top
.,u middle flats and part of
bottom flat in Regent Street.
Tel, 226-2260, 225-2873, 619-
5901.
PRIME business spot
(dimension: 14 ft x 45 ft) for
showroom, office above Plaza
Hang Out Bar opp. Sankar'sAuto
Spares), Lot 245 Sheriff Street,
C ville. Call: 227-8576.
RENT affordable house and
apartment at rock bottom prices
as low as S35 000. Single
person rooms $15 000 AC
areas inclusive. Call: 226-1808/
614-2073 Christopher.
ONE two-bedroom
apartment to rent in Annandale
North bottom flat. filled.
grilled, with phone, light, water
.:, ..i space $25 000
,,: ii ii 220-9477.
ENTIRE bottom flat.
Alexander Street, Kitty, suitable
for Supermarket, store, bond,
etc. A proximately 40'x 50'.
TELEPHONE 226-8148/615-
1624.
NEW one-bedroom
apartment, bottom flat -
unfurnished $25 000 monthly.
Single, couple or students.
Contact Mr. Lall, 84 Craig Street,
C/ville, Georgetown. Telephone
223-1410
NANDY PARK 2-bedroom
upper flat $50 000: 2-bedroom
lower flat $45 000: fully
furnished 3-bedroom US$800;
fully furnished 5-bedroorn -
US$1 100. Telephone 233-
2968/613-6674.
RESIDENTIAL and
commercial properties -
furnished and unfurnished.
Prices ranging from $35 000 to
US$3 000. Contact Carmen
Greene's Realty. Telephone
226-1192/623-7742.
2-NEWLY built offices, fully
carpeted and air conditioned,
(15 x 12) each. 217 South Road,
Georgetown (5 buildings east of
King Street. upper stairs of Penta
Paints). Call 227-2712 or 223-
7487.
1 NEW unfurnished 2-
bedroom apartment second
and third floors in one, 2 toilets
and baths, modern kitchen, fully
grilled, electricity, water, in Kitty,
Telephone number 225-7109.
Price $53 000.
QUEENSTOWN US$900,
Bel Air Park US$500 & US$1
000, Queenstown US$2 000
& US$3 500, Eccles US$500
& US$1 000 and many more.
Vidya 233-5282 or 611-2241.
2-BEDROOM apartment
(downstairs) 189 D'Urban
Backlands $45 000 monthly.
Upstairs (4) bedrooms, (2)
bathrooms $50 000 monthly.
Available April 1, 2005. Call:
June # 233-2175/623-1562 or
227-3067.
FOR immediate lease on
Northern Hogg Island 200
acres of cultivated rice land
along with rice mill complete
with drying floor and dryer.
Also tractor, combine, bull-
dozer for sale. Contact: 626-
1506/225-2903. Serious en-
quiries only.


CAMP STREET (Parking)
- $20 000; Campbellville $20
000, D'Urban Street, (Parking
& Phone) $25 000, Kitty -
$35 000; Eccles (top) parking -
$45 000; East Bank house -
(Phone & Parking) with
refrigerator and washing
machine $45 000. Call 231-
6236.
COMMERCIAL BUSINESS
SPACE TO SUIT ANY
OPERATION. Major Offices,
Warehouse, Bond, Store,
Jewellery Store, Cafe,
Restaurant, Boutique, Salon,
Disco, etc. Call 226-1808/614-
2073. E-mail:
Theserviceexpets@yahoo.com.
Agent Christopher
Goodridge.
NEW busy 4-corner strr-
8 months old ...ped i
lots of -, ,,pped wth
ls cases, lights,
unr:led, measuring 30 ft. x 60
rt. Perfect for Restaurant,
Pharmacy, General Store.
Located 8 Camp & D'Urban
Sts. Call Mr. Singh telephone
227-7677/624-8402. Ground
floor US$1 200 monthly neg.
ONE four-bedroom double
walled flat one bedroom self-
contained, one with two-piece
washroom, two air-conditioned
rooms, front verandah also
large tiled, grilled :' k;
verandah, with k.ltcenette, TV,
two-car garage. Near to
..,arKets, Pharmacies. Doorstep
- public transportation. Highly
motivated. For more info., call
618-5256.
TWO newly built large
concrete buildings, 3,500 and
1,250 square feet each.
Situated on 2 acres, riverside
site at Caledonia, EBD.
Roadside access and large
frontage. Flood free. Security
doors and grilled works,
concreted floors and yards.
Suitable for Lumber, Cement
Bond, Gas Station or Poultry
Farm. Serious enquiries only
to telephone 233-2491 or 233-
2492. E-mail: tff@gol.net.gy
LUXURY furnished 4-
bedroom house Eccles. Fully
air conditioned, fully screened/
grilled, large fitted kitchen, 3
fully tiled bathrooms, laundry
room, 3-bay car parking space,
large verandah and garden.
wash machine and generator.
No flooding. US$ 2 000 per
month. Telephone 233-2491
or 233-2492 E-mail:
tff@gol.net.gy
LAL'S REALTY 231-
7325. Bel Voir Court, furnished
US$1500 neg.; Good Hope
Gardens, furnished $40 000.
BUSINESS: SPOTS South
Road US$1 000 & $60 000;
Regent Street, ground floor -
US$2 500 & US$5 000. OFFICE
SPACE North Road $50 000;
Regent Street $120 000 & $50
000; Hadfield Street $20 000:
Robb Street $25 000.
BEL AIR PARK: Senior
executive residence, fully
furnished, fully air-
conditioned, generator, 5
bedrooms, 4 are self-contained
US$3 000 and 2 others at
US$1 700 and US$1 200.
KITTY: in a quiet compound,
large 5-bedroom home for
US$800. COURIDA PARK:
One-bedroom furnished
apartment $50 000 PLUS
many offices, bond.
ABSOLUTE REALTY. Call 226-
7128/615-6124.
2-BEDROOM, upper,
(furnished) South Ruimveldt -
60 000: 2-bedroom, semi-
furnished, Prashad Nagar $40
000; 1-bedroom, furnished,
telephone, parking in Prashad
Nagar $60 000; 2-bedroom,
unfurnished, in South $45 000;
2-bedroom upper flat in South
Road $45 000; 3-bedroom.
upper flat, unfurnished in
Prospect, EBD $40 000, 3-
bedroom, unfurnished house in
BelAir- $100 000. Future Homes
Realty. Telephone No. 227-4040/
611-3866/628-0796.
KITTY $35 000;
Campbellville $40 000:
CAMPBELLVILLE THREE
BEDROOMS $45 000;
Queenstown $50 000; D'Urban
Backlands furnished $95 000:
EXECUTIVE PLACES -
SUBRYANVILLE, Queenstown,
Bel Air Park, Bel Air Gardens.
Lamaha Gardens, Happy Acres,
Prashad Nagar; OFFICE
BUILDINGS Kingston, Main
Street, Camp Street; BUSINESS
PLACES: Sheriff Street, Regent
Street Croal Street and others.
MENTORE/SINGH REALTY -
225-1017/623-6136.







L't 24 iunrj.r-rrr.ur q -lvr.nn Cffj,


3-BEDROOM. furnished,
upper, in Queenstown US$1
000: furnished. 4-bedroom
house (residential) US$1 000;
New Haven, furnished US$1
400; furnished, (6) bedrooms in
Section 'K' C/ville US$1 500;
Bel Voir Court US$1 200;
Prashad Nagar US$1 000; Bel
Air Gardens (unfurnished) -
US$1 200; Happy Acres (gated
community) US$1 700; New
Providence US$1 200.
Furnished or unfurnished houses
in Ogle US$800. Also business
rentals. Future Homes Realty.
Telephone 227-4040/611-
3866/628-0796.
PRIME CITY LOCATION.
BRAND NEW SELF-CON-
TAINED TWO-BEDROOM CON-
CRETE FLATS (GROUND AND
FIRST FLOORS) $45 000
EACi-I LIGHTLY NEGO-
TiASLE. REFti.. -
HIGHEST ORDER NEED6U ,.
COMPLETION FIXED FOR 3
WEEKS COMMENCE. VIEW-
ING NOW ETC, IN ORDER TO
HAVE ONE. NUMBER OF
CHILDREN LIMITED. FIRST
COME FIRST SERVED".
HUMPHREY NELSON'S
226-8937.



SECTION 'K' C'VILLE -
$1j2;. KEYHOMES 223-
4267. ____
ATLANTIC ViLL_,
SEASIDE $18M.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
1 HOUSE lot with 4
houses: Persons interested
please call 333-2420 Price
negotiable
(1) CAMPBELLVILLE
property, (2) Success ECD
property. Call: 226-7043 or 613-
4225.
PROPERTY for sale in
Nandy Park good location.
Telephone: 223-3647/226-
0176.
BEL AIR PARK $15M.
(RECOMMENDED BUY).
EYHOMES 223-4267.
TURKEYEN, 6TH STREET
-$15M, 60X90, CONCRETE.
KEYHOMES 223-4267.
VREED-EN-HOOP,
Versailles, Leonora.
Telephone 225-0776, 227-
0464, 624-8234.
FREE valuation of
properties and land (up for
sale or rental), so you get the
right price. Call 231-6236.
PROPERTIES for sale -
one wooden and concrete
building, located at 50E Sher-
iff Street. Tel. 223-1529.
DOUBLE-LOT 3-bedroom
property for sale in Amelia's
ard, Linden. Price
negotiable. Call: 223-4938.
ONE two-apartment
building and land for sale (2)
bedrooms each. Price $3
million. Call: 223-1940/624-
2658.
TWO properties Lot 80 -
$11M, Lot 114- $14M, both at
Vreed-en-Hoop. West Coast
Demerara. Phone 233-5755.
1 TWO-BEDROOM
concrete house, Good Hope
Gardens. (Kisson's Housing
Scheme). $6.5 million.
Telephone 227-6315.
TRANSPORTED property
for sale by owner. Lot 38 Huis-
T-Dieren, Public Rd.,
Essequibo Coast. Contact
615-6596, 231-8855. -
GOING cheap! Republic
Park, Regent Street,
properties, Independence
Boulevard. Telephone 266-
2111/627-3606.
4-BEDROOM house, 239
Greenheart Street, Linden -
unfurnished, light, water, etc.
Price neg. Telephone 641-
2965/225-9144.
(2) TWO-STOREYED
business/residential proper-
ties in Robb St., Bourda. Tel:
225-9816, Monday Satur-
day (08:00 17:30 hrs).
LOT 8 Princes St.,
Werk-en-Rust, 2nd building
North of Camp Street suit-
able for any business your
dream home going cheap.
Call 226-6017.
40% REDUCTION on all
properties from $8 million
upwards. Telephone 225-
2626/231-2064 or E-mail:
tonyreidsrealty@hotmail.com
AMERICA STREET,
Lombard Street, High Street,
Regent Street, Water Street.
Telephone number., .225-
0776, 227-0464, 624-8234.


MON REPOS,
Campbellville, Kitty. D'Urban
Street. South Ruimveldt
Gardens. Telephone number
225-0776, 227-0464, 624-8234.
PORT MOURANT, 2-storeyed
wooden and concrete $12M
negotiable. Call 263-6043 or
613-5735.
QUEENSTOWN. 37 'B' Anira
Street vacant 2 ,.., ,, .,
building and- land i .,:, I.
building). Contact: Kissoon Lall
on Telephone No: 225-4328.
LARGE lot D'Urban St.,
Wortmanville, between Louisa
Row and Hardina Streets. Back
and front buildings, vacant
possession. Call 622-6000.
La PENITENCE Public
Road ( 2 bldgs.) or separately,
Mc Doom, Eccles, Land of
Canaan. Telephone number
225-0776, 227-0464, 624-8234.
BEL AIR PARK $15M;
$181v, $20M: $38M:
Q-nstown 131M; Kitty -
$8,5M now and more ,'.,
homes. UpfoThei`,.ute Realty -
226-5240/225-8097.
10-BEDROOM, fully
concrete, 2-family property.
Executive condition. Fully
furnished, master room, etc.
Eccles $15.5M neg. Vidya -
233-5282/611-2241.
2-FAMILY concrete and
wooden 6-bedroom property -
arage, lar e yard space, etc.
section 'K' Campbellville. $17M
neq. Vidya 233-5282/611-
2241.
ECCLES s ,M. $25M &
$5M. Nandy Park $11.i ,7.'.
Queenstown $15M & $18M, Iel
Air Park $18M & $20M, South -
$10M & $7M. Vidya 233-5282
or 611-2241.
1 FLAT concrete house with
a two (2) -storeyed foundation, (3)
bedrooms $5.5 million located
at 23 'CC' Almond Street, Eccles
New Scheme, EBD. Telephone:
233-2433.
GOED FORTUIN 3-
bedroom wooden house on
huge lot. Phone, light, etc. $5M
neg. Telephone 226-1192/623-
7742.
COMMERCIAL properties -
Regent St. (near Cummings) -
$27M neg.; Church Street $33M
neg. and more value.
UpToTheMinute Realty.
Telephone 226-5240/225-8097.
QUEENSTOWN $7.5M;
$8.5M; & $9.5; Kitty $3.6M;
Quamina Street. (Corner) -
$9.5M. Land Kitty &
Allberttown $3.5M;
Queenstown $5M; Lamaha
Gardens $9M. Call 231-6236.
ONE (1) newly renovated 3-
bedroom house telephone fa-
cility, overhead tank, car park
for (2) vehicles Drysdale
Street, Charlestown. Tel: 225-
9816, Monday Saturday,
(08:00 17:30 hrs)
ONE two-storey wooden and
concrete 4- bedroom house,
South Ruimveldt Gardens .
Contact Ronald on 662-5033 or
Samantha on 624-1370. No
reasonable offer refused.
Vacant possession.
1 EXECUTIVE 5-bedroom
- master room, three toilets,
three baths, fully filtered, insect-
proof, generator, air-condi-
tioned, large yard space with
beautiful gardens, etc. Bel Air
Park. # 225-9816.
EXECUTIVE 3-storeyed
concrete structure located in
prime business area No. 78
Corriverton, Berbice. Ideal for
business and or residential
purposes. Tel. 339-2274/2377/
616-1414. Price negotiable.
17% ACRES-of agricultural
land suitable for rice and cash
crop cultivation along with
house at Industry, Mahaica
Creek. No reasonable offer
refused. Serious enquiries. Call:
226-2963/220-0636/222-6910.
SUBRYANVILLE: over
looking the Atlantic mansion,
swimming pool, large roof
garden, generator, grilled/mesh,
unday overlooking new area
big lime, drink, food fair $35M.
(US$175 000). Ederson's -
226-5496.
KINGSTON near Seawall:
vacant 3-storeyed 6 bedrooms/
office mansion. Ideal luxurious
hotel, executives offices,
insurances, 8 cars parking. If
qualified move in tomorrow -
40M neg. Ederson's 226-
5496.
OVERSEAS/LOCAL:
Owners of buildings for sale/
rent. Welcome to our general
management services, paying,
insurance, taxes, general repairs.
Call now~fpr ,further iofprmatiaop.
Ederson's 226-5496.


MC DOOM RIVER SIDE:
note road to river, land 47'/
218'. Ideal wharf. large ship, auto
sales, 4 stores, mini-mall,
supermarket $22.5M neg.
Ederson's- 226-5496.
CAMPBELLVILLE: vacant 2-
storeyed concrete 4-bedroom
mansion, 3 toilets & baths large
sitting, library, 4-car "-rlin' .
Inspection anytime r'-l
Ederson's 226-5496.
REGENT & CUMMINGS
STREETS 2-storeyed .business,
top vacant. Ideal general
business, future 4-storeyed mall/
stores $33M. Ederson s 226-
5496. Website:
www.edersonsrealty.com
GIFT: New Market Street,
Doctors: Investors: ideal for 3-
storey hospital pharmacy,
restaurant, 2-storey concrete &
wooden :.Iiii, from road to
alley $ t r (US$85 000).
Ederson's 226-5496.
GIFT: Kuru Kiuru, active
business property with 3 freezers,
pool table, music set, chicken pen
,n 22 acres of land. Ideal resort
-- $1UV; "a-. (US$50 000).
Ederson's -'22b-a45.
DIAMOND HOUSING
SCHEME: neW' 2-storey 3-
bedroom concrete 2 y'rs old
building, with all modern,
conveniences, parking $8M
neg. (US$40 000). Ederson's -
22 -5496. Website:
www.edersonsrealty.com
CHARLESTOWN: Charles/
Sussex Streets, near school -
vacant front building & land.
Ideal internet cafe, mechanic
ship, taxi $4M neg. Ederson's
- 226-5496.
ALBERTTOWN. Strictly no
flooding. ',ncrete and wooden,
50 ft. x 28 ft.. e ilets and 2
baths, generator switL,., 10
pound brass lined reservoir ano
pump, paved yard, 10'/2 ft.
driveway, 110/240V.$9 500 000.
Telephone 223-7908.
URGENTLY needed:
Commercial, residential
buildings for sale or rent. Kitty,
South Ruimveldt,
Campbellville, Subryanville,
Prashad Nagar, Bel Air Park,
Lamaha Gardens, Atlantic
Gardens. Also land. Ederson's -
226-5496.
LAL'S REALTY 231-7325.
Regent Street US$600 000
neg.; America Streei I' ''
000; Water Street- -,'1 :r,1 i,,
Street Night Club $70M neg.;
Middle Street $60M neg.:
Thomas Street $12.5M neg.:
Kitt $6M neg.; Bel Air Park -
$3 M.
CRANE/La UNION PUBLIC
ROAD. WCD: residential vacant
2-storeyed wooden & concrete
4-bedroom property $5M. Back
2- storeyed, 4-bedroom concrete
building $4M. Package $8M
neg. Land 5,786 sq. ft.
Ederson's 226-5496.
GIFT. Queenstown wise
investment 3-storeyed concrete
building top/middle 2 & 3-
bedroom luxurious apartments
for overseas visitors; bottom -
sitting, toilet & bath 4 cars garage
- $18.5M neg. Owner will give -
$7.5M financing. Ederson's -
226-5496.
Le RESSOUVENIR, Atlantic
Gardens. Oleander Gardens,
Lamaha Gardens, New Haven
(Bel Air), Bel Air Park, Prashad
Nagar, Vlissengen Road,
Queenstown, Alberttown,
Kingston, Carmichael Street,
Church Street. Telephone
number 225-0776, 227-0464,
624-8234.
ENTERPRISE Gardens, East
Coast Demerara upstairs, 3-
bedroom residence includes
master room. Downstairs 2-
bedroom, self-contained, Maid's
quarters, fully meshed and
grilled, with lots of parking $6.6
million. Call 628-4809 or after
18:00 h 225-7034.
2-STOREY 4-bedroomrn
concrete and wooden house on
land 150' x 50', fenced, drive-
way, parking, television $4.9M.
Immediate vacant possession.
Best Village, WCD, half mile
from Vreed-en-Hoop. Call "MAX"
on 628-9970/264-2498.
KITTY $7M, Campbellville
- $9M, Bel Air Park $16M &
$27M, Prashad Nagar $15M.
Queenstown $13M, Larnaha
Gardens $25M. Regent Street
- $45M, Sheriff Street $45M.
Contact Carmen Greene's
Realty. Telephone 226-1192/
623-7742.
POULTRY FARMS Garden
of Eden and Craig Planning for a
bigger yield? We have pens that
can accommodate 15 000 birds
and lots and lots of running water
we are situated near to a creek, 1
Machine Shop Industrial Site with
an extra lot. Call SUCCESS RE-
ALTY 223-6524/628-0747


ECCLES AA: Large 4-
bedroom $20M; OGLE: Large
3-bedroom 2-flat on 1.3 acres of
land $15M; FELICITY: Vacant
lot 10 800 sq. ft. $6M; BROAD
STREET: 2-flat 5-bedroomrn -
$7M; MANDELAAVENUE: (near
Banks), 2-flat $9M and lots
more all over. ABSOLUTE
REALTY. Call 226-7128, 615-
6124.
D'URBAN STREET
(WORTMANVILLE) SIZEABLE
LAND CARRYING TWO BUILD-
INGS. REPAIRS NEEDED (EACH).
TRANSPORTED. PRICE NEGO-
TIABLE. (2) CHARLESTOWN
(LAND ONLY) FRONT. RESIDEN-
TIAL CUM COMMERCIAL $1.8M.
(TRANSPORTED).BENT STREET
NEWBURG) $3.2M
ALBOUYSTOWN $2.5M
PRASHAD NAGAR (4 200 SQ FT
OF LAND INCOMPLETE BUILD-
ING THEREON $8M CHANDAR
NAGAR STREET (PRASHAD
NAGAR)"AMERICAN" SCHOOL
VICINITY. EXECUTIVE CATEGORY.
FIVE-BEDROOM. $40M NEGO-
TIABLE. TELEPHONE 226-8937.
FUTURE HOMES REALTY.
Telephone: 227-4040/628-
0796/611-3866. House in
Success $2.5M; house in
Eccles $5.5 rin,;.nou to $30
million; house in Alberttown -
$1,.5 million; house in Prashad
Nagar ;19 million to $30
million; house in U',rhan Street
- $21 million; house nI
Queenstown $14 million: house
in South $10 million to 19
million: house in Kitty $12
million to $25 million: Bel Air
Park house $20 to $30 million;
house in Campbellville $20
million: house in Pomeroon S6
million: house in Happy Acres -
$30 million; house in Grove $7
million: house in Oleander
Gardens $38 million; house in
0',rbice $7 million; house in
Repubib .Park S20 million to
$4 million.
$20M. $20M. $21".
STARTLING FOR THE
SPECTACULAR ASPECT OF
RELATED PROPERTY. I.E.
AREA. EXECUTIVE SECTOR
"AA" ECCLES. EXECUTIVE
TWO-STOREY FIVE- YEAR-OLD
CONCRETE BUIDLING (70 X
50). 3 BEDROOMS INCLUSIVE
OF SELF-CONTAINED, 2
ADDITIONAL TOILETS ALSO
BATHROOMS, 2 SITTING ALSO
DINING ROOMS FULLY
GRILLED HOT AND COLD
WATER SYSTEM. PARKING
SPACE FOR 3 CARS. LARGE
KITCHEN CUM PANTRY. FIRST
COME FIRST SERVED.
READILY AVAILABLE.
HUMPHREY NELSON'S 226-
8937.



ORIGINAL INDIAN CDS AND
DVD. CALL 231-4208.
1 FISHING BOAT, SEINE,
ENGINE. TELEPHONE 220-
4676.
EARTH for sale. Delivery to
spot. Call 626-7127.
ONE 450 Night Hawk. motor
bike. Contact Nalini- 227-3128.
1 STALL at Bourda
Market. 16 ft. x 12 ft. Contact
612-5749.
HP LAPTOP for sale. Cost
US$1 000. Call Shellon on 640-
0256.
BRAND new Generac
generator 7750 watts.
Telephone 220-6770.
WOODWORKING machines.
Good condition. Telephone
225-4533.
DIESEL water pumps 2
and 3 inch, brand new from UK.
Call 261-5403 for details.
1 NEW stand up General
Electric freezer 56 x 28 $50 000.
Contact 225-3412.
1 BRAND new Dell computer
- $200 000, neg. Telephone: 220-
7643 or 611-1088.
ONE 17" solid aluminium
boat. Price $350 000. Call 231-
4110 or 227-0902.
ONE Refrigerator freezer in
excellent condition. Price $45
000. Telephone number 623-
9813.
ONE 4-cylinder Bedford
portable welding plan, D.C. Key
start. Tel. # 265-4217. Call
#621-4417.
NEW Honda generators, UK
standard key manual start,
2500 watts to 6000 watts. Call
233-5500.
16 CU. FT frost-free fridge in
excellent condition. $30 OQQ.
Contact: 233-2182.


INTERNET Cafe,
equipment Computers Internet
Ready. Contact 226-0058.
FOR Sale by Tender 1
(one) Damaged Mitsubishi
Galant PEE series, at GCIS,
47 Main Street.
ONE large male Doberman.
Very aggressive, excellent guard
dog. Price reasonable. Call 227-
3285 or 614-4703.
YAMAHA Outboard Motor
40Hp, Short foot. Excellent
condition. $450 000 negotiable.
Telephone 233-2491 or 233-
2492.
FERNS in hanging baskets.
Large concrete plant pots.
Telephone 226-1757/225-5641. 24
Bolvoir Court. Bel Air.
ONE brand new computer
with CD Burner, CD Walkmans,
car stereo and DVD Player.
Contact 225-4112, 626-9264.
PARTS for washers/dryers,
thermostats, knobs, belts, pumps,
motors, splines, etc. Technicians
available. Call 622-5776.
ONE pair custom-made
speaker boxes with 8-inch
speakers, mid range tweeter, etc.
- $30 000. Telephone 622-0267/
629-2239.
BRAND new Fi'g.-daire side-
by-side refrigerator $240 GO0,
neg. Serious enquiries only.
ContsC; Tel. No: 225-9808.
ORIGINAL brand .,'p!
clothes from USA. Jeans $2 000
- $3 000, shirts/tops $1 000 $1
500, Sale. Telephone 220-3410 -
(NATALIA).
ARGON/Co2 mixed gas. Also
shock treatment for swimming pools.
Phone 227-4857 (08:00 h 16:00
h), Mon. to Fri.
1 SD 23 Nissan Diesel
engine, block with crankshaft and
con rod and Pistons and fuel pump.
Tele-ne 225-2477 or 623-0535.
PARTS for ,-rs/dryers -
thermostats, knobs, belts, pump.
motors, splines, etc. Technicians
available. Call 622-5776.
1 GEMINI Power amplifier
- 800 watts: 1 Pyramid pre-
amplifier. Both equipment next
to new. Call 613-4536
125 E7 Motorcycle engine.
Price $48 000 and motorcycle seat
- $8 000. Fuel tank $7 000. Contact
Crawford. Telephone 771-5261-2,
1 AMP LineArtech 300W 2 15"
Speaker boxes with carpet.
Telephone number 225-3428 or
225-6809, 08:00 h 16:00 h,
Monday to Friday.
ONE Daewoo 7 cu. Ft.
refri gerator double door,
excellent condition. $39 000.
Telephone number 226-5243/
226-8217 (Bel Air Park).
1 FLOOR model PLASTIC
SEALING machine, 1 PORTABLE
ELECTRIC air compressor in ex-
cellent condition Tel: 222-4507/
623-7212
NEW. GE side by side
stainless steel refrigerator with
automatic water dispenser and
ice-maker. Telephone 614-5321/
226-7613 D. Khan.
ONE 150 HP & one 250 HP
Yamaha Outboard engines. Price
$700.000 & $1,200,000. Also parts
for 150 HP & 250 HP. Call 629-
6651 anytime.
IMPORTED white overcoats
- $2 000; Sarlitary Rubber Gloves
- $300 00; Plastic Aprons $400
00. Contact Francis Persaud.
Telephone 220-3064.
FIAT Spares, Land Rover
Spares, Motorcycle tyres, Truck
Liners, Leyland Head Gasket,
Stainless Steel Tubes. Contact
Nassar telephone 270-4126.
OXYGEN and Acetylene gases.
Fast and efficient service. 10 11
Mc Doom Public Road, EBD.
Phone 223-6533 (08:00 h 16:00
h), Mon. to Fri., (Sat. 08:00 h to
12:00 h).
PUPPIES for sale. Rottweiler
and German Shepherd (mixed) -
fully vaccinated. Contact: Dr. Mc
Lean. Telephone No. 226-3592/
227-0116/223-0754.
FREON gas: 11, 12, 22, 502,
134A & 404A. Also Nitrous Oxide,
Argon gas & Helium for balloons.
Phone 227-4857 (08:00 h 16:00
h), Mon. to Fri.
QSC AMPLIFIER RMX
series, 800, 1 400 watts,
Celestion Frontline 11 18"
speakers 2 800 watts: Numark
Jugg' 'I i"'. I ,.1. Telephone
615-1 -' I


POOL tables local and
.,.- 4. .-vith slates, including
.ii r..11 pocket, rubber, etc.
Contact: Naka, 64 Better Hope.
ECD. Tel: 220-4298/617-6100.
1 HONDA pressure washer.
brand new; 2 drills; 1 saw; 1
Jialing motorcycle, next to new;
1 amplifier; 1 truck pump; 1 bat-
tery charger: 1 bicycle. Tel. 265-
5876.
QUALITY SWEET POTA-
TOES available in large quan-
tities at very good prices. Place
your orders early for prompt de-
lvery. Contact: 621-0371/226-
3563.
FOREIGN shampoo sink,
pump-up Barber chair, steam
dryer, facial machine, blow
dryers, small photocopy
machine and restaurant
equipment. Phone 225-7648,
Mon. Sat. 09:00 h 17:00
h.
SKY Universal for the best
offer in Phillips digital dish.
View up to 125 channels includ-
ing Pay Per View channels and
also Direct TV. Contact: Gray
on Tel. 227-6397/227-1151 (0).
616-9563.
1 JIALING 150 T
Motorcycle 12 0000 Km: 1
Sonny 3-disc stereo set; 1
wedding dress; 1 Jura Jamma.
Telephone 225-1651/223-
9582/265-6076 John/Vicky.
3-PIECE wood (Cane in
the middle) C !irs, 2..- Morris
chairs, Marble top patiu _tles.
I carved Chinese wood trunk.
1 wood vanity with mirror and I
stool, 2 Cntre wood tables for
sitting room. Canl 225-818 or
225-7163.
JUST ARRIVED. WATCH
AND CALCULATOR
BATTERIES. MAXWELL -
SILVER OXIDE. BUY ONLY
THE BEST, NO SUBSTITUTES,
ONLY $300. FOR WATCH
BATTERY. FREE
INSTALLATION IN WATCHES.
GUYANA VARIETY STORE
(NUT CENTRE). 68 ROBB
STREET LACYTOWN.
TELEPH6NE 226-4333.
CAUSTIC SODA: 55-lb -
i i ""^' m55-lb $4 000.
$3 6,u. ,-,,- "- $8 000
Soda Ash: 100-iu -4
Sulphuric Acid: 45-gal au
000, Granular Chlorine.
Chlorine gas. Phone 227-
4857 (08:00 h 16:00 h), Mon.
to Fri.
John Deer Diesel
Generator. 30KVA, like new.
Also Bay Linder Speedboat
with Yamaha 115 HP outboard
engine, Honda power Washer
3500psi with 13 HP engine
(new). Tel. 225-2319, 225-
2873. 660-1061, 660-1060.
BOOKS on Aircraft
Electrical Engineering, Motor
Vehicles, Farm Machinery.
Management Practices.
Computer Graphics and
Designing. Scanner, Hindu
Religious Books. Contact
Francis Persaud. Telephone
220-3064.
LARGE QUANTITIES OF
GOLDEN BROOK VEGETABLE
COOKING OIL. ALL SIZES
AVAILABLE AND PRICES ON
ALL SIZES HAVE BEEN
REDUCED SIGNIFICANTLY.
COME IN TO POMEROON OIL
MILLS. 16 MUDLOT KINGSTON,
GEORGETOWN OR CALL: 223-
5273, 223-5274.
Brand new 64 JVC flat
screen TV PIP, Xerox 5028
Photocopier Machine. like new.
Split A/C units, (new). Also
Saniserv Cone Machine one-
spout and three-spout, like new.
anmar diesel Generator, Honda
5000 watts key start Generator.
Tel. 225-2873. 225-2319, 660-
1061, 660-1060.
PLAYSTATION 1 & 2, X-
BOX, game cube, Nintendo
64, ega Dreamcast &
Genesis, and all video game
systems, game CDs, cartridges.
memory cards, connectors.
and all accessories. DVD
players, DVD movies (for sale
and rental). Best prices and
service countrywide.
Gamestation Video Games
and DVD Stop, Pouderoyen,
Main Road, WBD. Opens
Monday Saturday. 10:00 -
21:00 h. Call 628-9970/611-
9001.
2 LARGE Oxygen bottles,
2 large Propane Bottles, Hoses
and Torches, Cylinder Trolley -
$80 000, Vertical Drilling
Machine $40 000, Rolling
Machine $300 000, Electric
Concrete Vibrator $100 000. X2
ton Chain Hoist $15 000, Oil
Pressure Gauges $1 000, Auto
Electrical Switches $1 000,
Cylinder Ridge Reamer $10
000 Cornpression Testing
gauges $3 000: Plastic Straps -
$6 000; Steel Pipe Valves and
Fittings $15 000. Contact
Francis Persaud. Telephone
220-3064.


------ ----- -- - ---- r - -- - - -- --- - -- - ~ -


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A QUANTITY of office wall
dividers $30 000: 3 rolls
upholstery material $16 000; 1 -
new tent enclosed to
accommodate (4) persons over
night, hunting. U.S.A.-made -$25
000; 1 Canadian heavy-duty
shredder -fully automatic, 110V -
$20 000; 1 large wall divider -
U.S.A-made, beautiful $50 000;
2 secretarial and typist adjustable
chairs on wheels $5 000, each; 1
executive large writing desk chair
on wheels $20 000; 1 inverter -
12V to 110V, 400 to 800 watts -
$22 000: 1 Land Ranger cycle
for boy excellent $10 000; 1 -
combination Panasonic double
tape and 5-CD player set along
with (2) speaker boxes and remote
control $55 000 110V-240V; 1 -
large thick egg-shaped carpet -
$15a 000: 1 4-burner gas stove
(SINGER) with oven and bottle
complete $25 000; 1 piece
10 x 12 carpet for office $11
000: 1 Whirlpool freezer $45
000 110V; 6 plastic chairs
with 1 round plastic table and
umbrella $15 000; 6 used 4-
drawer filing cabinets -$15 000,
each; 4 used 2-drawer filing
cabinets $10 000, each; 3 -
security Mercury Vapour lamps
110-240V, complete $5 000,
each; 1 Sharp turntable
microwave 110V $13 000: 1
Toshiba combination tape
recorder, radio, tape and CD
player 110-240V $15 000; a
quantity of 50 Meridian phones
M 7310 and M 7324, from (5)
lines to (20) lines phones,
bargain for the lot, could work
hotel, offices, etc.; one new
Peak split AC unit- 18 000 BTU,
complete; 2 18 000 BTU Peak
window units $25 000, each.
Owner leaving. # 611-8766/
621-4928.
ONE 15 KVA Kubota water-
cooled diesel generator -
custom-built with security sound
proof casing, no noise or
vibration, hardly used, crank or
battery start, 12V, 110-240V,
mint condition $800 000,
neg.; one 5-ton hydraulic pallet
lift with new spare wheel -$55
000; two Yale chain hoists: 1-
ton $25 000, '/-ton $20 000
English-made; two small
portable welding plants: 150k -
240V -$40 000, 75k 110V -
$30 000 complete with rod
holder and head goggles;
plumber tool one electrical
drain and pipe line cleaner for
blockage 110V, 50-60 Hz, %
Hg motor complete kit for $40
0 U.S.A.-made; one STIHL
FS 160 brush cutter hardly
used, with spares $60 000; 1 -
Drill press 12-speed,
adjustable table. 110-240V -
$45 000; 1 large 1-in bore
Sears pressure pump with pressure
tank, 110V-240V $35 000; 3 -
metal English bench lathes: (2) 5-
ft $100 000, each and (1) 8-ft -
$150 000; 1 4-ft width sheet metal
roller on steel stand heavy-duty,
manually operated, English-made
$105 000; 1 Dayton indoor an
outdoor dry vacuum industrial
and commercial use, on wheels,
large dust collector bag, U.S.A.-
made $35 000; 1 6-in Delta
electric belt sander on stand -
110V, for wood work $30 000; 1 -
machine to do tool shaping -240V
$200 000 (large); 1 machine to
do cutting of crankshaft 240V -
$200 000; 1 -heavy-duty arc-
welding transformer 240-320-
440V $50 000; 1 compressor
and air tank 100 Ib, 110V $40
000; 1 5-ft aluminum ladder with
2-ft by 18-in platform, U.S.A.-
made $15 000. Owner leaving.
# 621-4928/611-8766. A quantity
of electrical panels with circuit
breakers heavy-duty switch-over
panels 110-220V.



1 RZ minibus for sale -
BFF 6349. Telephone 220-
4791.
1 TOYOTA Carina AA 60 -
PDD 5434. Telephone 220-
4791.
1 NISSAN Caravan E
24, excellent condition.
Tel. # 220-4782
ONE Bedford TL 7-
ton lorry (not dump).
Tel: 227-1923/616-
5679.
TOYOTA Extra Cab, V6,
fully powered. $1.3M neg.
Tel. 254-0387.
ONE Toyota Camry, PGG
series. SV 41. Call 226-0935,
after 18:00 h.
1 HONDA CBR F3 600 for
sale $700 000 (neg.). Tel: 612-
6409 Ricky.
ONE 2000 Yamaha RI
going cheap, legal docu-
ments 226-6527 /623-
3122. ,


ONE Toyota RZ minibus. In
excellent condition. $800 000.
Cell 629-6590.
AE 81 TOYOTA Corolla -
PFF 3317. Telephone: 269-
0299/218-2042/615-5685.
TOYOTA Cnarina AT 150,
manual gear $525 000.
Telephone 227-0613.
TOYOTA Ceres automatic,
fully powered $1 175 000, etc.
Telephone 227-0613.
ONE Tn,,nti Surf, good
working :.... .. Contact A.
King on # 225-4443 or 622-
7628.
(1) ONE Ford Cargo Cab -
very good condition. Price $155
00 neg. Telephone: 220-1068.
4-WD RANGE Rover Land
Rover with alloy rims & Sony CD
player. Priced to go. # 621-7445.
(1) ET 176 Corona wagon -
excellent working condition.
Telephone: 218-3018/619-5087.
HILMAN Minx. Good
condition. PZ 5150. Price $280
000. Call 264-2204 or 625-1228.
BARGAIN. 1 Honda Accord
car. In good condition. $190 000.
Telephone Number 640-2545.
AT 192 CARINA. Excellent
condition. Mags, spoiler, etc. -
$1.3M,neg. Vidya 233-5282 or
611-2241.
TOYOTA Corona station
wagon, back wheel drive. Price
$550 000. Call 640-1318/628-
2910.
TOYOTA pick up JJ series.
Perfect working condition.
$2.1M. Telephone 233-2491 or
233-2492.
1 TOYOTA Corolla Wagon.
Excellent condition. Mags, PGG,
etc. $725 000 neg. Vidya 233-
5282 or 611-2241.
AT 192 Carina. Excellent
condition. Mags, spoiler, alarm
system $1 650 000 neg. Vidya
233-5282 or 611-2241.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter (3
tons), enclosed. Contact Tel. #
263-5404 after 16:00 hrs, 618-
9602, anytime.
ONE TT 131 CORONA in
good condition mag rims, stick
gear, tape deck. Tel: 626-6837
after hours # 220-4316.
ONE AA 60 Carina, in ex-
cellent working condition, needs
body work tape deck, AC etc.
Tel. 617-4063/225-0236.
s1 -TOYOTA Corolla AE 100
- automatic, fully powered, a/c,
etc. $1.2M neg. Telephone
623-7684.
ONE Toyota Mark 11, GX -
80 Model. Price $475 000 neg.
Telephone 641-1225/266-2127.
1 TOYOTA Cammi.
Excellent condition. PHH 5974.
Phone 618-9261 or 269-0273.
2 TOYOTA pick ups, 1 2-
door and 1 4-door at reduced
prices. Contact 225-6759, 274-
0418 after hrs.
AT 212 Carina fully
powered, PJJ 2015, 8 months
old, first owner $1.9M. Price
neg. Telephone 254-0101.
TOYOTA AT 212 Carina, AT
192 Carina, AE 110 Corolla. All
excellent condition. Phone 226-
9316/619-9187.
TOYOTA Carina AT 170,
Corolla AE 91, Corona AT
170. Contact City Taxi Service.
Telephone 226-7150.
1 HONDAVigorcar- (4)-door,
automatic. Good condition. Price
- $675 000 neg. Telephone 628-
4207/616-7408, anytime.
1 2-TON Toyota Dyna.
Excellent condition. Contact
Brian at Lusignan Market, Rd.,
ECD. Telephone 220-6229/622-
4059.
JAGUAR V-12 sports car -
right-hand drive, needs some
work. Sold as is. $200 000 cash.
Phone 624-8402/225-4631.
1 TOYOTA Single Cab (4
x 4) GHH series manual, 3Y,
new tyres. Price $1.3M. Contact
Rocky 225-1400/621-5902.
STARLET Turbo (EP 71) -
automatic, 2-door, 1300cc top
condition $725 000 neg.
Telephone 621-5130, 26 -
2105, 615-6349.
TOYOTA Carina 212, Toyota
Carina 192, 2 generators: (1) die-
sel, (1) gas 6 250 Watts, 110/220
Volts. Tel: 629-6464. Ask for Sir
Ken.
1 DUMP truck, 1 water
tender and 330 Timber Jack
Skidder all are in good working
condition. For more information
Contact: 264-2946.


1 BEDFORD MODEL
M TRUCK. TEL: 455-2303
ONE AE 91 Corolla -
automatic, fully powered, AC.
tape deck, etc. PGG series. In
good condition. Telephone 623-
8700/270-4465.
ONE Toyota Corolla, AE
100. In excellent working
condition. Music set, AC, alarm,
fully loaded. Telephone 223-
8153/621-8 146.
1 RZ (Short base) cat eye,
EFI, (15-seater), (BGG series).
Excellent condition. Price -
$1.2M. Contact Rocky 225-
1400/621-5902.
S1- NISSAN Double Cab pick
Lip (4 x 4) manual, excellent
working condition. Price $850
000. Contact Rocky 225-1400/
621-5902.
1 FB 13 Sunny, 1 AT 170
Carina, 1 AT 170 Corolla. All in
working condition. For further
information, Call Mario Auto
Sales, 616-8346.
1 HONDA Vigor (4-door
executive type car) automatic,
fully powered, AC, alarm,
spoiler, Price $1.2M. Contact
Rocky 225-11400/621-5902.
1 AT 192 TOYOTA Carina
automatic, fully powered, AC,
low mileage. Excellent
condition. Price $1 450 000
(neg.). Contact Rocky 225-
1400/621-5902.
1 AT 170 TOYOTA Corona,
(excellent working condition) -
automatic, fully powered. Price
$675 000. Contact Rocky -
225-1400/621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Celica (2-door
- 3S GE), PGG series.
Automatic, fully powered, AC,
CD Player. Price $1.3M.
Contact Rocky 225-1400/621-
5902.
1 AE 100 Toyota Ceres.
(Excellent condition).
Automatic, fully powered, AC,
mag rims, spoiler, CD. Price $1
500 000. Contact Rocky 225-
1400/621-5902.
1 AT 212 TOYOTA Carina
(PJJ series never in hire).
Automatic, fully powered, AC,
megrims, alarm. Price $1 825
000. Contact Rocky 225-1400/
621-5902.
1 NISSAN Pathfinder (V6
- PHH series). 2- door,
automatic, 4 x 4, crash bar, 5
seats, disc brakes. Price $2M.
Contact Rocky 225-1400/621-
5902.
1 NISSAN (U 13) Bluebird

fully powered, mags (Chrome),
fog lamp. Price $950 000.
Contact Rocky 225-1400/621-
5902.
TOYOTA Dyna, 2 ton
open back canter, GGG series,
in good condition; 1 long
wheel base Series II Land
Rover, gasoline. Call 266-
2458/625-5873.
ONE (1) TOYOTA Hiace
Super GL 14-seater mini bus
diesel engine, four (4)-wheel
drive dual air conditioned,
CD deck, BJJ 1995. Call 225-
5274/226-7665.
1 NISSAN Altima
(executive type) private,
automatic, fully powered, AC,
mags, alarm, CD Player. Price -
$1.1M (neg.). Contact Rocky -
225-1400/621-5902.
1 AT 170 TOYOTA Carina -
(PGG series, never in hire).
Automatic, fully powered, AC,
mag rims, low mileage. Price -
$850 000. Contact Rocky 225-
1400/621-5902.
TOYOTA Celica GTR (2-
door Sports), colour torch red.
Excellent condition. Automatic,
fully powered, AC, CD Player.
$1.3M neg. Telephone 660-
6717 (Moshin).
FOR sale (owner leaving
country) (2) Kawasaki (ZX
600) Ninja motorcycles in
excellent condition, like new,
with accessories, cat eye, low
mileage. Call # 642-3722/
223-1885.
1 15-SEATER fibreglass
boat- 150 Horse Power Johnson
engine. Working condition.
Price $950 000. Contact -
Reginald. Telephone 623-
4861/225-0746.
FORD Cortina Mark 11 car;
Land Rover Long Base, Series
3; Nissan 720 Pick Up; one
electrical lathe. Priced very
h,-i.., Cll Richard- 624-0774
7, n ,.14,


NISSAN Pathfinder SE V6 -
automatic, fully powered, mag
wheels, CD Player, auto start,
alarm. Excellent condition in
and out. Must see! Cash $1.5
million. Call 624-8402.
TOYOTA Celica GT 2-
door, automatic, full wide body,
skirt kit, nag wheels, CD Player
and lots more. Cash $'1.3
million. Phone 624-8402/227-
7677.
FORD Tow truck (for towing
crash vehicle), In good
condition, Transmission needs
to be installed, will supply. (Sold
as is). $500 000. An absolute
giveaway. Phone 624-8402/
225-4631.
MAZDA RX-7 Second
Generation Sports car recently,
imported from USA, engine,
wheels. Registration not sold
with vehicle. No accidents. $400
000. Phone 624-8402/225-4631.
CARINA AT 170, PGG -
$650 000 & $800 000; $300 000
- down payment; Carina AT 192
- $1.3M; Sprinter AE 100 -
$1.2M; AE 91 $750 000 & $650
000, Starlet $1.1M. Call 231-
6236.
1 AE 91 SPRINTER fully
powered, automatic, excellent
condition $775 000; (1) 2-door
EP 71 Starlet Turbo 5-speed
gear, excellent condition $775
000 Contact: Raymond.
Telephone: 265-4760.
VEHICLES to purchase and
sell. Our commission fees on motor
car is only $25 000, large vehicle -
$40 000. Quick sale. Hurry. Call G
& I Auto Sales 218-1095, 625-
9947. 622-5853 or 660-1267.
1 AT 170 fully powered,
automatic $825 000, Carina;
1 AT 170 fully powered,
automatic $550 000; 1 Hilux
pick up Single cab. Excellent
condition. $750 000. Call 260-
2355/222-3459.
1 TOYOTA Land Cruiser
(with wench) 4 x 4 manual,
power steering, straight 6. mag
rims, roof rack, crash bar, AC, CD
Player. Price $4.2M (neg.).
Contact Rocky 225-1400/621-
5902.
1 TOYOTA Tacoma (Extra
Cab) 2000 Model (4 x 4) -
automatic, 3400cc (V6), Chrome
rims. AC, CD Player, crystal light,
GJJ series (4 months old). Price
- $3M. Contact Rocky 225-
1400/621-5902.
1 TOYOTA RAV 4 (1997)
came in brand new manual,
fully powered. AC, Chrome mag
rims, roof rack, crash bar, low
mileage. Immaculate condition.
Price $3.1M. Contact Rocky -
225-1400/621-5902.
1 NISSAN Vanette small
bus (no back seats). Excellent
condition. Mags, gear. Price -
$500 000; 1 Nissan pick up -
gear. Excellent working
condition. Price $550 000.
Contact Rocky 225-1400/621-
5902.
1 XJ 6 Jaguar car auto and
fully powered, leather interior, oak-
finished dash board. Like new. This
is a number one rated Executive or
Play Boy vehicle. Call for viewing
and price. K and N Auto Sales -
227-4040/628-0796/616-7840.
ONE (1) NISSAN LAUREL -
C-33 MODEL, FULLY LOADED.
PRICE $750 000 NEG. AND (2)
TWO NEW LOCALLY MADE
POOLS TABLE $200 000 EACH.
CALL MONTY ON 629-7419 OR
223-9021.
Yamaha R1, cat-eye, like
new. Price to go. Yamaha XT
600cc Dirt bike Scrambler, also
Yamaha Banshee Four-wheel
drive Sports bike, Honda 250cc
Rebel, Honda 90cc ladies
Motorcycle. Tel.225-2873, 25-2873, 225-
2319, 660-1061, 660-1060.
1 ST 190 TOYOTA Corona,
(EFI). Price $1.6M (neg.).
Automatic, fully powered, AC,
mag rims; 1 GX 81, Toyota Mark
11. Price $1.3M. Automatic,
fully powered, AC, Mint
condition. Contact Rocky 225-
1400/621-5902.
HONDA CRV in immaculate
condition, RAV 4 $2.3M, $2.9M;
Toyota (Diesel) 1999 model Double
Cab $7M; Toyota Four Runner -
leather interior, nickel mags, 1999
Model $8M. K and N Auto Sales.
Telephone 227-4040/628-0796/
616-7840.
Honda Delsol Sports Car, PJJ
series, like new; Toyota Ceres, fully
powered, AC, like new: GMC Sierra
Extra Cab diesel 4 x 4 pick-up, 1998
model, like new; Land Rover 110
County diesel Turbo, Nissan
Pathfinder, Tel. 660-1061, 660-
1060; 225-2873, 225-2319.


1 TOYOTA (4 x i ?n...Il.-
Cab Pick-up ( 1, 1.... 1,
excellent condition, mag rims.
Price $900 000. Contact Rocky
225-1400/621-5902
FOR the best factory
reconditioned Japanese
vehicles: 1 RZ EFI, Cat eyes;
AT 192. AT 212, fully loaded
Toyota Carina; J 100 4 WD, SR5
Pick-up fully loaded, H-lilux Surf
4 Runner. Trade-in and credit
terms available at Paul
Camacho Auto Sales, 111 Croal
St.. (between Albert and
Oronoque Streets). Telephone
225-0773/621-5869.
FORD F 150 Xtra cab Pick
Up $3.3M; Toyota Thundra -
$5.8M to $7.5M; Toyota Station
Wagon Land Cruiser $4M and
$8M have to see; Toyota Surf -
manual and automatic, very
attractive $2.4M neg.; Toyota
Xtra Cab 4 4 $1.8M; Toyota
Single Cab 4 x 4 $875 000;
Toyota T 100 with 20-inch mags
$3.5M credit available;
Toyota (Diesel) Xtra Cab, new
model $2.8M; new model
Toyota mini van, ,.t,,i i -
$2.9M. K and N, Auto Sales -
227-4040/628-0796/616-7840.
NEW SHIPMENT
RECONDITIONED VEHICLES.
Cars: Sprinter AE 110; Starlet
Galanza Turbo EP 91; Carina AT
192; Lancer CK 2A; Cynos Sports
Coupe EL 54; Toyota Cynos
Convertible. Wagon: Corolla AE
100 G-Touring; Mitsubishi RVR
N 23, fully loaded. Pick Ups: (4 x
4) Toyota Hilux YN 100. Trucks:
enclosed freezer, open tray
Mitsubishi Canter. Used Carina
AT 170; Mark 11 GX 81. DEO
MARAJ AUTO SALES 207
SHERIFF AND SIXTH STREETS,
CAMPBELLVILLE. 226-4939. A
NAME AND A SERVICE YOU
CAN TRUST.
AE 81 Corolla, automatic
and stick gear $375 000 and
$460 000 Nissan Sunny $350
000 and $475 000; Nissan Blue
Bird $450 000, back wheel
drive, Camry $375 000; AA 60
Carina $375 000 and $450 000;
KE 30 Corolla $175 000 $100
000 deposit. And Deposit low as
$275 000. Buy now. Contact David
at Pete's Auto Sales, Lot 9 Croal
Street, Stabroek, 2 buildings before
B.M. Soat Auto Sales. Telephone:
223-6218/612-4477. Or Lot 2
George and Hadfield Streets.
Telephone 226-9951/226-5546/
623-7805.
212 CARINA $1.6M, 100
Corolla $975 000, Mitsubishi
Lancer $1 .8M PJJ, SV 30 Camry
$1.5M, Ceres $1.4M 2000 cc,
100 Sprinter $1 375 000 music
system & mags, Corolla wagon -
$850 000, 1RZ minibus mags,
spoiler, music system & low mileage
$1.9M. EP 82 Starlet $1M, 4
Runner Surf $2.2M & $2.4M, Hilux
5L engine $3.5M, AE 91 Sprinter
$750 000, AT 192 Carina -$1.2M,
$1.3M. G & I Auto Sales 218-
1095, 622-5853, 625-9947 &
660-1267.
212 CARINA $1 850 000
and $1 950 000; GX 90 Mark 11
$2 200 000; GX 80 Mark 11 -
$1 300 000; ST 190 Corona $1
450 000; AT 192 Carina $1 300
000, $1 450 000' AE 100 Corolla
and Sprinter $1 200 000 and
$1 275 000; AT 170 Corona -
$900 000, $850 000 and $775
000; AT 170 Carina $725 000
and $875 000; AE 91 Corolla
and Sprinter $675 000 and
$725 000. Also Buses: RZ buses,
Nissan Caravan, 3Y buses,
Toyota Lite Ace, 4 x 4 Pick Up, 4
Runner. Contact David at Pete's
Auto Sales, Lot 9 Croal Street,
Stabroek, 2 buildings before
B.M. Soat Auto Sales or Lot 2
George and Hadfield Streets.
Telephone 223-6218/612-4477/
226-9951/226-5546/623-7805;
after 16:00 H 231-3690 David.
212 CARINA-$1.9M:AT 192
Carina, PJJ series $1 450 000;
AE 100 Sprinter, automatic, 15-
inch nickel mags, CD Player,
(immaculate condition), PHH
series $1.4M: Toyota 110
Sprinter $1.5M neg.; EP 91
Glanza (4-door), automatic -
$1.5M neg.; EP 82 Starlet,
(manual) GT Turbo, PHH series -
1.4M neg.; 1 Mini, good to race
only $395 000; AE 100 Corolla
$1.3M neg.; Toyota Marino,
automatic $1.2M neg.; Toyota
SV 30 Camry $1.5M; Honda
Civic Fiero, low profile tyres,
(excellent) $1.5M; 555 Blue
Bird $600 000; EV11 Blue Bird
(Ark), new Model $1.1M neg.;
Nissan Altima $1.2M neg.; AE
91 Corolla $700 000: AE 91
Sprinter (manual) $600 000,
Toyota MR 2 Sports (manual),
round shape, very fast $1.8M;
GC 81 Mark 2 $1.1M; AT 170
Corona, full light $850 000
neg.; Toyota G-Touring wagon -
$1.4M. K and N Auto Sales -
227-4040/628-079C/616-7840.


JUST off the wharf, not
registered as yet 1 Nissan
Cifero. 2000cc, only 42 000
Km, Pearl white, automatic,
fully powered, dual airbag. air-
conditioned, CD Deck, right
hand drive. In immaculate
condition. Price at cost.
Vehicle can be seen at 79B
Cowan Street, Kingston,
Georgetown. Telephone 624-
8352/622-4554.
ONE TOYOTA LAND
CRUISER 4 X 4 MODEL FJ 62,
3F ENGINE RIGHT HAND DRIVE,
GASOLINE, EXCELLENT
CONDITION. IDEAL FOR
INTERIOR. EQUIPPED WITH
WINCH OFF AND ON ROAD
FRONT DISC BRAKES, 4-SET
LEAF, SPRING, MANUAL GEAR
BOX, POWER WINDOWS,
POWER STEERING, ETC. CALL
223-5273 OR 223-5274 FOR
FURTHER INFORMATION.



DRIVER. CALL 226-86341
629-2132.
GENERAL DOMESTIC.
CALL 613-8308.
1 SECURITY GUARD.
PHONE 227-4263.
HIRE CAR DRIVERS.
CONTACT TELEPHONE 227-
0018.
LIVE-IN DOMESTIC.
TELEPHONE 227-0060 -
(JENNY).
HOMES WANTED!
$$$$. KEYHOMES #
223-4267
ONE EXPERIENCED HIRE
CAR DRIVER. CONTACT 627-
0916.
ONE Jeweller. Please
call 622-6896/628-3345 -
ask for Danny.
Porters to work on truck.
Contact R. Narine 227-1923/
616-5679.
GIRLS to work in Printery.
Must know to number.
Telephone 225-8997.
1 LIVE-IN Domestic. Call
614-6053 or 625-5534 or 222-
4208.
JOINER with experience
Call 614-6053/625-5534/22.
4208. I
WANTED Taxi and
minibus Drivers. Teleph.
624-3268/233-5866, a.
19:00 h.
ONE EXPERIENCED
HAIRDRESSER. CONTACT
TELEPHONE # 225-5426.
(1) 90 HORSEPOWL.,
force outboard engine to be |
used for parts. 225-2477 or 62'
0535.
ONE live-in Apprentice
Mechanic for Bedford T.L. 500
Lorry. Telephone 228-24(..-,
613-8554.
REGENT STREE- ,
ESTABLISHED COMMERCIAL
BUILDING HUMPHREY NELSON'S .
REALTY. TEL- 226-8937.
WAITERS and Cashiers
Application person to Kamboat I
Restaurant, 51 Sheriff Stre,.,
Georgetown.
ONE Gardener and one
Domestic. Telephone 22-
1757/225-5641. 24 Bel
Court, Bel Air. I
ONE experienced
disciplined Taxi Driver, bete'..?
40 and 50 years. Call
8630.
CARPENTER to
general repairs and Painters.
Apply 68 Robb Street
Lacytown. Nut Centre.
ONE Cook to make Roti
and Puri. Hours: 18:00 H to ? I
Call 226-0283 or 226-1933
ask for Rada.
ONE live-in Babysitte..,
between 30 and 45 yer
Please contact Safraz 6
4332. Attractive salary.
URGENTLY needed liv
in Bartenders and Waitress .
work in bar. Attractive salary.
Contact: 618-8375.
ONE Arc and Acetylen
Welder. Must know grill work.
( ' tree
C ....... :v. -..... -* ^6 35. |
WANTED urgently or
apartment to rent. $10
monthly. Please c.,l Telep,
660-8473, anytime.
WANTED one Driver for
hire car. Contact by phone 225
4160 after 16:00 h an,'
onwards.


- - . I







SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005 SUNDAY CHRONICLE Maroh 6, 2006


26



APARTMENTS/FLATS -
$15 000 $40 000 monthly.
Get 12 months advance rent
(on contract) & loan to do
repairs. Call 231-6236.
SALESGIRL, kitchen
staff, live-in girl from coun-
try area. Nazeema Deli -
318 East St., N/C/ Burg.
226-9654/618-2902.
APARTMENTS flats,
houses to rent from $25 000
to US$2500 in/around
Georgetown. Prestige Realty
231-5304
EXPERIENCED Accounts
Clerk, Salesgirls Nazeema Deli,
318 East St., North C/burg. 231-
4139/226-5063/231-3913.
PART-TIME Gardener. 224
r Phase 1, Republic Park, EBD.
Call in person. Monday -
Saturday, 12:30 14:00 hrs.
DRIVERS to work 24 hours.
Must have Hire Car Licence.
Contact: Pacesetters Taxi
Service. Telephone: 223-7909/
223-7910.
WANTED urgently -
Porters to work on Canter
Truck. Hutson's Wholesale
Service, Industry Front.
Telephone 222-4650/623-
5317.
SALESBOYS and girls.
Apply Anand's Regent
Street, Athina's by the East
Coast car park and Avinash
Complex Water Street.
ONE Labour, Lorry Driver
to work at Diamond Estate,
immediately. Call 228-2480/
613-8554, 6M h 16:00 h.
ONE property to buy in
Georgetown, preferable in these
areas: Roxanne Burnham, East
La Penitence, West Ruimveldt,
South. Call: 624-3376.
EXPERIENCED waiters.
Apply in person with written
application. Hack's Halaal
Restaurant, 5 Commerce
Street, Georgetown.. 09:00 -
11:00 h.
ONE Salesgirl to sell
music and movies. Previous
experience would be an asset.
Apply in person to Guyana
Variety Store, 68 Robb Street,
G/town.
2 WAITRESSES. Apply
*: Plaza Hang Out Bar (Flat
op), Lot 245Sheriff Street,
ile. (opp. Sankar's Auto
,iares). Telephone No: 227-
1 8576.
BARTENDER, Waiters, also
Sone Maintenance Person.
Accommodation will be
provided for Maintenance
Person. Contact Telephone #
225-1293.
EXPERIENCED
I Hairdresser. Must know to do
"anicure, pedicure, facial
,d hairstyles, etc. Also
Snairs to rent. Please contact.
Tel. 223-5252 or 628-3415.
DOMESTIC 17 21
'"RS. NO COOKING,
XRY STARTS $16 000
Ek MONTH. MRS.
'ERSfAUD TELEPHONE
227-3233.
DOMESTIC. MON. TO
3AT. 08:30 H TO 17:30 H.
NO COOKING. SALARY
STARTS $16 000 PER
9NTH. MRS. PERSAUD -
-EPHONE 226-5299.
HONEST and careful
srs to work in popular Taxi
vice. Good wages and
.y loaded cars. Police
I Clearance and one Reference
uired. Please Call: 226-
1,_ai time.
'vt,O nve-in Domestics
fan the ages of 17 and
years from the country
i ,uas. Also one live-in boy to
do Handyman work around
heard and bond # 621-4928.
1 ASSISTANT to Pro-
duction Manager, 1 -Machine
Operator to work night shift
nd 1 -Machine Operator to
ork day. Call: 615-9752 be-
.ween 13:00 and 16:00 hrs .....
**!URGENTLY one
-etylene Welder to weld
.fs, buses. Job work/day
vdrk available. Contact
lucky Work Shop, 11-
industry, ECD. Telephone
| 612-4961.
MALE to sell tape
iucorders and radios. A sound
l secondary education along
oast .. .. w ,,'-' n
.ss .y
I Store, bo r acytown, (Nut Centre).__
CHAw' SAW Operators,
n or w,nout own saw. $18
J to $26 000 per BM.
| Mabura Area. Call 223-6588
08:00 h 17:00 h. 277-
: 7856, evenings 18:00 h -
'2.0!00 h.


EXOTIC Rentals is looking
for a mature driver to drive a
large vehicle. Applicants must
possess a sound secondary
education, at least 10 years
driving experience. Check out 68
Robb Street, Lacytown,
Georgetown (Nut Centre
building).
WANTED FOR RUNNING
OF CHINESE RESTAURANT
CLEAN HYGIENIC COMMER-
CIAL SECTOR AT BUSY AREA.
NOT AT A MADDENING RENTAL
HUMPHREY NELSON'S REALTY
226-8937 ALSO PURCHASING
WISE OFFICE BUILDING AT
DOWNTOWN GEORGETOWN
TELEPHONE HUMPHREY
NELSON'S 226-8937.
ONE Mechanic to work in
interior. Must know to repair, Perkins
Bedford Excavator engine and
Ih .-i'auli.:; and pick up. Full
knowledge of excavator would be
an asset. All accommodation
provided. Call 223-1609 and 624-
653.
WANTED ugy- Security Guards
and Ice Plant Operators. Must have
(2) recent References, valid Police
Clearance, Identification and NIS
cards. Apply in person to: The Man-
ager, BM Enterprise Inc., GFL Wharf,
Houstn, East Bank Demerara.
WANTED urgently Mechanics
who must have valid Truck Drivers
Licence, and (1) one Excavator
Operator. Must have experience in
repairing both gasoline and diesel
engines. Contact: Ramjit or Johnny
on Telephone No: 225-4500/225-
9920/777-4065.
WANTED MOST URGENTLY
5 TO 10 ACRES OF UNCULTI-
VATED LAND POSSESSED OF
SEASIDE ADVANTAGE FROM
PARIKA TO VREED-EN-HOOP,
ALSO AT ANY PART OF EAST
BANK OF DEMERARA.
TRANSPORT. MUST BE
FREE OF COMPLICATION.
TELEPHONE 226-8937.
MAJOR Trading Company
seeks Office Assistants. Minimum
qualification: CXC Maths and
english, Grade 111, Computer
knowledge desired but now
compulsory. Application:
Personnel Manager, Lot 'D'
Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park,
Georgetown. Call number 225-
9494 or 225-4492. Live-in
accommodations available for
Berbicians and Essequibians.


UPPER flat of two-
storeyed building for
business purposes located
in Coburg Street (next to
Police Headquarters). Call
Telephone # 618-6634.



CIRCUIT City Internet
Cafe and Computer School,
Lot 2 D'Edward Village, W/
C/B. All Internet facilities,
photocopying, Scanning
and Fax Services. Tel. #
330-2762/2830 or 625-
7189:



One Ransom 3-Disc
Plough, one pair MF 35-
cage wheel, one 35 MF back
blade, one steel rake Call
Tel: 333-3460 .
OXYGEN and acetylene
industrial gases. # 58
Village, Corentyne, Berbice.
Phone: 338-2221 (David
Subnauth).
3-STOREYED building
located in New Amsterdam;
p,.oi tables, ice maker
machine, 1 complete gym,
1 Lister generator. Call:
333-2457/231-5171.
1 LITTLE Giant
dragline with 371 engine; 1 -
48" x 36" pitch propeller; (1)
3/" dia. x 13 ft 6 ins.
propeller shaft; 1 Perkins
marine with transmission;
1 Bedford engine block
with standard crank shaft
and head; all sizes of 3-
phase motors; cutting
torch; one complete gas
welding set; one 371
GM engine. Tel: 333-
. 3 ,2 2 , , .G. . .


GaMp s step I" pub TVm*a


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- -7


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*


RHTYSC completes volleyball


and basketball tournaments


IN its continuing efforts to
offer sport as an alternative
to a life on the road away
from drugs and crime, the
Rose Hall Town Youth and
Sport Club (RHTYSC) com-
pleted two competitions in
different disciplines recently.
The Banks DIH-spon-
sored Volleyball tournament
was won by Rollers of New
Amsterdam who prevailed
over a spirited Rose Hall
Town team 25-17, 25-20 in
the final played on the Area
'H' court. In the 3rd place
play-off Shooters of Fyrish


upstaged Defenders of
Blairmont 29-27. 25-22. The
MVP of the tournament
award went to captain Mark
Wilson of Rollers.
In an all Rose Hall Town fi-
nal of the Banks Mini Malta
Basketball competition the 'A'
side overcame their 'B' counter-
parts 49-42 in a hotly contested
affair.
Captain Eon Wiggins of the
winning team led all scorers
with 15 points while team-mate
Sherain Murray supported with
12. Derwin Harry and Lottoy
Scott also scored 12 apiece in a


losing effort. In the 3rd place
play-off Fyrish 'A' proved too
strong for their juniors and eas-
ily won 32-18.
The top 3 teams in both
competitions were rewarded
with trophies, prizes and
Banks Mini Malts products.
Club Secretary/CEO of
the RHTYSC, Albert Foster,
at the presentation ceremony
reminded that the club would
be involved in hosting several
competitions for volleyball,
basketball, football, cricket
table tennis and boxing dur-
ing this year. (Allan La Rose)


Plnt to [lose fro[m...is]u

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"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

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TV/VCR Repairs. Rosignol
Market Stellinq Road.
Telephone # 621-2256


DANZIE'S: Brand name
footwear for all. Stall # D 9
N/A Market. Tel: 333-4685



CHURCH View Hotel, Main
and King Streets, NA. Tel: 333-
2880. Gift Flower and Souvenir
Shop, Main & Vryheid Streets. #
333-3927



WOODWORKS Door
Store, panel doors, cupboard
doors, windows and mouldings.
Pitt Street & Republic Road, N/
A. Tel.333-2558.



PRIME business property
located at Main and Kent
Streets, New Amsterdam.
Call: 225-7747, weekdays.
1 3-STOREYED building,
newly built in the heart of New
Amsterdam. Price reduced
drastically. Call 333-2457,
337-2348.
(1) 2-BEDROOM house at
Whim, Corentyne price US$40
000. Phone: 220-6115. Ideal for
businessperson or lawyer.
2-STOREY prime
residential property situated in
Canefield Canje Public Road.
Price $20 million, negotiable.
Contact Tel. 327-7164.
2-BEDROOM bottom flat -
122 Crane Street, Queenstown,
Corriverton, Berbice. Toilet,
bath, park facilities. Telephone
,'339.3221.,",-81 .";,,


Mr. G. Wynter on 333-3154/333-6628
or Mr. Clifford Stanley on 618-6538/232-0065


Y\~~ '


^ *






SURNAUN CHIIUROMCLL IVIh e


ADVERTISE

IN THE CHRONICLE
IT PAYS! CALL:
226-3243-9 or 225-4475
FOR FURTHER INFO




Ill MEMORIAL
I InI l l t_ I I C I I'IO ". *, -i
PE \Rl EE RO \CII
,..'10 dw d ,,n ll. .' ,M I Jli I I*"'-
L ir hIl -. 1'Jr r. e p. 'ed l' n i tll. ',tl.iJ >i I'
-" When our beloved one was taken away .a
\ We hold our tears when we speak your

S But he pain in our ..,11 I's still remains
No one knows the sorrow\ we share
W'ilcn llie faamil meets and \ou are not
.t"ere
: Lite goes on we\ knows tha, is inoe
Bui noi the same since losing yoi
0. h N VOUi \1'. .' 10 SCCee VOur S ilC
To sit and talk wnh you a\\.li!ek
To get together in thile same old wav
SWould be our dearest wish oda',
\With silent griet and tears unseen
S e wish vour absence was just a drean,
They sav memories are golden
.. ell maybe that is true
But we never wanted memories
VWe wanted vou.

a...I i .ed by Fred, Sabrina and


--_ ...-

IN MEMORIAL


( fb/lI(4l/{ I 'I/ (7.' eS

ANGELINA GRIMES
/. ..n./ ,/t (7 ),


I


N -2/ / /,/ ,/v
/ ,4,;; '<< ,'aav i -/ < I:.
/; ..-'' iin.'
A God saw she was getting tired
So He put His loving arms around her
And whispered "Come to Me"
With tear-filled eves, we watched her
faitde away
Although we loved her dearly
i I We could not make her stay
Lord, keep your arms around her
And in your loving care
Make her rest very peaceful
And completely free from fear
A golden heart has stopped beating
Hard working hands at rest
God has broken our hearts to prove to
tUS
He only takes the best

Sadly remembered by all her
relatives and friends.
LwA i^iJ


S


qw-


No more in our lives to
share
years
Now God will keep you in
His care
Each time I see yourpicture
You seem to smile and say
M om don: '.. .' .,, ... ,, :: r, ,,
T, i.',-I, ,rwayandeveryday
Beloved. Beloved, adored
Be this our grace to see thy face
In Jesus Christ Our Lord


/,. ,




Always will be
remembered by your
mom Hyacinth, aunts,
uncle, cousins, God-
mother, God-sisters, God-
children and friends.


I __A_


37- 7r


/ ,
~ 6


41


.I


Death Announcement


n #lfemoriam
D3 COSTA: Treasured
memories of my loving
only child SHARON
ALICIA (Jacquey), Lt.
9533, GDF Admin.
Officer. Maritime Corp
and Technical Records
(ri,..- Air Corp who was
called to eternity on
March4,1996.


I-,. ~9 4
-in,
- C i~
in,


a




father
Antho
Franc
F h 1, ,
iF
I ,. I _


.h I- ,
,. e,,- ,,,,,


r,..-(- (


January 21, 1957 tc


March 04,


"2'


e'-


0/ ,/


2003


formerly of 91 Gale Street, Annandale, East Coast Demerara, who passed away
on March 04, 2003 in Queens, New York.


Allah saw your pain was getting too much


A cur
So H
whisp
With
We w


e was not to be.
e put His arm around you and
ered. "Come with me."
pain filled hearts and tear filled eyes
watchedd you fade away.


Made up for all you suffered
And all that seemed unfair.
A golden heart has stopped beating
Hard working hands are at rest.
Allah has broken our hearts to prove to
us "He only takes the Best."


Although we love you so dearly If tears could build a stairway and
We could not make you stay. memories a lane,
Allah kept His arm around you in His loving We will walk right up to Heaven
care, And bring you home again.

Sadly missed by your loving husband Feroze, two children Shaneeza and Shazad, son-in-law
Teddy, granddaughter Zareefa, also all other relatives and friends.


Aa-J 4 K'a/,d oit Icw a na4c mevz 1/,a-.im Ma, egl- enrjk4


wmw


---pl


Born. July 23 192F. Died February 1-1 20(;5
. , .....I SIMON CARLTON NG.A-FOOK
D IC K .i .:.l i_ L ,. r F"-' r u. ...... i ...I 7 .




-n-law of Joan & Jennifer of the U.S.A., Lenr. I
ny De Nobrega of Guyana, Lynette, Jean aiI
;me; grandfather of Ava Monalita, Leon (Dino), Lennox
- h, ,, ,', i- ,11 P ,,tri l,: ". P, i un ,_- f the '


SI i ii , '. I'i l i L. .Il i i, i il ..-
? L i .... .'i I_,, l i I,, r ,- i ,. i ,,, rh ,.,I i I' 1
ii ,I Il ." I I I. ., r ., . ,i l ,, ,r '

Ti,, a. ., i, -ii SIMON CARLTON NG-A-
Fne grKan...It1.r.. ii .A M i t, L i Di Lnn i
,, : Im,:,-l..ii; Ih ,.% rlr~ ~ ~.H il i l-r i ,-, i,_ il


I


I Onu~




miunV IIn l IC A,, g ?n r





I /( I!' 1L /11 't I I i k- L I I I


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28 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005
Spr9Cho il


Ausse complete 5-0


swep after Ponting's


141


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Is m


Notice to all Shareholders

Shareholders of Guyana National Co-operative Bank are
hereby requested to contact the Guyana National
Co-operative Bank on ,i e orhi 'i.t\ I li M ah. 'l'. 2 ).
Monday to Friday between the hours of 09:00 hours and
16:30 hours at the address or telephone number stated
below as a mi.,tic' of urgency.


THE MOST
CONTROVERSIAL
AND SOUGHT
AFTER BOOK OF
THE MOMENT
vvw~ypV WT'^^2f r. I


Lot 77 Croal Street & Winter Place
Stabroek
Georgetown
Tel: 225-3276


Ms. J. Chapman
-Ct"f. 4 .4 ) < .11 6' W .1 . 1 4 t


GET YOUR I JUDGE FOR |
COPY NOW 5 YOURSELF I
AVAILABLE AT:
AnusTIN'.S OOM
", .~, 11, R l EET, BETWEEN WATERLOO & CAMP STS&. TE
."'4N -d "! SNG THE FRONTIERS


FEIRv I s O


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


Sr Sport Chronicle


CABLE & Wireless (C&W) is Cable & Wireless had with
dismayed by several elements the Board. According to Mr
of Friday night's statement by Griffith the reason that he
the President of the West wanted sight of the contract
Indies Cricket Board, Mr was to ensure that in his
Teddy Griffith. negotiations with the iim-
Firstly, given some of Mr pending team sponsor there
Griffith's comments, we be- would be no conflict with
lieve it's important to reiter- the players' obligations to
ate briefly some of Cable & C&W.
Wireless' contribution, to Friday night was the first
West Indies cricket during our time, since the arbitrator's
nearly 20-year sponsorship ruling last November, albeit
the longest running cricket on a regional media broadcast.
sponsorship in the world, that we were aware of the
Over the last 10 years of that Board's request for such spe-
sponsorship alone, we have cific documents.
invested over US$35 million However, as the WICB is
as the sponsor of all home fully aware, these are private
series games as well as re- personal endorsements con-
gional training and develop- tracts which we cannot legally
ment programmes which have share without the consent of
produced some of the West the other party to the con-
Indies' best players, tract.
Cable & Wireless views as As stated in a release we is-
most regrettable the decision sued on Thursday of this week.
by the West Indies Cricket we wish to repeat and re-
Board that some of the best emphasised that Cable & Wire-
cricketers in the West Indies less has always been, and con-
will not be invited to repre- tinues to be, willing to work
sent the region in the upcom- closely with the WICB, West
ing South Africa and Paki- Indies Players Association
stan series. (WIPA) and the series sponsor
Cable & Wireless is appalled to build a sports sponsorship
at what appears to be a great in- model that reflects international
justice to the.cricket fans in the best practices.
region and to the players who Consequently, in the best
are affected because of the stress interest of West Indies
they now undoubtedly face, cricket, Cable & Wireless
when all they want to do is sim- fully intends to stand by its
ply play cricket and represent commitment which was made
the West Indies. prior to Mr Griffith's unfor-
We firmly believe that tunate statement, to attend a
there is nothing in the in- meeting called by Prime Min-
dividual agreements of the ister Mitchell of Grenada for
players contracted to Cable tomorrow March 7.
& Wireless that would Although Cable & Wire-
cause any conflict with the less is not the series sponsor,
obligations that these play- our company is the regional
ers would be required to telecoms sponsor of Cricket
fulfil under the terms of World Cup 2007 and we be-
any contract entered into lieve that it is imperative that
by the board. all parties involved work
And, we are very sur- through this issue to ensure a
prised that Mr Griffith has smooth run up to, and the
claimed that Cable & Wireless success of Cricket World Cup
refused to share the non-fi- 2007 the biggest event to be
nancial provisions of the in- staged in the region.
dividual contracts, when we The decision by Cable & Wire-
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At that time, a copy of an mentasasponsoroftheWorldCup
entire contract without the is part of our company's long-term
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specific name was submitted ued development of cricket in the
to the CARICOM Sub-Com- region for the benefit of both fans
mittee on Cricket, chaired by and players.
Prime Minister Mitchell of Understanding the inte-
Grenada. gral importance of the game
Moreover, and more sig- of cricket to West Indians,
nificantly, well before the not just financially, but cul-
Board had entered into its turally, Cable & Wireless
agreement with our com- remains committed to its
petitor, Cable & Wireless development. We have a
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at.his request, a player con- Indies cricket will regain
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position and t-he -long- its.-resurgenee in-the fu--
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30 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


WA r


Leaders Jamaica close

in on Carib Beer title
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SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005 3


Sport Chronicle .


L ig reains


DAINA King remained un-
beaten, as rising star Deje
Dias dimmed under a defeat
in round three of the Toucan
Industries Mash Junior
squash tournament at
Georgetown Club, yesterday.
Cary McDonald, also unde-
feated at the end of Friday's play,
completed a hard-fought victory
over Mikail Carto in Group B but
was headed for a showdown with
Daina King who was the only
other player to remain undefeated
in Category B.
Yesterday, King halted
McDonald's winning streak in
a 3-1 match.
Dias bowed to Joshua Abdool
in Category C, his first defeat, los-
ing in straight games 5-9, 1-9, 3-9.
Dias rested yesterday and will be
on court today.
Category F. also began on
Friday evening with Lee Fung-
A-Fat confirming himself as the
early favourite with two victo-
ries over Dillon Williams and
Abhishek Singh.
Some 30 matches were
played during daylight hours,
yesterday, and more were fixed
for the evening.
The competition is being
played in round robin format.
Play will conclude today with
the final round followed by the
presentation.
Friday's results:
Category A Kristina King
defeated Rahul Singh 10-9. 9-6,
9-3 and Raphael de Groot beat
Chantelle Fernandes 9-4, 9-7.
9-6.
Category B Dominique


NEW rivals Matthew Khan
and Christopher Franklin
reached the top four of the
Swiss House-sponsored Top
Sixteen Men's and Top Eight
Women's table tennis compe-
titions at the Cliff Anderson
Sports Hall, yesterday.
The other two male players
who reached the top four are Den-
nis France and Andrew Daley.
On the distaff side, the fi-
nal four are Mash Women's
champion Trenace Lowe,
former National champion
Desiree Lancaster, Jody Ann
Blake and Michelle John.
For the Men's competition,
the 16 players were placed in
four groups of four players and
after playing each other in the
respective group, the top two
advanced to the quarterfinals.
In the quarterfinals, the
players were placed into two
groups and again faced each
other in a round robin format
within each group.
Khan won Group One in
the first round and Michael
John was the runner-up while
, Franklin was the winner of
Group Two and Donald Duff
was the runner-up.
Group Three winner was Paul
Meusa and Raymond Baksh the
runner-up and Dennis France was
Group Four winner and the run-
ner-up Andrew Daley.
Group One in the


Dias triumphed over Robert
Hiscock 9-10. 10-8, 9-4. 3-9, 9-
3 and Cary McDonald defeated
Mikhail Carto 7-9, 9-3, 9-10, 9-
5, 9-2.
Category C Jason Khalil
edged out Selwyn Daniel 9-7, 9-
2, 10-8, 9-1, 9-2, 9-1 and Joshua
Abdool beat Deje Dias 9-5, 9-1,
9-3.
Category E Victoria
Arjoon disposed of Talisa Will-
iams 9-0, 9-1, 9-6; Ashley Khalil
beat Alysa Xavier 9-2, 9-2, 9-0;


DEJE DIAS

Gabriella Xavier whipped Talisa
Williams 9-0, 9-0. 9-4.
Gabriella Xavier defeated
Talia Fiedtkou 6-9. 7-9, 9-0. 9-
7, 10/8.
Category F Lee Fung-A-Fat
beat Dillon Williams 9-2, 9-2;
Abhishek Singh defeated Steven
Xavier 9-4, 9-2; Lee Fung-A-Fat
trimphed over Abhishek Singh
9-4,8-10,9-3 and Joven Bem nde-
feated Ryan Dundas 9-2, 9-0.


quarterfinals had Khan, France,
Baksh and Duff. with Khan
emerging the winner playing un-
beaten, with France the runner-
up, while Group Two had
Franklin, Meusa, Daley and
John, with Franklin the winner
and Daley the runner-up.
Khan, France, Franklin and
Daley will again meet each other in
the final, playing four best in seven.
Sparks are expected to fly when
Khan and Franklin clash, a rivalry
that started at the Mash competi-
tion in which Khan beat Franklin for
the Under-21 Boys' Singles title,
but Franklin turned the tables on
him to take the Men's Singles title.
The Women's competition had
Lowe, Lancaster, Rhonda Farley
and Marilyn Mitchell in Group
One, but Mitchell turned up late and
the three played each other with
Lowe winning the group and
Lancaster being the runner-up.
Group Two had Blake,
John, Nasiah Hadman and Tif-
fany Blair who replaced Vida
Moore. However, Blair did not
turn up and the remaining three
played each other with John
winning the group and the run-
ner-up being Blake.
SThe final will be staged to-
day at the same venue from
12:00 h and immediately after,
the team for the French Guiana
tour over the Easter weekend
will be announced. (Isaiah
Chappelle)


By Imran Khan

IT was bound to happen at
some stage. Guyana with a
puzzling strategy of playing a
bowling attack of only two
specialist bowlers, would have
found it a painfully tedious
task to dismiss a team that
had batsmen, or even tail-
enders, who decided that they
wanted to bat long and score
runs.
Yesterday was the day at
Bourda when the Windward Is-
lands were without a centurion
in their innings of 443, and get-
ting wickets at most times
looked an unachievable goal.
In addition to the 8 1 scored
by Devon Smith on day one.
their captain Rawle Lewis bat-
ted with the responsibility you
would expect from a captain to
get 82.
But Guyana's problem was
the last four batsmen, none of
whom is a noted batter. They)
scored a total of 125 runs be-
tween them.
So far Guyana have not
done badly in response. They
are 111 for 2, 332 runs behind
the Windward Islands' total
after two days of their ninth
round Carib Beer Series.
Rainnaresh Sarwan. who
opened thile innings in place of
the injured Ryan Ranldass
blazed 50 runs from 62 balls
with ten fours as if he was
engrossed in a one-day game.
Perhaps he is yet to shake off
the effects of his exceptional
form in that version of the
game, leading him to be
ranked as the top interna-
tional player.
Sewnarine Chattergoon re-
mains at the wicket on 40.
At the start of the day
Lewis, the bowling all-
rounder who bats ,at number
six, and his tail-enders
worked the Guyana, bowlers to
the bone as the last four bats-
men put on 196 runs to take
their team up to 443 from
163.3 overs.
They commenced the day
on 240 for five and lost Lyndon
James for 33 early up but the
rest of the batsmen did not roll
over. Orlanzo Jackson (44).
Shane Shillingford (28), Fernix
Thomas (27*) and Deighton
Butler (26) all contributed sig-
nificantly to stretch their total
close to 450.
Jackson and Thomas played
aggressive hands with Jackson
slamming seven fours and a six
while Thomas blazed five fours
and a six in his 13 ball innings.
Jackson and Butler added 7 I
runs for the ninth wicket as the
Guyanese strategy of playing
only two specialist bowlers
proved insufficient.
Lewis, re-started his innings
at 28 and played sensibly with-
out taking unnecessary risks to
acquire his runs from 175 deliv-
eries with nine fours.
Damodar Daesrath came in
for a caning from Lewis, in his
first over with the second new
ball being put away for fours in
the over.-
After surviving a chance at


41, he eventually went 18
runs short of a deserving cen-
tury when he hooked a deliv-
ery from pacer Reon King to
Daesrath running around
from fine leg.
The Windwards got to 300
from 132 overs and took another
26 overs to get another hundred
runs. Mahendra Nagamootoo
bowled with control to end with
figures of 3 for 93 from 52 overs,
inclusive of 20 maidens.
It took the leg-spin of
Sarwan, to bring the innings to


--. ~





~, 5,.


MAHENDRA NAGAMOOTOO

a close, getting the last two
wickets for 58 runs from 11.3
overs.
GusaLna. needing 294 runs
to avoid being asked to bat for
a second time. started their in-
nings before tea and Sarwan
looked in ripping form.
Fernix Thomas, replacing
the injured Kenroy Peters
took the brunt of his attack.
his four overs costing 35
runs as Sarwan picked off
two boundaries from each of
his overs. Just after achiev-
ing the milestone he lofted
Shillingford. in his first over
to Thomas at mid on.
Narsingh Deonarine (2) did
not last long as he lifted Lewis
high to long off and Xavier
Gabriel took a fine running
catch. Later on though, Gabriel
let off Chattergoon when he
was on 36, unable to hang on
to a similar running catch.
Chattergoon was left stalled
in the blocks as Sarwan mo-
tored away but after he was
out, Chattergoon stepped on the
accelerator hitting three fours
and a straight six. His innings
has lasted 100 deliveries and
Assad Fudadin on 12 is with
him.
Sarwan opened after Ryan
Ramdass injured his leg while
diving in the field in a failed at-
tempt to save a boundary and
for the second game in a row
had to be stretchered off the
field.
With Ramdass, once re-
covered, and Test batsman
Shivnarine Chanderpaul still
to appear for Guyana in a
lengthy batting line-up the
hosts are capable of over-
hauling the Windwards total
but they will have to bat re-
sponsibly on a pitch with
varying bounce and against
the three-prong spin attack
and the swing of Butler who
bowled well without success.


WINDWARD ISLANDS first innings
(o/n 240 for 5)
C. Emmanuel c wkp. V Nagamootoo
b Nagamootoo 29
D. Smith b Nagamootoo 81
A. La Feuille c Daesrath
b Chanderpaul 43
D. Sammy Ibw Chanderpaul 5
E. Francis c Sarwan
b Deonarine 14
R. Lewis c Daesrath b King 82
L. James Ibw Cush 33
S. Shillingford lbw
Nagamootoo 28
D. Butler c M. Nagamootoo
b Sarwan 26
0. Jackson c Fudadin
b Sarwan 44
F. Jackson not out 27
Extras: (w-2, nb-9, b-6, lb-14) 31
Total: (all out from 163.3 overs) 443
Fall of wickets: 1-57,2-162,3-167,4-


171,5-199,6-247,7-322,8-337,9-408.
Bowling: King 24-6-62-1 (nb-7),
Daesrath 5-1-33-0 (nb-2), Fudadin,
3-0-10-0 (w-1) Cush 36-7-87-1,
Nagamootoo 52-20-93-3, Deonarine
18-5-50-1, Sarwan 11.3-1-58-2,
Chanderpaul 14-4-30-2 (w-1)
GUYANA first innings
S.Chattergoon not out 40
R.Sarwan c Thomas
b Shillingford 50
N.Deonarine c sub. (Gabriel)
b Lewis 2
A.Fudadin not out 12
Extras: (b-3, lb-4) 7
Total: (for 2 wkts
from 39 overs) 111
Fall of wkts: 1-66,2-79.
Bowling: Butler 9-3-22-0 (nb-3),
Thomas 4-0-35-0, Lewis 11-3-25-1,
Shillingford 9-1-17-1, Jackson 6-2-8-
0.


SLL__ LLL,






.1 L









DATE FOR OUTSTANDING BALANCES
ON YOUR JANUARY 2005 BILL IS



AND THE SECOND SUNDAY IN EVERY MONTH
Please note that bills can be paid until 6:00 pm (1800 hrs)
Monday to Friday and until 2:00 pm (1400 hrs) on Saturday
at GT&T's Business Office, 78 Church Street, Georgetown,
Guyana Lottery Company, Regional Office, Robb Street,
Georgetown, any Post Office and at these following Bill
Express Locations:

R & S Shopping Centre, Belvedere Public Road. Corentyne

J's Supermarket, 131 Essex St. & Republic Road,
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Neighborhood Plhairmi .. 54 Second Avenue, Bartica

Nigel's Supermarket. 44-45 Robb & Light Sts., Bourda

Johnny P Supermarket, 1571 Aubrey Barker Road,
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141 Dagei.iad Av~enue,
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SPORT








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A Guyanese Trabition

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Same great INDI Taste
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SHtICKS HOLLYW


Page XX


I don't care what it cures, I'm not taking it...
Page VIII


I int - I___ I Ilf ~4~1 CICIP~III ~~1~


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to be SM swummi-el*7





Sunday Chronicle :March 6, 2005


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ing at work will get you places' smile instead. "
. ., HAPPINESS (conceals: sadness/disappointment)
"'', ' ,-"MU




mg, or smilincheerfully at rude customers, but con- OK, so your new project is as dull as djsh water, but stifle like a wet weekend is depressing for everyone.
cealing yo" 6elings at work particularly negative the yawns. Research shows enthusiasm is the most common WHY FAKE: Being miserable is contagious. "If you're per-
ones is tiway to get ahead. According to re- emotion at work butit's faked 66 per cent of the time. manently down it can have a demoralising effect on the team,"
searchers at The University of Salford in England, WHY FAKE? "Positivity is the current buzzword in busi- says Mann.
ness so cynicism is a no-no, explains. James:'. A boss wants HOW? Talk in an upbeat voice and force your mouth into
25 per cent of workplace emotions are faked. And someone who's keen, not negative and moaning, a smile. Research says that smiling has a physical effect that



maturity or weakness. CALM (conceals: alger) "The pressureto always be affable can be stressful and leads
SIf you're about to blow a fuse, zip it. Find a wall to kick to 'depression and even burn-out" says Mann. There are times
ne t f ke. rather than workmates. Shouting or swearing is not big or clever when it's important to let genuine emotions show": .
S- it may even get you sacked. When your home problems are tpo much to cope with
SWHY FAKE? "It shows a serious lack of control and you and your 'brave' performance is fooling no one. Mann advises
ICON'FIDENCE (conceals: panic) may well regretit" says Sandi Mann, author of Hiding What that if things really are serious and upsetting, it's best to con-
You've forgotten to send a crucial e-mail but, "Don't let the We Feel, Faking What We Don't (Chrysalis). The rule of thumb fide. a .
sweat show advises James. is to treat everyone with respect. When you have to stand your ground. Take the assertive
WHY FAKE? The anxious frown is not a good look your He OW? When you feel blood pressure rising, pause, path, though. Build a logical and foolproof argument and present
boss will rry. Successful people project confidence at all take deep breaths and tell yourself not to take it perso- it calmly, sticking to the facts. Repeat it, if necessary. Explain
times"l soa s mo ines nd ct ad wk k eig w ally. Put the phone on hold or. ideally. go and sit in the how you feel if you must, but definitely avoid amateur dramat-
HOW? Talk slowly and calmly and walk at full height, with loo until you calm down. Tel yourself 'Life's too short ics -it dilutes thepower ofyourmessage. ,

,,9 WHEN IT'S iK TO LEUTI MASK SI< L& t r sf
%16 t'yo ekes"CL cnel: ne)"" "h rsuet las eafbecnb tesu n ed


I 'A akI o'r butt lw ue zpi.,ida'altIkc o Jpe Jnadevr umot ay an.TeearAie


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RECOMMENDED I)IETARY ALLOWANCES OF
NUTRIENTS FOR USE IN THE CARIBBEAN


IN PART One. we sai that proteins are made up of amino acids or 'building blocks' of proteins
and thaL the-,kere e\tremelN important in mainiaining structure and for the proper functinmng of the
bod'. with about half of the bod\ 's protein being present in structural uts-ues such as muscle and the
skin. The good food sources of protein were also discussed but how much of this do ie need" TodaN.
we v. ill examine this a, vell as the effects of too much in the diet.
I How much protein do we need?
. In the body. protein is consiantl being broken down and remade. resulting in a contuiuou, re-
quiremeni fIor new sources if protein.. Your need for protein can alio be determined b. ~,oiur._tate of
health An', illne'. disease or trauni'due to intiury. surgery or burns will increase sour requirement for
protein abo:e the normal le\el because bod5 i iue is being broken down and need 1,i be replaced.
The process of growth during childhood and pregnancy, presents an additional requirement or protein
so.that ne% bod. tissues can he created
It is p-'ible to calculate indiudual protein needs bN their Nbd. weight. For adults. it is calculaiied as being
one gain of protein for e.ich lalkgiqn I 2.21bsi o bJod v eight Tiherefoie. an adult who weighs 50 kilognurs 11 li i
lbsi would need about 50 giantm uf protein per JLi\ This ;unount is usually iiu,, get bt on les- In contnr.'L, t.cho:1 age cluldren need about I 5 gramsI per kilogrnm body weight per day. and
this increase. lunther flor babie- and toddler, v. ho requure appronxim.ely two gI'iam. per kilogram had) eight
becjaue of their fast rate of grow thi ind dc velopment.
The table below gi\es an idea of the amount of protein required foi different age groups in the
Caribbean populate n '.) '
Now that we have placed ourelkes in a particular'group, ydu can now use the follow ing table to
.calculate, roughly, the amount of protein you are geltirig from your diet -


Protein content of comiimonl', ued foods


High Protein
(15g and over
per 100g/3V1/
oz of food)
Cheese powdv'er'd
Milk. miei. chicken.
Fish. eggs, liver.
Kidne\. hear. nuts,
Almonds, peanuts.
,r melon seed), sun-
flower seeds, sesame
, seeds. pumpkin seeds


Moderate Pruitein
(6- -14g per lIOg,/. .
.11 2 oz >c ftm,,dtI

w heat flour. cornnmeal
hreal, rite, i.,
nuicarom and other
past dried corn .
noodles. green peas
and beans, crackers
biscutns.


Low Protein
(5g or less pei 10Oig/
3V2 o6zoftfood),

liquid milk, chicken feel*.
LOW 'S fotl",, pig's trotetrso.
dried oaconut..)frult~i
vegetables, grouttd
piovisipn.s, cakes, gTeen
cut i, dougm.l)ut'',carined
* Corn. ,. ,'


Age Gender


Body Weight Protein
kg g


0?3 mths MF 4.5 9
4? 6mths MF 7.0 13
7?9mths MF 8.5 14
10?11mths MF 9.6 14
I?3 years M 13.5 16
F 12.9 15
4-6 years M 19.7 22
F 18.6 21
7-9 years M 26.7 27
F 26.6 27
10-14 years M 45.0 45
F 45.0 45
15-18 years M 60.0 57
F 55.0 52
"19-29 years M 70.0 53
F 60.0 45
30M60 years M 70.0 53
F 60.0 45
>60 years M 70.0 53
F 60.0 45


Pregnancy
Lactailn


' B IN


+ 1
+i


0-I) rnths
0. mIt,'


..,, iNao tihdi we have placed ourselves in parTicular group. you canI nor1 use the following table to calculate,
roughily..the amountt of protein you arc getting from n'our diei


-Page II






ny C M 2 P


I recently moved in with a man. We were friends for
three years, then we fell in love. We now live together
and have two cats. He is the love of my life:
wonderful, kind, and caring. He is truly my best


friend. .
The cats are his babies. I love cats, too, but have one
problem. The problem is in the bedroom. These cats run the
house, climb on the countertops, and lay on the kitchen table.
I can live with that, but he thinks they should always be
allowed in the bedroom and the door should not be closed
"because they like to lie on the bed."
I have put up with cats staring at me, crawling on me, and going
under the covers to play with my feet during intimacy. Finally, the
other day I got up, put them out, and closed: the door. I said, "I
can't concentrate!"
He thought this was terrible, and I was being mean. I know he
was upset, and as soon as we finished lovemaking, he got up and
let them back in. We don't have children. Do you think this may
cause problems for us in the future? I intend to keep putting them
out and closing the door.
AMBER

Amber, Jon Katz wrote a book called 'The New Work
of Dogs'. His name is Katz and his field is dogs, but what
he says applies to cats as well: companion animals tend
to our emotional needs. We seek beings to love and to


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I s,.; :-.-. ? lar -aqernnt, Stores, Personnel, '.-ri.- !ii..j *
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SPCO Box 53, S,--.uthampton, S014 OYP, Britain g
Fax:+44 2380 337200 |
Sj .'ebsite: www ,. ,i.nhr',rjiccl, i,- co.uk |
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or il in arnd post thns '.. wth your name address & age


/ ........... ..... ...................... . .....

,' .iss I,..ii.l accredited British Careers Trarb'''i--,j

3/4/2005, 5:13 PM '


'FIRM W


AIL


Tamara comr


love us. Not surprisingly,
when television usage
exploded in America, the
number of companion
animals also exploded.
Jon Katz mentions a lonely
woman who got a dog at
Christmas, reasoning if she
couldn't find a good man, at
least she could find a good dog.
Perhaps your boyfriend was
like that. At one time the cats
were his only reliable
conmpantions, and lie deferred to
iheim.
Now he has you. It's time
.to discuss the proper role of
cats in his life. .on's book is
the kind of book you can read
together il bed. with the door
closed anid the cats on the
other side.

WAYNE & TIAMARA

Send letters to:
Direct Answers,
PO Box 964,
Springfield, MO
65801 or email:
DirectAnswers@
WayneAnd


INVITATION TO TENDER

TENDERS ARE INVITED FOR
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
AT NCN, HOMESTRETCH AVENUE.

TENDER DOCUMENTS CAN BE
UPLIFTED FROM THE GATE SECURITY
FROM. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2005.

TENDERS MUST BE PLACED IN THE TENDER BOX
LOCATED AT NCN ON OR BEFORE MARCH 14,2005.





MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill
the following positions:

Deputy Chief Education Officer (T)
Assistant Chief Education Officer
Chief Test Development Officer
School Inspectors
Subject Specialist (Curriculum)
Senior Test Development Officer
Test Development Officer
Senior Education Officer
.-....,n and Job Specification can be obtained from *
the Personnel Department, f, -. f- Education, 21
Brickdam; Georgetown.

Applications on Public Service Commission no. 31 forms
should be sent to:
Secretary
Public Service Commission
Fort Street, Kingston

Closing date March 25, 2005
', Government ads can be viewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy


wants to start ; fami
,ir;ud to brain ai chi
world and haCe lhe c
like lie treats c. I'n
it) -,s\ c this i ; 1 tira'



Melissa. the Re
political writer M,
was an astute obser
man behaviour. He
served that in the
a disease might b
cure, but difficult
nose. Once the di
developed, however


ily, but I'm easy to diagnose, but difficult
Id into this to cure.
hild treated You are right to be wary
.I desperate about starting a family. If your
Ce. nut it's husband thinks you are at noMV.
idI';. wha t ill Ihlc I ,n iou I are
pregnant.' -\tier A i, mng nirti ;. ou
iETLISSA ',ill find it even moe JitH1iculi;
to control wevcht.
renaissance Your husband can i rccon-
achiavelli cile who you arc with \ ho he
rver of hu- wants \onl to be. Thai raise-.
e once ob- questions about his genuine lo\e
beginning for you. You have diagnosed the
Ie easy to problem. Unless the problem is
t to diag- cured, it is unwise to start a funily.


disease has
r, it may be


I married my hus
hand four months
ago. We lived to
gether two years
before getting married. kt
first he Mls ', nlderful. N\e
:tad grol n sot close. But since
,ve got married things have
changed.
put on na;\ he fi\ce or tenll
'OtLuiLis .II'lCr \\c married. biu
now I'm exercising and watch-
ing what [ eat. He's been calling
me fat and other not-so-nice
names. I confronted him, and he
got mad saying he was just jok-
ing. I am hurt. When we argue
he gets mad and tells me to go
away. Or he gets quiet, won't
talk to me, and sleeps on the
couch.
The communication we
once had is becoming scarce. I
don't know what to do. He


VACANCY

EXISTS FOR




Applicant must have at least 5 years
experience, an average of 2.2 on at least
five Subjects CXC, be computer literate,
competent and fluent in written and oral
English, and be able to type at 40 words per
minute. The applicant must provide an
application with two references to the CEO,
CIOG, and preferably be at least 25 years of
age and have knowledge of Islamic
etiquette.
The closing date for application is March
10,2005.



F DEMERARA, DISTILLERS LIMITED
VACANCIES
Applications are invited from suitably qualified
persons to fill the following vacancies:-


POSITIONS

Trainee Clerks


Forklift Operators


REQUIREMENTS

5 Subjects- CXC, Maths
and English inclusive

Sound secondary
education
Must have Tractor
License
At least 2 years
experience driving forklift


We offer an attractive salary with continuous training
tazd ta r.* development.

Interested persons can send their applications to:-

Assistant General Manager-
I lulman Resources
Demerara Distillers Limited
Plantation Diamond
East Bank Demerara.


WEIGHTY




ISSUES


Sundlav Chronicle Mlarch 6, 2005


Page III


WAYNE & TAMARA






Pa~le V~ Sunay Chrnicle ni h......5


flood thatblankted.he cost an par so G orgeown Hwevrwe op
S 3*- 3SS 1*P S; A SI


Yr N K V 7& MA Y V V L J N
F A M I N E S T S E D I L S





GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA / EUROPEAN UNION
SUPPORT TO THE LOW INCOME HOUSING SECTOR 8/ACP/GUA/015



Applications are invited from highly motivated, efficient individuals for the
key position of Project Engineer to the GOG / EU project. The position
requires a high level of Engineering skills for support to the Project.


Project Title
Post Title


Funding


Support to the Low Income Housing Sector
PROJECT ENGINEER


European Development Fund


Duty Station Georgetown
Closing date for March 11, 2005
applications

Qualifications (1) Masters Degree in Civil Engineering from a
recognized Institution plus 5 years professional
experience in supervising, large scale projects,
tendering process, contract management, site
management and supervision. One year
experience in managing a donor funded project
would be an asset
(2) Excellent computer skills, extensive use of database
and spreadsheet software a must.

Nationality Guyana National or ACP country citizen
Requirement

Job description aid terms of reference for the position are available from
the Project Unit, at the Ground Floor of the Central Housing & Planning
Authority Building, 41 Brickdam & United Nations Place, Georgetown.

Since the job/requires extensive skills at a senior level, an attractive
package is available for the successful candidate.

All applications will be processed confidentialresse
in a sealed envelope to:-

(a) EU /CH&PA Project Consultant
Low Income Housing Programme
41 Brickdam & United Nations Place
Stabroek
or
(bt) by electronic mail to:-
iihproject(d yahoo.~o6r ." ....... "- .... .... -..


BACCHANAL
CALYPOSES
COMPETITIONS
CONCERNS
CULTURE
ENTHUSIASTIC
FLOATS
GUEST/HOUSE
HOTEL


IMAGINATION
INTEGRATION
MASHRAMANI
MEMENTOES
PARADE/ROUTE
PATRIOTIC
POTENTIALS
PRESENTS
PRIVATE/SECTOR


PAGEANT
SENSIBLY
SPIRITUALLY
STAGE/SHOWS
TOURISTS/GAMES
VIEW/TENTS


GLOBAL FUND/ GUYANA HIV/AIDS PROJECT
GRANT# GYA-304-GO1-H
MINISTRY OF HEALTH
HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT UNIT



VACANCIES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill
the positions outlined below:
(1) BCC Specialist (2) Health Education/Community
Moblization Coordinator, (3) Treatment Care arid Support
Coordinator (Physician)(4) Physicians (contract.
20hrs/week,5 outlying Regions), (5 ) Medexes (2/Region ,5
outlying Regions), (6) Home-Based Care (HBC) Coordinator,
(7) Social Services HIV/AIDS Coordinator (8) HIV/AIDS Deputy
Programme Manager for the PMU, (9)HIV/AIDS Technical
Advisor for the PMU, (10) Project Accountant, (11)
Administrative Assistant, (1,2) Driver-ERU and PMU, (13)
Deputy Procurement Officer

Details of duties for this: --- x ed'from,
and applicatir- -dt
Health Sector Development Unit
Project Management Unit
Georgetown Public Hospital Compound
East Street, Georgetown
Guyana

Deadline for submission of applications is Tuesday 15'"
March, 2005 at 3:00 p.m. Only short-listed applicants will be
acknowledged. .. /
^**itc- .*i> < -** i-.-.*A".n iio.1i.**.<; i 'ti~-A aaai-a. w Vfi a'tW~'~ i-


PaHe' V-


Sunddj! Chronicle 'Ma~Mrch 6,12005,






Sunda -o.,.a .. M


MURER EHUATINCOVITIN N

I EXECUTION [OF1 K~4ILLER I


ON' DECEMBER 3, 1977, Mr. B. 0. Adams, S.C., dissat-
Latchman Outar, murdered isfied with the decision, ap-
his 19-year-old estranged pealed to the Guyana Court of
wife Sheila by chopping off Appeal in a life-saving effort.
her legs and arms and dispos- At the hearing of the appeal
ing of her trunk among a -that followed, the State repre-
clump of bushes in New sented by Director of Public
Amsterdam, where a discov- Prosecutions, Mr. George.
ery of the remains, was made Jackman and T. Ragnauth, began
six days later. with a set back when it was dis-
A foreign doctor who exam- closed that the trial Judge had
ined the body could not tell the migrated and that his note book
gender nor determine the cause with notes of evidence of the
of death. The resulting effect trial had disappeared.
was that the body was released The Appellate Court was
for burial without an autopsy. left only with the Judge's sum-
But as fate would have it, ming-up of the evidence as re-
two months later, after new in- corded by the shorthand note
formation reached the police, an taker.
exhumation was ordered. There, However, the lawyers on
Dr. Leslie Mootoo, Government both sides got together and de-
Bacteriologist and Pathologist cided on what they considered
performed a post-mortem and a true representation of the evi-
concluded that death was caused -dence. And together with the
to shock and haemorrhage, due summing-up, the Appellate
to the chopping off of the limbs. Court constituted by Chancel-
Dr. Mootoo also found in a lor Victor Crane, and Justices of
owned 'by the girl and -her (who later became Chancellor) -
mother, which revealed that the: was. able to proceed with the
,girl had visited a New appeal.
Amsterdam Bank on the mom-rn- The appeal was dismissed
ing of the day of her demise to and the conviction and death
make a withdrawal of $10.00, sentence were affirmed.
There was no eye-witness The death row appellant
to the crime, no confession subsequently faced execution
statement, but the circumstan- and suffered death by hanging.
tial evidence which unfolded i' di I In his judgement, Chancel-
a result of the exhumation, re- lor Crane, in referring to the
suited in Latchman Outar being facts said that the accused was
arrested and charged with the' indicted, tried and convicted for
,woman's murder. the murder of his wife
At his jury trial, he wa (Taitmattie Outar, called
found guilty and sentenced to 'Sheila'). There was no eye-
death by-the .trial Judge, who witness to the murder; the proof
ordered that Outar be hanged. laid on by the prosecution was
But Outar, rqjresented by entirely circumstantial.


NCN Radio 13:30 14:00 hrs
MARCH 7 MARCH 11, 2005

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
o 7KC 7: j.^SligpH 9 MARC .10
Grade 6 Grade4 Grade 5 Grade 3
English ,. Malthmratics Language Mathematics
'Language;i Plane Shapes Arts Time -
-Contractiohs Prepositional
Ph cases


i Science Sthbe Science Social Studies
Ma organs Helpful Insects & We care
of ohr huhan, Iante '. arahnil .


S or ouI
community


He added: "We have'bleen
able to glean from the summing,.
up that the conjugal relationship
was not a happy one. The mar-
riage was described as a very
stormy one. There was, in fact,
no matrimonial home on the
date of the murder, namely 3rd
December 1977.
The parties were living
separate lives the wife at her
mother's (Kowsilla Jawahir)
home and the husband at his
own relations on the Corentyne
Coast. The modus vivendi of the
parties was that after frequent
quarrels and beatings of thewife
by the husband, they constantly
reconciled differences, only to
separate all over again. "
This continued until 23rd
November 1977, when the wife
was forced to flee the matrimo-
nial home at Edinburgh, East
Bank, Berbice, and return to her
mother at No. 2 Village with
lips burst and scratches on her
&,cnmThMa nrimu3iyluhra
that he had beaten his wife and
that she had run away from
home.
So it happened that, on the
day of her murder, the wife was
residing at Kowsilla's home
from where they set out to-
gether for the Royal Bank of
Canada, in New Amsterdam to
transact business.
- About 10 am Kowsilla left
the wife at the bank expecting
that she would return home af-
ter midday. When she did not,
a search was made for her. This,
however, proved futile, and it
was not until six days later, i.e.
on December 9, 1977, that a
badly mutilated and decom-


Social
Studies
Hurricanes
'.iDamages
and Relief

, Mathepatics

Decimals -
addition
of tenths


posed corpse was discovered in
a clump of bushes at Islington,
with both forearms and forelegs
missing.


*George Barclay


ON 0 N--
NO E'OW1INESS,






NO CONFESSION...


Remembering Dr. Cheddi Jagan
The following is an excerpt of Dr. Jagan's writing:
"'Those who see only race/ethnicity in politics in Guyana,
as others who see tribalism and religion in other
countries, are not viewing reality comprehensively,
objectively and scientifically. In Guyana, because of the
strong foreign monopoly domination by the sugar
plantocracy, the class struggle was more intense. And
,. although the two major racial/ethnic groups are culturally
different, they are not uni-class and class different as
formally the case in the colonial period in East Africa.
.3 Both groups are largely made up of working people. As-
such, the PPP/Civic, with its working class sympathy
and policies oriented to'matenal and cultural fulfillment,
can lay the foundation for unity in diversity"
.%,_ "Aw_1T rmr
MlhistrofT*Muinsm, Industry aid Commerce
NU. -*^ *-.'- "-.,Of"7 -.* :- : -,.-- .. '. -: .-.,-


Bamboo Craft Training


Invitation to participate in training mentioned above is extended to local
craft producers.

Training will be done by Local Craft Trainers
The programme is aimed at improving the skills of craft producers and
particularly those in production and sales.
Training in bamboo weaving and furniture making will commence on April
04, 2005 and will last for twelve (12) and twenty four (24) weeks
respectively.
Interested persons must satisfy the following condition mentioned below:
Currently involved in craft production and sales.

Venue: Bamboo Resource Centre, National Exhibition Site
Sophia, Georgetown

| Inl ted persons who are involved in craft Irod4 and sales can send
,w|^ application to the Office of,the Permanent Secrnry, Ministry of Tourism
Inai y and Commerce stating name, address, nime-of company or grou5,
telephone & fax numbers, years of-,xperience in craft production.

Application forms are also available and can be uplifted from the Department of
Industry, Ministry of Tourism; Industry and Commerce.

2290South Road'L
Lacytown Georgetown
SL Telephone # 225-0668/226-2505
". . Fax #225-4310

Government ads can bevlewed on http://www.gina.gov.gy ', ,


The dead bod% \%as discov-
ered some 15 yards \\est of .1
north/soLh cross-dain not far
'iom a plac'c'alled 'Republic
Dam'. where Reuben bh sgith
testified to having seen the ac-
cused and the wife about 3.45
pm on December 3.
Another %Itness,
Parmanand Ramkarran, also
saw the accused and "a woman"
walking in each other's com-
pany as late as 5.45 pm on De-
cember 3-, 1977. The corpse in
the bushes, unrecognisable and
badly decomposed, was clad in
a greenish-blue dress and a half
slip when discovered on De-
cember 9, and, although exam-


ined by a doctor. 'A.I. buried
_ ,nhoul an auiop'.\ hcl ng p.r-
formed on it.
Subsequent information
led the police to exhume the
decomposed remains on Feb-
ruary 4, 1978. some two
months later, but on this oc-
casion, an autopsy was per-
formed b) Dr. Leslie Nlooloo,
a Government medical prac-
titioner and a forensic pa-
thologist. His report is dated
June 22, 1978. Shock and
haemorrhage, caused by (he

(Please turn.
to page VI)


-


- -


SuiidaG'ihrorfible Ma". rch"6,,2005:


Page .V


ti la






SSnaCrnc Mah62


NO EYE-


WITN ESS,


NO CONFESSION..N


(From page V)
amputation of both legs, were
said to be the cause of death.
Chancellor Crane 'had
noted: "With the background
of their unhappy marriage in


mind,, coupled with the fact
they had been engaged in a
violent quarrel and fight as
recently as on 23rd Novem-
ber, 1977, i.e., some ten days
before the fatal day, the pros-
ecution founded its case and


led evidence to show the ac-
cused was the last person to
be seen in company with a
woman, who was in all prob-
ability, his wife, by no fewer
than four persons from about
midday on 3rd December,


THE GUYANA OIL COMPANY LIMITED

PRE-QUALIFICATION OF CONTRACTORS
1. Contractors are invited to apply for the Pre-Qualification for Works to be
undertaken by the Guyana Oil Company Limited (GUYOIL) for year 2005.

Contractors who had previously been qualified are asked to re-apply.

Areas of work include but are not limited to the following:

a. Construction & Rehabilitation of Buildings, Roads, Drains and
associated Drainage Structures.
b. Fabrication of Fuel Storage Tanks.
c. Installation of Fuel Storage Tanks (Foundation, Bond Walls, Pipe Works &
d.- Replacement of Fender Piles and other repairs to Berths of Terminals.
e. Vehicle Servicing and Repairs (Mechanical, Electrical, Body Work and
Spray Painting).
f. Installation and Servicing of Air Conditioning equipment on Buildings and
Vehicles.
g. Electrical- Installation of Motors, Switches to API SPECS.
h. Sinage, Logos, Canopy Facia, Artwork and Graphics.
i. Painting and General Carpentry.


2. CONTRACTORS ARE REQUIRED TO SUBMIT:

a. Valid National Insurance Scheme (NIS) and Guyana Revenue. Authority
(GRA) Compliance Certificates.
b. Copy of Company or Business Registration.
c. List of Machinery & Equipment, including their capacity and current


d.

e.
f.


status.
Evidence of availability of financial resources from Banking institutions to
undertake works.
List of personnel with relevant experience.
Record of past performance of works completed during the past three (3)
years.


3. PRE-QUALIFICATION BIDS MUST BE SUBMITTED in sealed envelopes
bearing no identity of the Company or Business and clearly marked at the
top, left-hand corner"Pre-Qualification For Contractors":

4. PRE-QUALIFICATION BIDS must be addressed to the Chairman Tender
Board Committee. The Guyana Oil Company Limited, 166 Waterloo Street,
North Cummingsburg, Georgetown and must be deposited in the Tender
Box which is located in the lower flat of Building 'C' 166 Waterloo Street,
Georgetown, not laterthan March 15,2005.

)5. PRE-QUALIFICATION TENDERS which do not comply with the stated
requirements will be regarded as non-responsive.

6. GUYOIL RESERVES THE RIGHT to inspect and request certification of
equipment at any time.

7. GUYOIL RESERVES THE RIGHT to reject any or all submissions without
assigning reasons for such rejection.


1977, right up to about 5.45 in
the afternoon of that day
when'he-was seen walking
along the backdam road to a
point not far from the bushes
where her mutilated body
was found.
Justice of Appeal
Gonsalves-Sabola shared the
views expressed by the Chan-
: cellor.
According to him: "I enter-
tain no doubt that the evidence
That the accused, prior to.the kill-
ing, had seriously beaten the de-
ceased from time to time, was
quite properly admitted, not, I
point out as evidence of similar
facts, but as going to the element
of malice in the accused towards
his wife.
'The charge was murder and


the prosecution was therefore
under a duty to tender evidence
which went to proof of malice
aforethought. This evidence
did," Justice Gonsalves-Sabola
had said.
In his judgement, Justice of
Appeal Keith Massiah said that
.he had no doubt at all that upon
the evidence before them it was
open to the jury to reach the
verdict they'did.
According to him, it was
for the trial Judge to de-
termine what amounted to
the degree of proof which,
in law, could justify the
jury in drawing the infer-
ence of guilt, and if he con-
sidered the evidence insuf-
ficient, it was his duty to
withdraw the case from
them.
But he could not do this, if
to borrow the words of Sir Ed-
ward O'Malley CJ in R. v
Hookoomchand and Sagar
[1897] LRBG 12 at page 16,
there was "reasonable evidence
on which reasonable men could
reasonably or fairly find a ver-
dict".
"This is now settled law. It
would do unjustifiable discredit
to the State's case to speak of
its fragility, and on the proper
weighing of all the circum-
stances, it seems clear to me
that there was sufficient evi-
dence on which the jury could
properly have convicted the ac-
cused.


"It is important to remem-
ber that in the evaluation of the
strength and weight of circum-
stantial proof, it is wrong: to pay
regard merely to the respective
weight of the individual eviden-
tial links. .
"What is required is a
perception of the :concatena,
tion of all the events and cir'
cumstances and their inter-
actions with one another, for
it is the case taken as a,
whole that must be consid-
ered," Justice. Massiah had
said. '
In dismissing the appealhe.
said: "I have answered in the af-
firmative, the question whether
upon the evidence it. was open
to the jury to be satisfied be-
yond a reasonable doubt that the
accused had murdered his wife.
"That was the fundamental
question propounded for adju-
dication. Of the ampleness of,
the evidence and the chiming
together of its various compo-
nents I have not the slightest
doubt.
"The ascertainment of
the matrix of facts, their
acceptance or rejection, the
conclusions to be reached
therefrom, and the discard of
apparently competing hypoth-
eses, were all matters emi-
nently suited for the jury's
determination. I am of the
opinion that this appeal fails
and must be dismissed," Jus-
tice of Appeal Massiah said.


GUYANA GEOLOGY AND MINES COMMISSION


Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to
fill the under mentioned vacancies:



VACANCIES




Job Specification:

Technical Diploma in Mining, Geology, Civil Engineering
or Environmental Science from the University of Guyana
or any other recognized Institution/University.




Job Specification:

A First Degree in Mining, Geology, Civil Engineering,
Mineral Processing or Mineral Exploration from a
recognized Institution/University. Alternatively, a first
Degree in Environmental Science from a recognized
Institution/University with at least one (1) year experience
in the Mining Industry.

The Officer must be self-motivated, capable of working
independently in the field for extended periods, be able to
interface with miners and Mining Industry personnel and
have good writing and communication skills.

Applications should be addressed to the
Administrative Manager, and should reach no later
than March 18,2005.


Sunday Chronicle March 6, 2005


gBane VI


\






Page VII


bUn uay unron *tw fllc% V, VVu


late death.
Fainting comes from inad-
,equate blood supply to the
brain. Once the patient as-
sumes the horizontal posi-
lion, either by having fallen
r) r


40


A ALTHOUGH
scary both for
the dentist
and patient,
fainting is not an uncommon
occurrence in the dental of-
fice. Associated with the ordi-
nary faint are a number of
other clinical conditions
which can mimic syncope
(temporary unconsciousness),
thereby complicating and
confusing the diagnosis and
treatment. These may in-
clude shock, spells, epileptic
attacks, hysteria and coma.
Faints can be classified into
three broad groups depending
on their cause;
1. Episodes occurring sec-,
ondary to a decrease in the
quantity of blood reaching the
brain,
2. Episodes arising from a
change in the quality of blood
to the brain, and
3. Episodes that occur sec-
ondary to disturbances within


the brain structure itself.


The cause of the most
common type of faint varies
but usually it happens in the
normal health following a
strong emotional experience,
particularly under conditions
that favour vasodilatation (ex-
pansion of blood vessels) such
as hot, crowded rooms. Some
statistics indicate that while
fainting accounts for more
than half of all medical emer-
gencies in the dental office,
untreated diabetes represents
a significant proportion. Per-
sons who are tired, hungry or
ill are more prone to faint.
Recent studies indicate that
young males under 35 years
of age are at a slightly higher
risk of fainting. Physical and
emotional stress, the receipt
of unwelcome news, anxiety,
fear, pain, the sight of blood,
or minor surgical procedures


may precipitate syncope. All
can and do occur in the den-
tal office.
The fainting attack usually
occurs with the patient in the
upright positions. It developed
rapidly, but unconsciousness is
rarely lost with the absolute
suddenness of an 'epileptic sei-
zure. The patient typically has
a warning of impending faint
manifested by a sense of 'feel-
ing badly'. This is why falls as-
sociated with fainting seldom
are injurious.
When unconsciousness is
profound with complete lack of
awareness or ability to respond,
the state should last for a few
seconds to several minutes. If
the faint persists for more that
eight to ten minutes; or if com-
plete recovery has not occurred
in 25 to 30 minutes, then other
mechanisms or diseases states
must be considered.
Sometimes convulsive


SAID Guyana HIV/AIDS

^ ,Reduction and Prevention (GHARP) Project
V ,/ A Joint Government of Guyana-U.S. Government Projed

ADVERTISING AGENCY REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS


SAID GUYANA HIVIAIDS REDUCTION AND PREVENTION
(GHARP) PROJECT

The USAID Guyana HIVIAIDS Reduction and Prevention (GHARP) Project, a
Joint Government of Guyana US Government Project is soliciting proposals_
for the services of an advertising agency or partnered agencies to.design develop
and implement two communication campaigns: .

1. A comprehensive anti-stigma, and discrimination campaign that
addressesmyths and misconceptions related to the modes of HIV/AIDS
transmissiorrand reduces the stigmatising and discriminating practices in
-*. -relation to HIV/AIDS

2. A comprehensive, multi-media campaign to promote AIDS safe attitudes
and practices including delayed sexual debut, consistent condom use
and reduction of sexual partners or faithfulness.

Details of proposal submission guidelines and application criteria will be included
* in the Request for Proposal (RFP) guidance document. Applications are due on
or before 16:00 hrs, 14 March 2005.,
Interested agencies can uplift this document at the USAID/GHARP Office at 44
High Street(DDL Building), 3rd Floor, Kingston Georgetown.

To apply or receive additional information by email or telephone please contact

Mr. Dale Browne

dbrowne(.fhiguyana.orq .
. Tel:231-63i7 Ext.248


movements occur after the on-
set of unconsciousness as asso-
ciated with syncope. These are
rarely generalised, but more
commonly consist of clonic
jerks of the arms and twitching
of the fac. There is no loss of
bowel or bladder control. Pulse
is weak or imperceptible, blood
pressure is low and respirations
quite shallow. The alterations in
vital signs, along with the pal-
lor and unconsciousness, simu-


MUM=


BASIC NEEDS TRUST FUND FIFTH PROGRAMME


INVITATION TOQ ENDER

The Government of Guyana (GOG), Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and
the Government of Canada through the Canadian Internatiofial Development
Agency (CIDA) has recently signed an agreement to finance several projects
under the Basic Needs Trust Fund (BNTF) Fifth Programme. Construction of
the sub-projects is expected to be implemented in 2004/2005. The sub-projects
consist primarily of buildings and other civil works aimed, at improving the social
and economic infrastructure,.. :

The Basic Needs Trust Fund invites tenders for the following sub-projects:

LotA


1. Port Kaituma Hospital Mortuary -Construction
2. Akawini Primary School ExtensionA& Teachers Quarters
3. Wakapao Primary School Extension & Teachers Quarters'
4. Bare Root Water Supply
5. Skeldor Water Supply
6. Kwakwani Water Supply

7 .LOTB :R '

7. Ainess Nursery School Street Rehabilitation


- Reg.#1
- Reg. # 2
-Reg. #2
- Reg.#4
- Reg. #6
- Reg.#10



- Regq.#6


Tender Documents for these sub-projects can be purchased from the office of
the Basic Needs Trust Fund at 237 Camp Street, G/town in the form of
MANAGER'S CHEQUE payable to the BASIC NEEDS TRUST FUND. Tender
Documents for Lot A can be purchased for a non-refundable fee of
G$10,000 per sub-projects. Tender Documents for Lot B can be purchased
for a non-refundable fee of five thousand dollars G$5AO 0Q0O.

Sealed tenders accompanied by valid N.I.S. and Tax Compliance Certificates
should be addressed to the Project Manager, and deposited in the Tender Box of
the Basic Needs Trust Fund at 237 Camp Street SIMAP's Building, Georgetown,
on or before 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, March 23,2005.

Each tender must be placed int a separate envelope with the name of the
sub-project clearly marked on the top, left-hand corner. The envelope
should in no way identify the tenderer.

The Basic Needs Trust Fund doe? not bind itself to accept the lowest or any other
tender.

Tenderers or their representatives may be present at the opening of the tenders
at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, March 23, 2005.


Project Managei:


by being reclined with assis-
tance, gravity no longer hin-
ders blood flow to the brain.
In addition, the physical or
emotional stress which pre-
cipitated the faint is relieved
by the loss of unconscious-
ness. The pulse increases in
rate and amplitude, the
colour returns to the patient
having a correct percep-
tion of events and his
surroundings.
If the blood flow to the
brain is interrupted for
three to four seconds,
fainting results. It becomes
readily apparent when re-
viewing these mechanisms
Ihat a person could have ir-
reversible brain damage or
even. die if supported in an
upright position, such as
in a dental chair, dur-
ing syncope. Treatment
., of fainting thus con-
sists of placing the vic-
tim horizontally; loosen
tight clothing around
the neck-and .having
them'inhale ammonia
salts.


r


Cintou91rnicp arh 00











































NATIONALBANK
OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE LIMITED


MOTOR CYCLES, VEHICLES LOCATION'
4 Toyota Sprinter Motor Car # PJJ 1754 N.B.I.C. Rose Hall
Branch
4 Toyota Corolla Motor Car # PFF 2710 N.B:I.C.,Rose Hall Branch

PROPERTIES FOR SALE BY TENDER

4 Lot4 Columbia, Essequibo Coast
4 Lot 'O'& 'A' Cotton Tree, West Coast Berbice
4 18 Grant 1803 Crabwood Creek, C,orentyne, Berbice
4 Plot 86 Section 'H' Windsor Castle, Essequibo Coast
4_ 74 Huis'T Dieren, Essequibo Coast
4 Lots 86 & 87 Block'A' Plantation Zorg, Essequibo Coast
4 110 & 116 Westfield, Essequibo Coast
4 Block XXXII Parcel 141 Devonshire Castle, Essequibo
4 8 Amazon, Essequibo Coast
4 46 Section "A" Bush Lot, West Coast Berbice
4 50 Cotton Field, Essequibo Coast
4 8 Danielstown, Essequibo Coast
4 West Half of Lot 31 Queenstown, NewAmsterdam, Berbice
4 East Portion of 23 & 24 Main Street, South Cummingsburg,
Georgetown
Tender closes at 14:00 h on March 18, 2005
Tender Forms can be uplifted at any Mfou0jNBIC locations,.
Tenders must be sealed in an envelope marked "Tender For,;.;',
and placed in the Tender Box at Water Street Branch on t;a
Receptionist's Desk no later than 14:00 h onMarch 18, 2005.
For further information please contact:
Mr. Frederick Rampersaud
Telephone # 226-4091-5, Ext. 239.
The Bank reserves the right aot to accept the highest or
any Tender, without assigning a reason.


skin-whitening
cream, baldness
and ,mpae
cures, soap L
a cow unn e
"antiseptic
attershave."
Siddarth
Singh, a
spokesman for
the Hindu
nationalist
BJP, which has
o n g
campaigned on
the cow, said the
stall aimed to,
promote village
the biggest "ic
employers in s an antisept c
India. i pa ty d vP area a n a e
"If you go back r r with Idia's na noP stall inparty headquarters
in the history of AWOr made o cow urin ath %r/ teis )
India, this belongs to aftershave 2005. (B Mat sau, ini's
our culture. There"s Delhi Febrruary c25,2005. (BMat r ` te ed
no commercial value Hindus, who make up some'* bringing their friends and
to us. Village industry -i this 82 per cent of India's more., their family and their
country needs to be promoted." than one billion people. Cow neighbours back with them,"
, The use of cow products in slaughter is banned in most says Kumar.
. India is centuries old. The five parts of the country. Singh already uses the
key products butter, milk, The goratna products, made" detergent and is thinking of
curd, urine and dung are by a cooperative in the northern experimenting further.
collectively known as "cow-belt" state of Uttar. I"I'm tempted to try
Spanchgavya and, ,'are an Pradesh, arerapidly gainingin something for the hair let's
important part ,of ayurvedic' popularity. hope," he grins, running his
medicine'" "Once they use it, they fingers through his thinning
The cow is worshipped by are coming back and they are crop.







SSund'v' Chronicle March 6,2005


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II



Pre~sidentBharrat4,Jagq3e'o
F ormert President-)Janet',Jag4a'i,-OE.
PPF?-General :Secreta ry,D'Q.01kiR~motarl"




CorrIN MbaMA-pait b


SSunday-Chro' tier March 6,'2005


0 I


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Gpi ~rn*hron


0


PRESERVING OUR LITERARY HERITAGE




Norman Eustace Cameron




1903 1983


by Petamber Persaud


great- lengths to
spread the word.
N. E. Cameron
was'concerned that his writ-
ings should not linger be-
tween two covers or gather
dust on shelves. This con-
straint found him on many oc-
casions going from door to
door trying to sell his books.
Those ventures were ex-
tremely satisfying in that he
was able to review his books
(even if he didn't sell many at
the said time), share his opin-
ions and leave quality impres-
sions with whom he came into
contact. In this way, he laid
the foundation to execute
many of his future projects,
bringing people together in
various organizations for up-
lirling or communities and
country, forming a literary so-
ciety and founding a school in
the process.
Cameron did what had to be
done, filling the lacuna in many
areas. His magnum opus 'The
Evolution of-the Negro', a sub-
ject .hunned by dunkeris on the
British colonial portion of the
world, published while yet in
his 20s, was one such significant
feature ofhi con-,tribution to so-
cieti. Another was 'Guianese
Poetry a collection of a century
of Guianese poetry from 1831
to 1931,. making him the first
Guyianese to do so.
Cameron was not satisfied
with just talkhe acted turning
iodatsia to effect the empow-
enrment of his people, producing
a number of plays to induce
pride of ancestry and to elicit
concerted actioiqfor a better fu-
ture because. hdiined- .'those
Apho are disloyal to tho ances-
tty have. less cl anbe-o1'reAting
something with ..rii ., ni -
tive mark".
,-For his contribution to
drama, he was calledrthe father
of modern drama InG'Guyana.
Other labels thIfrust' upon
Cameron were: 'a true son of
Guyana', 'the man selling the
books', 'distinguished author'
and 'Professor Emeritus'.
Educationist, mathematician,
historian, poet, dramatist,
sportsman, cultural 'activist and
social reformer, Norman. Eustace
Cameron was born in New
Amsterdam, Berbice, on Januar'y
26, 1903, not far from the biith--
places of Edgar Mittleholzer and
Wilson Harris. Although
Cameron was blessed With a
'light but pleasant tenor voice',
he was a trailblazer, pioneer and
pacesetter. All of this due in no
small way* to the fact that his
father's great4hirst for knowl-
edge rubbed off on him and his
mother's wonderful organising
ability grounded in religious te-
nets was foisted on him.
In 1916, while at Christ
Church Primary School,
Cameron won the Government
Junior Scholarship, paying the
way for him.to,.eiiter'~uneen's
College. In 1921.'hebecame ait
Guiana. Scholar, and went on to, !.
the-University.of Cambndge li


was while at this institution of
higher learning with massive li-
brary and climate for research
that Cameron felt the need to
write, going on to produce re-
markable scholarships.
Back in Guyana (1926), he
was more Guyanese than when
he left, an identity entrenched by


4'



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to include work by East Indian
poets even though Peter
Ruhomon (born 1880) was a
founder-member of the British
Guiana Literary Society, and
Ruhomon, along with other
Berbicians like his brother Jo-
seph (born 1873), J. W.
Chinapen (born 1908), and C. E.


confessing how he was "saved
from being an early divorcee
by a forgiving wife."
And yet he was a family man,
holding numerous house parties, de-
voting quality time to an adopted
child, Joan, whom he would take on
his bicycle on excursions to various
places of interest.


.',, '."~



,'









~.4 ,,-


4s& ~


NORMAN EUSTACE CAMERON


discriminatory treatment in the
'mother country'. Equipped
with a 'message', an instrument
to research, disseminate and jus-
tify, Cameron signalled his inten-
tion to stay home and mould a
nation. So Guyajese he was he
married while in Britain to a
Guyanese, Lurline Daly. So
Guyanese he was that almost all
his books were published lo-
cally.
Also in the year of his re-
turn, Cameron inaugurated his
own school, 'The Guyanese
Academy' which he headed from
1926 to 1934.
In 1929, he gained his M.A.
and published 'The Evolution of -
the Negro'.
The following year, he
founded the British Guiana Lit-
erary Society which staged
workshops in short story and
poetry writing among other ac-
tivities. He played active roles in
other societies like the Coffee
House Club, the New. Age Soci-
ety headed by E. 0.' Pilgrim, the
British Guiana Union of Cultural.
Clubs of which A. J. Seymour
was honourable secretary. In
1953, he founded the Associa-
tion of Masters and Mistresses.
Although the above evidence
made him out to be a social ani-
mal, he declared that cliquismm
in clubs has never agreed" with
him. That declaration supported
by another statement, "mine has
been a full life and complex with
notable contradictions", said that
he was a no-nonsense individual.
His first play 'Balthasar'
was published in 1931, the same
year 'Guianese Poetry' camedisut.t
Uoi ever, sompething,;as amioss
it.this production which failed.


J. Ramcharitar-Lalla (born 1906),
were already churning our po-
etry. This should not take away
from the import of such an an-
thology filling a lacuna.
Cameron had a special affin-
ity to Queen's College starting
with memories of good fortune
attending him as a student. In
1934, he returned as an Assistant
Master and in 1958 was ap-
pointed Deputy Principal. Later
in 1963, when the University of
Guyana started in the compound
of Queen's College, he was ap-
pointed Associate Professor of
Mathematics. In 19,64,. he was
made a full-time staff atthe uni-
versity and elected Dean of the
Faculty of Arts. He was even
housed for a while in the com-
pound. In 1951, he compiled the
'History of Queen's College'. "
At this point, his life
seemed to be one of philo-
sophical and intellectual pur-
suits, evidenced in his writing
and even the manner he car-
ried himself as a teacher. But
as a youth he was "raiding
jamoon trees, racing on
rented bicycles, tormenting
stray cats." Norman Cameron
played chess with distinction,
training him to be two/three
moves ahead in everything.
On cricket he made his mark
but it is suspected he was
drawn more to the outfit, suit-
ing his nature as a dandy. He
could also train a mean tug-
a-war team. In 1948, he be-
came the first President of the
British Guiana Table Tennis
Association. He was also trea-
Ssiri" 6f' th'ei"- Lawn Tennis
Group: Cameron was a player
in every sense of the wok.d,.


There were times he had to
park his bicycle:; he travelled ex-
tensively abroad. opening the
magic of his mind, translated
into his literary output. Return-
ing from a visit to the UK,
France and the Pyramids of
Egypt, he published 'Additional
Mathematics', 'Adoniya', 'Ja-
maica Joe' and 'Interlude'. 'In-
terlude' is a collection of his own
poems narrative and humorous
verses written to fill a 'certain
gap especially with respect to
subject-matter'. The poem
'Three Cricketing Resorts' will
cheer the heart of anyone who .
was entertained at the Bourda
Cricket Ground, Georgetown.
Returning from visits to
Trinidad and Jamaica. he pub-
lished 'Thoughts on Life and
Literature' 1950 and 'History of
Queen's' College', 1951.
.Returning from the U.K..
and the U.S.A., he produced
'Three ImmortaLs', 1953,
'Guianese Music and Compos-
ers', 1958, '150 years of Educa-
tion in Guyana', 1968, and 'Ad-
ventures in the Field of Culture', .
1971, which he confessed took
"some forty years of organised
efforts."
The books 'Adventures in
the field of Culture' and
'Thoughts on Life and Litera-
'ture' are instructive to writers
and cultural activists, containing
minute-details and verbatim re--
ports on life and literature in his
time which would please the.
heart of any researcher.
While all of this was hap-
opening, he never-forgot his reli-
.gious upbringing for he "re-
garded... religion and the Church
.. as.pryi.ding.trainiag ground and..,


training for one's participation in
the affairs of one's country." In
1949, he was appointed Warden
of Christ Church and in 1967,
Vicar's Warden of the same
church. In the year of the latter
appointment, he compiled 'A
Historical Account of the Parish
of Christ Church. Guyana'.
And he participated in the
affairs of his country. In
1954, he was called to give
evidence in British Guiana
Constitutional Crisis and, in
1979, he made submission for
a new socialist constitution.
He also published his views
on various forms of govern-
ment including communism
and 'Thoughts on the Making
a New Nation'. Well qualified
for the task, a witness to
various stages of nationhood
started in his youth while
growing up among living evi-
dence of slavery and feeling


the throb of a nation heading to-
wards independence while work-
ing as a freelance journalist from
1963 to 1966.
Many honours and awards
lit up his life. In 1962, he was
made a Member of the British
Empire. Ten years later, he was
awarded the Golden Arrow of
Achievement by the Govern-
ment of Guyana. In 1976, he
gained the Sir Alfred Victor Crane
Gold Medal for outstanding con-
tribution to education.
And a few days before he
died in 1983, he received the
country's highest award, the Ca-
cique Crown of Honour.
'Nebbo', as all my recent
interviewees respectfully re-
ferred to him, died adding
years (fifteen or more) to the
lives of those that read his
work. That's what books do:
add years unto the lives of
men, women and children.


References:
. "Norman E. Cameron, The Man and his Works' by
Professor Joycelynne Loncke
* Books by Cameron especially 'Adventures in the field of
Culture' and 'Thoughts on Life and Literature'
* Interviews with "Bill' Pilgrim, Sheila King. Ron Robinson
* Data collected at The Journey, an evening of literature,
part two, staged at Castellani House on July 8, 2004
" Chronicle Christmas Annual 1966
Guyana Chronicle 1983

Comments please contact this author by telephone #
226-0065 or Email: oraltradition2002@yahoo.com



At Belize international

film festival


GUIANA 1838


WINS BEST.


FEATURE FILM


AWARD


elize, City THE
motion picture
'Guiana 1838'
won the Best
Feature Film of. the Year
Award at the third Belize In-.
ternational Film festival held'
recently at the Bliss Center in
Belize City, Belize, in Ceq-
tral America.
Competing films included
Shah Rukh Khan in 'Swades',
Subhash Ghai's 'Kisna', 'Con
Game', 'Olive Harvest', 'Red
,Passport', 'Story of an African
farm', 'Out of Season Fuera.de
TeInporada' and 'U R 4 Given'.
'The Belize International


Film Festival is an annual week-
long event that showcases an ex-
citing diverse mix of recent films
from Belize, the Caribbean,
Southern Mexico and Central
American regionsas well as In-
dia, UK and the rest of the
world..
Guiana 1838, a Rohit
iJagessai film, tells the story of
Indians brought from India to
labour on sugar cane plantations
in the Caribbean and the West
Indies amidst the abolition of sla-
very in the 19th century. Festi-
val organizers chose Guiana
1838 as the opening film and it
was screed twice during the fes-


-- t:.~t--' ^cJa


46


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tival. America.
The film stars. .Knmar. ., hit-al i the Bsi- Cenier
Gaurav as Laxman, Aarti Bathija in Belize to receive his award for


as Urmila, Henry Rodney as=:
Cabi, Neville Williams as Amie
among other Guyanese, African,
Britih and Indian aWors.. -
A key element of the fes-
tival is the presence of invited
filmmakers who were on hand
to present their films as well
as to host productions work-
shops and seminars and to
dialogue with festlyal-goers.
Mr. Jagessar and Mr.
Harbance Kumar were on
hand to address a special ses-
sion on film making, market-
ing and distribution.
The Third Edition of the
Festival took place February 21-
February 28 entirely at the Bliss
'Center fori teerforining Ar-s
in Belhze Ci'ty in Central


Best Feature Film of the Year
was the film's director Mr.
R'hit Jagessar. The filmmaker
thanked voters for recognizing
the unique language of cinema
his film depicted and paid spe-
cial tribute to Mr. Harbance
Mickey Kumar, director of the
first movie made in the West
Indies, 'The Right andThe
Wrong'. Mr. Kumar was invited
on stage to present the award to
Jagessar.
Jagessar dedicated the award
to the people of Guyana and re-
quested foreign dignitaries at-
tending the festival to urge their
people to support Guyana at
this time of crisis.
Guin i3'8 which
opened in the US five months


ago, recoraeo me rignei per.
screen average in the US on
opening weekend. The film is
also charted as the 17th high-
est per theatre average for all
films released in the US over
the last 25 years.
The film was scheduled to
play at The New Jersey City
University located at 2039
Kennedy Blvd in Jersey City,
New Jersey yesterday. Among
those on the guest.-list were
Guyanese supersxar-'rrGajraj
and popular radio and televi-
sion personalities Clyfee,
Madhu, Farook Juman and
Haji Zakir. The film will open
in twelve additional US cities
in May. Preparations are un-
der way for the film's pre-
miere in Guyana and' the
West Indies, Europe and Asia.'
(Guipna 1838.com)
II I, 'I i .4


Poem of life
S I have to tell what I've been through
All of which for my children, two
Boys they were now grown to men
L. Had often wondered if this was po

* Despite all this I firmly acclaim
t A perfect character I must maintain
Thus making sacrifices in sun and
Achieving my children's respect, al

"V Perseverance to life I fought hard t(
Courtesy, honesty and discipline I t
Being a great Mother (and Father)
Now, prpof of their love and respect

Together, a shelter we provided on
After we decided not to seek help
During this period by our Aunt's de
But successfully we completed the
We now have as our own home

My dear sisters out there I know the
/ Always be strong to succeed life fig
Gaining the admiration from those
Then we'll finally say to ourselves, t
Did come from our father above

Written by Cynthia Daly
** Dedicated to International Woi
Month. March, 1997
/


ssible then



rain
ways will remain

o achieve
aught my sons to believe
to them was no deceit
t ,

our own
outside of our home
ath we mourned
project alone, which '


at I'm not alone
ghting to the bone
proud children we love
hat our help and strength



menr History and Health


r v


',,. ,'


..2


.i


AtIC Mid ILAIV, 4- V-vi


9IM4W "'^ ."- aiFePaal', cnoreog
A semi Indian Classical dance Paa Fe P nore
by Shana and performed by Marilyn Bose's group.


t


,


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f f


-: Pictures and story by Linden Drakes in New York

.A N EVENING of dance to raise funds and to collect clothes and food items for the
flood victims in Guyana, was held last Sunday at The New Life Center Of Truth in
Brooklyn, New York.
1.....The event was the brainchild of Rose October-Edun and Verna Walcott-White and they
were ably assisted by Wayne Daniels and Sandra Primus, all former members of The Guyana National
Dance School.
The evening started with a screening of the areas that were affected by the floods in Guyana, showing
President Bharat Jagdeo and Opposition Leader Mr. Robert Corbin visiting the affected areas.
The programme was chaired by Claire Patterson-Monah.
7. .The dances were choreographed by October-Edun, Primus, Sherman Hope, Daniels, Walcott-White,
Kesha Worrell, Unita St. Remain, Shana Somarro and Obidiah Wright.
'" -' The dancers who performed are students of Elegant Dance School, Full of Energy, Mildred Forde
St Praise Dancers, New Hope Worship Dancers, Marilyn Bose's Daric-Grotip aiid-Balance Dance Com-
pany.
The event was supported by Vibert Bernard 'Cookie' of Sybils Restaurant, Jerome Boyd of Atlantic
Graphics Group, Oswald Bobb of Bobb-O-Visions Computers & Video Services and Lawrence Medas of
Medas Shipping Company.
Persons who attended the concert brought food stuff, clothes, and other items to put in the
barrels to be shipped to Guyana.


3%





Sunday Chronicle March 6, 2005


0






"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


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HERE ARE FURTHER FUNCTIONS OF THE ERC
a. Study and make recommendations to the National Assembly
on any issue relating to ethnic affairs, including conducting studies
to determine whether race relations are improving:


b. Monitor and make recommendations to the National
Assembly and other relevant public and private sector bodies on
factors inhibiting the development of harmonious relations among It!
ethnic groups and on barriers to the participation of all ethnic groups
in the social, economic, commercial, financial, cultural and political life of the people;
c. Consult with other bodies and persons to determine and specify the perceived needs of
the various ethnic groups for the fostering of harmonious relations;
d. Train and enlist the aid of such persons and acquire such facilities as the Commission
deems necessary to accomplish its functions:
e. Make recommendations on penalties, including the prevention of any political party or
any person (s) from participating in elections for a specified period, to be imposed for any breach
of provision of the Constitution or of any law dealing with ethnicity;
f. Do all other acts and things as may be necessary to facilitate the efficient discharge of the
functions of the Commission.


w


Page XIV


j


I Continued ,.
Stem-end Rot I
Stem end rot is caused by the fungus Lasiodiplodia 4i
theobromae. The disease is first seen as a shriveling and drying
of the stem followed by browning of the area around the stem,
which progressively enlarges as the disease develops. The cut flesh
is noticeably softened and lightly browned. If the cut melon is I
exposed to the air for a few hours, the diseased areas become ,
black. The disease develops rapidly in the fruit at temperatures '
greater than or equal to 250C (77F) but slowly or not at all at
100C (50F). In order to minimize the incidence of this disease,
at least 2.5 cm of stem should remain attached to the fruit at har- i
vest.
Bacterial Soft Rot
Bacterial soft rot, caused by Erwinia carotovora, is the prin-
cipal postharvest bacterial disease of watermelons. It is a secondary decay organism, requiring open-
ings in the skin or wounded areas of the rind to enter. Insect damage, fungal decay, and mechanical
I injuries predispose fruits to infection. The disease causes rapid fruit rot and rancidity. Foul odors
develop within a few days at ambient temperatures. The disease can be avoided by careful han-
dling of the fruit to minimize rind damage.
POSTHARVEST DISORDERS
Mechanical Injury
Rough handling during harvest, loading, and unloading of watermelons will result in fruit bruis-
ing, cracking, and high amounts of postharvest loss. Internal bruising leads to premature flesh break-
down and mealiness. Watermelons should not be dropped, thrown, or walked on, as internal bruis-
ing and flesh breakdown will occur.
Chilling Injury
Watermelons develop chilling injury (Cl) when stored below 10C (50F) for more than a few
days. Damage becomes greater as the temperature decreases and the length of storage time at CI-
inducing temperatures increase. Symptoms of CI include sunken depressions on the fruit surface
(pitting), brown-staining of the rind, loss of flesh color, loss of flavor, and increased decay when
returned to ambient temperature. Conditioning fruit at 30C (860F) for about 4 days before cooling
will induce some tolerance to CI, but will not alleviate the problem completely. Fruit may sustain
I chilling injury in cold storage without exhibiting symptoms until the fruit is returned to warm
temperatures.
Ethylene Damage
Watermelon are adversely affected by exposure to ethylene. Exposure to as little as 5 ppm
thylene for 7 days at 18C (64F) results in tissue softening and rind thinning. Flesh color fades
and has the appearance of being overripe. Higher concentrations of potassium permanganate may
be used to inactivate ethylene in enclosed areas. Avoiding exposure to ethylene by keeping water-
melons away from other commodities that emit high amounts of ethylene is the simplest way to
avoid injury,
Hollow Heart
Hollow heart is a fruit disorder of pre-harvest origin, in which the internal flesh separates,
creating an open cavity or hollow area. It is more problematic on crown-set fruit than lateral-set
fruit. Cultivars differ in susceptibility and the severity of the disorder varies among growing loca-
tions and seasons. The exact cause of this disorder is unknown. It is also very difficult to exter-
nally distinguish fruits with hollow heart.






The ERC You







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Sunday ~ThronicIe March 6, 2005 Page XVII


Please note that the Vacant Posts listed
herein are being-advertised at the request,
ofthe Ministry of Education.

The Cjosing Date for a COPY of each
Aplicaiori to reach: the Teaching Service
: irnmission is Thursday, April 07, 2005.
j. 'The 'Smng Date for the ORIGINAL of each
ARplicai o reach the REdO/PEO (GT) is


Friday, April22, 2005. The Closing Date for
the OIGINAL'of each Application to reach
Ce.t u Ministry'.fromn the REdOs and PE Q
(GT --dayo N 06o20.5.

BE OBSERVED APPLICANTS


1-' tAppica'tn~didade by senior teachers for appointment to parallel
"- posts &3bofth.emiggade:as those in which they are working .
'-..re.. i1 pctionisfof'tra r, and are.not processed by the
Teachi Servi -ommissio'(TSC) -at. the same time that it is
dealing with'promotions. -
%. -. Teachers who wish tpooply for rore.than one (1) advertised vacant


pcRITERIA FOR MAKING
APPOINTMENTS TO SENIOR
08I)TSIN SCHOOLS, 2005


THE ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA'

A. ^ ACADEMIC/GENERAL
ADMINISTRATIVE STREAM


SB: Except for'posis of Headjfo Department for which Untrained
University Graduates may apply, only teachers who have
attained trained status are eligible to apply for promotion to a
senior; post. Exept in, instances where, on accoTint of the
Ministry's re-organisation of a school orj, group of schools, a
.t her has to be moved from one systemm (i.e.,' Nursery,
S iimary or Secondary (including the Community High Schools))
to another, teachers who have attained trained status and
'Untrairied University Graduates (in the case of posts of Head of
SDepartment) may apply forprbonotion only in the system in
which they are working:


m m Mm Is
TEACHIN



a


C. ACADEMIC/GENERAL
ADMINISTRATIVE SYSTEM
PRIMARY SCHOOLS


N'B.: Except for posts of Head of Department. for which untrained
University Graduates may apply, only teachers who have attained
trained status and who have at least five (5) years of post-trainirig
experience at least two (2) years of which must have been in a
Primary School immediately preceding the application are eligible to
apply for promotion to a senior post in a Primary School. However, a
teacher with at least five (5) years of post-training experience who,
on account of the Ministry's re-organisation of a school or aPFoupof
schools, has been moved from one system to the Prirmay.system
will, for tw.4 (2) consecutive years thereafter, be granted the
concession of being eligible to seek promotion in either of thso two
(2) systems.:Such concession becomes void if the teacher seeks
and obtains pronmotibn the.first year.. .


post must make separate appiications and rnust insert o each .---
application a list, in order of.prference, of all the posts appliedJ tr..,' Teachers who have attained trained status and Untrained.
Teachers should take great care to set out an identical order of '. Graduates (in the case of posts of Head of Department) who
preference on all application fo wish toapply for promotionto a post in a system in which they
are notfWorking must go on transfer/secondment and spend at
3. Teachers should applyonly foiy:e advertised vacant posts which I- j I two (2) years in that system before being considered
they intend to take up, if offeedlalie wtioail to take up the offer .. lible for promotion tloa post in that system
of an appointment within one (I)ionth of the r;-opening of schools ,. '.
orofthe daleofl the letteroffT ,emthe appointment twhicheveris .In callquating the years -of service, the applicant should
the later) may be debarred -frompromotion for up to three (3) years. ; ., includetrhe period up to August 31 of the academic year of
Teachers are free however. t6'Withdraw ary application made for a -"' .".' Itheapplication.-- .
post. provided that the notification of withdrawal reaches the- ":
Secretary, TSC no later than tti.tiosing date for receipt of duplicate '
applicanon forms, by the Goission (ie. by Thursday, April 07,., :: .::ACADEMIC/GEfEIRAL
'2005).' .
ADMINISTRATIVE SYSTEM"
4. The deadline date 0Y which-ORIGiNAL application forms from MINISTRATV SYSTEM -
teachers must reach hie OREdqs and the PEO (GT) through the ,-- INURSERY SCHOOLS
.,Heads of schools is Frinday, Apri1 22, 2005 The deadline date by . .. .. .
which ORIGINAL application forms must reach Central Ministry from N.B: Only teachers who have attained traind atus anid whohave at
the REdOs and the PEO (GT) isFriday May 06, 2005 .:- least five (5) years of post-training experience at least (2) two
:'years .f'which must have been in a Nursery School or in the
5. Copies of application documents are available horn the TSC and the ...Nursery Class of a Primary School immediately preceding the
,,offices of all REdOs and the PEd (Georgetownr application will be eligible to apply for promotion to a senior post
in a Nursery-School. However, a.teacher with at least' five-(5)..
Every teacher who applies for offered senior post is expected years of post-training experience who, on account of-the
"TQ'live within easy reach of the&,ool. This condition isiritended to Ministrys re-organisation of a schoolora group of schools, has
facilitate proper placement Wproper school performance; for beenm.oved fromonesystem tothii N rsry System will, fortwo
participation as much as possible in the activities of the community, (2) consecutive years thereafter; tiegranted the concession of
and for the support of regionalism anrid the deielopmrneni of all parts of being eligible to seek promotion :in either of those two'(2)"
the country systems Such concession becomes yvid if the teacher seeks
and obtains promotion the first year.


7 Subject to 6 (above) applications must be made out in duplicate
using the prescribed form (Rev.2005/11
8. NO APPLICATION FORM OTkI'R THAN (Rev. 2005/1) CONTAINS
THE CORRECT INFORMATION REQUIRED FOR THE
PROMOTIONS EXERCISE _RIS YEAR. The Original of the
application must be sent through the normal official channel, and the
copy, clearly marked COPY must be dispatched through the HM to,
the Secretary. TSC, 22 Brickdam and Sendall Place Slabrek..
Georgetown. for delivery by Thursday, April07.2005
9. Teachers.should obtain a receit romn the Educabon Department for
all original applications receiveiohere.
N.B.: 1. EVERY APPLUCATIO PRM MUST BE FULLY AND
ACCURATELY COMPILED. "NIL" MUST BE ENTERED
.WHEREVERAPPLICABLE.
2. APPLICATIONS ON .INCORECTLY-WORDED FORMS
MAY BE REJECTED.


1. Heads of Grade A Nursery Schools
(1) Heads of Grade Band Grade C Nursery Schools.
(2) Head of Grade D Nursery Schools with at least three (3)
years of experience as such
2 Heads of Grade B Nursery Schools
(1) Heads of Grade C and Grade D Nursery Schools
(2) Senior Masters/Mistresses of Nursery Schools with at least
three (3) years of experience assuch. _--
(3) Senior Assistant Masters/Mistresses of Nursery Schools
with at least two (2) years of experience as such.
3 Heads of Grade C Nursery Schools
(1) Heads of Grade D Nursery Schqols..
(2) Senior MasterstMistresses of NurserySchools
3) ..Jenlor Assistant Masters/Mistresse: with at least two (2)
S years of experience In a Nursery School and/or in the
S .. Nursery Class of a Primary School, Immediately preceding
thp application


1. HeadsofGradeA PrimarySchools .
',- (1) Headsof GradeBandGradeCPrimarySchools-; ., ..
(2) Deputy Heads of GradeAPrimary Schools.
(3) Deputy Heads of Grade B Primary Schools -with at least two (21
years of experience as such.
2. Heads of Grade B Primary Schools
(1) Heads ofGrade C and Grade D Primary Schools.
(2) DeputyHeadsofGradeAand Grade B Primary Schools.

3. Heads of Grade C Primary Schools '
(1) HeadsofGrade D PrimarySchools. -.: .: ..-:
(2) DeputyHeadsofGradeAandGradeB PnmarySchools.
(3) Heads ofGrade E Primary Schools, Senior. Masters/ Mistr ees
of Primary .Schools, and Heads of Departments in Primary
Schools, all with at least three (3) years of experleneOr.. .
combinationsof experience as such... ."
4 Heads ofGadeD PimaSchools
(1) Heads of Grade E Primary Schools. '
(2) Senior Masters/Mistresses of Primary Schools, and Heads of0
Departments in Primary Schools. :.. ..
(3) Senior Assistant Masters/Mistresses of Primary Schools with at
*'. '. .: least two (2) years of experience as such. .
5. Heads of Grade E Primary Schools
(1) Senior Masters/Mistresses of Primary Sch,:iols, arid Trained -
-Heads of Departments in Primary Schools
(2) Trained Teachers with at least five (5) years of.post- training
experience at least two i1) years of which, immediately preceding
the application, must have been in a Pnrnary School

6 Deputy Heads of Grade A Primary Schools


(1) Heads of Grade 0 Pnrmary Schools
(2) Deputy Heads of Grade B Primary Schools.
(3) Heads of Grade E Prinmary Schools, Senior Masters/Mistresses
of Primary Schools and Trained Heads of Departments in
Primary Schools, all with at least three (3j years of expenence or
combinationsof experience as such.

7. Deputy He.ads_of Grade B Primary Schools
Heads of Grade E Primary Schools. Senior Masters/ Mistresses of
I Pnmary Schools: and Trained Heads of apartments in Primary
Schools ., .. .


I'


4. Heads of Grade D Nursery Schools
(1) Senior Masters/Mistresses of Nursery Schools.
(2) SeniorAssistant Masters/Mistresses of Nursery Schools.
(3) Trained Teachers with at least five (5) years of post- training
experience at least two (2) years of which, immediately preceding
the application, must have been in a Nursery School or in the
Nursery Class of a Primary School.

5. Senior Masters/Mistresses of Nursery Schpols,
Trained Teachers with at least five (5) years of post- training experience
at least two (2) years of which, immediately preceding the application,
must have been in a Nursery School or in the Nursery Class of a
Primary School.


-- i


Sunday-Ordnicle March 6, 2005


Pagee.XYYsI


N


If,






Pane XVIII


Sunday Chronicle March 6,2005


8. Senior Masters/Mistresses of Primary Schools
Trained Teachers with at least five (5) years of post-training
experience at least two (2) years of which, immediately preceding the
application, must have been in a Primary School.


9. Heads of Departments (Agriculture, Home Economics &
Industrial Technolocy) in Primary Schools
(1) Trained University Graduates with at least two (2) years of
experience (after attaining trained status) which experience
must have been in the specific subject area in a Primary School.
(2) Untrained University Graduates with at least four (4) years of
experience (after attaining University Graduate status) which
experience must have been in the specific subject area in a
Primary School.
(3) Trained Teachers with at least four (4) years of post-training
experience at least(2) years of which, immediately preceding
the application, must have been in the specific subject area in a
Primary School.


ACADEMICIGENERAL
ADMINISTRATIVE SYSTEM
SECONDARY SCHOOLS


N.B. Except for posts of Head of .Department, for, which Untrained
University Graduates may apply, only teachers who have attained.
trained status and who have at, least five (5) years of post-training.
experience at least two-(2) years of which must have been in a
Secondary School immediately preceding the application will be
eligible to apply for promotion to.any senior post in a Secondary,
School. However, a teacher'with at least five (5) year of post-
training experience who, on account of the Ministry's re-
organisation of a school or a group of schools, has been moved
from one system to -the Secondary system 'will, for two (2)', .
consecutive years thereafter, be granted the concession of being
eligible to seek promotion in either of those (2) systems. Such,
concession becomes void if 'the teacher seeks:, and obtains
nrmftinn the firstvear. .


8. Deputy Heads of Grade B Secondary Schools
Senior Masters/Mistresses and Trained Heads of Departments
in Secondary and Community High Schools all with at least three
(3) years of experience or any combination of such experience in
such schools.


9. Senior Masters/Mistresses of Secondary Schools
Trained Teachers with at least five (5) years of post-training
experience at least two (2) years of which, immediately
preceding the application, must have been in a, Secondary
and/or Community High School.


10. Heads of Subject Departments in Secondary Schools
(1) Trained University Graduates with at least three (3) years of
experience (after attaining trained status) which experience
must have been in the specific subject area in a Secondary
School or a Community High School (or any combination of
such experience in such schools).
(2) Untrained University Graduates with at least five (5) years of
.experience (after attaining University Graduate status)
which experience must have been in the specific subject
area in a Secondary School or a Community High School (or
anycombination of such experience in such schools).
(3) Trained Teachers with at least five (5) years of experience
(after attaining trained status) whiqh experience must have
been in the specific subject area rina Secondary School or a
Community High School (or any -combination of such
experience in such schools).


E. ACADEMIC/GENERAL


ADMINISTRATIVE SYSTEM
COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOLS


1. HeadsofGradeACommunityHighSchools
S (1) Graduate Heads of Grade B and Grade C Community High
and,.SecondarySchools'
(2) Graduate Deputy Heads of Grade A Community High and
SecondarySchools.
(3)' Graduate Deputy Heads of Grad&B-CommunityHigh.and --
Secondary Schools with at leasttwo (2) years of experience' -
orcombinationsofexperienceassuch.


1. Heads of Senior Secondary Schools -: ', 2., Heads of Grade B Community HighSchools ,'.
(1). Graduate Heads of Grade A SecondarySchools th atleast- < .(1) Graduate Head.,oL.GraderC-'Comuinity High and
two (2)yearsofexperienceas such :. .',: SecondarySchools.
(2) Graduate Deputy Heads ofSeniof-Secoqdary Schools with at .. (2): Graduate Deputy' Heads 0of'. rade-A- and Grade B
leasttwo(2)years.of experienceassuch. ', CommunitHigh andSecondarySchbois. ..' ,

2. Heads of GradeA Secondary Schools 3 ::'-' ra . Ami High Schol
:`(1) GraduateHeadsofGradeBandGradeCSecohdarySchOols 3, HeadstofG radeoComem munityH ih a Scheconda
(2) .GraduateDeputyHeadsofGradeASecondarySchools. ,(Heads 'of Grade. :D ommunityHigh and Secondary
(3). Graduate Deputy Heads of Grade B Secondary Sc~olswith at Schools ---T -.-- "
leasttwo(2)yearsofexperienbe as such,' .. (2) Deputy Heads of gradeA and Grade Community High and
S.. .... .. Secondarych.ols. .
,3. HeadsofGradeB SecondarySchools .-- ...
S, (1} Graduate Head-ofGrade CSeondai'rySchools.; 4. Heads of Grade D Comunity High Schools" ...
(2) Graduate Deputy Heads of Grade A and Grade B Secondary Snior Master/Mistrsses and T Heads of Departments
Schools, ..'...- .''in Community High and Secondary Schools, all with at least
".. -'.; ... . three (3): years of, experience or combinations, of such,-
*.4 HeadsofGradeC Secondary Schools experience in such'schools.,'. _
(1).- Heads of Grade D SecondarySchools arid Community High .,
Schools. r '


Du) ( deputy Heads or frade A and Grade B oeuuconlary ouuis
and Community High Schools. .

5. Heads of Grade D Secondary Schools
Senior Masters/Mistresses and Trained Heads of Departments in
Secondary and Community High Schools all with at least three (3)
years of experience or combinations of such experience in such,'.
schools.

6. Deputy Heads of Senior Secondary Schools
(1) GraduateHeads of Grade C SecondarySchools.
(2) Graduate Deputy Heads of Grade B Secondary Schools.
(3) Graduate Senior Masters/Mistresses of Secondary Schools
and Trained Graduate Heads of Departments of Secondary
Schools all with at least three (3) years of experience or
combinations of experience as such.

7. Deputy Heads of GradeASecondary Schools


) Graduate Heads of Grade C Secondary Schools.
) Graduate DeputyH-leads'of Grade B Secondary'Schools.
) Graduate Senior Masters'AAj*,....'*- and Trained Graduate
. Heads of Depart'- ts'in ...., and/or Community High
east three (3) years 'of experience or
combination, n experience in such schools.


, 5Deputy Heads of Grade A Community High Schools
(1)'Heads of Grade C Community High and Secondary
Schools. '
(2) Deputy Heads of Grade B Community High and Secondary
Schools.
(3) Senior.: MasterslMistresses and Trained Heads of
Departments of Community High and Secondary Schools all
with'lat least three (3) years of experience or combinations of.
such experience ih such schools.


6. Deputy Heads of Grade B Community High Schools
Senior Masters/Mistresses and Trained Heads of Department of
Community High and Secondary Schools, all with at least three
(3) years of experience orcombinations of experience as such.

7. Senior Masters/Mistresses of Community High Schools
Trained Teachers with at least five (5) years of post-training
experience at least two (2) years of. which, immediately
precedingthe application, must have been, ina Community High
Sand/orSecondary School.


8. Heads of Departments in Community High Schools
(1) Trained University Graduates with at least three (3) years of
experience (after attaining trained status) which experience must
have been in the specific subject area in a Community High or a
Secondary School (or any combination of such experience in
such schools).
(2) Untrained University Graduates with .at least five (5) years of
experience (after attaining University Graduate status) which
experience must have been in the specific subject area in a
Community High School or a Secondary School (or any
combination of such experience in such schools).
(3) Trained Teachers with at least five (5) years of experience (after
attaining trained status) which experience must have been in the
specific subject area in a Community High School or a Secondary
School (or any combination of such experience in such schools).



F. PRE-VOCATIONAL STREAM.


1. Heads of GradeA Practical Instruction Centres
(1) Heads of Grade B and Grade C Practical Instruction Centres.
(2) Deputy Heads of GradeA Practical Instruction Centres,

2. Heads of Grade B Practical Instruction Centres
(1) Heads of Grade C Practical InstructionCentres.
(2) Deputy Heads of GradeAPractical Instruction Centres.


3. Heads of Grade C Practical Instruction Centres
(1) DeputyHeadsofGradeA Fracticalnstruction Centres.:
(2) Trained Heads of Practical Instruction Departments in Primary,
Secondary and Commlunity High Schools and Senior
Masters/Mistresses of Practical Instruction Centres all with at
least two (2) years of experience .,or combinations of such
experience in such schools.


4'. Deputy Heads of GradeAPractical Instruction Centres
(1) Heads of Grade C Practical Instruction Centres
(2) Trained Heads of Practical Instruction Departments in Primary,
Secondary and Community. High Schools and Senior
Masters/Mistresses of Practical Instruction Centres all with at.
least two (2) years of experiencee or combinations of such
experience in such schools.


5. SeniorMasters/Mistresses of Practical Instruction Centres
(1) Trained Upiversity Graddates with'at least:two (2):years of
experience (after attaining trained status) which experience
must .have been in the specific subjectt areaI in: a Primary,
Secondary or a Commuhity Hiqih School or a Practical
Instruction Centre (or any, combiriatiQn of such experience in
such schools). '
(2) Trained Teachers with atleast four.(4)years of expeence (after
attaining trained status)' Which experience must haie'been in
the specific subject area in Prinary,;Secondary ora Community
High School or a Practicali nstructioi Department or Centre (or
anycombination of suchexperiendeirnsuch schools)..

6. Heads of SubjectDepartments in the Pre-Vocational
Stream .
(1) Trained University Graduates with at least two (2)_ years of
experience (after attaining trained status) which experience
must have been in the specific subject area in a Primary,
Secondary or a Community High School or :a Practical
Instruction Centre (or any combination of such experience in
such schools).
(2) Untrained University Graduates withat least four (4) years of
experience (after attaining .University Graduate status) which
experience must have been in the specific subject, area in a
Primary, Secondary or a Community High School or a Practical
Instruction Centre (or any combination of such experience in
such schools),
(3) Trained Teachers with at least four (4) years of experience (after
attaining trained status) which experience must have been in
the specific subject area in Primary,.Secondary or a Community:
High School or a Practical Instructiori Department or Centre (or
any combination of such experience in such schools).

Sgd. FrancescaVieira.
Secretary
TEACHING SERVICE COMMISSION




< . .. "b


w' -






Sunday Chronicle March 6, 2005


I


TECIN SRICECOMSSO


VAANY N[TICE


VACANCY LIST
2005


HA= House Available
NHA= No House Available


NURSERY
SCHOOLS


HEADMASTERS/
HEADMISTRESSES

HM GRADE A


1. May 26
2. St. Gabriel's


HM GRADE B

Victoria North
Grove
Turkeyen
Liana


HM -GRADE C


1. Santa Rosa (NHA)
2 Port Kaituma
3. Hydronie
4. Canal# 1
5. Philadelphia
6. Soesdyke No. 2
7. Nabaclis
8 Whim
9. Yakusari
10. No. 69
11. Joanna
12. Karaudamau
(NHA)
13. Sand Creek (NHA)
16. Republic Avenue
(w.e.f. 2005-10-01)


HM GRADE D

1. Sheba
-2. Pakera (NHA)
3. Bumbury (NHA)
4. Parakeese
5. Kwebana (NHA)
6. Parika Back
7. Belle Plaine
8. St Cuthbert's
9. Gandhi Memorial
10. Hand-en-Veldt
11. Mora Point
12. St. Francis
13. PlegtAnker
14. No.1 Reef
15. Lochaber
16. Lighttown
17. Shulinab (NHA)
18. Parishara (NHA)
19: Yupukari (NHA)
20. Nappi (NHA)
21. Moco-Moco (NHA)
22. Kumu (NHA)
23. Katoka (NHA)
24. Parikwarunau (NHA)
25. Katoonarib (NHA)
26. Sawariwau (NHA)
27. Tipuru (NHA)
28. Yurong Peru (NHA)
29. Tiger Pond (NHA)
30. Shea (NHA)
31. Maruranau (NHA)
32. Awarewaunau
(NHA)
33. Achawib (NHA)
34. Potarinau
35. Mabura Hill
36. Weroni


SENIOR MASTERS/
MISTRESSES

1. Deleted
2. Enterprise (ECD)
'3. Lusignan
4. May 26
5. Deleted
*6. Eccles
7. Gacestock
8. St. Agnes
9. Smyth Street
10. Starters
11. St. Christopher


PRIMARY
SCHOOLS

HEADMASTERSI
HEADMISTRESSES

HM GRADE A

1. BV/Quamina
2. Flelena
3. Ketley
4. Stella Maris
5. St. Margaret's
6. Graham's Hall
7. Sacred Heart
8. Cotton Tree
9. Lachmansingh
(w.e.f. 2005-10-01)

HM GRADE B

1. Kawall
2. Greenwich Park
3. Cornelia Ida
4. Goed Fortuin
5. Philadelphia
6. Chateau Margot
7. Paradise
8. St. Andrew's
9. Blairmont

12. Watooka Day


HM- GRADE C


1. Waramuri
2. Sparta
3. Queenstown
4. Annandale
5. Supply (EBD)
6. BelAir
7. Alness
8. Bohemia
9. New Amsterdam


HM GRADE D

1. Kamwatta (Moruca)
(HA)
2. Peter & Paul (NHA)
3. Deleted
4. Nismes
5. Blake
6. Cane Grove
7. Low Wood
8. St. Cuthbert's
9. Moblissa
10. Buxton
11. Central
12. Agricola
13. Karamat
14. St. Francis
15. No.5
16. Seafield
17. Strath Campbell
18. Lochaber
19. Wellington Park
20. Baracara
21. 72 Miles (HA)
22. Kamarang (HA)
23. Kopinang
24. Chenapau (NHA)
25. Paramakatoi (HA)
26. Kurukubaru (NHA)
27. Sawariwau


HM GRADE E


1. Almond Beach (HA)
2. Arakaka(HA)
3 Sebai (HA)
4. St Margaret's (HA)
5. St Ninian's (HA)
6. Black Water (HA)
7. Lower Waini (HA)
8. St Anthony's (HA)
9. St Bede's (HA)
10. Chinese Landing (HA)
11. Kokerite (HA)
12. St John's (HA)
13. Hobedei (HA)
14. St Domiric's (HA)
15. St. Cyprian's (HA)
16. Santa Cruz
17. Wallaba
18. Caria Caria
19. Eastern Mogg Is.
20. Lanaballi: .
21. Endeavour
22. Clemwood
23. Aliki
24. Upper Bonasika
25. Northern Hogg Is.
26. Dora
27. Essau & Jacob
28. Grass Hook
29. Tacouba
30. Schepmoed
31. Siparuta
32. Butukari (HA)
33. Kurupung (HA)
34. Arrau (HA)
35. St. Martin's (HA)
36. Chinoweing (HA)
37. Isseneru (HA)
38. Micobie (HA)
39. Kamana (NHA)
40. Taruka (NHA)
41. Bamboo Creek
(NHA)
42. Tuseneng (NHA)
43. Kanapang (NHA)
44. Itabac (NHA)
45. Chiung Mouth
(NHA)
46. Princeville (HA)
47. Karisparu (NHA)
48. Maikwak (NHA)
49. Kaibarupai (NHA)
51. Konashen HA)
52. Katoka (HA)
53. Rupunau (HA)
54. Kaicumbay (HA)
55. Shirriri (HA)
56. Baitoon (HA)
57. Rukumuta (HA)
58. Taushida (HA)
59. Kumu (HA)
60. Padkwarunau
(HA)
61. Wowetta (HA)
62. Geatroy (NHA)
63. Mount Carmel
(NHA)
64. Kibilibiri (NHA)
65. 47 Miles
66. Sand Hills
67. Muritaro
68. Mabura Mission
(NHA)


DEPUTY HEADMASTERS/
HEADMISTRESSES

DHM GRADE A


1. Meten-Meer-Zorg
2. Mon Repos
3. Golden Grove (ECD)
4. Grove (EBD) .
5. Craig
6. B.V/Quamina
7. Sacred Heart
8. Sophia
9. St. Gabriel's
10. St. Pius
11. South Ruimveldt
12. St Angela's
13. St Agnes
14. Lachmansingh
15. Cumberland
16. St Aidan's
17. Wismar Hill


DHM GRADE B

1. Charity
2. Cornelia=lda
3. Patentia ,
4. Goad Fortuln
5. Kawall i
*6. *Peter's'Hall
7., Virginia
8. Plaisance ;
(w.e.f. 2005-12-01)
9, St. indrew's
10. East La PenitnTe e
11. St Ambrose .
12:)N,o. 2.9 .'.
13: Novar
14:. StAioysius,
15. New Markbt:
16. Messiah
17. Skeldon *
(w.e.f. 2005-10-01
.18 .St John-the-Baptist
'19. Watooka Day


SENIOR MASTERS/
. MISTRESSES

SM 4 GRADE A

1. C.V.'Nunes'
2. Vreed-en-Hoop
3. Grove
4. Graham's Hall
5. Golden Grove (ECD)
6. Mon Repos
7. St. Stephen's
(2 vacancies)
8. .North Georgetown
9. Rama Krishna
10. Comenius
11. South Ruimveldt
12. St. Agnes
13. Stella Maris
14. St. Ambrose
15. St Angela's
16. F.E. Pollard
17. Rosignol
18. Cotton Tree
19. Bath
20. Cropper
21. Crabwood Creek

23. Corniverton
24. Wismar Hill
25. St Aidan's


2
3
3.
3
4
4
4


GT
GIT
GT .
5
5 .
: 6 ,
6
6

6
7
10


SM GRADE B


1. Suddie
2. Zeelugt
3. Windsor Forest
4. Cornelia Ida
5. Friendship (ECD)
6. Chateau Margot
7. Clonbrook
8. Peter's Hall
9. Providence
10. Enterprise
11. East La Penitence
12. St Andrew's
13. Mahaicony
14. Woodley Park
15. Auchlyne
16. Kildonan
17. Skeldon
18. Watooka Day

SM GRADE C

1. Aurora
2. Fisher
3. Mc Gillivary
4. Endeavour &
the Commons
5. Crane
6. Sans Souci
7. Moca- Arcadia
8. Soesdyke
9. Kuru Kururu
10. La Bonne
Intention
11. Bel Air
12. St. Anne's
(Agricola)
13. Hopetown
14. Zeeland
15. No.48
16. No. 68


17. No. 56
18. Mc Gowan
19. Belvedere.
20. Fort Ordnance
21.. Phillippi
22. Jawalla
23. Karasabai
24. Coormacka

SM 'GRADE D


1.' Holoquai
2. Peler & Paul
3" Kanwatta .
:' ( oruca)

4. Kwebana
:5. Mariborogh
6. Lilydale
7. God Hope
8. St. Monica's Creek
9. Jacklow .
10. Matindale
11 .Friendship (Pomeroon)
12. Mdryville
13. Parika Back
14. M na's Pleasure
.15. Btbke .
16. Lower Bonrasika .
17. Nitmes
18. Laluni .
19. St Cuthbert's
20. Kru Kuru
21. Thomas More
22. Sirathcampbell
23. Spafield
24. Gangaram
25. Fryish
26. Orealla
27. .Wellington Park
28. Lobhaber
29. Kamarang (NHA)
30. Kako (NHA)
31. Waramadong (NHA)
32. Pahuima
33. Kato (NHA)
34. Kopinang (NHA)
35. Chenapau (NHA)
36. KurukubarU (NHA)
37 MonkeyMountain
(HA)
38. Potarinau
40. Yupukari
41. Kwaimatta
42. Sawariwau
43. Shea
44. Maruranau
45. Karaudamau
46. Tipuru
47. Tiger Pond
48. Nappi
49. Awarewanau
50. Aishalton
51. Achawib
52. Coomacka

EANS-9OfDEP-T-


HOD AGRICULTURE

1. Rosignol
2. St. Ignatius

HOD HOME ECONS

1. Diamond
2. Paradise
3. No. 29
4. Rosignol
5. Fort Ordnance
SECONDARY
SCHOOLS


HEADMASTERS/
HEADMISTRESSES

KM......SENIQ.R.S.EC


President's College
Queen's College
St. Rose's High

HlM GRADE A SEC,


Charity
Leonora
Bladen Hall


6
6
6
6
7
7
9
10


4. New Campbellville
5. Sophia Special
6. St. Mary's High
7. Ascension
8. North Rulmveldt
9. Chadestown
10. Rosignol
11. Bush Lot
12. Berbice Edn Inst.
13. Vryman's Erven CH
14. Central Corentyne
15. J.C. Chandisingh
.16. Bartica (HA)


HM GRADE B SEC.


1
'1.

1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
GT
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8

8
9
-9
9
9
9


Aurora
L'Aventure
Buxton CHS
Soesdyke CHS
East Ruimveldt
Tucville
Belladrum
Winifred Gaskin
Memorial
Manchester
Lower Corentyne
Port Mourant CHS
Tutorial Academy


1.
2.
3.
4
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.


HM GRADE C SEC.

8th of May CHS 2
Vergenoegen CHS 3
St. John's CHS 3
Leguan 4
St Barnabas Special GI
David Rose CHS G"
Alleyne's High GI
Freeburg G
St. Ignatius (HA) 9


DEPUTY HEADMASTERS/
HEADMISTRESSES


President's College
The Bishops' High
St. Rose's High
Queen's College
St. Stanislaus Coll.


9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
10





6
9



4
4
5
5
6










4
GT
GT



2
3
4


DHM GRADE A SEC.


1. Port Kaituma
2. Anna Regina
3. Cotton Field
4. Leonora
5. Zeeburg
6. West Demerara
7. Vreed-en-Hoop
8. Parika-Salem
9. Wales CHS
10. Annandale
.11. Bladen Hall
12. Plaisance CHS
13. Beterverwagting CH
14. Richard Ishmael
15. Christ Church
16. St. John's Coll.
17. South Ruimveldt
18. Ascension CHS
19. North Ruimveldt
20. Central High
21. Canje
22. New Amsterdam
23. Berbice High
24. Berbice Edn Inst.
25. Skeldon Line Path
26. Tagore Memorial
27. Bartica (NHA)
28. Linden Foundn.
29 C/burg/Wismar


1
2
3
4
5
6


DHM GRADE B SEC.
. Aurora 2
. L'Aventure 3
. Golden Grove 4
Buxton CHS 4
. St. Winefride's GT
. Kingston GT


L Cont'd on Page XX


Page XIX


-






Sunday Chronicle March'6;2005


TEC OSRIECMI SSO


7. St. George's High
8. Carmel
9. Queenstown
10. Tucville
11. Houston
12. Tutorial Academy
13. W'st.u, j


SENIOR MASTERS/
MISTRESSES

SM GRADE A SEC.


1. Port Kaituma .1
S2. Abram Zuil 2
. 3 :Zeeburg ,,- ,-.,
4. Plaisance CHS 4
5. Cummings Lodge '. GT
6. Sophia-Special GT..
7. lew.Campbellville- GT
8. .North Ruimveldt GT
9. *.South Ruimveldt GT
10. Mahaicony 5
11.' Rosignol 5
12. Skeldon High 6
13. Canje 6
14. Skeldon Line Path
(3 vacancies) 6
15 Tagore Memorial 6
16. Skeldon High .
".. :(2 vacancies) .
S17.C/burg Wismar i1
(3vacanies) 10 1
18.t Mackenzie High 10


SM GRADE B SEC.


18. Freeburg GT
1,9. Houston CHS GT
20. Ascension CHS GT
21. CarmetiHS GT
22. St. Joseph High GT
23. Alleyne's High GT
24. Brickdam GT
25. Queen's College GT
26. St. George's GT
27. David Rose CHS GT
28. Bush Lot, 5
29. Fort Wellington 5
30. Rosignol *. 5
31. Black Bus 6
32. Central .ltyne 6
33: Lower Corentyne 6
34. Canje: -;:. 6
35. Vrymans.Even CH 6
36.: C. Chanrisingh 6
S37. Waramadong (NHA) 7
38. Paramakatoi (HA)- 8
39. Ahalton (HA) 9
40. Annai (HA) 9
41. St. Ignatius (HA) 9
42. Christianburg/Wismar 10
43. Linden Foundation 10


,ROD SCIENCE

.11 Port Kaituma
2. NorthWest
3.,.Leonoa
4. Zeebwg
5. eed-ent-iHoop
6: Soesdyke CHS
7 Golden Grove .,
8 Bladen Half- .


HOD ENGLISH


1. Port Kaituma 1
2. Santa Rosa 1
3. 8th of May CHS 2
4. Aurora 2
5. Abram's Zuil 2
6. Anna Regina 2
7. Vreed-en-Hoop CHS, 3
8. Parika-Salem CHS 3
9. Stewartville 3
10. St. John's CHS 3
11. West Demerara 3
12. Zeeburg 3
13. Bladen Hall 4
14. Friendship (EBD) 4'
15. Swami Purnananda 4
16. Golden Grove 4'
-17, Plaisance 4
18. Tutorial High GT
19. St. Winefride's GT
20. Ascension CHS GT
21. David Rose CHS GT
22. Houston CHS GT
23. Carmel CHS GT
24. North Georgetown GT
25. North Ruimveldt GT
26. Lodge CHS GT
27, St. John's Colleg GT
28. Christ Church GT
29. Dolphin GT
30. Belladrum 5
31. Bush Lot 5
32. Fort Wellington CHS 5
-33. Berbice Edn Inst 6
34. Skeldon High 6
35. Lower Corentynie 6
36. Canje 6
37. Port Mourani 6
38; Vrymans ErveCHS 6
.39. Bprbice High : ",, 6
W. a. ^.aramadong (NHA) 7
`41 i


12. Buxton CHS
13. Lodge CHS
14. St. George's High
15. Carmel CHS
16. N;oth Georgetown'
17. South Ruimveldt
18. Freeburg
19. Tucville
20. David Rose CHS
21. Bygeval
22. Rosignol
23. Vrymans Erven CHS
24. Skeldon Line Path
25. Central Corentyne
26. Black Bush
27. Canje
28. Manchester
29. Waramadong(NHA)
30. Annai (HA)
31. St. Ignatius (HA)
32. Aishalton (HA)
33. New Silver City


HOD BUSINESS EDUCATION


1. North West
2. Aurora
3. Uitvlugt
4. Leonora
5. Vreed-en-Hoop CHS
6. St. John's CHS
7. Essequibo Islands
8. Stewartville,
9. Zeeburg
10. Soesdyke CHS .
11. Covent Garden'
12. Dora
13. Golden Grove
14.,Swaini Pumananda.
Is. Queenstown CHS
16. North Ruimveldt
17. Brickdam


18, Lodge CHS


'1
2 .
3
;:3.
'3 *
3'
' 3
3 l


10. Tutorial High
11. St. Winefride's
12, Belladrum


. OD HOME ECONS
.Z.r ;f


1; North West (HA)
2. Port Kaituma (HA)
3. Johanna Cecelia
4. 8 th of May CHS
5, Aurora
6. Zeeburg
7. Bladen Hall
8. Plaisance CHS
9. South Ruimveldt
10. Brickdam
11. Cummings Lodge
12. Lodge
13. Central High
14. Christ Church
15. East Ruimveldt
16. New Campbellville
17. Queen's College
18, Winifred.Gaskin
Memorial
19. Berbice Edn Inst
20. Manchester
21. Kwakwani
HOD -
AGRICULTURAL
SCIENCE


1
1
2
2
2
3
4
4
GT
GT
GT
GT
GT
GT
GT
G
GT .

6
S6
6 1
1'0


3 1. Port Kaituma (HA)
4 2. Johanna Cecelia
A'4., -. 3. Ayrora
'4. A;. .Cotton field
5. Wales QHS
4 6. Leonora .
S *'KLoeguan'
8. Parika-Salem'CHS
9. Uitvlugt
T in 7Ahbuim


10. North Ruimveldt
11. East Ruimveldt
12. North Georgetown
13. Tutorial High
14. St. George's High
15. Charlestown
16. The Bishops' High
17. Cummings Lodge
18. Central High
19. Lodge CHS
20. Bush Lot
21. Waramadong
22. Paramakatoi
25. Annai (HA)
26. Wisburg
27. New Silver City
28. Mackenzie High


HOD INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
1. North West 1
2. The Bishops' High GT
3. Christ Church GT
4. North Georgetown GT
5. Dolphin GT
',6. New.CampbellVille GT
7. Charlestown GT
8. South Ruimveldt GT
9. Berb'ice Edn Inst 6
10. New Amsterdam 6
11. J.C. Chandisingh 6
12. Central Corentyne 6
13. Berbice High 6
14. Corentyne Compre 6
. 15. Tagore Memorial 6
416. Skeldon Line Path 6
17. Linden Foundation 10


PRACTICAL

INSTRUCTION


2. Queenstwn .
(2 vacancies)
3. SI. Wiefide's
4. Tuto;af-tiigh
5.., Kingston CHS
-. S..L George's High. ,:
; 7. ,-Mahchester
:'8. New Silver City
(2 vacancies)
S Wisburg
(2 vacancies)
SM .GRADE C SE

SM GRADE C SEC;


1. North West 1
,32 .Santa-Rosa -
.3: Annai(HA). 9
4 :'Aishalton (HA) 9

-HOD MATHEMATICS

I1 NorthWe st 1--
2 Port ailuma ,
3 Wales CHS 3
4 Vergenplgen CH3S 3
5. L'Aw n ," .i 3
6. Parnli- 'efi CHS 3
7. SI.l f 3
8 Leontt-. ". 3
.9 Utvu 3
10, Covent garden 4
11.-Bladerl" al "4
.12 Dora 4
.13. Pla' ance CHS 4


15. So1i,.qreldt GT
S16. Lodge CIS GT
'17. Tucville,' GT


10. Friendship (EBD) :4 43. Anna 9 21
11. Swami Pumananda .4 '-44.: St. Ignatius' 9 22
12; PlaisanceCHS ;4 45 Kwakwani .... 10 23
13.. Queen's .College -.- .GT .. 24
4. East Ruinreldf GT 25
15. St. Joseph High GT FOREIGN 26
16. North'Ruimveldt. GT. LANGUAGES 27
17. SoUthfRuimveldt GT 28
S18. Dolphin,. "T- (Al Vacancies are for Spanish 29
19. Lodg1eCHS GT except whereilndlcated oth*rwisej] 3
-20.,Carme : [ :;, ...'GT '. : .31
21.. harlestown GT 1. Port Keitun)' 1 32
22. Ascension GT 2. North West 1 33
23. St. Winefr]ies .. GT- 3. Santa Rosa 1 34
24. St George's -.GT .4. Charity 2 .
25; Tutorial High -GT 5. -Cotton Field 2 3
26: Houston CHS GT 6. St. John's CHS 3 3
27. North Georgetown GT 7. Brickdam GT. :
28, Central High GT 8. Christ Church GT
29. Alleyne's High ,, GT S C ueen's College
41
S 30 Freeburg GT (Spanish/French) GT 42
31. New Campbellviile GT 10 INRchard fshmael GT 43
32. David Rose CHS GT 11.' South' uirveldt GT 44
33 Rosignel 5 12. SI. Joseph High GT 45
34. Bellad ,, 5 Mahacony. ', 5 46
35 FortNWdligion .5 14.-' eva ',.
36 Mahl 5 .5. 7 "
37 Lon 6 -. ,
38 j . -: .
... 6
40 T 6y". '.. 2 .W lor hWest(HA) -
41:.Wa2(gM-l) 7 2 .S Rs' 4.
42 Pdialat(HAI 8 3 'Aur 2
43 AlshalVnKA) 9 4 Johanna Cecella CHS 2 5.
44 Anak(i,, 9 ;.5 L'Aventure. % .
4'9 er0geoid C' .'
,46:- 10 7 Slewart-iN 3-
8 Golden Grove \
9 PlaisanceCHS 4 9.
I 10. IBladen Hall 1
S11.~~ S m

' ~ ? ; ,-,. ; ^ '" -


fulLtmuuju


U. tumnbI.1 I.I ,U I
Dolphin GT
2. New CampbellMlle- ,'-'GT,
i. St. George's High .GT
. Alleyne's High- QT.
i. Tutorial High GT,
. St. Josdpp High GT
t. The Bishops' High GT
8. Chahiestown GT
9. Richard Ishmael GT
I. St. John's College GT
. Kingston CHS GT
:. St. Winefrde's .GT
, Bush Lot .5
. Bygeval 5
i Rosignol 5
6. Beldium 5
L CorentyneCompPe 6
.&Manchester 6
. Lower Corentyne 6
P. Tagoe Memorial 6.
'BlackBush : '6
!.:Banica(NHA) l
I Annai(HA) i 9
4 Si Ignalius (HA) 9
5 Aishallon (HA) 9
SKwakwani 10

HOD ALLIED ARTS

LJohanna Cecelia,'.-- 2 2
i'JCharity ,
"8 th of May 2
.Vreed-en-Hoop CHS
(CrafuMbsiciPE) 3-
Covenr Garden 4
The Bishops' High GT
.Chnsl Church,,hw r G
South Rdirhv^.; .1 I' !
(Visual Arts) GT
Tucville J
.(Visual Arts/E) GT
i : :


12. Bladen Hall
13, GolderGrove
14. Swami Pumananda
15. Ann's Grove
16 East Ruimveldt
17. Ascension
18. St. John's College
19. The Bishops' High
20. Cummings Lodge
21. Tutorial High '
22. Alleyne's High
23. Christ Church
-24. St. Joseph High
25. South Rulmyeldt
26. Rosignol
27. Corentyne Compre
-& .Tutorial Academy
29. BerbiceEdn Inst
S30. Lower Corentyne
: 31.. Central Corentyne
' Winifred Gaskin
Memorial
33. Port Mourant CHS
34., New Amsterdam
)5. Black Bush
.Bartica
.'7. St Ignaltus (HA)

HOD INDUSTRY
TECHNOLOGY

il Port Ka iuma (HAi
2. 8 in of MayCHS
3 Vergenoegen CHS
4. UlMvugl
I ; Vreed-en-Hoop
West Darnerara
7. Bixton CHS
&8 Dora
9 Richard Ishmael
2


4 " HEAD
4 HEADMS
4
GT' HM GR

GT 1. Agricola PIC (Indu
GT Technology)
GT
ar HM GRA
GT
'-GT: -_ IMahaica PIC-

GT D.
5 HEAD!
6 HEADMI
6
6 DHM G

6 1 D'rban Backlan,


1
2
3
3
3
3
4
4 ,
..-_


EPIITY


4
", : ,.
. .'


[ -2 New"Amsterdam PIC
(Industrial Technology) 6 .

DHM GRADE B PIC

S1 Malaica PIC 4

SENIOR MASTERS/,
-,. 'i STRESSES PIC ,
1 Agncola PJC (H6me
Economics) GT
., 2 Agncola PIC
(Industrnal


Technology) C
3. D'Urban
Backlands PIC- G
4. Kingston PIC G
Sgd. Francesca Vieira
Secretary
TEACHING SERVICE
' ...:COWMISSION


T
GT


Page X-X'-


VASTEWS
ISTRESISES

tA~ A PIC

ustrial
GTI?

ADE B PIC


WASTERSI
STRESSES

TRADE A PIC

ds PIC GT


~ -


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Sunday Chronicle March 6; 2005


(~)


( (I
(' r


Hello Readers,


What do you know about,
Global Warming? We have all"'
heard about the term Global
Warming before but do you re-
ally understand what it-is
This week's article, \ill fo-
cus on Global Waning 'a nits
effects related rinh to I10lood-
ing. -
Scientists have pOedicted the
phenomenon of GloIal Warming
for decades. Global Warmnning is
perhaps the mos(significant en-
vironmental pro em facing the
world today. This phenomenon.
is the gradual warming of the
earth's atmosphere caused by
the build up of greenhouse
gases, which ate mainly carbon
dioxide, methafie, -nitrous oxide
and chlorifluoro-carbons
(CFCs). Carbon dioxide is re-
leased when we bum fuel (wood
or petroleum based) for cook-
ing, heating, mranufacturing.pro-
cesses and transportation. CFCs
are released when we use some
kinds of aerosols, fire extin-
guishers and also in the foam
making process, The result of
global warming fisthat there is'
the thinning of the Artic ice cap.
Thiscan lead to-flooding of
coastal lowlands. E.g. Guyana is
vulnerable to such as our coast
is below sea level.
The Earth's atmosphere, a


thin blanket of gases, protects
the planet from the harshest of
the sun's ultraviolet radiation.
The atmosphere, by trapping
the Earth's warmth, keeps riv-
ers and oceans from freezing.
Carbon dioxide and water
\vapour are the most important
,gases in creating the insulating
or "greenhouse effect" of the
atmosphere, this green house
effect is the main contributor to
the phenomenon of global warnn-
ing.

.Unfortunately, some of the
adverse impacts from global
,warming predicted are occurring
around the world, including:.
Increasing inci-
dence of droughts in some ar-
eas, flooding in others;


Rising ocean tempera-
tures and sea levels;
Increased .severe
weather events such as torna-
does and hurricanes;
Melting of glaciers
and reduction in mountain snow
cover;
Dying coral reefs; and
coastal erosion, and the loss of
coastal ecosystems.

WHAT IS FLOODING?

The Macmillan Dictionary.
of the Environment, 1988 de-
fines a flood as
'an unusual accumulation of
water above the ground caused
by high tide, heavy rain, melt-
ing snow or rapid run-offfrom
paved areas.' Many rivers have
natural FLOOD PLAINS. Al-


The Greenhouse Effect.


SamSowe satar o
mmtsrfected by 6h~e
earth and iee

ttwnuphe
thx
* ,h u,

..~rz~~:I

th-


Some ot 114ifiraeedradtabormpasses
tkmc4 the a-cate m ,and some ts
absorbed anid ~enmitted tn alt

ft* eamt~s Si'ace and Ma e low
atmnoxsphte.


though in urban areas they can
also occur naturally, the most
serious floods are experienced in
coastal
areas. This will occur when,
low atmospheric pressure; leads,
to a combination of heavy rain
and consequent increased river
flow: An additional factor influ-
encing.coastal flood is the on-
shoie winds and waves, and
'these coincide with high.tide.
When flooding occurs it is
'usually accompanied with vari-
ous environmental impacts such
as; ,

(1) Destruction of plants
and animals
(2) Destruction of places


where plants and animals live
(3) Loss of soil cover
which and
This will affect the way
plants grow
. (4) "Dainage .to potable
Drinking water supply.
(5) Salt water intrusion if
there is flooding from the sea
(6) Health risks; such as
increased numbers of vectors,
water borne diseases etc.
(7) More accumulation of
,wastes.
(8) Deceased standards
of living. .

This list of impacts is by
no means exhausted, since sev-
eral other impacts can be di-


rectly or indirectly associated
"with floods.
Remember that you
can share. you findings
and ideas with me by
sending your letters to:
"Our Environment", C/
o EIT .Division, Envi-
ronmental Protection
Agency, IAST Building,
Turkeyen, UG Campus,
G R E A T E RI
GEORGETOWN.


GOVERNMENT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE
GEORGETOWN, GUYANA
COURSES COMMENCING SEPTEMBER 1, 2005


1. CraffCourses


Agricultural Mechanic' (Full-time o Evening),
Bricklaying and Concerting (Fill-time/ Evening)
Carpentry and Joinery (Full-time or Evening).
Electrical Instillation (Full-time, Day-Release and Evening)
Fitting and Machining (Full-time, Day- Release and Evening)
Motor Mechanics (Full-time, Day- Release or Evening)
Plumbing (Full-time or Evening)
Radio and Electronics Servicing (Full-time or Evening)
Refrigeration and Air Conditioning (Full-time or Evening)
Welding (Full-time or Evening)


.-- E

QUESTION

What is the difference between an Invalid and a Disabled' ,

person? ",


ANSWER 1,
According to NIS, an Invalid is an insured person who,'
has been incapable (not able to work) for a period of not O=
less than 26 weeks and whose condition is one that is!
likely to be permanent, thus he/she cannot work again.,. |
Note his/her incapacity is not as a result of Employment i
Iti n n : i


l .pers ,. :.. .. -- -ns ..
NB Even thouh this person's condition will be


N.B. Even though this person's condition will be [


permanent, such a person can worK again.


Do you have a question on N.I.S ? Thqn'write/call.
NIS MAIL BAG
I C/O Dianne Lewis Baxter
, Publicity and Public Relations Officer (ag)
SNational Insurance Scheme
/ Brickdam and Winter Place
I P.O. Box. 101.135 "
SE-mail: prr nis@solutionZ000.net ..Y
.- -.--r-


I
. :'





"- 1



I


2. Technician Certificate Courses


2.1 Architectural Drawing (Evening Only)
2.2 Building & Civil Construction (Day-Release)
2.3 Electrical Engineering (Day-Release)
2.4 Mechanical Enigineering (Day-Release)
2.5 Telecommunications (Evening Only)

3. Technician Diploma Course


3.1 Building and Civil Engineering (Two-years Full-time)
3.2 Electrical Engineering (Two years Full-time)
3.3 Mechanical Engineering (Two year Full- Time)
3.4 Science (Two years Full- time)

4. Business .Education Course, .

4.1 Ordinary Diplomain.Commerce (Two Years Full- Time)
4.2 Secretarial Science Diploma (Two Years Full- Time)
4.3 Secretarial Science Certificate (Two YearsE
4:4 Ordinary Certificat : .,. h f
* Thri~echnoIogyCouses ,., :.'! '

5.1 Diploma in Computer'Studies 2 x (Two Years Full Time)

R gislrations commence: Fbruary2'4th 2005, ajndwill conclude on April 22nd 2005.

ptry Requirements

1. Applicants must be at least (15) years old on the 31st August 2005, to be eligible to' attend
Full-time Courses and eighteen (18) years old by the said date, to attend Day,.,Releas6 or
Evening Courses.

2.{ For/Craft Courses, applicants must have successfully completed the Secondary School
'.; Proficiency Examination Part 'I and II, or attained' a sound Secondary Education, most
preferably up to 4th Form.

:3, ,,For all other courses, applicants must possess at lease three (3) subject at the G.C.E '0'
Levels or C.X.C General Proficiency Level.

S. Khan
Principal Government ads can be viewed on
'' http://w)wwgina.gov.gy :


Page XXI


I


I
a


THE EFFECTS OF, GLOBAL


WARMING AND FLOODING]


~- -- 7--- -~- --~v---------- ------ -Yk


:- II' 1~ .


--- - - - - - - - - --
AIL






I


NAME- NAME-
ADDRESS- ADDRESS-


ACROSS:
1. Leptospira organisms
have been found in'
cattle, horses,
rodents and
wild animals..
4. Persons with
symptoms suggestive
of Leptospirosis
should a
health care provider.
6. Word used as a
homophone, ie, a
word that is
pronounced in the
same way as another
but spelt in a
different way and'
has a differejnt-
meaning.,'-
7. Direction.
8. Outbreaks of
Leptospirosis are
usually caused by
exposure to water
contaminated with


the ***** of infected
animals.
12. Male personal
name.
14. is included as a
symptom of
Leptospirosis.
15. South American
country.
16. River on the Left-
Bank of the
Essequibo River in
Guyana.,
20. Comb. form relating
to the earth.
121. Synonym for the
S verb, bother.
22. Acronym for "Water
Closet" (Restroom).
DOWN:
2. Acronym for
"Government
Resolution".
3. Word used as a
homophone.
4. A fact or piece of
evidence used to solve
a crime, or that seems


A new "Should-Bie-Won"


you play the greater is the
possibility of winning. The


puzzle for $40,000.00+ is amount of entries submitted
now presented to you. Note must be covered by the
well,, this Pre-Easter "S-B- relevant sums of money or
W" competition will be they will not be judged.
wn on Friday, March 18. Then place those entries in
Scompetitionll wiT-re-%rrhsl, saChronicle Crossword box


same, except, that where'
there is one error, the prize
money is $25,000.00 and for
two errors the prize money
is $15,000.00. If there is
more than one winner the
prize money will be shared
among the winners.

The additional incentives of
$1,000.00 and $2,000.00 for
the 40+ and 80+ entries
groupings are in effect.

If you. play. smart, as Mr.
Chapman did, you can win this
offer of $40,000.00. The more
, +, ,( ,+I i" / .a.I f


I a At'A .7A


If you need coupons just
purchase a copy of the
Sunday or Wednesday
Chronicle. For extra


to reveal something.
5; Word used as a
homophone.
7. South Africa (Abbr.)
9. Acronym for
"Research Officer"..
10. Direction.
11. Leptospirosis is
by laboratory testing
of a blood or urine
sample.
13. Country on the
Africafi continent.


17. University of Guyana
(Abbr.)
18. "Behold I will do a
*** thing, now it
shall spring forth;
shall ve not know
it? I will even nimake
A way in the
wilderness and rivers
in the desert".
19. International Olympic
Committee (Abbr.)


orWednesday Chronicle.

Players are reminded that
they need to write legibly for
the judges to understand.
No entry is opened before
12.30 pm on the day the
puzzle is drawn and judging
does not begin before 4.30
o cp nhn e last entry is
o p e n e d% !- ,4. .. .
puzzle is not known before-
that time.,


coupons, purchases can This apart, our general rules
be made at our offices in apply.


Linden, New Amsterdam
and Georgetown. You can
also obtain extra coupons
from Mr. Vincent
Mercurius of D'Edward
Village, Rosignol,
Berbice. They cost $20.00
each or $40.00 for two as
they appear in the Sunday


We. continue to be
optimistic, that our many
fans and residents affected
by the flood situation would
experience quick relief and
resolution to this crisis.

Thanks
Crossword Committee


(From page XI)
in Peterson's trial on charges of murdering his wife, Laci, an
their unborn child. Melville has banned all electronic com-
munications devices from the two buildings no cell phones,
no laptops, no BlackBerrys. So if news breaks, reporters hav
to race from the building to their camera positions outside,
with other reporters standing by to run inside to take their
place. "It's going to be a tag-team event," said Tim Sullivan,
who oversees Court TV's daytime programming.
Behind the scenes of the Jackson legal drama, the news medi
are waging their own battle. A coalition of media companies, in-
cluding The Washington Post and the New York Times, has fdr-
mally objected to "media impact" fees of $7,500 per day that ar
being levied by Santa Barbara County officials. The county say
the fees are necessary to recoup the costs of parking, addition
security and the media "overflow" trailer to accommodate the ex
traordinary news coverage of the trial.
In a letter sent last week to the Santa Barbara County Counsel
media-pool attorney Theodore Boutrous Jr. characterized the fee
as excessive and unconstitutional, and asked that they be reduce
or eliminated. "We're not asking for a free ride," Boutrous said i
an interview, "but none of these costs are related to anything tha
the media has requested or needs. It's part of the government's func
tion to give the media access to a public trial. Charging the pres
for access amounts to a tax, and that's a violation of the First Amend
ment."
County officials have said that without the fees, taxpayers wil
bear an additional burden in a trial that will likely last more than si'
months and cost millions of dollars. Besides, the county points out
media representatives agreed last May to pay for some services.
Media fees and the controversy surrounding them hav
grown with each new high-profile trial. In Simpson's trial more th
a decade ago, Los Angeles officials asked for and received "a rea
sonable fee" to rent a parking lot across from the criminal cou
building, said Jennifer Siebens, CBS News's West Coast burea
chief. During Peterson's 10-month trial on double murder charges
San Mateo County collected $75,000 from TV, radio and print out
lets The bill to the media for Jackson's trial already exceeds $82,500
says Boutrous., and could reach more than $1.1 million if the tria
runs its expected length.
It's not just the issues of media access and the logistics of get
ting images to broadcast that make Jackson's trial a bit of a bum
mer for news organizations. Journalists have another big problem
The revulsion factor.
The trial is likely to elicit months and months of graphically
detailed testimony about criminal sexual deviancy, not exactly th
kind of fodder for Katie and Matt on your typical morning wake
up show. As with Bill Clinton's affair with Monica Lewinsky, re
porting on Jackson could be another moment that defines where
The Line is in reporting certain uncomfortable details. Some of those
details may just be left out altogether.
"Everyone is taking a real wait-and-see on this one because
'they're afraid of the story," said one network producer, who aske
q-Vt.to be identified because he's not authorized by his employer t
in Scotete-s-i."What's the worst [testimony] that you hear
With Michael Jackson, therare"g bp.ashedup onthe beacl
about masturbation and stains. At which point TVseTssretftiP
be clicking off all across America."
Said CBS's Siebens: "These are very painful allegations. We hav
to handle it with kid gloves."
Court TV's Sullivan already knows people are ,queanni "
it were not for the celebrity of Michael Jackson, this would not b
the kind of story that will cause a lot of talk," he said. "Pedophili
is not a very attractive subject. People don't want to hear about
or talk about it."
Sullivan says his correspondents will shy away from talking
about the details of the testimony. They'll talk instead about leg.
strategy and tactics, such as whom the prosecution or defense migl
want on the jury, he says. This could make for some rather du
TV, no matter how famous the defendant.
"I used to think this was going to be a really big deal and noi
I'm not so sure," Siebens said. "I think it's all so distasteful. An
he's so over with a capital 0. 1 don't think this is another trial <
the century."
ernTrue enog t ly r,Q.,


Bolivia, clue, confirmed, consult, contact, depress, -
Deo, diarrhea, disrupt. disturb, dogs, Ecuador, geo,
GR, IOC, Leo, Mazaruni, NE, new, NW, Nigeria,
pigs, real, reel, RO, Rupununi, SA, SE, sea, see, Seo,
Senegal, Siparuni, Somalia, SW, tale, tail, UG,
urine, Uruguay, validated, vomiting, WC.


Sunday Chronicle March 6, 2005


Page XXII


$40,000.00 "SHOULD-BE-WON"

r. CROSSWORD PUZZLE
-- ^-- ^- -R -i- 1-^ -1- ^ *i-







Sunday Chronicle March 6, 2005


Page XXIII


VERY prac
tising vet
erinarian
would have
been con-
fronted by clients who shiver in
fear as they present their pets
'who they believe are suffering
from cancer. Some are reluctant
even to mention the word. They
call it'the 'Big C' or just sim-
ply a "growth". It takes some
effort firstly to placate the
owner and assuage the terror,
before actually administering to
the.'pet. Yet, so often. ihe
'lump' or swelling ha, nothing


to do with cancer. Today we'll
begin a series of articles on the
subject. I have relied heavily on
texts from Drs Giffin and
Carlson in their Handbook for
pet owners.
Most people associate the
word tumourr' with a growth
occurring on the skin or some-
where inside the body. How-
ever, any sort of lump, bump,
growth or swelling (such as an
abscess) is a Tumour. Those
which are true growths are
called Neoplasms.
Benign neoplasni' are
growths whichh do nol invade


and destroy, 'or do they b''d.,
spread rapidly and unconltrol- nietastt
labl. The.t are cured b) s'ur- Ca
gical removal, provided that ingl'y
all the tumour has been re- U nancy.
moved. tinue't
Malignant neoplasmns are a larg
the amnie :s Cancers also called late in
Carciioni.ma. Sarcom.'' or Lym- High-g
phoi'na depending upon the cell early v
type). Cancers invade and de- still qu
stroy. They tend to spread via able.
the blood'utream aInd lymphatic Ca
system to disiant parts of the the fol


asi
anc
to
L(
o g
e s
the
;ra
whe
rite

lnc
lo1


rg


r THE VET





This is called a female dog has a lump in her
sing. breast. Since it is solid, it is
er is graded accord- probably a neoplasm. It could
its degree of malig- be benign or malignant. The de-
ow-grade cancers con- cision is made to biopsy the
;row locally and attain lump. This is a surgical opera-
ize. They metastasise tion during which the lump, or
e course of the illness, a part of the lump, is removed
de cancers metastasise and sent to the pathologist. A
en the primary focus is pathologist is a medical doctor
small or barely detect- who has been trained to make a
diagnosis by visual inspection
ers are approached in of tissue under a microscope.
wing manner: Suppose An experienced pathologist can
tell whether the tumour is a
cancer. He can often provide ad-
ditional information as to the
degree of malignancy. This
serves the purpose of making


the diagnosis and. in miny
cases, gi es the rationale for the
most appropriate treatment
Next week we will continue
this topic.
Please implement disease
preventative measures (vacci-
nations, routine dewormings,
monthly anti-Heartworm
medication, etc) and adopt-a-
pet from the GSPCA's Ani-
mal Clinic and Shelter at
Robb Street and Orang.
Walk, if you have the where-
withal to care for the ani-
mals. Also, find out more
about the Society's free spay
and neutering programme by
calling 226-4237.






"- "


Sit


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-V.
~?
It


Friends of Trek Force.


[HE first prize 201-inch leletision set raffled ht (lie
or ganising committee of the Guyana Flood Aid
Concert. is still unclainied.
'... The omlii. nli e .aii d 111. i I|le holder ol the Ininmii2
I,, i i. l ntimiheCr il31, should coniiiact Enmnco Woollotid at
C inild Nie'., on ielephine inumbiiir 227-S2S')
lie second prize day trip to Airro" point for one
-.: person., coimplimenils of Rorainma Airways, mas claimed
il Lthe time of the draining I) holder of ticket number


CHAMPION''

Cookery Corner
y?4 Corner

Sj' Welcome to the 335"'edition of
^-_ x ". ( / Champion Cookery Corner', a
-^ ,// weekly feature giving recipesand
Y\. tips on cooking in Guyana.


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Fr thie rn i 1" i .'k. ,I ..111. I ica.n n.', in r c ,rc.,r n iIL JI.1itlicur il't nonioii E.'ru.'" t a liianlt he .' lingu cll iller .. il '.inc .Jddl m illl,
celebr.in.'n bill l, n tc nm oIi btecniO L'ti.i rn m 11o1i .ci| ,L T*ii. ,et'l c Icliiicic >-ire',n-$' il people L1d iluil
h.e'licL in br.. Al. in hea' .1ii .. iit- j t itinieritl-,r lull .l] ir.id ,i.u- I, 1 I.11] ctl i hc ll mc hi, iini.t, CIei, ii l i S 1 TH I
Grce p .,ipl,. lii ~ I -.,oIcni n '..Cl. lull .I pr.1:' --..i.On iil. 1 i, i ai li. ,I l ( 1)I, prLc.jsi'- i 4i ln il td ..'' ORI I t
iradilil nAl Ik. pl i.LC r. M ount d 1 hur.d.i',' .A11n1 ii luJd1.. I, 111 I -i 'l jg ..IL'cp red I) l'h ,.ltihrd.i '
M. fliit rcd g.- l IL' .r ed .L i and opened I.. r-'all lih ,i, ,,i .I il iIt iii' icbrlrlh i i, Ai. rutVi .ii... In *.' P' i Powt de
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. lic hr i,,.n Ih-.i ill r- iE'r *tiund. '' Ihi-", urLnd i i mnc l .IL i ..nl ii. I .. n nT i ill i .. "ll h l..n iut,..,- l , u t'bi vd r ,ll
Iirii.uhlhei1lhiiii..Ain.Jr.d inieciling Blartk Prgpe .


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.LkeI 5 di;'en


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE MIa-rch 6, 2005


-R a i n

submerges

city streets
By Shirwin Campbell
SEVERAL streets in and
around the city were
under water yesterday
following an increase in
rainfall. Businesses in
Georgetown's shopping
zone were severely
affected by the flood,
which forced them to
erect temporary
walkways to
accommodate
customers.
Some residents were
seen wading through
flooded yards and streets
with shoes in hand, after
the rain. While drizzles
continued throughout the
day, at times the rain
came down in torrents
forcing pedestrians to
seek shelter while others
took to the streets selling
umbrellas which are in
demand...
January 1, 2004

Constant
downpours
cause
widespread
flooding
By Shawnel Cudjoe
GUYANESE are ringing
in the New Year on a rainy
note, after constant down-
pours over the past four
days caused many parts
of the city, and to some
extent, the East Bank and
East Coast of Demerara,
to remain under water.
The extensive flood-
ing of the city caused
many businesses to lose
sales and forced a high
level team of government
officials to visit the
country's pumps and
kokers yesterday morn-
ing...
January 1, 2005


PRELUDE



AND PORTENT


Portent. Ominous clouds over Atlantic Ville are reflected in
the flooded streets. (Photo by Cord Garrido-Lowe)

In an article published in, among other
places, the Sunday Chronicle of January
18th of this year, Dr. Ruben Sili6 Secretary-
General of the Association of Caribbean


States wrote that:
"This phenomenon re-
minded us, among other things,
of the frailty and vulnerability
of the environment in which
our societies exist, where we
fail to take into consideration
the very risks of the dictates of
the natural environment. Man-
kind has been reluctant to con-
form to the rules of nature, to
take into account the external
risk, always seeking to subject
nature to man's own plan, in-
stead of proposing greater har-
mony based on respect for its
laws, which moreover, are ful-


filled irremissibly and indepen-
dently of human will."
While, in retrospect, Dr. Sili6
could as well have been referring
to the seeming perpetual rain and
the subsequent flooding which
swamped most of Guyana's
coastal strip, he was in fact re-
ferring to the tsunami which dev-
astated the coasts of a dozen
states bordering the Indian
Ocean.
The majority of Guyanese
alive today have never been
overly concerned with the dan-
gers weather can pose to our way


of life. The most we consider
inclement weather to be is an
inconvenience, a disruption in
going about our business. As
one post-flood Guyana
Chronicle editorial on our situ-
ation says:
"As inhabitants of a coun-
try that is situated some six feet
below the Atlantic Ocean,
Guyanese have been exception-
ally blessed as a people. But for
the current widespread flood,
this country has been spared
season after season of violent
hurricanes that have every so
often decimated the economies
of sister Caricom states as well
as important agricultural crops
in other territories of the West


Indies. Guyana has no volcano
and therefore is never threat-
ened with the periodic fiery
eruptions that could bring the
pursuit of ordinary activities to
a halt and send residents fleeing
with fear."
Human memory is short
and, more often than not, un-
reliable; something that is be-
coming increasingly endemic
with our escalating dependence
on computers to not only re-
member. but also to actually
"think for us." Few of us -
with the exception perhaps of
the hundreds of farmers who
were directly affected would
(Continued on page seven)


A, aENP


Regretfully we have to advise that as of
6th March e205 our Self-Service section
will be closed on SUNDAYS until further notice.
Manaeasment regrets any inconvenience cawusd.

OGAOORS HOUSTOIN COMPLEX


COMPARING
NOTES
The recent weather
patterns in Guyana
have been anything
but predictable.
These two excerpts
from Guyana
Chronicle articles,
when seen together,
provide ample proof
of that.
Essequibo
flooding:
Assistance
being
sought for
effected
residents

The Region Two admin-
istration (Pomeroon/
Supenaam) has written
to the Agriculture Minis-
ter seeking assistance
for persons who lost live-
stock and crops during
the recent flooding at
Marias Lodge, caused
as a result of the
breached sea defence.
Vice Chairman, Mr
Vishnu Samaroo told the
Chronicle yesterday that
they are awaiting the re-
turn of Minister
Satyadeow Sawh, who
is out of the country.
He added that the
Region is also seeking
assistance for emer-
gency clearing of drains,
to prevent flooding...
January 16, 2005

Region Two
severely
affected by
dry weather
THE Pomeroon/
Supenaam region is "se-
verely affected" by the
current dry weather,
Drainage and Irrigation
Coordinator, Mr. Farukh
Khan said yesterday.
For about a month
now, the administration
in the region (Region
Two) has been pumping
water from the
Pomeroon River into ca-
nals to irrigate predomi-
nantly rice cultivated
land.
"We do not have
enough water in the con-
servancies," Khan told
the Chronicle...
January 5, 2002


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005 3


Taking the reins:


Presidential response



and responsibility



during the flood crisis


tK


......
.


If there is any litmus test for
true leadership, it is the sort
of crisis that came to Guyana
one and a half months ago.
Immediately after the conse-
quences of the seemingly un-
ending deluge began to set in,
President Bharrat Jagdeo
took hold of the reins and led
relief efforts in a way that -
arguably more than any
other time in his career -
characterised his capacity for
a statesmanship that belied
both his age and his rela-
tively short tenure in politics.
At a press briefing on the 18"'
the President announced that he
had allocated $20 million for im-
mediate relief to affected commu-
nities, and established several
task forces, consisting of both
government agencies and private
sector entities. The President
also took the initiative to make
State House his official resi-
dence the headquarters for the
national flood relief effort.
Perhaps most remarkably -
and this is a testament to the ca-
pacity for compromise of both
men when it comes to facing a na-
tional crisis the President met
with Opposition Leader, Robert
Corbin in order to establish a
working relationship- with the
PNC-R in providing flood relief.
Commenting on the linkage
that he had established with the
main opposition party, Jagdeo
had said that:
""I am very pleased that we
are treating it as such and that
no one is trying to make politi-
cal mileage out of the situation.
They all recognized that it is an
unusual situation that we are
faced with and it requires every-
one to work together to bring
help to people."
Even though short-lived,
this cease-fire as it turned out
to be, offered hope to a coun-
try desperately in need of it.
On the 18"h of January, the
President began what would be.
the first of many ventures to a
flood-ravaged East Coast of
Demerara, visiting a marathon
fourteen villages during the
course of that day. Over the
next couple of days, Jagdeo kept


a hectic schedule of meetings, re-
ceiving reports from the various
task forces and other agencies
involved in relief work; during
this period he announced an ad-
ditional $200M for flood relief.
Meanwhile, the President
continued to hold briefings at
his residence, receiving both ad-
ditional reports from the ap-
pointed task forces as well as
personal appeals from affected
citizens. Commenting on one
such session, at which an eld-
erly woman told him of hous-
ing several families at her home,
the President remarked:
"It is this kind of display
of courage and of giving that
makes me real proud to be the
President of Guyana today, al-
though the country is facing its
worst disaster in our history."
The two weeks of continu-
ous rains saw the President tak-
ing some bold and very unor-
thodox moves to help allevi-
ate woes of citizens affected by
the flood: appealing to the pri-
vate sector to provide amnesty
for customers with outstanding
debts; suggesting that persons
take goods on credit from
neighbourhood shops, which
the government would repay;
and instructing persons to
break into schools to find shel-
ter.
Up until recently, President
Jagdeo was, still personally
heading government contingents
visiting flood hit areas to assess
the damages and to try to get
the various communities back
on track. During the most re-
cent visit to several schools
along the East Coast, the Presi-
dent learned that teachers had to
pay out of their own pockets -
with promises of reimburse-
ment for the cleanup efforts.
The President took the initia-
tive to order the hiring of pro-
fessional cleaners to undertake
the exercise, stressing on the
importance of schools being re-
opened.
There is overwhelming con-
sensus that President Jagdeo
has taken control of the situa-
tion from day one of the flood,
providing the sort of steward-


ship or steersmanship that is -
to a great number of Guyanese
- very reassuring thing indeed.
The flood seems to have accel-
erated the President's popular-
ity, incrementally increasing
prior to the flood something
that in America would have been
seen as a positive spike in his
"approval ratings".
While this no doubt speaks
volumes about President
Jagdeo's ability to lead, it is also
a grave indictment of the effec-
tiveness, or lack thereof, of our
socio-political systems an ele-
ment of which was dealt with in
the recent report on parliament
by Commonwealth parliamen-
tary expert, Sir Michael Davies.
A recent editorial in another
newspaper, referring to Presi-
dent Jagdeo's recent visit to
schools on the East Coast,
notes:
"After much of a ruckus
over who was to do the clean-
ing, the President stepped
into the breach again on
Thursday. Central govern-
ment will do it, he said. And
.he decreed that professional
cleaners should be brought in
to prepare the schools for
classes. Well Hallelujah! But
must it always be this way?
Must the President Ibe seen
deciding who, when, where
and how schools must be


President Jagdeo listens
to a Chateau Margot
resident during his visit to
the East Coast on the 18th
January. (Cullen Bess-
Nelson photo)
cleaned and latrines posi-
tioned?" Stabroek News, 05-
March-2005
The post of elected Execu-
tive President of Guyana is
meant to be a cog if a sub-
stantial cog in the complex
machinery of this country's po-
litical administration; it is
meant for the holder of that
post to fill "the breach" every
time someone falls asleep on the
job.
If this situation is not
remedied in time for next
January, we might in the
not unlikely event of an-
other catastrophic flood -
find President Jagdeo being
forced to stick his finger in
a hole in the Conservancy
Dam, single-handedly trying
to stop the floods.


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4 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


I ,


A Pictorial

Review of

the Flood


Going Under

The headline. "Going Under",
and the first two paragraphs...
"FLOOD waters blanketed
much of Georgetown and sev-
eral villages on the East Coast
and East Bank Demerara yes-
terday and residents braced for
more as further heavy rains
threatened last night.
Families in the city and
other parts of the coast battled
to hold back the rising waters
from their bottom flats, some
stacking sandbags at doors, as
rains continued through the
day."
...of the Sunday Chronicle
of January 18 captured the at-
mosphere of coastal Guyana as
the deluge descended, blanketing
everything. Guyana was expe-
riencing what experts termed the
worst rain in over a century.


Carnival

As the fact of the flood began
to settle in, that inherent
Guyanese esprit that combi-
nation of adaptability, ingenuity
and, not least of all, humour -
began to make itself known.
The newspapers were filled
images of frolicking and frivol-
ity in the midst of the flood;
men playing sitting at a table
playing cards and drinking in
knee-deep water; people con-
verting anything that could float
- water tanks, mini-bus tops,
old refrigerators into boats.
In many places, the
carnivalesque atmosphere belied
what lay ahead.


Crisis
(Revisited)

With supplies running short
and many people trapped in
their homes without access to
adequate food and water, the cri-
sis of the situation began to
spread again. In scenes that
looked more at home in some
starving sub-Saharan nation,
around Georgetown thronged


lki Ull


114


~ -_-=






SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6. 2005


The Guyana Flood
1....... - 1 - i -- -. .... i


How a small website became an

Internet flood phenomenon


Like many Guyanese living
in Georgetown and on the
East Coast of Demerara,
Bryan Mackintosh at first
didn't think too much of the
rain which fell on Friday, 16"h
of January. In an interview
for this supplement, Mackin-
tosh said that he just noticed
that his yard in University
of Guyana Road, Tlarkeyen -
was beginning to get a bit
flooded.
"After getting a call," said
Mackintosh, "from a friend that
his business was flooded out
and he wanted some photo-
graphs for insurance purposes,
I went down town on Saturday
to take the pictures for him. I


nities like Better Hope and Ogle
and others further up the East
Coast of Demerara.
Mackintosh said that he had
a website on a free web-hosting
service which he usually used to
post pictures of goings on in
Guyana for his sister and her
family in Tampa, Florida to see.
He says that he originally
posted about twenty pictures on
the URL http://
www.bryanmaxx.netfirms.com.
He only expected his sister and
her family and their close circle
of friends to access it.
Mackintosh said that things
changed when he sent a link to
his site to a friend in the United
States.


Guyanese in Iraq, thanking him
for hosting the site. He said
that he had to upgrade his site
capacity twice, to "full-service"
and even then he had to de-
velop another website to handle
some the traffic that the origi-
nal was getting.
The site's visitors began to
diversify as well. Mackintosh
said that he had e-mailed re-
quests from over 100 news


agencies around the world in-
cluding CNN asking for per-
mission to use his pictures. He
said that he granted permission
to use in each case, declining of-
fers of payment.
He said that within six
weeks of the website being cre-
ated, it had registered around
304, 000 hits. Mackintosh be-
gan to develop the website
more, transforming it from a site
where anyone could log on sim-
ply to see pictures of the floods
in Guyana, to one with links to
news services, flood relief agen-
cies as well as information on
waterborne diseases.
Mackintosh said that the


worK ihe cUiU and what Ubecame tl U
Guyana Flood Website Team -
Sheik Yassen. Camille
Gonsalves and his wife,
Michelle Mackintosh under-
took was some of the most chal-
lenging in his life.
He said that he became ob-
sessed with the flood. Mack-
intosh said that at one point he
spent four days without sleep,
going around taking dozens of
pictures; going home to edit and
update the website; then upload-
ing the new information to the
Internet. He calculated spend-
ing over $100,000 of his own
money on the website, not fac-
toring in incidental costs like


gasoline, for example; one ex-
pensive digital camera, in the US
$700 range fell into water while
he was taking photos.
Now that most of the
flooding is done, Mackintosh
said that he wants to retain
the website and transform
into an alternative news ser-
vice, but the high cost of such
a venture is discouraging. He
said that once he finds spon-
sors either individual or
corporate to support the
site, he can go ahead with his
plans. If not, then the
"Guyana Flood Website" may
be in danger of going offline
as quickly as it went on.


SUP ER


WE PAY YOU FOR YOUR OLD ITEMS
TOWARDS YOUR W W PURCtHASE.
( BARGAIN CENTRE NOT INCLUDED. )





OR GET
ORDGE Trr E. --"


Bryan Mackintosh, the accidental web host.


* ,'


I"'


met up with this incredible "She has an incredible list of
amount of water around people that she has in her ad-
Georgetown; places like in dress book. She sent [the link]
Quamina Street [were] com- out to about seventy other
pleted flooded out." people. I call it the "hit list" be-
Mackintosh says that on cause anyone wants to get a
his way back home he decided message out, Nicole can do it for
to take a few more pictures, them."
with his digital camera, on the Mackintosh said that the
road. He says that when he amount of persons accessing the
woke up on Sunday morning site increased so quickly that
(18'" January) he was greeted within a week, due to the num-
with a flooded Turkeyen. He ber of people trying to gain ac-
said he spent the day on his ve- cess to the site, he could no
randah taking pictures of traffic longer receive the web-hosting
- motor vehicles and animal- service for free.
driven carts travelling through "We put ul a hit-counter on
the water on UG Road. Worse the website and started counting
was yet to come. the hits coining in. We moved
"I woke Monday morning up from about twenty hits to
in ankle-deep water," said about ten thousand hits in three
Mackintosh. He said that about days."
11 o'clock he had about a foot Guyanese from all around
of water in his house. Mackin- the world began accessing
tosh said that he began to take Mackintosh's website, which he
more pictures: .fronj,his veran-' had renamed "The Guyana
dah on Monday and Tuesday;. Flood Website": He said that he
and then going out into.comrnu-',', even got an ,e-mail "from', a


LL9AVAP


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It -~
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.-r 1 ( .-
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GEORGETOWN Main SIreel Tel. 22558169 GROVE lel 2 O (i Ag ItA ATl 70 1614 MAHAtCA Ter,228-2 ; RUSHLDO rr 2324-021 NEW AMSTERQAJMTe 333 5265
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6 SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005,,


Woodlands-

Farm NDC in


drain cleaning

efforts

By Clifford Stanley
The Woodlands/Farm Neighbourhood Democratic Council
in Region 5 (Mahaica/Berbice) is in the process of clean-
ing several drains and irrigation channels within the
neighbourhood with assistance from Central Government
and the Regional Administration.
Most of the channels targeted are being cleaned with ma-
chines while the remaining ones will be cleaned manually.
NDC Chairman K. P. Deokarran disclosed the sum of $16M
will be spent on the exercise which should be completed within
the next three weeks.
Deokarran disclosed that the current project is being un-
dertaken with assistance from the Ministry of Agriculture, the
Office of the President and the National Drainage and Irriga-
tion Board. 7
"The aim is to be in a better state of preparedness for the
May-June rains, to reduce or eliminate the kind of problem
which had in some areas in the recent period of heavy rainfall,"
he said.
The Woodlands/Farm NDC bounded by the Mahaicony
River in the east and the Mahaica River in the west comn- Crisis (Revisited)
prises seventy villages and some ninety miles of drainage and
irrigation channels. (From page four)
Several villages along the right bank of the Mahaica River gether to provide relief to the worst hit.
had been under flood water for over five weeks in January and On the flip side of that, if the flood brought
mid-February causing heavy losses of crops and livestock in out the best in most of us, it also brought out the
the area. worst in some. The price gouging by several busi-
Many farmers in the area have to date been unable to ness owners showed us how greedy some people
makeanymeaingfl efors atrecver. (Se bck age ness owners showed us how greedy some people "'.
make any meaningful efforts at recovery. (See back page can become even in the most devastating of times.
for related stories) Up to now, abandoned houses are still being looted
in many flood-stuck communities. ,









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SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005 -7


Sewa USA Donates



flood relief cheque


An international Hindu
charitable organisation has
come to the aid of a local
counterpart to assist in their
flood relief efforts. Sewa
USA the American Branch of
Sewa International last week
donated a cheque of US
$5,000 to the National
Ramnavmi Committee to as-
sist with the NRC's ongoing
work of helping flood hit citi-
zens of Guyana to get their
lives back on track.
The NRC is a conglomerate
consisting of representatives
from Sewa-Guyana; the Guyana
Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha;
the Guyana Pandits' Council;
Gandhi Youth Organisation;


Vishwa Hindu Parishad-
Guyana; Hindu Swayamsewak
Sangh-Guyana; Guyana Central
Arya Samaj; and the Mahakali
Organisation of Guyana.
According to Swami
Ashkarananda, who represents
the Hindu Swayamsewak
Sangh-Guyana:
"We are really more
programme and project-ori-
ented, we're not really an
organisation as such. We just
try to pull as many Hindu
organizations as possible when-
ever we are involved in any ma-
jor activity. Most recently, we
have been involved in the flood
relief efforts."
According to Ashkarananda,


the NRC is now entering its
fourth year of existence, having
been fornned originally to spon-
sor the public celebration of the
most auspicious events in the
Hindu calendar, Ramnavmi, the
birth of Lord Rama.
Over the past three years,
the NRC has broadened its
mandate, branching into com-
munity development activities
as well as cultural work. When
the floods came, said
Ashkarananda, the Committee
rounded up about 100 volun-
teers who have been involved in
distributing disinfectants, soaps
and skin lotions to persons in
need, as well as cooking meals
for flood-affected families.


Ashkarananda said that the
NRC sent out requests for help
via the Internet and one of the
groups that responded was
Sewa USA. According to a rep-
resentative of Sewa USA,
Saumitra Gokhale, who was here
to present the cheque to the
NRC, his organisation was
formed last year to raise relief
for tsunami survivors in Asia.
So far, said Ghokale, between
US $750,000 and one million
has been raised so far.
He said that when the re-
quest for assistance from the
NRC came in to them, a mem-
ber of Sewa USA, Srikanth
Konda, recognized some of the
organizations comprising the
NRC, having spent some time
in Guyana in 1998. According
to Gohkale, some fundraising
was done through several
ashramns throughout Minneapo-
lis, which constituted the sum
donated.
Ashkarananda said that
while the great bulk of the
cleanup effort is over with,
and while the government
has undertaken the
healthcare aspect of the post-
flood environment, many
people have lost everything
in their homes. He said that
the money will be donated to
victims of the disaster on a
needs-assessed basis.


EUD* 1..i]


(From page two)
recall that the exact oppo-
site of our current situation
was happening only three years
ago.
According to a Guyana
Chronicle report of January 5,
2002:
"The Hydrometeorological
Service has indicated that dry
weather is expected to prevail
throughout all 10 regions of the
country up to January 10. For
the rest of January, moderately
dry weather is predicted for Re-
gions One (Barima/Waini), Two,
Five (Mahaica/Berbice) and Six,
while moderately wet weather
is the forecast for the others.
For February, dry weather
is expected to occur in Regions
Four (Demerara/Mahaica), Five,
Six and Nine (Upper Takutu/
Upper Essequibo), while the
others can expect moderately
dry weather.
For March, the Hydrom-
eteorological Service stated that
Regions One to Six will be dry,
while Regions Seven to 10 will
be moderately dry."
The next year, 2003, also
experienced severe dry spells.
Then the flooding of January.
2004 came. Reports of flood-
ing of early January this year
mirror almost exactly reports of
flooding early last year. and
contrasting with the drought of
2002.
If what happened in
Guyana in 2004 was not pre-
lude enough to what was to


happen just a year later, then
the erratic and often devastat-
ing weather patterns across the
globe. In the region before the
tsunami hit Asia Tropical
Storm Jeanne ravaged Haiti,
while Hurricane Ivan (the Ter-
rible) destroyed up to 90 per-
cent of Grenada's physical in-
frastructure.
The weather around the
world, but increasingly in tropi-
cal zones, has not been behav-
ing well over the past few
years. A good example and
one that should have had les-
sons for us here in Guyana -
was the heavy rains and subse-
quent mudslides in Venezuela in
1999.
According to reports from
around that time, over 30,000
people perished in the after-
math of that natural disaster,
mudslides wiping entire villages
off the face of the earth. A re-
port on the website
www.climatehotmap.org says
that,
"The heaviest rainfall in
100 years caused massive land-
slides and flooding that killed
approximately 30,000 people.
Total December rainfall in
Maiquetia, near Caracas, was
almost 4 feet (1.2 m), more than
5 times the previous December
record."
If the words "heaviest
rainfall in 100 years" rings a
bell, it is because that same
phrase has been used to de-
scribe the inundation that
overwhelmed Guyana in
January, 2005.


Sewa USA representative, Saumitra Gokhale presents the $5,000 flood relief cheque to
Pandit Haresh Tiwari, NRC rep of the Gandhi Youth Organisation. In background are other
members of the NRC.





The Insurance Association of Guyana wishes to express it's deepest sympathy to all those who
have suffered loss of property and to the families of those who have lost their lives during the
recent flooding. The catastrophic effects of this disaster will impact negatively not only on the
Insurance Industry but on the economy as a whole.

As the representative 7ody of the companies which comprise the industry, we would like the
public to know that our members have been notified of at least 600(six hundred) potential
claims and claims adjusters both local and foreign have been in the field to survey and
negotiate settlement of these claims. We wish to state quite categorically that we expect ou
members to honor all valid claims.

We feel compelled however to put our policyholders and the public at large on notice that a
serious reassessment will have to be made of our position in terms of offering cover for flood
and other catastrophic perils in the foreseeable future. The status quo with regards to rates will
certainly change. The industry must receive certain assurances and guarantees in relation to
the drainage and irrigation system and sea defenses in order that we may be able to
scientifically underwrite these perils as well as convince our reinsurers that another potential
disaster is not lurking around the corner.

We also feel that itmis timely to remind the public that over the past 5 (five) years our members
have paid in excess of $3(three) billion in fire claims and we must take this opportunity to
express our concern overthe inadequate fire fighting facilities throughout the length and breath
of Guyana. Recent letter from the Association to the relevant Minister of the Government about
this situation remains unanswered.

While recognizing that the purposes of insurance is ultimately to pay claims for fortuitous losse,
it must be pointed out that almost every fire regardless of how small when discovered and it's
close proximity to the central fire department becomes a conflagretion within a short space of
time. The issue of the inadequacy of our fire hydrants and the proper equipping of the Fire
Service must be ,addressed with urhericy

For the future the. industry will certainly have to strengthen it's underwriting guidelines and
increased rates will be inevitable. The size of the increase will depend on whether positive
action is taken to address our concerns.

Hbward Cox
President (ag)
S''InsuranceAssociation of Guyana


*WE ..ETANDNGWABY-OUR!W0P[

Two weeks ago we gave the undertaking to sell basic foodstuff items at a
cost recovery price for as long as is necessary and we meant what we said.
To this end a New Shipment has Just Arrived and is


AVAILABLE IN LARGE QUANTITIES.


oil I














ALSO AVAILABLE:
Garlic, Split Peas,
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Sardines, Cooking Oil,
Mourne Maid Milk Powder etc
AT THE MOST Ga
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23 Lombard Street, Werk-en-Rust, Georgetown. Tel: 227-6458 Fax: 227-61 0.


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INVIIIIII&IMEM






SUNDAY CHRONICLE March 6, 2005


Deluge then devastation:


Doodnauth Bissoondial next to one of his lost plots.


By Clifford Stanley

Receding flood waters from
the Mahaica River have re-
vealed a landscape of hun-
dreds of acres of stunted and
dead rice plants in fields in
De Hoop and other villages
on the right bank of the river.
During a visit to the area by
Chronicle last Tuesday, rice
farmers pointed to large lakes of
dirty brown water spotted with
clumps of rust coloured and
rotting vegetation which they
said had been rice fields densely
populated with lush green and
healthy plants rustling in the
breeze in early January prior
to the floods.
Rice farmers along this
stretch of the Mahaica have es-
timated losses due to destruction
of crops in millions of dollars -
a direct result they say of their
cultivated plots being flooded out
by the swollen river between
February 7th and 24th last.


Reports of between five to
seven thousand acres of rice plants
being destroyed are currently be-
ing investigated by Agricultural
Officers within Region 5.
Cattle, cash crop and poul-
try farmers in communities at
De Hoop and other villages on
the Mahaica River had also suf-
fered but to a considerably less
extent than those involved in
rice cultivation.
Dianand Maraj, Vice Chair-
man of the Woodlands/ Farm
Neighborhood Democratic
Council said that affected farm-
ers had passed on estimates on
their losses to the Extension Of-
ficers attached to the Ministry
of Agriculture for their informa-
tion and verification if necessary.
Affected large scale rice
farmer Chateram Jagnarain dis-
closed that cultivation plots of
formerly green and healthy
plants, some ready for harvest-
ing, had been inundated by flood
waters for several days during


the height of the floods.
He said:"The time the
plants were ducked out was too
long. The plants could not sur-
vive; the water was too much."
"The flood waters",
Jagnarain said, "have gone but
the major problem in here now
is that unlike people in other
flood hit areas, we here do not
have jobs. We depend wholly on
the land for our income. Nor-
mally when you harvest this
crop you would get money to
get you into the autumn crop in
May and also help you to meet
living expenses up to October
by which time the autumn crop
is ready for harvesting and
money is available again.
But now there is no in-
come. The question in all the
farmers' minds is how are we
going to survive up to
October that is even if we
manage to get back into the au-
tumn crop and even that is not
yet certain," he said.


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Jagnarain said that the flood
situation in the area had been
manageable up to early Febru-
ary but he lost control when
water fr, ',e Conservancy
was released into the Mahaica
River to relieve the pressure on
the Conservancy dam.
"Up to then, I used
Hymacs to excavate mud and
built meres and other embank-
ments to protect the crop. But
after the releases from the con-
servancy the water just poured
in. I became literally helpless in
preventing the water from pour-
ing in and covering the plants.
Dianand Maraj Chairman of
the Woodlands Farm Neighbor-
hood Democratic Council said
that flood conditions at De
Hoop and other villages on the
right bank of Mahaica river first
became noticeable following
heavy rainfall in mid January.
The build up peaked on the
12th of February at the time of the
visit of President Bharrat Jagdeo
with a sheet of almost waist high
water covering the entire area.
The recession began around


mid February after inundation
for over five weeks with some
areas still affected up to as re-
cently as early this week.
Affected farmer Chateram
Jagnarain said he lost two hun-
dred and ninety acres of rice cul-
tivated at a minimum cost of
$11,000 per acre to the flood.
Jagnarain a remigrant from
Canada said that some of the
plots had been close to harvest-
ing which meant that he had
spent more money on these
plots because of crop hus-
bandry such as application of
fertilizers, spraying for padi
bugs and related labour costs.
"I had planted three hun-
dred and three acres. It would
have been a bountiful crop.
Only thirleen acres survived the
floods and I am not sure whether
I will get good yield on these
plants as yet," he said.
Doodnauth Bissoondial an-
other large scale farmer said that
he had lost two hundred and
fifty acres of rice in addition to
cattle, sheep and goats and over


one thousand red-finned tilapia
which he reared in a pond on his
farm and which had been ready
for harvesting.
"The fish swam away," he
said.
Bissoondial estimated flood
related losses at his agricultural
endeavor at No. 10 in millions
of dollars.
Other rice farmers reported
flood related losses ranging from
fifty to eleven acres.
Bissoondial said: "There is
no exaggeration. We were hard
hit and we are worried about the
future. About how we will re-
late to the banks. About how we
can get back if possible into the
upcoming autumn crop.
Prakash a cattle farmer of
No. 10 said that he was able to
minimize losses within his flock
of two hundred heads of cows
by evacuating them from No. 10
which is six miles inland and
bringing them onto the roadside
at Dantzig.
The situation remains bleak
since he may have to keep his
animals along the roads side for


another four to six weeks when
grass on his pasture will have
recovered from the submergence
and reemerged to provide feed
for his animals.
He is fervently hoping that
all this can materialize before
the start of the May-June rains.
Mrs Khemrajie Maraj a
poultry farmer at Frederick
Johanna reported that she lost
eighty fully grown ducks to al-
ligators which used the flood
waters to swim into her yard
and feast on the birds at nights.
Her family had also lost
thirty three acres of rice plants.
Her husband Dianand said:
"We have been living here for
fifty two years. We have expe-
rienced floods and we have lost
before. But never this much."
Speaking about the alligators
she said:
"The pen flood...We had no
place to lock up the ducks...
The alligators came every
night swinuiming all around the
house and ate the ducks. My
husband and my son would get


their torchlights and use long
sticks to beat the water and try
to scare them off but it was no
use they just move off a little
distance, waited a little bit and
then moved back in again."
Mrs Maraj also reminded
that the people in the area are not
employed people who can get
back to .their jobs and recover.
"We don't have nurses and
police and public servants in
here. The land is our only hope
and source of income and now
we are at zero and we hoping
that we can recover and that
things can get back to normal for
us very soon."
Farmers and residents in the
affected areas said that they were
satisfied with Government's re-
sponse and the flood relief and
medical assistance they received
during the crisis.
They were happy over the
visit by President Jagdeo during
the height of the flooding.
"Is a lucky thing the Presi-
dent herself come in fuh see for
himself what happen. He not
neglectful. Look at the -
President walking in the wa-
ter. Some people wouldn't do
that. He did his job what he was
supposed to do. He ent had to
hear, he see."
Residents also said that the
Administration of Region 5
helped save sections of the De
Hoop Branch Road and parts of
the crop when they responded
promptly in building an em-
bankment along the road at
Biaboo to block the overflow
from the Mahaica River.
Some residents felt that
there should be a follow-up visit
by a medical team to deal with
instances of itches and other
skin ailments which they believe
are related to the flooding.
Cattle farmer Prakash said
that there was urgent need for
supplies such as dewormers,
mineral salts, antibiotics and if
possible molasses to be given to
livestock farmers so that they
can keep their animals alive and
in good shape until the grass re-
emerges.
Bissoodial feels that construc-
tion of an embankment on the right
bank of the Mahaica River from
the Mahaica Stelling to as far in-
land as Joe Hook would eliminate
flooding in thie area.
Regional Chairman of Re-
gion 5 Mr Harrinarine Baldeo
has since confirmed that such a
project is part of the work
programme of the Administra-
tion for the area in 2005.
In the meantime, how-
ever Bissoondial Rajnarain
and Maraj are, like all the
other flood hit farmers along
De Hoop Branch Road, deriv-
ing solace from assurances
from Government that they
will be given help to recover
from the financial losses and
return to cultivation and nor-
imalcy. (END).


IF








FROM MARCH 1 31, 2005
EVERYTHING MUST GO!


A tractor being used to pump water out from one fiela
which the farmer believes could be salvaged.


,T


I I I I I




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